WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel operating experience

  1. Canadian CANDU fuel development program and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.K.; Inch, W.W.R.; Cox, D.S.; Steed, R.G.; Kohn, E.; Macici, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the CANDU fuel in the Canadian CANDU reactors in 1997 and 1998. The operating experience demonstrates that the CANDU fuel has performed very well. Over the 2-year period, the fuel-bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in the Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, at between 0.006% to 0.016%. On a fuel element basis, this represents an element defect rate of less than about 0.0005%. One of the reasons for the good fuel performance is the support provided by the Canadian fuel research and development programs. These programs address operational issues and provide evolutionary improvements to the fuel products. The programs consist of the Fuel Technology Program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, and the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycles Technology Program, funded by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. These 2 programs, which have been in place for many years, complement each other by sharing expert resources and experimental facilities. This paper describes the programs in 1999/2000, to provide an overview of the scope of the programs and the issues that these programs address. (author)

  2. Canadian fuel development program and recent operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.S.; Kohn, E.; Lau, J.H.K.; Dicke, G.J.; Macici, N.N.; Sancton, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current Canadian CANDU fuel R and D programs and operational experience. The details of operational experience for fuel in Canadian reactors are summarized for the period 1991-1994; excellent fuel performance has been sustained, with steady-state bundle defect rates currently as low as 0.02%. The status of introducing long 37-element bundles, and bundles with rounded bearing pads is reviewed. These minor changes in fuel design have been selectively introduced in response to operational constraints (end-plate cracking and pressure-tube fretting) at Ontario Hydro's Bruce-B and Darlington stations. The R and D programs are generating a more complete understanding of CANDU fuel behaviour, while the CANDU Owners Group (COG) Fuel Technology Program is being re-aligned to a more exclusive focus on the needs of operating stations. Technical highlights and realized benefits from the COG program are summarized. Re-organization of AECL to provide a one-company focus, with an outward looking view to new CANDU markets, has strengthened R and D in advanced fuel cycles. Progress in AECL's key fuel cycle programs is also summarized. (author)

  3. MOX and UOX PWR fuel performances EDF operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, Jean-Luc; Debes, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Based on a large program of experimentations implemented during the 90s, the industrial achievement of new FAs designs with increased performances opens up new prospects. The currently UOX fuels used on the 58 EDF PWR units are now authorized up to a maximum FA burn-up of 52 GWd/t with a large experience from 45 to 50 GWd/t. Today, the new products, along with the progress made in the field of calculation methods, still enable to increase further the fuel performances with respect to the safety margins. Thus, the conditions are met to implement in the next years new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet with increased enrichment (up to 4.5%) and irradiation limits (up to 62 GWd/t). The recycling of plutonium is part of EDF's reprocessing/recycling strategy. Up to now, 20 PWR 900 MW reactors are managed in MOX hybrid management. The feedback experience of 18 years of PWR operation with MOX is satisfactory, without any specific problem regarding manoeuvrability or plant availability. EDF is now looking to introduce MOX fuels with a higher plutonium content (up to 8.6%) equivalent to natural uranium enriched to 3.7%. It is the goal of the MOX Parity core management which achieve balance of MOX and UOX fuel performance with a significant increase of the MOX average discharge burn-up (BU max: 52 GWd/t for MOX and UOX). The industrial maturity of new FAs designs, with increased performances, allows the implementation in the next years of new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet. The scheduling of the implementation of the new fuel managements on the PWRs fleet is a great challenge for EDF, with important stakes: the nuclear KWh cost decrease with the improvement of the plant operation performance. (author)

  4. Operational experience of the fuel cleaning facility of Joyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaibo, R.; Matsuno, Y.; Sato, I.; Yoneda, Y.; Ito, H.

    1978-01-01

    Spent fuel assemblies in 'Joyo', after they are taken out of the core, are taken to the Fuel Cleaning Facility in the reactor service building and sodium removal is done. The cleaning process is done by cooling the assembly with argon gas, steam charging and rinsing by demineralized water. Deposited sodium was 50 ∼ 60 g per assembly. The sodium and steam reaction takes about 15 minutes to end and the total time the fuel is placed in the pot is about an hour. The total number of assemblies cleaned in the facility was 95 as of November 1977. In this report the operational experience together with discussions of future improvements are given. (author)

  5. The Canadian CANDU fuel development program and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.K.; Inch, W.W.R.; Cox, D.S.; Steed, R.G.; Kohn, E.; Macici, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the CANDU fuel in the Canadian CANDU reactors in 1997 and 1998. The operating experience demonstrates that the CANDU fuel has performed very well. Over the two-year period, the fuel-bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in the Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, at between 0.006% to 0.016%. On a fuel element basis, this represents an element defect rate of less than about 0.0005%. One of the reasons for the good fuel performance is the support provided by the Canadian fuel research and development programs. These programs address operational issues and provide evolutionary improvements to the fuel products. The programs consist of the Fuel Technology Program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, and the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycles Technology Program, funded by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. These two programs, which have been in place for many years, complement each other by sharing expert resources and experimental facilities. This paper describes the programs in 1999/2000, to provide an overview of the scope of the programs and the issues that these programs address. (author)

  6. Operational experience with the fuel processing system for fuel cell drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonts, B.; Bøgild Hansen, J.; Grube, T.; Höhlein, B.; Peters, R.; Schmidt, H.; Stolten, D.; Tschauder, A.

    Electric motor vehicle drive systems with polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) for the conversion of chemical into electrical energy offer great advantages over internal combustion engines with respect to the emission of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides. Since the storage systems available for hydrogen, the "fuel" of the fuel cell, are insufficient, it is meaningful to produce the hydrogen on board the vehicle from a liquid energy carrier, such as methanol. At the Research Center Jülich such a drive system has been developed, which produces a hydrogen-rich gas from methanol and water, cleans this gas and converts it into electricity in a PEFC. This system and the operational experience on the basis of simulated and experimental results are presented here.

  7. Experience of RepU fuel fabrication and operation in WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolosovsky, V.; Asatiani, I.; Sannikov, E.; Novikov, V.; Kuleshov, A.; Mikheev, E.; Proselkov, V.; Plyashkevich, V.; Semchenkov, Y.; Spirkin, E.; Ionov, V.; Pimenov, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Russia has a long-lasting experience in successful utilization of the reprocessed uranium fuel with different types of reactors. Stages of implementing the RepU fuel for WWER reactors are presented.The nuclear design assays, radiation and nuclear safety analysis during fabrication and handling of the fuel are made. The operational experience of commercial batches is summarized. It is shown that the RepU fuel characteristics meet the design limitations, approved for WWER reactors. (authors)

  8. Processing biogas to obtain motor fuel - Operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how raw biogas can be processed in order to remove carbon dioxide and corrosive substances and thus bring it up to natural gas quality. The ecological advantages of using biogas as a fuel are discussed and the situation in Europe and Switzerland is examined. Also, feeding biogas into the normal natural gas mains is discussed and the technologies necessary for the cleaning and preparation of the biogas are described. These include absorption and adsorption processes as well as membrane systems that are used to remove excessive carbon dioxide. The costs involved are discussed on the basis of experience gained in Sweden and Switzerland. Finally, the environmental aspects of methane losses are discussed.

  9. High Burnup Fuel: Implications and Operational Experience. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    This publication reports on the outcome of a technical meeting on high burnup fuel experience and economics, held in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 2013. The purpose of the meeting was to revisit and update the current operational experience and economic conditions associated with high burnup fuel. International experts with significant experience in experimental programmes on high burnup fuel discussed and evaluated physical limitations at pellet, cladding and structural component levels, with a wide focus including fabrication, core behaviour, transport and intermediate storage for most types of commercial nuclear power plants

  10. The operational and logistic experience on transportation of Brazilian spent fuel to USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, Jose Rubens; Frajndlich, Roberto; Mandlae, Martin; Bensberg, Werner; Renger, August; Grabow, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    A shipment of 127 spent MTR fuel assemblies was made from IEA-R1 Research Reactor located at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, Brazil to Savannah River Site Laboratory in the United States. This paper describes the operational and logistic experience on this transportation made by IPEN staff and the Consortium NCS/GNS. (author)

  11. Radiological safety experience in nuclear fuel cycle operations at Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushparaja; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Subramaniam, G.

    2000-01-01

    Activities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, cover nuclear fuel cycle operations based on natural uranium as the fuel. The facilities include: plant for purification and production of nuclear grade uranium metal, fuel fabrication, research reactor operation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste management in each stage. Comprehensive radiation protection programmes for assessment and monitoring of radiological impact of these operations, both in occupational and public environment, have been operating in BARC since beginning. These programmes, based on the 1990 ICRP Recommendations as prescribed by national regulatory body, the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), are being successfully implemented by the Health, Safety and Environment Group, BARC. Radiation Hazards Control Units attached to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities provide radiation safety surveillance to the various operations. The radiation monitoring programme consists of measurement and control of external exposures by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), hand-held and installed instruments, and internal exposures by bioassay and direct whole body counting using shadow shield counter for beta gamma emitters and phoswich detector based system for plutonium. In addition, an environmental monitoring programme is in place to assess public exposures resulting from the operation of these facilities. The programme involves analysis of various matrices in the environment such as bay water, salt, fish, sediment and computation of resulting public exposures. Based on the operating experience in these plants, improved educating and training programmes for plant operators, have been designed. This, together with the application of new technologies have brought down individual as well as average doses of occupational workers. The environmental releases remain a small fraction of the authorised limits. The operating health physics experience in some of these facilities is discussed in this paper

  12. Operating experiences with a molten carbonate fuel cell at Stuttgart-Möhringen wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locher, C; Meyer, C; Steinmetz, H

    2012-01-01

    Fuel cells on wastewater treatment plants are a relatively new technology to convert biogas from anaerobic digestion into thermal and electrical energy. Since the end of 2007, a type of MCFC fuel cell (>250 kW(el), 180 kW(th)) has been installed at Stuttgart-Möhringen wastewater treatment plant. The goals of this research project are to raise the power self-sufficiency in Stuttgart-Möhringen, to further optimise high temperature fuel cells using biogas and to gain practical experience. After approximately 9,000 h of operation, a mean electrical 'gross'-efficiency of 44% was achieved. To fully exploit this high electrical efficiency, it is essential to keep the energy consumption of peripheral devices (gas pressure unit, gas cleaning unit, etc.) of the fuel cell as low as possible.

  13. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on nuclear fuel and control rods: operating experience, design evolution and safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Design and management of nuclear fuel has undergone a strong evolution process during past years. The increase of the operating cycle length and of the discharge burnup has led to the use of more advanced fuel designs, as well as to the adoption of fuel efficient operational strategies. The analysis of recent operational experience highlighted a number of issues related to nuclear fuel and control rod events raising concerns about the safety aspects of these new designs and operational strategies, which led to the organisation of this Specialists Meeting on fuel and control rod issues. The meeting was intended to provide a forum for the exchange of information on lessons learned and safety concern related to operating experience with fuel and control rods (degradation, reliability, experience with high burnup fuel, and others). After an opening session 6 papers), this meeting was subdivided into four sessions: Operating experience and safety concern (technical session I - 6 papers), Fuel performance and operational issues (technical session II - 7 papers), Control rod issues (technical session III - 9 papers), Improvement of fuel design (technical session IV.A - 4 papers), Improvement on fuel fabrication and core management (technical session IV.B - 6 papers)

  14. Operational experience using the OSTR flip fuel self-protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.; Ringle, J.C.; Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.

    1982-01-01

    Recent changes in NRC Physical Security regulations make it highly desirable for a small number of TRIGA research reactor establishments to maintain each of the fuel elements in their reactor core above the self-protection dose rate criterion. OSTR operations personnel have written a computer program (SPOOF) which calculates the exposure rate (in Rhr -1 ) from an irradiated fuel element at 3 feet in air using the actual operating history of the reactor. The purpose of this current paper is to describe the operational experience gained over the last year and a half while using the SPOOF computer program, and while performing the quarterly dose rate measurements needed to confirm the continuing accuracy of the program, and, most importantly, the self-protection status of the OSTR fuel. The computer program in association with the quarterly dose rate measurements have been accepted by the NRC, and allow the OSTR to take credit for self-protecting FLIP fuel under the current physical security regulations

  15. Design, fabrication and operating experience of Monju ex-vessel fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Yoshio; Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Kuroha, Mitsuo; Inoue, Tatsuya

    1995-01-01

    In FBRs there are two methods of storing and cooling the spent fuel - the in-vessel storage and the ex-vessel storage. Because of the sodium leaks through the tank at the beginning of pre-operation, the utilization of the ex-vessel fuel storage tank (EVST) of some FBR plant has been changed from the ex-vessel fuel storage to the interim fuel transfer tank. This led to reactor designers focusing on the material, structure and fabrication of the carbon steel sodium storage tanks worldwide. The Monju EVST was at the final stage of the design, when the leaks occurred. The lesson learned from that experience and the domestic fabrication technology are reflected to the design and fabrication of the Monju EVST. This paper describes the design, fabrication and R and D results for the tank, and operating experience in functional test. The items to be examined are as follows: (1) Overall structure of the tank and design philosophy on the function, (2) Structure of the cover shielding plug and its design philosophy, (3) Structures of the rotating rack and its bearings, and their design philosophy, (4) Cooling method and its design philosophy, (5) Structure and fabrication of the cooling coil support inside EVST with comparison of leaked case, (6) R and D effort for items above. The fabrication of the Monju EVST started in August 1986 and it was shipped to the site in March 1990. Installation was completed in November 1990, and sodium fill after pre-heating started in 1991. The operation has been continued since September 1992. In 1996 when the first spent fuel is stored, its total functions will be examined. (author)

  16. Operation experience of the automated pilot plant for the BOR-60 vibropac fuel element and subassembly fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunk, R.; Leske, U.; Krompass, R.; Steinkopff, H.; Rudolph, K.; Herbig, R.; Pietsch, H.; Tsykanov, V.A.; Skiba, O.V.; Makarov, V.A.; Bol'shakov, L.P.; Porodnov, P.T.; Maershin, A.A.; Keruchenko, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Brief characteristics of the automated, remote pilot plant for vibropac uranium-plutonium oxide fuel element and fuel subassembly fabrication for the Soviet experimental fast reactor BOR-60 are presented. The plant was created under scientific and technical cooperation of the USSR and the GDR. The flow sheet of fuel element and fuel subassembly production process, their quality control, service, and maintenance of the equipment arranged in two shielded cells is described. About 10000 fuel elements (270 fuel subassemblies) have been fabricated at the plant which were further used for the BOR-60 transition to a new uranium-plutonium core since 1981. Design and 10 years' operating experience of the plant may be used to develop the automated lines for commercial production of high-level uranium-plutonium fast reactor fuel elements and fuel subassemblies. (orig.)

  17. Experiences with fuels B30 and B 100 in haulage, railway operation and agricultural machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matejovsky, V. [QMS Consulting, Prague (Czech Republic); Hendrych, K.; Mares, V. [PREOL, Lovosice (Czech Republic)

    2013-06-01

    High prices of diesel fuel have increased an interest in cheaper biodiesel, especially for vehicles with high fuel consumption and not only for haulage vehicle parks but also for railway vehicles and heavy agricultural machinery. When price difference between standard diesel B7 and cheaper biodiesel B100 reached more than 10% it was a sufficient benefit for operators to use biodiesel but this fuel had not been approved for all vehicles types by their manufacturers. Despite this problem, some operators have begun to use biodiesel also for vehicles not having the approval. To prevent operational problems and misgiving of engines damage, the transition to alternative fuel was organized as field tests of one or more vehicles from the operator's fleet. The tests usually started with B30 fuel and if no operational problems occurred the second stage continued with B100. The tested vehicles were under permanent surveillance at least during one year of operation and once a month and later once in a quarter a deeper inspections were made including engine diagnostics, emissions testing, engine oil sampling for laboratory examination, injectors tenting and filters and fuel hoses condition evaluation. The presentation includes the results of vehicles inspections and the measures that had to be done to prevent engines failure and to ensure trouble-free operation of vehicles using biofuels. (orig.)

  18. Operational experience with ultrasonic bolt seals for safeguards containment of multielement bottles in THORP spent-fuel storage ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatt, C.D.; Reynolds, A.F.; Jeffrey, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the operational experience gained by British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) at the THORP spent-fuel storage facility in the application and verification of ultra-sonic bolt seals to light water reactor fuel containers and multielement bottles while in the storage ponds. Additionally, it discusses BNFL's cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, Euratom, and Joint Research Council-Ispra to facilitate the development and design modifications of the remote-handling tools used. Finally, it summarizes the benefits, from an operator's point of view, of using the bolt seals as a safeguards/containment device

  19. Transporting spent fuel and reactor waste in Sweden experience from 5 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybeck, P.; Gustafsson, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that since the Final Repository for Reactor Waste, SFR, was taken into operation in 1988, the SKB sea transportation system is operating at full capacity by transporting spent fuel and now also reactor waste from the 12 Swedish reactors to CLAB and SFR. Transports from the National Research Center, Studsvik to the repository has recently also been integrated in the system. CLAB, the central intermediate storage for spent fuel, has been in operation since 1985. The SKB Sea Transportation System consists today of the purpose built ship M/s Sigyn, 10 transport casks for spent fuel, 2 casks for spent core components, 27 IP-2 shielded steel containers for reactor waste and 5 terminal vehicles. During an average year about 250 tonnes of spent fuel and 3 -- 4000 m 3 of reactor waste are transported to CLAB and SFR respectively, corresponding to around 30 sea voyages

  20. Implementation and operational experience of an integrated fuel information service at the BNFL THORP facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, D.N.; Ramsden, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    BNFL's THORP Plant, which started active operations early in 1994, has contracts to reprocess 7000t(U) of fuel belonging to 33 customers in 9 countries in the UK, Europe and Japan during its first 10 years of operation. Contracts are in place or being negotiated, and further business sought after, with the expectation of extending THORP's operations well beyond the initial 10 years. An integrated data management service, for the fuel storage areas of BNFL's THORP Division, is being implemented to replace several, independent, systems. This Fuel Information Service (FIS) will bring the Nuclear Materials Accountancy and Safeguards Records together with the Operating Records into one database from which all Safeguards Reports will be made. BNFL's contractual and commercial data and technical data on the stored fuel, required to support the reprocessing business, will also be brought into the common database. FIS is the first stage in a project to integrate the Materials Management systems throughout the THORP nuclear recycling business including irradiated fuel receipt and storage, reprocessing and storage of products, mixed oxide fuel manufacture and the conditioning and storage of wastes

  1. Operating experience feedback report: Assessment of spent fuel cooling. Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.; Ornstein, H.L.; Pullani, S.V.

    1997-02-01

    This report documents the results of an independent assessment by a team from the Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data of spent-fuel-pool (SFP) cooling in operating nuclear power plants. The team assessed the likelihood and consequences of an extended loss of SFP cooling and suggested corrective actions, based on their findings

  2. Operational experience with HTR-fuel in the AVR experimental power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivens, G.; Wimmers, M.

    1985-01-01

    The 15 MW experimental power station with HTR reactor, operated by Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) in Juelich, FRG, went into operation in 1967. One of its main tasks is to test different kinds of fuel elements and to demonstrate in how far the concept of the pebble-bed reactor permits a safe and reliable operation at high gas temperatures. Evaluation can be summarized as follows: Pressed fuel elements with highly enriched (UTh)C 2 with Biso coating show up a good retention capability for fission products up to hot-gas temperatures of 900 deg. C. No particle damages arise up to highest burnups. At higher temperatures mainly strontium is released which not only impedes repair works on the primary system, but also lowers corrosion resistance of fuel element graphite. Pressed fuel elements with highly enriched (ThU)O 2 and Biso coating shop up an excellent behaviour without particle damage, even at hog-gas temperatures of 950 deg. C. In particular all 15,000 fuel elements introduced since 1974 from the production for 300 MWe THTR confirm all results as expected. Special attention is paid to fuel elements with LEUTRISO particles that are being tested since 1982. Their excellent retention behaviour at hot-gas temperatures up to 950 deg. C is confirmed by the presently especially low coolant-gas activity. Because of the low burn-up of these elements it is still too early to make conclusive statements

  3. Shipment of spent research reactor fuel to US-operators experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krull, W.

    1999-01-01

    To ship 1500 spent fuel elements over more than 30 years to different reprocessing or storage sites a large amount of experience has been gotten. The most important partners for these activities have been US organizations. The development of the US policy for the receipt of foreign spent fuel elements of US origin is described briefly. The experience being made and lessons learned with the on May 13, 1996 renewed receipt program is described in detail, including US organizations, shipment and formal steps. (author)

  4. Spent fuel storage cask testing and operational experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslinger, L.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Spent-fuel storage cask research, development, and demonstration activities are being performed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) as a part of the storage cask testing program. The cask testing program at federal sites and other locations supports the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and DOE objectives for cooperative demonstrations with the cask vendors and utilities for development of at-reactor dry cask storage capabilities for spent nuclear fuel assemblies. One research and development program for the storage cask performance testing of metal storage cask was initiated through a cooperative agreement between Virginia Power and DOE in 1984. The performance testing was conducted for the DOE and the Electric Power Research Institute by the Pacific Northwest laboratory, operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), operated for DOE by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. In 1988 a cooperative agreement was entered into by DOE with Pacific Sierra Nuclear Associates (PSN) for performance testing of the PSN concrete Ventilated Storage Cask. Another closely related activity involving INEL is a transportable storage cask project identified as the Nuclear Fuel Services Spent-Fuel Shipping/Storage Cask Demonstration Project. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of packing, transporting, and storing commercial spent fuel in dual-purpose transport/storage casks

  5. Implementation and operational experience of an integrated fuel information service at the BNFL THORP facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, D.N.; Ramsden, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    An integrated data management service for the fuel storage areas of British Nuclear Fuel Limited's (BNFL's) Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) Division has been implemented to replace several independent systems. This fuel information service (FIS) has brought the nuclear materials accountancy and safeguards records together with the operating records into one database from which all safeguards reports are made. The BNFL's contractual and commercial and technical data on the stored fuel, required to plan reprocessing campaigns, has also been brought into the common database. A commercially available software package, widely used in warehousing applications and the food and drugs industries, has been used as the basis of FIS. System enhancements and customization have been developed in partnership between THORP Division, BNFL IT Services, and the software supplier. The FIS is the first stage in a project to integrate the materials management systems throughout the THORP nuclear recycling business, including irradiated fuel receipt and storage, reprocessing and storage of products, mixed-oxide fuel manufacture, and the conditioning and storage of wastes

  6. Operational experience with the first eighteen slightly enriched uranium fuel assemblies in the Atucha-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, M.; Perez, R.; Pineyro, J.; Sidelnik, J.; Fink, J.; Casario, J.A.; Alvarez, L.

    1997-01-01

    Atucha I is a 357 Mwe nuclear station, moderated and cooled with heavy water, pressure vessel type of German design, located in Argentina. Fuel assemblies (FA) are 36 active natural UO2 rod clusters, 5.3 meters long and fuel is on power. Average FA exit burnup is 6 MWd/kg U. The reactor core contains 252 FA. To reduce the fuel costs about 6 MU$S/yr a program of utilization of SEU (0.85 %w U235) fuel was started at the beginning of 1995 with the introduction of 12 FA in the first step. The exit burnup of FA is approx. 10 MWd/kgU. It is planned to increase gradually the number of them up to having a full core with SEU fuel with an expected FA average exit burnup of 11 MWd/kgU. The SEU program has also the advantage of a strong reduction of spent fuel volume, and a moderate reduction of fuelling machine use. This paper presents the satisfactory operation experience with the introduction of the first 12 SEU fuel assemblies and the planned activities for the future. The fresh SEU fuel assemblies were introduced in six fuel channels located in an intermediate zone located 136 cm from the center of the reactor and selected because they have higher margins to the channel powers limits to accommodate the initial 15 to 20 % relative channel power increase. To verify the design and fuel management calculations, comparisons have been made of the calculated and measured values of the variation of channel ΔT, regulating rods insertion and flux reading in in-core detectors near to the refueled channel. The agreement was good and in most of the cases within the measurement errors. Cell calculations were made with WIMS-D4, and reactor calculations with PUMA. a fuel management 3D diffusion program developed in Argentina. With SEU fuel with a greater burnup in the central high power core region, new operating procedures were developed to prevent PCI failures in fuel power ramps that arise during operation. Some fuel rod and structural assembly design changes were introduced on the

  7. Fuel performance experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofer, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The history of LWR fuel supply has been characterized by a wide range of design developments and fuel cycle cost improvements. Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. has pursued an aggressive fuel research and development program aimed at improved fuel performance. Exxon Nuclear has introduced many design innovations which have improved fuel cycle economics and operating flexibility while fuel failures remain at very low levels. The removable upper tie plate feature of Exxon Nuclear assemblies has helped accelerate this development, enabling repeated inspections during successive plant outages. Also, this design feature has made it possible to repair damaged fuel assemblies during refueling outages, thereby minimizing the economic impact of fuel failure from all causes

  8. Safety evaluation of the NSRR facility relevant to the modification for improved pulse operation and preirradiated fuel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inabe, Teruo; Terakado, Yoshibumi; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hideo

    1988-11-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) is a pulse reactor for the inpile experiments to study the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident conditions. The present operation modes of the NSRR consist of the steady state operation up to 300 kW and the natural pulse operation in which a sharp pulsed power is generated from substantially zero power level. In addition to these, two new modes of shaped pulse operation and combined pulse operation will be conducted in the near future as the improved pulse operations. A transient power up to 10 MW will be generated in the shaped pulse operation, and a combination of a transient power up to 10 MW and a sharp pulsed power will be generated in the combined pulse operation. Furthermore, preirradiated fuel rods will be employed in the future experiments whereas the present experiments are confined to the test specimens of unirradiated fuel rods. To provide for these programs, the fundamental design works relevant to the modification of the reactor facility including the reactor instrumentation and control systems and experimental provision were developed. The reactor safety evaluation is prerequisite for confirming the propriety of the fundamental design of the reactor facility from the safety point of view. The safety evaluation was therefore conducted postulating such events that would bring about abnormal conditions in the reactor facility. As a result of the safety evaluation, it has been confirmed as to the NSRR facility after modification that the anticipated transients, the postulated accidents, the major accident and the hypothetical accident do not result respectively in any serious safety problem and that the fundamental design principles and the reactor siting are adequate and acceptable. (author)

  9. Operational experiences in radiation protection in fast reactor fuel reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenakshisundaram, V.; Rajagopal, V.; Santhanam, R.; Baskar, S.; Madhusoodanan, U.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Balasundar, S.; Suresh, K.; Ajoy, K.C.; Dhanasekaran, A.; Akila, R.; Indira, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Reprocessing facility for Advanced fuels in Lead cells (CORAL), situated at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam is a pilot plant to reprocess the mixed carbide fuel, for the first time in the world. Reprocessing of fuel with varying burn-ups up to 155 G Wd/t, irradiated at Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR), has been successfully carried out at CORAL. Providing radiological surveillance in a fuel reprocessing facility itself is a challenging task, considering the dynamic status of the sources and the proximity of the operator with the radioactive material and it is more so in a fast reactor fuel reprocessing facility due to handling of higher burn-up fuels associated with radiation fields and elevated levels of fissile material content from the point of view of criticality hazard. A very detailed radiation protection program is in place at CORAL. This includes, among others, monitoring the release of 85 Kr and other fission products and actinides, if any, through stack on a continuous basis to comply with the regulatory limits and management of disposal of different types of radioactive wastes. Providing radiological surveillance during the operations such as fuel transport, chopping and dissolution and extraction cycle was without any major difficulty, as these were carried out in well-shielded and high integrity lead cells. Enforcement of exposure control assumes more importance during the analysis of process samples and re-conversion operations due to the presence of fission product impurities and also since the operations were done in glove boxes and fume hoods. Although the radiation fields encountered in process area were marginally higher, due to the enforcement of strict administrative controls, the annual exposure to the radiation workers was well within the regulatory limit. As the facility is being used as test bed for validation of prototype equipment, periodic inspection and maintenance of components such as centrifuge

  10. Operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, L.P.; Six, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company began operating a first-generation integrated safeguards system in the Plutonium Finishing Plant storage vaults. This Vault Safety and Inventory System is designed to integrate data into a computer-based nuclear material inventory monitoring system. The system gathers, in real time, measured physical parameters that generate nuclear material inventory status data for thousands of stored items and sends tailored report to the appropriate users. These data include canister temperature an bulge data reported to Plant Operations and Material Control and Accountability personnel, item presence and identification data reported to Material Control and Accountability personnel, and unauthorized item movement data reported to Security response forces and Material Control and Accountability personnel. The Westinghouse Hanford Company's experience and operational benefits in using this system for reduce radiation exposure, increase protection against insider threat, and real-time inventory control are discussed in this paper

  11. Proceedings of the international workshop on irradiated fuel storage: operating experience and development programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.J.; Frost, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Irradiated fuel storage was discussed under the following major topic headings: irradiated fuel management strategies, water pool storage, dry storage technology and engineering studies, dry storage economics, standards and licensing, dry storage - fuel behaviour, and dry storage - the future

  12. Operational experience in the non-destructive assay of fissile material in General Electric's nuclear fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Operational experience in the non-destructive assay of fissile material in a variety of forms and containers and incorporation of the assay devices into the accountability measurement system for General Electric's Wilmington Fuel Fabrication Facility measurement control programme is detailed. Description of the purpose and related operational requirements of each non-destructive assay system is also included. In addition, the accountability data acquisition and processing system is described in relation to its interaction with the various non-destructive assay devices and scales used for accountability purposes within the facility. (author)

  13. Operational experience gained with the Failed Fuel Rod Detection System in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, H.H.; Foerch, H.

    1985-01-01

    Fuel assemblies containing defective fuel rods are releasing fission products, and consequently have to be removed from further service in the core. Partially spent fuel assemblies can only be reinserted into the core after removal of the defective rods. Spent fuel assemblies have to be freed from these failed rods before being shipped to a reprocessing plant

  14. French experience of regulation and operation on reprocessing facilities of LWR spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, J.P.

    1992-02-01

    This presentation describes the French experience of regulation and operation on reprocessing facilities: how the safety assessment was made of UP3-A plant of the La Hague establishment for the building permit and operating license within the context of French nuclear regulations and the national debate on the need for reprocessing. Other factors discussed are how the public was involved, how the regulations were improved in the process and what the different stages of commissioning consisted of. In the design studies of a reprocessing facility, three complementary approaches are used: - observance of regulations born of technical considerations, and good practice, - analysis of the hazards, using deterministic and probabilistic methods, within the framework of a safety report, - review of experience feedback from such a facility or like plants. The design of the facility must permit the prevention of accidents and limit their consequences. Moreover, during all foreseeable cases (normal operating, incidents and accidents), the safety of the staff, the public and the environment with regard to consequences of radioactive releases and ionising radiations must be ensured. In the evaluation of these consequences, the approach used is voluntarily pessimistic in order to take into account every possible case. It is based on the main following principles: definition of the events considered for the dimensioning of the facility; redundancy and diversification; defense in depth which consists of the multiplication of the barriers. The experience feedback comes, on the one hand from operator's findings aiming at improving its facility, on the other hand from incidents, the lessons of which being taken into account after careful analysis. These incidents are analyzed by the Safety Authority upon presentation of the data by the operator and on site findings of inspections. In other respects, the aim of inspections is to check that the plant and its operating practices are

  15. Comparison of problems and experience of core operation with distorted fuel element assemblies in VVER-1000 and PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, A.

    1999-01-01

    The main reactors leading to distortion of fuel element assemblies during reactor operation were studied. A series of actions which compensate this effect was proposed. Criteria of operation limitation in VVER-1000 and PWR reactors are described

  16. GNF2 Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, John

    2007-01-01

    GNF's latest generation fuel product, GNF2, is designed to deliver improved nuclear efficiency, higher bundle and cycle energy capability, and more operational flexibility. But along with high performance, our customers face a growing need for absolute fuel reliability. This is driven by a general sense in the industry that LWR fuel reliability has plateaued. Too many plants are operating with fuel leakers, and the impact on plant operations and operator focus is unacceptable. The industry has responded by implementing an INPO-coordinated program aimed at achieving leaker-free reliability by 2010. One focus area of the program is the relationship between fuel performance (i.e., duty) and reliability. The industry recognizes that the right balance between performance and problem-free fuel reliability is critical. In the development of GNF2, GNF understood the requirement for a balanced solution and utilized a product development and introduction strategy that specifically addressed reliability: evolutionary design features supported by an extensive experience base; thoroughly tested components; and defense-in-depth mitigation of all identified failure mechanisms. The final proof test that the balance has been achieved is the application of the design, initially through lead use assemblies (LUAs), in a variety of plants that reflect the diversity of the BWR fleet. Regular detailed surveillance of these bundles provides the verification that the proper balance between performance and reliability has been achieved. GNF currently has GNF2 lead use assemblies operating in five plants. Included are plants that have implemented extended power up-rates, plants on one and two-year operating cycles, and plants with and without NobleChem TM and zinc injection. The leading plant has undergone three pool-side inspections outages to date. This paper reviews the actions taken to insure GNF2's reliability, and the lead use assembly surveillance data accumulated to date to validate

  17. Experience from operation of equipment for fuel element transport, replacement and inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belko, D.; Slugen, V.

    1989-01-01

    A workplace enabling repairs of the mechanical and electrical parts of the charging machine bars and their vibrational checking to be performed has been additionally developed for the Bohunice V-1 nuclear power plant. The workplace is provided with a tool for adjusting the rack assembly of the charging machine in the vertical position, with a bar vibration measuring ring, with a device for the modification of stops, a device for fast adjustment of the rotary section in the vertical position, and with a device for decontamination of the working bars of the charging machine. Although the use of four sampling cases for leak tests of fuel element cans was initially assumed in the design, the use of two cases only was found optimal with regard to the actual speed of the charging machine. An approach to the refuelling, in which the fresh fuel containers do not come in contact with the water in the spent fuel storage tank, is described. In this manner, material needed for the decontamination of containers in which fresh fuel assemblies are shipped by the charging machine is saved, and the refuelling process is sped up. (J.B.). 1 fig

  18. Operational experience in remote handling during the reprocessing of PFR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, G.

    1982-01-01

    The reprocessing of PFR fuel elements at DNE was achieved using new techniques of remote handling as well as standard manipulative procedures. This engineering balance was justified in the successful completion of two PFR reprocessing campaigns, where the personnel involved received low radiation doses. Development work is progressing along the lines of minimizing in-cell equipment, improved remote viewing, and the modular assembly and construction of equipment and cells

  19. The safety of operations in the Dragon fuel element production building during the manufacture of thorium fuel for the first charge of the Dragon Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, H.; Gardham, B.; Holliday, J.

    1965-04-01

    The first charge of fuel and fuel elements for the Dragon Reactor has been completed without significant difficulty. This report covers the safety of operations during the production of the 10 thorium elements together with the final 2 driver elements needed to complete the 37 element charge. (author)

  20. Operating experience with a near-real-time inventory balance in a nuclear fuel cycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armento, W.J.; Box, W.D.; Kitts, F.G.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Morrison, G.W.; Pike, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The principal objective of the ORNL Integrated Safeguards Program (ISP) is to provide enhanced material accountability, improved process control, and greater security for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With the improved instrumentation and computer interfacing currently installed, the ORNL 233 U Pilot Plant has demonstrated capability of a near-real-time liquid-volume balance in both the solvent-extraction and ion-exchange systems. Future developments should include the near-real-time mass balancing of special nuclear materials as both a static, in-tank summation and a dynamic, in-line determination. In addition, the aspects of site security and physical protection can be incorporated into the computer monitoring

  1. Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Howard, R.; Corporan, E.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The rising cost of oil coupled with the need to reduce pollution and dependence on foreign suppliers has spurred great interest and activity in developing alternative aviation fuels. Although a variety of fuels have been produced that have similar properties to standard Jet A, detailed studies are required to ascertain the exact impacts of the fuels on engine operation and exhaust composition. In response to this need, NASA acquired and burned a variety of alternative aviation fuel mixtures in the Dryden Flight Research Center DC-8 to assess changes in the aircraft s CFM-56 engine performance and emission parameters relative to operation with standard JP-8. This Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment, or AAFEX, was conducted at NASA Dryden s Aircraft Operations Facility (DAOF) in Palmdale, California, from January 19 to February 3, 2009 and specifically sought to establish fuel matrix effects on: 1) engine and exhaust gas temperatures and compressor speeds; 2) engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) gas phase and particle emissions and characteristics; and 3) volatile aerosol formation in aging exhaust plumes

  2. Design, Fabrication, and Operation of Innovative Microalgae Culture Experiments for the Purpose of Producing Fuels: Final Report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for a 1000-acre (water surface) algae culture facility for the production of fuels. The system is modeled after the shallow raceway system with mixing foils that is now being operated at the University of Hawaii. A computer economic model was created to calculate the discounted breakeven price of algae or fuels produced by the culture facility. A sensitivity analysis was done to estimate the impact of changes in important biological, engineering, and financial parameters on product price.

  3. U.S. Department of Energy operational experience with shipments of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, Charles E.; Massey, Charles D.; Mustin, Tracy P.

    1998-01-01

    On May 13, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Record of Decision on a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. The goal of the long-term policy is to recover enriched uranium exported from the United States, while giving foreign research reactor operators sufficient time to develop their own long-term solutions for storage and disposal of spent fuel. The spent fuel accepted by the U.S. DOE under the policy must be out of the research reactors by May 12, 2006 and returned to the United States by May 12, 2009. (author)

  4. Fuel improvement and WWER-1000 FA main operational results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhkov, V.; Enin, A.; Bezborodov, Y.; Petrov, V.

    2003-01-01

    The JSC NCCP experience of WWER-1000 Fuel Assemblies (FAs) fabrication and operation confirms the adequate feasibility and efficiency of fuel operation in 3-4-x fuel cycles, high operating reliability and competitive capacity as compared with foreign analogues. The work on fuel improvement is aimed at an improvement of the operating reliability and an enhancement of the fuel use efficiency in WWER-1000 advanced FAs

  5. KNF's fuel service technologies and experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jung Cheol; Kwon, Jung Tack; Kim, Jaeik; Park, Jong Youl; Kim, Yong Chan

    2009-01-01

    In Korea, since 1978, the commercial nuclear power plant was operated. After 10 years, from 1988, the nuclear fuel was produced by KNF (Korea Nuclear Fuel). The Fuel Service Team was established at KNF in 1995. Through the technical self reliance periods in cooperate with advanced foreign companies for 5 years, KNF has started to carry out fuel service activities onsite in domestic nuclear power plants. By ceaseless improving and advancing our own methodologies, after that, KNF is able to provide the most safe and reliable fuel repair services and poolside examinations including the root cause analysis of failed fuels. Recently, KNF developed the fuel cleaning system using ultrasonic technique for crud removal, and the CANDU fuel sipping system to detect a failed fuel bundle in PHWR. In this paper, all of KNF's fuel service technologies are briefly described, and the gained experience in shown

  6. The modeling experience of fuel element units operation under MSC.MARC and MENTAT 2008R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakov, G.; Kashirin, B.; Kosaurov, A.; Konovalov, Y.; Kuznetsov, A.; Medvedev, A.; Novikov, V.; Vatulin, A.

    2009-01-01

    MSC Software is leading developer of CAE-software in the world, so behaviour of fuel elements modeling with MSC.MARC use is of great practical importance. Behaviour of fuel elements usually is modeled in the elastic-viscous-plastic statement with account on fuel swelling during irradiation. For container type fuel elements contact interaction between fuel pellets and cladding or other parts of fuel element in top and bottom plugs must be in account. Results of simulated behaviour of various type fuel elements - container type fuel elements for PWR and RBMK reactors, dispersion type fuel elements for research reactors are presented. (authors)

  7. Irradiation experience with FRAMATOME fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.; Texier, C.; Traccucci, R.

    1978-01-01

    This program principally consists of: - monitoring of the reactor coolant activity due to fission and corrosion products, - on-site non-destructive examinations (visual, dimensional, gamma spectrometry, etc.) on irradiated fuel assemblies, - on-site and hot cell examinations on removable fuel rods. Additional tests are also in progress in order to improve models used in fuel rod and fuel assembly design and to verify the technical limits of fuel operation with respect to power ramp, daily load follow, load regulation, etc. The objective of this paper is to review the behavior of FRAMATOME fuel in power reactors

  8. Apparatus and method for grounding compressed fuel fueling operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joseph Perry; Farese, David John; Xu, Jianguo

    2002-06-11

    A safety system for grounding an operator at a fueling station prior to removing a fuel fill nozzle from a fuel tank upon completion of a fuel filling operation is provided which includes a fuel tank port in communication with the fuel tank for receiving and retaining the nozzle during the fuel filling operation and a grounding device adjacent to the fuel tank port which includes a grounding switch having a contact member that receives physical contact by the operator and where physical contact of the contact member activates the grounding switch. A releasable interlock is included that provides a lock position wherein the nozzle is locked into the port upon insertion of the nozzle into the port and a release position wherein the nozzle is releasable from the port upon completion of the fuel filling operation and after physical contact of the contact member is accomplished.

  9. The experiences from interim spent fuel storage operation with CASTOR 440/84 CASKS in NPP Dukovany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuba, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture are presented: principles of the CASTOR 440/84 design; design development works; commissioning of interim spent fuel storage facility; international transports of spent fuel utilising CASTOR 440/84 casks

  10. MOX fuel transport: the French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchis, H.; Verdier, A.; Sanchis, H.

    1999-01-01

    In the back-end of the fuel cycle, several leading countries have chosen the Reprocessing, Conditioning, Recycling (RCR) option. Plutonium recycling in the form of MOX fuel is a mature industry, with successful operational experience and large-scale fabrication plants an several European countries. The COGEMA Group has developed the industrialized products to master the RCR operation including transport COGEMA subsidiary, TRANSNUCLEAIRE has been operating MOX fuel transports on an industrial scale for more than 10 years. In 1998, around 200 transports of Plutonium materials have been organised by TRANSNUCLEAIRE. These transports have been carried out by road between various facilities in Europe: reprocessing plants, manufacturing plants and power plants. The materials transported are either: PuO 2 and MOX powder; BWR and PWR MOX fuel rods; BWR and PWR MOX fuel assemblies. Because MOX fuel transport is subject to specific safety, security and fuel integrity requirements, the MOX fuel transport system implemented by TRANSNUCLEAIRE is fully dedicated. Packaging have been developed, licensed and manufactured for each kind of MOX material in compliance with relevant regulations. A fleet of vehicles qualified according to existing physical protection regulations is operated by TRANSNUCLEAIRE. TRANSNUCLEAIRE has gained a broad experience in MOX transport in 10 years. Technical and operational know-how has been developed and improved for each step: vehicles and packaging design and qualification; vehicle and packaging maintenance; transport operations. Further developments are underway to increase the payload of the packaging and to improve the transport conditions, safety and security remaining of course top priority. (authors)

  11. Spent Fuel Storage Operation - Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    Experience gained in planning, constructing, licensing, operating, managing and modifying spent fuel storage facilities in some Member States now exceeds 50 years. Continual improvement is only achieved through post-project review and ongoing evaluation of operations and processes. This publication is aimed at collating and sharing lessons learned. Hopefully, the information provided will assist Member States that already have a developed storage capability and also those considering development of a spent nuclear fuel storage capability in making informed decisions when managing their spent nuclear fuel. This publication is expected to complement the ongoing Coordinated Research Project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III); the scope of which prioritizes facility operational practices in lieu of fuel and structural components behaviour over extended durations. The origins of the current publication stem from a consultants meeting held on 10-12 December 2007 in Vienna, with three participants from the IAEA, Slovenia and USA, where an initial questionnaire on spent fuel storage was formulated (Annex I). The resultant questionnaire was circulated to participants of a technical meeting, Spent Fuel Storage Operations - Lessons Learned. The technical meeting was held in Vienna on 13-16 October 2008, and sixteen participants from ten countries attended. A consultants meeting took place on 18-20 May 2009 in Vienna, with five participants from the IAEA, Slovenia, UK and USA. The participants reviewed the completed questionnaires and produced an initial draft of this publication. A third consultants meeting took place on 9-11 March 2010, which six participants from Canada, Hungary, IAEA, Slovenia and the USA attended. The meeting formulated a second questionnaire (Annex II) as a mechanism for gaining further input for this publication. A final consultants meeting was arranged on 20-22 June 2011 in Vienna. Six participants from Hungary, IAEA, Japan

  12. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, L.G.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.; Thurygill, E.W.

    1980-05-01

    The CANDU-PHW program is based upon 38 years of heavy water reactor experience with 35 years of operating experience. Canada has had 72 reactor years of nuclear-electric operations experience with 10 nuclear units in 4 generating stations during a period of 18 years. All objectives have been met with outstanding performance: worker safety, public safety, environmental emissions, reliable electricity production, and low electricity cost. The achievement has been realized through total teamwork involving all scientific disciplines and all project functions (research, design, manufacturing, construction, and operation). (auth)

  13. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, L.G.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1982-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This paper highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations both to the workers and the public

  14. Operating experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimesa, S.

    2007-01-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has developed its own system for tracking, screening and evaluating the operating experiences of the nuclear installations. The SNSA staff regularly tracks the operating experiences throughout the world and screens them on the bases of applicability for the Slovenian nuclear facilities. The operating experiences, which pass the screening, are thoroughly evaluated and also recent operational events in these facilities are taken into account. If needed, more information is gathered to evaluate the conditions of the Slovenian facilities and appropriate corrective actions are considered. The result might be the identification of the need for modification at the licensee, the need for modification of internal procedures in the SNSA or even the proposal for the modification of regulations. Information system helps everybody to track the process of evaluation and proper logging of activities. (author)

  15. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.; Ohta, M.M.; Simmons, G.R.; Whitaker, S.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs

    1997-12-31

    This paper covers the overview of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program, the general approach to the siting, design, construction, operation and closure of a geological disposal facility, the implementing disposal, and the public involvement in implementing geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste. And two appendices are included. 45 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  16. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.; Ohta, M.M.; Simmons, G.R.; Whitaker, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper covers the overview of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program, the general approach to the siting, design, construction, operation and closure of a geological disposal facility, the implementing disposal, and the public involvement in implementing geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste. And two appendices are included. 45 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs

  17. Fuel behavior during a LOCA: LOFT experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1980-11-01

    The LOFT experiments have provided the following fuel behavior information which appears to be valuable for improving the safety of PWR operation and resolving PWR licensing issues: (1) A generic unassisted core cooling event occurs during large-break LOCAs that dominates the cooling of the core before ECC reflood commences and potentially eliminates the possibility of flow channel blockage from prepressurized fuel rod swelling. (2) The large-break LOCA decompression forces do not disturb the normal control rod gravity drop and may not structually damage the fuel assemblies. (3) Large-break LOCA core cooling may also be enhanced by spacer grid and core counter flow delay of liquid escape from the core boundaries and liquid fallback from the upper plenum into the core region. (4) Lower fuel rod prepressurization may be possible in PWR fuel rods which would reduce flow channel blockage complications during LOCA's. (5) Uniform fuel rod cladding temperature indications during the large break LOCA's do not confirm expectations for the fuel rod cladding temperature variations that would inhibit development of flow channel blockages by ballooning of prepressurized fuel rods

  18. Irradiated fuel reassembling experience at the fuel monitoring facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aratani, K.; Koizumi, A.; Matsushima, H.

    1989-01-01

    For the first time in the 10-yr hot operation of the fuel monitoring facility (FMF), the reassembling or irradiated fuels was successfully conducted and a reassembled irradiation vehicle was reinserted in Japanese experimental fast reactor JOYO. The FMF, one of the largest hot laboratories in Japan operated by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), demonstrated its new capability in remote handling. More than 130 assemblies have already been examined and disassembled at FMF for postirradiation examination and many results have been obtained to evaluate fuel performance. In addition to these once-through examinations, it is becoming more and more important to conduct interim examinations and reinsertion for continuous irradiation. More flexibility for irradiation experiments will thus be provided. Since FMF was originally designed to make the reinsertion possible, there is a path to get the assembly back to the reactor. The main developments needed for the reinsertion of assemblies were as follows: (1) irradiation vehicle, (2) disassembling and interim examination, (3) decontamination of fuel pin surface, and (4) reassembling machine. This paper mainly describes items 2, 3, and 4. The reinsertion program is now planned for two vehicles a year, and several new types of irradiation vehicles for the reinsertion are now being developed. The reassembling machine may be slightly modified so that those new types of rigs can also be handled

  19. Operating experience with a near-real-time inventory balance in a nuclear-fuel-cycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armento, W.J.; Box, W.D.; Kitts, F.G.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Morrison, G.W.; Pike, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The principal objective of the ORNL Integrated Safeguards Program (ISP) is to provide enhanced material accountability, improved process control, and greater security for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With the improved instrumentation and computer interfacing currently installed, the ORNL 233 U Pilot Plant has demonstrated capability of a near-real-time liquid-volume balance in both the solvent-extraction and ion-exchange systems. Future developments should include the near-real-time mass balancing of special nuclear materials as both a static, in-tank summation and a dynamic, in-line determination. In addition, the aspects of site security and physical protection can be incorporated into the computer monitoring

  20. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, L.G.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1982-09-01

    The CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) Pressurized Heavy Water (PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station was developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This paper summarizes Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components, and nuclear safety considerations to both the workers and the public

  1. Development of operation support system for MOX fuel production line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunji, Yasutoshi; Fujiwara, Shigeo; Iso, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Shishido, Toshio

    1989-01-01

    Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) FBR line started production of MOX fuels for 'JOYO' MK-II in October 1988. The production campaign for 'Monju' initial core fuel followed that for 'Joyo'. Control of this line is mainly computerized to allow remote operation. According to our test run experiences the automated plant, requires the higher judgement ability of operator when a problem arises. We need the plant which can be operated by even unskilled operator, on the technical level equal to that of skilled operator. This requirement will be satisfied by introduction of new support system into applying Artificial Intelligence technology based on operating experience. Now we have developed some operation support systems taking main aim at high efficiency of production for example, the optimum operation control system the failure diagnosis system and the production planning support system. (author)

  2. Stirling machine operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, B. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States); Dudenhoefer, J.E. [Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy operating lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and are not expected to operate for lengthy periods of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered. The record in this paper is not complete, due to the reluctance of some organizations to release operational data and because several organizations were not contacted. The authors intend to repeat this assessment in three years, hoping for even greater participation.

  3. Operating experience: safety perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piplani, Vivek; Krishnamurthy, P.R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Upadhyay, Devendra

    2015-01-01

    Operating Experience (OE) provides valuable information for improving NPP safety. This may include events, precursors, deviations, deficiencies, problems, new insights to safety, good practices, lessons and corrective actions. As per INSAG-10, an OE program caters as a fundamental means for enhancing the defence-in-depth at NPPs and hence should be viewed as ‘Continuous Safety Performance Improvement Tool’. The ‘Convention on Nuclear Safety’ also recognizes the OE as a tool of high importance for enhancing the NPP safety and its Article 19 mandates each contracting party to establish an effective OE program at operating NPPs. The lessons drawn from major accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi NPPs had prompted nuclear stalwarts to change their safety perspective towards NPPs and to frame sound policies on issues like safety culture, severe accident prevention and mitigation. An effective OE program, besides correcting current/potential problems, help in proactively improving the NPP design, operating and maintenance procedures, practices, training, etc., and thus plays vital role in ensuring safe and efficient operation of NPPs. Further it enhances knowledge with regard to equipment operating characteristics, system performance trends and provides data for quantitative and qualitative safety analysis. Besides all above, an OE program inculcates a learning culture in the organisation and thus helps in continuously enhancing the expertise, technical competency and knowledge base of its staff. Nuclear and Radiation Facilities in India are regulated by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Operating Plants Safety Division (OPSD) of AERB is involved in managing operating experience activities. This paper provides insights about the operating experience program of OPSD, AERB (including its on-line data base namely OPSD STAR) and its utilisation in improving the regulations and safety at Indian NPPs/projects. (author)

  4. ERB-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.N.; Cissel, D.W.; Smith, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    As originally designed and operated, EBR-II successfully demonstrated the concept of a sodium-cooled fast breeder power plant with a closed fuel reprocessing cycle (mini-nuclear park). Subsequent operation has been as an irradiation facility, a role which will continue into the foreseeable future. Since the beginning of operation in 1961, operating experience of EBR-II has been very satisfactory. Most of the components and systems have performed well. In particular, the mechanical performance of heat-removal systems has been excellent. A review of the operating experience reveals that all the original design objectives have been successfully demonstrated. To date, no failures or incidents resulting in serious in-core or out-of-core consequences have occurred. No water-to-sodium leaks have been detected over the life of the plant. At the present time, the facility is operating very well and continuously except for short shutdowns required by maintenance, refueling, modification, and minor repair. A plant factor of 76.9% was achieved for the calendar year 1976

  5. ATLAS IBL operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237659; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the inner most pixel layer in the ATLAS experiment, which was installed at 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis in 2014 to improve the tracking performance. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed for the IBL. After the long shut-down period over 2013 and 2014, the ATLAS experiment started data-taking in May 2015 for Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IBL has been operated successfully since the beginning of Run-2 and shows excellent performance with the low dead module fraction, high data-taking efficiency and improved tracking capability. The experience and challenges in the operation of the IBL is described as well as its performance.

  6. 250-kW-fuel cell system. Fields of application and operational experience (carbonate fuel cell technology); 250-kW-Brennstoffzellenanlage. Einsatzbereiche und Betriebserfahrungen (Karbonat-Brennstoffzellen Technologie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, P. [MTU CFC Solutions GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The author shows us a 250 kW-carbonate fuel cell system, describing the technical properties of the system based on the carbonate fuel cell technology. The system operates with relatively high cell temperatures, can be operated using methan as a fuel and it can generate process vapour in addition to electric power. The article shows the fields of application, giving also a concrete example and illustrating the mode of operation of the fuel cell system which is advantageous, from the environment-related point of view. 1. Technical properties fuel cell power plant 2. Advantages in decentralized energy techniques 3. Applications, markets and objective groups 4. A case example for the ITK branch: Deutsche Telekom 5. Renewable and CO2-neutral energy supply.

  7. Review of thorium fuel reprocessing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; McDuffee, W.T.; Rainey, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    The review reveals that experience in the reprocessing of irradiated thorium materials is limited. Plants that have processed thorium-based fuels were not optimized for the operations. Previous demonstrations of several viable flowsheets provide a sound technological base for the development of optimum reprocessing methods and facilities. In addition to the resource benefit by using thorium, recent nonproliferation thrusts have rejuvenated an interest in thorium reprocessing. Extensive radiation is generated as the result of 232 U-contamination produced in the 233 U, resulting in the remote operation and fabrication operations and increased fuel cycle costs. Development of the denatured thorium flowsheet, which is currently of interest because of nonproliferation concerns, represents a difficult technological challenge

  8. Operating a fuel cell using landfill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippel, C.E.; Preston, J.L. Jr.; Trocciola, J.; Spiegel, R.

    1996-12-31

    An ONSI PC25{trademark}, 200 kW (nominal capacity) phosphoric acid fuel cell operating on landfill gas is installed at the Town of Groton Flanders Road landfill in Groton, Connecticut. This joint project by the Connecticut Light & Power Company (CL&P) which is an operating company of Northeast Utilities, the Town of Groton, International Fuel Cells (IFC), and the US EPA is intended to demonstrate the viability of installing, operating and maintaining a fuel cell operating on landfill gas at a landfill site. The goals of the project are to evaluate the fuel cell and gas pretreatment unit operation, test modifications to simplify the GPU design and demonstrate reliability of the entire system.

  9. Efficiency improvement of nuclear power plant operation: the significant role of advanced nuclear fuel technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Velde, AA. de; Burtak, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper authors deals with nuclear fuel cycle and their economic aspects. At Siemens, the developments focusing on the reduction of fuel cycle costs are currently directed on .further batch average burnup increase, .improvement of fuel reliability, .enlargement of fuel operation margins, .improvement of methods for fuel design and core analysis. These items will be presented in detail in the full paper and illustrated by the global operating experience of Siemens fuel for both PWRs and BWRs. (authors)

  10. Fuel management for TRIGA reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totenbier, R.E.; Levine, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    One responsibility of the Supervisor of Reactor Operations is to follow the TRIGA core depletion and recommend core loading changes for refueling and special experiments. Calculations required to analyze such changes normally use digital computers and are extremely difficult to perform for one who is not familiar with computer language and nuclear reactor diffusion theory codes. The TRICOM/SCRAM program developed to perform such calculations for the Penn State TRIGA Breazeale Reactor (PSBR), has a very simple input format and is one which can be used by persons having no knowledge of computer codes. The person running the program need not understand computer language such as Fortran, but should be familiar with reactor core geometry and effects of loading changes. To further simplify the input requirements but still allow for all of the studies normally needed by the reactor operations supervisor, the options required for input have been isolated to two. Given a master deck of computer cards one needs to change only three cards; a title card, core energy history information card and one with core changes. With this input, the program can provide individual fuel element burn-up for a given period of operation and the k eff of the core. If a new loading is desired, a new master deck containing the changes is also automatically provided. The life of a new core loading can be estimated by feeding in projected core burn-up factors and observing the resulting loss in individual fuel elements. The code input and output formats have now been made sufficiently convenient and informative as to be incorporated into a standard activity for the Reactor Operations Supervisor. (author)

  11. Fuel pellets of various shapes- fabrication experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, R.; Nair, M.R.; Majumdar, S.; Purushotham, D.S.C.

    1996-10-01

    Sintered uranium oxide and mixed oxide pellets are extensively used as nuclear reactor fuel. The shape of the fuel-pellets influence greatly their in-reactor performance. Fuel pellets of various shapes were prepared in Radiometallurgy Division to study their fabricability and in-reactor performance. This paper presents the experience in fabricating these fuel pellets. (author)

  12. Canadian experience in irradiation and testing of MOX fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, S.; Floyd, M.; Dimayuga, F.

    2018-04-01

    Experimental irradiation and performance testing of Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) has taken place for more than 40 years. These experiments investigated MOX fuel behaviour and compared it with UO2 behaviour to develop and verify fuel performance models. This article compares the performance of MOX of various concentrations and homogeneities, under different irradiation conditions. These results can be applied to future fuel designs. MOX fuel irradiated by CNL was found to be comparable in performance to similarly designed and operated UO2 fuel. MOX differs in behaviour from UO2 fuel in several ways. Fission-gas release, grain growth and the thickness of zirconium oxide on the inner sheath appear to be related to MOX fuel homogeneity. Columnar grains formed at the pellet centre begin to develop at lower powers in MOX than in UO2 fuel.

  13. Operations monitoring concept. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    Operations monitoring is a safeguards concept which could be applied in future fuel cycle facilities to significantly enhance the effectiveness of an integrated safeguards system. In general, a variety of operations monitoring techniques could be developed for both international and domestic safeguards application. The goal of this presentation is to describe specific examples of operations monitoring techniques as may be applied in a fuel reprocessing facility. The operations monitoring concept involves monitoring certain in-plant equipment, personnel, and materials to detect conditions indicative of the diversion of nuclear material. An operations monitoring subsystem should be designed to monitor operations only to the extent necessary to achieve specified safeguards objectives; there is no intent to monitor all operations in the facility. The objectives of the operations monitoring subsystem include: verification of reported data; detection of undeclared uses of equipment; and alerting the inspector to potential diversion activities. 1 fig

  14. Reviewing operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide detailed supplementary guidance to OSART experts to aid in the evaluation of operational experience feedback (OEF) programmes at nuclear power plants. The document begins by describing the objectives of an OEF programme. It goes on to indicate preparatory work and investigatory guidance for the expert. Section 5 describes attributes of an excellent OEF programme. Appended to these guidelines are examples of OEF documents from various plants. These are intended to help the expert by demonstrating the actual implementation of OEF in practice. These guidelines are in no way intended to conflict with existing national regulations and rules. A comprehensive OEF programme, as described in Section 2, would be impossible to evaluated in detail in the amount of time typically allocated for assessing OEF in an OSART review. The expert must use his or her time wisely by concentrating on those areas that appear to be the weakest

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debban, B.L.

    1996-03-01

    Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project's current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M ampersand O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M ampersand O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins

  16. Fuels Development Operation. Quarterly progress report, July, August, September, 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-10-15

    The present quarterly report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development Operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations.

  17. Storage experience in Hungary with fuel from research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, J.; Hargitai, T.

    1996-01-01

    In Hungary several critical assemblies, a training reactor and a research reactor have been in operation. The fuel used in the research and training reactors are of Soviet origin. Though spent fuel storage experience is fairly good, medium and long term storage solutions are needed. (author)

  18. Novel materials for fuel cells operating on liquid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. C. Sequeira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Towards commercialization of fuel cell products in the coming years, the fuel cell systems are being redefined by means of lowering costs of basic elements, such as electrolytes and membranes, electrode and catalyst materials, as well as of increasing power density and long-term stability. Among different kinds of fuel cells, low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are of major importance, but their problems related to hydrogen storage and distribution are forcing the development of liquid fuels such as methanol, ethanol, sodium borohydride and ammonia. In respect to hydrogen, methanol is cheaper, easier to handle, transport and store, and has a high theoretical energy density. The second most studied liquid fuel is ethanol, but it is necessary to note that the highest theoretically energy conversion efficiency should be reached in a cell operating on sodium borohydride alkaline solution. It is clear that proper solutions need to be developed, by using novel catalysts, namely nanostructured single phase and composite materials, oxidant enrichment technologies and catalytic activity increasing. In this paper these main directions will be considered.

  19. Operation of spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the IAEA's programme on safety of spent fuel storage. This is for interim spent fuel storage facilities that are not integral part of an operating nuclear power plant. Following the introduction, Section 2 describes key activities in the operation of spent fuel storage facilities. Section 3 lists the basic safety considerations for storage facility operation, the fundamental safety objectives being subcriticality, heat removal and radiation protection. Recommendations for organizing the management of a facility are contained in Section 4. Section 5 deals with aspects of training and qualification; Section 6 describes the phases of the commissioning of a spent fuel storage facility. Section 7 describes operational limits and conditions, while Section 8 deals with operating procedures and instructions. Section 9 deals with maintenance, testing, examination and inspection. Section 10 presents recommendations for radiation and environmental protection. Recommendations for the quality assurance (QA) system are presented in Section 11. Section 12 describes the aspects of safeguards and physical protection to be taken into account during operations; Section 13 gives guidance for decommissioning. 15 refs, 5 tabs

  20. Towards operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T. S.; Yang, W. W.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    A significant advantage of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is the high specific energy of the liquid fuel, making it particularly suitable for portable and mobile applications. Nevertheless, conventional DMFCs have to be operated with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and the detrimental consequences. Operation with diluted methanol solutions significantly reduces the specific energy of the power pack and thereby prevents it from competing with advanced batteries. In view of this fact, there exists a need to improve conventional DMFC system designs, including membrane electrode assemblies and the subsystems for supplying/removing reactants/products, so that both the cell performance and the specific energy can be simultaneously maximized. This article provides a comprehensive review of past efforts on the optimization of DMFC systems that operate with concentrated methanol. Based on the discussion of the key issues associated with transport of the reactants/products, the strategies to manage the supply/removal of the reactants/products in DMFC operating with highly concentrated methanol are identified. With these strategies, the possible approaches to achieving the goal of concentrated fuel operation are then proposed. Past efforts in the management of the reactants/products for implementing each of the approaches are also summarized and reviewed.

  1. Regulatory experience with fuel failures in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the main ENSI activities like: supervision of reactor and radiation safety and security; supervision of safety of transports of nuclear materials and assess the safety of proposed solutions for the geological disposal are listed. Recent events concerning the reactor core, common causes for fuel failures, findings during inspections and potential root cause for fuel failures are discussed. Management of fuel failures, started from reporting of the event – evaluation of the need of imminent action; identification of the fuel element if possible till evaluation by the plant and fuel vendor and allowance by ENSI for repair of the fuel element and definition of measures (short and long term) are also presented. The following Conclusions by ENSI about status of fuel failures are made: 1) Number of fuel failures was reduced regardless more economic operation in all plants; 2) Old PWR and BWR reactors achieved 15 to 29 years operation without leakers, but two minor fuel damage during fuel handling appeared; 3) Newer plants are not better in achieving operation without leakers than older plants; 4) Technical improvements at fuel elements parallel to changes in operation strategy and improvements in manufacturing quality but single effects difficult to judge. The issues about how to implement “Zero Failure Rates” in regulations and how to achieve “Zero Failure Rates” as well as some future measures by ENSI are discussed

  2. Framatome experience in fuel assembly repair and reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, G.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1985, FRAMATOME has build up extensive experience in the poolside replacement of fuel rods for repair or R and D purposes and the reconstitution of fuel assemblies (i.e. replacement of a damaged structure to enable reuse of the fuel rod bundle). This experience feedback enables FRAMATOME to improve in steps the technical process and the equipment used for the above operations in order to enhance their performance in terms of setup, flexibility, operating time and safety. In parallel, the fuel assembly and fuel rod designs have been modified to meet the same goals. The paper will describe: - the overall experience of FRAMATOME with UO 2 fuel as well as MOX fuel; the usual technical process used for fuel replacement and the corresponding equipment set; - the usual technical process for fuel assembly reconstitution and the corresponding equipment set. This process is rather unique since it takes profit of the specific FRAMATOME fuel assembly design with removable top and bottom nozzles, so that fuel rods insertion by pulling through in the new structure is similar to what is done in the manufacturing plant; - the usual inspections done on the fuel rods and/or the fuel assembly; - the design of the new reconstitution equipment (STAR) compared with the previous one as well as their comparative performance. The final section will be a description of the alternative reconstitution process and equipment used by FRAMATOME in reactors in which the process cannot be used for several reasons such as compatibility or administrative authorization. This process involves the pushing of fuel rods into the new structure, requiring further precautions. (author)

  3. EBR-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.F.

    1978-07-01

    Operation of the EBR-2 reactor is presented concerning the performance of the heat removal system; reactor materials; fuel handling system; sodium purification and sampling system; cover-gas purification; plant diagnostics and instrumentation; recent improvements in identifying fission product sources in EBR-2; and EBR-2 safety

  4. Environmental impact of nuclear fuel cycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, W.L.

    1989-09-01

    This paper considers the environmental impact of nuclear fuel cycle operations, particularly those operated by British Nuclear Fuels plc, which include uranium conversion, fuel fabrication, uranium enrichment, irradiated fuel transport and storage, reprocessing, uranium recycle and waste treatment and disposal. Quantitative assessments have been made of the impact of the liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment from all stages in the fuel cycle. An upper limit to the possible health effects is readily obtained using the codified recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. This contrasts with the lack of knowledge concerning the health effects of many other pollutants, including those resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. Most of the liquid and gaseous discharges result at the reprocessing stage and although their impact on the environment and on human health is small, they have given rise to much public concern. Reductions in discharges at Sellafield over the last few years have been quite dramatic, which shows what can be done provided the necessary very large investment is undertaken. The cost-effectiveness of this investment must be considered. Some of it has gone beyond the point of justification in terms of health benefit, having been undertaken in response to public and political pressure, some of it on an international scale. The potential for significant off-site impact from accidents in the fuel cycle has been quantitatively assessed and shown to be very limited. Waste disposal will also have an insignificant impact in terms of risk. It is also shown that it is insignificant in relation to terrestrial radioactivity and therefore in relation to the human environment. 14 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Evaluation of design and operation of fuel handling systems for 25 MW biomass fueled CFB power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, D.

    1991-01-01

    Two circulating fluidized bed, biomass fueled, 25MW power plants were placed into operation by Thermo Electron Energy Systems in California during late 1989. This paper discusses the initial fuel and system considerations, system design, actual operating fuel characterisitics, system operation during the first year and modifications. Biomass fuels handled by the system include urban/manufacturing wood wastes and agricultural wastes in the form of orchard prunings, vineyard prunings, pits, shells, rice hulls and straws. Equipment utilized in the fuel handling system are described and costs are evaluated. Lessons learned from the design and operational experience are offered for consideration on future biomass fueled installations where definition of fuel quality and type is subject to change

  6. Injection of zinc in plants of ANAV. Impact on fuel and operation experience; Inyeccion de cinc en las plantas de ANAV. Impacto sobre el combustible y experiencia de operacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doncell, N.; Gago, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Zinc injection performed in the three ANAV (Asociacion Nuclear Asco-Vandellos) plants is part of an overall primary water chemistry program, material management and dose reduction program. The application of zinc shown significant benefits in radiation field reduction as well as in mitigation of PWSCC initiation. Although zinc injection also reduces general corrosion rates and consequently reduces corrosion product transport to the fuel, and evaluation of the risks with respect to fuel performance should be done. ANAV and ENUSA, following industry recommendations, have coordinated the task related to the viability of the program in Asco and Vandellos including monitoring, inspections and control parameters. finally, this article includes a comprehensive review of operating experience and an assessment of fuel performance effects. (Author)

  7. Taipower's operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Huei-Hsiung; Lin, M.M.H.; Chiang, Min-Kuang

    1988-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company currently operates four BWRs and two PWRs at three different sites. Chinshan NPS is a twin 636 MWe General Electric BWR-4 reactors with Mark I containment and Kuosheng NPS is a twin 985 MWe General Electric BWR-6 reactors with Mark III contaiqment. They are both located at northern sea coast of Taiwan. Maanshan NPS, sited in the southern tip of Taiwan, has two Westinghouse PWR units with 951 MWe output each. After a series of betterments, the water qualities of Chinshan, Kuosheng and Maashan MPSs are now controlled in satisfactory condition. The betterments made in the Chinshan NPS are: dreasing the elbow's quantity and adoption of the smaller piping and control valves for easy flow control of URC; material improvement for RWCU pump mechanical seal for favorable RWCU operation; and con-demin resin ratio alteration. HWC is now planned to be adopted to minimize the IGSCC. The betterments made in the Huosheng NPS include: resin transfer improvement for con-demin; resin type alteration; non-regenerative adoption; and RWCU V/V checking and reparing, and improvement for precoat medium and procedure. Those made in the Maashan NPS are: betterment concerning the problem of dissolved oxygen, betterment for the TOC of make up system, and strengthening of the internal structure of condensate polisher, and operating concept's settlement. (Nogami, K.)

  8. Hungary [Country Specific Operational Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The PAKS NPP in Hungary has four WWER-440 units which have been operated on annual cycles. The main changes in fuel types used with the dates of introduction are shown. The improvements and changes that have been made include: - The exchange of spacer grids from stainless steel to zirconium alloy providing less absorption in structural materials; - A reduction of the shroud wall thickness (2-1.5 mm) which changed the by-pass flow rate because of different key-sizes of the assemblies; - Recovery of the key-size and increasing the lattice pitch of the fuel pins in the assemblies to reduce the excess power in the peripheral fuel pins because of the thinner wall (excess moderator); - Hafnium shielding of the follower heads to reduce local power peaking near the head of the follower assembly (excess moderator)

  9. Operating Experience at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavsek, D.; Bach, B.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic analysis of operational experience by assessment of internal and industry events and the feedback of lessons learned is one of the essential activities in the improvement of the operational safety and reliability of the nuclear power plant. At NPP Krsko we have developed a document called ''Operating Experience Assessment Program''. Its purpose is to establish administrative guidance for the processing of operating events including on-site and industry events. Assessment of internal events is based on the following methods: Event and Causal Factor Charting, Change Analysis, Barrier Analysis, MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree Analysis) and Human Performance Evaluation. The operating experience group has developed a sophisticated program entitled ''Operating experience tracking system'' (OETS) in response to the need for a more efficient way of processing internal and industry operating experience information. The Operating Experience Tracking System is used to initiate and track operational events including recommended actions follow up. Six screens of the system contain diverse essential information which allows tracking of operational events and enables different kinds of browsing. OETS is a part of the NPP Krsko nuclear network system and can be easily accessed by all plant personnel. (author)

  10. CANDU 6 operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Joo-bo; Love, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The CAMDU 6 reactor has an international reputation as one of the world's best performing and safe reactors. CANDU 6 reactors are consistently ranked in the world's top 10 for annual and lifetime performance. Six CANDU 6 units are currently in operation in four continents; in Quebec, New Brunswick, South Korea, Argentina and Romania. There are another two CANDU 6 units currently under construction at wolsong, in Korea which ore scheduled to go into service in 1998 and 1999 respectively. A second CANDU 6 unit is currently being considered for Romania. The construction of two CANDU 6 units at Qinshan, in China, is now underway. The performance of the four first-generation CANDU 6 plants, which have now been in service for 15 years, continue to show very good performance, with capacity factors on average since in-service of over 85%. The annual capacity factor of 10.21% during 1997 has been achieved by the Wolsong-1 unit in South Korea. These high capacity factors have been achieved on a regular basis by the four international utilities by: 1. applying effective operations philosophy to assure safety and reliability; 2. managing efficient maintenance outages to minimize unplanned outages; 3. On-power refuelling and the flexible power management features of the CANDU

  11. Nuclear spent fuel management. Experience and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely for long periods at relatively low cost, but some form of permanent disposal will eventually be necessary. This report examines the options for spent fuel management, explores the future prospects for each stage of the back-end of the fuel cycle and provides a thorough review of past experience and the technical status of the alternatives. Current policies and practices in twelve OECD countries are surveyed

  12. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.; Ohta, M.M.; Simmons, G.R.; Whitaker, S.H.

    1997-12-01

    The siting, design, construction, operation, decommissioning, and closure of a geological facility for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste is a complex undertaking that will span many decades. Both technical and social issues must be taken into account simultaneously and many factors must be considered. Based on studies carried out in Canada and elsewhere, it appears that these factors can be accommodated and that geological disposal is both technically and socially feasible. But throughout the different stages of implementing disposal, technical and social issues will continue to arise and these will have to be dealt with successfully if progress is to continue. This paper discusses these issues and a proposed approach for dealing with them. (author)

  13. MOX fuel development: Experience in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchi, D.E.; Adelfang, P.; Menghini, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1973, when a laboratory conceived for the safe manipulation of a few hundred grams of plutonium was built, the CNEA (Argentinean Atomic Energy Commission) has been involved in the small-scale development of MOX fuel technology. The plutonium laboratory consists in a glove box facility (α Facility) featuring the necessary equipment to prepare MOX fuel rods for experimental irradiations and to carry out studies on preparative processes development and chemical and physical characterization. The irradiation of the first prototypes of (U,Pu)O 2 fuels fabricated in Argentina began in 1986. These experiments were carried out in the HFR (High Flux Reactor)- Petten , Holland. The rods were prepared and controlled in the CNEA's a Facility. The post-irradiation examinations (PIE) were performed in the KFK (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe), Germany and the JRC (Joint Research Center), Petten. In the period 1991-1995, the development of new laboratory methods of co-conversion of uranium and plutonium were carried out: reverse strike co-precipitation of ADU-Pu(OH) 4 and direct denitration using microwaves. The reverse strike process produced pellets with a high sintered density, excellent micro-homogeneity and good solubility in nitric acid. Liquid wastes showed a very low content of actinides and the process is easy to operate in a glove box environment. The microwave direct denitration was optimized with uranium alone and the conditions to obtain high density pellets, with a good microstructure, without using a milling step, have been developed. At present, new experiments are being carried out to improve the reverse strike co-precipitation process and direct microwave denitration. A new glove box is being installed at the plutonium laboratory, this glove box has process equipment designed to recover scrap from previous fabrication campaigns, and to co-convert mixed U-Pu solutions by direct microwave denitration. (author)

  14. Operating experiences at Poelitz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-03-12

    A discussion was held between Poelitz and Ludwigshafen personnel on regulating valves, an interchange of two converters, operating temperatures, water and lye solution injection, the banking position of the catchpot, and preparation of a schematic drawing of a modified chamber. Desiring better regulation in its gas inlet valve, Poelitz proposed a smaller main valve with a smaller bypass. Ludwigshafen considered it best to install a regulating valve with an elongated cone or needle. The cold gas valves were to be similarly rebuilt. Poelitz did not consider a regulating cone necessary for the 16 millimeter air valves. With regard to the interchange of long converters, Poelitz provided a movable concrete base for the short converters. Specific arrangements for the interchange were discussed briefly. The maximum allowable temperature for pipelines was lowered from 570 to 550 degrees. Plans were made for establishing a uniform system of wall temperature measurements in the various plants. Quantities of lye injected and the dimension of pumps and container were discussed, but no conclusion was reached. It was decided that separate lines were to be used for the soda solution and water to the stalls. Dosing procedure for water and lye was discussed. The slope of the catchpot was to be 1 percent, that of the suction and pressure separators 4 percent.

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Akbari, F.; Thompson, D.M.; Thurgood, C.; Higgs, J.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical treatment has been developed to predict the fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective nuclear fuel elements. The equilibrium stoichiometry deviation in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel has been derived from thermodynamic considerations using a self-consistent set of thermodynamic properties for the U-O system, which emphasizes replication of solubilities and three-phase invariant conditions displayed in the U-O binary phase diagram. The kinetics model accounts for multi-phase transport including interstitial oxygen diffusion in the solid and gas-phase transport of hydrogen and steam in the fuel cracks. The fuel oxidation model is further coupled to a heat conduction model to account for the feedback effect of a reduced thermal conductivity in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel. A numerical solution has been developed using a finite-element technique with the FEMLAB software package. The model has been compared to available data from several in-reactor X-2 loop experiments with defective fuel conducted at the Chalk River Laboratories. The model has also been benchmarked against an O/U profile measurement for a spent defective fuel element discharged from a commercial reactor

  16. Operator aid system for Dhruva fueling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, S.M.; Ramaswamy, L.R.; Gohel, N.; Bharadwaj, G.; Ranade, M.R.; Khadilkar, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Systems with significant software contents are replacing the old hardware logic systems. These systems not only are versatile but are easy to make changes in the program. Extensive use of such systems in critical real-time operation environment warrants not only excessive training on simulators, documentation but also fault tolerant system to bring the operation to a safe state in case of error. With new graphic user software interface and advancement in personal computer hardware design, the dynamic status of the physical environment can be shown on the visual display at near real time. These visual aids along with the software covering all the interlocks aids an operator in his professional work. This paper highlights the operator aid system for Dhruva fueling machine. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig

  17. Spent fuel storage and transportation - ANSTO experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has operated the 10 MW DIDO class High Flux Materials Test Reactor (HIFAR) since 1958. Refuelling the reactor produces about 38 spent fuel elements each year. Australia has no power reactors and only one operating research reactor so that a reprocessing plant in Australia is not an economic proposition. The HEU fuel for HIFAR is manufactured at Dounreay using UK or US origin enriched uranium. Spent fuel was originally sent to Dounreay, UK for reprocessing but this plant was shutdown in 1998. ANSTO participates in the US Foreign Research Reactor Spent Fuel Return program and also has a contract with COGEMA for the reprocessing of non-US origin fuel

  18. Experience in WWER fuel assemblies vibration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovtcharov, O.; Pavelko, V.; Usanov, A.; Arkadov, G.; Dolgov, A.; Molchanov, V.

    2003-01-01

    It is stated that the vibration studies of internals and the fuel assemblies should be conducted during the reactor designing, commissioning and commercial operation stages and the analysis methods being used should complement each other. The present paper describes the methods and main results of the vibration noise studies of internals and the fuel assemblies of the operating NPPs with WWER reactors, as an example of the implementation of the comprehensive approach to the analysis on equipment flow-induced vibration. At that, the characteristics of internals and fuel assemblies vibration loading were dealt jointly as they are elements of the same compound oscillating system and their vibrations have the interrelated nature

  19. Transit experience with hydrogen fueled hybrid electric buses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P.B.; Mazaika, D.M.; Levin, J.; Edwards, T.

    2006-01-01

    Both AC Transit and SunLine Transit operate hybrid electric hydrogen fueled buses in their transit service. ACT presently operates three fuel cell buses in daily revenue service, and SunLine operates a fuel cell bus and a HHICE (Hybrid Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine) bus. All these buses use similar electric drive train and electric accessories, although the detailed design differs notably between the fuel cell and the hybrid ICE buses. The fuel cell buses use a 120kW UTC fuel cell and a Van Hool Chassis, whereas the HHICE bus uses a turbocharged Ford engine which is capable of 140kW generator output in a New Flyer Chassis. The HHICE bus was the first in service, and has been subjected to both winter testing in Manitoba, Canada and summer testing in the Palm Springs, CA region. The winter testing included passenger sampling using questionnaires to ascertain passenger response. The fuel cell buses were introduced to service at the start of 2006. All five buses are in daily revenue service use. The paper will describe the buses and the experience of the transit properties in operating the buses. (author)

  20. GRID INDEPENDENT FUEL CELL OPERATED SMART HOME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

    2003-12-07

    A fuel cell power plant, which utilizes a smart energy management and control (SEMaC) system, supplying the power need of laboratory based ''home'' has been purchased and installed. The ''home'' consists of two rooms, each approximately 250 sq. ft. Every appliance and power outlet is under the control of a host computer, running the SEMaC software package. It is possible to override the computer, in the event that an appliance or power outage is required. Detailed analysis and simulation of the fuel cell operated smart home has been performed. Two journal papers has been accepted for publication and another journal paper is under review. Three theses have been completed and three additional theses are in progress.

  1. Recent fuel handling experience in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, good operation of the fuel handling system at Ontario Hydro's nuclear stations has been taken for granted with the unavailability of the station arising from fuel handling system-related problems usually contributing less than one percent of the total unavailability of the stations. While the situation at the newer Hydro stations continues generally to be good (with the specific exception of some units at Pickering B) some specific and some general problems have caused significant loss of availability at the older plants (Pickering A and Bruce A). Generally the experience at the 600 MWe units in Canada has also continued to be good with Point Lepreau leading the world in availability. As a result of working to correct identified deficiencies, there were some changes for the better as some items of equipment that were a chronic source of trouble were replaced with improved components. In addition, the fuel handling system has been used three times as a delivery system for large-scale non destructive examination of the pressure tubes, twice at Bruce and once at Pickering and performing these inspections this way has saved many days of reactor downtime. Under COG there are several programs to develop improved versions of some of the main assemblies of the fuelling machine head. This paper will generally cover the events relating to Pickering in more detail but will describe the problems with the Bruce Fuelling Machine Bridges since the 600 MW 1P stations have a bridge drive arrangement that is somewhat similar to Bruce

  2. NONDESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF FUEL PLATES FOR THE RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; S.C. Taylor; G.A. Moore; D.M. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    Nuclear fuel is the core component of reactors that is used to produce the neutron flux required for irradiation research purposes as well as commercial power generation. The development of nuclear fuels with low enrichments of uranium is a major endeavor of the RERTR program. In the development of these fuels, the RERTR program uses nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for the purpose of determining the properties of nuclear fuel plate experiments without imparting damage or altering the fuel specimens before they are irradiated in a reactor. The vast range of properties and information about the fuel plates that can be characterized using NDE makes them highly useful for quality assurance and for analyses used in modeling the behavior of the fuel while undergoing irradiation. NDE is also particularly useful for creating a control group for post-irradiation examination comparison. The two major categories of NDE discussed in this paper are X-ray radiography and ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection/evaluation. The radiographic scans are used for the characterization of fuel meat density and homogeneity as well as the determination of fuel location within the cladding. The UT scans are able to characterize indications such as voids, delaminations, inclusions, and other abnormalities in the fuel plates which are generally referred to as debonds as well as to determine the thickness of the cladding using ultrasonic acoustic microscopy methods. Additionally, the UT techniques are now also being applied to in-canal interim examination of fuel experiments undergoing irradiation and the mapping of the fuel plate surface profile to determine fuel swelling. The methods used to carry out these NDE techniques, as well as how they operate and function, are described along with a description of which properties are characterized.

  3. MIT January Operational Internship Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanac, Natasha; DeVivero, Charlie; James, Jillian; Perez-Martinez, Carla; Pino, Wendy; Wang, Andrew; Willett, Ezekiel; Williams, Kwami

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the MIT January Operational Internship Experience (JOIE) program. The topics include: 1) Landing and Recovery; 2) Transportation; 3) Shuttle Processing; 4) Constellation Processing; 5) External Tank; 6) Launch Pad; 7) Ground Operations; 8) Hypergolic Propellants; 9) Environmental; 10) Logistics; 11) Six Sigma; 12) Systems Engineering; and 13) Human Factors.

  4. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.A.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1984-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations for the workers and the public

  5. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, R.W.; Woodhead, L.W.; Horton, E.P.; Nichols, M.J.; Daly, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on worker and public safety, operating performance and costs, and reliability of system components

  6. Fuel consumption of a sugarcane harvester in different operational settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. G. Ramos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The interventions performed during the mechanized harvesting are essential to improve the operational performance of sugarcane harvesters and reduce operational costs. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the fuel consumption of a sugarcane harvester in different forward speeds and engine rotations. Harvesting was conducted in a green cane plot, with the variety RB 855156. Flow meters were installed in the harvester's fuel supply system and an electronic device was used for data acquisition. The experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design in a factorial scheme (3 x 2, using three engine rotations and two forward speeds, with six replicates. Harvesting capacity and fuel consumption per hour, per area and per ton of harvested sugarcane were analyzed. The results were subjected to analysis of variance and means were compared by Tukey test. The variations in engine rotation did not affect the performance for harvesting capacity, but influenced fuel consumption. Forward speed influenced both harvesting capacity and fuel consumption.

  7. MELOX fuel fabrication plant: Operational feedback and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugelmann, D.; Greneche, D.

    2000-01-01

    As of December 1, 1998, 32 Europeans LWRs are loaded with MOX fuel. It clearly means that plutonium recycling in MOX fuels is a mature industry, with successful operational experience in fabrication plants in some European countries, especially in France. Indeed, the recycling of plutonium generated in LWRs is one of the objectives of the full Reprocessing-Conditioning-Recycling (RCR) strategy chosen by France in the 70's. The most impressive results of this strategy, is the fact that 31 of the 32 reactors are loaded with MOX fuels supplied by the COGEMA Group from the same efficient fabrication process, the MIMAS process, improved for the MELOX plant to become the A-MIMAS process. In France, 17 reactors are already loaded and 11 additional reactors are technically suited to do so. Indeed, the EDF MOX program plans to use MOX in 28 of its 57 reactors. An EDF 900 MWe reactor core contains 157 assemblies of 264 rods each. 52 fuel assemblies per year are necessary for a 'UO 2 3-batches-MOX 3-batches' core management. In this case, a third of the UO 2 and a third of the MOX assemblies are replaced yearly, that means 36 UO 2 fuel assemblies and 16 MOX fuel assemblies. Some MOX fuelled reactors have now switched from the previously described core management to a so-called 'hybrid core management'. In this case, a quarter of UO 2 assemblies is replaced yearly. The first EDF reactor loaded with MOX fuel was Saint-Laurent B1, in 1987. The in-core experience, based on several hundred assemblies loaded, with reloading on a 1/3 cycle basis, shows that there is no operational difference between UO 2 and MOX fuels, both in terms of performance and safety. MOX fueling of 900 MWe EDF's PWRs, with a limited in-core MOX ratio of 30%, has needed only minor adaptations, such as addition of control rods, modification of the boron concentration in the cooling system and precaution against radiation exposure, easy to set up (optimisation of the fresh MOX fuel handling process, remote

  8. Experiences on the fuel inspection field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The characteristics of the fuel assemblies used in nuclear power plants undergo evolution as a result of operation, an evolution which in certain cases it is interesting to know and to evaluate. In addition fuel assembly improvements and new designs may introduce modifications whose suitability should be verified before they are used in standard supplies. The main characteristics to be checked in the case of spent fuel assemblies are: general condition, dimensional variations, corrosion and fuel rod integrity. This article describes a system developed for the inspection of spent fuel assemblies in pressurized water plants, and is divided mainly into the following sub-assemblies: a) Mechanical equipment to be installed in the spent fuel pool to support and rotate the assemblies and allow the inspection modules to be moved and positioned along the length of the assembly to be inspected. b) A remote control console for operation of the mechanical equipment. c) An artificial vision system for the determination of dimensional measurements. d) An eddy current system for the measurement of the oxide layer on peripheral rods. This article describes also a visual inspection system for fuel assemblies. (Author)

  9. Commentary on spent fuel storage at Morris operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eger, K.J.; Zima, G.E.

    1979-10-01

    The General Electric Company is providing technical support to Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in the analysis of the design, operation, and maintenance experience in the handling of nuclear fuel at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Facility. The purpose of this report is to provide a description of spent fuel handling activities and systems, and an analysis of the storage performance as developed over the seven year operational history of the Morris Operation. Design considerations and performance are analyzed for both the basin and key supporting systems. The bases for this analysis are the provisions for containing radioactive by-product materials, for shielding from the radiation they emit, and for preventing the formation of a critical array. These provisions have been met effectively over the history of storage at Morris. The release of radioactive materials is minimized by the protection of the cladding integrity, the containment of the basin water, the removal of radioactive and other contaminants from the water, and by filtering and then dispersing the basin air. Four auxiliary systems are provided to accomplish this, the basin leak detection system, the filter, the coolers, and the building ventilation system. This successful history notwithstanding, action to reduce personnel exposure, to improve fuel handling reliability and to lessen the potential for accidents continues to be taken

  10. Operation results of WWER fuel fabricated by OAO MSZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asatiani, A.; Balabanov, S.; Komarova, T.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a statistical analysis concerning the operation results of WWER fuel manufactured by OAO MSZ. For different fuel modifications we noted individual trends demonstrating the change in the achievable fuel assembly (FA) burnup figures; we also gave statistical evaluations of fuel rod (FR) leakage levels occurring in different WWER power units. (authors)

  11. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: October - December 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation; Tobin, J. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1960-01-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  12. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: July - September 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Wallace, W. P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1957-10-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  13. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: January - March 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation; Tobin, J. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1958-04-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  14. Demonstrating and evaluating heavy-duty alternative fuel operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peerenboom, W. [Trucking Research Inst., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The principal objectives of this project was to understand the effects of using an alternative fuel on a truck operating fleet through actual operation of trucks. Information to be gathered was expected to be anecdotal, as opposed to statistically viable, because the Trucking Research institute (TRI) recognized that projects could not attract enough trucks to produce statistically credible volumes of data. TRI was to collect operational data, and provide them to NREL, who would enter the data into the alternative fuels database being constructed for heavy-duty trucks at the time. NREL would also perform data analysis, with the understanding that the demonstrations were generally pre-production model engines and vehicles. Other objectives included providing information to the trucking industry on the availability of alternative fuels, developing the alternative fuels marketplace, and providing information on experience with alternative fuels. In addition to providing information to the trucking industry, an objective was for TRI to inform NREL and DOE about the industry, and give feedback on the response of the industry to developments in alternative fuels in trucking. At the outset, only small numbers of vehicles participated in most of the projects. Therefore, they had to be considered demonstrations of feasibility, rather than data gathering tests from which statistically significant conclusions might be drawn. Consequently, data gathered were expected to be useful for making estimates and obtaining valuable practical lessons. Project data and lessons learned are the subjects of separate project reports. This report concerns itself with the work of TRI in meeting the overall objectives of the TRI-NREL partnership.

  15. Cracking and relocation of UO2 fuel during nuclear operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Dagbjartsson, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cracking and relocation of light water reactor (LWR) fuel pellets affect the axial gas flow path within nuclear reactor fuel rods and the thermal performance of the fuel. As part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Water Reactor Safety Research Fuel Behavior Program, the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc., is conducting fuel rod behavior studies in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Halden, Norway. The Instrumental Fuel Assembly-430 (IFA-430) operated in that facility is a multipurpose assembly designed to provide information on fuel cracking and relocation, the long-term thermal response of LWR fuel rods subjected to various internal pressures and gas compositions, and the release of fission gases. This report presents the results of an analysis of fuel cracking and relocation phenomena as deduced from fuel rod axial gas flow and fuel temperature data from the first 6.5 GWd/tUO 2 burnup of the IFA-430

  16. CERCA'S experience in UMO fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarousse, Ch.; Lavastre, Y.; Grasse, M.

    2003-01-01

    Considered as a suitable solution for non-proliferation and reprocessing purposes, UMo fuel has been chosen and studied by the RERTR program since 1996. Involved in the RERTR fuel developments since 1978, with more than 20 years of U 3 SI 2 fuel production, and closely linked to the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CERCA was able to define properly, from the beginning, the right R and D actions plan for UMo fuel development. CERCA has already demonstrated during the last 4 years its ability to manufacture plates and fuel elements with high density UMo fuel. UMo full size plates produced for 4 irradiation experiments in 3 European reactors afforded us a unique experience. In addition, as a main part of our R and D effort, we have always studied in depth a key part of the CERCA process outline which is the plate rolling stage. After some preliminary investigation in order to define the phenomenological model describing the behavior of the fuel core when rolling, we have developed a rolling digital simulator. (author)

  17. Experience with unconventional gas turbine fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, D.K. [ABB Power Generation Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    Low grade fuels such as Blast Furnace Gas, biomass, residual oil, coke, and coal - if used in conjunction with appropriate combustion, gasification, and clean-up processes and in combination with a gas turbine combined cycle -offer attractive and environmentally sound power generation. Recently, the Bao Shan Iron and Steel Company in Shanghai placed an order with Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Japan, to supply a combined-cycle power plant. The plant is to employ ABB`s GT 11N2 with a combustor modified to burn blast furnace gas. Recent tests in Shanghai and at Kawasaki Steel, Japan, have confirmed the burner design. The same basic combustor concept can also be used for the low BTU gas derived from airblown gasification processes. ABB is also participating in the API project: A refinery-residual gasification combined-cycle plant in Italy. The GT 13E2 gas turbine employees MBTU EV burners that have been successfully tested under full operating conditions. These burners can also handle the MBTU gas produced in oxygenblown coal gasification processes. ABB`s vast experience in burning blast furnace gas (21 plants built during the 1950s and 1960s), residuals, crude, and coal in various gas turbine applications is an important asset for building such power plants. This presentation discusses some of the experience gained in such plants. (orig.) 6 refs.

  18. Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology for use in fuel cell vehicles and other applications has been intensively developed in recent decades. Besides the fuel cell stack, air and fuel control and thermal and water management are major challenges in the development of the fuel cell for vehicle applications. The air supply system can have a major impact on overall system efficiency. In this paper a fuel cell system model for optimizing system operating conditions was developed wh...

  19. Operating practical experience at Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quihillalt, Oscar

    1997-01-01

    Operating experiences of Atucha-1 and Embalse Nuclear Power Plants were discussed in this work. The technical and economic aspects, such as reliability, availability, personnel training, operating costs, prices and market, which exercise influence upon Argentina nuclear energy policy, mainly on the power electric generation by nuclear power plants were considered. Finally the current status of the nucleoelectric sector in Argentina and forecasting were analysed

  20. Spent fuel and HLW transportation the French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Charles, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    With 53 nuclear power plants in operation at EDF and a fuel cycle with recycling policy of the valuable materials, COGEMA is faced with the transport of a wide range of radioactive materials. In this framework, the transport activity is a key link in closing the fuel cycle. COGEMA has developed a comprehensive Transport Organization System dealing with all the sectors of the fuel cycle. The paper will describe the status of transportation of spent fuel and HLW in France and the experience gathered. The Transport Organization System clearly defines the role of all actors where COGEMA, acting as the general coordinator, specifies the tasks to be performed and brings technical and commercial support to its various subcontractors: TRANSNUCLEAIRE, specialized in casks engineering and transport operations, supplies packaging and performs transport operations, LEMARECHAL and CELESTIN operate transport by truck in the Vicinity of the nuclear sites while French Railways are in charge of spent fuel transport by train. HLW issued from the French nuclear program is stored for 30 years in an intermediate storage installation located at the La Hague reprocessing plant. Ultimately, these canisters will be transported to the disposal site. COGEMA has set up a comprehensive transport organization covering all operational aspects including adapted procedures, maintenance programs and personnel qualification

  1. Laboratory experiments with impacting fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, S.; Lipcsei, S.

    1994-10-01

    Vibration surveillance and diagnostics of fuel rods and fuel assemblies are important tasks in NPPs. Thus accurate knowledge of vibration phenomena and measurability is very important. Experimental results on models without limiter give good coincidence with theoretical calculations. Spectra measured on impacting rod become smoother with increasing impacting level. Spectra of fuel rods have a wider range in impacting rate and higher level of smoothing than spectra of model rod have. The impacting rate strongly depends on mechanical properties of the rod. By the experiments, one can state that as for Fourier spectra the only thing caused by the impacts is the smoothening. However, there is a chance to give faulty diagnosis by Fourier spectra only. Consequently, investigation of fuel rod vibration requires increased caution. (author) 4 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Learning of the operative experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Perez, A. B.; Esteban, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Operating experience is not new, in the most of the activities that we perform in our daily lives, we can find examples of how, using the knowledge that we acquired to develop a work and to solve problems, we can get an improvement or sounded benefit. (Author)

  3. Comparing PRAs with operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, R.R.; Martz, H.F.

    1998-12-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment is widely used to estimate the frequencies of rare events, such as nuclear power plant accidents. An obvious question concerns the extent to which PRAs conform to operating experience--that is, do PRAs agree with reality? The authors discuss a formal methodology to address this issue and examine its performance using plant-specific data.

  4. Trial operation of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PC25) for CHP applications in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhrig, M.; Droste, W.; Wolf, D. [Ruhrgas AG, Dorsten (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    In Europe, ten 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) produced by ONSI (PC25) are currently in operation. Their operators collaborate closely in the European Fuel Cell Users Group (EFCUG). The experience gained from trial operation by the four German operators - HEAG, HGW/HEW, Thyssengas and Ruhrgas - coincides with that of the other European operators. This experience can generally be regarded as favourable. With a view to using fuel cells in combined heat and power generation (CHP), the project described in this report, which was carried out in cooperation with the municipal utility of Bochum and Gasunie of the Netherlands, aimed at gaining experience with the PC 25 in field operation under the specific operating conditions prevailing in Europe. The work packages included heat-controlled operation, examination of plant behavior with varying gas properties and measurement of emissions under dynamic load conditions. The project received EU funding under the JOULE programme.

  5. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dempsey, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  6. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean; Hayes, Steven Lowe; Dempsey, Douglas; Harp, Jason Michael

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  7. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Materials technology reactor operating experience medium-enriched-uranium fuel development. Quarterly progress report for the period ending April 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaae, J. L.; Lai, G. Y.; Thompson, L. D.; Sheehan, J. E.; Rosenwasser, S. N.; Johnson, W. R.; Li, C. C.; Pieren, W. R.; Smith, A. B.; Holko, K. H.; Baenteli, G. J.; Cheung, K. C.; Orr, J. D.; Potter, R. C.; Baxter, A.; Bell, W.; Lane, R.; Wunderlich, R. G.; Neylan, A. J.

    1978-05-01

    The work reported includes the development of the materials properties data base for noncore components, plant surveillance and testing performed at Fort St. Vrain, and work to demonstrate the feasibility of using medium-enriched fuel in Fort St. Vrain. Studies and analyses plus experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  8. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoxing; Quan, Wenying; Xiao, Jing; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Fujii, Mamoru; Sun, Funxia; Shalaby, Cigdem; Li, Yan; Xie, Chao; Ma, Xiaoliang; Johnson, David; Lee, Jeong; Fedkin, Mark; LaBarbera, Mark; Das, Debanjan; Thompson, David; Lvov, Serguei; Song, Chunshan

    2014-09-30

    This DOE project at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) initially involved Siemens Energy, Inc. to (1) develop new fuel processing approaches for using selected alternative and renewable fuels – anaerobic digester gas (ADG) and commercial diesel fuel (with 15 ppm sulfur) – in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation systems; and (2) conduct integrated fuel processor – SOFC system tests to evaluate the performance of the fuel processors and overall systems. Siemens Energy Inc. was to provide SOFC system to Penn State for testing. The Siemens work was carried out at Siemens Energy Inc. in Pittsburgh, PA. The unexpected restructuring in Siemens organization, however, led to the elimination of the Siemens Stationary Fuel Cell Division within the company. Unfortunately, this led to the Siemens subcontract with Penn State ending on September 23rd, 2010. SOFC system was never delivered to Penn State. With the assistance of NETL project manager, the Penn State team has since developed a collaborative research with Delphi as the new subcontractor and this work involved the testing of a stack of planar solid oxide fuel cells from Delphi.

  9. Analysis of fuel operational reliability and fuel failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smiesko, I.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the fuel failure (loss of fuel rod (cladding) integrity, corruption of second barrier for fission product release from duel and their consequences (increase of primary coolant activity; increase of fission product releases to environment; increase of rad-waste activities and potential increase of personnel exposure) are discussed

  10. Review of BNFL's operational experience of wet type flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliam, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    BNFL International Transport's operational experience includes shipping 6000te of spent fuel from Japan to Sellafield, through its dedicated terminal at Barrow, and to Cogema La Hague. This fuel was shipped under the PNTL (Pacific Nuclear Transport Ltd) banner for which BNFL is responsible. PNTL owned and operated a fleet of 5 ships for Japanese business and a fleet of 80 wet and 58 dry flasks, for the transport of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel, from both Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). ''Wet'' or ''dry'' flask is the common terminology used to distinguish between spent fuel flasks transporting fuel where the fuel is immersed in water, or spent fuel flasks that have been drained of water and dried. This paper concentrates on the wet type of flask utilised to transport fuel to Sellafield, that is the Excellox type (including similar type NTL derivatives). It aims to provide a summary of operational experience during handling at power stations, shipment, unloading at reprocessors and from scheduled maintenance

  11. A Survey of the Fuel Cycles Operated in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1963-01-01

    (a) The natural uranium/ magnox fuel cycle. The United Kingdom have chosen the natural uranium graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactor as the basis of their nuclear power programme. They have operated the reactors at Calder Hall and Chapelcross for seven years; the Berkeley and Bradwell reactors of the CEGB are now operating, and reactors at seven other sites are under construction or planned. The fuel for these reactors is designed and manufactured at the U.K.A.E.A. Springfields factory and then transported to the reactor site for loading. After irradiation and discharge the fuel is transported to the U.K.A.E.A. site at Windscale for separation of uranium and plutonium from fission products. The paper outlines the UK experience of design and manufacture of fuel, re actor operation, transport of irradiated fuel and subsequent processing of the fuel. Mention is made of the behaviour of fuel in a reactor and alternative charging and discharging programmes, the subject is further elaborated in another paper. (b) Reactors using enriched fuels. The UK are developing an advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR), the prototype reactor of which came on power in 1963. The fuel is manufactured from enriched uranium oxide canned in stainless steel and it will be reprocessed through a ''head-end'' which will be added to the Windscale Magnox separation plant. The enriched uranium for the AGR is produced in the UK Diffusion Plant at Capenhurst. An alternative to enriched uranium oxide as a fuel is plutonium-enriched natural-uranium oxide. The paper outlines the experience in production of oxide fuel for AGR, the operating experience with the reactor so far and the plans for reprocessing the fuel. The alternative use of a plutonium fuel is considered and the effects of this on costs and the fuel cycle. Finally the paper outlines the place of Magnox and AGR reactors in the UK power programme. (author) [fr

  12. Small-scale CHP Plant based on a 35 kWel Hermetic Four Cylinder Stirling Engine for Biomass Fuels- Development, Technology and Operating Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obernberger, I.; Carlsen, Henrik; Biedermann, F.

    2003-01-01

    should normally be operated on a heat-controlled basis in order to achieve a high overall efficiency and should run for more than 5,000 annual full load operating hours to ensure economical operation. Two of the technologies examined are very promising and innovative: the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC...

  13. Fast reactor fuel development in Germany: Irradiation experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kummerer, K.R. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Material- und Festkoerperforschung 3 - Teilinstitut Brennelemente); Muehling, G. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Projekt Schneller Brueter)

    1990-04-01

    Within the German Fast Breeder Project an extensive effort has been devoted to the development of fast reactor fuel elements, mostly in close cooperation between the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe and partners from industry and from other European ''breeder groups''. The main objective was the design and qualification of the envisaged reference fuel element with mixed oxide fuel and austenitic stainless steel cladding and structure. In this context a manifold irradiation programme in different European test reactors covered the normal standard operation conditions as well as above normal incidents and hypothetical accidents. The whole network of experiments resulted in sufficient experience for the design and realization of the prototype fast reactor power station SNR 300 in Kalkar. (orig.).

  14. European experience with spent fuel transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, I.A.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Transport Ltd has transported 5000 tonnes of spent fuel from 35 reactors in 8 European countries since 1972. Transport management is governed by the Quality Plan for: transport administration, packaging and shipment procedures at the shipping plant, operations at the power plant, and packaging and shipment organization at the power plant. Selection of a suitable carrier device is made with regard to the shipping plant requirements, physical limitations of the reactor, fuel characteristics, and transport route constraints. The transport plan is set up taking into account exploitation of the casks, reactor shut-down requirements, fuel acceptance plans at the reprocessing plant, and cask maintenance periods. A transport cycle involving spent fuel shipment to La Hague or to Sellafield takes typically two or four weeks, respectively. Most transports through Europe are by rail. A special-design railway ferry boat serves transports to the United Kingdom. Both wet or dry casks are employed. Modern casks are designed for high burnups and for oxide fuels. (J.B.)

  15. Manufacturing experience of PHWR and LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, C.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear power contributes ∼ 16% to global electricity. Presently, some 441 nuclear power reactors, with total installed capacity of ∼ 358 GWe, are in operation in 32 countries. Nuclear energy is an inevitable option for meeting the ever-increasing demand of electricity without degrading the environment. For judicious utilization of natural uranium and thorium resources, it would be essential to adapt a closed nuclear fuel cycle in coming years. Natural and enriched uranium oxide fuels are likely to be replaced by mixed uranium plutonium oxide or ThO 2 -based mixed oxide fuels containing 235 U, 239 Pu or 233 U fissile material. The current powder-pellet-route is associated with the problem of radiotoxic dust hazard and should be replaced by dust-free advanced routes like SGMP for remote and automated manufacturing of highly radiotoxic 233 U or Pu-bearing mixed oxide fuels. The combined SGMP-LTS process for fabrication of UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 fuel pellets not only minimizes radiotoxic dust hazard but leads to significant energy saving. The ever-expanding nuclear power programme in India should see massive expansion in zirconium, UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 production in coming years

  16. Operating experience with steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouecke, R.

    1991-01-01

    In contrast to steam generator tube degradation problems that have been widely encountered worldwide, steam generators of the Siemens/KWU design have proven by operating experience that they are very efficient in minimizing tube corrosion or any other SG related problems. The paper will substantiate this statement by addressing the performance characteristics of nearly 20 years of operation experience. Emphasis is put on evaluations comparing the heat transfer capacity of Incoloy 800 with that of Inconel 690 TT. Various tube support designs are discussed with respect to hide-out behaviour. Recent evaluations confirm the superiority of grid type tube support designs compared to tube support plates. Anti vibration bars acc. to Siemens/KWU design allow proper support even of the innermost U-tubes, by which excessive vibration induced tube failures due to fatigue are ruled-out. Steam generators are key components which can heavily effect plant safety and availability. This was recognized by Siemens/KWU at a very early stage of the SG design. A multi level concept was developed and consequently applied, the characteristics of which can be highlighted as follows: - Implementation of specific design features after careful experimental and/or analytical verification; - Material selection based on profound validation tests; - Stringent inspection requirements regarding control of manufacturing; - Deliberate specification and control of water chemistry guidelines; - Close feedback of operational problems to be readily considered in design improvements or remedial actions to be taken. A strict application of this concept has reached a stage which allows the following summarizing statements: - All main design features of the Siemens/KWU SG are in use - basically unchanged - for roughly 20 years; - All of them are verified by excellent operating experience and available for implementation in any replacement or new SG design; - No need for replacement of Siemens/KWU SG is

  17. MTR spent fuel transport and handling experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, Vincent [TRANSNUCLEAIRE (France)

    1999-07-01

    The present paper describes the last MTR transport operations performed by TN in exotic countries, as well as within Europe. Each transport is specific and must be very carefully prepared, because all MTR fuels are generally very specific to each research reactor. Their characteristics (i.e. type, dimensions, irradiation...) have to be precisely identified because, for instance, they are not always well-known due to their period of storage. We will mainly talk about the International Shipments. (author)

  18. Method of operating a direct dme fuel cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of operating a fuel cell system comprising one or more fuel cells with a proton exchange membrane, wherein the membrane is composed of a polymeric material comprising acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI). The method comprises adjusting the operating...

  19. Spent fuel receipt and storage at the Morris Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrom, K.A.; Eger, K.J.

    1978-06-01

    Operating and maintenance activities in an independent spent fuel storage facility are described, and current regulations governing such activities are summarized. This report is based on activities at General Electric's licensed storage facility located near Morris, Illinois, and includes photographs of cask and fuel handling equipment used during routine operations

  20. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO 2 oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO 2 pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs

  1. ATLAS Pixel Detector Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Di Girolamo, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.9% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  2. Gadolinia experience and design for PWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe Siemens Power Corporation's (SPC) current experience with the burnable absorber gadolinia in PWR fuel assemblies, including optimized features of SPC's PWR gadolinia designs, and comparisons with other burnable absorbers. Siemens is the world leader in PWR gadolinia experience. More than 5,900 Siemens PWR gadolinia-bearing fuel assemblies have been irradiated. The use of gadolinia-bearing fuel provides significant flexibility in fuel cycle designs, allows for low radial leakage fuel management and extended operating cycles, and reduces BOC (beginning-of-cycle) soluble boron concentrations. The optimized use of an integral burnable neutron absorber is a design feature which provides improved economic performance for PWR fuel assemblies. This paper includes a comparison between three different types of integral burnable absorbers: gadolinia, Zirconium diboride and erbia. Fuel cycle design studies performed by Siemens have shown that the enrichment requirements for 18-24 month fuel cycles utilizing gadolinia or zirconium diboride integral fuel burnable absorbers can be approximately the same. Although a typical gadolinia residual penalty for a cycle design of this length is as low as 0.02-0.03 wt% U-235, the design flexibility of gadolinia allows for very aggressive low-leakage core loading plans which reduces the enrichment requirements for gadolinia-bearing fuel. SPC has optimized its use of gadolinia in PWR fuel cycles. Typically, low (2-4) weight percent Gd 2 O 3 is used for beginning to middle of cycle reactivity hold down as well as soluble boron concentration holddown at BOC. Higher concentrations of Gd 2 O 3 , such as 6 and 8 wt%, are used to control power peaking in assemblies later in the cycle. SPC has developed core strategies that maximize the use of lower gadolinia concentrations which significantly reduces the gadolinia residual reactivity penalty. This optimization includes minimizing the number of rods with

  3. A Method of Operating a Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of determining the net water drag coefficient (rd) in a fuel cell. By measuring the velocity of the fluid stream at the outlet of the anode, rd can be determined. Real time monitoring and adjustments of the water balance of a fuel cell may be therefore ac...

  4. Operating Experiences with a Small-scale CHP Pilot Plant based on a 35 kWel Hermetic Four Cylinder Stirling Engine for Biomass Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biedermann, F.; Carlsen, Henrik; Schoech, M.

    2003-01-01

    Within the scope of the RD&D project presented a small-scale CHP plant with a hermetic four cylinder Stirling engine for biomass fuels was developed and optimised in cooperation with the Technical University of Denmark, MAWERA Holzfeuerungsanlagen GesmbH, an Austrian biomass furnace and boiler ma...... exchanger of the Stirling engine, of the air preheater and of the entire combustion system. Furthermore, the optimisation of the pneumatic cleaning system to reduce ash deposition in the hot heat exchanger is of great relevance....... manufacturer, and BIOS BIOENERGIESYSTEME GmbH, an Austrian development and engineering company. Based on the technology developed, a pilot plant was designed and erected in Austria. The nominal electric power output of the plant is 35 kWel and the nominal thermal output amounts to approx. 220 kWth. The plant...

  5. Method for operating a combustor in a fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfant, Robert W.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of operating a combustor to heat a fuel processor in a fuel cell system, in which the fuel processor generates a hydrogen-rich stream a portion of which is consumed in a fuel cell stack and a portion of which is discharged from the fuel cell stack and supplied to the combustor, and wherein first and second streams are supplied to the combustor, the first stream being a hydrocarbon fuel stream and the second stream consisting of said hydrogen-rich stream, the method comprising the steps of monitoring the temperature of the fuel processor; regulating the quantity of the first stream to the combustor according to the temperature of the fuel processor; and comparing said quantity of said first stream to a predetermined value or range of predetermined values.

  6. Safeguards operations in the integral fast reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, K.M.; Benedict, R.W.; Brumbach, S.B.; Dickerman, C.E.; Tompot, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently demonstrating the fuel cycle for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), an advanced reactor concept that takes advantage of the properties of metallic fuel and liquid metal cooling to offer significant improvements in reactor safety, operation, fuel-cycle economics, environmental protection, and safeguards. The IFR fuel cycle employs a pyrometallurgical process using molten salts and liquid metals to recover actinides from spent fuel. The safeguards aspects of the fuel cycle demonstration must be approved by the United States Department of Energy, but a further goal of the program is to develop a safeguards system that could gain acceptance from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and International Atomic Energy Agency. This fuel cycle is described with emphasis on aspects that differ from aqueous reprocessing and on its improved safeguardability due to decreased attractiveness and diversion potential of all process streams, including the fuel product

  7. End plug welding of nuclear fuel elements-AFFF experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, R.B.; Singh, S.; Aniruddha Kumar; Amit; Arun Kumar; Panakkal, J.P.; Kamath, H.S.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility is engaged in the fabrication of mixed oxide (U,Pu)O 2 fuel elements of various types of nuclear reactors. Fabrication of fuel elements involves pellet fabrication, stack making, stack loading and end plug welding. The requirement of helium bonding gas inside the fuel elements necessitates the top end plug welding to be carried out with helium as the shielding gas. The severity of the service conditions inside a nuclear reactor imposes strict quality control criteria, which demands for almost defect free welds. The top end plug welding being the last process step in fuel element fabrication, any rejection at this stage would lead to loss of effort prior to this step. Moreover, the job becomes all the more difficult with mixed oxide (MOX) as the entire fabrication work has to be carried out in glove box trains. In the case of weld rejection, accepted pellets are salvaged by cutting the clad tube. This is a difficult task and recovery of pellets is low (requiring scrap recovery operation) and also leads to active metallic waste generation. This paper discusses the experience gained at AFFF, in the past 12 years in the area of end plug welding for different types of MOX fuel elements

  8. Operation experience with elevated ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankova, Katerina; Kysela, Jan; Malac, Miroslav; Petrecky, Igor; Svarc, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The 10 VVER units in the Czech and Slovak Republics are all in very good water chemistry and radiation condition, yet questions have arisen regarding the optimization of cycle chemistry and improved operation in these units. To address these issues, a comprehensive experimental program for different water chemistries of the primary circuit was carried out at the Rez Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, with the goal of judging the influence of various water chemistries on radiation build-up. Four types of water chemistries were compared: standard VVER water chemistry (in common use), direct hydrogen dosing without ammonia, standard VVER water chemistry with elevated ammonia levels, and zinc dosing to standard VVER water chemistry. The test results showed that the types of water chemistry other than the common one have benefits for the operation of the nuclear power plant (NPP) primary circuit. Operation experience with elevated ammonia at NPP Dukovany Units 3 and 4 is presented which validates the experimental results, demonstrating improved corrosion product volume activity. (orig.)

  9. Liquid waste evaporator operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauchamp, A.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) operates the Waste Treatment Centre (WTC) to treat and immobilize some of the low- level radioactive waste (LLRW) streams at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). The WTC at treats low- level radioactive liquid waste by removing the contaminants from the wastewater, concentrating them, and immobilizing them. The fundamental design concept for the WTC is to process the waste streams using forced circulation type liquid waste evaporation (LWE), to solidify the concentrates using thin film evaporator and to discharge the purified effluent into the Ottawa River following verification monitoring. The solidified product drums are stored in existing storage facilities in the CRL. The LWE was installed in the WTC to treat the LLRW. After about four (4) years of design, construction and cold commissioning, the active commissioning of the evaporator process using radioactive waste streams commenced in February 2000. The LWE has overcome problems encountered with previous processing system such as fouling and enabled treatment of historical liquid wastes, which are currently stored in tanks at CRL, and waste from future CRL projects. This paper summarizes some of the operating experience obtained during the last four years of operation. (author)

  10. Operating experiences at the Finnish TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmenhaara, Seppo

    1988-01-01

    The Finnish TRIGA reactor has been in operation since March 1962. There are still 57 original Al-clad fuel elements in the core. So far we have had only two fuel cladding failures in 1981 and 1988. The first one was an Al-clad element and the second one a SS-clad. The low rate of fuel cladding failures has made it possible to use continuously also the Al-clad fuel elements. Although some conventional irradiations of certain type have been repeated successfully tens of times, new and unexpected incidents can still take place. As an example an event of a leaking irradiation capsule is described

  11. Operation control device for a nuclear reactor fuel exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Takashi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a operation control device for a nuclear reactor fuel exchanger with reduced size and weight capable of optionally meeting the complicated and versatile mode of the operation scope. Constitution: The operation range of a fuel exchanger is finely divided so as to attain the state capable of discriminating between operation-allowable range and operation-inhibitive range, which are stored in a memory circuit. Upon operating the fuel exchanger, the position is detected and a divided range data corresponding to the present position is taken out from the memory circuit so as to determine whether the fuel exchanger is to be run or stopped. Use of reduced size and compact IC circuits (calculation circuit, memory circuit, data latch circuit) and input/output interface circuits or the likes contributes to the size reduction of the exchanger control system to enlarge the floor maintenance space. (Moriyama, K.)

  12. Worldwide experience with light water reactor fuel - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasser, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Continued attention to fuel performance has over the years improved fuel reliability and reduced fuel related failures. But further improvements can still be made by increased attention to reactor operating and maintenance methods, as well as to quality control during fuel fabrication. (author)

  13. Results of trial operation of the WWER advanced fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Dragunov, Y.; Mikhalchuk, A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes results from experimental operation of advanced WWER-1000 fuel assemblies (AFA) at five units in Balakovo NPP. Advanced fuel is developed according to the concept of standard WWER-1000 fuel assembly (jacket-free). The new features includes: 1) zirconium guiding channels (alloy E-635 and E-110) and spacer grids (alloy E-110); 2) integrated burnable absorber gadolinium; 3) extended service life of fuel assemblies (FA) and absorber rods (possibility of repair of FA); 4) improved adoption to reactor conditions. Some results of AFA pilot operation of a three year operation are presented and analyses of effectiveness of improvements are made concerning application of zirconium channels and grids; application of integrated burnable absorbers; extension of FA and absorbing rods service life and FA repairability. These new features of WWER-1000 fuel design allow: 1) to reduce the average fuel enrichment to the 3.77% instead of 4.31% in U-235; 2) to reduce the FA axial load in reactor hot state by 40%,; 3) increasing of fuel operation in reactor to the 30000 effective days with possibility to have a 5-year residence time in the reactor. The design of new generation FA for WWER-440 reactors involves few key changes. Fuel inventory in new fuel design is increased due to elongation of fuel stack and reducing the diameter of the central hole. Vibration stability is enhanced as a result of: no-play junction of the fuel rod with the lower grid; change of SG arrangements; strengthening of the lower grid unit; secure of the central tube in the gap. Water-uranium ration is increased. Introduction of all these kinds of modernization in a 5-year fuel cycle reduces fuel component in the energy cost to the 7%

  14. FBFC's gadolinium fuel assembly manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Eynde, M.; Belvegue, P.

    1999-01-01

    The burnable poison used by Framatome is gadolinium oxide integrated in the pellet by blending with UO 2 . This is the integrated poison which provides the largest experience feedback world-wide. Its main advantages are design flexibility and its well-known rod in reactor behaviour. FBFC's manufacturing experience with gadolinium is extensive. The first pellets were produced in 1986, present production averages 10 tons/year and cumulated experience reaches 47 tons. In parallel Framatome acquired gadolinium irradiation experience with more then 2 000 fuel assemblies in 33 reactors in 5 countries. Taking into account the increasing needs, a new gadolinium shop has been implemented in the FBFC Dessel plant. This shop, with a production capacity of 30 tU/yr is to be commissioned in the second quarter of 1999. It implements the most recent technological developments to achieve top product quality, safety and environment protection. (authors)

  15. Fast Reactor Spent Fuel Processing: Experience and Criticality Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chad Pope

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses operational and criticality safety experience associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility which uses a pyrometallurgical process to treat spent fast reactor metallic fuel. The process is conducted in an inert atmosphere hot cell. The process starts with chopping metallic fuel elements into a basket. The basket is lowered into molten salt (LiCl-KCl) along with a steel mandrel. Active metal fission products, transuranic metals and sodium metal in the spent fuel undergo chemical oxidation and form chlorides. Voltage is applied between the basket, which serves as an anode, and the mandrel, which serves as a cathode, causing metallic uranium in the spent fuel to undergo electro-chemical oxidation thereby forming uranium chloride. Simultaneously at the cathode, uranium chloride undergoes electro-chemical reduction and deposits uranium metal onto the mandrel. The uranium metal and accompanying entrained salt are placed in a distillation furnace where the uranium melts forming an ingot and the entrained salt boils and subsequently condenses in a separate crucible. The uranium ingots are placed in long term storage. During the ten year operating history, over one hundred criticality safety evaluations were prepared. All criticality safety related limits and controls for the entire process are contained in a single document which required over thirty revisions to accommodate the process changes. Operational implementation of the limits and controls includes use of a near real-time computerized tracking system. The tracking system uses an Oracle database coupled with numerous software applications. The computerized tracking system includes direct fuel handler interaction with every movement of material. Improvements to this system during the ten year history include introduction of web based operator interaction, tracking of moderator materials and the development of a plethora database queries to assist in day to day

  16. Burnup credit in operations in the British nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, P.R.; Rice, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) is involved in all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle, including the transport, storage, and reprocessing of irradiated oxide fuel. Irradiated fuel is transported from reactor sites to BNFL Sellafield in Cumbria, where it is stored in ponds. In the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP), the design of the plant and the associated processes must ensure safe operation, and often pessimistic assumptions are made about the materials involved. Currently, BNFL assumes that fuel is unirradiated for the purposes of criticality assessment and takes no account of the reduction in reactivity known to occur with fuel irradiation. It is recognized that the unirradiated fuel assumption can impose substantial economic liability because the introduction of burnup arguments have the potential to lead to increased fuel transport payloads, increased capacity in fuel stores, increased plant throughputs, and a reduction in costly neutron poisoning. It is of prime importance that a methodology be established covering fuel identification, burnup quantification, inventory prediction, and reactivity calculation to enable BNFL to convince the regulatory bodies that there is an adequate margin to criticality safety in assessments. It is our goal to establish a route that will show that having taken all error margins into account, the operations are adequately safe, allowing for the irradiation of the fuel

  17. Operating experience of Fugen-HWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, F.

    1991-01-01

    Fugen is a 165 MWe prototype heavy water reactor which mainly uses plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has taken responsibility for the advanced thermal reactor (ATR) project, with its name 'FUGEN' taken from the Buddhist God of Mercy. The project started in October 1967, to develop and establish the technology for this new type of reactor and to clarify MOX fuel performance in the reactor. Site construction began in December 1970 at Tsuruga and the plant commenced commercial operation on March 20, 1979. Since then, Fugen has been operated successfully for more than twelve years. The plant performance and reliability of this type of reactor has been demonstrated through the operation. All these operational experiences have contributed to the establishment of the ATR technology

  18. Operational requirements of spherical HTR fuel elements and their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roellig, K.; Theymann, W.

    1985-01-01

    The German development of spherical fuel elements with coated fuel particles led to a product design which fulfils the operational requirements for all HTR applications with mean gas exit temperatures from 700 deg C (electricity and steam generation) up to 950 deg C (supply of nuclear process heat). In spite of this relatively wide span for a parameter with strong impact on fuel element behaviour, almost identical fuel specifications can be used for the different reactor purposes. For pebble bed reactors with relatively low gas exit temperatures of 700 deg C, the ample design margins of the fuel elements offer the possibility to enlarge the scope of their in-service duties and, simultaneously, to improve fuel cycle economics. This is demonstrated for the HTR-500, an electricity and steam generating 500 MWel eq plant presently proposed as follow-up project to the THTR-300. Due to the low operating temperatures of the HTR-500 core, the fuel can be concentrated in about 70% of the pebbles of the core thus saving fuel cycle costs. Under all design accident conditions fuel temperatures are maintained below 1250 deg C. This allows a significant reduction in the engineered activity barriers outside the primary circuit, in particular for the loss of coolant accident. Furthermore, access to major primary circuit components and the reuse of the fuel elements after any design accident are possible. (author)

  19. Wide Operating Voltage Range Fuel Cell Battery Charger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Sen, Gokhan

    2014-01-01

    DC-DC converters for fuel cell applications require wide voltage range operation due to the unique fuel cell characteristic curve. Primary parallel isolated boost converter (PPIBC) is a boost derived topology for low voltage high current applications reaching an efficiency figure up to 98.2 %. Th...

  20. Fuel element failure detection experiments, evaluation of the experiments at KNK II/1 (Intermediate Report)

    CERN Document Server

    Bruetsch, D

    1983-01-01

    In the frame of the fuel element failure detection experiments at KNK II with its first core the measurement devices of INTERATOM were taken into operation in August 1981 and were in operation almost continuously. Since the start-up until the end of the first KNK II core operation plugs with different fuel test areas were inserted in order to test the efficiency of the different measuring devices. The experimental results determined during this test phase and the gained experiences are described in this report and valuated. All three measuring techniques (Xenon adsorption line XAS, gas-chromatograph GC and precipitator PIT) could fulfil the expectations concerning their susceptibility. For XAS and GC the nuclide specific sensitivities as determined during the preliminary tests could be confirmed. For PIT the influences of different parameters on the signal yield could be determined. The sensitivity of the device could not be measured due to a missing reference measuring point.

  1. Main operation results of the 3-rd generation nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeev, V.; Saprykin, V.; Gagarinsky, A.

    2013-01-01

    On the Kola NPP, Unit 4 trial operation of the 3-rd generation fuel continues. This fuel have a number of design features, providing the best operational characteristics. Increasing of efficiency of nuclear fuel usage will be achieved by reduction of the parasitic capture of thermal neutrons in constructional materials (weight of zirconium is reduced), optimization of uranium water relation (increase in fuel elements step), increasing of uranium loading (usage of fuel pallets with increased diameter and without central hole in them). The basic characteristics of the core with fuel of the 3rd generation are provided in work [3]. In the present report, being addition to the report [4], gave new results of operation and the short analysis of the obtained data is made. Experimental characteristics of WWER-440 reactor core with fuel assemblies of the 2nd (FA-2) and 3rd (FA-3) generation of the enrichment increased to 4.87% are submitted. Some questions of operation of FA-2 and FA-3 are discussed: assessment of influence of cover absence on indications of thermocouples at joint operation of FA-2 and FA-3, features and methods of core design. (authors)

  2. 14 CFR 135.244 - Operating experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operating experience. 135.244 Section 135... Crewmember Requirements § 135.244 Operating experience. (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may... that make and basic model aircraft and in that crewmember position, the following operating experience...

  3. Application-oriented discussion of the operating and load following behavior of LWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, R. von; Klinger, W.

    1983-01-01

    The evaluation of experience gained in operation on fuel elements is often affected by irregularities in operation and variations in load change behaviour owing to certain systems. A number of facts and aspects shall therefore be compiled in order to facilitate the use of experience gained. To this end, we will confine ourselves to those fuel element types for LWR-type reactors that will with KWU and on a worldwide level prevail even after the year 2000; fuel elements for PWR-type reactors in 14x14 up to 17x17/18x18 assembly and fuel elements for BWR-type reactors in 8x8/9x9 assembly. Right now statistically relevant operational experience exists for those types of fuel in front of the diagonal (abbreviated PWR and BWR 8x8). Our evaluations refer to all of KWU's experience and the information we were able to gather an experience gained with these fuel element types since 1979 throughout the world. (orig.) [de

  4. Operation and maintenance of spent fuel storage and transportation casks/containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Member States have a growing need for casks for spent fuel storage and transportation. A variety of casks has been developed and is in use at an increasing number of sites. This has resulted in an accumulation of experience that will provide valuable information for other projects in spent fuel management. This publication provides a comprehensive review of information on the cask operation and maintenance associated with spent fuel storage. It draws upon generic knowledge from industrial experience and applications and is intended to serve as a basis for better planning and implementation in future projects

  5. TSTA Piping and Flame Arrestor Operating Experience Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; Willms, R. Scott

    2014-10-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium handling technology and experiment research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility operated from 1984 to 2001, running a prototype fusion fuel processing loop with ~100 grams of tritium as well as small experiments. There have been several operating experience reports written on this facility’s operation and maintenance experience. This paper describes analysis of two additional components from TSTA, small diameter gas piping that handled small amounts of tritium in a nitrogen carrier gas, and the flame arrestor used in this piping system. The operating experiences and the component failure rates for these components are discussed in this paper. Comparison data from other applications are also presented.

  6. Niobia-doped UO2 fuel manufacturing experience at British nuclear fuels Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.; Wood, G.A.; Perkins, C.P.

    1998-01-01

    BNFL Fuel Division has made niobia doped fuel for over twenty years in its Springfields Research and Development facilities. This paper reviews this experience together with feedback from successful in-reactor and laboratory tests. Recent experience in qualifying and manufacturing niobia doped fuel pellets for a European PWR will be described. (author)

  7. Cost estimates of operating onsite spent fuel pools after final reactor shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rod, S.R.

    1991-08-01

    This report presents estimates of the annual costs of operating spent fuel pools at nuclear power stations after the final shutdown of one or more onsite reactors. Its purpose is to provide basic spent fuel storage cost information for use in evaluating DOE's reference nuclear waste management system, as well as alternate systems. The basic model of an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) used in this study was based on General Electric Corporation's Morris Operation and was modified to reflect mean storage capabilities at an unspecified, or ''generic,'' US reactor site. Cost data for the model came from several sources, including both operating and shutdown nuclear power stations and existing ISFSIs. Duke Power Company has estimated ISFSI costs based on existing spent fuel storage costs at its nuclear power stations. Similarly, nuclear material handling facilities such as the Morris Operation, the West Valley Demonstration Project, and the retired Humbolt Bay nuclear power station have compiled spent fuel storage cost data based on years of operating experience. Consideration was given to the following factors that would cause operating costs to vary among pools: (1) The number of spent fuel pools at a given reactor site; (2) the number of operating and shutdown reactors onsite; (3) geographic location; and (4) pool storage capacity. 10 ref., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation

  9. Compressed natural gas fueled vehicles: The Houston experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the experience of the City of Houston in defining the compressed natural gas fueled vehicle research scope and issues. It details the ways in which the project met initial expectations, and how the project scope, focus, and duration were adjusted in response to unanticipated results. It provides examples of real world successes and failures in efforts to commercialize basic research in adapting a proven technology (natural gas) to a noncommercially proven application (vehicles). Phase one of the demonstration study investigates, develops, documents, and disseminates information regarding the economic, operational, and environmental implications of utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG) in various truck fueling applications. The four (4) truck classes investigated are light duty gasoline trucks, medium duty gasoline trucks, medium duty diesel trucks and heavy duty diesel trucks. The project researches aftermarket CNG conversions for the first three vehicle classes and original equipment manufactured (OEM) CNG vehicles for light duty gasoline and heavy duty diesel classes. In phase two of the demonstration project, critical issues are identified and assessed with respect to implementing use of CNG fueled vehicles in a large vehicle fleet. These issues include defining changes in local, state, and industry CNG fueled vehicle related codes and standards; addressing vehicle fuel storage limitations; using standardized vehicle emission testing procedures and results; and resolving CNG refueling infrastructure implementation issues and related cost factors. The report identifies which CNG vehicle fueling options were tried and failed and which were tried and succeeded, with and without modifications. The conclusions include a caution regarding overly optimistic assessments of CNG vehicle technology at the initiation of the project.

  10. Falling fuel inventory levels represent growing operational risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, S. [PA Consulting Group, Washington, DC (United States)

    2002-04-01

    Many asset owners have stripped the inventory cupboard bare, exposing themselves and the public, to significant cost and operating risks. The miscalculation is due to a combination of ill-considered cost cutting efforts and a reliance on historical supply patterns that may have little relevance to the future. Generators maintain fuel stockpiles to buffer routine surges and shortfalls in fuel deliveries, and to provide for emergency fuel if normal supplies are interrupted. Coal and some oil-fired plants maintain fuel reserves for both reasons. Gas-fired plants keep oil on-hand for emergencies. The philosophy that smaller is better for fuel inventories needs to be reconsidered. On a common-sense basis, the radical cutback - or in the case of gas, actual elimination - of fuel inventories seems difficult to justify. For 15 years the generation business has been skipping on the security of adequate fuel inventories. At gas-fired stations with no backup fuel, it is as though there is no guard at the gate. The industry needs to re-evaluate its fuel planning before its leaders end up as star attractions at congressional hearings about why the lights went out. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Visual in-pile fuel disruption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, G.L.; Ostensen, R.W.; Young, M.F.

    1978-01-01

    In a loss-of-flow (LOF) accident in an LMFBR, the mode of disruption of fuel may determine the probability of a subsequent energetic excursion. To investigate these phenomena, in-pile disruption of fission-heated irradiated fuel pellets was recorded by high speed cinematography. Instead of fuel frothing or dust-cloud breakup (as used in the SAS code) massive and very rapid fuel swelling, not predicted by analytical models, occurred. These tests support massive fuel swelling as the initial mode of fuel disruption in a LOF accident. (author)

  12. Nevada commercial spent nuclear fuel transportation experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an historic overview of commercial reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipments that have occurred in the state of Nevada, and to review the accident and incident experience for this type of shipments. Results show that between 1964 and 1990, 309 truck shipments covering approximately 40,000 miles moved through Nevada; this level of activity places Nevada tenth among the states in the number of truck shipments of SNF. For the same period, 15 rail shipments moving through the State covered approximately 6,500 miles, making Nevada 20th among the states in terms of number of rail shipments. None of these shipments had an accident or an incident associated with them. Because the data for Nevada are so limited, national data on SNF transportation and the safety of truck and rail transportation in general were also assessed.

  13. Nevada commercial spent nuclear fuel transportation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an historic overview of commercial reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipments that have occurred in the state of Nevada, and to review the accident and incident experience for this type of shipments. Results show that between 1964 and 1990, 309 truck shipments covering approximately 40,000 miles moved through Nevada; this level of activity places Nevada tenth among the states in the number of truck shipments of SNF. For the same period, 15 rail shipments moving through the State covered approximately 6,500 miles, making Nevada 20th among the states in terms of number of rail shipments. None of these shipments had an accident or an incident associated with them. Because the data for Nevada are so limited, national data on SNF transportation and the safety of truck and rail transportation in general were also assessed

  14. Recent U.S. reactor operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stello, V. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative assessment of U.S. and foreign reactor operating experience is provided. Recent operating occurrences having potentially significant safety impacts on power operation are described. An evaluation of the seriousness of each of these issues and the plans for resolution is discussed. A quantitative report on U.S. reactor operational experience is included. The details of the NRC program for evaluating and applying operating reactor experience in the regulatory process is discussed. A review is made of the adequacy of operating reactor safety and environmental margins based on actual operating experience. The Regulatory response philosophy to operating reactor experiences is detailed. This discussion indicates the NRC emphasis on the importance of a balanced action plan to provide for the protection of public safety in the national interest

  15. On-site scanning and operation equipment for fuel assemblies and fuel pencils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoine, O.; Leseur, A.

    1984-10-01

    Presentation of equipments utilizable in cooling pools and which meet the two following objectives: - ensure on-site visual and measured control allowing fast evaluation of the mechanical behaviour of the fuel assemblies and fuel pencils, - extract pencils from assemblies designed for this purpose, so they can be transfered to hot cells where their mechanical, chemical and physical characteristics may be observed. After a review of the various devices used in France for this end (in service or under construction), design, operation and results are presented for three of them (fuel assemblies and fuel pencils control apparatus and removable pencil handling equipment) [fr

  16. Introduction of HTR-PM Operation and Fuel Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fucheng; Luo Yong; Gao Qiang

    2014-01-01

    There is a big difference between High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Pebble-modules Demonstration Project(HTR-PM) and PWR in operation mode. HTR-PM is a continually refuelled reactor, and the operation and fuel management of it, which affect each other, are inseparable. Therefore, the analysis of HTR-PM fuel management needs to be carried out “in real time”. HTR-PM operation and fuel management system is developed for on-power refuelling mode of HTR-PM. The system, which calculates the core neutron flux and power distribution, taking high-temperature reactor physics analysis software-VSOP as a basic tool, can track and predict the core state online, and it has the ability to restructure core power distribution online, making use of ex-core detectors to correct and check tracking calculation. Based on the ability to track and predict, it can compute the core parameters to provide support for the operation of the reactor. It can also predict the operation parameters of the reactor to provide reference information for the fuel management.The contents of this paper include the development purposes, architecture, the main function modules, running process, and the idea of how to use the system to carry out HTR-PM fuel management. (author)

  17. Fuel Consumption and Emissions from Airport Taxi Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Developed a method to calculate fuel consumption and emissions of phases of taxi operations. Results at DFW showed that up to 18% of fuel can be saved by eliminating stop-and-go situations. Developed an energy efficient and environmentally friendly surface concept: Spot and Runway Departure Advisory (SARDA) tool. The SARDA tool has been identified as a potential candidate for a technology transfer to the FAA.

  18. Experiments of progressive replacement in Cesar at operation temperature. Uranium-plutonium fuels. Study performed within the frame of the CEA-EURATOM - No. 002 64 9 TRUF contract - 'Plutonium recycling'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosser, Roland; Cuny, Gerard; Hoffmann, Alain; Langlet, Gerard; Laponche, Bernard; Morier, Francis; Penet, Francois; Charbonneau, Serge

    1969-08-01

    Experiments of progressive replacement (or substitution) of uranium-plutonium alloy fuels are part of a general program of experimental studies which are aimed at testing the methods used by the CEA to calculate the evolution of nuclear power reactors (calculation of spectrum in plutonium-containing fuels and validity of data used in these calculations, calculation of cross sections). Such progressive replacements have been performed in Aquilon (with heavy water as moderator) and measurements have been performed by oscillation in Marius and Cesar (graphite moderator). Herein reported experiments have been performed at 20, 100 and 200 C during a first campaign in 1966, and at 300, 400 and 450 C during a second campaign in 1968. Measurements are interpreted by means of the Coregraf 2 code. The report presents experimental conditions in Cesar, the measurement principle and the interpretation method (substitution experiments, enriched uranium calibration, interpretation steps, and temperature coefficient measurement), the obtained results and their discussion [fr

  19. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells physical principles of materials and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Eikerling, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a systematic and profound account of scientific challenges in fuel cell research. The introductory chapters bring readers up to date on the urgency and implications of the global energy challenge, the prospects of electrochemical energy conversion technologies, and the thermodynamic and electrochemical principles underlying the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The book then presents the scientific challenges in fuel cell research as a systematic account of distinct components, length scales, physicochemical processes, and scientific disciplines. The main part of t

  20. Nuclear units operating improvement by using operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Bilegan, I.C.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents how the information experience can be used to improve the operation of nuclear units. This areas include the following items: conservative decision making; supervisory oversight; teamwork; control room distraction; communications; expectations and standards; operator training and fundamental knowledge, procedure quality and adherence; plant status awareness. For each of these topics, the information illustrate which are the principles, the lessons learned from operating experience and the most appropriate exemplifying documents. (authors)

  1. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring

  2. Fuel performance-experience to date and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proebstle, R.A.; Klepfer, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    The experience in the USA to date, as reported in the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission data, conforms a very favorable cost trend for nuclear fuel costs relative to fossil fuel costs. The nuclear fuel cost promose relative to other fuels looks even better in future. Uranium supply surplus and advances in enrichment technology suggest that this trend should continue. Threats to the economic potential for nuclear fuel costs include unexpected problems in actural versus projected core and fuel technical performance. The New designs for BWR's nuclear fuel are extended to 38,000 MWd/MTU and the fuel rod reliabilities of 0.999994 are achievable. This reliability is equivalent to less than 3 fuel rod failures over the 40 year life of a reactor. (Liu)

  3. MOX use in PWRs. EDF operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, Jean-Luc; Debes, Michel

    2011-01-01

    From the origin, EDF back-end fuel cycle strategy has focused on 'closing the fuel cycle', in other words integrating fuel reprocessing, with vitrification of high level waste concentrated within small volumes, and the recycling of valuable materials. The implementation of this policy was marked in 1987 by the first loading of sixteen MOX. By December 2010, 20 reactors have been loaded with 1750 tHM of MOX. EDF current strategy is to match the reprocessing program with MOX manufacturing capacity to limit the quantity of separated plutonium. This is routinely called the 'flow ad-equation' strategy. Currently, the MOX Parity core management achieves balance of MOX and UOX performance with a significant increase of the MOX discharge burn-up. Globally, the behavior under irradiation of MOX fuel assemblies has been satisfactory. So far, from the beginning of MOX use in EDF PWRs, only 6 MOX FAs with rod leakage have been identified, which gives a very satisfactory level of reliability. The industrial maturity of MOX fuel, with increased performances, allows the improvement of nuclear KWh competitiveness and of the plant operation performance, while maintaining in operation the same safety level, without significant impact on environment and radiological protection. (author)

  4. System for controlling the operating temperature of a fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabis, Thomas R.; Makiel, Joseph M.; Veyo, Stephen E.

    2006-06-06

    A method and system are provided for improved control of the operating temperature of a fuel cell (32) utilizing an improved temperature control system (30) that varies the flow rate of inlet air entering the fuel cell (32) in response to changes in the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32). Consistent with the invention an improved temperature control system (30) is provided that includes a controller (37) that receives an indication of the temperature of the inlet air from a temperature sensor (39) and varies the heat output by at least one heat source (34, 36) to maintain the temperature of the inlet air at a set-point T.sub.inset. The controller (37) also receives an indication of the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32) and varies the flow output by an adjustable air mover (33), within a predetermined range around a set-point F.sub.set, in order to maintain the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32) at a set-point T.sub.opset.

  5. FFTF fuel pin design procedure verification for transient operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baars, R.E.

    1975-05-01

    The FFTF design procedures for evaluating fuel pin transient performance are briefly reviewed, and data where available are compared with design procedure predictions. Specifically, burst conditions derived from Fuel Cladding Transient Tester (FCTT) tests and from ANL loss-of-flow tests are compared with burst pressures computed using the design procedure upon which the cladding integrity limit was based. Failure times are predicted using the design procedure for evaluation of rapid reactivity insertion accidents, for five unterminated TREAT experiments in which well characterized fuel failures were deliberately incurred. (U.S.)

  6. TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

    2008-10-01

    This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

  7. The wonderland of operating the ALICE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustinus, A.; Chochula, P.; Jirden, L.; Lechman, M.; Rosinsky, P.; Pinazza, O.; Cataldo, G. De; Kurepin, A.; Moreno, A.

    2012-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. Composed of 18 sub-detectors each with numerous subsystems that need to be controlled and operated in a safe and efficient way. The Detector Control System (DCS) is the key to this and has been used by detector experts with success during the commissioning of the individual detectors. During the transition from commissioning to operation, more and more tasks were transferred from detector experts to central operators. By the end of the 2010 data-taking campaign, the ALICE experiment was run by a small crew of central operators, with only a single controls operator. The transition from expert to non-expert operation constituted a real challenge in terms of tools, documentation and training. A relatively high turnover and diversity in the operator crew that is specific to the high energy physics experiment environment (as opposed to the more stable operation crews for accelerators) made this challenge even bigger. This paper describes the original architectural choices that were made and the key components that enabled the DCS to come to an homogeneous control system that would allow for efficient centralized operation. Challenges and specific constraints that apply to the operation of a large complex experiment are described. Emphasis will be put on the tools and procedures that were implemented to allow the transition from local detector expert operation during commissioning and early operation, to efficient centralized operation by a small operator crew not necessarily consisting of experts. (authors)

  8. Fuel conditioning facility electrorefiner cadmium vapor trap operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    Processing sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West involves an electrometallurgical process employing a molten LiCl-KCl salt covering a pool of molten cadmium. Previous research has shown that the cadmium dissolves in the salt as a gas, diffuses through the salt layer and vaporizes at the salt surface. This cadmium vapor condenses on cool surfaces, causing equipment operation and handling problems. Using a cadmium vapor trap to condense the cadmium vapors and reflux them back to the electrorefiner has mitigated equipment problems and improved electrorefiner operations

  9. Design improvements, construction and operating experience with BWRs in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchigasaki, G.; Yokomi, M.; Sasaki, M.; Aoki, R.; Hashimoto, H.

    1983-01-01

    (1) The first domestic-made 1100-MW(e) BWR in Japan commenced commercial operation in April 1982. The unit is the leading one of the subsequent three in Fukushima Daini nuclear power station owned by the Tokyo Electric Power Company Inc. (Tepco). Based on the accumulated construction and operation experience of 500-MW(e) and 800-MW(e) class BWRs, improvements in various aspects during both the design and construction stages were introduced in core and fuel design with advanced gadolinia distribution, reactor feedwater treatment technology for crud reduction, a radwaste island, control and instrumentation to cope with the lessons learned through Three Mile Island assessment etc. (2) Based on many operating experiences with BWRs, an improved BWR core, which has easier operability and higher load factor than the conventional core, has been developed. The characteristic of the improved core is ''axially two-zoned uranium enrichment distribution''; the enrichment of the upper part of the fuel is slightly higher than that of the lower part. Through the improved core it became possible to optimize the axial power flattening and core reactivity control separately by axial enrichment distribution and burnable poison content. The improved fuels were loaded into operating BWRs and successfully proved the performance by this experience. (3) To shorten annual outage time, to reduce radiation exposure, to save manpower, and to achieve high reliability and safety of inspection operation, the remote automatic service and inspection equipment were developed in Japan. This paper presents the concept, distinctive features, and actual operation experience of the automatic refuelling machine, control-rod drive (CRD) remote-handling machine, improved main steam line isolation plug, and the automated ultrasonic inspection system with a computerized data processing unit, which have been developed by Hitachi, Ltd. with excellent results. (author)

  10. Reactor operator screening test experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, W.J.; Penkala, J.L.; Witzig, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    When it became apparent to Duquesne Light Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that the throughput of their candidate selection-Phase I training-reactor operator certification sequence was something short of acceptable, the utility decided to ask consultants to make recommendations with respect to candidate selection procedures. The recommendation implemented was to create a Nuclear Training Test that would predict the success of a candidate in completing Phase I training and subsequently qualify for reactor operator certification. The mechanics involved in developing and calibrating the Nuclear Training Test are described. An arbitration decision that resulted when a number of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers union employees filed a grievance alleging that the selection examination was unfair, invalid, not job related, inappropriate, and discriminatorily evaluated is also discussed. The arbitration decision favored the use of the Nuclear Training Test

  11. Neutronics and Fuel Performance Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Fuel under Normal Operation Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Wu; Piyush Sabharwall; Jason Hales

    2014-07-01

    This report details the analysis of neutronics and fuel performance analysis for enhanced accident tolerance fuel, with Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent and INL’s fuel performance code BISON, respectively. The purpose is to evaluate two of the most promising candidate materials, FeCrAl and Silicon Carbide (SiC), as the fuel cladding under normal operating conditions. Substantial neutron penalty is identified when FeCrAl is used as monolithic cladding for current oxide fuel. From the reactor physics standpoint, application of the FeCrAl alloy as coating layer on surface of zircaloy cladding is possible without increasing fuel enrichment. Meanwhile, SiC brings extra reactivity and the neutron penalty is of no concern. Application of either FeCrAl or SiC could be favorable from the fuel performance standpoint. Detailed comparison between monolithic cladding and hybrid cladding (cladding + coating) is discussed. Hybrid cladding is more practical based on the economics evaluation during the transition from current UO2/zircaloy to Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) system. However, a few issues remain to be resolved, such as the creep behavior of FeCrAl, coating spallation, inter diffusion with zirconium, etc. For SiC, its high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, low thermal neutron absorption cross section, irradiation stability (minimal swelling) make it an excellent candidate materials for future nuclear fuel/cladding system.

  12. Mox fuel experience: present status and future improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanpain, P.; Chiarelli, G.

    2001-01-01

    Up to December 2000, more than 1700 MOX fuel assemblies have been delivered by Framatome ANP/Fragema to 20 French, 2 Belgian and 3 German PWRs. More than 1000 MOX fuel assemblies have been delivered by Framatome ANP GmbH (formerly Siemens) to 11 German PWRs and BWRs and to 3 Swiss PWRs. Operating MOX fuel up to discharge burnups of about 45,000 MWd/tM is done without any penalty on core operating conditions and fuel reliability. Performance data for fuel and materials have been obtained from an outstanding surveillance program. The examinations have concluded that there have been no significant differences in MOX fuel assembly characteristics relative to UO 2 fuel. The data from these examinations, combined with a comprehensive out-of-core and in-core analytical test program on the current fuel products, are being used to confirm and upgrade the design models necessary for the continuing improvement of the MOX product. As MOX fuel has reached a sufficient maturity level, the short term step is the achievement of the parity between UO 2 and MOX fuels in the EdF French reactors. This involves a single operating scheme for both fuels with an annual quarter core reload type and an assembly discharge burnup goal of 52,000 MWd/tM. That ''MOX parity'' product will use the AFA-3G assembly structure which will increase the fuel rod design margins with regards to the end-of-life internal pressure criteria. But the fuel development objective is not limited to the parity between the current MOX and UO 2 products: that parity must remain guaranteed and the MOX fuel managements must evolve in the same way as the UO 2 ones. The goal of the MOX product development program underway in France is the demonstration over the next ten years of a fuel capable of reaching assembly burnups of 70,000 MWd/tM. (author)

  13. The Wonderland of Operating the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Augustinus, A; Pinazza, O; Rosinský, P; Lechman, M; Jirdén, L; Chochula, P

    2011-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. Composed of 18 sub-detectors each with numerous subsystems that need to be controlled and operated in a safe and efficient way. The Detector Control System (DCS) is the key to this and has been used by detector experts with success during the commissioning of the individual detectors. During the transition from commissioning to operation, more and more tasks were transferred from detector experts to central operators. By the end of the 2010 datataking campaign, the ALICE experiment was run by a small crew of central operators, with only a single controls operator. The transition from expert to non-expert operation constituted a real challenge in terms of tools, documentation and training. A relatively high turnover and diversity in the operator crew that is specific to the HEP experiment environment (as opposed to the more stable operation crews for accelerators) made this challenge even bigger. Thi...

  14. Feasibility of performing criticality experiments with spent LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Considering fuel operating histories, i.e., burnup, in criticality analyses and control involves two distinctly different issues. One of these issues is concerned with the design and fabrication of fuel shipping and storage systems. The other issue is concerned with the verification of actual operating practices in the field. Both design and verification activities would benefit from physical measurement data as opposed to relying on administrative controls and calculations; however, it is the authors intention to address only the feasibility of obtaining experimental spent fuel criticality data in support of the design effort. The author discusses the background, obstacles, feasibility conclusions reached when applying burnup concepts to spent fuels

  15. Increasing Fuel Efficiency of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems with Feedforward Control of the Operating Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngseung Na

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the R&D on fuel cells for portable applications concentrates on increasing efficiencies and energy densities to compete with other energy storage devices, especially batteries. To improve the efficiency of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC systems, several modifications to system layouts and operating strategies are considered in this paper, rather than modifications to the fuel cell itself. Two modified DMFC systems are presented, one with an additional inline mixer and a further modification of it with a separate tank to recover condensed water. The set point for methanol concentration control in the solution is determined by fuel efficiency and varies with the current and other process variables. Feedforward concentration control enables variable concentration for dynamic loads. Simulation results were validated experimentally with fuel cell systems.

  16. Material Control and Accountability Experience at the Fuel Conditioning Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D.; Fredrickson, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: 1) it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security, and 2) it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and materials are within control limits. Material Control and Accountability is also a Department of Energy (DOE) requirement (DOE Order 474.1). The FCF employs a computer based Mass Tracking (MTG) System to collect, store, retrieve, and process data on all operations that directly affect the flow of materials through the FCF. The MTG System is important for the operations of the FCF because it supports activities such as material control and accountability, criticality safety, and process modeling. To conduct material control and accountability checks and to monitor process performance, mass balances are routinely performed around the process equipment. The equipment used in FCF for pyro-processing consists of two mechanical choppers and two electro-refiners (the Mark-IV with the accompanying element chopper and Mark-V with the accompanying blanket chopper for processing driver fuel and blanket, respectively), and a cathode processor (used for processing both driver fuel and blanket) and casting furnace (mostly used for processing driver fuel). Performing mass balances requires the measurement of the masses and compositions of several process streams and equipment inventories. The masses of process streams are obtained via in-cell balances (i.e., load cells) that weigh containers entering and leaving the process equipment. Samples taken at key locations are analyzed to determine the composition of process streams and equipment inventories. In cases where equipment or containers cannot be

  17. US remote monitoring operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupree, S.A.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Under international partnerships and bilateral agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, other national laboratories, and international partner organizations have emplaced remote monitoring systems in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world for the purpose of conducting field trials of remote monitoring. The purpose of the present report is to review the results from these field trials and draw general conclusions regarding the trials. Many thousands of hours of sensor and system operation have been logged, and data have been retrieved from many locations. In virtually all cases the system components have functioned as intended and data have been successfully collected and transmitted for review. Comparisons between front-end-triggered video and time-lapse video have shown that the triggered record has captured all relevant monitored operations at the various nuclear facilities included in the field trials. We believe the utility and functional reliability of remote monitoring for international safeguards has been shown. However, it should be kept in mind that openness and transparency, including some form of short-notice inspections, are likely to be prerequisites to the safeguards implementation of remote monitoring in any State

  18. Methods for continuous direct carbon fuel cell operation with a circulating electrolyte slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harjes, Daniel I.; Dineen, Jr., D. Andrew; Guo, Liang; Calo, Joseph M.; Bloomfield, Valerie J.

    2017-02-07

    The present invention relates to methods and systems related to fuel cells, and in particular, to direct carbon fuel cells. The methods and systems relate to cleaning and removal of components utilized and produced during operation of the fuel cell, regeneration of components utilized during operation of the fuel cell, and generating power using the fuel cell.

  19. A Mobile Robot for Emergency Operation of Fuel Exchange Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yongchil; Lee, Sunguk; Kim, Changhoi; Shin, Hochul; Jung, Seungho; Choi, Changhwan

    2007-01-01

    A Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) uses a heavy water as the coolant and moderator because it does not attenuate the neutron inside the reactor, which makes it possible to use natural uranium for nuclear fuels. However, since the uranium ratio is too low within the natural uranium, the reactor should be refueled everyday while the reactor is working. For that purpose, there is a fuel exchange machine. However as the time passes by, the durability and reliability become a problem. While the fuel handling machine exchanges the reactor fuel, it can be stuck to the pressure tube attached in the Calandra. Although this kind of situation is rarely happen, it can make the reactor be shutdown for normalizing the operation. Since the refueling is performed while the reactor is working, the radiation level is extremely high and the machine can be located at a high position up to nine meters from the floor, that is, the human worker can not approach the machine, so the fuel handling machine should be released remotely. To cope with this situation, the fuel handling machine has a manual drive mechanism at the rear side of it as shown in the circled images. If the worker can handle these manual drive mechanisms, the fuel handling machine can be released form the pressure tube. The KAERI had developed a long-reach manipulator system with a telescophic mast mechanism which can be deployed in the basement of the reactor room and manipulate the manual lever of the fuel exchange machine. Since the manipulator is located in the basement, there are several problems for its application such that the plug hole should be removed before the operation and the vibration of the mast mechanism make it difficult to locate the end effecter of the manipulator

  20. High pressure anode operation of direct methanol fuel cells for carbon dioxide management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    Experiments with independent pressurization of the direct methanol fuel cell anode and cathode allow for the observation of DMFC operation with carbon dioxide gas formation suppressed. Results indicate that the limiting current density is strongly related to the applied pressure, and, therefore, to the presence of CO 2 in the liquid phase. An additional experiment where CO 2 is allowed to accumulate in recycled anode fuel solution over a period of time and is then stripped from solution using nitrogen gas indicates that the presence of CO 2 in anode fuel solution at any pressure contributes to significant decreases in power and current density. Because CO 2 bubbles are ubiquitous in direct methanol fuel cells, this finding is key to the optimization of these systems.

  1. Experience in producing LEU fuel elements for the RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Soentono, S.

    1991-01-01

    To achieve a self-reliance in the operation of the 30 MW Multipurpose Research Reactor at Serpong (the RSG-GAS), a fuel element production facility has been constructed nearby. The main task of the facility is to produce MTR type fuel and control elements containing U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion LEU fuel for the RSG-GAS. The hot commissioning activity has started in early 1988 after completion of the cold commissioning using depleted uranium in 1987, marking the beginning of the real production activity. This paper briefly describes the main features of the fuel production facility, the production experience gained so far, and its current production activity. (orig.)

  2. Fuel centerline temperature measurement experiment in JMTR, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Ando, Hiroei; Komukai, Bunsaku; Niimi, Motoji

    1982-03-01

    The first experiment for the fuel centerline temperature experiment using the water loop facility OWL-1 in JMTR have been already irradiated, and the second is to be irradiated from the end of September in 1982. For the second, we made a preliminary experiment using the JMTR critical facility (JMTRC), in order to estimate the heat generation of the second experiment (the linear heat rate of the fuel rods) in JMTR. By this preliminary experiment, we obtained the heat generation ratio of each fuel rod, the axial distribution of the thermal neutron flux and the axial peaking factors. Further, we ascertained that the heat generation ratio of each fuel rod is obtained with sufficient accuracy from the self-powered neutron detector (SPND) output (i.e. relative thermal neutron flux) arranged at three points horizontally by approximating the horizontal distribution of the thermal neutron flux at the fuel position in OWL-1 to the simple plane. (author)

  3. AREVA 10x10 BWR fuel experience feedback and on going upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, Hans Joachim; Rentmeister, Thomas; Garner, Norman; Tandy, Jay; Mollard, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Established with engineering and manufacturing operations in the US and Europe, AREVA NP has been and is supplying nuclear fuel assemblies and associated core components to boiling water reactors worldwide, representing today more than 63 000 fuel assemblies. The evolution of BWR fuel rod arrays from early 6x6 designs to the 10x10 designs first introduced in the mid 1990's yielded significant improvements in thermal mechanical operating limits, critical power level, cold shutdown margin, discharge burnup, as well as other key operational capabilities. Since first delivered in 1992, ATRIUM T M 1 0 fuel assemblies have now been supplied to a total of 32 BWR plants in the US, Europe, and Asia resulting in an operating experience over 20 000 fuel assemblies. This article presents in detail the operational experience consolidated by these more than 20 000 ATRIUM T M 1 0 BWR assemblies already supplied to utilities. Within the different 10x10 fuel assemblies available, the Fuel Assembly design is chosen and tailored to the operating strategies of each reactor. Among them, the latest versions of ATRIUM T M a re ATRIUM T M 1 0XP and ATRIUM T M 1 0XM fuel assemblies which have been delivered to several utilities worldwide. The article details key aspects of ATRIUM T M 1 0 fuel assemblies in terms of reliability and performance. Special attention is paid to key proven features, ULTRAFLOW T M s pacer grids, the use of part length fuel rods (PLFRs) and their geometrical optimization, water channel and load chain, upgraded features available for inclusion with most advanced designs. Regular upgrading of the product has been made possible thanks to a continuous improvement process with the aim of further upgrading BWR fuel assembly performance and reliability. Regarding thermal mechanical behavior of fuel rods, chromia (Cr2O3) doped fuel pellets, described in Reference 1, well illustrate this improvement strategy to reduce fission gas release, increase power thresholds for PCI

  4. EBR-II: summary of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, W.H.; Leman, J.D.; Lentz, G.L.; Longua, K.J.; Olson, W.H.; Shields, J.A.; Wolz, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. The primary cooling system is a submerged-pool type. The early operation of the reactor successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor operating as an integrated reactor, power plant, and fuel-processing facility. In 1967, the role of EBR-II was reoriented from a demonstration plant to an irradiation facility. Many changes have been made and are continuing to be made to increase the usefulness of EBR-II for irradiation and safety tests. A review of EBR-II's operating history reveals a plant that has demonstrated high availability, stable and safe operating characteristics, and excellent performance of sodium components. Levels of radiation exposure to the operating and maintenance workers have been low; and fission-gas releases to the atmosphere have been minimal. Driver-fuel performance has been excellent. The repairability of radioactive sodium components has been successfully demonstrated a number of times. Recent highlights include installation and successful operation of (1) the hydrogen-meter leak detectors for the steam generators, (2) the cover-gas-cleanup system and (3) the cesium trap in the primary sodium. Irradiations now being conducted in EBR-II include the run-beyond-cladding breach fuel tests for mixed-oxide and carbide elements. Studies are in progress to determine EBR-II's capability for conducting important ''operational safety'' tests. These tests would extend the need and usefulness of EBR-II into the 1980's

  5. Experience of Areva in fuel services for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, I.

    2015-01-01

    AREVA being an integrated supplier of fuel assemblies has included in its strategy to develop services and solutions to customers who desire to improve the performance and safety of their fuel. These services go beyond the simple 'after sale' services that can be expected from a fuel supplier: The portfolio of AREVA includes a wide variety of services, from scientific calculations to fuel handling services in a nuclear power plant. AREVA is committed to collaborate and to propose best-in-class solutions that really make the difference for the customer, based on 40 years of Fuel design and manufacturing experience. (Author)

  6. Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

    2005-11-01

    A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

  7. One year of operation of the Belgonucleaire (Dessel) plutonium fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Based on experience with plutonium since 1958, Belgonucleaire has successively launched a pilot plant and then a fuel fabrication plant for mixed uranium and plutonium oxides in 1968 and 1973 respectively. After describing briefly the plants and the most important stages in the planning, construction and operation of the Dessel plant, the present document describes the principal problems which were met during the course of operation of the plant and their direct incidence on the capacity and quality of the production of fuel elements

  8. Optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions for compression ignition engine fueled with pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seokhwon; Jeon, Joonho; Park, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel was used with direct injection system. • KIVA-CHEMKIN code modeled dual-fuel fuel spray and combustion processes with discrete multi-component model. • The characteristics of Combustion and emission on pre-blended fuel was investigated with various fuel reactivities. • Optimization of combustion chamber shape improved combustion performance of the gasoline-diesel blended fuel engine. - Abstract: In this study, experiments and numerical simulations were used to improve the fuel efficiency of compression ignition engine using a gasoline-diesel blended fuel and an optimization technology. The blended fuel is directly injected into the cylinder with various blending ratios. Combustion and emission characteristics were investigated to explore the effects of gasoline ratio on fuel blend. The present study showed that the advantages of gasoline-diesel blended fuel, high thermal efficiency and low emission, were maximized using the numerical optimization method. The ignition delay and maximum pressure rise rate increased with the proportion of gasoline. As the gasoline fraction increased, the combustion duration and the indicated mean effective pressure decreased. The homogeneity of the fuel-air mixture was improved due to longer ignition delay. Soot emission was significantly reduced up to 90% compared to that of conventional diesel. The nitrogen oxides emissions of the blended fuel increased slightly when the start of injection was retarded toward top dead center. For the numerical study, KIVA-CHEMKIN multi-dimensional CFD code was used to model the combustion and emission characteristics of gasoline-diesel blended fuel. The micro genetic algorithm coupled with the KIVA-CHEMKIN code were used to optimize the combustion chamber shape and operating conditions to improve the combustion performance of the blended fuel engine. The optimized chamber geometry enhanced the fuel efficiency, for a level of nitrogen oxides

  9. The nuclear fuel cycle associated with the operation of nuclear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nuclear power option has been mentioned as an alternative for Ghana but the issue of waste management worries both policy makers and the public. In this paper, the nuclear fuel cycle associated with the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) for electric power generation has been extensively reviewed. Different ...

  10. 14 CFR 121.639 - Fuel supply: All domestic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... nontransport category airplanes type certificated after December 31, 1964, to fly for 30 minutes at normal... § 121.639 Fuel supply: All domestic operations. No person may dispatch or take off an airplane unless it has enough fuel— (a) To fly to the airport to which it is dispatched; (b) Thereafter, to fly to and...

  11. The review of LWR operating experience in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasiev, A.; Protopopov, A.

    2001-01-01

    Most probably in Ukraine the WWER-1000 reactors will generate up to 93-96% of all NPPs electric power and about 40-50% of the total electric power production for the period of ten years (2000-2010). The operating experience of Ukrainian NPPs with WWER-1000 is 137 reactor-years. At the beginning of 1999 a total quantity of the fuel assemblies (FAs) discharged during all operational time of 11 reactors was 5819 (110 fuel cycles). Economical improvement is reached by increase of fuel burnup using some of the FAs of 3 annual fuel cycles design in 4-th fuel loading cycle. The main problem of core operation of the last years have been consisted in incomplete rod control cluster assembly (RCCA) insertion. There were RCCA jammed at intermediate position or RCCA drop time was longer than the required 4 sec. The compensatory measures realization has allowed for decreasing the probability of incomplete RCCA operation. As a result of compensatory measures (excluding some cases) RCCA drop time problem was almost solved. Periodic measurements of RCCA drop time are not necessary. The cost, allowable time of operation, and possibility of inexpensive disposal are the main consumer features of RCCA. In order to increase RCCA lifetime it is required to replace the bottom (300-500 mm) n/α absorber B 4 C by unswelling n/γ absorber (Hf, Dy2TiO5 or In + Cd + Ag) and to use cladding material that will be more stable to radiation embrittlement. (author)

  12. Experience feedback from the transportation of Framatome fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, M.E.; Gaillard, G.; Aubin, C.

    1998-01-01

    Framatome, the foremost world nuclear fuel manufacturer, has for 25 years been delivering fuel elements from its three factories (Dessel, Romans, Pierrelatte) to the various sites in France and abroad (Germany, Sweden, Belgium, China, Korea, South Africa, Switzerland). During this period, Framatome has built up experience and expertise in fuel element transportation by road, rail and sea. In this filed, the range of constraints is very wide: safety and environmental protection constraints; constraints arising from the control and protection of nuclear materials, contractual and financial constraints, media watchdogs. Through the experience feedback from the transportation of FRAMATOME assemblies, this paper addresses all the phases in the transportation of fresh fuel assemblies. (authors)

  13. Operator training and the training simulator experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.

    The author outlines the approach used by Ontario Hydro to train operators from the day they are hired as Operators-in-Training until they are Authorized Unit First Operators. He describes in detail the use of the simulator in the final year of the authorization program, drawing on experience with the Pickering NGS A simulator. Simulators, he concludes, are important aids to training but by no means all that is required to guarantee capable First Operators

  14. Heavy duty gas turbines experience with ash-forming fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Molière, M.; Sire, J.

    1993-01-01

    The heavy duty gas turbines operating in power plants can burn various fuels ranging from natural gas to heavy oils. Ash-forming fuels can have detrimental effects on the turbine hardware such as : combustion troubles, erosion, corrosion and fouling by ashes. For decades, progress has been made by the gas turbine industry, especially in the fields of superalloy metallurgy, coating and cooling technology. Furthermore, fuel treatments inspired by the petroleum and marine-engine industries (elec...

  15. Industry Operating Experience Process at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, B.; Bozin, B.; Cizmek, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experience has shown that number of minor events and near misses, usually without immediate or significant impact to plant safety and reliability, are precursors of significant or severe events due to the same or similar root or apparent cause(s). It is therefore desirable to identify and analyze weaknesses of the precursor problems (events) in order to prevent occurrence of significant events. Theoretically, significant events could be prevented from occurring if the root cause(s) of these precursor problems could be identified and eliminated. The Operating Experience Program identifies such event precursors and by reporting them to the industry, plant specific corrective actions can be taken to prevent events at other operational plants. The intent of the Operating Experience Program is therefore to improve nuclear power plant safety and reliability of the operating nuclear power plants. Each plant develops its own Operating Experience Program in order to learn from the in-house operating experience as well as from the world community of nuclear plants. The effective use of operating experience includes analyzing both plant and industry events in order to identify fundamental weaknesses and then determining appropriate plant-specific actions that will minimize the likelihood of similar events. Learning and applying the lessons from operating experience is an integral part of station safety culture and is encouraged by managers throughout the top plant administrative programs and procedures. Krsko NPP is developed it own Operating Experience Program by using the most relevant INPO/WANO/IAEA guidelines as well as its own knowledge, skills an operating practice. The Operating Experience Program is a part of the Corrective Action Program, which is among top management programs, thus program is strongly encouraged by top management. The purpose of Operating Experience Program is to provide guidance for using, sharing, and evaluating operating experience information

  16. Palliative effects of H2 on SOFCs operating with carbon containing fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeping, Kyle W.; Bohn, Jessie M.; Walker, Robert A.

    2017-12-01

    Chlorine can accelerate degradation of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) Ni-based anodes operating on carbon containing fuels through several different mechanisms. However, supplementing the fuel with a small percentage of excess molecular hydrogen effectively masks the degradation to the catalytic activity of the Ni and carbon fuel cracking reaction reactions. Experiments described in this work explore the chemistry behind the "palliative" effect of hydrogen on SOFCs operating with chlorine-contaminated, carbon-containing fuels using a suite of independent, complementary techniques. Operando Raman spectroscopy is used to monitor carbon accumulation and, by inference, Ni catalytic activity while electrochemical techniques including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltammetry are used to monitor overall cell performance. Briefly, hydrogen not only completely hides degradation observed with chlorine-contaminated carbon-containing fuels, but also actively removes adsorbed chlorine from the surface of the Ni, allowing for the methane cracking reaction to continue, albeit at a slower rate. When hydrogen is removed from the fuel stream the cell fails immediately due to chlorine occupation of methane/biogas reaction sites.

  17. Experience in the transport of European irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, A.

    1993-01-01

    The transport of irradiated nuclear fuel is an essential and integral component of the nuclear fuel cycle. Nuclear Transport Limited (NTL) has been in the forefront of the transport of irradiated fuel for two decades and has safely and successfully completed over 2500 shipments containing more than 5000 tonnes of uranium to the reprocessing plants of COGEMA at Cap La Hague in France and British Nuclear Fuels, Sellafield, in England. During the two decades, there have been significant changes in fuel parameters, flask designs, regulations and public perception, all of which have impacted on the management of the irradiated fuel transport business. This paper briefly describes NTL experience in meeting these challenges, the design and development of new flasks to meet future requirements of high burnup fuels to 55 GWD/TeU and the flasks for the return of highly active vitrified waste. (Author)

  18. Experience with a fuel rod enrichment scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubik, R.N.; Pettus, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    This enrichment scanner views all fuel rods produced at B and W's Commercial Nuclear Fuel Plant. The scanner design is derived from the PAPAS System reported by R. A. Forster, H. D. Menlove, and their associates at Los Alamos. The spatial resolution of the system and smoothing of the data are discussed in detail. The cost-effectiveness of multi-detector versus single detector scanners of this general design is also discussed

  19. The qualification of a new fuel - the operator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.

    2001-01-01

    Operators of a research reactor generally have as their primary mission to provide the users with a safe, reliable and economic source of neutrons. They have to assure the availability of that source, while respecting the requirements of the license. The fuel management is one of the major aspects they have to tackle in order to fulfill their mission. This sometimes includes the qualification of a new fuel and the core conversion. The operator has to assure that the whole process is conducted in such manner that the availability of the neutron source is only minimally disturbed, that the costs are kept under control and the characteristics of the neutron source are preserved. This paper gives an overview of the various issues that the operator has to consider. (author)

  20. CANDU fuel - fifteen years of power reactor experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjoy, G.R.; Bain, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) fuel has operated in power reactors since 1962. Analyses of performance statistics, supplemented by examinations of fuel from power reactors and experimental loops have yielded: (a) A thorough understanding of the fundamental behaviour of CANDU fuel. (b) Data showing that the predicted high utilization of uranium has been achieved. Actual fuelling costs in 1976 at the Pickering Generating Station are 1.2 m$/kWh (1976 Canadian dollars) with the simple oncethrough natural-UO 2 fuel cycle. (c) Criteria for operation, which have led to the current very low defect rate of 0.03% of all assemblies and to ''CANLUB'' fuel, which has a graphite interlayer between the fuel and sheath to reduce defects on power increases. (d) Proof that the short length (500 mm), collapsible cladding features of the CANDU bundle are successful and that the fuel can operate at high-power output (current peak outer-element linear power is 58 +- 15% kW/m). Involvement by the utility in all stages of fuel development has resulted in efficient application of this fundamental knowledge to ensure proper fuel specifications, procurement, scheduling into the reactor and feedback to developers, designers and manufacturers. As of mid-1976 over 3 x 10 6 individual elements have been built in a well-estabilished commercially competitive fuel fabrication industry and over 2 x 10 6 elements have been irradiated. Only six defects have been attributed to faulty materials or fabrication, and the use of high-density UO 2 with low-moisture content precluded defects from hydrogen contamination and densification. Development work on UO 2 and other fuel cycles (plutonium and thorium) is continuing, and, because CANDU reactors use on-power fuelling, bundles can be inserted into power reactors for testing. Thus new fuel designs can be quickly adopted to ensure that the CANDU system continues to provide low-cost energy with high reliability

  1. Aerosol emissions of a ship diesel engine operated with diesel fuel or heavy fuel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibel, Thorsten; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Czech, Hendryk; Harndorf, Horst; Jakobi, Gert; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Karg, Erwin; Lintelmann, Jutta; Matuschek, Georg; Michalke, Bernhard; Müller, Laarnie; Orasche, Jürgen; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Rabe, Rom; Reda, Ahmed; Rüger, Christopher; Schwemer, Theo; Sippula, Olli; Stengel, Benjamin; Sklorz, Martin; Torvela, Tiina; Weggler, Benedikt; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Gaseous and particulate emissions from a ship diesel research engine were elaborately analysed by a large assembly of measurement techniques. Applied methods comprised of offline and online approaches, yielding averaged chemical and physical data as well as time-resolved trends of combustion by-products. The engine was driven by two different fuels, a commonly used heavy fuel oil (HFO) and a standardised diesel fuel (DF). It was operated in a standardised cycle with a duration of 2 h. Chemical characterisation of organic species and elements revealed higher concentrations as well as a larger number of detected compounds for HFO operation for both gas phase and particulate matter. A noteworthy exception was the concentration of elemental carbon, which was higher in DF exhaust aerosol. This may prove crucial for the assessment and interpretation of biological response and impact via the exposure of human lung cell cultures, which was carried out in parallel to this study. Offline and online data hinted at the fact that most organic species in the aerosol are transferred from the fuel as unburned material. This is especially distinctive at low power operation of HFO, where low volatility structures are converted to the particulate phase. The results of this study give rise to the conclusion that a mere switching to sulphur-free fuel is not sufficient as remediation measure to reduce health and environmental effects of ship emissions.

  2. Investigation of degradation effects in polymer electrolyte fuel cells under automotive-related operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enz, S.; Dao, T. A.; Messerschmidt, M.; Scholta, J.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of artificial starvation effects during automotive-related operating conditions is investigated within a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) using non-dispersive infrared sensors and a current scan shunt. Driving cycles (DC) and single load change experiments are performed with specific fuel and oxidant starvation conditions. Within the DC experiments, a maximal CO2 amount of 4.67 μmol per cycle is detected in the cathode and 0.97 μmol per cycle in the anode exhaust without reaching fuel starvation conditions during the DC. Massive cell reversal conditions occur within the single load change experiments as a result of anodic fuel starvation. As soon as a fuel starvation appears, the emitted CO2 increases exponentially in the anode and cathode exhaust. A maximal CO2 amount of 143.8 μmol CO2 on the anode side and 5.8 μmol CO2 on the cathode side is detected in the exhaust gases. The critical cell reversal conditions only occur by using hydrogen reformate as anode reactant. The influence of the starvation effects on the PEFC performance is investigated via polarization curves, cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry as well as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The PEFC performance is reduced by 47% as a consequence of the dynamic operation.

  3. Spent fuel cask handling at an operating nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The importance of spent fuel handling at operating nuclear power plants cannot be overstated. Because of its highly radioactive nature, however, spent fuel must be handled in thick, lead-lined containers or casks. Thus, all casks for spent fuel handling are heavy loads by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's definition, and any load-drop must be evaluated for its potential to damage safety-related equipment. Nuclear Regulatory Guide NUREG-0612 prescribes the regulatory requirements of alternative heavy-load-handling methodologies such as (a) by providing cranes that meet the requirements of NUREG-0554, which shall be called the soft path, or (b) by providing protective devices at all postulated load-drop areas to prevent any damage to safety-related equipment, which shall be called the hard path. The work reported in this paper relates to cask handling at New York Power Authority's James A. FitzPatrick (JAF) plant

  4. Hydrazine - hydrate water regime and operation of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashevitch, V.I.; Pashevitch, D.V.; Bogancs, J.; Tilky, P.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistries currently used in WWER reactors are potassium based water chemistry (KOH) to adjust the pH with ammonia or hydrazine as oxygen scavenger. Based on the measurements of Zr 95 which is a corrosion product of the zirconium cladding, it is shown in this paper that the amount of corrosion products accompanying the reactor shutdown is smaller when hydrazine is used. This is particularly obvious on PAKS 1 and 2 when Zr 95 measurements are performed before and after switching the water chemistry from ammonia to hydrazine. It is concluded that the main advantage of using the hydrazine water chemistry is to decrease the thickness of the corrosion product layer formed on the fuel cladding, therefore the fuel temperature can be kept low. It is estimated that the fuel temperature increase due to the layer of corrosion products is 120 deg. C for KOLA 3 which is operated with ammonia water chemistry. (author). 5 figs

  5. Assess How Changes in Fuel Cycle Operation Impact Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Stephen Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division; Adigun, Babatunde John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division; Fugate, Michael Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division; Trellue, Holly Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division; Sprinkle, James K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division

    2016-10-31

    Since the beginning of commercial nuclear power generation in the 1960s, the ability of researchers to understand and control the isotopic content of spent fuel has improved. It is therefore not surprising that both fuel assembly design and fuel assembly irradiation optimization have improved over the past 50+ years. It is anticipated that the burnup and isotopics of the spent fuel should exhibit less variation over the decades as reactor operators irradiate each assembly to the optimum amount. In contrast, older spent fuel is anticipated to vary more in burnup and resulting isotopics for a given initial enrichment. Modern fuel therefore should be more uniform in composition, and thus, measured safeguards results should be easier to interpret than results from older spent fuel. With spent fuel ponds filling up, interim and long-­term storage of spent fuel will need to be addressed. Additionally after long periods of storage, spent fuel is no longer self-­protecting and, as such, the IAEA will categorize it as more attractive; in approximately 20 years many of the assemblies from early commercial cores will no longer be considered self-­protecting. This study will assess how more recent changes in the reactor operation could impact the interpretation of safeguards measurements. The status quo for spent fuel assay in the safeguards context is that the overwhelming majority of spent fuel assemblies are not measured in a quantitative way except for those assemblies about to be loaded into a difficult or impossible to access location (dry storage or, in the future, a repository). In other words, when the assembly is still accessible to a state actor, or an insider, when it is cooling in a pool, the inspectorate does not have a measurement database that could assist them in re-­verifying the integrity of that assembly. The spent fuel safeguards regime would be strengthened if spent fuel assemblies were measured from discharge to loading into a difficult or impossible

  6. Hydrogen/Air Fuel Nozzle Emissions Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D.

    2001-01-01

    The use of hydrogen combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines provides significant opportunities to reduce harmful exhaust emissions. Hydrogen has many advantages (no CO2 production, high reaction rates, high heating value, and future availability), along with some disadvantages (high current cost of production and storage, high volume per BTU, and an unknown safety profile when in wide use). One of the primary reasons for switching to hydrogen is the elimination of CO2 emissions. Also, with hydrogen, design challenges such as fuel coking in the fuel nozzle and particulate emissions are no longer an issue. However, because it takes place at high temperatures, hydrogen-air combustion can still produce significant levels of NOx emissions. Much of the current research into conventional hydrocarbon-fueled aircraft gas turbine combustors is focused on NOx reduction methods. The Zero CO2 Emission Technology (ZCET) hydrogen combustion project will focus on meeting the Office of Aerospace Technology goal 2 within pillar one for Global Civil Aviation reducing the emissions of future aircraft by a factor of 3 within 10 years and by a factor of 5 within 25 years. Recent advances in hydrocarbon-based gas turbine combustion components have expanded the horizons for fuel nozzle development. Both new fluid designs and manufacturing technologies have led to the development of fuel nozzles that significantly reduce aircraft emissions. The goal of the ZCET program is to mesh the current technology of Lean Direct Injection and rocket injectors to provide quick mixing, low emissions, and high-performance fuel nozzle designs. An experimental program is planned to investigate the fuel nozzle concepts in a flametube test rig. Currently, a hydrogen system is being installed in cell 23 at NASA Glenn Research Center's Research Combustion Laboratory. Testing will be conducted on a variety of fuel nozzle concepts up to combustion pressures of 350 psia and inlet air temperatures of 1200 F

  7. Experiences on operation, maintenance and utilization in JRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Japan Research Reactor No.2 (JRR-2) is a high performance 10 MW multi purpose research reactor, heavy water moderated and cooled enriched uranium fuel used. Since the first criticality was attained in October, 1960, JRR-2 has been operated to satisfy the utilization demands, such as irradiation of fuel and materials, neutron beam experiments, radio isotope production and B.N.C.T (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). During the operation, various kinds of troubles mainly caused by the old design concept had been occurred at the JRR-2 systems and components. Those troubles were solved with adequate countermeasures of timely repairs and large scale modifications with newest techniques. The works above were completely carried out by the staff of JRR-2 and related divisions. As a result, JRR-2 became one of the oldest research reactors which are still under operation in the world. Since JRR-2 has been utilized for more than 30 years, the operation mode was changed from 12 days-one cycle to 3 days-one cycle in April, 1994, taking into consideration aging of the reactor systems. In this paper, the experiences of JRR-2 for more than 30 years such as operation, maintenance, repair, modifications and utilization on JRR-2 are described. (author)

  8. Strategies for Lowering Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tarancón

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Lowering the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs to the intermediate range (500–700 ºC has become one of the main SOFC research goals. High operating temperatures put numerous requirements on materials selection and on secondary units, limiting the commercial development of SOFCs. The present review first focuses on the main effects of reducing the operating temperature in terms of materials stability, thermo-mechanical mismatch, thermal management and efficiency. After a brief survey of the state-of-the-art materials for SOFCs, attention is focused on emerging oxide-ionic conductors with high conductivity in the intermediate range of temperatures with an introductory section on materials technology for reducing the electrolyte thickness. Finally, recent advances in cathode materials based on layered mixed ionic-electronic conductors are highlighted because the decreasing temperature converts the cathode into the major source of electrical losses for the whole SOFC system. It is concluded that the introduction of alternative materials that would enable solid oxide fuel cells to operate in the intermediate range of temperatures would have a major impact on the commercialization of fuel cell technology.

  9. Combining risk analysis and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the systematic utilization of operating experience in the decision making process concerning large industrial facilities. Even before the advent of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), operating experience had always played an important role in such decisions. Of course, operating experience has always been an input to PSA also; however, as PSA becomes more mature and the quality and quantity of operating experience improve, greater emphasis is now being placed on the use of operating experience to update and validate PSA and thereby provide a more rational basis for decision making. This report outlines the ways in which data are collected, processed using mathematical techniques and utilized in decision making. It is not intended to provide details of the methods and procedures to be used in these areas, but is rather intended as an introduction to these topics and some of the relevant literature. The meeting presentations were divided into three sessions devoted to the following topics: evaluation of nuclear power plants operational experience (5 papers); uncertainties (2 papers); probabilistic safety assessment studies in Member States (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  10. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several metallic fuel element designs which have been tested and used as driver fuel in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The most recent advanced designs have all performed acceptably in EBR-H and can provide reliable performance to high burnups. Fuel elements tested have included use of U-l0Zr metallic fuel with either D9, 316 or HT9 stainless steel cladding; the D9 and 316-clad designs have been used as standard driver fuel. Experimental data indicate that fuel performance characteristics are very similar for the various designs tested. Cladding materials can be selected that optimize performance based on reactor design and operational goals

  11. MIT January Operational Internship Experience 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLatte, Danielle; Furhmann, Adam; Habib, Manal; Joujon-Roche, Cecily; Opara, Nnaemeka; Pasterski, Sabrina Gonzalez; Powell, Christina; Wimmer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the 2011 January Operational Internship experience (JOIE) program which allows students to study operational aspects of spaceflight, how design affects operations and systems engineering in practice for 3 weeks. Topics include: (1) Systems Engineering (2) NASA Organization (3) Workforce Core Values (4) Human Factors (5) Safety (6) Lean Engineering (7) NASA Now (8) Press, Media, and Outreach and (9) Future of Spaceflight.

  12. Operational experience of the Marcoule reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.

    1963-01-01

    The results obtaining from three years operation of the reactors G-2, G-3 have made it possible to accumulate a considerable amount of operational experience of these reactors. The main original points: - the pre-stressed concrete casing - the possibility of loading while under power - automatic temperature control have been perfectly justified by the results of operation. The author confirms the importance of these original solutions and draws conclusions concerning the study of future nuclear power stations. (author) [fr

  13. Operating manual for the critical experiments facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The operation of the Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) requires careful attention to procedures in order that all safety precautions are observed. Since an accident could release large amounts of radioactivity, careful operation and strict enforcement of procedures are necessary. To provide for safe operation, detailed procedures have been written for all phases of the operation of this facility. The CEF operating procedures are not to be construed to constitute a part ofthe Technical Specifications. In the event of any discrepancy between the information given herein and the Technical Specifications, limits set forth in the Technical Specifications apply. All normal and most emergency operation conditions are covered by procedures presented in this manual. These procedures are designed to be followed by the operating personnel. Strict adherence to these procedures is expected for the following reasons. (1) To provide a standard, safe method of performing all operations, the procedures were written by reactor engineers experienced in supervising the operation of reactors and were reviewed by an organization with over 30 years of reactor operating experience. (2) To have an up-to-date description of operating techniques available at all times for reference and review, it is necessary that the procedures be written

  14. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  15. Survey of experience with dry storage of spent nuclear fuel and update of wet storage experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Spent fuel storage is an important part of spent fuel management. At present about 45,000 t of spent water reactor fuel have been discharged worldwide. Only a small fraction of this fuel (approximately 7%) has been reprocessed. The amount of spent fuel arisings will increase significantly in the next 15 years. Estimates indicate that up to the year 2000 about 200,000 t HM of spent fuel could be accumulated. In view of the large quantities of spent fuel discharged from nuclear power plants and future expected discharges, many countries are involved in the construction of facilities for the storage of spent fuel and in the development of effective methods for spent fuel surveillance and monitoring to ensure that reliable and safe operation of storage facilities is achievable until the time when the final disposal of spent fuel or high level wastes is feasible. The first demonstrations of final disposal are not expected before the years 2000-2020. This is why the long term storage of spent fuel and HLW is a vital problem for all countries with nuclear power programmes. The present survey contains data on dry storage and recent information on wet storage, transportation, rod consolidation, etc. The main aim is to provide spent fuel management policy making organizations, designers, scientists and spent fuel storage facility operators with the latest information on spent fuel storage technology under dry and wet conditions and on innovations in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Method of operating a molten carbonate fuel cell, a fuel cell, a fuel cell stack and an apparatus provided therewith

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, K.; Dijkema, G.P.J.

    1998-01-01

    A method of operating a molten carbonate fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and in between a matrix comprising molten carbonate. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the matrix at a distance from the cathode. This greatly reduces the cathode's deterioration and in the system design increases the

  17. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  18. Storage of water reactor spent fuel in water pools. Survey of world experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent fuel has to be stored in water pools at the reactor site to allow for radioactive decay and cooling. After this initial storage period, the future treatment of spent fuel depends on the fuel cycle concept chosen. Spent fuel can either be treated by chemical processing or conditioning for final disposal at the relevant fuel cycle facilities, or be held in interim storage - at the reactor site or at a central storage facility. Recent forecasts predict that, by the year 2000, more than 150,000 tonnes of heavy metal from spent LWR fuel will have been accumulated. Because of postponed commitments regarding spent fuel treatment, a significant amount of spent fuel will still be held in storage at that time. Although very positive experience with wet storage has been gained over the past 40 years, making wet storage a proven technology, it appears desirable to summarize all available data for the benefit of designers, storage pool operators, licensing agenices and the general public. Such data will be essential for assessing the viability of extended water pool storage of spent nuclear fuel. In 1979, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD jointly issued a questionnaire dealing with all aspects of water pool storage. This report summarizes the information received from storage pool operators

  19. Behaviour of short-lived iodines in operating UO2 fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.; Hastings, I.J.; Hunt, C.E.L.

    1984-11-01

    Sweep gas experiments have been done to determine the behaviour of short-lived fission products within operating UO 2 fuel elements at linear powers of 45, 54, and 60 KW/m, and to burnups of 70, 80, and 50 MWh/kgU respectively. Although radioiodine transport was not observed directly during normal operation, equilibrium gap inventories for I-131 were deduced from the shutdown decay behaviour of the fission gases. These inventories were a strong function of fuel power and ranged from 10 GBq (0.27 Ci) to 100 GBq (2.7 Ci) over the range tested. We conclude that the iodine inventory was adsorbed onto the fuel and/or sheath surfaces with a volatile fraction of less than 10 -2 and a charcoal-filter-penetrating fraction of less than 2x10 -4

  20. CANDU-PHW fuel channel replacement experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, J.T.; Kakaria, B.K.

    1982-09-01

    One of the main characteristics of the CANDU pressurized heavy water reactor is the use of pressure tubes rather than one large pressure vessel to contain the fuel and coolant. This provides an inherent design capability to permit their replacement in an expeditious manner, without seriously affecting the high capacity factors of the reactor units. Of th eight Ontario Hydro commercial nuclear generating units, the lifetime performance places seven of them (including two that have had some of their fuel channels replaced), in the top ten positions in the world's large nuclear-electric unit performance ranking. Pressure tube cracks in the rolled joint region have resulted in 70 fuel channels being replaced in three reactor units, the latest being at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A', Unit 2 in February 1982. The rolled joint design and rolling procedures have been modified to eliminate this problem on CANDU units subsequent to Bruce 'A'. This paper describes the CANDU pressure tube performance history and expectations, and the tooling and procedures used to carry out the fuel channel replacement

  1. Gaseous fuels: past experiences and future expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M. van der

    1996-01-01

    During the fifties, the use of LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) was promoted in Italy and the Netherlands. The Dutch government promulgated tax regulations which made the use of LPG, available in large quentities as a by-product in the refineries, attractive as an automotive fuel. Dedicated heavy-duty

  2. Shielding considerations for advanced fuel irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Moon; Kim, Bong-Goo; Kim, Hark-Rho; Lee, Dong-Soo

    2008-01-01

    An in-pile test program for the development of a high burn-up fuel is planned for the HANARO reactor. The source term originates from a leakage of fission products from the anticipated failed fuels into the gas flow tubes and around the instrumentation and control system. In order to quantify the fuel composition in the event of a fuel failure, the isotope generation and depletion code ORIGEN 2.0 was used. The computer program Microshield 6.2 was used to calculate the doses from specific locations, where a high radioactivity is expected during an irradiation. The results indicate that the equivalent dose in the investigated working areas is less than the permitted dose rate of 6.25 μSv/hr. However, access to the area of a decay vessel may need to be limited, and the installation of a Pb wall with a 20.5 cm thickness is recommended. From the analysis of a radioactive decay with time, most of the concerned gaseous nuclides with short half-lives after 3 months, were decayed, with one exception which was Kr-85, thus it should be released in accordance with applicable government laws after measuring its activity in individual holding vessels. (author)

  3. Characteriztion of particulate plutonium released in fuel cycle operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seefeldt, W.B.; Mecham, W.J.; Steindler, M.J.

    1976-05-01

    An estimate of the plutonium source terms is made for the fuel cycles of three reactor types on the basis of currently applied, currently available, and estimated future technology. The three reactors are LWR-U, LWR-Pu, and LMFBR. The source terms are characterized as to quantity, form, and particle size distribution. Historical operating data for existing plants and the state of the art of the technology of air cleaning are reviewed.

  4. Operating experience and TPA: the Italian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, G.

    1990-01-01

    Collection and analysis of operating experience from the Italian plants and utilization of abroad data both to plants in operation and in construction are presented. Some results are also referred, aimed to evidence the role of the international cooperation to safe operation of nuclear plants. The approach to the Trend and Pattern analyses is described as well, and the use of computerized techniques of analysis on personal computer. Finally on going activities are introduced, specifically application of operating experience of plants in operation to small sized reactors and to ones with more intrinsic safety characteristics; review of the reporting system for future application and comparative analysis of the different realization of selected safety systems

  5. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: flow field for efficient air operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechi, F.N.; Tsukada, A.; Haas, O.; Scherer, G.G. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    A new flow field was designed for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack with an active area of 200 cm{sup 2} for operation at low air stoichiometry and low air over pressure. Optimum of gas flow and channel dimensions were calculated based on the required pressure drop in the fluid. Single cells and a bi-cell stack with the new flow field show an improved current/voltage characteristic when operated at low air stoichiometries as compared to that of the previous non optimized design. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  6. The achivements of Japanese fuel irradiation experiments in HBWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Michio; Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Domoto, Kazunari

    1984-02-01

    OECD Halden Reactor Project celebrated the 25th anniversary in 1983. The JAERI has been participating in the Project since 1967 on behalf of Japanese Government. Since the participation, thirty-six Japanese instrumented fuel assemblies have been irradiated in HBWR. The irradiation experiments were either sponsored by JAERI or by domestic organizations under the joint research agreements with JAERI, beeing steered by the Committee for the Joint Research Programme. The cooperative efforts have attained significant contributions to the development of water reactor fuel technology in Japan. This report review the irradiation experiments of Japanese fuel assemblies. (author)

  7. Advanced operator interface design for CANDU-3 fuel handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arapakota, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Operator Interface for the CANDU 3 Fuel Handling (F/H) System incorporates several improvements over the existing designs. A functionally independent sit-down CRT (cathode-ray tube) based Control Console is provided for the Fuel Handling Operator in the Main Control Room. The Display System makes use of current technology and provides a user friendly operator interface. Regular and emergency control operations can be carried out from this control console. A stand-up control panel is provided as a back-up with limited functionality adequate to put the F/H System in a safe state in case of an unlikely non-availability of the Plant Display System or the F/H Control System'. The system design philosophy, hardware configuration and the advanced display system features are described in this paper The F/H Operator Interface System developed for CANDU 3 can be adapted to CANDU 9 as well as to the existing stations. (author)

  8. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Operations Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report Annex B--Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1999, (Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements), Rev. 4. and the CVDF Final Design Report. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence and references to the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDDs). This manual has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved

  9. X447 EBR-II Experiment Benchmark for Verification of Audit Code of SFR Metal Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Won; Bae, Moo-Hoon; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk

    2016-01-01

    In KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), to prepare audit calculation of PGSFR licensing review, the project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. In this study, to verify the new code system, the benchmark analysis is performed. In the benchmark, X447 EBR-II experiment data are used. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis according to mass flux change of coolant is performed. In case of LWR fuel performance modeling, various and advanced models have been proposed and validated based on sufficient in-reactor test results. However, due to the lack of experience of SFR operation, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. In this study, X447 EBR-II Experiment data are used for benchmark. The fuel composition of X447 assembly is U-10Zr and PGSFR also uses this composition in initial phase. So we select X447 EBR-II experiment for benchmark analysis. Due to the lack of experience of SFR operation and data, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. However, in order to prepare the licensing of PGSFR, regulatory audit technologies of SFR must be secured. So, in this study, to verify the new audit fuel performance analysis code, the benchmark analysis is performed using X447 EBR-II experiment data. Also, the sensitivity analysis with mass flux change of coolant is performed. In terms of verification, it is considered that the results of benchmark and sensitivity analysis are reasonable

  10. California's experience with alternative fuel vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, C.

    1993-01-01

    California is often referred to as a nation-state, and in many aspects fits that description. The state represents the seventh largest economy in the world. Most of California does not have to worry about fuel to heat homes in the winter. What we do worry about is fuel for our motor vehicles, approximately 24 million of them. In fact, California accounts for ten percent of new vehicle sales in the United States each year, much of it used in the transportation sector. The state is the third largest consumer of gasoline in the world, only exceeded by the United States as a whole and the former Soviet Union. California is also a leader in air pollution. Of the nine worst ozone areas in the country cited in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, two areas the Los Angeles Basin and San Diego are located in California. Five of California's cities made the top 20 smoggiest cities in the United States. In reality, all of California's major metropolitan areas have air quality problems. This paper will discuss the beginnings of California's investigations of alternative fuels use in vehicles; the results of the state's demonstration programs; and future plans to improve California's air quality and energy security in the mobile sector

  11. Spent Fuel Test - Climax data acquisition system operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyholm, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of the retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercially generated, spent nuclear reactor fuel in granite rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies, together with 6 electrical simulators and 20 guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below the surface in the Climax granite at the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site. On June 2, 1978, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) secured funding for the SFT-C, and completed spent fuel emplacement May 28, 1980. The multi-year duration test is located in a remote area and is unattended much of the time. An extensive array of radiological safety and geotechnical instrumentation is deployed to monitor the test performance. A dual minicomputer-based data acquisition system (DAS) collects and processes data from more than 900 analog instruments. This report documents the software element of the LLNL developed SFT-C Data Acquisition System. It defines the operating system and hardware interface configurations, the special applications software and data structures, and support software

  12. Three years operational experience with biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.

    2008-01-01

    TSI Terminal Systems Inc. is the largest container terminal operator in Canada, and has an annual payroll exceeding $150 million. The company started a biodiesel test program with the Canadian Bioenergy Corporation in order to assess the emission reduction impacts of using biodiesel. The pilot was tested with 6 different pieces of equipment used at the terminal over an initial period of 3 weeks. Emissions testing was then conducted for different biodiesel blend levels and compared with baseline data in relation to particulate matter, total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and nitrous oxides (NO x ). Results of the tests confirmed that the biodiesel blends significantly reduced emissions at the terminal and confirmed the operability of biodiesel. Overall emissions were reduced by 30 per cent. The fuel is now being used in all the company's equipment. The use of the biodiesel has not resulted in any engine failures or power losses. tabs., figs

  13. JSC Case Study: Fleet Experience with E-85 Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Kirck

    2009-01-01

    JSC has used E-85 as part of an overall strategy to comply with Presidential Executive Order 13423 and the Energy Policy Act. As a Federal fleet, we are required to reduce our petroleum consumption by 2 percent per year, and increase the use of alternative fuels in our vehicles. With the opening of our onsite dispenser in October 2004, JSC became the second federal fleet in Texas and the fifth NASA center to add E-85 fueling capability. JSC has a relatively small number of GSA Flex Fuel fleet vehicles at the present time (we don't include personal vehicles, or other contractor's non-GSA fleet), and there were no reasonably available retail E-85 fuel stations within a 15-minute drive or within five miles (one way). So we decided to install a small 1000 gallon onsite tank and dispenser. It was difficult to obtain a supplier due to our low monthly fuel consumption, and our fuel supplier contract has changed three times in less than five years. We experiences a couple of fuel contamination and quality control issues. JSC obtained good information on E-85 from the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC). We also spoke with Defense Energy Support Center, (DESC), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and US Army Fort Leonard Wood. E-85 is a liquid fuel that is dispensed into our Flexible Fuel Vehicles identically to regular gasoline, so it was easy for our vehicle drivers to make the transition.

  14. Self-regulating passive fuel supply for small direct methanol fuel cells operating in all orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paust, N.; Krumbholz, S.; Munt, S.; Müller, C.; Koltay, P.; Zengerle, R.; Ziegler, C.

    A microfluidic fuel supply concept for passive and portable direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) that operates in all spatial orientations is presented. The concept has been proven by fabricating and testing a passive DMFC prototype. Methanol transport at the anode is propelled by the surface energy of deformed carbon dioxide bubbles, generated as a reaction product during DMFC operation. The experimental study reveals that in any orientation, the proposed pumping mechanism transports at least 3.5 times more methanol to the reactive area of the DMFC than the stoichiometry of the methanol oxidation would require to sustain DMFC operation. Additionally, the flow rates closely follow the applied electric load; hence the pumping mechanism is self-regulating. Oxygen is supplied to the cathode by diffusion and the reaction product water is transported out of the fuel cell along a continuous capillary pressure gradient. Results are presented that demonstrate the continuous passive operation for more than 40 h at ambient temperature with a power output of p = 4 mW cm -2 in the preferred vertical orientation and of p = 3.2 mW cm -2 in the least favorable horizontal orientation with the anode facing downwards.

  15. Operating experience insights supporting ageing assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitoi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Be effective in ageing management means looking at the right aspects, with the right techniques, and one of the most effective tool which could be used for that purpose is the analysis of operating experience. The paper has as objective to perform a review of available operating experience, with the aim to provide a better picture about the impact of ageing effects. The IAEA International Reporting System and NRC Licensee Event Reports were chosen as reference databases, both databases being internationally recognized as important sources of information about events occurrences in the nuclear power plants. The ageing related events identified in the selected time window were analyzed in detail, and the contributions of each major degradation mechanisms that have induced the ageing related events (specific to each defined group of components) was represented and discussed. The paper demonstrates the possibility to use operating experience insights in highlighting the ageing effects. (authors)

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell performance under severe operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren; Hendriksen, P.V.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2006-01-01

    The performance and degradation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) were studied under severe operating conditions. The cells studied were manufactured in a small series by ECN, in the framework of the EU funded CORE-SOFC project. The cells were of the anode-supported type with a double layer LSM...... cathode. They were operated at 750 °C or 850 °C in hydrogen with 5% or 50% water at current densities ranging from 0.25 A cm–2 to 1 A cm–2 for periods of 300 hours or more. The area specific cell resistance, corrected for fuel utilisation, ranged between 0.20 Ω cm2 and 0.34 Ω cm2 at 850 °C and 520 m......V, and between 0.51 Ω cm2 and 0.92 Ω cm2 at 750 °C and 520 mV. The degradation of cell performance was found to be low (ranging from 0 to 8%/1,000 hours) at regular operating conditions. Voltage degradation rates of 20 to 40%/1,000 hours were observed under severe operating conditions, depending on the test...

  17. Operational experience with SLAC's beam containment electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, T.N.; Crook, K.; Heggie, D.

    1977-03-01

    Considerable operating experience was accumulated at SLAC with an extensive electronic system for the containment of high power accelerated beams. Average beam power at SLAC can approach 900 kilowatts with the potential for burning through beam stoppers, protection collimators, and other power absorbers within a few seconds. Fast, reliable, and redundant electronic monitoring circuits have been employed to provide some of the safeguards necessary for minimizing the risk to personnel. The electronic systems are described, and the design philosophy and operating experience are discussed

  18. 14 CFR 121.434 - Operating experience, operating cycles, and consolidation of knowledge and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... position, the operating experience, operating cycles, and the line operating flight time for consolidation...) Separate operating experience, operating cycles, and line operating flight time for consolidation of... operating experience, operating cycles, and line operating flight time for consolidation of knowledge and...

  19. BNFL's experience in the sea transport of irradiated research reactor fuel to the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, I.A.; Porter, I.

    2000-01-01

    BNFL provides worldwide transport for a wide range of nuclear materials. BNFL Transport manages an unique fleet of vessels, designed, built, and operated to the highest safety standards, including the highest rating within the INF Code recommended by the International Maritime Organisation. The company has some 20 years of experience of transporting irradiated research reactor fuel in support of the United States' programme for returning US obligated fuel from around the world. Between 1977 and 1988 BNFL performed 11 shipments of irradiated research reactor fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the US. Since 1997, a further 3 shipments have been performed as part of an ongoing programme for Japanese research reactor operators. Where possible, shipments of fuel from European countries such as Sweden and Spain have been combined with those from Japan for delivery to the US. (author)

  20. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, S.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Holmes, S.; James, C.; Lee, W.; Louis, W.; Moore, C.; Plunkett, R.; Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2006. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2006 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam in neutrino and antineutrino modes, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and SY 120 activities.

  1. Fuel centerline temperature measurement experiment in JMTR, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroei; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Sezaki, Katsuji; Komukai, Bunsaku

    1980-11-01

    Fuel centerline temperature measurement experiment which is the most fundamental for the LWR fuel safety study, is planned to conduct in JMTR using OWL-1 loop facility. Irradiation of the first test assembly was completed. In this paper, the comparison between measured fuel centerline temperature data and predicted ones by JAERI's FREG-4 code which is a computer program to calculate fuel temperature distribution is made. Furthermore, the data analysis method such as how to estimate local linear power and inpile behavior of the instrumentations are described. The maximum fuel center temperature was 1250 0 C at steady state, the maximum linear power was 320 W/cm, and the maximum burnup was about 1600 MWD/T. (author)

  2. Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Jabbar, Mohammed Hussain

    An important issue that has limited the potential of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) for portable applications is its high operating temperatures (800-1000 ºC). Lowering the operating temperature of SOFCs to 400-600 ºC enable a wider material selection, reduced degradation and increased lifetime....... On the other hand, low-temperature operation poses serious challenges to the electrode performance. Effective catalysts, redox stable electrodes with improved microstructures are the prime requisite for the development of efficient SOFC anodes. The performance of Nb-doped SrT iO3 (STN) ceramic anodes...... at 400ºC. The potential of using WO3 ceramic as an alternative anode materials has been explored. The relatively high electrode polarization resistance obtained, 11 Ohm cm2 at 600 ºC, proved the inadequate catalytic activity of this system for hydrogen oxidation. At the end of this thesis...

  3. Combustion Noise Analysis for Combustion and Fuels Diagnosis of a CI Diesel Engine Operating with Biodiesels

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen, Dong; Shi, Zhanqun; Song, Zhongyue; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the combustion noise of a compression ignition (CI) diesel engine operating with biodiesels has been investigated experimentally. It aims to explore an effective method for combustion process monitoring and fuel quality evaluation through analysing the characteristics of the engine combustion noise. The experiments were conducted on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine fuelled with biodiesels (B50 and B100) and normal pure diesel, and op...

  4. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4-8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  5. Experiments on contrail formation from fuels with different sulfur content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busen, R.; Kuhn, M.; Petzold, A.; Schroeder, F.; Schumann, U. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Baumgardner, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Borrmann, S. [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Hagen, D.; Whitefield, Ph. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Bureau of Mines; Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    A series of both flight tests and ground experiments has been performed to evaluate the role of the sulfur contained in kerosene in condensation trail (contrail) formation processes. The results of the first experiments are compiled briefly. The last SULFUR 4 experiment dealing with the influence of the fuel sulfur content and different appertaining conditions is described in detail. Different sulfur mass fractions lead to different particle size spectra. The number of ice particles in the contrail increases by about a factor of 2 for 3000 ppm instead of 6 ppm sulfur fuel content. (author) 10 refs.

  6. Gas phase carbonyl compounds in ship emissions: Differences between diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Ahmed A.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Orasche, J.; Abbaszade, G.; Lintelmann, J.; Arteaga-Salas, J. M.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Harndorf, H.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-09-01

    Gas phase emission samples of carbonyl compounds (CCs) were collected from a research ship diesel engine at Rostock University, Germany. The ship engine was operated using two different types of fuels, heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF). Sampling of CCs was performed from diluted exhaust using cartridges and impingers. Both sampling methods involved the derivatization of CCs with 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). The CCs-hydrazone derivatives were analyzed by two analytical techniques: High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) and Gas Chromatography-Selective Ion Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry (GC-SIM-MS). Analysis of DNPH cartridges by GC-SIM-MS method has resulted in the identification of 19 CCs in both fuel operations. These CCs include ten aliphatic aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, isobutanal, butanal, isopentanal, pentanal, hexanal, octanal, nonanal), three unsaturated aldehydes (acrolein, methacrolein, crotonaldehyde), three aromatic aldehyde (benzaldehyde, p-tolualdehyde, m,o-molualdehyde), two ketones (acetone, butanone) and one heterocyclic aldehyde (furfural). In general, all CCs under investigation were detected with higher emission factors in HFO than DF. The total carbonyl emission factor was determined and found to be 6050 and 2300 μg MJ-1 for the operation with HFO and DF respectively. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were found to be the dominant carbonyls in the gas phase of ship engine emission. Formaldehyde emissions factor varied from 3500 μg MJ-1 in HFO operation to 1540 μg MJ-1 in DF operation, which is 4-30 times higher than those of other carbonyls. Emission profile contribution of CCs showed also a different pattern between HFO and DF operation. The contribution of formaldehyde was found to be 58% of the emission profile of HFO and about 67% of the emission profile of DF. Acetaldehyde showed opposite behavior with higher contribution of 16% in HFO compared to 11% for DF. Heavier carbonyls

  7. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarapata, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2015-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2015 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  8. Experience with failed or damaged spent fuel and its impacts on handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-12-01

    Spent fuel management planning needs to include consideration of failed or damaged spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel. Described in this paper, which was prepared under the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program that is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are the following: the importance of fuel integrity and the behavior of failed fuel, the quantity and burnup of failed or damaged fuel in storage, types of defects, difficulties in evaluating data on failed or damaged fuel, experience with wet storage, experience with dry storage, handling of failed or damaged fuel, transporting of fuel, experience with higher burnup fuel, and conclusions. 15 refs

  9. Low NO{sub x} pulverised fuel burners: Summary of plant experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.L. [Babcock Energy Limited, Renfrew (United Kingdom)

    1996-01-01

    Over the past six years Babcock Energy have retrofitted over 10,000 MW of electrical-power plant around the world with an advanced pulverised fuel fired low NO{sub x} burner. The burner was developed in 1989 in the Babcock Energy Large Scale Burner Test Facility in the United Kingdom. The paper summarises the significant results from the operational experience gained in the burner retrofits on a wide variety of wall fired boiler configurations and with a range of fuel qualities. NO{sub x} reductions of up to 70% have been achieved with no significant adverse effect on boiler efficiency and with positive operational benefits.

  10. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, A.; Convery, M.; Geer, S.; Geesaman, D.; Harris, D.; Johnson, D.; Lang, K.; McFarland, K.; Messier, M.; Moore, C. D.; Newhart, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Plunkett, R.; Rominsky, M.; Sanchez, M.; Schmidt, J. J.; Shanahan, P.; Tate, C.; Thomas, J.; Donatella Torretta, Donatella Torretta; Matthew Wetstein, Matthew Wetstein

    2016-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2016. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2016 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MicroBooNE experiment and the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment, LArIAT experiment and Meson Test Beam activities in the 120 GeV external switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was then edited for inclusion in this summary.

  11. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Convery, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geer, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geesaman, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harris, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lang, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); McFarland, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Messier, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moore, C. D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Newhart, D. [Fermilab; Reimer, P. E. [Argonne; Plunkett, R. [Fermilab; Rominsky, M. [Fermilab; Sanchez, M. [Iowa State U.; Schmidt, J. J. [Fermilab; Shanahan, P. [Fermilab; Tate, C. [Fermilab; Thomas, J. [University Coll. London; Donatella Torretta, Donatella Torretta [Fermilab; Matthew Wetstein, Matthew Wetstein [Iowa State University

    2016-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2016. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2016 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MicroBooNE experiment and the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment, LArIAT experiment and Meson Test Beam activities in the 120 GeV external switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was then edited for inclusion in this summary.

  12. Impact of fuel cladding failure events on occupational radiation exposures at nuclear power plants. Case study: PWR during routine operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, M.P.; Martin, G.F.; Haggard, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present data in support of evaluating the impact of fuel cladding failure events on occupational radiation exposure. To determine quantitatively whether fuel cladding failure contributes significantly to occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure measurements were taken at comparable locations in two mirror-image pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and their common auxiliary building. One reactor, Unit B, was experiencing degraded fuel characterized as 0.125% fuel pin-hole leakers and was operating at approximately 55% of the reactor's licensed maximum core power, while the other reactor, Unit A, was operating under normal conditions with less than 0.01% fuel pin-hole leakers at 100% of the reactor's licensed maximum core power. Measurements consisted of gamma spectral analyses, radiation exposure rates and airborne radionuclide concentrations. In addition, data from primary coolant sample results for the previous 20 months on both reactor coolant systems were analyzed. The results of the measurements and coolant sample analyses suggest that a 3560-megawatt-thermal (1100 MWe) PWR operating at full power with 0.125% failed fuel can experience an increase of 540% in radiation exposure rates as compared to a PWR operating with normal fuel. In specific plant areas, the degraded fuel may elevate radiation exposure rates even more

  13. Safety of operations in the manufacture of driver fuel for the first charge of the Dragon Reactor and modifications to the safety document for the Dragon Fuel Element Production Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, H.; Cross, J.; Flamm, J.

    1965-01-01

    The manufacture of the zirconium containing 'driver' fuel and fuel elements for the First Charge of the Dragon Reactor Experiment has been completed without incident. This is a report on the safety of operations in the Dragon Fuel Element Production Building during an approximately six month period when the 'driver' fuel was manufactured and 25 elements containing this fuel were assembled and exported to the Reactor Building. The opportunity is taken to bring the Safety Document up-to-date and to report on any significant operational failures of equipment. (author)

  14. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  15. Experience of development of the methods and equipment and the prospects for creation of WWER fuel examination stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, S.; Smirnov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The report presents the basic methods and equipment developed for inspection of the fuel elements and fuel assemblies in the spent fuel pools. It considers their characteristics and results of the tests under laboratory and experimental fuel examination stand conditions. In particular, the following techniques are presented: visual inspection, measurement of the geometrical dimensions, definition of the form change in fuel assemblies and fuel elements, detection of the failed fuel elements, etc. The experience of the experimental fuel examination stand operation is generalized. The concept of the creation of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 FA and FE inspection stands is presented. The concept is based on the modular principle which runs as follows. A set of the basic functional blocks is being developed based on which it is possible to make such a stand configuration which is necessary to fulfil the specific program of the examination at the particular nuclear power plant. (author)

  16. Experiences of operation for Ikata Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimoto, Shigeyuki

    1979-01-01

    No. 1 plant in the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., is a two-loop PWR unit with electric output of 566 MW, and it began the commercial operation on September 30, 1977, as the first nuclear power station in Shikoku. It is the 13th LWR and 7th PWR in Japan. The period of construction was 52 months since it had been started in June, 1973. During the period, it became the object of the first administrative litigation to seek the cancellation of permission to install the reactor, and it was subjected to the influence of the violent economical variation due to the oil shock, but it was completed as scheduled. After the start of operation, it continued the satisfactory operation, and generated about 2.35 billion KWh for 4300 operation hours. It achieved the rate of utilization of 96.7%. Since March 28, 1978, the first periodical inspection was carried out, and abnormality was not found in the reactor, the steam generator and the fuel at all. The period of inspection was 79 days and shorter than expected. The commercial operation was started again on June 14. The outline of the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, its state of operation, and the periodical inspection are reported. Very good results were able to be reported on the operation for one year, thanks to the valuable experiences offered by other electric power companies. (Kako, I.)

  17. Assessment of radiological and non-radiological hazards in the nuclear fuel cycle - The Indian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamony, S.; Gopinath, D.V.

    1996-01-01

    Design and operational aspects of nuclear fuel cycle facilities have several features that distinguish them from nuclear power plants. These are related to (i) the nature of operations which are chiefly mining, metallurgical and chemical; (ii) the nature and type of radio-active materials handled, their specific activities and inventories; and (iii) the physical and chemical processes involved and the associated containment provisions. Generally the radioactive materials are present in an already highly dispersible or mobile form, in the form of solutions, slurries and powders, often associated with a wide variety of reactive and corrosive chemicals. There are further marked differences between the front-end and back-end of the fuel cycle. Whereas the front-end is characterized by the presence of large quantities of low specific activity naturally occurring radioactive materials, the back-end is characterized by high specific activities and concentrations of fission products and actinides. Radioactive characteristics of waste arisings are also different in different phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. Potential for internal exposure in the occupational environment is another distinguishing feature as compared with the more common designs of nuclear power reactors. Potential for accidents, their phenomenology and the resulting consequences are also markedly different in fuel cycle operations. The non-radiological hazards in fuel cycle operations are also of significance, since the operations are mostly mining, metallurgical and chemical in nature. These aspects are examined and evaluated in this paper, based on the Indian experience. (author). 12 refs, 10 tabs

  18. GRAS NRT Precise Orbit Determination: Operational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    MartinezFadrique, Francisco M.; Mate, Alberto Agueda; Rodriquez-Portugal, Francisco Sancho

    2007-01-01

    EUMETSAT launched the meteorological satellite MetOp-A in October 2006; it is the first of the three satellites that constitute the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) space segment. This satellite carries a challenging and innovative instrument, the GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding (GRAS). The goal of the GRAS instrument is to support the production of atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity with high accuracy, in an operational context, based on the bending of the GPS signals traversing the atmosphere during the so-called occultation periods. One of the key aspects associated to the data processing of the GRAS instrument is the necessity to describe the satellite motion and GPS receiver clock behaviour with high accuracy and within very strict timeliness limitations. In addition to these severe requirements, the GRAS Product Processing Facility (PPF) must be integrated in the EPS core ground segment, which introduces additional complexity from the data integration and operational procedure points of view. This paper sets out the rationale for algorithm selection and the conclusions from operational experience. It describes in detail the rationale and conclusions derived from the selection and implementation of the algorithms leading to the final orbit determination requirements (0.1 mm/s in velocity and 1 ns in receiver clock error at 1 Hz). Then it describes the operational approach and extracts the ideas and conclusions derived from the operational experience.

  19. Basis for Interim Operation for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    This document establishes the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) for the Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility (FSS) as managed by the 300 Area Deactivation Project (300 ADP) organization in accordance with the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract procedure (PHMC) HNF-PRO-700, ''Safety Analysis and Technical Safety Requirements''. A hazard classification (Benecke 2003a) has been prepared for the facility in accordance with DOE-STD-1027-92 resulting in the assignment of Hazard Category 3 for FSS Facility buildings that store N Reactor fuel materials (303-B, 3712, and 3716). All others are designated Industrial buildings. It is concluded that the risks associated with the current and planned operational mode of the FSS Facility (uranium storage, uranium repackaging and shipment, cleanup, and transition activities, etc.) are acceptable. The potential radiological dose and toxicological consequences for a range of credible uranium storage building have been analyzed using Hanford accepted methods. Risk Class designations are summarized for representative events in Table 1.6-1. Mitigation was not considered for any event except the random fire event that exceeds predicted consequences based on existing source and combustible loading because of an inadvertent increase in combustible loading. For that event, a housekeeping program to manage transient combustibles is credited to reduce the probability. An additional administrative control is established to protect assumptions regarding source term by limiting inventories of fuel and combustible materials. Another is established to maintain the criticality safety program. Additional defense-in-depth controls are established to perform fire protection system testing, inspection, and maintenance to ensure predicted availability of those systems, and to maintain the radiological control program. It is also concluded that because an accidental nuclear criticality is not credible based on the low uranium enrichment

  20. Operational experience of the ATLAS accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, P.K.; Bogaty, J.M.; Bollinger, L.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Craig, S.L.; Harden, R.E.; Markovich, P.; Munson, F.H.; Nixon, J.M.; Pardo, R.C.; Phillips, D.R.; Shepard, K.W.; Tilbrook, I.R.; Zinkmann, G.P.

    1990-01-01

    The ATLAS accelerator consists of a HVEC model FN tandem accelerator injecting into a linac of independently-phased niobium superconducting resonators. The accelerator provides beams with masses 6 ≤ A ≤ 127 and with energies ranging up to 20 MeV/A for the lightest ions and 4 MeV/A for the heaviest ions. Portions of the linac have been in operation since 1978 and, over the last decade, more than 35000 h of operating experience have been accumulated. The long-term stability of niobium resonators, and their feasibility for use in heavy-ion accelerators is now well established. (orig.)

  1. Preheat operating experiences at the FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    The rather extensive test program performed on the FFTF preheat control system resulted in successful sodium fill of one secondary heat transport loop on July 2, 1978. The data obtained during testing and the attendant operating experience gained resulted in some design changes and provided the information necessary to fully characterize system performance. Temperature excursions and deviations from preset limits of only a minor nature were encountered during preheat for sodium fill. The addition of the rate alarm feature was beneficial to operation of the preheat system and allowed early detection and correction of impending excursions

  2. Operational experience of extreme wind penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estanqueiro, Ana [INETI/LNEG - National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisbon (Portugal); Mateus, Carlos B. [Instituto de Meteorologia, Lisboa (Portugal); Pestana, Rui [Redes Energeticas Nacionais (REN), Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the operational experience from the Portuguese Power System during the 2009/2010 winter months when record wind penerations were observed: the instantaneous wind power penetration peaked at 70% of consumption during no-load periods and the wind energy accounted for more than 50% of the energy consumed for a large period. The regulation measures taken by the TSO are presented in the paper, together with the additional reserves operated for added system security. Information on the overall power system behavior under such extreme long-term wind power penetrations will also be addressed. (org.)

  3. Operating procedures: Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Carey, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility (FEAF) is a computer facility based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer. It became operational in late 1982. At that time two manuals were written to aid users and staff in their interactions with the facility. This manual is designed as a reference to assist the FEAF staff in carrying out their responsibilities. It is meant to supplement equipment and software manuals supplied by the vendors. Also this manual provides the FEAF staff with a set of consistent, written guidelines for the daily operation of the facility

  4. Operational experience at Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramblett, G.C.; Fisher, C.R.; Swart, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) station, a 330-MW(e) single reheat steam cycle powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is the first HTGR to enter commercial operation. Designed and built by General Atomic Company (GA), the plant is owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). Many unique design features have been incorporated into this reactor system, including high-pressure helium as the primary system coolant, a graphite-moderated prismatic block core design, fission-product-containing carbide coatings on both fissile and fertile fuel particles, steam-driven helium circulators turning on water bearings, and once-through steam generators. All of these systems are contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Extensive testing has been conducted during the rise to power following first criticality early in 1974 to verify system design performance. During this period, the plant has operated at power levels up to 70% and produced over one billion kilowatt hours of electricity. In 1979, the first refueling was conducted in conjunction with an extensive in-core inspection, the addition of in-core instrumentation, and a planned removal of a circulator for inspection. Later in the year, a scheduled shutdown was undertaken for surveillance tests, insertion of core region constraint devices (RCDs), and other maintenance. Fort St. Vrain has encountered problems of the type that would be expected in a first-of-a-kind system. The plant is currently restricted to 70% of design power by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pending resolution of the core region gas outlet temperature fluctuation problem. Even so, the basic performance of the HTGR concept and all of the unique design features have been successfully demonstrated. The system has been characterized by low personnel radiation exposures, operational flexibility, and long time afforded for status evaluation and response. (author)

  5. Large scale fuel oil production experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-08-04

    The effect of the coal throughput and the composition of the pasting oil, in particular the effect of different middle oil contents in the pasting oil, was previously tested in small scale experiments of hydrogenation of coal. Possibilities of increasing the throughput through the converter when producing heavy oil together with middle oil is shown in this work. The proper industrial detail for the production of heavy oil had to be developed first on a semi-commercial plant. The Upper Silesian coal was used to study the production of gasoline, middle oil, and heavy oil at 700 atm in a 1.6 m/sup 3/ converter and to relate the results with the small scale experiments (10-liter converter). Paste heat exchange was carried out successfully. The following experiments, among others, were carried out: mixed coals were hydrogenated to 100% gasoline plus middle oil, to 65% gasoline and middle oil and 35% heavy oil, as well as 50% gasoline and middle oil plus 50% heavy oil, in part with the usual iron catalyst combination and in part with the sulfurated Bayer mass together with the iron sulfate and sulfigran. The Heinity coal had been hydrogenated with the usual iron catalyst to 65% gasoline and middle oil plus 35% heavy oil. The important results were summarized in a table. Details of the experiments and processes used were given in 3 graphs and 42 tables.

  6. Particle fueling experiments with a series of pellets in LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldzuhn, J.; Damm, H.; Dinklage, A.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Ida, K.; Yamada, H.; LHD Experiment Group; Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2018-03-01

    Ice pellet injection is performed in the heliotron Large Helical Device (LHD). The pellets are injected in short series, with up to eight individual pellets. Parameter variations are performed for the pellet ice isotopes, the LHD magnetic configurations, the heating scenario, and some others. These experiments are performed in order to find out whether deeper fueling can be achieved with a series of pellets compared to single pellets. An increase of the fueling efficiency is expected since pre-cooling of the plasma by the first pellets within a series could aid deeper penetration of later pellets in the same series. In addition, these experiments show which boundary conditions must be fulfilled to optimize the technique. The high-field side injection of pellets, as proposed for deep fueling in a tokamak, will not be feasible with the same efficiency in a stellarator or heliotron because there the magnetic field gradient is smaller than in a tokamak of comparable size. Hence, too shallow pellet fueling, in particular in a large device or a fusion reactor, will be an issue that can be overcome only by extremely high pellet velocities, or other techniques that will have to be developed in the future. It turned out by our investigations that the fueling efficiency can be enhanced by the injection of a series of pellets to some extent. However, further investigations will be needed in order to optimize this approach for deep particle fueling.

  7. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, Stephen J.; Buehler, M.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Grinstein, S.; Habig, A.; Holmes, S.; Hylen, J.; Kissel, W.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2008. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2008 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  8. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M.N; Appel, J.A.; Brice, S.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, d.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Holmes, S.; Kissel, W.; Lee, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2009. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2009 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  9. Review of BNFL's operational experience of wet type flasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWilliam, D.S. [BNFL International Transport (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    BNFL International Transport's operational experience includes shipping 6000te of spent fuel from Japan to Sellafield, through its dedicated terminal at Barrow, and to Cogema La Hague. This fuel was shipped under the PNTL (Pacific Nuclear Transport Ltd) banner for which BNFL is responsible. PNTL owned and operated a fleet of 5 ships for Japanese business and a fleet of 80 wet and 58 dry flasks, for the transport of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel, from both Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). ''Wet'' or ''dry'' flask is the common terminology used to distinguish between spent fuel flasks transporting fuel where the fuel is immersed in water, or spent fuel flasks that have been drained of water and dried. This paper concentrates on the wet type of flask utilised to transport fuel to Sellafield, that is the Excellox type (including similar type NTL derivatives). It aims to provide a summary of operational experience during handling at power stations, shipment, unloading at reprocessors and from scheduled maintenance.

  10. Operational and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, F.; Gow, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    In the last 15 years the CEGB has experienced progressive plant development, integration and changes in operating regime through nine nuclear (gas-cooled reactor) power stations with corresponding instrumentation advances leading towards more refined centralized control. Operation and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation is reported in this paper with reference to the progressive changes related to the early magnox, late magnox and AGR periods. Data on instrumentation reliability in terms of reactor forced outages are presented and show that the instrumentation contributions to loss of generating plant availability are small. Reactor safety circuits, neutron flux and temperature measurements, gas analysis and vibration monitoring are discussed. In reviewing the reactor instrumentation the emphasis is on reporting recent experience, particularly on AGR equipment, but overall performance and changes to magnox equipment are included so that some appreciation can be obtained of instrumentation requirements with respect to plant lifetimes. (author)

  11. DAFNE operation with the FINUDA experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Milardi, C; Benedetti, G; Biagini, M E; Biscari, C; Boni, R; Boscolo, M; Clozza, A; Delle Monache, Giovanni O; Di Pirro, G; Drago, A; Gallo, A; Ghigo, A; Guiducci, S; Incurvati, M; Ligi, C; Marcellini, Fabio; Mazzitelli, G; Pellegrino, L; Preger, M A; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Ricci, R; Rotundo, U; Sanelli, C; Serio, M; Sgamma, F; Spataro, B; Stecchi, A; Stella, A; Vaccarezza, C; Vescovi, M; Zobov, M

    2004-01-01

    DAFNE operation restarted in September 2003, after a six month shut-down for the installation of FINUDA, a magnetic detector dedicated to the study of hypernuclear physics. FINUDA is the third experiment running on DAFNE and operates while keeping on place the other detector KLOE. During the shut-down both Interaction Regions have been equipped with remotely controlled quadrupoles in order to operate at different solenoid fields. Among many other hardware upgrades one of the most significant is the reshaping of the wiggler pole profile to improve the field quality and the machine dynamic aperture. Commissioning of the collider in the new configuration has been completed in short time. The peak luminosity delivered to FINUDA has reached 6 10^31 s-1cm-2, with a daily integrated value close to 4 pb-1.

  12. Operational Experience from Solar Thermal Energy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  13. In-pile observations of fuel and clad relocation during LMFBR initiation phase accident experiments - the STAR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Schumacher, G.; Henkel, P.R.; Royl, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of seven in-pile experiments (the STAR experiments) were performed in which clad motion and fuel dispersal were observed in small pin bundles with high-speed cinematography. The experimental heating conditions reproduced a range of Loss of Flow (LOF) accident scenarios for the lead subassemblies in LMFBRs. The experiments show strong tendencies for limited clad motion in multiple pin bundles, early fuel disruption and dispersal (prior to fuel melting) in moderate power transients having simultaneous clad melting and fuel disruption. The more recent experiments indicate a possibility of steel vapor driven fuel dispersal after fuel breakup and intimate fuel/steel mixing. (author)

  14. CANDU fuel - fifteen years of power reactor experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjoy, G.R.; Bain, A.S.

    1977-05-01

    Analyses of performance statistics, supplemented by examinations of fuel from power reactors and experimental loops have yielded: (a) a thorough understanding of the fundamental behaviour of CANDU fuel; (b) data showing that the predicted high utilization of uranium has been achieved; (c) criteria for operation, which have led to the current very low defect rate of 0.03% of all assemblies and to 'CANLUB' fuel, which has a graphite interlayer between the fuel and sheath to reduce defects on power increases; (d) proof that the short length (500 mm), collapsible cladding features of the CANDU bundle are successful and that the fuel can operate at high-power output (current peak outer-element linear power is 58 +- 15% kW/m). As of mid-1976 over 3 x 10 6 individual elements have been built and over 2 x 10 6 elements have been irradiated. Only six defects have been attributed to faulty materials or fabrication, and the use of high-density UO 2 with low-moisture content precluded defects from hydrogen contamination and densification

  15. Operator decision aid for breached fuel operation in liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.; Hawkins, R.E.; Nickless, W.K.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the development of an expert system that provides continuous assessment of the safety significance and technical specification conformance of Delayed Neutron (DN) signals during breached fuel operation. The completed expert system has been parallelized on an innovative distributed-memory network-computing system that enables the computationally intensive kernel of the expert system to run in parallel on a group of low-cost Unix workstations. 1 ref

  16. Dual-fuel HCCI operation with DME/LPG/gasoline/hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, C.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines include usage of the different type of fuels, ultra low nitrogen oxide and particulate matter emissions and improved fuel economy. Disadvantages include an excessive combustion rate, engine noise, and hydrocarbon and carbon emissions. An experiment on dual-fuel HCCI operation with dimethyl ether (DME)/liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)/gasoline/hydrogen was presented. The advantages and disadvantages were first presented and the dual-fuel HCCI combustion engine was illustrated through an experimental apparatus. The experimental conditions were also presented in terms of engine speed, DME injection quantity, LPC injection quantity, and LPC composition. Experimental results were discussed for output performance and indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). It was concluded that the effect of LPG composition in a DME-LPG dual-fueled HCCI engine at various injection quantity and injective timing were observed. Specifically, it was found that propane was a more effective way to increase IMEP in this study, and that in a DME HCCI engine, higher load limit was extended by using LPG as an ignition inhibitor. tabs., figs.

  17. Special considerations on operating a fuel cell power plant using natural gas with marginal heating value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, L. Ng; Chien-Liang Lin [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan (China); Ya-Tang Cheng [Power Research Institute, Taiwan (China)

    1996-12-31

    In realizing new power generation technologies in Taiwan, a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant (model PC2513, ONSI Corporation) has been installed in the premises of the Power Research Institute of the Taiwan Power Company in Taipei County of Taiwan. The pipeline gas supplying to the site of this power plant has a high percentage of carbon dioxide and thus a slightly lower heating value than that specified by the manufacturer. Because of the lowering of heating value of input gas, the highest Output power from the power plant is understandably less than the rated power of 200 kW designed. Further, the transient response of the power plant as interrupted from the Grid is also affected. Since this gas is also the pipeline gas supplying to the heavily populated Taipei Municipal area, it is conceivable that the success of the operations of fuel cells using this fuel is of vital importance to the promotion of the use of this power generation technology in Taiwan. Hence, experiments were set up to assess the feasibility of this fuel cell power plant using the existing pipeline gas in this part of Taiwan where fuel cells would most likely find useful.

  18. Evaluation of gap heat transfer model in ELESTRES for CANDU fuel element under normal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Moon; Ohn, Myung Ryong; Im, Hong Sik; Choi, Jong Hoh; Hwang, Soon Taek

    1995-01-01

    The gap conductance between the fuel and the sheath depends strongly on the gap width and has a significant influence on the amount of initial stored energy. The modified Ross and Stoute gap conductance model in ELESTRES is based on a simplified thermal deformation model for steady-state fuel temperature calculations. A review on a series of experiments reveals that fuel pellets crack, relocate, and are eccentrically positioned within the sheath rather than solid concentric cylinders. In this paper, the two recently-proposed gap conductance models (offset gap model and relocated gap model) are described and are applied to calculate the fuel-sheath gap conductances under experimental conditions and normal operating conditions in CANDU reactors. The good agreement between the experimentally-inferred and calculated gap conductance values demonstrates that the modified Ross and Stoute model was implemented correctly in ELESTRES. The predictions of the modified Ross and Stoute model provide conservative values for gap heat transfer and fuel surface temperature compared to the offset gap and relocated gap models for a limiting power envelope. 13 figs., 3 tabs., 16 refs. (Author)

  19. Operational Experience with the ALICE Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mastroserio, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) constitutes the two innermost layers of the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment and it is the closest detector to the interaction point. As a vertex detector, it has the unique feature of generating a trigger signal that contributes to the L0 trigger of the ALICE experiment. The SPD started collecting data since the very first pp collisions at LHC in 2009 and since then it has taken part in all pp, Pb-Pb and p-Pb data taking campaigns. This contribution will present the main features of the SPD, the detector performance and the operational experience, including calibration and optimization activities from Run 1 to Run 2.

  20. Multi-response optimization of diesel engine operating parameters running with water-in-diesel emulsion fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vellaiyan Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-in-diesel emulsion fuel is a promising alternative diesel fuel, which has the potential to promote better performance and emission characteristics in an existing Diesel engine without engine modification and added cost. The key factor that has to be focused with the introduction of such fuel in existing Diesel engine is desired engine-operating conditions. The present study attempts to address the previous issue with two-phases of experiments. In the first phase, stable water-in-diesel emulsion fuels (5, 10, 15, and 20 water-in-diesel are prepared and their stability period and physico-chemical properties are measured. In the second phase, experiments are conducted in a single cylinder, 4-stroke Diesel engine with pre-pared water-in-diesel emulsion fuel blends based on L16 orthogonal array suggested in Taguchi’s quality control concept to record the output responses (perormance and emission levels. Based on signal-to-noise ratio and grey relational analysis, optimal level of operating factors are determined to obtain better response and verified through confirmation experiments. A statistical analysis of variance is applied to measure the significance of individual operating parameters on overall engine performance. Results indicate that the emulsion fuel prepared by Sorbitan monolaurate surfactant at high stirrer speed endows with better emulsion stability and acceptable variation in physicochemical properties. Results of this study also reveal that the optimal parametric setting effectively improves the combustion, performance, and emission characteristics of Diesel engine.

  1. Operational experience feedback with precursor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncar, M.; Ferjancic, M.; Muehleisen, A.; Vojnovic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Experience of practical operation is a valuable source of information for improving the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. Operational experience feedback (Olef) system manages this aspect of NPP operation. The traditional ways of investigating operational events, such as the root cause analysis (RCA), are predominantly qualitative. RCA as a part of the Olef system provides technical guidance and management expectations in the conduct of assessing the root cause to prevent recurrence, covering the following areas: conditions preceding the event, sequence of events, equipment performance and system response, human performance considerations, equipment failures, precursors to the event, plant response and follow-up, radiological considerations, regulatory process considerations and safety significance. The root cause of event is recognized when there is no known answer on question 'why has it happened?' regarding relevant condition that may have affected the event. At that point the Olef is proceeding by actions taken in response to events, utilization, dissemination and exchange of operating experience information and at the end reviewing the effectiveness of the Olef. Analysis of the event and the selection of recommended corrective/preventive actions for implementation and prioritization can be enhanced by taking into account the information and insights derived from Pasa-based analysis. A Pasa based method, called probabilistic precursor event analysis (PPE A) provides a complement to the RCA approach by focusing on how an event might have developed adversely, and implies the mapping of an operational event on a probabilistic risk model of the plant in order to obtain a quantitative assessment of the safety significance of the event PSA based event analysis provides, due to its quantitative nature, appropriate prioritization of corrective actions. PPEA defines requirements for PSA model and code, identifies input requirements and elaborates following

  2. Non-commercial power operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Root, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    The information in this section is selected and excerpted from DOE weekly publication OPERATING EXPERIENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY, surveys the operations of those power reactors in the United States which have been issued operating licenses. Table I shows the number of such reactors and their net capacities as of June 30, 1992, the end of the three-month period covered in this report Table 2 lists the unit capacity and forced outage rate for each licensed reactor for each of the three-months covered in each report and the cumulative values of these parameters at the end of the covered quarter since the beginning of commercial operation. The information for this table was obtained from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Information Resources Management. The Maximum Dependable Capacity (MDC) Unit Capacity (in percent) is defined as follows: (Net electrical energy generated during the reporting period x 100) divided by the product of the number of hours in the reporting period and the MDC of the reactor in question. The forced outage rate (in percent) is defined as: (The total number of hours in the reporting period during which the unit was inoperable as the result of a forced outage x 100) divided by the sum (forced outage hours + operating hours)

  3. Simulation with GOTHIC of experiments Oxidation of fuel in Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Murillo Mendez, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work has been addressed for the first time la simulation with the GOTHIC code, experiments oxidation and ignition of SFP in phase 1. This work represents a solid starting point for analysis of specific degradation of fuel in the pools of our facilities.

  4. Operation and maintenance manuals for VEGA apparatus on radionuclide release from irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Retsu; Hidaka, Akihide; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kudo, Tamotsu; Ohtomo, Takashi; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    2001-03-01

    An experimental program, Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release (VEGA), was initiated at JAERI from September 1999 to improve source term predictabilities for hypothetical severe accidents. In the experiment, a short fuel segment taken from LWR fuels irradiated in Japanese power reactors is inductively heated to high temperatures (∼3273K) in a hot cell under high pressure conditions up to 1.0MPa. Particularly, a focus will be placed on the release and transport behaviors of low-volatile fission products (FP), actinides and short-life FP which have not been well investigated in previous studies. This experimental apparatus was completed in February 1999 and three experiments were performed by the end of 2000. Most of these experiments were successfully conducted, but some problems were also found. Especially, in the first VEGA-1 test with the purpose of shakedown and reference data acquisition, there were problems such as flow blockage at the outlet of furnace due to structure melting, malfunction of heaters and so on. Therefore, the design for these defective parts was changed for future experiments. Moreover, the apparatus is not so big but the entire processes are very complicated. Accordingly, the operators should well understand the details of the apparatus including the recent change of design. This report describes outlines of the VEGA apparatus and the procedures for operation and maintenance. (author)

  5. Operation and maintenance manuals for VEGA apparatus on radionuclide release from irradiated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashida, Retsu [Mitsubishi Kakoki Kaisha Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hidaka, Akihide; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kudo, Tamoatsu; Ohtomo, Takashi; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    An experimental program, Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release (VEGA), was initiated at JAERI from September 1999 to improve source term predictabilities for hypothetical severe accidents. In the experiment, a short fuel segment taken from LWR fuels irradiated in Japanese power reactors is inductively heated to high temperatures ({approx}3273K) in a hot cell under high pressure conditions up to 1.0MPa. Particularly, a focus will be placed on the release and transport behaviors of low-volatile fission products (FP), actinides and short-life FP which have not been well investigated in previous studies. This experimental apparatus was completed in February 1999 and three experiments were performed by the end of 2000. Most of these experiments were successfully conducted, but some problems were also found. Especially, in the first VEGA-1 test with the purpose of shakedown and reference data acquisition, there were problems such as flow blockage at the outlet of furnace due to structure melting, malfunction of heaters and so on. Therefore, the design for these defective parts was changed for future experiments. Moreover, the apparatus is not so big but the entire processes are very complicated. Accordingly, the operators should well understand the details of the apparatus including the recent change of design. This report describes outlines of the VEGA apparatus and the procedures for operation and maintenance. (author)

  6. Canadian experience with wet and dry fuel storage concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayman, S.A.

    1978-07-01

    Canada has been storing fuel in water-filled pools for 30 years. There have been no significant problems, but until recently little effort has been invested in quantitative assessment of fuel performance under storage conditions. Work is now in progress to provide such information. Storage pools at nuclear generating stations have operated satisfactorily. The Canadian nuclear industry has nevertheless been studying methods for reducing storage costs and/or increasing reliability. Various concepts, using both water and air cooling, have been suggested. One such concept - the air-cooled concrete canister - is presently under test at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. (author)

  7. Initial cathode processing experiences and results for the treatment of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Laug, D.V.; Brunsvold, A.R.; Roach, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment demonstration at Argonne National Laboratory, a vacuum distillation process is being employed for the recovery of uranium following an electrorefining process. Distillation of a salt electrolyte, primarily consisting of a eutectic mixture of lithium and potassium chlorides, from uranium is achieved by a batch operation termed ''cathode processing.'' Cathode processing is performed in a retort furnace which enables the production of a stable uranium product that can be isotopically diluted and stored. To date, experiments have been performed with two distillation units; one for prototypical testing and the other for actual spent fuel treatment operations. The results and experiences from these initial experiments with both units will be discussed as well as problems encountered and their resolution

  8. Shortcut model for water-balanced operation in fuel processor fuel cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Kramer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    In a fuel processor, a hydrocarbon or oxygenate fuel is catalytically converted into a mixture rich in hydrogen which can be fed to a fuel cell to generate electricity. In these fuel processor fuel cell systems (FPFCs), water is recovered from the exhaust gases and recycled back into the system. We

  9. Extended fuel cycle operation for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, G.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear steam turbine power plant system having an arrangement therein for extended fuel cycle operation is described. The power plant includes a turbine connected at its inlet to a source of motive fluid having a predetermined pressure associated therewith. The turbine has also connected thereto an extraction conduit which extracts steam from a predetermined location therein for use in an associated apparatus. A bypass conduit is provided between a point upstream of the inlet and the extraction conduit. A flow control device is provided within the bypass conduit and opens when the pressure of the motive steam supply drops beneath the predetermined pressure as a result of reactivity loss within the nuclear reactor. Opening of the bypass conduit provides flow to the associated apparatus and at the same time provides an increased flow orifice to maintain fluid flow rate at a predetermined level

  10. The European Union Clearinghouse on Operating Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escrig, D.

    2015-07-01

    In the European Union, a regional network has been established to enhance nuclear safety through improvement of the use of lessons learned from Operating Experience. This network’s hub is located at the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Petten, the Netherlands. This organisation is known as the European Clearinghouse on Operating Experience Feedback for Nuclear Power Plants. The ‘Clearinghouse’ is comprised of dedicated staff from JRC and member states that have joined the organisation. Membership is mainly composed of nuclear safety regulatory authorities and their Technical Support Organizations within the EU region. Its Centralised Office gathers nuclear safety experts performing the following technical tasks in support to the EU Member States: “Topical Studies” providing in-depth assessment of either articularly significant events or either families of events. Trend analysis of events in order to identify priority areas.Improvement of the quality of event reports submitted by the EU Member States to the International Reporting System jointly operated by the OECD-NEA and the IAEA.Reporting every three months the main events having occurred in NPPs. Database: a European central OE repository being developed in order to ensure long term storage of OE and to facilitate information retrieval. (Author.

  11. Critical experiments on minimal-content gadolinia for above-5wt% enrichment fuels in Toshiba NCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Shouichi; Yoshioka, Kenichi; Mitsuhashi, Ishi; Kumanomido, Hironori; Sugahara, Satoshi; Hiraiwa, Kouji

    2009-01-01

    A concept of 'minimal-content gadolinia' with a content of less than several hundred ppm mixed in the 'above-5wt% enrichment UO 2 fuel' for super high burnup is proposed for ensuring the criticality safety in the UO 2 fuel fabrication facility for light water reactors (LWRs) without increase in investment cost. Required gadolinia contents calculated were from 53 to 305 ppm for enrichments of UO 2 powders for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel from 6 to 10 wt%. It is expected that the minimal-content gadolinia yields an acceptable reactivity suppression at the beginning of operating cycle and no reactivity penalty at the end of operating cycle due to no residual gadolinium. A series of critical experiments were carried out in the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA). Reactivity effects of the gadolinia were measured to clarify the nuclear characteristics, and the measured values and the calculated values agreed within 5%. (author)

  12. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles (∼30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller (∼ mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced ∼100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was ≥343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water

  13. High-burn-up fuels for fast reactors. Past experience and novel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Kevan D.; Gilleland, John; Whitmer, Charles; Zimmerman, George

    2009-01-01

    Fast reactors in the U.S. routinely achieved fuel burn-ups of 10%, with some fuel able to reach peak burn-ups of 20%, notably in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. Maximum burn-up has historically been constrained by chemical and mechanical interactions between the fuel and its cladding, and to some extent by radiation damage and thermal effects (e.g., radiation-induced creep, thermal creep, and radiation embrittlement) that cause the cladding to weaken. Although fast reactors have used several kinds of fuel - including oxide, metal alloy, carbide, and nitride - the vast majority of experience with fast reactors has been using oxide (including mixed oxide) and metal-alloy fuels based on uranium. Our understanding of high-burn-up operation is also limited by the fact that breeder reactor programs have historically assumed that their fuel would eventually undergo reprocessing; the programs thus have not made high burn-up a top priority. Recently a set of novel designs have emerged for fast reactors that require little initial enrichment and no reprocessing. These reactors exploit a concept known as a traveling wave (sometimes referred to as a breed-and-burn wave, fission wave, or nuclear-burning wave). By breeding and using its own fuel in place as it operates, a traveling-wave reactor can obtain burn-ups that approach 50%, well beyond the current base of knowledge and experience. Our computational work on the physics of traveling-wave reactors shows that they require metal-alloy fuel to provide the margins of reactivity necessary to sustain a breed-and-burn wave. This paper reviews operating experience with high-burn-up fuels and the technical feasibility of moving to a qualitatively new burn-up regime. We discuss our calculations on traveling-wave reactors, including those concerning the possible use of thorium. The challenges associated with high burn-up and fluence in fuels and materials are also discussed. (author)

  14. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim [Multipurpose Reactor Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (PRSG-BATAN), Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1999-08-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  15. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim

    1999-01-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  16. Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

    2008-09-01

    Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

  17. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost element of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  18. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschbuehl, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  19. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Marcisovsky, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  20. Operational experience of the ATLAS accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, P.K.; Bogaty, J.M.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The ATLAS accelerator consists of a HVEC model FN tandem accelerator injecting into a linac of independently-phased niobium superconducting resonators. The accelerator provides beams with masses from 6≤A≤127 and with energies ranging up to 20 MeV/A for the lightest ions and 4 MeV/A for the heaviest ions. Portions of the linac have been in operation since 1978 and, over the last decade, more than 35,000 hours of operating experience have been accumulated. The long-term stability of niobium resonators, and their feasibility for use in heavy-ion accelerators is now well established. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Selection of operations staff, qualifications and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Requirements and suggestions have been made by authorities and various organisations in a number of countries which define necessary experience and training for the various groups of nuclear power plant personnel. For two countries, the USA and the FRG, a comparison has been made which shows that there is only a slight deviation, taking into account the different education systems. With the example of the Biblis nuclear power plant the training on the job is described. Especially the production or operation department is looked at in more detail. The training is split up into several parts: a general part, such as nuclear physics, reactor physics and engineering, reactor safety, radiation protection and so on and a plant related part, such as arrangement and mode of operation of the plant under normal and accident conditions, license conditions and so on. (orig.) [de

  2. The Brazilian experience with alcohol fuel: microeconomic and environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seroa da Motta, R.

    1990-01-01

    Producers and consumers in Brazil are not longer regarding alcohol (ethanol) as a valuable fuel choice. Although the falling of oil prices has contributed to this situation, the lack of concern on microeconomic behaviour has also played an important role. Furthermore, environmental gains derived from the use of a mixture of alcohol and gasoline have been forgotten when alcohol fuel is evaluated. From the Brazilian experience some fruitful lessons can be learnt, to support research efforts for renewable energy programmes in Europe and the U.S.A. (author)

  3. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lantzsch, Kerstin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with new service quarter panels to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run 1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning, operation and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector will be presented.

  4. CMS Tracker commissioning and first operation experience

    CERN Document Server

    Delaere, C

    2007-01-01

    The CMS silicon strip tracker is the largest device of its type ever built. There are 24244 single-sided micro-strip sensors covering an active area of nearly 200 square meters. After a short introduction on the tracker, the program at the CMS tracker integration facility will be described. The strategy and results from the commissioning will be presented together with results on low-level detector performance. The general experience gained by operating the Tracker at different temperatures will be presented. This includes hardware aspects, acquisition software and infrastructures choices, or distributed data processing.

  5. ATLAS Tracker and Pixel Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00222525; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The tracking performance of the ATLAS detector relies critically on the silicon and gaseous tracking subsystems that form the ATLAS Inner Detector. Those subsystems have undergone significant hardware and software upgrades to meet the challenges imposed by the higher collision energy, pile-up and luminosity that are being delivered by the LHC during Run2. The key status and performance metrics of the Pixel Detector and the Semi Conductor Tracker, are summarised, and the operational experience and requirements to ensure optimum data quality and data taking efficiency are described.

  6. OPERATIONS ELECTRONIC LOGBOOK EXPERIENCE AT BNL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMPBELL,I.; MARR,G.; SAMPSON,P.

    2002-06-02

    A web-based system for electronic logbooks, ''elog'', developed at Fermilab (FNAL), has been adopted for use by AGS and RHIC operations and physicists at BNL for the 2001-2 fixed target and collider runs. This paper describes the main functional and technical issues encountered in the first year of electronic logbook use, including security, search and indexing, sequencer integration, archival, and graphics management. We also comment on organizational experience and planned changes for the next facility run starting in September 2002.

  7. Operating experience with gamma ray irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, F.M.; Ouwerkerk, T.

    1980-01-01

    The experience of Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) with radioisotopes dates back to the mid-1940s when radium was marketed for medical purposes. Cobalt-60 came on the scene in 1949 and within a few years a thriving business in cancer teletherapy machines and research irradiators was developed. AECL's first full-scale cobalt-60 gamma ray sterilizer for medical products was installed in 1964. AECL now has over 50 plants and 30 million curies in service around the world. Sixteen years of design experience in cobalt-60 sources, radiation shielding, safety interlock systems, and source pass mechanisms have made gamma irradiators safe, reliable, and easy to operate. This proven technology is being applied in promising new fields such as sludge treatment and food preservation. Cesium-137 is expected to be extensively utilized as the gamma radiation source for these applications

  8. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector, therefore, in view of Run-2 of LHC, the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and an additional optical link per module was added to overcome in some layers the readout bandwidth limitation when LHC will exceed the nominal peak luminosity by almost a factor of 3. The key features and challenges met during the IBL project will be presented, as well as its operational experience and Pixel Detector performance in LHC.

  9. Irradiated fuel reassembling experience of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishinoiri, Kenji; Nagamine, Tsuyoshi; Harada, Mamoru; Aratani, Kiyonori; Matsushima, Hideya

    1990-01-01

    The Fuel Monitoring Facility (FMF) is located adjacent to the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO', at the Oarai Engineering Center. At FMF, more than 140 assemblies has already been disassembled and examined, and a lot of results to evaluate the fuel performance has been obtained. In addition to these once-through examinations, it is getting more and more important to conduct the interim examinations and the reinsertion for continuous irradiation. It will give more flexibility for the irradiation experiments. Since FMF was originally designed to make the reinsertion possible, there is a path to get the assembly back to the reactor. The main items to be developed for the reinsertion of assemblies were as follows. 1. Irradiation vehicle 2. Disassembling and interim examination 3. Decontamination of fuel pin surface 4. Reassembling machine (author)

  10. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  11. Experience of remote under water handling operations at Tarapur Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Each Refuelling outage of Tarapur Atomic Power Station Reactors involves a great deal of remote underwater handling operations using special remote handling tools, working deep down in the reactor vessel under about sixty feet of water and in the narrow confines of highly radioactive core. The remote underwater handling operations include incore and out of core sipping operations, fuel reloading or shuffling, uncoupling of control rod drives, replacement and shuffling of control blades, replacement of local power range monitors, spent fuel shipment in casks, retrieval of fallen or displaced fuel top guide spacers, orifices and their installation, underwater CCTV inspection of reactor internals, core verification, channelling and dechannelling of fuel bundles, inspection of fuel bundles and channels, unbolting and removal of old racks, installation of high density racks, removal and reinstallation of fuel support plugs and guide tubes, underwater cutting of irradiated hardware material and their disposal, fuel reconstitution, removal and reinstallation of system dryer separator etc.. The paper describes in brief the salient experience of remote underwater handling operations at TAPS especially the unusual problems faced and solved, by using special tools, employing specific techniques and by repeated efforts, patience, ingenuity and skills. (author). 10 figs

  12. International co-operation in the supply of nuclear fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper draws on B.N.F.L.'s wide experience of international collaboration in nuclear fuel process activities to examine the pros and cons of international agreements. Initially, the factors that influence the need to co-operate, the extent of possible co-operation and the alternative types of agreement are reviewed. Next, the benefits, problems and risks associated with each function, such as managmenet, financial, R and D, marketing and operations that could be covered within the scope of an international agreement, are examined in detail. The paper continues by calling upon specific experience obtained by B.N.F.L. in co-operation with other organisations over several years in operating both major and much smaller agreements illustrating the rationale behind the co-operation, the resolution of 'teething' troubles and the current status of these organisations. In conclusion, the paper comments upon the effectiveness of collaboration agreements and identifies several requirements for internation co-operation to succeed

  13. Fast reactor parameter optimization taking into account changes in fuel charge type during reactor operation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afrin, B.A.; Rechnov, A.V.; Usynin, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation and solution of optimization problem for parameters determining the layout of the central part of sodium cooled power reactor taking into account possible changes in fuel charge type during reactor operation time are performed. The losses under change of fuel composition type for two reactor modifications providing for minimum doubling time for oxide and carbide fuels respectively, are estimated

  14. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 02-2-603A Vehicle Fuel Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 02-2-603A Vehicle Fuel Consumption 5a. CONTRACT...test methods used to measure and present the fuel consumption characteristics for wheeled and tracked vehicles. Specific facilities, instrumentation...test controls, and analysis techniques are presented. 15. SUBJECT TERMS fuel consumption traction battery hybrid

  15. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  16. Experiences and Trends of Manufacturing Technology of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    The 'Atoms for Peace' mission initiated in the mid-1950s paved the way for the development and deployment of nuclear fission reactors as a source of heat energy for electricity generation in nuclear power reactors and as a source of neutrons in non-power reactors for research, materials irradiation, and testing and production of radioisotopes. The fuels for nuclear reactors are manufactured from natural uranium (∼99.3% 238 U + ∼0.7% 235 U) and natural thorium (∼100% 232 Th) resources. Currently, most power and research reactors use 235 U, the only fissile isotope found in nature, as fuel. The fertile isotopes 238 U and 232 Th are transmuted in the reactor to human-made 239 Pu and 233 U fissile isotopes, respectively. Likewise, minor actinides (MA) (Np, Am and Cm) and other plutonium isotopes are also formed by a series of neutron capture reactions with 238 U and 235 U. Long term sustainability of nuclear power will depend to a great extent on the efficient, safe and secure utilization of fissile and fertile materials. Light water reactors (LWRs) account for more than 82% of the operating reactors, followed by pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), which constitute ∼10% of reactors. LWRs will continue to dominate the nuclear power market for several decades, as long as economically viable natural uranium resources are available. Currently, the plutonium obtained from spent nuclear fuel is subjected to mono recycling in LWRs as uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX), containing up to 12% PuO 2 , in a very limited way. The reprocessed uranium (RepU) is also re-enriched and recycled in LWRs in a few countries. Unfortunately, the utilization of natural uranium resources in thermal neutron reactors is 2 and MOX fuel technology has matured during the past five decades. These fuels are now being manufactured, used and reprocessed on an industrial scale. Mixed uranium- plutonium monocarbide (MC), mononitride (MN) and U-Pu-Zr alloys are recognized as advanced fuels

  17. Cycle to Cycle Variation Study in a Dual Fuel Operated Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Pasunurthi, Shyamsundar

    2017-03-28

    The standard capability of engine experimental studies is that ensemble averaged quantities like in-cylinder pressure from multiple cycles and emissions are reported and the cycle to cycle variation (CCV) of indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) is captured from many consecutive combustion cycles for each test condition. However, obtaining 3D spatial distribution of all the relevant quantities such as fuel-air mixing, temperature, turbulence levels and emissions from such experiments is a challenging task. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of engine flow and combustion can be used effectively to visualize such 3D spatial distributions. A dual fuel engine is considered in the current study, with manifold injected natural gas (NG) and direct injected diesel pilot for ignition. Multiple engine cycles in 3D are simulated in series like in the experiments to investigate the potential of high fidelity RANS simulations coupled with detailed chemistry, to accurately predict the CCV. Cycle to cycle variation (CCV) is expected to be due to variabilities in operating and boundary conditions, in-cylinder stratification of diesel and natural gas fuels, variation in in-cylinder turbulence levels and velocity flow-fields. In a previous publication by the authors [1], variabilities in operating and boundary conditions are incorporated into several closed cycle simulations performed in parallel. Stochastic variations/stratifications of fuel-air mixture, turbulence levels, temperature and internal combustion residuals cannot be considered in such closed cycle simulations. In this study, open cycle simulations with port injection of natural gas predicted the combined effect of the stratifications on the CCV of in-cylinder pressure. The predicted Coefficient of Variation (COV) of cylinder pressure is improved compared to the one captured by closed cycle simulations in parallel.

  18. HTCAP-1: a program for calcuating operating temperatures in HFIR target irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.; Howard, A.M.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal modeling code, HTCAP-1, calculates in-reactor operating temperatures of fueled specimens contained in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target irradiation experiments (HT-series). Temperature calculations are made for loose particle and bonded fuel rod specimens. Maximum particle surface temperatures are calculated for the loose particles and centerline and surface temperatures for the fuel rods. Three computational models are employed to determine fission heat generation rates, capsule heat transfer analysis, and specimen temperatures. This report is also intended to be a users' manual, and the application of HTCAP-1 to the HT-34 irradiation capsule is presented

  19. Transport of oxide spent fuel. Industrial experience of COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1983-01-01

    COGEMA is ruling all transports of spent fuel to La Hague reprocessing plant. The paper summarizes some aspects of the experience gained in this field (road, rail and sea transports) and describes the standards defined by COGEMA as regards transport casks. These standards are as follows: - casks of dry type, - casks of the maximum size compatible with rail transports, - capability to be unloaded with standardized equipment and following standard procedures

  20. Small sodium valve design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, R.; Elie, X.; Vercasson, M.; Nedelec, J.

    1974-01-01

    Conventionally, valves for sodium pipes smaller than 125 mm in diameter are called ''small sodium valves''. However, this limit should rather be considered as the lower limit o ''large sodium valves''. In fact, both the largest sizes of small valves and the smallest of large valves can be found in the range of 125-300 mm in diameter. Thus what is said about small valves also applies, for a few valve types, above the 125 mm limit. Sodium valves are described here in a general manner, with no manufacturing details except when necessary for understanding valve behavior. Operating experience is pointed out wherever possible. Finally, some information is given about ongoing or proposed development plans. (U.S.)

  1. PWR Fuel licensing in France - from design to reprocessing: licensing of nuclear PWR fuel rod design to satisfy with criteria for normal and abnormal fuel operation in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, R.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture are presented: French regulatory context; Current fuel management methods; Request from the french operator EdF; Most recent actions of the french Nuclear safety authority; Fuel assemblies deformations (impact of high burn-up; investigations during reactor's exploitation; control rods drop off times)

  2. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanty, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. During Run-I, the detector provided hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and two endcaps with three disk layers each. It consisted of 1744 n+-in-n silicon modules with a total of about 80 million pixels that were individually read out via chips bump-bonded to the silicon substrate. The ATLAS Pixel Detector started to record data since the first LHC collisions and since the beginning of its operation it performed very well. The operational challenges included the maximization of data taking efficiency, dealing with single event upsets, and the recovery of lost modules. The data acquisition techniques also had to adapt to the rapidly changing LHC beam conditions. In order to maximize the physics potential and the quality of the data, online and offline calibrations were performed on a regular basis. The calibrations ensured maximal hit and charge collection efficiency. The position resolut...

  3. The operating experience of French PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meclot, B.

    1984-01-01

    Since March 1, 1984, 27 PWR plants of 900 MW have been connected to the French grid, and their installed capacity of 24,280 MW constitutes a half of the thermal power plants of Electricite de France. The energy production of the PWR plants amounted to 126 TWh in 1983, that is, 68 % of the thermal output. At the beginning of 1984, the total operating experience of 27 plants reached 87 reactor years, and 47 shutdowns have been made for inspection and refueling. In 1984, six new plants are to be commissioned, and two of these are the first 1,300 MW plants. When the proportion of nuclear power plants becomes substantial, they tend to be operated in load-following mode, and such situation has begun as early as 1982 in France. The availability of 23 plants of one year old was 55 %, that of 21 plants of two years old was 56 %, and that of 16 plants of three years old was 67 %. The policy of the standardized technical design has resulted in very beneficial series effect. All the collected data and their follow up have been stored in the Event File, and as of March 1, 1984, more than 7,000 events have been processed. The adaptation to power regulation, the extension of refueling intervals, and the shutdown for maintenance and refueling are reported. (Kako, I.)

  4. On the influence of temperature on PEM fuel cell operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, M.; Siegel, N. P.; Spakovsky, M. R. von

    The 3D implementation of a previously developed 2D PEMFC model [N.P. Siegel, M.W. Ellis, D.J. Nelson, M.R. von Spakovsky, A two-dimensional computational model of a PEMFC with liquid water transport, J. Power Sources 128 (2) (2004) 173-184; N.P. Siegel, M.W. Ellis, D.J. Nelson, M.R. von Spakovsky, Single domain PEMFC model based on agglomerate catalyst geometry, J. Power Sources 115 (2003) 81-89] has been used to analyze the various pathways by which temperature affects the operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell [M. Coppo, CFD analysis and experimental investigation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, Ph.D. Dissertation, Politecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy, 2005]. The original model, implemented in a specially modified version of CFDesign ® [CFDesign ® V5.1, Blue Ridge Numerics, 2003] , accounts for all of the major transport processes including: (i) a three-phase model for water transport in the liquid, vapor and dissolved phases, (ii) proton transport, (iii) gaseous species transport and reaction, (iv) an agglomerate model for the catalyst layers and (v) gas phase momentum transport. Since the details of it have been published earlier [N.P. Siegel, M.W. Ellis, D.J. Nelson, M.R. von Spakovsky, A two-dimensional computational model of a PEMFC with liquid water transport, J. Power Sources 128 (2) (2004) 173-184; N.P. Siegel, M.W. Ellis, D.J. Nelson, M.R. von Spakovsky, Single domain PEMFC model based on agglomerate catalyst geometry, J. Power Sources 115 (2003) 81-89; N.P. Siegel, Development and validation of a computational model for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, Ph.D. Dissertation, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2003], only new features are briefly discussed in the present work. In particular, the model has been extended in order to account for the temperature dependence of all of the physical properties involved in the model formulation. Moreover, a novel model has been developed to describe liquid

  5. Operating performance and reliability of CANDU PHWR fuel channels in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, B.; Brown, D.R.

    1983-03-01

    CANDU nuclear plants use many small-diameter high-pressure fuel channels. Good operating performance from the CANDU fuel channels has made a major contribution to the world-leading operating record of the CANDU nuclear power plants. As of 1982 December 31, there were 7,480 fuel channels installed in 18 CANDU reactors over 500 MW(e) in size. Eight of these reactors have been declared in-service and have accumulated 24,000 fuel channel-years of operation. The only significant operating problems with fuel channels have been the occurrence of leaking cracks in 70 fuel channels and a larger amount of axial creep on the early reactors than was originally provided for in the design. Both of these problems have been corrected on all CANDU reactors built since the Bruce GS 'A' station and the newer reactors should exhibit even better performance

  6. Efficiency improvement of nuclear power plant operation: the significant role of advanced nuclear fuel technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velde Van de, A.; Burtak, F.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the increased liberalisation of the power markets, nuclear power generation is being exposed to high cost reduction pressure. In this paper we highlight the role of advanced nuclear fuel technologies to reduce the fuel cycle costs and therefore increase the efficiency of nuclear power plant operation. The key factor is a more efficient utilisation of the fuel and present developments at Siemens are consequently directed at (i) further increase of batch average burnup, (ii) improvement of fuel reliability, (iii) enlargement of fuel operation margins and (iv) improvement of methods for fuel design and core analysis. As a result, the nuclear fuel cycle costs for a typical LWR have been reduced during the past decades by about US$ 35 million per year. The estimated impact of further burnup increases on the fuel cycle costs is expected to be an additional saving of US$10 - 15 million per year. Due to the fact that the fuel will operate closer to design limits, a careful approach is required when introducing advanced fuel features in reload quantities. Trust and co-operation between the fuel vendors and the utilities is a prerequisite for the common success. (authors)

  7. Operating experience with the Harwell thermo-mechanical generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke-Yarborough, E.H.

    1980-06-01

    The Stirling-cycle thermo-mechanical generator (TMG) provides small amounts of electrical power continuously over long periods, while requiring much less fuel than other power sources running from hydrocarbon fuel or radio-isotopes. Two of these 25-watt generators, fuelled by propane, have been used to power the UK National Buoy on two successive missions. A total of more than three years experience at sea has now been accumulated. In addition, a 60-watt version has provided the power for a major lighthouse for more than a year. An early development version of the Thermo-mechanical Generator, adapted to run from the heat of a radio-isotope source, was loaded with strontium 90 titanate in October 1974 and has run continuously in the laboratory ever since. The improvements and changes found necessary in the course of 90,000 generator-hours of running time are described, and the improvements in operational performance and reliability which have resulted are outlined. (author)

  8. The General Surgery Chief Resident Operative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D.; Goldin, Adam B.; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989–1990 through 2011–2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. RESULTS The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P general surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves. PMID:23864049

  9. Experiment in operation of a trash and garbage processing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashkina, E.N.; Matveev, I.K.; Obroskova, T.F.; Shcherbo, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment in the operation of the Leningrad pilot plant for mechanized processing of household wastes (put into service in 1970) is analyzed, the technology of which was assured by a scheme for the composting of solid household wastes in horizontally rotating drums, accepted as the basic technological equipment in designing analogous plants in the country. It is noted that this plant is a highly effective enterprise for rendering the mentioned wastes harmless in the sanitation system of the city. The final plant product at the present time is turned out with high sanitary conditions and according to the bacteriological index corresponds to the requirement of the technical specification for compost-biological fuel. More than 90% of the sample appearing after a 2-hour biofermentation of the compost has a coliform bacteria titer of 0.01 and higher. The experiment in the operation of the plant can be used in organizing the industrial disposal of solid household wastes in other cities of the country.

  10. Fuel elements assembling for the DON project exponential experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anca Abati, R. de

    1966-01-01

    It is described the fuel unit used in the DON exponential experience, the manufacturing installments and tools as well as the stages in the fabrication.These 74 elements contain each 19 cartridges loaded with synterized urania, uranium carbide and indium, gold, and manganese probes. They were arranged in calandria-like tubes and the process-tube. This last one containing a cooling liquid simulating the reactor organic. Besides being used in the DON reactor exponential experience they were used in critic essays by the substitution method in the French reactor AQUILON II. (Author) 6 refs

  11. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tsvetkov, Pavel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  12. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  13. Operation of N Reactor and Fuels Fabrication Facilities, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Benton County, Washington: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    Environmental data, calculations and analyses show no significant adverse radiological or nonradiological impacts from current or projected future operations resulting from N Reactor, Fuels Fabrication and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities. Nonoccupational radiation exposures resulting from 1978 N Reactor operations are summarized and compared to allowable exposure limits.

  14. Operation of CANDU power reactor in thorium self-sufficient fuel cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents the results of calculations for CANDU reactor operation in thorium fuel cycle. Calculations are performed to estimate the feasibility of operation of heavy-water thermal neutron power reactor in self-sufficient thorium cycle. Parameters of active core and scheme of fuel reloading were considered to be the ...

  15. Experience in the manufacture and performance of CANDU fuel for KANUPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salim, M.; Ahmed, I.; Butt, P.

    1995-01-01

    Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) a 137 MWe CANDU unit is In operation since 1971. Initially, it was fueled with Canadian fuel bundles. In July 1980 Pakistani manufactured fuel was introduced in the reactor core, irradiated to a burnup of about 7500 MWd-teU -1 and successfully discharged in May 1984. The core was progressively fuelled with Pakistani fuel and in August 1990 the reactor core contained all Pakistani made fuel. As of the present, 3 core equivalent Pakistani fuel bundles have been successfully discharged at an average bumup of 6500 MWd-teU -1 . with a maximum burnup of ∼ 10,200 MWd-teU -1 . No fuel failure of Pakistani bundles has been observed so far. This paper presents the indigenous efforts towards manufacture and operational aspects of KANUPP fuel and compares its behaviour with that of Canadian supplied fuel. The Pakistani fuel has performed well and is as good as the Canadian fuel. (author)

  16. Applying operating experience to design the CANDU 3 process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.S.; Hinchley, E.M.; Pauksens, J.; Snell, V.; Yu, S.K.W.

    1991-01-01

    The CANDU 3 is an advanced, smaller (450 MWe), standardized version of the CANDU now being designed for service later in the decade and beyond. The design of this evolutionary nuclear power plant has been carefully planned and organized to gain maximum benefits from new technologies and from world experience to date in designing, building, commissioning and operating nuclear power stations. The good performance record of existing CANDU reactors makes consideration of operating experience from these plants a particularly vital component of the design process. Since the completion of the first four CANDU 6 stations in the early 1980s, and with the continuing evolution of the multi-unit CANDU station designs since then, AECL CANDU has devised several processes to ensure that such feedback is made available to designers. An important step was made in 1986 when a task force was set up to review and process ideas arising from the commissioning and early operation of the CANDU 6 reactors which were, by that time, operating successfully in Argentina and Korea, as well as the Canadian provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick. The task force issued a comprehensive report which, although aimed at the design of an improved CANDU 6 station, was made available to the CANDU 3 team. By that time also, the Institute of Power Operations (INPO) in the U.S., of which AECL is a Supplier Participant member, was starting to publish Good Practices and Guidelines related to the review and the use of operating experiences. In addition, details of significant events were being made available via the INPO SEE-IN (Significant Event Evaluation and Information Network) Program, and subsequently the CANNET network of the CANDU Owners' Group (COG). Systematic review was thus possible by designers of operations reports, significant event reports, and related documents in a continuing program of design improvement. Another method of incorporating operations feedback is to involve experienced utility

  17. Experiments for IFR fuel criticality in ZPPR-21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.N.; Collins, P.J.; Carpenter, S.G.

    1991-01-01

    A series of benchmark measurements was made in ZPPR-21 to validate criticality calculations for fuel processing operations for Argonne's Integral Fast Reactor program. Six different mixtures of Pu/U/Zr fuel with a graphite reflector were built and criticality was determined by period measurements. The assemblies were isolated from room return neutrons by a lithium hydride shield. Analysis was done using a fully-detailed model with the VIM Monte Carlo code and ENDF/B-V.2 data. Sensitivity analysis was used to validate the measurements against other benchmark data. A simple RZ model was defined and used with the KENO code. Corrections to the RZ model were provided by the VIM calculations with low statistical uncertainty. (Author)

  18. Experiments for IFR fuel criticality in ZPPR-21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.N.; Collins, P.J.; Carpenter, S.G.

    1991-01-01

    A series of benchmark measurements was made in ZPPR-21 to validate criticality calculations for fuel operations in Argonne's Integral Fast Reactor. Six different mixtures of Pu/U/Zr fuel with a graphite reflector were built and criticality was determined by period measurements. The assemblies were isolated from room return problems by a lithium hydride shield. Analysis was done using a fully-detailed model with the VIM Monte Carlo code and ENDF/B-V.2 data. Sensitivity analysis was used to validate the measurements against other benchmark data. A simple RZ model was defined the used with the KENO code. Corrections to the RZ model were provided by the VIM calculations with low statistical uncertainty. 7 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Experience from construction and operation of Karachi nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, S.M.N.

    1977-01-01

    Pakistan's first nuclear power plant (KANUPP) is owned and operated by the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). It uses a heavy water moderated and cooled natural uranium fuelled reactor. Total installed capacity is 137 MW(e). It was designed, constructed and commissioned by Canadian General Electric Co. Ltd. (CGE) as Prime Contractor. Construction started in mid-1966 and was completed in mid 1970; commissioning started in early 1970 and was completed at the end of 1972. Intensive on-the-job training for 20 engineers and 15 operators was provided by CGE in Canada. Ten engineers also worked in CGE's design offices. With this key group of engineers and technicians PAEC had no difficulty in taking over the plant from CGE after completion. The construction of the plant in a developing country presented special problems to CGE. The relatively small local construction firms had limited experience and equipment. Construction plant, equipment and tools were scarce. Fabrication and workshop facilities of limited scope were available but their quotations were relatively high. A scarcity of engineering, technical and skilled manpower for the construction of the project left as the only alternative on-site training for carefully recruited technicians. The results were most gratifying and compared favourably with CGE's Canadian experience. Welding, pipe fitting, tubing work and electrical connections were excellent. The local staff's productivity and dedication were very good. In the commissioning period, PAEC and CGE engineers and technicians worked as one team, testing and debugging the equipment and systems and demonstrating the contractual performance warranties. This period extended to approximately three years due to many technical problems resulting from equipment failures, environmental problems, system problems, plant loading limitations in view of the relatively small size of the grid system and special requirement of fuel conditioning to avoid premature fuel

  20. Medical supply on contingency military operations: experience from Operation GRITROCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J P; Reeves, P

    2015-01-01

    Medical supply during military operations has the ability to affect the efficacy of the operation being undertaken, either negatively or positively. An appropriately-managed maritime platform with a robust medical supply chain during transit and on arrival in theatre is the main aim. A secure supply chain will reduce any implications that logistics may have with regard to capability, and negate the effects of deficiencies of short shelf life items occurring over time and during use in high tempo operations.

  1. A plan of reactor physics experiments for reduced-moderation water reactors with MOX fuel in TCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Shoichiro; Akie, Hiroshi; Suzaki, Takenori; Okubo, Tutomu; Usui, Shuji; Shirakawa, Toshihisa; Iwamura, Takamiti; Kugo, Teruhiko; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is one of the next generation water-cooled reactors which aim at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up, long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. For verification of the feasibility, negative void reactivity coefficient and conversion ratio more than 1.0 must be confirmed. Critical Experiments performed so far in Eualope and Japan were reviewed, and no useful data are available for RMWR development. Critical experiments using TCA (Tank Type Critical Assembly) in JAERI are planned. MOX fuel rods should be prepared for the experiments and some modifications of the equipment are needed for use of MOX fuel rods. This report describes the preliminary plan of physics experiments. The number of MOX fuel rods used in the experiments are obtained by calculations and the modification of the equipment for the experiments are shown. (author)

  2. Operating experience feedback report - Solenoid-operated valve problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1991-02-01

    This report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential common-mode failures of solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) in US plants. These events resulted in degradation or malfunction of multiple trains of safety systems as well as of multiple safety systems. On the basis of the evaluation of these events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concludes that the problems with solenoid-operated valves are an important issue that needs additional NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendations for actions to reduce the occurrence of SOV common-mode failures. 115 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Feasibility and incentives for the consideration of spent fuel operating histories in the criticality analysis of spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.; Westfall, R.M.; Jones, R.H.

    1987-08-01

    Analyses have been completed that indicate the consideration of spent fuel histories (''burnup credit'') in the design of spent fuel shipping casks is a justifiable concept that would result in cost savings and public risk benefits in the transport of spent nuclear fuel. Since cask capacities could be increased over those of casks without burnup credit, the number of shipments necessary to transport a given amount of fuel could be reduced. Reducing the number of shipments would increase safety benefits by reducing public and occupational exposure to both radiological and nonradiological risks associated with the transport of spent fuel. Economic benefits would include lower in-transit shipping, reduced transportation fleet capital costs, and reduced numbers of cask handling operations at both shipping and receiving facilities. 44 refs., 66 figs., 28 tabs

  4. Experience of European irradiated fuel transport - the first four hundred tonnes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the successful integration of the experience of its three shareholders into an international company providing an irradiated fuel transport service throughout Europe. The experience of transporting more than 400 tonnes of irradiated uranium from fifteen power reactors is used to illustrate the flexibility which the transport organisation requires when the access and handling facilities are different at almost every reactor. Variations in fuel cross sections and lengths of fuel elements used in first generation reactors created the need for first generation flasks with sufficient variants to accommodate all reactor fuels but the trend now is towards standardisation of flasks to perhaps two basic types. Increases in fuel rating have raised the flask shielding and heat dissipation requirements and have influenced the design of later flasks. More stringent criticality acceptance criteria have tended to reduce the flask capacity below the maximum number of elements which could physically be contained. Reprocessing plant acceptance criteria initiated because of the presence of substantial quantities of loose crud released in the flask and the need to transport substantial numbers of failed elements have also reduced the flask capacity. Different modes of transport have been developed to cater for the various limitations on access to reactor sites arising from geographical and routing considerations. The safety record of irradiated fuel transport is examined with explanation of the means whereby this has been achieved. The problems of programming the movement of a pool of flasks for fifteen reactors in eight countries are discussed together with the steps taken to ensure that the service operates fairly to give priority to those reactors with the greatest problems. The transport of European irradiated fuel can be presented as an example of international collaboration which works

  5. Activity of the RA Reactor Physics group in 1980 - Definition of the Operation conditions for future safe and economical RA reactor operation with 80% enriched fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.

    1980-01-01

    During 1980. the RA reactor was not in operation. That is why this period was devoted to definition of operating conditions for further reactor operation with 80% enriched fuel. The fuel elements which were in the core at the moment of shutdown in March 1979will not be used again (388 80% enriched fuel elements, and 511 2% enriched fuel elements). The reactor will be operated only with 80% enriched fuel, staring with initiat core configuration with 440 elements on the borders gradually changing to equi;librium core with 720 fuel elements. The analyses were concerned with safety issues of future operation [sr

  6. Vacuum and fueling systems for the IGNITEX experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallock, G.; Booth, W.D.; Carrera, R.

    1989-01-01

    The results of preliminary studies of the vacuum and fueling requirements for the proposed fusion ignition experiment IGNITEX are presented. An initial design for the vacuum pumping and plasma fueling system is given. The IGNITEX vacuum system must meet the demands of providing sufficient pumping speed to reach a base pressure of about 10 -8 Torr to provide a clean environment for plasma formation. In addition, the pumping speed should meet the requirements during the discharge cleaning cycle. The design of the vacuum pumping system including layout and location and structure of the vacuum ports required for pumping and diagnostic access is presented. Two different types of pumping systems - turbomolecular pumps and cryrogenic pumps have been considered. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of pumping system are analyzed

  7. Technical Guide for conservation of wood fuel: Experiences from Sahel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorez, J.P.

    1992-03-01

    The guide gives technical information in design of energy efficient cooking stoves for the wood depleted countries in sub-saharan Africa. Knowledge and experiences of the Sahel region have been used to design the stoves discussed. As an introduction, the causes and consequences of the wood fuel crises are reviewed. The main models of improved stoves that are spread in Sahel are then described, together with data on performance and design considerations. Strategies for distribution of the improved stoves are analyzed, and ways to follow-up and evaluate their use are suggested. Results of campaigns to distribute the stoves in West African countries are given and methods to improve the distribution are proposed, in particular to promote the ceramic stoves. Finally, complementary wood fuel conservation campaigns are suggested for activities other than household cooking. 22 refs, 14 figs, 5 tabs and photos

  8. Operation of solid oxide fuel cells on glycerol fuel: A thermodynamic analysis using the Gibbs free energy minimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima da Silva, Aline; Müller, Iduvirges Lourdes

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are very flexible, unlike other fuel cells. In principle, SOFCs can operate on almost any fuel. Currently much effort is invested in the development of SOFCs for portable applications operating directly on liquid fuels such as methanol and ethanol rather than hydrogen. However, there are very few publications dealing with the direct use of glycerol in SOFCs for portable systems. A recently published study shows that the performance achieved for an SOFC fueled by pure glycerol is quite interesting even when there is a thick electrolyte membrane, indicating that glycerol is a promising fuel for portable applications. For this reason a thermodynamic analysis for SOFCs operating directly on glycerol fuel is performed in the present study. The Gibbs energy minimization method computes the equilibrium compositions of the anode gas mixture, carbon deposition boundaries and electromotive forces (EMFs) as a function of fuel utilization and temperature. Moreover, the minimum amounts of H 2O, CO 2 (direct internal reforming case) and air (partial oxidation case) to be added to glycerol in the feedstock to avoid carbon deposition at the open circuit voltage (OCV) are calculated. Finally, a thermodynamic analysis is performed, taking into account the experimental conditions employed in a previous study. Experimental observations concerning carbon deposition in an SOFC operating on glycerol can be explained by the theoretical analysis developed in the present study. Additionally, the effect of mixed electronic-ionic conduction of the electrolyte on carbon deposition at the anode is discussed based on the thermodynamic analysis of the C-O system.

  9. Physical security in multinational nuclear-fuel-cycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willrich, M.

    1977-01-01

    Whether or not multinationalization will reduce or increase risks of theft or sabotage will depend on the form and location of the enterprise, the precise nature of the physical security arrangements applied to the enterprise, and the future course of crime and terrorism in the nuclear age. If nuclear operations are multinationalized, the host government is likely to insist on physical security measures that are at least as stringent as those for a national or private enterprise subject to its jurisdiction. At the same time, the other participants will want to be sure the host government, as well as criminal groups, do not steal nuclear material from the facility. If designed to be reasonably effective, the physical security arrangements at a multinational nuclear enterprise seem likely to reduce the risk that any participating government will seek to divert material from the facility for use in a nuclear weapons program. Hence, multinationalization and physical security will both contribute to reducing the risks of nuclear weapons proliferation to additional governments. If economic considerations dominate the timing, scale and location of fuel-cycle facilities, the worldwide nuclear power industry is likely to develop along lines where the problems of physical security will be manageable. If, however, nuclear nationalism prevails, and numerous small-scale facilities become widely dispersed, the problem of security against theft and sabotage may prove to be unmanageable. It is ironic, although true, that in attempting to strengthen its security by pursuing self-sufficiency in nuclear power, a nation may be reducing its internal security against criminal terrorists

  10. The HEAO experience - design through operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The design process and performance of the NASA High Energy Astronomy Observatories (HEAO-1, 2, and 3) are surveyed from the initiation of the program in 1968 through the end of HEAO-3 operation in May, 1981, with a focus on the attitude control and determination subsystem (ACDS). The science objectives, original and revised overall design concepts, final design for each spacecraft, and details of the ACDS designs are discussed, and the stages of the ACDS design process, including redefinition to achieve 50 percent cost reduction, detailed design of common and mission-unique hardware and software, unit qualification, subsystem integration, and observatory-level testing, are described. Overall and ACDS performance is evaluated for each mission and found to meet or exceed design requirements despite some difficulties arising from errors in startracker-ACDS-interface coordination and from gyroscope failures. These difficulties were resolved by using the flexibility of the software design. The implicationns of the HEAO experience for the design process of future spacecraft are suggested.

  11. Proposed Reactor Operating Experience Feedback System Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Hoon; Kim, Min Chul; Huh, Chang Wook; Lee, Durk Hun; Bae, Koo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Most events occurring in nuclear power plants are not individually significant, and prevented from progressing to accident conditions by a series of barriers against core damage and radioactive releases. Significant events, if occur, are almost always a breach of these multiple barriers. As illustrated in the 'Swiss cheese' model, the individual layers of defense or 'cheese slices' have weakness or 'holes.' These weaknesses are inconstant, i.e., the holes are open or close at random. When by chance all the holes are aligned, a hazard causes the significant event of concern. Elements of low significant events, inattention to detail, time or economic pressure, uncorrected poor practices/habits, marginal maintenance and equipment care, etc., make holes in the layers of defense; some elements may make more holes in different layers, incurring more chances to be aligned. An effective reduction of the holes, therefore, is gained through better knowledge or awareness of increasing trends of the event elements, followed by appropriate actions. According to the Swiss cheese metaphor, attention to the Operating Experience (OE) feedback system, as opposed to the individual and to randomness, is drawn from a viewpoint of reactor safety

  12. Fuel-motion diagnostics for PFR/TREAT experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVolpi, A.; Doerner, R.C.; Fink, C.L.; Regis, J.P.; Rhodes, E.A.; Stanford, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    In all the transients in the PFR/TREAT series, fuel motion had been monitored by the fast-neutron hodoscope. This paper treats the enhancements in hodoscope operation and data analysis since the start of the PFR/TREAT tests. The hodoscope has a maximum viewing height of 1.2 m. Data collection intervals for the series have been in the order of 1 ms, depending on the duration of the transient. Mass-displacement resolutions of about 0.1 g are achievable for the single-pin tests and 1 g for 7-pin tests. The hodoscope system can accommodate the full dynamic range of power

  13. Experiments to understand the corrosion process of fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeschel, F.; Hermann, A.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel rods in light water reactors have to respond to the trends in increased burn-up and extended dwelling time in reactor. Waterside corrosion of the cladding affecting wall thickness, mechanical stability due to hydriding and the heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of the oxide scale may become the limiting factors. The corrosion process is complex and involves a large variety of mechanisms. Understanding of the process is important for safe operation and a prerequisite for development of improved materials. A variety of analytical techniques and mechanical tests, including examination of irradiated pathfinder rods, are used to tackle the different aspects. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs

  14. Alcohols/Ethers as Oxygenates in Diesel Fuel: Properties of Blended Fuels and Evaluation of Practiacl Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nylund, N.; Aakko, P. [TEC Trans Energy Consulting Ltd (Finland); Niemi, S.; Paanu, T. [Turku Polytechnic (Finland); Berg, R. [Befri Konsult (Sweden)

    2005-03-15

    Oxygenates blended into diesel fuel can serve at least two purposes. Components based on renewable feedstocks make it possible to introduce a renewable component into diesel fuel. Secondly, oxygenates blended into diesel fuel might help to reduce emissions. A number of different oxygenates have been considered as components for diesel fuel. These oxygenates include various alcohols, ethers, esters and carbonates. Of the oxygenates, ethanol is the most common and almost all practical experiences have been generated from the use of diesel/ethanol blends (E-diesel). Biodiesel was not included in this study. Adding ethanol to diesel will reduce cetane, and therefore, both cetane improver and lubricity additives might be needed. Diesel/ethanol emulsions obtained with emulsifiers or without additives are 'milky' mixtures. Micro-emulsions of ethanol and diesel can be obtained using additives containing surfactants or co-solvents. The microemulsions are chemically and thermodynamically stable, they are clear and bright blends, unlike the emulsions. Storage and handling regulations for fuels are based on the flash point. The problem with, e.g., ethanol into diesel is that ethanol lowers the flash point of the blend significantly even at low concentrations. Regarding safety, diesel-ethanol blends fall into the same category as gasoline. Higher alcohols are more suitable for diesel blending than ethanol. Currently, various standards and specifications set rather tight limits for diesel fuel composition and properties. It should be noted that, e.g., E-diesel does not fulfil any current diesel specification and it cannot, thus, be sold as general diesel fuel. Some blends have already received approvals for special applications. The critical factors of the potential commercial use of these blends include blend properties such as stability, viscosity and lubricity, safety and materials compatibility. The effect of the fuel on engine performance, durability and emissions

  15. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  16. 18 years experience on UF{sub 6} handling at Japanese nuclear fuel manufacturer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujinaga, H.; Yamazaki, N.; Takebe, N. [Japan Nucelar Fuel Conversion Co., Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1991-12-31

    In the spring of 1991, a leading nuclear fuel manufacturing company in Japan, celebrated its 18th anniversary. Since 1973, the company has produced over 5000 metric ton of ceramic grade UO{sub 2} powder to supply to Japanese fabricators, without major accident/incident and especially with a successful safety record on UF{sub 6} handling. The company`s 18 years experience on nuclear fuel manufacturing reveals that key factors for the safe handling of UF{sub 6} are (1) installing adequate facilities, equipped with safety devices, (2) providing UF{sub 6} handling manuals and executing them strictly, and (3) repeating on and off the job training for operators. In this paper, equipment and the operation mode for UF{sub 6} processing at their facility are discussed.

  17. Third international conference on CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boczar, Peter

    1992-01-01

    These proceedings contain full texts of all 49 papers from the ten sessions and the banquet address. The sessions were on the following subjects: International experience and programs; Fuel behaviour and operating experience; Fuel modelling; Fuel design; Advanced fuel and fuel cycle technology; AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  18. Fuel performance annual report for 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Tokar, M.

    1982-12-01

    This annual report, the fourth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1981 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel problems, fuel design changes and fuel surveillance programs, and high-burnup fuel experience are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included

  19. Development of operational criteria for the interim spent fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. H.; Kim, J. C.; Kim, D. K.; Cho, D. K.; Bae, K. M.

    1997-03-01

    The final objective is to develop the technical criteria for the facility operation of the interim spent fuel storage facility. For this purpose, elementary technical issues are evaluated for the wet storage of spent fuels and status of operation in foreign counties are examined. Urgent objective of this study is to provide technical back data for the development of operational criteria. For the back data for the development of operational criteria, domestic technical data for the wet storages are collected as well as standards and criteria related to the spent fuel storage. Operational stutus of spent fuel storages in foreign countries CLAB in Sweden and MRS in the United States are studied. Dry storage concept is also studied in order to find the characteristics of wet storage concept. Also basic technical issues are defined and studied in order to build a draft of operational criteria

  20. The Effect of Uncertainties on the Operating Temperature of U-Mo/Al Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweidana, Faris B.; Mistarihia, Qusai M.; Ryu Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Jeong Sik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, uncertainty and combined uncertainty studies have been carried out to evaluate the uncertainty of the parameters affecting the operational temperature of U-Mo/Al fuel. The uncertainties related to the thermal conductivity of fuel meat, which consists of the effects of thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat capacity, the interaction layer (IL) that forms between the dispersed fuel and the matrix, fuel plate dimensions, heat flux, heat transfer coefficient and the outer cladding temperature were considered. As the development of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels has been pursued for research reactors to replace the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) for the improvement of proliferation resistance of fuels and fuel cycle, U-Mo particles dispersed in an Al matrix (UMo/Al) is a promising fuel for conversion of the research reactors that currently use HEU fuels to LEUfueled reactors due to its high density and good irradiation stability. Several models have been developed for the estimation of the thermal conductivity of U–Mo fuel, mainly based on the best fit of the very few measured data without providing uncertainty ranges. The purpose of this study is to provide a reasonable estimation of the upper bounds and lower bounds of fuel temperatures with burnup through the evaluation of the uncertainties in the thermal conductivity of irradiated U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. The combined uncertainty study using RSS method evaluated the effect of applying all the uncertainty values of all the parameters on the operational temperature of U-Mo/Al fuel. The overall influence on the value of the operational temperature is 16.58 .deg. C at the beginning of life and it increases as the burnup increases to reach 18.74 .deg. C at a fuel meat fission density of 3.50E+21 fission/cm{sup 3}. Further studies are needed to evaluate the behavior more accurately by including other parameters uncertainties such as the interaction layer thermal conductivity.

  1. The Effect of Uncertainties on the Operating Temperature of U-Mo/Al Dispersion Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweidana, Faris B.; Mistarihia, Qusai M.; Ryu Ho Jin; Yim, Jeong Sik

    2016-01-01

    In this study, uncertainty and combined uncertainty studies have been carried out to evaluate the uncertainty of the parameters affecting the operational temperature of U-Mo/Al fuel. The uncertainties related to the thermal conductivity of fuel meat, which consists of the effects of thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat capacity, the interaction layer (IL) that forms between the dispersed fuel and the matrix, fuel plate dimensions, heat flux, heat transfer coefficient and the outer cladding temperature were considered. As the development of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels has been pursued for research reactors to replace the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) for the improvement of proliferation resistance of fuels and fuel cycle, U-Mo particles dispersed in an Al matrix (UMo/Al) is a promising fuel for conversion of the research reactors that currently use HEU fuels to LEUfueled reactors due to its high density and good irradiation stability. Several models have been developed for the estimation of the thermal conductivity of U–Mo fuel, mainly based on the best fit of the very few measured data without providing uncertainty ranges. The purpose of this study is to provide a reasonable estimation of the upper bounds and lower bounds of fuel temperatures with burnup through the evaluation of the uncertainties in the thermal conductivity of irradiated U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. The combined uncertainty study using RSS method evaluated the effect of applying all the uncertainty values of all the parameters on the operational temperature of U-Mo/Al fuel. The overall influence on the value of the operational temperature is 16.58 .deg. C at the beginning of life and it increases as the burnup increases to reach 18.74 .deg. C at a fuel meat fission density of 3.50E+21 fission/cm 3 . Further studies are needed to evaluate the behavior more accurately by including other parameters uncertainties such as the interaction layer thermal conductivity.

  2. Improvement of the environmental and operational characteristics of vehicles through decreasing the motor fuel density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaril, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The environmental and operational characteristics of motor transport, one of the main consumers of motor fuel and source of toxic emissions, soot, and greenhouse gases, are determined to a large extent by the fuel quality which is characterized by many parameters. Fuel density is one of these parameters and it can serve as an indicator of fuel quality. It has been theoretically substantiated that an increased density of motor fuel has a negative impact both on the environmental and operational characteristics of motor transport. The use of fuels with a high density leads to an increase in carbonization within the engine, adversely affecting the vehicle performance and increasing environmental pollution. A program of technological measures targeted at reducing the density of the fuel used was offered. It includes a solution to the problem posed by changes in the refining capacities ratio and the temperature range of gasoline and diesel fuel boiling, by introducing fuel additives and adding butanes to the gasoline. An environmental tax has been developed which allows oil refineries to have a direct impact on the production of fuels with improved environmental performance, taking into account the need to minimize the density of the fuel within a given category of quality.

  3. Integrating Renewable Generation into Grid Operations: Four International Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mylrea, Michael E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Levin, Todd [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Botterud, Audun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); O' Shaughnessy, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-04-22

    International experiences with power sector restructuring and the resultant impacts on bulk power grid operations and planning may provide insight into policy questions for the evolving United States power grid as resource mixes are changing in response to fuel prices, an aging generation fleet and to meet climate goals. Australia, Germany, Japan and the UK were selected to represent a range in the level and attributes of electricity industry liberalization in order to draw comparisons across a variety of regions in the United States such as California, ERCOT, the Southwest Power Pool and the Southeast Reliability Region. The study draws conclusions through a literature review of the four case study countries with regards to the changing resource mix and the electricity industry sector structure and their impact on grid operations and planning. This paper derives lessons learned and synthesizes implications for the United States based on answers to the above questions and the challenges faced by the four selected countries. Each country was examined to determine the challenges to their bulk power sector based on their changing resource mix, market structure, policies driving the changing resource mix, and policies driving restructuring. Each countries’ approach to solving those changes was examined, as well as how each country’s market structure either exacerbated or mitigated the approaches to solving the challenges to their bulk power grid operations and planning. All countries’ policies encourage renewable energy generation. One significant finding included the low- to zero-marginal cost of intermittent renewables and its potential negative impact on long-term resource adequacy. No dominant solution has emerged although a capacity market was introduced in the UK and is being contemplated in Japan. Germany has proposed the Energy Market 2.0 to encourage flexible generation investment. The grid operator in Australia proposed several approaches to maintaining

  4. Nuclear power operating experience and technical improvement in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, M.

    1983-01-01

    LWR technology in Japan, originally introduced from the United States of America, is now almost entirely supplied domestically. During the initial stage of plant operation, electric power companies experienced various troubles such as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in the piping in BWRs and steam generator (S/G) tube leaks in PWRs, which once reduced the capacity factor to about 40%. As a result of efforts to investigate the causes of the troubles and to establish countermeasures, which were applied to the plants in operation and under construction for improvement, as well as to shorten the period of regular inspection and to extend the operation cycle, the capacity factor has been improved to 60% since 1980. In 1975 an LWR improvement and standardization programme was launched to aim at improvement of reliability and availability factor and reduction of occupational radiation exposure with the development of domestic technology based on construction and operating experience. The First Phase Programme, which ran from 1975 to 1977, established countermeasures to preclude these troubles and improved workability by enlargement of the containment vessel. The Second Phase Programme followed and ran until 1981. The major steps taken during this period include the adoption of new IGSCC-resistant material and improved core design for BWRs and the improvement of fuels and S/Gs for PWRs. With these improvements, the capacity factor is now expected to reach a 75% level and occupational radiation exposure should be reduced by 50%. A Third Phase Programme will centre on the test and development programme for advanced BWRs and PWRs now under way to further improve the availability factor and reliability while also minimizing radiation exposure. (author)

  5. A choice experiment on fuel taxation and earmarking in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saelen, Haakon; Kallbekken, Steffen

    2010-07-01

    Pigouvian taxes are efficient - but unpopular among voters. Earmarking of revenues has been widely reported to increase support for taxes, but this practice represents a deviation from optimal policy design. This trade-off between efficiency and political feasibility is the inspiration for this paper's attempt to quantify the effect of earmarking on voter support for fuel tax rises. Another aim of the paper is to investigate why earmarking increases support. The study estimates models of voter preferences for fuel taxes based on data are collected through a choice experiment conducted on a sample of 1177 respondents representative of the Norwegian voter population, and fitted using logistic regression models. The results show that earmarking the revenues for environmental measures has a substantial effect on voter support for fuel tax increases, garnering a majority for increases of up to 20 per cent above present levels. Earmarking the additional revenue for income redistribution does not result in a majority for any increase. Further analysis indicates that a prime reason why earmarking for environmental measures is popular is that it increases the perceived environmental effectiveness of the tax, and hence its legitimacy as an environmental rather than a fiscal policy. (Author)

  6. Calculation Analysis of San Onofre Depletion MOX Fuel Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovichev, AM

    2001-08-31

    The report provides calculation results of isotopic composition of spent MOX fuel irradiated in Sun Onofre PWR reactor. The calculation was performed by means of the MCU/BURNUP Monte Carlo code. The code is developed in Kurchatov Institute, Russia. The predicted isotope contents are compared with the measured ones. A purpose of this work is a verification both the code and the model of experiment description. Predicted plutonium content exceeds the measured one approximately by 3%. It is arise mainly from error of {sup 239}Pu isotope. Isotopic contents of the main plutonium and uranium isotopes are predicted with satisfactory precision.

  7. Chemical engineering in fuel reprocessing. The French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, M.; Sombret, C.; Bernard, C.; Miquel, P.; Moulin, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Reprocessing is the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, designed to recover valuable fissile materials, especially plutonium, and to condition safely all the wastes ready for disposal. For its new commercial reprocessing plants (UP 3 and UP 2 800) COGEMA decided to include many engineering innovations as well as new processes and key-components developed by CEA. UP 3 is a complete new plant with a capacity of 800 t/y which was put in operation in August 1990. UP 2 800 is an extension of the existing UP 2 facility, designed to achieve the same annual capacity of 800 t/y, to be put in operation at the end of 1993 by the commissioning of a new head-end and highly active chemical process facilities

  8. Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation's first and the world's largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge trademark level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs

  9. Operating experience review for the AP1000 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, T. E.; Lipner, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    Westinghouse is performing an update to the Operating Experience Review (OER) Report for the AP1000 project to account for operating experience since December 1996. Significant Operating Experience Reports, Significant Event Reports, Significant Event Notifications, Operations and Maintenance Reminders, Topical Reports, Event Analysis Reports and Licensee Event Reports were researched for pertinent input to the update. As a part of the OER, Westinghouse has also conducted operator interviews and observations during simulated plant operations and after operating events. The main purpose of the OER is to identify Human Factors Engineering (HFE) related safety issues from existing operating plant experience and to ensure that these issues are addressed in the new design. The issues and lessons learned regarding operating experience provide a basis for improving the plant design. (authors)

  10. Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.

    2003-09-02

    An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

  11. Operational Art and the ADF Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    environment interacts with and changes the system . Naveh professes that operational art is fundamentally dependent upon systems theory and therefore a...deep operations theory, which he identifies as a breakthrough in military thinking and the application of systems theory. Finally, Naveh identifies the...incorporates general systems theory12 to the concept of operational art, identifying that military systems are an example of an open system where the

  12. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Gillett, James E.; Basel, Richard A.; Antenucci, Annette B.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas, (O) and pressurized fuel gas, (F), into fuel cell modules, (10 and 12), containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing (18), surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel (64), where there is a purge gas volume, (62), between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas, (P), through the purge gas volume, (62), to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas, (82), and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transpatable when the pressure vessel (64) is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity.

  13. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % 235 U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 rods containing 4.31 wt % 235 U and 2 wt % PuO 2 in natural UO 2 respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in 235 U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel

  14. Mechanical behaviour of PEM fuel cell catalyst layers during regular cell operation

    OpenAIRE

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2010-01-01

    Damage mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling), and the stresses arise during fuel cell running, because it consists of the materials with different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of the mechanical behaviour of the catalyst layers during regular cell operation, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses s...

  15. Alternative concepts for spent fuel storage basin expansion at Morris Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, W.A. Jr.; King, C.E.; Miller, G.P.; Shadel, F.H.; Sloat, R.J.

    1980-08-01

    Alternative concepts for increasing basin capabilities for storage of spent fuel at the Morris Operation have been defined in a series of simplified flow diagrams and equipment schematics. Preliminary concepts have been outlined for (1) construction alternatives for an add-on basin, (2) high-density baskets for storage of fuel bundles or possible consolidated fuel rods in the existing or add-on basins, (3) modifications to the existing facility for increasing cask handling and fuel receiving capabilities and (4) accumulation, treatment and disposal of radwastes from storage operations. Preliminary capital and operating costs have been prepared and resource and schedule requirements for implementing the concepts have been estimated. The basin expansion alternatives would readily complement potential dry storage projects at the site in an integrated multi-stage program that could provide a total storage capacity of up to 7000 tonnes of spent fuel

  16. Dealing with Historical Discrepancies: The Recovery of National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor Fuel Rods at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) - 13324

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickerd, Meggan

    2013-01-01

    Following the 1952 National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor accident, fuel rods which had short irradiation histories were 'temporarily' buried in wooden boxes at the 'disposal grounds' during the cleanup effort. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), strategically retrieves legacy waste and restores lands affected by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) early operations. Thus under this program the recovery of still buried NRX reactor fuel rods and their relocation to modern fuel storage was identified as a priority. A suspect inventory of NRX fuels was compiled from historical records and various research activities. Site characterization in 2005 verified the physical location of the fuel rods and determined the wooden boxes they were buried in had degraded such that the fuel rods were in direct contact with the soil. The fuel rods were recovered and transferred to a modern fuel storage facility in 2007. Recovered identification tags and measured radiation fields were used to identify the inventory of these fuels. During the retrieval activity, a discrepancy was discovered between the anticipated number of fuel rods and the number found during the retrieval. A total of 32 fuel rods and cans of cut end pieces were recovered from the specified site, which was greater than the anticipated 19 fuel rods and cans. This discovery delayed the completion of the project, increased the associated costs, and required more than anticipated storage space in the modern fuel storage facility. A number of lessons learned were identified following completion of this project, the most significant of which was the potential for discrepancies within the historical records. Historical discrepancies are more likely to be resolved by comprehensive historical record searches and site characterizations. It was also recommended that a complete review of the wastes generated, and the total affected lands as a result of this historic

  17. Sodium-fuel interaction: dropping experiments and subassembly test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtbecker, H.; Schins, H.; Jorzik, E.; Klein, K.

    1978-01-01

    Nine dropping tests, which bring together 2 to 4 kg of molten UO 2 with 150 l sodium, showed the incoherency and non-violence of these thermal interactions. The pressures can be described by sodium incipient boiling and bubble collapse; the UO 2 fragmentation by thermal stress and bubble collapse impact forces. The mildness of the interaction is principally due to the slowness and incoherency of UO 2 fragmentation. This means that parametric models which assume instantaneous mixing and fragmentation are of no use for the interpretation of dropping experiments. One parametric model, the Caldarola Fuel Coolant Interaction Variable Mass model, is being coupled to the two dimensional time dependent hydrodynamic REXCO-H code. In a first step the coupling is applicated to a monodimensional geometry. A subassembly test is proposed to validate the model. In this test rapid mixing between UO 2 and sodium has to be obtained. Dispersed molten UO 2 fuel is obtained by flashing injected sodium drops inside a UO 2 melt. This flashing is theoretically explained and modelled as a superheat limited explosion. The measured sodium drop dwell times of two experiments are compared to results obtained from the mentioned theory, which is the basis of the Press 2 Code

  18. Investigation Regarding the Operation of Absorption Refrigerator using Waste Heat of Phosphoric acid Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimijima, Shinji; Waragai, Shisei; Uekusa, Tsuneo; Kawai, Sunao

    Fuel cells are emerging as a major power generation system that is suitable for distributed power generation from a view point of high efficiency and low pollutant emission, In order to develop high efficiency system, it is indispensable to take into consideration effective use of waste heat recovered from power generation unit. And the system design that is based on the characteristics of individual component and all of the system is significant. In this report, characteristics of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) cogeneration system, especially waste heat recovery from PAFC cell stack and exhaust gas is discussed, and operation of absorption refrigerator using waste heat of PAFC are investigated. PAFC cogeneration test facility is constructed, power generation and waste heat recovery experiment is carried out, and system performance is evaluated, As a result, beneficial knowledge are obtained as follows: It is clarified that the cell stack waste heat is dominant for the exhaust gas heat recovery characteristics, and the cooling performance of absorption refrigerator in partial load operation of PAFC. And, the effect of cooling water temperature on the performance of waste heat recovery and absorption refrigerator is obtained.

  19. Experiment studies of fuel rod vibration in coolant flow for substantiation of vibration stability of fuel rods with no fretting-wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu. V.; Afanasiev, A. V.; Makarov, V. V.; Matvienko, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    For substantiation of vibration stability it is necessary to determine the ultimate permissible vibration levels which do not cause fretting, to compare them with the level of fuel rod vibration caused by coolant flow. Another approach is feasible if there is experience of successful operation of FA-prototypes. In this case in order to justify vibration stability it may be sufficient to demonstrate that the new element does not cause increased vibration of the fuel rod. It can be done by comparing the levels of hydro-dynamic fuel rod vibration and FA new designs. Program of vibration tests of TVS-2M model included studies of forced oscillations of 12 fuel rods in the coolant flow in the spans containing intensifiers, in the reference span without intensifiers, in the lower spans with assembled ADF and after its disassembly. The experimental results for TVS-2M show that in the spans with intensifier «Sector run» the level of movements is 6% higher on the average than in the span without intensifiers, in the spans with intensifier «Eddy» it is 2% higher. The level of fuel rod vibration movements in the spans with set ADF is 2 % higher on the average than without ADF. During the studies of TVS-KVADRAT fuel rod vibration, the following tasks were solved: determination of acceleration of the middle of fuel rod spans at vibration excited due to hydrodynamics; determination of influence of coolant thermal- hydraulic parameters (temperature, flowrate, dynamic pressure) on fuel rod vibration response; determination of influence of span lengths on the vibration level. Conclusions: 1) The vibration tests of the full-scale model of TVS-2M in the coolant flow showed that the new elements of TVS-2M design (intensifiers of heat exchange and ADF) are not the source of fuel rod increased vibration. Considering successful operation of similar fuel rod spans in the existing TVS-2M design, vibration stability of TVS-2M fuel rods with new elements is ensured on the mechanism of

  20. The tritium operations experience on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Halle, A.; Gentile, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Anderson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tritium gas system is administratively limited to 5 grains of tritium and provides the feedstock gas for the neutral beam and torus injection systems. Tritium operations on TFTR began with leak checking of gas handling systems, qualification of the gas injection systems, and high power plasma operations using using trace amounts of tritium in deuterium feedstock gas. Full tritium operation commenced with four highly diagnosed neutral beam pulses into a beamline calorimeter to verify planned tritium beam operating routines and to demonstrate the deuterium to tritium beam isotope exchange. Since that time, TFTR has successfully operated each of the twelve neutral beam ion sources in tritium during hundreds of tritium beam pulses and torus gas injections. This paper describes- the TFTR tritium gas handling systems and TFTR tritium operations of the gas injection systems and the neutral beam ion sources. Tritium accounting and accountability is discussed, including tritium retention issues of the torus limiters and beam impinged surfaces of the beamline components. Also included is tritium beam velocity analysis that compares the neutral beam extracted ion species composition for deuterium and tritium and that determines the extent of beam isotope exchange on subsequent deuterium and tritium beam pulses. The required modifications to TFTR operating routines to meet the US Department of Energy regulations for a low hazard nuclear facility and the problems encountered during initial tritium operations are described.

  1. Experiment and numerical simulation on the performance of a kw-scale molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Yu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature molten carbonate fuel cell stack was studied experimentally and computationally. Experimental data for fuel cell temperature was obtained when the stack was running under given operational conditions. A 3-D CFD numerical model was set up and used to simulate the central fuel cell in the stack. It includes the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations, the ideal gas law and an empirical equation for cell voltage. The model was used to simulate the transient behavior of the fuel cell under the same operational conditions as those of the experiment. Simulation results show that the transient temperature and current and power densities reach their maximal values at the channel outlet. A comparison of the modeling results and the experimental data shows the good agreement.

  2. Diamond Ordinance Radiation Facility (DORF) reactor operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieseler, Walter

    1970-01-01

    The Diamond Ordnance Radiation Facility Mark F Reactor is described and some of the problems encountered with its operation are discussed. In a period from reactor startup in September 1961 to June 1964, when the aluminum-clad core was changed to a stainless-steel clad core, a total of 30 fuel elements were removed from reactor service because of excessive growth. One leaking fuel element was detected during the lifetime of the aluminum- clad core. In June 1964, the core was changed to the stainless-steel-clad high hydride fuel elements. Since the installation of the stainless-steel-clad fuel element core, there has been a gradual decline of excess reactivity. Various theories were discussed as the cause but the investigations have resulted in no definitive conclusion that could account for the total reactivity loss

  3. Core design options for high conversion BWRs operating in Th–233U fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnik, Y.; Shwageraus, E.; Elias, E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • BWR core operating in a closed self-sustainable Th– 233 U fuel cycle. • Seed blanket optimization that includes assembly size array and axial dimensions. • Fully coupled MC with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules. • Thermal-hydraulic analysis includes MCPR observation. -- Abstract: Several options of fuel assembly design are investigated for a BWR core operating in a closed self-sustainable Th– 233 U fuel cycle. The designs rely on an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure consisting of a single axial fissile zone “sandwiched” between two fertile blanket zones, in order to improve fertile to fissile conversion ratio. The main objective of the study was to identify the most promising assembly design parameters, dimensions of fissile and fertile zones, for achieving net breeding of 233 U. The design challenge, in this respect, is that the fuel breeding potential is at odds with axial power peaking and the core minimum critical power ratio (CPR), hence limiting the maximum achievable core power rating. Calculations were performed with the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules. A single 3-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries was modeled applying simplified restrictions on the maximum centerline fuel temperature and the CPR. It was found that axially heterogeneous fuel assembly design with a single fissile zone can potentially achieve net breeding, while matching conventional BWR core power rating under certain restrictions to the core loading pattern design

  4. Program of experiments for the operating phase of the Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, G.R.; Bilinsky, D.M.; Davison, C.C.; Gray, M.N.; Kjartanson, B.H.; Martin, C.D.; Peters, D.A.; Lang, P.A.

    1992-09-01

    The Underground Research Laboratory (URL) is one of the major research and development facilities that AECL Research has constructed in support of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The URL is a unique geotechnical research facility constructed in previously undisturbed plutonic rock, which was well characterized before construction. The site evaluation and construction phases of the URL project have been completed and the operating phase is beginning. A program of operating phase experiments that address AECL's objectives for in situ testing has been selected. These experiments were subjected to an external peer review and a subsequent review by the URL Experiment Committee in 1989. The comments from the external peer review were incorporated into the experiment plans, and the revised experiments were accepted by the URL Experiment Committee. Summaries of both reviews are presented. The schedule for implementing the experiments and the quality assurance to be applied during implementation are also summarized. (Author) (9 refs., 11 figs.)

  5. Handling and transfer operations for partially-spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    This project involved the handling and transfer of partially-spent reactor fuel from the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor in Corvallis, Oregon to Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory in Richland, Washington. The method of handling is dependent upon the burn-up history of the fuel elements. Legal constraints imposed by standing U.S. nuclear regulations determine the selection of transport containers, transportation procedures, physical security arrangements in transit and nuclear material accountability documentation. Results of in-house safety evaluations of the project determine the extent of involvement of pertinent nuclear regulatory authorities. The actual handling activities and actual radiation dose rates are also presented (author)

  6. The Influence of Fuel Sulfur on the Operation of Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov

    The present work focusses on SO3/H2SO4 formation and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) condensation in a large low speed 2-stroke marine diesel engine. SO3 formation is treated theoretically from a formulated multizone engine model described in this work that includes a detailed and validated sulfur reaction...... as also demonstrated by a number of SO3 experiments described in this work. The experiments are carried out with a heavy duty medium speed 4 stroke diesel engine operating on heavy fuel oil including ≈ 2 wt. % sulfur. SO3 was measured successfully in the exhaust gas with the PENTOL SO3 analyzer...... mechanism. Model results show that for a large marine engine generally about 3 % - 6 % of the fuel sulfur converts to SO3 while the remainder leaves the engine as SO2 from which the SO3 is formed during the expansion stroke. SO3 formation scales with the cylinder pressure and inversely with the engine speed...

  7. Impact of new diesel fuels used in port operations on subsurface quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Diesel is widely used as fuel for operations in the port of Los Angeles - Long : Beach as well as for transport of goods to and from the port. Conventional diesel fuel : contributes disproportional to air pollution (particulate matter, NOx, CO, and :...

  8. Low stoichiometry operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell employing the interdigitated flow field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A multiphase fuel cell model based on computational fluid dynamics is used to investigate the possibility of operating a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at low stoichiometric flow ratios (ξ < 1.5) employing the interdigitated flow field design and using completely dry inlet gases. A case study...

  9. RESULTS OF AIRPLANE TU-204-300 OPERATED BY "VLADIVOSTOK AVIA" COMPANY FUEL FLOW MONITIRING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Maslennikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the results obtained from continuous monitoring of fuel flow on the airplanes Tu-204-300, operated by the aircompany "Vladivostok Avia". The reasons for the change in the cost of each copy of airplane and changes in fuel characteristics due to pilots manner of flying.

  10. Korean experience in CANDU-PHWR operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang-kee Park

    1987-01-01

    Among KEPCO's 9 nuclear power units, Korea Nuclear Unit No. 3, the Wolsung Nuclear Power Plant is the only CANDU-PHWR Unit, while the rest of 8 others are PWR units. The unit was designed by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd(AECL) of Canada, who also perfomed overall project management for the plant construction under the provisions and arrangement of the relevant contracts. The gross electrical output of the plant is 678.7 MWe and thermal output of the reactor is 2061 MWth. While these figures lead to lower plant eficiency than LWR counterparts, unit energy cost for fuel is more favorable than LWRs because natural uranium is utilized for the fuel bundles, some of which are already being fabricated domestically. Annual capacity factors for 1983 and 1984 could have been improved, if two major planned outages for the modification works on steam generator internals and one major forced outage form the heavy water spill incident could be eliminated. The heavy water spill incident in November, 1984 brought plant staffs many lessons to learn and many things to contemplate. Unique design concepts and features such as on-power refuelling, poison prevent mode, versatile plant control system built around digital computers and power step back/set back logics may be credited for these relatively good plant performances. Human related factors such as staff's technical capabilities and strong will toward good performance were other elements which could not be overlooked

  11. Experience with Pu-recycle fuel for large light water reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, H.; Spierling, H.; Eickelpasch, N.; Stoll, W.

    1977-01-01

    In general, design and operational performance of Pu-bearing recycle fuel are quite similar to those of Uranium fuel. Up to Nov. 1976 153 Pu-bearing fuel assemblies with altogether 8000 fuel rods, fabricated by ALKEM, have been or are in operation in German power reactors. Their performance is very satisfactory. In the Obrigheim and in the Gundremmingen plant up to 20% of the core are made up of Pu-fuel. In either case all-Pu fuel assemblies are used, graded in their Pu-content for compatibility with the surrounding U-fuel. The physics calculations are accomplished with basically the same methods as applied for U-fuel. Theoretical investigations and physics measurements have shown that differences in reactivity balance can be minimized by proper loading patterns. In additional experiments at elevated temperature (KRITZ) the neutron physics methods were verified in greater detail. The main feature of fabrication of mixed oxide pellets is mechanical blending of natural UO 2 - and PuO 2 -powder before pressing green pellets, and a rather high degree of mechanisation in all fabrication steps including sintering, wet grinding, and rod filling operations. The Zircaloy cladding know-how, welding techniques, final surface treatment etc. were all taken from the large experience of KWU in the LWR fuel area. Several fuel assemblies have been examined in the spent fuel pools and in hot cell laboratories after a maximum burn-up of 30 GWd/t. The examinations revealed no significant differences compared to U-fuel. Fission gas release is somewhat higher, attributed to the inhomogeneous fissioning on the microscopic scale in the mechanically mixed oxide. For the same reason the rate of densification is reduced. No Pu-redistribution has been observed. β-scans ( 140 La) and isotopic analyses confirmed the adequate accuracy of the calculation methods. In order to investigate the thermo-mechanical behaviour especially under power ramping conditions in greater depth mixed oxide test

  12. Recent operational experiments at the LANSCE facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) consists of a pulsed 800-MeV room-temperature linear accelerator and an 800-MeV accumulator ring. It simultaneously provides H{sup +} and H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have their own distinctive requirements, e.g. intensity, chopping pattern, duty factor, etc.. This multibeam operation presents challenges both from the standpoint of meeting the individual requirements but also achieving good overall performance for the integrated operation. Various aspects of more recent operations including the some of these challenges will be discussed.

  13. Operating experience of a portable thermophotovoltaic power supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Frederick E.; Doyle, Edward F.; Shukla, Kailash

    1999-03-01

    Two configurations of man-portable thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power supplies based on Thermo Power's supported continuous fiber emitter have been designed, built, and are being tested. The systems use narrow-band, fibrous, ytterbia emitters radiating to bandgap matched silicon photovoltaic arrays with dielectric stack filters for optical energy recovery and recuperators for thermal energy recovery. The systems have been designed for operation with propane and with combustion air preheat temperatures of up to 1250 K. To operate at air preheat temperatures above the auto-ignition temperature of the fuel, a unique fuel delivery system was devised which results in the micromixing and rapid combustion of the fuel and air right in the emitter fibers. This allows the ytterbia emitter fibers to run much hotter (˜2000 K) than any of the surrounding structure.

  14. Effects of the Fuel Price Increase on the Operating Cost of Freight Transport Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohari, Adel; Matori, Nasir; Yusof, Khamaruzaman Wan; Toloue, Iraj; Myint, Kin Cho

    2018-03-01

    One of the most important criteria in freight modal choices is the transport operating cost in which fuel price changes has a significant effect on it. This paper presents the impact of fuel price increases on the operating cost of the different transport modes for the containerized freight transportation. In this study, an operating cost equation was applied to compare the operating cost of different freight transport vehicles as well as evaluation of the operating cost changes across a range of fuel prices between the current price and one-hundred percent increase. The equation consists of influential parameters such as fuel cost, driver wage and maintenance cost of a vehicle. It has been concluded that the effect of the fuel price increase on the operating cost of different freight transportation modes is not in the same rate. According to equation and effective parameters considered, comparing the results showed that truck has the highest cost, train has the largest increase in price. Finally, the ship is the most influenced vehicle in terms of operating cost percentage increase when the rate of fuel price increase, followed by train and truck.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine systems operating with various biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, H.C.; Woudstra, T.; Aravind, P.V. [Process and Energy Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, Section Energy Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    Solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) systems provide a thermodynamically high efficiency alternative for power generation from biofuels. In this study biofuels namely methane, ethanol, methanol, hydrogen, and ammonia are evaluated exergetically with respect to their performance at system level and in system components like heat exchangers, fuel cell, gas turbine, combustor, compressor, and the stack. Further, the fuel cell losses are investigated in detail with respect to their dependence on operating parameters such as fuel utilization, Nernst voltage, etc. as well as fuel specific parameters like heat effects. It is found that the heat effects play a major role in setting up the flows in the system and hence, power levels attained in individual components. The per pass fuel utilization dictates the efficiency of the fuel cell itself, but the system efficiency is not entirely dependent on fuel cell efficiency alone, but depends on the split between the fuel cell and gas turbine powers which in turn depends highly on the nature of the fuel and its chemistry. Counter intuitively it is found that with recycle, the fuel cell efficiency of methane is less than that of hydrogen but the system efficiency of methane is higher. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Phobos L1 Operational Tether Experiment (PHLOTE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A sensor package that “floats” just above the surface of Phobos, suspended by a tether from a small spacecraft operating at the Mars/Phobos Lagrange 1 (L1) Point...

  17. Measuring low rates of erosion from forest fuel reduction operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Elliot; Ina Sue Miller

    2004-01-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate three methods for measuring low levels of hillside soil erosion associated with forest fuel management activities, and to measure erosion from cable logging and skid trails. The tipping bucket device with a sediment basin appears to be a better tool for this application than silt fences or rillmeter analysis. The greatest erosion...

  18. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  19. Simulated first operating campaign for the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, K.M.; Mariani, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Park, K.H.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which is an innovative liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept that is being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. It takes advantage of the properties of metallic fuel and liquid-metal cooling to offer significant improvements in reactor safety, operation, fuel cycle-economics, environmental protection, and safeguards. Over the next few years, the IFR fuel cycle will be demonstrated at Argonne-West in Idaho. Spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) win be processed in its associated Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) using a pyrochemical method that employs molten salts and liquid metals in an electrorefining operation. As part of the preparation for the fuel cycle demonstration, a computer code, PYRO, was developed at Argonne to model the electrorefining operation using thermodynamic and empirical data. This code has been used extensively to evaluate various operating strategies for the fuel cycle demonstration. The modeled results from the first operating campaign are presented. This campaign is capable of processing more than enough material to refuel completely the EBR-II core

  20. Operating experience of Fugen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohteru, Shigeru; Kaneko, Jun; Kawahara, Toshio; Matsumoto, Mitsuo

    1987-01-01

    The prototype ATR 'Fugen' developed as one of the national project has verified the performance and reliability of the advanced thermal reactor system through the operation for about eight years since 1979, and the elucidation of the characteristics in plutonium utilization and the development and verification of the tuilizing techniques have been advanced. Besides, the operational results and the achievement of the technical development are successively reflected to the design of a demonstration reactor. In this paper, the outline of Fugan and the operational results are reported. The ATR Fugen Power Station is that of the prototype reactor of heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled, pressure tube type, having the electric output of 165 MW. It started the full scale operation on March 20, 1979, and as of January, 1987, the total generated electric power reached about 7 billion kWh, the time of power generation was about 43,000 h, and the average capacity factor was 60.6 %. Plutonium utilization techniques, the flow characteristics and the dynamic plant characteristics of a pressure tube type reactor, the operational characteristics of a heavy water system and the techniques of handling heavy water containing tritium, and the operational reliability and maintainability of the machinery and equipment installed have been studied. (Kako, I.)

  1. Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-08-01

    Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

  2. Improving operational efficiency of fuel oil facilities used at gas-and-oil-fired power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vnukov, A. K.; Rozanova, F. A.; Bazylenko, A. A.; Zhurbilo, V. L.; Tereshko, V. S.; Perevyazchikov, V. A.; Parakevich, A. L.

    2009-09-01

    Results obtained from experimental investigations of energy consumption are described, and ways for considerably reducing it are proposed taking as an example the fuel oil facility at the 2400-MW Lukoml District Power Station, which operates predominantly on gas.

  3. Safety and operations of hydrogen fuel infrastructure in northern climates : a collaborative complex systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    "This project examined the safety and operation of hydrogen (H2) fueling system infrastructure in : northern climates. A multidisciplinary team lead by the University of Vermont (UVM), : combined with investigators from Zhejiang and Tsinghua Universi...

  4. Fuel-disruption experiments under high-ramp-rate heating conditions. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, S.A.; Worledge, D.H.; Cano, G.L.; Mast, P.K.; Briscoe, F.

    1983-10-01

    This topical report presents the preliminary results and analysis of the High Ramp Rate fuel-disruption experiment series. These experiments were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the timing and mode of fuel disruption during the prompt-burst phase of a loss-of-flow accident. High-speed cinematography was used to observe the timing and mode of the fuel disruption in a stack of five fuel pellets. Of the four experiments discussed, one used fresh mixed-oxide fuel, and three used irradiated mixed-oxide fuel. Analysis of the experiments indicates that in all cases, the observed disruption occurred well before fuel-vapor pressure was high enough to cause the disruption. The disruption appeared as a rapid spray-like expansion and occurred near the onset of fuel melting in the irradiated-fuel experiments and near the time of complete fuel melting in the fresh-fuel experiment. This early occurrence of fuel disruption is significant because it can potentially lower the work-energy release resulting from a prompt-burst disassembly accident.

  5. CANDU fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanoff, N.V.; Bazeley, E.G.; Hastings, I.J.

    1982-01-01

    CANDU fuel has operated successfully in Ontario Hydro's power reactors since 1962. In the 19 years of experience, about 99.9% of all fuel bundles have performed as designed. Most defects occurred before 1979 and subsequent changes in fuel design, fuel management, reactor control, and manufacturing quality control have reduced the current defect rate to near zero. Loss of power production due to defective fuel has been negligible. The outstanding performance continues while maintaining a low unit energy cost for fuel

  6. Optimal design and operation of solid oxide fuel cell systems for small-scale stationary applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Robert Joseph

    The advent of maturing fuel cell technologies presents an opportunity to achieve significant improvements in energy conversion efficiencies at many scales; thereby, simultaneously extending our finite resources and reducing "harmful" energy-related emissions to levels well below that of near-future regulatory standards. However, before realization of the advantages of fuel cells can take place, systems-level design issues regarding their application must be addressed. Using modeling and simulation, the present work offers optimal system design and operation strategies for stationary solid oxide fuel cell systems applied to single-family detached dwellings. A one-dimensional, steady-state finite-difference model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is generated and verified against other mathematical SOFC models in the literature. Fuel cell system balance-of-plant components and costs are also modeled and used to provide an estimate of system capital and life cycle costs. The models are used to evaluate optimal cell-stack power output, the impact of cell operating and design parameters, fuel type, thermal energy recovery, system process design, and operating strategy on overall system energetic and economic performance. Optimal cell design voltage, fuel utilization, and operating temperature parameters are found using minimization of the life cycle costs. System design evaluations reveal that hydrogen-fueled SOFC systems demonstrate lower system efficiencies than methane-fueled systems. The use of recycled cell exhaust gases in process design in the stack periphery are found to produce the highest system electric and cogeneration efficiencies while achieving the lowest capital costs. Annual simulations reveal that efficiencies of 45% electric (LHV basis), 85% cogenerative, and simple economic paybacks of 5--8 years are feasible for 1--2 kW SOFC systems in residential-scale applications. Design guidelines that offer additional suggestions related to fuel cell

  7. Field experience of new nuclear fuel types on the Kola NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeev, V.; Burlov, S.; Panov, A.; Saprykin, V.

    2008-01-01

    Specificity of the Kola nuclear power plant geographical position, conditions of region economics determine fuel management strategy. Isolation of Kola power supply system and, as a consequence, generating capacities redundancy cause operation of the nuclear power plant on reduced power level. At the same time there is a need to operate the power unit on the maximum power level in the case of not planned conditions. The basis of in-core fuel management is an achievement of the maximal burnup under providing of high installed capacity. At present there are not abilities to improve the fuel cycle based on traditional implementation fuel assemblies. Burnup maximum in these fuel cycles is achieved. At the core periphery installed highest possible quantity of the burned-up assemblies in the view of safety operation margins satisfaction. Works on application of the second generation fuel have been carried out on the Kola NPP since 2002. Fuel assemblies of this type are profiled. Burnable absorber, changed lattice spacing in relation to standard fuel, changed height of a fuel column, thickness of fuel pin clad are applied. In CR fuel followers modernized docking unit (with hafnium plates are intended for energy-release splash suppression) is used. At present 2-nd generation fuel is in experimental operation on unit 3 (18-21 fuel cycles, 2002-2007 years) and unit 4 (18-19 fuel cycles, 2005-2007 years). Safety margins did not exceeded. Coolant activity did not exceed the limiting value. There were not damaged fuel assemblies of second generation. Originally in the project of applications of new fuel it was supposed to refuel annually 78 fresh assemblies. At the moment annual refueling consists of 66 assemblies with effective enrichment 3.82 %. Cycle duration does not exceed 250-260 effective days. The part of assemblies is left on 5-th cycle of operation. In a similar fuel cycle in 2007 on the unit 1 operation with profiled fuel (enrichment of 3.82 %) of shakeproof type

  8. Final environmental statement related to the operation of the Barnwell Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (Docket No. 70-1729)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The proposed action is to issue a materials license, pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30, 40 and 70 of the Commission's regulations, authorizing Allied-General Nuclear Services to receive and handle fuel casks containing spent reactor fuel elements and to store spent reactor fuel at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP), in the Barnwell Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (BFRSS). The BFRSS is a part of, and contiguous to, the BNFP-Separations Facility which is being constructed on a small portion of a 1700 acre site about six miles west of the city of Barnwell in Barnwell County, South Carolina. Construction of the BFRSS facility has been completed and the BNFP Separations Facility is more than 90% complete. A uranium Hexafluoride Facility is being constructed on the same site, and a Plutonium Product Facility is proposed to be constructed adjacent to the Separations Facility. The license that is the subject of this action will, if issued, allow lthe use of the BFRSS separate4 from the operation of the Separations Facility. Impacts resulting from the construction of the BFRSS have already occurred and mitigating measures have been and are being implemented to offset any adverse impacts. Operation of the BFRSS will not interfere with water sources, and should cause no noticeable damage to the terrestrial or aquatic environments. Operating experience at other fuel receiving and storage facilities has shown that radioactive concentrations discharged to the environs (the more significant process effluents) have been well below applicabhle state and federal limits. The small quantities to be released during operation of the BFRSS will result in negligible environmental impact. 20 figs

  9. Using alcohol fuels in dual fuel operation of compression ignition engines: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Coulier, Jakob; Verhelst, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Because of global warming and increasing air pollution, alternative fuels are increasingly being considered for use in internal combustion engines (ICEs). Among the alternatives, alcohol fuels seem very interesting. They can be produced in a renewable way and possess certain advantageous properties that give them the potential to lower pollutants and CO2 emissions from ICEs. Methanol and ethanol are the most researched alcohols today. In fact, in some areas of the world, gasoline is blended w...

  10. Fuel failure assessments based on radiochemistry. Experience feedback and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, C.; Ziabletsev, D.; Zeh, P.

    2015-01-01

    Significant improvements have been observed in LWR nuclear fuel reliability over the past years. As a result, the number of fuel failures in PWRs and BWRs has recently dramatically decreased. Nevertheless, a few remaining challenges still exist. One of them is that the industry has recently started seeing a relatively new type of fuel failure, so-called 'weak leak failures', which could be characterized by a very small release of gaseous fission products and essentially almost zero release of iodines or any other soluble fission products in the reactor coolant. Correspondingly, the behavior of these weak leakers does not follow typical behavior of a conventional leaker characterized by a proportionality of the amount of released Xe 133 related to the failed rod power. Instead, for a weak leaker, the activity of Xe 133 is directly correlated to the size of the cladding defects of the leaker. The presence of undetected weak leaker in the core may lead to carryover of a leaker into the subsequent cycle. Even if the presence of weak leaker in the core is suspected, it typically requires more effort to identify the leaker which could result in extended duration of the outage and ultimately to economic losses to the utility operating the reactor. To effectively deal with this issue the industry has been facing, several changes have been recently realized, which are different from the methodology of dealing with conventional leaker. These changes include new assessment methods, the need for improved sipping techniques to better identify low release leakers, and correspondingly better equipment to be able to locate small clad defects associated with weak leaker, such as sensitive localization device of failed rods, sensitive eddy current coil for the failed rod, ultra high definition cameras for the failed rod examination and experienced fuel reliability engineers performing cause of failure and rood cause research and analyses. Ultimately, the destructive

  11. GALILEO NIMS EXPERIMENT DATA RECORDS: JUPITER OPERATIONS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NIMS Experiment Data Record (EDR) files contain raw data from the Galileo Orbiter Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (CARLSONETAL1992). This raw data requires...

  12. Fabrication experience with mixed-oxide LWR fuels at the BELGONUCLEAIRE plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhellemont, G.

    1979-01-01

    For nearly 20 years BELGONUCLEAIRE has been involved in a steadily growing effort to increase its production of mixed oxides. This programme has ranged from basic research and process development through a pilot-scale unit to today's mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plant at Dessel, which has been in operation for just over 5 years. The reference fabrication flow sheet includes UO 2 , PuO 2 and a scraped powder preparation, sintered ground pellets as well as rod fabrication and assembling. With regard to quality, attention is especially paid to the process monitoring and quality controls at the qualification step and during the routine production. Entirely different types of thermal UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel pellets, rods and assemblies have been manufactured for PWR and BWR operation. For these fabrications, some diagrams of the results with regard to the required technical specifications are presented. Special emphasis is placed on the occasional deviations of some finished products from the specifications and on the solutions applied to avoid such problems. Concerning the actual capacity of the mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plant, several limiting factors due to the nature of plutonium itself are discussed. Taking into account all these ambient limitations, a reference PWR mixed-oxide fuel output of nominally 18 t/a is obtained. The industrial feasibility of UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel fabrication has been thoroughly demonstrated by the present BELGONUCLEAIRE plant. The experience obtained has led to progressive improvements of the fabrication process and adaptation of the product controls in order to ensure the requested quality levels. (author)

  13. Commonwealth Edison operating experience: the people factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soth, L.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1955, Commonwealth Edison's nuclear commitment has evolved into three operating stations, another in startup, and two more under construction. Paralleling this evolution has been the investment in the personnel resources to operate, maintain, and manage these facilities. The personnel resource, its training and development, is the foundation for safe operation at any nuclear plant - the people factor. The personnel requirement at Edison has expanded and evolved with each station to meet ever increasing regulatory requirements. An extensive training organization has been developed to emphasize the importance of the man side of the human factors man/machine interface. Personnel errors are investigated to identify and correct the root causes, and outstanding personnel performance is recognized by the Company

  14. Five years of operating experience with Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of Phenix began at the end of 1968; the unit first went critical on August 31 st, 1973, and it was first connected to the grid of Electricite de France on 31st December 1973. It started operating industrially on July 14th, 1974. The balance sheet after five years of operations is as follows: Gross thermal capacity: 590 MW; Grosss electric capacity: 264 MW; Gross capacity factor of the power station: 45%; Gross electrical power produced by 30th september 1979: more than six billion kWh. In 1976 and 1977 the operation of the plant was affected by modifications made to the intermediate heat exchangers following leaks discovered in October 1976. Since 1976 the plants has been working at full capacity and the availability rate during the period July 1978 - July 1979 was more than 80% [fr

  15. High pressure operation of tubular solid oxide fuel cells and their intergration with gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, C.; Wepfer, W.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fossil fuels continue to be used at a rate greater than that of their natural formation, and the current byproducts from their use are believed to have a detrimental effect on the environment (e.g. global warming). There is thus a significant impetus to have cleaner, more efficient fuel consumption alternatives. Recent progress has led to renewed vigor in the development of fuel cell technology, which has been shown to be capable of producing high efficiencies with relatively benign exhaust products. The tubular solid oxide fuel cell developed by Westinghouse Electric Corporation has shown significant promise. Modeling efforts have been and are underway to optimize and better understand this fuel cell technology. Thus far, the bulk of modeling efforts has been for operation at atmospheric pressure. There is now interest in developing high-efficiency integrated gas turbine/solid oxide fuel cell systems. Such operation of fuel cells would obviously occur at higher pressures. The fuel cells have been successfully modeled under high pressure operation and further investigated as integrated components of an open loop gas turbine cycle.

  16. Development of materials for use in solid oxid fuel cells anodes using renewable fuels in direct operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, D.B.P.L. de; Florio, D.Z. de; Bezerra, M.E.O.

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells produce electrical current from the electrochemical combustion of a gas or liquid (H2, CH4, C2H5OH, CH3OH, etc.) inserted into the anode cell. An important class of fuel cells is the SOFC (Solid Oxide Cell Fuel). It has a ceramic electrolyte that transports protons (H +) or O-2 ions and operating at high temperatures (500-1000 °C) and mixed conductive electrodes (ionic and electronic) ceramics or cermets. This work aims to develop anodes for fuel cells of solid oxide (SOFC) in order to direct operations with renewable fuels and strategic for the country (such as bioethanol and biogas). In this context, it becomes important to study in relation to the ceramic materials, especially those that must be used in high temperatures. Some types of double perovskites such as Sr2MgMoO6 (or simply SMMO) have been used as anodes in SOFC. In this study were synthesized by the polymeric precursor method, analyzed and characterized different ceramic samples of families SMMO, doped with Nb, this is: Sr2 (MgMo)1-xNbxO6 with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2. The materials produced were characterized by various techniques such as, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and electrical properties determined by dc and ac measurements in a wide range of temperature, frequency and partial pressure of oxygen. The results of this work will contribute to a better understanding of advanced ceramic properties with mixed driving (electronic and ionic) and contribute to the advancement of SOFC technology operating directly with renewable fuels. (author)

  17. Power-Cooling-Mismatch Test Series Test PCM-7. Experiment operating specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, D.T.; Smith, R.H.; Stanley, C.J.

    1979-02-01

    The experiment operating specifications for the Power-Cooling-Mismatch (PCM) Test PCM-7 to be conducted in the Power Burst Facility are described. The PCM Test Series was designed on the basis of a parametric evaluation of fuel behavior response with cladding temperature, rod internal pressure, time in film boiling, and test rod power being the variable parameters. The test matrix, defined in the PCM Experiment Requirements Document (ERD), encompasses a wide range of situations extending from pre-CHF (critical heat flux) PCMs to long duration operation in stable film boiling leading to rod failure

  18. Operational Experience with the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00205212

    2015-05-15

    In the first LHC running period the CMS-pixel detector had to face various operational challenges and had to adapt to the rapidly changing beam conditions. In order to maximize the physics potential and the quality of the data, online and offline calibrations were performed on a regular basis. The detector performed excellently with an average hit efficiency above 99\\% for all layers and disks. In this contribution the operational challenges of the silicon pixel detector in the first LHC run and the current long shutdown are summarized and the expectations for 2015 are discussed.

  19. Operating experience feedback report - Air systems problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1987-12-01

    This report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential failures of safety-related systems in U.S. plants that resulted from degraded or malfunctioning non-safety grade air systems. Based upon the evaluation of these events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) concludes that the issue of air systems problems is an important one which requires additional NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendations for corrective actions to deal with the issue. (author)

  20. Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

  1. Experience on wet storage spent fuel sipping at IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The IEA-R1 research reactor of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) is a pool type reactor of B and W design, that has been operating since 1957 at a power of 2 MW. Irradiated (spent) fuels have been stored at the facility during the various years of operation. At present there are 40 spent fuel assemblies at dry storage, 79 spent fuel assemblies at wet storage and 30 fuel assemblies in the core. The oldest fuels are of United States origin, made with U-Al alloy, both of LEU and HEU MTR fuel type. many of these fuel assemblies have corrosion pits along their lateral fuel plates. These pits originate by galvanic corrosion between the fuel plate and the stainless steel storage racks. As a consequence of the possibility of sending the irradiated old fuels back to the U.S.A., sipping tests were performed with the spent fuel assemblies. The reason for this was to evaluate their 137 Cs leaking rate, if any. This work describes the procedure and methodology used to perform the sipping tests with the fuel assemblies at the storage pool, and presents the results obtained for the 137 Cs sipping water activity for each fuel assembly. A correlation is made between the corrosion pits and the activity values measured. A 137 Cs leaking rate is determined and compared to the criteria established for canning spent fuel assemblies before shipment. (author)

  2. Experience on wet storage spent fuel sipping at IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Divisao de Engenharia do Nucleo

    1997-12-01

    The IEA-R1 research reactor of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) is a pool type reactor of B and W design, that has been operating since 1957 at a power of 2 MW. Irradiated (spent) fuels have been stored at the facility during the various years of operation. At present there are 40 spent fuel assemblies at dry storage, 79 spent fuel assemblies at wet storage and 30 fuel assemblies in the core. The oldest fuels are of United States origin, made with U-Al alloy, both of LEU and HEU MTR fuel type. many of these fuel assemblies have corrosion pits along their lateral fuel plates. These pits originate by galvanic corrosion between the fuel plate and the stainless steel storage racks. As a consequence of the possibility of sending the irradiated old fuels back to the U.S.A., sipping tests were performed with the spent fuel assemblies. The reason for this was to evaluate their {sup 137}Cs leaking rate, if any. This work describes the procedure and methodology used to perform the sipping tests with the fuel assemblies at the storage pool, and presents the results obtained for the {sup 137}Cs sipping water activity for each fuel assembly. A correlation is made between the corrosion pits and the activity values measured. A {sup 137}Cs leaking rate is determined and compared to the criteria established for canning spent fuel assemblies before shipment. (author).

  3. Experience on wet storage spent fuel sipping at IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A

    1998-03-01

    The IEA-R1 research reactor of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) is a pool type reactor of B and W design, that has been operating since 1957 at a power of 2 MW. Irradiated (spent) fuels have been stored at the facility during the various years of operation. At present there are 40 spent fuel assemblies at dry storage, 79 spent fuel assemblies at wet storage and 30 fuel assemblies in the core. The oldest fuels are of United States origin, made with U-Al alloy, both of LEU and HEU MTR fuel type. Many of these fuel assemblies have corrosion pits along their lateral fuel plates. These pits originate by galvanic corrosion between the fuel plate and the stainless steel storage racks. As a consequence of the possibility of sending the irradiated old fuels back the U.S.A., sipping tests were performed with the spent fuel assemblies. The reason for this was to evaluate their {sup 137}Cs leaking rate, if any. This work describes the procedure and methodology used to perform the sipping tests with the fuel assemblies at the storage pool, and presents the results obtained for the {sup 137}Cs sipping water activity for each fuel assembly. A correlation is made between the corrosion pits and the activity values measured. A {sup 137}Cs leaking rate is determined and compared to the criteria established for canning spent fuel assemblies before shipment.

  4. Experience on wet storage spent fuel sipping at IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    The IEA-R1 research reactor of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) is a pool type reactor of B and W design, that has been operating since 1957 at a power of 2 MW. Irradiated (spent) fuels have been stored at the facility during the various years of operation. At present there are 40 spent fuel assemblies at dry storage, 79 spent fuel assemblies at wet storage and 30 fuel assemblies in the core. The oldest fuels are of United States origin, made with U-Al alloy, both of LEU and HEU MTR fuel type. Many of these fuel assemblies have corrosion pits along their lateral fuel plates. These pits originate by galvanic corrosion between the fuel plate and the stainless steel storage racks. As a consequence of the possibility of sending the irradiated old fuels back the U.S.A., sipping tests were performed with the spent fuel assemblies. The reason for this was to evaluate their 137 Cs leaking rate, if any. This work describes the procedure and methodology used to perform the sipping tests with the fuel assemblies at the storage pool, and presents the results obtained for the 137 Cs sipping water activity for each fuel assembly. A correlation is made between the corrosion pits and the activity values measured. A 137 Cs leaking rate is determined and compared to the criteria established for canning spent fuel assemblies before shipment

  5. Annual meeting on nuclear technology 1980. Technical meeting: Operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In addition to general experiences, experiences in reactor operation with relation to the Phenix reactor, KNK-2 reactor, the AVR reactor, the BWR-type KKI-reactor, the Philippsburg-1 reactor and the Obrigheim reactor are described. (DG) [de

  6. Results of international standard problem No. 36 severe fuel damage experiment of a VVER fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firnhaber, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen-und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany); Yegorova, L. [Nuclear Safety Institute of Russian Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Brockmeier, U. [Ruhr-Univ. of Bochum (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    International Standard Problems (ISP) organized by the OECD are defined as comparative exercises in which predictions with different computer codes for a given physical problem are compared with each other and with a carefully controlled experimental study. The main goal of ISP is to increase confidence in the validity and accuracy of analytical tools used in assessing the safety of nuclear installations. In addition, it enables the code user to gain experience and to improve his competence. This paper presents the results and assessment of ISP No. 36, which deals with the early core degradation phase during an unmitigated severe LWR accident in a Russian type VVER. Representatives of 17 organizations participated in the ISP using the codes ATHLET-CD, ICARE2, KESS-III, MELCOR, SCDAP/RELAP5 and RAPTA. Some participants performed several calculations with different codes. As experimental basis the severe fuel damage experiment CORA-W2 was selected. The main phenomena investigated are thermal behavior of fuel rods, onset of temperature escalation, material behavior and hydrogen generation. In general, the calculations give the right tendency of the experimental results for the thermal behavior, the hydrogen generation and, partly, for the material behavior. However, some calculations deviate in important quantities - e.g. some material behavior data - showing remarkable discrepancies between each other and from the experiments. The temperature history of the bundle up to the beginning of significant oxidation was calculated quite well. Deviations seem to be related to the overall heat balance. Since the material behavior of the bundle is to a great extent influenced by the cladding failure criteria a more realistic cladding failure model should be developed at least for the detailed, mechanistic codes. Regarding the material behavior and flow blockage some models for the material interaction as well as for relocation and refreezing requires further improvement.

  7. Modeling and operation optimization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system for maximum efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, In-Su; Park, Sang-Kyun; Chung, Chang-Bock

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system is operationally optimized. • A constrained optimization problem is formulated to maximize fuel cell efficiency. • Empirical and semi-empirical models for most system components are developed. • Sensitivity analysis is performed to elucidate the effects of major operating variables. • The optimization results are verified by comparison with actual operation data. - Abstract: This paper presents an operation optimization method and demonstrates its application to a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system. A constrained optimization problem was formulated to maximize the efficiency of a fuel cell system by incorporating practical models derived from actual operations of the system. Empirical and semi-empirical models for most of the system components were developed based on artificial neural networks and semi-empirical equations. Prior to system optimizations, the developed models were validated by comparing simulation results with the measured ones. Moreover, sensitivity analyses were performed to elucidate the effects of major operating variables on the system efficiency under practical operating constraints. Then, the optimal operating conditions were sought at various system power loads. The optimization results revealed that the efficiency gaps between the worst and best operation conditions of the system could reach 1.2–5.5% depending on the power output range. To verify the optimization results, the optimal operating conditions were applied to the fuel cell system, and the measured results were compared with the expected optimal values. The discrepancies between the measured and expected values were found to be trivial, indicating that the proposed operation optimization method was quite successful for a substantial increase in the efficiency of the fuel cell system.

  8. Operational experiences and upgradation of waste management facilities Trombay, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chander, Mahesh; Bodke, S.B.; Bansal, N.K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Waste Management Facilities Trombay provide services for the safe management of radioactive wastes generated from the operation of non power sources at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. The paper describes in detail the current operational experience and facility upgradation by way of revamping of existing processes equipment and systems and augmentation of the facility by way of introducing latest processes and technologies to enhance the safety. Radioactive wastes are generated from the operation of research reactors, fuel fabrication, spent fuel reprocessing, research labs. manufacture of sealed sources and labeled compounds. Use of radiation sources in the field of medical, agriculture and industry also leads to generation of assorted solid waste and spent sealed radiation sources which require proper waste management. Waste Management Facilities Trombay comprise of Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP), Decontamination Centre (DC) and Radioactive Solid Waste Management Site (RSMS). Low level radioactive liquid effluents are received at ETP. Plant has 100 M 3 /day treatment capacity. Decontamination of liquid effluents is effected by chemical treatment method using co- precipitation as a process. Plant has 1800 M 3 of storage capacity. Chemical treatment system comprises of clarifloculator, static mixer and chemical feed tanks. Plant has concentrate management facility where chemical sludge is centrifuged to effect volume reduction of more that 15. Thickened sludge is immobilized in cement matrix. Decontamination Centre caters to the need of equipment decontamination from research reactors. Process used is ultrasonic chemical decontamination. Besides this DC provides services for decontamination of protective wears. Radioactive Solid Waste Management Site is responsible for the safe management of solid waste generated at various research reactors, plants, laboratories in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Spent sealed radiation sources are also stored

  9. Operational experience with the CERN hadron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmot, H.; Dutriat, C.; Hill, C.E.; Langbein, K.; Lombardi, A.M.; O'Neil, M.; Tanke, E.; Vretenar, M.

    1996-01-01

    The present CERN proton linac (Linac2) was commissioned in 1978 and since that date has been the primary source of protons to the CERN accelerator complex. During the past 18 years, the machine has had a very good reliability record in spite of the demands made upon it. Modifications have been made with the view of maintaining this reliability with reduced resources and new requirements from the users. Further demands will be made in the future for LHC operation. In 1994, a new linac for heavy ion production was put into service replacing the original CERN proton linac. As this machine was built within an international collaboration, operation had to take into account the novelty of the techniques used and the variety of equipment supplied by outside collaborators. Even so, the new machine has also had very good reliability. (author)

  10. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    During 1997 the PWRs in Ringhals performed extremely well (capability factors 85-90%), the unit Ringhals 2 reached the best capability factor since commercial operation started in 1976. The BWRs made an average 76% capability, which is somewhat less than in 1996. The slightly reduced capability derives from ongoing modernization projects at several units. At the youngest plants, Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3, capability and utilization were very high. Events and data for 1997 are given for each reactor, together with operational statistics for the years 1990-1997. A number of safety-related events are reported, which occurred st the Swedish plants during 1997. These events are classified as level 1 or higher on the international nuclear event scale (INES).

  11. Overview - Defense Waste Processing Facility Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility. Radioactive operations began in March 1996 and over 1,000 canisters have been produced. This paper presents an overview of the DWPF process and a summary of recent facility operations and process improvements. These process improvements include efforts to extend the life of the DWPF melter, projects to increase facility throughput, initiatives to reduce the quantity of wastewater generated, improved remote decontamination capabilities, and improvements to remote canyon equipment to extend equipment life span. This paper also includes a review of a melt rate improvement program conducted by Savannah River Technology Center personnel. This program involved identifying the factors that impacted melt rate, conducting small scale testing of proposed process changes and developing a cost effective implementation plan

  12. Rules for the licensing of new experiments in BR2: application to the test irradiation of new MTR-fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joppen, F.

    2000-01-01

    New types of MTR fuel elements are being developed and require a qualification before routine operation could be authorized. During the test irradiation the new fuel elements .are considered as experimental devices and their irradiation is allowed according to the procedures for experiments. Authorization is based on the advice .of a consultative committee on experiments. This procedure is valid as long as the irradiation is covered by the actual reactor license. An additional license or an amendment is only required if due to the experiment the risk for the workers or the environment is increased in a significant way. A few experimental fuel plates loaded in the primary loop of the reactor will not increase this risk. The source term for potential radioactive releases remains more or less the same. The probability for an accident can be limited by restricting the heat flux and surface temperature. (author)

  13. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laintz, Kenneth E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  14. Recent Advances in Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Experiments and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic fuel cells convert the chemical energy of biofuels into electrical energy. Unlike traditional fuel cell types, which are mainly based on metal catalysts, the enzymatic fuel cells employ enzymes as catalysts. This fuel cell type can be used as an implantable power source for a variety of medical devices used in modern medicine to administer drugs, treat ailments and monitor bodily functions. Some advantages in comparison to conventional fuel cells include a simple fuel cell design and lower cost of the main fuel cell components, however they suffer from severe kinetic limitations mainly due to inefficiency in electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. In this review article, the major research activities concerned with the enzymatic fuel cells (anode and cathode development, system design, modeling by highlighting the current problems (low cell voltage, low current density, stability will be presented.

  15. The mode of operation of CANDU power reactor in thorium self-sufficient fuel cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergelson Boris R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of calculations for CANDU reactor operation in the thorium fuel cycle. The calculations were performed to estimate feasibility of operation of a heavy-water thermal neutron power reactor in the self-sufficient thorium cycle. The parameters of the active core and the scheme of fuel reloading were considered to be the same as for the standard operation in the uranium cycle. Two modes of operation are discussed in the paper: the mode of preliminary accumulation of 233U and the mode of operation in the self-sufficient cycle. For calculations for the mode of accumulation of 233U, it was assumed that plutonium was used as the additional fissile material to provide neutrons for 233U production. Plutonium was placed in fuel channels, while 232Th was located in target channels. The maximum content of 233U in the target channels was about 13 kg/t of ThO2. This was achieved by six year irradiation. The start of reactor operation in the self-sufficient mode requires content of 233U not less than 12 kg/t. For the mode of operation in the self-sufficient cycle, it was assumed that all the channels were loaded with the identical fuel assemblies containing ThO2 and a certain amount of 233U. It was shown that the non-uniform distribution of 233U in a fuel assembly is preferable.

  16. Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

    2008-12-31

    Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

  17. Operational experience with the CEBAF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Chowdhary, M.; Karn, J.; Tiefenback, M.; Zeijts, J. van; Watson, W.

    1996-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) successfully began its experimental nuclear physics program in November of 1995 and has since surpassed predicted machine availability. Part of this success can be attributed to using the EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) control system toolkit. The CEBAF control system is one of the largest accelerator control system now operating. It controls approximately 338 SRF cavities, 2,300 magnets, 500 beam position monitors and other accelerator devices, such as gun hardware and other beam monitoring devices. All told, the system must be able to access over 125,000 database records. The system has been well received by both operators and the hardware designers. The EPICS utilities have made the task of troubleshooting systems easier. The graphical and test-based creation tools have allowed operators to custom build control screens. In addition, the ability to integrate EPICS with other software packages, such as Tcl/Tk, has allowed physicists to quickly prototype high-level application programs, and to provide GUI front ends for command line driven tools. Specific examples of the control system applications are presented in the areas of energy and orbit control, cavity tuning and accelerator tune up diagnostics

  18. Improved Density Control in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment using Internal Fueling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, K. E.; Bongard, M. W.; Cole, J. A.; Fonck, R. J.; Redd, A. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    Routine density control up to and exceeding the Greenwald limit is critical to key Pegasus operational scenarios, including non-solenoidal startup plasmas created using single-point helicity injection and high β Ohmic plasmas. Confinement scalings suggest it is possible to achieve very high β plasmas in Pegasus by lowering the toroidal field and increasing ne/ng. In the past, Pegasus achieved β ˜ 20% in high recycling Ohmic plasmas without running into any operational boundaries.footnotetext Garstka, G.D. et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 1705 (2003) However, recent Ohmic experiments have demonstrated that Pegasus currently operates in an extremely low-recycling regime with R pumping. Hence, it is difficult to achieve ne/ng> 0.3 with these improved wall conditions. Presently, gas is injected using low-field side (LFS) modified PV-10 valves. To attain high ne/ng operation and coincidentally separate core plasma and local current source fueling two new gas fueling capabilities are under development. A centerstack capillary injection system has been commissioned and is undergoing initial tests. A LFS movable midplane needle gas injection system is currently under design and will reach r/a ˜ 0.25. Initial results from both systems will be presented.

  19. Operating Point Optimization of a Hydrogen Fueled Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Steam Turbine (SOFC-ST Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjo Ugartemendia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a hydrogen powered hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-steam turbine (SOFC-ST system and studies its optimal operating conditions. This type of installation can be very appropriate to complement the intermittent generation of renewable energies, such as wind generation. A dynamic model of an alternative hybrid SOFC-ST configuration that is especially suited to work with hydrogen is developed. The proposed system recuperates the waste heat of the high temperature fuel cell, to feed a bottoming cycle (BC based on a steam turbine (ST. In order to optimize the behavior and performance of the system, a two-level control structure is proposed. Two controllers have been implemented for the stack temperature and fuel utilization factor. An upper supervisor generates optimal set-points in order to reach a maximal hydrogen efficiency. The simulation results obtained show that the proposed system allows one to reach high efficiencies at rated power levels.

  20. A Choice Experiment on Alternative Fuel Vehicle Preferences of Private Car Owners in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, A.; Koetse, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of an online stated choice experiment on preferences of Dutch private car owners for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and their characteristics. Results show that negative preferences for alternative fuel vehicles are large, especially for the electric and fuel cell car,

  1. Used Fuel Logistics: Decades of Experience with transportation and Interim storage solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orban, G.; Shelton, C.

    2015-07-01

    Used fuel inventories are growing worldwide. While some countries have opted for a closed cycle with recycling, numerous countries must expand their interim storage solutions as implementation of permanent repositories is taking more time than foreseen. In both cases transportation capabilities will have to be developed. AREVA TN has an unparalleled expertise with transportation of used fuel. For more than 50 years AREVA TN has safely shipped more than 7,000 used fuel transport casks. The transportation model that was initially developed in the 1970s has been adapted and enhanced over the years to meet more restrictive regulatory requirements and evolving customer needs, and to address public concerns. The numerous “lessons learned” have offered data and guidance that have allowed for also efficient and consistent improvement over the decades. AREVA TN has also an extensive experience with interim dry storage solutions in many countries on-site but also is working with partners to developed consolidated interim storage facility. Both expertise with storage and transportation contribute to safe, secure and smooth continuity of the operations. This paper will describe decades of experience with a very successful transportation program as well as interim storage solutions. (Author)

  2. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel rods in HFIR experiments HRB-7 and -8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, K.H.; Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.; Montgomery, B.H.; Hamner, R.L.; Beatty, R.L.

    1977-05-01

    The HRB-7 and -8 experiments were designed as a comprehensive test of mixed thorium-uranium oxide fissile particles with Th:U ratios from 0 to 8 for HTGR recycle application. In addition, fissile particles derived from Weak-Acid Resin (WAR) were tested as a potential backup type of fissile particle for HTGR recycle. These experiments were conducted at two temperatures (1250 and 1500 0 C) to determine the influence of operating temperature on the performance parameters studied. The minor objectives were comparison of advanced coating designs where ZrC replaced SiC in the Triso design, testing of fuel coated in laboratory-scale equipment with fuel coated in production-scale coaters, comparison of the performance of 233 U-bearing particles with that of 235 U-bearing particles, comparison of the performance of Biso coatings with Triso coatings for particles containing the same type of kernel, and testing of multijunction tungsten-rhenium thermocouples. All objectives were accomplished. As a result of these experiments the mixed thorium-uranium oxide fissile kernel was replaced by a WAR-derived particle in the reference recycle design. A tentative decision to make this change had been reached before the HRB-7 and -8 capsules were examined, and the results of the examination confirmed the accuracy of the previous decision. Even maximum dilution (Th/U approximately equal to 8) of the mixed thorium-uranium oxide kernel was insufficient to prevent amoeba of the kernels at rates that are unacceptable in a large HTGR. Other results showed the performance of 233 U-bearing particles to be identical to that of 235 U-bearing particles, the performance of fuel coated in production-scale equipment to be at least as good as that of fuel coated in laboratory-scale coaters, the performance of ZrC coatings to be very promising, and Biso coatings to be inferior to Triso coatings relative to fission product retention

  3. Heat and fuel coupled operation of a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell with a heat exchanger methanol steam reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, G.; Vázquez, F. Vidal; Waiblinger, W.; Auvinen, S.; Ribeirinha, P.

    2017-04-01

    In this work a methanol steam reforming (MSR) reactor has been operated thermally coupled to a high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack (HT-PEMFC) utilizing its waste heat. The operating temperature of the coupled system was 180 °C which is significantly lower than the conventional operating temperature of the MSR process which is around 250 °C. A newly designed heat exchanger reformer has been developed by VTT (Technical Research Center of Finland LTD) and was equipped with commercially available CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 (BASF RP-60) catalyst. The liquid cooled, 165 cm2, 12-cell stack used for the measurements was supplied by Serenergy A/S. The off-heat from the electrochemical fuel cell reaction was transferred to the reforming reactor using triethylene glycol (TEG) as heat transfer fluid. The system was operated up to 0.4 A cm-2 generating an electrical power output of 427 Wel. A total stack waste heat utilization of 86.4% was achieved. It has been shown that it is possible to transfer sufficient heat from the fuel cell stack to the liquid circuit in order to provide the needed amount for vaporizing and reforming of the methanol-water-mixture. Furthermore a set of recommendations is given for future system design considerations.

  4. International Experience with Fast Reactor Operation & Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, John I.; Grandy, C.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: • Worldwide experience with fast reactors has demonstrated the robustness of the technology and it stands ready for worldwide deployment. • The lessons learned are many and there is danger that what has been learned will be forgotten given that there is little activity in fast reactor development at the present time. • For this reason it is essential that knowledge of fast reactor technology be preserved, an activity supported in the U.S. as well as other countries

  5. Statistic Analysis of Operating Experience Using DIOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I. S.; Kim, M. C.; Kim, J. T.; Lee, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    As the number of operating nuclear power plants(NPPs) increased up to 20 and their aging steadily progressed, a comprehensive and systematic system for the nuclear safety supervision would be needed as a national level. Also in order to make an excellent product by integrating national regulatory capabilities, and to increase the public confidence on in-situ regulations, KINS have launched a top brand project since early 2007, which called the 'Tracking System for the Implementation of Nuclear Regulation: RTRACER' The one of main contents of R-TRACER is promoting nuclear safety by interconnecting the information of the events and that of safety review and regulatory inspection

  6. Evaluation of operating experience with safety values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bung, W.; Hoemke, P.; Oberender, W.; Paul, H.; Rueter, W.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes statistical investigations of 2076 functional tests carried out on power operated safety valves in conventional power plants in 1972 until 1983 with special regard to Common Mode-Failures. The results clearly show that Common Mode-Failures play an important part of non-availability for the controlled safety valves, especially in the control system. The 'Deutsche Risikostudie' does not consider any Common Mode-Failures of the primary safety valves. However there is no significant increase of the risk resulted by the primary safety valves in the 'Referenzanlage' if the calculated Common Mode-Failures probabilities are considered. (orig.) [de

  7. Operating envelope of a short contact time fuel reformer for propane catalytic partial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Michael G.; Walluk, Mark R.; Trabold, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Fuel cell technology has yet to realize widespread deployment, in part because of the hydrogen fuel infrastructure required for proton exchange membrane systems. One option to overcome this barrier is to produce hydrogen by reforming propane, which has existing widespread infrastructure, is widely used by the general public, easily transported, and has a high energy density. The present work combines thermodynamic modeling of propane catalytic partial oxidation (cPOx) and experimental performance of a Precision Combustion Inc. (PCI) Microlith® reactor with real-time soot measurement. Much of the reforming research using Microlith-based reactors has focused on fuels such as natural gas, JP-8, diesel, and gasoline, but little research on propane reforming with Microlith-based catalysts can be found in literature. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal operating parameters for the reformer that maximizes efficiency and minimizes solid carbon formation. The primary parameters evaluated were reformate composition, carbon concentration in the effluent, and reforming efficiency as a function of catalyst temperature and O2/C ratio. Including the lower heating values for product hydrogen and carbon monoxide, efficiency of 84% was achieved at an O2/C ratio of 0.53 and a catalyst temperature of 940 °C, resulting in near equilibrium performance. Significant solid carbon formation was observed at much lower catalyst temperatures, and carbon concentration in the effluent was determined to have a negative linear relationship at T reactor displayed good stability during more than 80 experiments with temperature cycling from 360 to 1050 °C.

  8. Operational experience acquired in radioactive waste compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, S.; Mohr, P.; Hempelmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    The low-level radioactive waste scrapping facility in the KfK decontamination division was commissioned in 1983. Non-combustible residues and removed system components of low activity, but which are to be handled and disposed of as radioactive waste are in drums, casks or containers delivered to the facility. The waste usually undergoes pretreatment in a crusher, with the volume being definitively reduced at a pressure of 690 bar in the high-pressure compactor. In 1990, the overhead-crane was refurbished for remote control handling in the scrapping caisson. The parts to undergo scrapping are unpacked in the material lock, and then go into the scrapping caisson. It is possible to use here various mechanical and thermal methods to dismantle the respective parts. But most of the parts to undergo scrapping are such as that it is possible to directly pretreat them in the crusher. The obtained scrap is loaded into 180-liter drums. Most of the machinery in the caisson is manually operated. The operating crew enters the caisson in fully ventilated protective overalls. The drums filled with the scrap then go to the high-pressure compactor in the caisson. The compacts are temporarily stored, until recalled depending on their height and filled into drums such as that optimal drum filling is guaranteed

  9. Fuel Injection Pressure Effect on Performance of Direct Injection Diesel Engines Based on Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Rosli A. Bakar; Semin; Abdul R.  Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Fuel injection pressures in diesel engine plays an important role for engine performance obtaining treatment of combustion. The present diesel engines such as fuel direct injection, the pressures can be increased about 100 200 Mpa bar in fuel pump injection system. The experimental investigated effects of fuel injection pressure on engine performance. Experiments have been performed on a diesel engine with four-cylinder, two-stroke, direct injection. Engine performance values such as indicat...

  10. Operation of real landfill gas fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using internal dry reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langnickel, Hendrik; Hagen, Anke

    2017-01-01

    Biomass is one renewable energy source, which is independent from solar radiation and wind effect. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC’s) are able to convert landfill gas derived from landfill directly into electricity and heat with a high efficiency. In the present work a planar 16cm2 SOFC cell...

  11. Incorporating operational experience and design changes in availability forecasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.

    1988-01-01

    Reliability or availability forecasts which are based solely on past operating experience will be precise if the sample is large enough, and unbiased if nothing in the future design, environment, operating region or anything else changes. Unfortunately, life is never like that. This paper considers the methodology and philosophy of modifying forecasts based on past experience to take account also of changes in design, construction methods, operating philosophy, environments, operator training and so on, between the plants which provided the operating experience and the plant for which the forecast is being made. This emphasises the importance of collecting, assessing, and learning from past data and of a thorough knowledge of future designs, and procurement, operation, and maintenance policies. The difference between targets and central estimates is also discussed. The paper concludes that improvements in future availability can be made by learning from past experience, but that certain conditions must be fulfilled in order to do so. (author)

  12. Experience in startup and operation of fast flux facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The testing program was structured to perform all testing under formal testing procedures with a test engineer as the test director and the plant operators operating the systems and equipment. This provided excellent training and experience for the operators in preparation for eventual reactor operation. Operations preparations for the testing and operation activities has consisted of academic training, formal on-the-job training including systems operation and examinations by persons with an expert knowledge on that portion of the plant, training at EBR-II and the High Temperature Sodium Facility for selected senior operators, operating procedure preparation, training on an FFTF Control Room operator training simulator, and formal written, oral and operating examinations

  13. RAS III - concept and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, U.; Wander, J.

    1990-01-01

    A new noise analysis system RAS III is being employed at the Greifswald NPP 'Bruno Leuschner' units 5 and 6 which differs from its forerunner types by an extended number of measuring points and a higher degree of automation. Substantial prerequisite of the system's full efficiency is implementation of efficient signal monitoring techniques that free the power plant engineer from routine work as well. The system has therefore been completed by algorithms established for automatic noise signal spectra control and for monitoring the pressure vessel vibrations. Moreover, a number of special techniques have been developed, such as for recording velocity-time plots during control element drop experiments. (author)

  14. Spent fuel dissolution rates: from experiments to models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, J.; Casa, I.; Clarens, F.; Rovira, M.; Pablo, J. de

    2003-01-01

    In this work we made a review on the different models and mechanisms that have been developed by different authors to explain the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel under oxic conditions. In most cases the oxidizing reagent used has been the molecular oxygen, but also some works with hydrogen peroxide or even with hypochloric acid can be found. Leaching experiments have been carried out with different types of spent nuclear fuel as well as with either chemical or natural analogues such as non irradiated uranium dioxide or natural uraninites, respectively. In oxygen and in the absence of bicarbonate ion, the data found in literature can be fitted considering the two-step oxidative dissolution mechanism developed by Torrero et al. (1998). This mechanism is able to explain the different reaction orders for pH oxygen concentration obtained depending on the experimental conditions. In the presence of bicarbonate, the data can be fitted considering the mechanism described de Pablo et al. (1999), which consists on two different steps: (1) oxidation of the surface of the solid and (2) surface co-ordination of the bicarbonate ion and dissolution of the complex formed. This model allows to explain different reaction orders for bicarbonate and oxygen concentration obtained by different authors. The development of a mechanism of UO 2 oxidation and dissolution in the presence of hydrogen peroxides is much more complied than in the case of oxygen because of the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide, which is probably catalysed by the UO 2 (s). At present, more work is being directed to the elucidation of this mechanism, including the study of the influence of some radicals such as OH on the UO 2 dissolution. (Author)

  15. Summary of NRC LWR safety research programs on fuel behavior, metallurgy/materials and operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.

    1979-09-01

    The NRC light-water reactor safety-research program is part of the NRC regulatory program for ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. This paper summarizes the results of NRC-sponsored research into fuel behavior, metallurgy and materials, and operational safety. The fuel behavior research program provides a detailed understanding of the response of nuclear fuel assemblies to postulated off-normal or accident conditions. Fuel behavior research includes studies of basic fuel rod properties, in-reactor tests, computer code development, fission product release and fuel meltdown. The metallurgy and materials research program provides independent confirmation of the safe design of reactor vessels and piping. This program includes studies on fracture mechanics, irradiation embrittlement, stress corrosion, crack growth, and nondestructive examination. The operational safety research provides direct assistance to NRC officials concerned with the operational and operational-safety aspects of nuclear power plants. The topics currently being addressed include qualification testing evaluation, fire protection, human factors, and noise diagnostics

  16. Operational experience of gamma radiation processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Nilesh

    2014-01-01

    Universal lSO-MED is now proud to announce an extension of its irradiation service for low-dose applications specifically in agriculture commodities, food and healthcare applications with the start of Gujarat Agro Radiation Processing Facility at Village: Bavla, Ahmedabad (A Government Enterprise) Operated, Maintained and Managed by Universal Medicap Ltd. Availability of hygienic, safe and nutritious food commodities is essential for any sustainable human development. Food stability is an important element of economic stability and self-reliance of a nation. Though the need to preserve food has been felt by the mankind since the time immemorial, it is even stronger in today's context. The rising population and increasing gap between demand and supply, agro-climatic conditions, in adequate post-harvest practices, seasonal nature of produce and long distances between production and consumption centers underscore the need to device improved conservation and preservation strategies

  17. ETSON proposal on the European operational experience feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqua, Michael; Bertrand, Remy; Gelder, Pieter de

    2007-01-01

    The new IAEA Safety Fundamentals states regarding the operating experience feedback: The feedback of operating experience from facilities and activities - and, where relevant, from elsewhere - is a key means of enhancing safety. Processes must be put in place for the feedback and analysis of operating experience, including initiating events, accident precursors, near misses, accidents and unauthorized acts, so that lessons may be learned, shared and acted upon. This presentation deals with the proposal of the ETSON (European TSO Network) to optimize the European operating experiences feedback (OEF). It is generally recognized that the efficiency of nuclear safety supervision by public authorities is based on two key requirements: - the existence of a competent authority at national level, benefiting from an appropriate legislative and regulatory basis, from adequate (quantitatively and qualitatively) human resources, particularly for inspection purposes, - the availability of resources devoted to highly specialised independent technical expertise, in order to provide competent authorities with pertinent technical opinions on: -- the safety files provided by operators, for the purpose of licensing corresponding activities, -- the exploitation for regulatory purposes of the operating experience feed back from licensed nuclear installations. There are two worldwide systems intended to learn lessons from experience: the WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) system established by the licensees with access restricted to operating organizations and the IRS system jointly operated by IAEA and OECD/NEA accessible to regulators and to some other users nominated by the regulators in their countries. The IRS itself is dedicated to the analysis of safety significant operating events. NEA/CNRA runs a permanent working group on operating experience (WGOE). WGOE provides among other things also generic reports on safety concerns related to operating experiences and

  18. Large remote manipulator operating and maintenance experience at IEM cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.F.; McGuinness, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has two large Electro-Mechanical Manipulators (EMM's). These manipulators are used for cell operations (processing of reactor core components) as well as general cell maintenance. From our eleven years of operation and maintenance experience with these large EMM's, we have learned many lessons concerning manipulator design. This paper describes the IEM Cell EMM design features and discusses operating and maintenance experience at the IEM Cell

  19. Proceedings of 2nd PHWR operating safety experience meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    Papers presented during the eight sessions of the meeting were devoted to the impact of PHWR operating experience on design of civil structures (reactor building integrity); operating experiences related to pressure tubes, nuclear steam supply system, plant stability; reactor maintenance and control systems, reactor operational safety. Some events concerned with reactor shutdown due to power failures are described, as well as action undertaken to prevent major damage

  20. 14 CFR 121.643 - Fuel supply: Nonturbine and turbo-propeller-powered airplanes: Supplemental operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... operating nontransport category airplanes type certificated after December 31, 1964, to fly for 30 minutes...-powered airplanes: Supplemental operations. 121.643 Section 121.643 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.643 Fuel supply: Nonturbine and turbo-propeller-powered airplanes...

  1. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility operations manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-05-12

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  2. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved

  3. Transient fission product release within operating UO2 fuel elements during power cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.; Hunt, C.E.L.; Hastings, I.J.

    1983-05-01

    We have measured short-lived fission product release during shutdown and startup transients for intact UO 2 fuel elements normally operating at linear powers of 45-62 kW/m. The magnitudes of the transient releases are dependent on the steady state operating power and severity of the transient. It is inferred that the inventory of short-lived species at the fuel-to-sheath gap, and thus the accident source term, could be augmented by a series of normal operation transients

  4. Model support for an out-reactor-instrumented-defected-fuel-experiment to validate the RMC fuel oxidation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quastel, A.D.; Corcoran, E.C.; Lewis, B.J. [Royal Military College of Canada, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept., Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Thiriet, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Hadaller, G. [Stern Laboratories Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    An out-reactor fuel oxidation experiment with controlled parameters is being planned to provide data for validation of the Royal Military College (RMC) mechanistic fuel oxidation model. In support of this work, fuel oxidation 2D r-θ and 3D models are presented. The 2D r-θ model with radial cracks provides the radial temperature distribution in the test fuel element and also provides heating power information. The 3D model with radial cracks and a pellet-pellet gap under a defected sheath indicate that an oxygen stoichiometry deviation of 0.057 could result within one week of heating a defected UO{sub 2} fuel element with a 5-mm{sup 2} sheath defect. (author)

  5. Fabrication experience and integrity confirmation tests of the first-loading-fuel of the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Tobita, Tsutomu; Sumita, Junya; Mogi, Haruyoshi; Yoshimuta, Shigeharu; Suzuki, Shuuichi; Deushi, Kouzaburou; Kato, Shigeru

    1999-01-01

    The first-loading core of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) consists of 150 fuel assemblies. An HTTR fuel assembly is so-called a pin-in-block type of hexagonal graphite block. A fuel rod consists of a graphite sleeve and of 14 fuel compacts. In a fuel compact, about 13,000 TRISO coated fuel panicles are dispersed densely. The coated fuel panicle is TRISO (Tri-isotropic) type with four coating layers. The fuel kernel is low-enriched (average 6wt%) UO 2 . The fabrication of the first-loading fuel started from June 1995. A total of 4,770 fuel rods were successfully produced and transferred to the reactor building of the HTTR. Finally, in the reactor building, the fuel rods were inserted to the graphite blocks to form fuel assemblies. On December 1997, 150 fuel assemblies were completely formed and were stored in new fuel storage cells. The cells were filled with helium gas to keep the fuel blocks in dry condition. Fabrication technology of the HTTR fuel was established through a lot of R and D activities and fabrication experiences of irradiation examination samples spread over about 30 years. High quality and production efficiency of fuel were achieved by the development of the fuel kernel process using the vibration dropping technology, the continuous 4-layer coating process and optimization of the compaction conditions. In the safety design of HTGR fuel, it is important to retain fission products within the coated fuel panicles so that their release to the primary coolant may not exceed an acceptable level. From this point of view, as-fabricated failure fraction is important. In the specification, SiC-failure and exposed uranium fractions were determined to be less than 1.5x10 -3 and l.5x10 -4 , respectively. The quality of the first loading fuel fully satisfied the design specifications for the fuel. The fuel compacts contained almost no through-coatings failed particles and few SiC-defective particles. Average through-coatings and Si

  6. Areva new fuel designs; increased reliability, operating margins and operating efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollard, P.; Vollmer, N.; Curca-Tivig, F.; Cole, S.; Louf, H. P.

    2015-01-01

    AREVA is continuously working on the improvement of the fuel design to address immediate and future needs of the utilities. This improvement process regularly leads to incremental changes but also to breakthrough changes addressing the next needs of the market. Since a few years now, the improvements of the fuel design and licensing benefit from the improvement and upgrade in codes and methods and computational capabilities. Changes in design are sustained by these more powerful and phenomenological tools which secure and fasten the fuel design optimization and its implementation. (Author)

  7. A microfluidic-structured flow field for passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with highly concentrated fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q X; Zhao, T S; Chen, R; Yang, W W

    2010-01-01

    Conventional direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have to operate with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and its detrimental consequences. Operation with such diluted methanol solutions not only results in a significant penalty in the specific energy of the power pack, limiting the runtime of this type of fuel cell, but also lowers the cell performance and operating stability. In this paper, a microfluidic-structured anode flow field for passive DMFCs with neither liquid pumps nor gas compressors/blowers is developed. This flow field consists of plural micro flow passages. Taking advantage of the liquid methanol and gas CO 2 two-phase counter flow, the unique fluidic structure enables the formation of a liquid–gas meniscus in each flow passage. The evaporation from the small meniscus in each flow passage can lead to an extremely large interfacial mass-transfer resistance, creating a bottleneck of methanol delivery to the anode CL. The fuel cell tests show that the innovative flow field allows passive DMFCs to achieve good cell performance with a methanol concentration as high as 18.0 M, increasing the specific energy of the DMFC system by about five times compared with conventional designs.

  8. Experiences in the fabrication of aluminium clad metallic uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayaraghavan, R.

    1989-01-01

    With a view to achieve self-sufficiency and self-reliance in the fabrication of metallic natural uranium fuel, a full fledged fuel fabrication facility was set up in 1958. Based on the then technical information available and the development work carried out, a flow-sheet for the fabrication of metallic uranium fuel, starting from uranium ingots, was worked out and the first fuel element was successfully fabricated in June 1959. More than half the first charge for the initial criticality of CIRUS, a 40 MWt research reactor at Trombay, was fabricated and supplied. Since then, this facility has been regularly catering to the replacement fuel and component requirements for CIRUS. The fuel for Dhruva, a 100 MWt research reactor at Trombay, is in the form of a cluster consisting of 7 fuel pins as compared to the rigid single fuel element for CIRUS. The fabrication process chosen for making this fuel is more or less on the same lines as that has been followed for CIRUS fuel. However, because of the smaller diameter of uranium metal rod, higher length to diameter ratio, configurations of fins on aluminium sheaths, cluster assembly etc., extensive development work was required to be undertaken for optimising various production parameters. Several prototype fuel clusters of different designs were made and subjected to rigorous out-of-pile and in-pile testing. Based on the reliable satisfactory performance, type II-B SPT cluster design was finally frozen for production. Stringent quality control is of prime importance in ensuring good performance of the fuel in the reactor. Hence, appropriate quality control measures have been adopted at various stages of fuel fabrication to ensure conformance with the specifications. (author) 9 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  9. Fuel-Coolant Interaction Experiments in the TROI Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, B. T.; Hong, S. W.; Hong, S. H.; Park, I. K.; Kim, H. Y.; Song, J. H.; Kim, H. D

    2006-03-15

    A steam explosion has long been a concern in case of severe accidents in a nuclear reactor, since it might threaten the integrity of the containment. Although many studies have been performed on a steam explosion, there are still some remaining unsolved issues such as the explosivity of the real core material (corium) and the estimation of the energy conversion ratio. At the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), the TROI steam explosion experiments were performed, in order to investigate the explosivity of corium. The TROI experiments were carried out to provide the experimental data for a proper estimation of a structural loading resulting from a steam explosion. These experiments were performed with prototypic materials such as ZrO{sub 2} melt and a mixture of ZrO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} melt (corium). Total 46 tests were conducted in the TROI test series from year 2000 to the end of year 2004. The main test parameters were the variations on the composition of the melt, geometry of the interaction vessel, sub-cooling, ambient pressure, and amount of melt. Additionally the effects of an external trigger and argon environment were investigated. The main findings are that the composition, geometry, and inert gas had dominant effects on energetic steam explosions. In addition, the strength of the steam explosion was not that much strong compared to that of alumina, such as KROTOS-44. Even though efforts were made to maximize the strength of a steam explosion by increasing the amount of melt mass in water (increasing water depth), and fuel fraction (using a narrow test section), it did not work. The test results suggest that the melt of pure zirconia or eutectic corium in a wide test section leads to energetic spontaneous or triggered steam explosions, while the melt of other compositions does not.

  10. Operating experience and construction status of ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, R.C.; DenHartog, P.; Shepard, K.W.; Zinkann, G.

    1984-01-01

    The present Argonne Tandem-Linac accelerator has operated in a reliable manner during the past year. The accelerator system provided 4402 hours of experimental beam time with a wide variety of heavy-ions. Figure 1 shows the beams which have been provided during the past year. New beams accelerated by the linac include 300 MeV 82 Se and 390 MeV 109 Ag. In tests, the tandem accelerated 102 MeV 127 I. This is the heaviest beam ever accelerated by the Argonne tandem. The long-term performance of the niobium resonators appears to be good. No significant degradation of performance has been observed for most resonators over many years of use with the exceptions of problems caused by catastrophic vacuum accidents. Resonators whose performance has deteriorated after vacuum accidents have recently been restored to their original performance state by a simple technique. The technique used is to rinse the interior of the resonator with a sequence of baths of solvents and water

  11. Effect of reactor chemistry and operating variables on fuel cladding corrosion in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Ghu; Lee, Sang Hee

    1997-01-01

    As the nuclear industry extends the fuel cycle length, waterside corrosion of zircaloy cladding has become a limiting factor in PWR fuel design. Many plant chemistry factors such as, higher lithium/boron concentration in the primary coolant can influence the corrosion behavior of zircaloy cladding. The chemistry effect can be amplified in higher duty fuel, particularlywhen surface boiling occurs. Local boiling can result in increased crud deposition on fuel cladding which may induce axial power offset anomalies (AOA), recently reported in several PWR units. In this study, the effect of reactor chemistry and operating variables on Zircaloy cladding corrosion is investigated and simulation studies are performed to evaluate the optimal primary chemistry condition for extended cycle operation. (author). 8 refs., 3 tabs., 16 figs

  12. In-core fuel management for the course on operational physics of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    The heart of a nuclear power station is the reactor core producing power from the fissioning of uranium or plutonium fuel. Expertise in many different technical fields is required to provide fuel for continuous economical operation of a nuclear power plant. In general, these various technical disciplines can be dichotomized into ''Out-of-core'' and ''In-core'' fuel management. In-core fuel management is concerned, as the name implies, with the reactor core itself. It entails calculating the core reactivity, power distribution, and isotopic inventory for the first and subsequent cores of a nuclear power plant to maintain adequate safety margins and operating lifetime for each core. In addition, the selection of reloading schemes is made to minimize energy costs

  13. Recycling galvanized steel: Operating experience and benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Morgan, W.A. [Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

    1993-08-01

    In response to the increase in consumption of galvanized steel for automobiles in the last decade and the problems associated with remelting larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is recovered electrolytically as dendritic powder. The dezinced ferrous scrap is rinsed and used directly. The process is effective for zinc, lead, and aluminum removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 900 tonnes of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap, with a design capacity of 48,000 tonnes annually, has been in operation in East Chicago, Indiana since early in 1993. The first 450 t of scrap degalvanized in the pilot plant have residual zinc below 0.01% and sodium dragout below 0.01%. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials, environmental compliance, and opportunity costs to steel- and iron-makers. Availability of clean degalvanized scrap may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant and EAF shops to produce flat products without use of high quality scrap alternatives such as DRI, pig iron, or iron carbide. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap. The quantities of zinc available by the year 2000 from prompt and obsolete automotive scrap win approach 25% of zinc consumed in the major automotive production centers of the world. Zinc recycling from galvanized steel scrap, either before or after scrap melting, will have to be implemented.

  14. Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use in Corps of Engineers Floating Plant Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the Army, the Department of Defense, civilian agencies, and our nation’s public...vessels. Fourteen vessels were converted to biodiesel use in the expanded study, and additional tests of emissions and fuel usage were conducted on... California , Riverside (Nicholos Gysel, William Welch, and Wayne Miller). USACE is part of a Federal Green Fleet working Group that includes members from

  15. Operating and maintenance experience at the TRIGA Mainz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke, Helmut

    1982-01-01

    In January 1966 the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the University of Mainz went into operation, licensed for 100 kW steady state operation and 250 MW pulse performance but a severe disadvantage was observed in the Radiation Monitoring System, which lead to installation of a new monitoring system. An Inspection of the beam-tubes using an endoscope is performed to assess its condition after 17 years of work. The observed corrosion and other damages are reported. The results from the fuel element measurement are also reported

  16. The effect of test configuration on the true operating conditions of PEM fuel cells. Paper no. IGEC-1-124

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, T.; Li, X.

    2005-01-01

    The operating conditions of a single PEM fuel cell can be significantly affected by the configuration in which the fuel cell test is setup. This study investigates the effect on the gas dewpoint temperature of not insulating the inlet fittings to a PEM fuel cell and the effect of non-optimal stack control thermocouple placement on fuel cell stack operating temperature. Both of these setup configurations can significantly affect fuel cell membrane humidification conditions, especially in a single fuel cell as demonstrated through the sample test conditions presented in this paper. (author)

  17. [Operating Room Nurses' Experiences of Securing for Patient Safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang Ok; Kim, Jong Kyung; Kim, Myoung Sook

    2015-10-01

    This study was done to evaluate the experience of securing patient safety in hospital operating rooms. Experiential data were collected from 15 operating room nurses through in-depth interviews. The main question was "Could you describe your experience with patient safety in the operating room?". Qualitative data from the field and transcribed notes were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin's grounded theory methodology. The core category of experience with patient safety in the operating room was 'trying to maintain principles of patient safety during high-risk surgical procedures'. The participants used two interactional strategies: 'attempt continuous improvement', 'immersion in operation with sharing issues of patient safety'. The results indicate that the important factors for ensuring the safety of patients in the operating room are manpower, education, and a system for patient safety. Successful and safe surgery requires communication, teamwork and recognition of the importance of patient safety by the surgical team.

  18. Neutronics substantiation of possibility for conversion of the WWR-K reactor core to operation with low-enriched fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arinkin, F.M.; Gizatulin, Sh.H.; Zhantikin, T.M.; Koltochnik, S.N.; Takibaev, A.Zh.; Talanov, S.V.; Chakrov, P.V.; Chekushina, L.V.

    2002-01-01

    The studies are aimed to calculation and experimental justification of possibility for conversion of the WWR-R reactor core to low-enriched nuclear fuel (the 19.75-% enrichment in isotope U-235), resulting in reducing the risk of non-sanctioned proliferation of nuclear materials which can be used as weapons materials. The analysis of available published data, related to problem of reduction of enrichment in the fuel used in research thermal reactors, has been carried out. Basing on the analysis results, reference fuel compositions have been chosen, in particular, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) in aluminum master form and the UA1 4 alloy. Preliminary calculations have shown that, with the WWR-K reactor core preserved existing critical characteristics (the fuel composition: UA1 4 ), the uranium concentration in the fuel element is to be increased by a factor of 2.0-2.2, being impossible technologically. The calculations have been performed by means of the Monte Carlo computational codes. The program of optimal conversion of the WWR-K reactor core to low-enriched fuel has been developed, including: development of calculation models of the reactor core, composed of various designs of fuel elements and fuel assemblies (FA), on a base of corresponding computational codes (diffusion, statistical, etc.); implementation of experiments in the zero-power reactor (critical assembly) with the WWR-C-type FA, in view of correction of the computational constants used in calculations; implementation of reactor core neutronics calculations, in view of selection of the U-235 optimal content in the low-enriched fuel elements and choice of FA reload strategy at the regime of reactor core after burning; determination of the fuel element specification; determination of the critical and operational loads for the reactor core composed of rod/tubular fuel elements; calculation of the efficiency of the protection control system effectors, optimization of its composition, number and locations in the

  19. Fuel performance annual report for 1990. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preble, E.A.; Painter, C.L.; Alvis, J.A.; Berting, F.M.; Beyer, C.E.; Payne, G.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wu, S.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1993-11-01

    This annual report, the thirteenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1990 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience and trends, fuel problems high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided . References to additional, more detailed information, and related NRC evaluations are included where appropriate.

  20. Transnucleaire's experience with burnup credit in transport operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesys, P.

    2001-01-01

    Facing a continued increase in fuel enrichment values, Transnucleaire has progressively implemented a burnup credit programme in order to maintain or, where possible, to improve the capacity of its transport packagings without physical modification. Many package design approvals, based on a notion of burnup credit, have been granted by the French competent authority for transport since the early eighties, and many of these approvals have been validated by foreign competent authorities. Up to now, these approvals are restricted to fuel assemblies made of enriched uranium and irradiated in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The characterization of the irradiated fuel and the reactivity of the package are evaluated by calculation, performed using qualified French codes developed by the CEA (Commisariat a l'Energie Atomique/French Atomic Energy Commission): CESAR as a depletion code and APOLO-MORET as a criticality code. The approvals are based on the hypothesis that the burnup considered is that applied on the least irradiated region of the fuel assemblies, the conservative approach being not to take credit for any axial profile of burnup along the fuel assembly. The most reactive configuration is calculated and the burnup credit is also restricted to major actinides only. On the operational side and in compliance with regulatory requirements, verification is made before transport, in order to meet safety objectives as required by the transport regulations. Besides a review of documentation related to the irradiation history of each fuel assembly, it consists of either a qualitative (go/no-go) verification or of a quantitative measurement, depending on the level of burnup credit. Thus the use of burnup credit is now a common practice with Transnucleaire's packages, particularly in France and Germany. New improvements are still in progress and qualifications of the calculation code are now well advanced, which will allow in the near future the use of six selected