WorldWideScience

Sample records for fuel operating experience

  1. LOFT instrumented fuel design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    A summary description of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) system instrumented core construction details and operating experience through reactor startup and loss-of-coolant experiment (LOCE) operations performed to date are discussed. The discussion includes details of the test instrumentation attachment to the fuel assembly, the structural response of the fuel modules to the forces generated by a double-ended break of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant pipe at the inlet to the reactor vessel, the durability of the LOFT fuel and test instrumentation, and the plans for incorporation of improved fuel assembly test instrumentation features in the LOFT core

  2. Canadian CANDU fuel development program and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.K.; Inch, W.W.R.; Cox, D.S.; Steed, R.G.; Kohn, E.; Macici, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the CANDU fuel in the Canadian CANDU reactors in 1997 and 1998. The operating experience demonstrates that the CANDU fuel has performed very well. Over the 2-year period, the fuel-bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in the Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, at between 0.006% to 0.016%. On a fuel element basis, this represents an element defect rate of less than about 0.0005%. One of the reasons for the good fuel performance is the support provided by the Canadian fuel research and development programs. These programs address operational issues and provide evolutionary improvements to the fuel products. The programs consist of the Fuel Technology Program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, and the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycles Technology Program, funded by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. These 2 programs, which have been in place for many years, complement each other by sharing expert resources and experimental facilities. This paper describes the programs in 1999/2000, to provide an overview of the scope of the programs and the issues that these programs address. (author)

  3. Fuel performance and operation experience of WWER-440 fuel in improved fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinski, A.; Proselkov, V.; Semchenkov, Yu.

    2007-01-01

    The paper summarizes WWER-440 second-generation fuel operation experience in improved fuel cycles using the example of Kola NPP units 3 and 4. Basic parameters of fuel assemblies, fuel rods and uranium-gadolinium fuel rods, as well as the principal neutronic parameters and burn-up achieved in fuel assemblies are presented. The paper also contains some data concerning the activity of coolant during operation (Authors)

  4. Natural uranium metallic fuel elements: fabrication and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammad, F.H.; Abou-Zahra, A.A.; Sharkawy, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    The main reactor types based on natural uranium metallic fuel element, particularly the early types, are reviewed in this report. The reactor types are: graphite moderated air cooled, graphite moderated gas cooled and heavy water moderated reactors. The design features, fabrication technology of these reactor fuel elements and the operating experience gained during reactor operation are described and discussed. The interrelation between operating experience, fuel design and fabrication was also discussed with emphasis on improving fuel performance. (author)

  5. Halden fuel and material experiments beyond operational and safety limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Boris; Wiesenack, Wolfgang; McGrath, M.; Tverberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main tasks of any research reactor is to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuel and materials prior to their introduction into the market. For commercial NPPs, it is important both to test nuclear fuels at a fuel burn-up exceeding current limits and to investigate reactor materials for higher irradiation dose. For fuel vendors such tests enable verification of fuel reliability or for the safety limits to be found under different operational conditions and accident situations. For the latter, in-pile experiments have to be performed beyond some normal limits. The program of fuel tests performed in the Halden reactor is aimed mainly at determining: The thermal FGR threshold, which may limit fuel operational power with burn-up increase, the “lift-off effect” when rod internal pressure exceeds coolant pressure, the effects of high burn-up on fuel behavior under power ramps, fuel relocation under LOCA simulation at higher burn-up, the effect of dry-out on high burn-up fuel rod integrity. This paper reviews some of the experiments performed in the Halden reactor for understanding some of the limits for standard fuel utilization with the aim of contributing to the development of innovative fuels and cladding materials that could be used beyond these limits. (author)

  6. LOFT fuel design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the LOFT fuel is to provide a pressurized water reactor core that has (1) test instrumentation for measurement of core conditions and (2) materials and geometric features to ensure heat transfer, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical, metallurgical and nuclear behaviors are typical of large pressurized water reactors (LPWRS) during the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) sequence. The LOFT core is unique because it is designed for exposure to several LOCAs without loss of function

  7. Canadian fuel development program and recent operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.S.; Kohn, E.; Lau, J.H.K.; Dicke, G.J.; Macici, N.N.; Sancton, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current Canadian CANDU fuel R and D programs and operational experience. The details of operational experience for fuel in Canadian reactors are summarized for the period 1991-1994; excellent fuel performance has been sustained, with steady-state bundle defect rates currently as low as 0.02%. The status of introducing long 37-element bundles, and bundles with rounded bearing pads is reviewed. These minor changes in fuel design have been selectively introduced in response to operational constraints (end-plate cracking and pressure-tube fretting) at Ontario Hydro's Bruce-B and Darlington stations. The R and D programs are generating a more complete understanding of CANDU fuel behaviour, while the CANDU Owners Group (COG) Fuel Technology Program is being re-aligned to a more exclusive focus on the needs of operating stations. Technical highlights and realized benefits from the COG program are summarized. Re-organization of AECL to provide a one-company focus, with an outward looking view to new CANDU markets, has strengthened R and D in advanced fuel cycles. Progress in AECL's key fuel cycle programs is also summarized. (author)

  8. Evolution of PHWR fuel transfer system based on operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvatikar, R.S.; Singh, Jaipal; Chaturvedi, P.C.; Bhambra, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel Transfer System facilitates loading of new fuel into Fuelling Machine, receipt of spent fuel from Fuelling Machine and its further transportation to Storage Bay. To overcome the limitations of transferring a pair of bundles in the single tube Airlock and Transfer Arm in RAPS-1 and 2/MAPS, a new concept of six tube Transfer Magazine was introduced in NAPS. This resulted in simultaneous loading of new fuel from Transfer Magazine into the Fuelling Machine and unloading of spent fuel from the Fuelling Machine through the exchange mode. It further facilitated the parallel/simultaneous operation of refuelling by Fuelling Machines on the reactor and transferring of spent fuel bundles from the Transfer Magazine to the bay. This new design of Fuel Transfer System was adopted for all standardised 220 MWe PHWRs. Based on the experience gained in 220 MWe PHWRs in the area of operation and maintenance, a number of improvements have been carried out over the years. These aspects have been further strengthened and refined in the Fuel Transfer System of 540 MWe units. The operating experience of the system indicates that the presence of heavy water in the Transfer Magazine poses limitations in its maintenance in the Fuel Transfer room. Further, Surveillance and maintenance of large number of under water equipment and associated valves, rams and underwater sensors is putting extra burden on the O and M efforts. A new concept of mobile light water filled Transfer Machine has been evolved for proposed 700 MWe PHWR units to simplify Fuel Transfer System. This has been made possible by adopting snout level control in the Fuelling Machine, elimination of Shuttle Transport System and locating the Storage Bay adjacent to the Reactor Building. This paper describes the evolution of Fuel Transfer System concepts and various improvements based on the experience gained in the operation and maintenance of the system. (author)

  9. LOFT fuel design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of the LOFT fuel design and fabrication effort was to provide a pressurized water reactor core that has (1) materials and geometric features to ensure that heat transfer, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical, metallurgical and nuclear behaviors are typical of large pressurized water reactors (PWR) during the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) sequence and (2) test instrumentation for measurement of core conditions. The LOFT core is unique because it is designed for exposure to several LOCAs without loss of function. This paper summarizes the design effort and extent to which the design objectives have been achieved

  10. Physics operating experience and fuel management of RAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakra, A.N.; Purandare, H.D.; Srinivasan, K.R.; Rastogi, B.P.

    1976-01-01

    Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit-1 achieved criticality on August 11, 1972. Thereafter the reactor was brought to power, in November, 1972. Due to non-availability of the depleted fuel, the loading of which was necessary to obtain full power to begin with, the core was loaded with all natural uranium fuel and only 70% of the full power could be achieved. During the reactor operation for the last three years, the reactor has seen more than one effective full power year and about 1400 fresh fuel bundles have been loaded in the core. The reactor was subjected to about 150 power cycles resulting in more than 30% variation in operating power level and about 10 fuel bundles have failed. For satisfactory fuel management and refuelling decisions, a three dimensional simulator TRIVENI was developed. This was extensively tested during the start-up experiments and was found to be a satisfactory tool for day to day operation of the plant. In this paper, a brief account of analysis of the start-up experiments, approach to full power, power distortions and flux peaking, fuel management service and analysis of the failed fuel data has been given. (author)

  11. MOX and UOX PWR fuel performances EDF operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, Jean-Luc; Debes, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Based on a large program of experimentations implemented during the 90s, the industrial achievement of new FAs designs with increased performances opens up new prospects. The currently UOX fuels used on the 58 EDF PWR units are now authorized up to a maximum FA burn-up of 52 GWd/t with a large experience from 45 to 50 GWd/t. Today, the new products, along with the progress made in the field of calculation methods, still enable to increase further the fuel performances with respect to the safety margins. Thus, the conditions are met to implement in the next years new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet with increased enrichment (up to 4.5%) and irradiation limits (up to 62 GWd/t). The recycling of plutonium is part of EDF's reprocessing/recycling strategy. Up to now, 20 PWR 900 MW reactors are managed in MOX hybrid management. The feedback experience of 18 years of PWR operation with MOX is satisfactory, without any specific problem regarding manoeuvrability or plant availability. EDF is now looking to introduce MOX fuels with a higher plutonium content (up to 8.6%) equivalent to natural uranium enriched to 3.7%. It is the goal of the MOX Parity core management which achieve balance of MOX and UOX fuel performance with a significant increase of the MOX average discharge burn-up (BU max: 52 GWd/t for MOX and UOX). The industrial maturity of new FAs designs, with increased performances, allows the implementation in the next years of new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet. The scheduling of the implementation of the new fuel managements on the PWRs fleet is a great challenge for EDF, with important stakes: the nuclear KWh cost decrease with the improvement of the plant operation performance. (author)

  12. Operational experience of the fuel cleaning facility of Joyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaibo, R.; Matsuno, Y.; Sato, I.; Yoneda, Y.; Ito, H.

    1978-01-01

    Spent fuel assemblies in 'Joyo', after they are taken out of the core, are taken to the Fuel Cleaning Facility in the reactor service building and sodium removal is done. The cleaning process is done by cooling the assembly with argon gas, steam charging and rinsing by demineralized water. Deposited sodium was 50 ∼ 60 g per assembly. The sodium and steam reaction takes about 15 minutes to end and the total time the fuel is placed in the pot is about an hour. The total number of assemblies cleaned in the facility was 95 as of November 1977. In this report the operational experience together with discussions of future improvements are given. (author)

  13. Operational experience of the fuel cleaning facility of Joyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukaibo, R; Matsuno, Y; Sato, I; Yoneda, Y; Ito, H [O-arai Engineering Centre, PNC, Ibaraki-ken, Tokio (Japan)

    1978-08-01

    Spent fuel assemblies in 'Joyo', after they are taken out of the core, are taken to the Fuel Cleaning Facility in the reactor service building and sodium removal is done. The cleaning process is done by cooling the assembly with argon gas, steam charging and rinsing by demineralized water. Deposited sodium was 50 {approx} 60 g per assembly. The sodium and steam reaction takes about 15 minutes to end and the total time the fuel is placed in the pot is about an hour. The total number of assemblies cleaned in the facility was 95 as of November 1977. In this report the operational experience together with discussions of future improvements are given. (author)

  14. Operational Experience of Nuclear Fuel in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants (with Emphasis on WWER Fuel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraesvirta, R.

    2009-01-01

    The four operating nuclear reactors in Finland, Loviisa-1 and -2 and Olkiluoto-1 and -2 have now operated approximately 30 years. The overall operational experience has been excellent. Load factors of all units have been for years among the highest in the world. The development of the fuel designs during the years has enabled remarkable improvement in the fuel performance in terms of burnup. Average discharge burnup has increased more than 30 percent in all Finnish reactor units. A systematic inspection of spent fuel assemblies, and especially all failed fuel assemblies, is a good and useful practise employed in Finland. A possibility to inspect the fuel on site using a pool side inspection facility is a relatively economic way to find out root causes of fuel failures and thereby facilitate developing remedies to prevent similar failures in the future

  15. Fuel design and operational experience in Loviisa NPP, future trends in fuel issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasvirta, R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the past operational experience of nuclear fuel with reference to most significant design changes during the years. In general, the fuel behaviour in Loviisa NPP in terms of leaking fuel assemblies has been good. The major improvements by fuel design changes in Lovissa NPP, including rod elongation margin, change in the pellet design and manufacturing process, upper grid modifications, change of material in the spacer grids and reduction of the shroud tube thickness are discussed and related to the number of failed fuel assemblies. The detailed investigation of fuel failure rates as function of different fuel and operation characteristics allows to classify the leaking fuel assemblies according to the cause of failure. In a brief discussion concerning new changes in the safety guide for nuclear design limits, re-issued by the Finnish Safety Authority (STUK), the frequencies for class 1 and class 2 accidents are determined. Another change in this guide is the introduction of design limits for the number of fuel rods experiencing DNB in class 1 accidents and number of failed rods in class 2 accidents. It is concluded that as far as normal operation is concerned, there seems to be sufficiently large margin between present operational limits in Loviisa and the design limits. The real limits do not come from fuel behaviour in the normal operation or operational occurrences but from the accident behaviour. At the moment, fuel assembly burnup extension beyond 45 MWd/kgU is clearly out of the question before further information and positive results are obtained on high burnup fuel behaviour in accident conditions

  16. The Canadian CANDU fuel development program and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.K.; Inch, W.W.R.; Cox, D.S.; Steed, R.G.; Kohn, E.; Macici, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the CANDU fuel in the Canadian CANDU reactors in 1997 and 1998. The operating experience demonstrates that the CANDU fuel has performed very well. Over the two-year period, the fuel-bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in the Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, at between 0.006% to 0.016%. On a fuel element basis, this represents an element defect rate of less than about 0.0005%. One of the reasons for the good fuel performance is the support provided by the Canadian fuel research and development programs. These programs address operational issues and provide evolutionary improvements to the fuel products. The programs consist of the Fuel Technology Program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, and the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycles Technology Program, funded by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. These two programs, which have been in place for many years, complement each other by sharing expert resources and experimental facilities. This paper describes the programs in 1999/2000, to provide an overview of the scope of the programs and the issues that these programs address. (author)

  17. Operating experiences in fuel handling system at KGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, G.P.; Nagabhushanam

    2006-01-01

    Refuelling operations were started at KGS in August, 2000. Rich and varied experience was gained during this period through internal discussion/Quality circles/Procedural reviews and analysis of various incidents that have taken place in KGS and other units of NPCIL Some of the unique jobs carried out at KGS include-Development of tools for in-situ replacement of FM front end cover in FM service area (which was done for the first time in NPCIL history), Modification of FM magazine rear end plate mounting screws to avoid the possibility of magazine rotation stalling, The incident of Stalling of B-Ram during installation of upstream shield plug in KGS - 1 has brought out many weakness that were existing in the system in a dormant manner. Review of maintenance procedures was carried out and a special underwater operated sensor was developed and installed in Transfer Magazine to sense the presence and proper positioning of fuel bundles in the Transfer magazine tube during fuel loading operation. Numerous modifications were carried out in the system to increase equipment reliability, ease of operation and maintenance, to reduce man-rem consumption. Most notable among these modifications include -zig saw panel modification, EFCV O-ring modification, Ram BF switch modification, provision for increase in SFSB level provision, snout clamp oil circuit modification, ball valve actuator modification, installation of additional switch for sensing STS carriage UP position etc, This paper focuses on the challenges tackled in achieving near perfect performance, innovations and improvements carried out in the system to strive for this goal and development of procedures for reducing man-rem consumption and life extension of critical components. (author)

  18. Swedish spent fuel management systems, facilities and operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, J.

    1998-01-01

    About 50% of the electricity in Sweden is generated by means of nuclear power from 12 LWR reactors located at four sites and with a total capacity of 10,000 MW. The four utilities have jointly created SKB, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, which has been given the mandate to manage the spent fuel and radioactive waste from its origin at the reactors to the final disposal. SKB has developed a system for the safe handling of all kinds of radioactive waste from the Swedish nuclear power plants. The keystones now in operation of this system are a transport system, a central interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (CLAB), a final repository for short-lived, low and intermediate level waste (SFR). The remaining, system components being planned are an encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel and a deep repository for encapsulated spent fuel and other long-lived radioactive wastes. (author)

  19. Operation experiences of JOYO fuel failure detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Seiji; Hikichi, Takayoshi; Rindo, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    Monitoring of fuel failure in the experimental fast reactor JOYO is provided by two different methods, which are cover gas monitoring (FFDCGM) by means of a precipitator, and delayed neutron monitoring (FFDDNM) by means of neutron detectors. The interpretation of signals which were obtained during the reactor operation for performance testings, was performed. The countrate of the CGM is approximately 120 cps at 75MW operation, whose sources are due to Ne 23 , Ar 41 , and Na 24 . And the countrate of the DNM is approximately 2300 cps at 75MW operation which is mainly due to leakage neutron from the core. With those background of the systems, alarm level for monitoring was set at several times of each background level. The reactor has been operated for 5 years, the burn-up of the fuel is 40,000 MWD/T at the most. No trace of any fuel failure has been observed. The fact is also proven by the results of cover gas and sodium sampling analysis. In order to evaluate sensitivity of the FFD systems, a preliminary simulation study has been performed. According to the results, a signal level against one pin failure of 0.5 mm 2 hole may exceed the alarm level of the FFDCGM system. (author)

  20. Commissioning and Operational Experience in Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: spradhan@barctara.gov.in [Tarapur Based Reprocessing Plant, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    2014-10-15

    After completing design, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance experience of the reprocessing plants at Tarapur, Mumbai and Kalpakkam a new reprocessing plant is commissioned and put into operation at BARC, Tarapur since 2011. Subsequent to construction clearance, commissioning of the plant is taken in many steps with simultaneous review by design and safety committees. In spite of vast experience, all the staff was retrained in various aspects of process and utility operations and in operation of innovative changes incorporated in the design. Operating personnel are licensed through an elaborate procedure consisting of various check lists followed by personnel interview. Commissioning systems were divided in sub-systems. Sub-systems were commissioned independently and later integrated testing was carried out. For commissioning, extreme operating conditions were identified in consultation with designers and detailed commissioning procedures were made accordingly. Commissioning was done in different conditions to ensure safety, smooth operation and maintainability. Few modifications were carried out based on commissioning experience. Technical specifications for operation of the plant are made in consultation with designers and reviewed by safety committees. Operation of the plant was carried out after successful commissioning trials with Deep Depleted Uranium (DDU). Emergency operating procedures for each design basis accident were made. Performance of various systems, subsystems are quite satisfactory and the plant has given very good capacity factor. (author)

  1. Operating experience with Exxon nuclear advanced fuel assembly and fuel cycle designs in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogen, F.B.; Killgore, M.R.; Holm, J.S.; Brown, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Exxon Nuclear Company (ENC) has achieved a high standard of performance in its supply of fuel reloads for both BWRs and PWRs, while introducing substantial innovations aimed at realization of improved fuel cycle costs. The ENC experience with advanced design features such as the bi-metallic spacer, the dismountable upper tie plate, natural uranium axial blankets, optimized water-to-fuel designs, annular pellets, gadolinia burnable absorbers, and improved fuel management scenarios, is summarized

  2. Processing biogas to obtain motor fuel - Operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how raw biogas can be processed in order to remove carbon dioxide and corrosive substances and thus bring it up to natural gas quality. The ecological advantages of using biogas as a fuel are discussed and the situation in Europe and Switzerland is examined. Also, feeding biogas into the normal natural gas mains is discussed and the technologies necessary for the cleaning and preparation of the biogas are described. These include absorption and adsorption processes as well as membrane systems that are used to remove excessive carbon dioxide. The costs involved are discussed on the basis of experience gained in Sweden and Switzerland. Finally, the environmental aspects of methane losses are discussed.

  3. Initial operational experience with Gd-2M+ fuel at Dukovany NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovička, M.; Zýbal, J.

    2015-01-01

    Trend of continuous development of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle can be observed from the very beginning of Dukovany NPP operation. The results of this development are documented on the one hand by extending the length of the cycle and on the other by significant reduction in the number of fresh FA’s which are loaded into reactor cores. As a continuation of this trend introduces Dukovany NPP evolutional change of nuclear fuel from the fuel Gd-2M to the Gd-2M + . (authors) Keywords: Gd-2M + , fuel assembly, operational experience

  4. High Burnup Fuel: Implications and Operational Experience. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    This publication reports on the outcome of a technical meeting on high burnup fuel experience and economics, held in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 2013. The purpose of the meeting was to revisit and update the current operational experience and economic conditions associated with high burnup fuel. International experts with significant experience in experimental programmes on high burnup fuel discussed and evaluated physical limitations at pellet, cladding and structural component levels, with a wide focus including fabrication, core behaviour, transport and intermediate storage for most types of commercial nuclear power plants

  5. Operation experience of the advanced fuel assemblies at Unit 1 of Volgodonsk NPP within four fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Kobelev, S.; Kushmanov, S.

    2006-01-01

    The first commissioning of Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1 with standard reactor WWER-1000 (project V-320) was in 2001. The reactor core, starting from the first fuel charge, was arranged completely with Advanced Fuel Assemblies (AFAs). In this way, it is possible to obtain the experience in startup and operation of the core, completely arranged with AFAs, and also to get a possibility of performing the comprehensive check for justification of newly commissioned units and justification of design solutions accepted in the design of reactor core for Taiwan NPP, Bushehr NPP and Kudankulam NPP. The first fuel charge of the Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1 is a reference and unified for Tiawan NPP (V-428), Bushehr NPP (V-446), Kudankulam NPP(V-412) with small differences caused by design features of RP V-320. The first core charge of Unit 1 of Volgodonsk NPP was arranged of 163 AFAs, comprising 61 CPS ARs and 42 BAR bundles. The subsequent fuel charges were arranged of AFAs with gadolinium oxide integrated into fuel instead of BAR. By 2005 the results of operation of the core at Unit 1 of Volgodonsk NPP during four fuel cycles showed that AFA is sufficiently reliable and serviceable. The activity of the primary coolant of the Volgodonsk NPP is at stable low level. During the whole time of the core operation of the Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1 no leaky AFAs were revealed. The modifications of the internals, made during pre-operational work, are reasonable and effective to provide for fuel mechanical stability in the course of operation. The modifications, made in AFA structure during operation of the Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1, are aimed at improving the service and operational reliability of its components. Correctness of the solutions taken is confirmed by AFAs operation experience both at the Volgodonsk NPP, and at other operating Russian NPPs

  6. Experience with fuel damage caused by abnormal conditions in handling and transporting operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to determine the expected condition of spent USA light-water reactor (LWR) fuel upon arrival at interim storage or fuel reprocessing facilities or, if fuel is declared a waste, at disposal facilities. Initial findings were described in an earlier PNL paper at PATRAM '80 and in a report. Updated findings are described in this paper, which includes an evaluation of information obtained from the literature and a compilation of cases of known or suspected damage to fuel as a result of handling and/or transporting operations. To date, PNL has evaluated 123 actual cases (98 USA and 25 non-USA). Irradiated fuel was involved in all but 10 of the cases. From this study, it is calculated that the frequency of unusual occurrences involving fuel damage from handling and transporting operations has been low. The damage that did occur was generally minor. The current base of experience with fuel handling and transporting operations indicates that nearly all of these unusual occurrences had only a minor or negligible effect on spent fuel storage facility operations

  7. The operational and logistic experience on transportation of Brazilian spent fuel to USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, Jose Rubens; Frajndlich, Roberto; Mandlae, Martin; Bensberg, Werner; Renger, August; Grabow, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    A shipment of 127 spent MTR fuel assemblies was made from IEA-R1 Research Reactor located at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, Brazil to Savannah River Site Laboratory in the United States. This paper describes the operational and logistic experience on this transportation made by IPEN staff and the Consortium NCS/GNS. (author)

  8. Czech interim spent fuel storage facility: operation experience, inspections and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajman, V.; Bartak, L.; Coufal, J.; Brzobohaty, K.; Kuba, S.

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the situation in the spent fuel management in the Czech Republic. The interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility (ISFSF) at Dukovany, which was commissioned in January 1997 and is using dual transport and storage CASTOR - 440/84 casks, is briefly described. The authors deal with their experience in operating and inspecting the ISFSF Dukovany. The structure of the basic safety document 'Limits and Conditions of Normal Operation' is also mentioned, including the experience of the performance. The inspection activities focused on permanent checking of the leak tightness of the CASTOR 440/84 casks, the maximum cask temperature and inspections monitoring both the neutron and gamma dose rate as well as the surface contamination. The results of the inspections are mentioned in the presentation as well. The operator's experience with re-opening partly loaded and already dried CASTOR-440/84 cask, after its transport from NPP Jaslovske Bohunice to the NPP Dukovany is also described. The paper introduces briefly the concept of future spent fuel storage both from the NPP Dukovany and the NPP Temelin, as prepared by the CEZ. The preparatory work for the Central Interim Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facility (CISFSF) in the Czech Republic and the information concerning the planned storage technology for this facility is discussed in the paper as well. The authors describe the site selection process and the preparatory steps concerning new spent fuel facility construction including the Environmental Impact Assessment studies. (author)

  9. Radiological safety experience in nuclear fuel cycle operations at Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushparaja; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Subramaniam, G.

    2000-01-01

    Activities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, cover nuclear fuel cycle operations based on natural uranium as the fuel. The facilities include: plant for purification and production of nuclear grade uranium metal, fuel fabrication, research reactor operation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste management in each stage. Comprehensive radiation protection programmes for assessment and monitoring of radiological impact of these operations, both in occupational and public environment, have been operating in BARC since beginning. These programmes, based on the 1990 ICRP Recommendations as prescribed by national regulatory body, the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), are being successfully implemented by the Health, Safety and Environment Group, BARC. Radiation Hazards Control Units attached to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities provide radiation safety surveillance to the various operations. The radiation monitoring programme consists of measurement and control of external exposures by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), hand-held and installed instruments, and internal exposures by bioassay and direct whole body counting using shadow shield counter for beta gamma emitters and phoswich detector based system for plutonium. In addition, an environmental monitoring programme is in place to assess public exposures resulting from the operation of these facilities. The programme involves analysis of various matrices in the environment such as bay water, salt, fish, sediment and computation of resulting public exposures. Based on the operating experience in these plants, improved educating and training programmes for plant operators, have been designed. This, together with the application of new technologies have brought down individual as well as average doses of occupational workers. The environmental releases remain a small fraction of the authorised limits. The operating health physics experience in some of these facilities is discussed in this paper

  10. Romanian nuclear fuel fabrication and in-reactor fuel operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budan, O.

    2003-01-01

    A review of the Romanian nuclear program since mid 60's is made. After 1990, the new Romanian nuclear power authority, RENEL-GEN, elaborated a realistic Nuclear Fuel Program. This program went through the Romanian nuclear fuel plant qualification with the Canadian (AECL and ZPI) support, restarting in January 1995 of the industrial nuclear fuel production, quality evaluation of the fuel produced before 1990 and the recovery of this fuel. This new policy produced good results. FCN is since 1995 the only CANDU fuel supplier from outside Canada recognised by AECL as an authorised CANDU fuel manufacturer. The in-reactor performances and behaviour of the fuel manufactured by FCN after its qualification have been excellent. Very low - more then five times lesser than the design value - fuel defect rate has been recorded up to now and the average discharge of this fuel was with about 9% greater than the design value. Since mid 1998 when SNN took charge of the production of nuclear generated electricity, FCN made significant progresses in development and procurement of new and more efficient equipment and is now very close to double its fuel production capacity. After the completion of the recovery of the fuel produced before June 1990, FCN is already prepared to shift its fuel production to the so-called 'heavy' bundle containing about 19.3 kg of Uranium per bundle

  11. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on nuclear fuel and control rods: operating experience, design evolution and safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Design and management of nuclear fuel has undergone a strong evolution process during past years. The increase of the operating cycle length and of the discharge burnup has led to the use of more advanced fuel designs, as well as to the adoption of fuel efficient operational strategies. The analysis of recent operational experience highlighted a number of issues related to nuclear fuel and control rod events raising concerns about the safety aspects of these new designs and operational strategies, which led to the organisation of this Specialists Meeting on fuel and control rod issues. The meeting was intended to provide a forum for the exchange of information on lessons learned and safety concern related to operating experience with fuel and control rods (degradation, reliability, experience with high burnup fuel, and others). After an opening session 6 papers), this meeting was subdivided into four sessions: Operating experience and safety concern (technical session I - 6 papers), Fuel performance and operational issues (technical session II - 7 papers), Control rod issues (technical session III - 9 papers), Improvement of fuel design (technical session IV.A - 4 papers), Improvement on fuel fabrication and core management (technical session IV.B - 6 papers)

  12. Operational experience using the OSTR flip fuel self-protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.; Ringle, J.C.; Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.

    1982-01-01

    Recent changes in NRC Physical Security regulations make it highly desirable for a small number of TRIGA research reactor establishments to maintain each of the fuel elements in their reactor core above the self-protection dose rate criterion. OSTR operations personnel have written a computer program (SPOOF) which calculates the exposure rate (in Rhr -1 ) from an irradiated fuel element at 3 feet in air using the actual operating history of the reactor. The purpose of this current paper is to describe the operational experience gained over the last year and a half while using the SPOOF computer program, and while performing the quarterly dose rate measurements needed to confirm the continuing accuracy of the program, and, most importantly, the self-protection status of the OSTR fuel. The computer program in association with the quarterly dose rate measurements have been accepted by the NRC, and allow the OSTR to take credit for self-protecting FLIP fuel under the current physical security regulations

  13. Design, fabrication and operating experience of Monju ex-vessel fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Yoshio; Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Kuroha, Mitsuo; Inoue, Tatsuya

    1995-01-01

    In FBRs there are two methods of storing and cooling the spent fuel - the in-vessel storage and the ex-vessel storage. Because of the sodium leaks through the tank at the beginning of pre-operation, the utilization of the ex-vessel fuel storage tank (EVST) of some FBR plant has been changed from the ex-vessel fuel storage to the interim fuel transfer tank. This led to reactor designers focusing on the material, structure and fabrication of the carbon steel sodium storage tanks worldwide. The Monju EVST was at the final stage of the design, when the leaks occurred. The lesson learned from that experience and the domestic fabrication technology are reflected to the design and fabrication of the Monju EVST. This paper describes the design, fabrication and R and D results for the tank, and operating experience in functional test. The items to be examined are as follows: (1) Overall structure of the tank and design philosophy on the function, (2) Structure of the cover shielding plug and its design philosophy, (3) Structures of the rotating rack and its bearings, and their design philosophy, (4) Cooling method and its design philosophy, (5) Structure and fabrication of the cooling coil support inside EVST with comparison of leaked case, (6) R and D effort for items above. The fabrication of the Monju EVST started in August 1986 and it was shipped to the site in March 1990. Installation was completed in November 1990, and sodium fill after pre-heating started in 1991. The operation has been continued since September 1992. In 1996 when the first spent fuel is stored, its total functions will be examined. (author)

  14. Design and operational experience of the NUHOMS-24P spent fuel storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConaghy, W.J.; Lehnert, R.A.; Rasmussen, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    The NUHOMS spent fuel storage system provides a safe and economical method for the dry storage of spent fuel assemblies either at an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) at reactor or at a centralized storage facility away from reactor. The system consists of three major safety-related components: a dry shielded canister (DSC) which provides a high integrity containment boundary and a controlled storage environment for the fuel; a reinforced concrete horizontal storage module (HSM) which houses the stored DSCs and provides radiation shielding, protection against natural phenomena and an efficient means for decay heat removal; and a transfer cask which provides for the safe shielded transfer of DSCs from a plant spent fuel pool to a HSM. The NUHOMS system is designed and licensed to the requirements of 10 CFR 72 and ANS/ANSI 57.9 for ISFSIs. The NUHOMS concept was developed in early 1980s, and in 1987, a larger version of the NUHOMS system, 24P, was developed. The operational features of NUHOMS and the loading experience at Oconee are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Design considerations and operating experience with wet storage of Ontario Hydro's irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, C.R.; Naqvi, S.J.; McEachran, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of Ontario Hydro's fuel and at-reactor irradiated fuel storage water pools (or irradiated fuel bays) are described. There are two types of bay known respectively as primary bays and auxiliary bays, used for at-reactor irradiated fuel storage. Irradiated fuel is discharged remotely from Ontario Hydro's reactors to the primary bays for initial storage and cooling. The auxiliary bays are used to receive and store fuel after its initial cooling in the primary bay, and provide additional storage capacity as needed. The major considerations in irradiated fuel bay design, including site-specific requirements, reliability and quality assurance, are discussed. The monitoring of critical fuel bay components, such as bay liners, the development of high storage density fuel containers, and the use of several irradiated fuel bays at each reactor site have all contributed to the safe handling of the large quantities of irradiated fuel over a period of about 25 years. Routine operation of the irradiated fuel bays and some unusual bay operational events are described. For safety considerations, the irradiated fuel in storage must retain its integrity. Also, as fuel storage is an interim process, likely for 50 years or more, the irradiated fuel should be retrievable for downstream fuel management phases such as reprocessing or disposal. A long-term experimental program is being used to monitor the integrity of irradiated fuel in long-term wet storage. The well characterized fuel, some of which has been in wet storage since 1962 is periodically examined for possible deterioration. The evidence from this program indicates that there will be no significant change in irradiated fuel integrity (and retrievability) over a 50 year wet storage period

  16. Nuclear fuel in water reactors: Manufacturing technology, operational experience and development objectives in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, R.; Knoedler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel industry in the Federal Republic of Germany comprises the full range of manufacturing capabilities for pressurized-, boiling- and heavy-water reactor technology. The existing manufacturing companies are Reaktor-Brennelement Union (RBU) and Alkem. RBU makes natural and enriched UO 2 -fuel assemblies, starting with powder preparation. Facilities to produce UO 2 -gadolinia and UO 2 -ThO 2 fuel are also available. Alkem manufactures mixed-oxide UO 2 /PuO 2 fuel and fuel rods. Zircaloy cladding tubes are produced by Nuklearrohr-Gesellschaft (NRG) and Mannesmannroehren-Werke (MRW). Construction of a new fuel manufacturing plant has been announced by Exxon. Supplementary to quality control, an integrated quality assurance system has been established between the reactor vendor's fuel design and engineering division and the existing manufacturing companies for fuel and tubing. Operating experience with LWR and HWR fuel dates back to 1964/65 and has shown good performance. Possible reasons for a small fraction of defective rods could be identified quickly by a fast feedback system incorporating close co-operation between Kraftwerk Union (KWU) and the utilities. KWU combines fuel development, hot-cell and pool-side service facilities as well as fuel technology linked to manufacturing. The responsibility of KWU for core and fuel design, which enabled an integral optimization, was also an important reason for the successful operation and design flexibility. (author)

  17. LMFBR operational and experimental local-fault experience, primarily with oxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warinner, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Case-by-case reviews of selective world experience with severe local faults, particularly fuel failure and fuel degradation, are reviewed for two sodium-cooled thermal reactors, several LMFBRs, and LMFBR-fuels experiments. The review summarizes fuel-failure frequency and illustrates the results of the most damaging LMFBR local-fault experiences of the last 20 years beginning with BR-5 and including DFR, BOR-60, BR2's MFBS- and Mol-loops experiments, Fermi, KNK, Rapsodie, EBR-II, and TREAT-D2. Local-fault accommodation is demonstrated and a need to more thoroughly investigate delayed-neutron and gaseous-fission-product signals is highlighted in view of uranate formation, observed blockages, and slow fuel-element failure-propagation

  18. LMFBR operational and experimental in-core local-fault experience, primarily with oxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warinner, D.K.

    Case-by-case reviews of selective world experience with severe local faults, particularly fuel failure and fuel degradation, are reviewed for two sodium-cooled thermal reactors, several LMFBRs, and LMFBR-fuels experiments. The review summarizes fuel-failure frequency and illustrates the results of the most damaging LMFBR local-fault experiences of the last 20 years beginning with BR-5 and including DFR, BOR-60, BR2's MFBS-and Mol-loops experiments, Fermi, KNK, Rapsodie, EBR-II, and TREAT-D2. Local-fault accommodation is demonstrated and a need to more thoroughly investigate delayed-neutron and gaseous-fission-product signals is highlighted in view of uranate formation, observed blockages, and slow fuel-element failure-propagation

  19. Experiences with fuels B30 and B 100 in haulage, railway operation and agricultural machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matejovsky, V. [QMS Consulting, Prague (Czech Republic); Hendrych, K.; Mares, V. [PREOL, Lovosice (Czech Republic)

    2013-06-01

    High prices of diesel fuel have increased an interest in cheaper biodiesel, especially for vehicles with high fuel consumption and not only for haulage vehicle parks but also for railway vehicles and heavy agricultural machinery. When price difference between standard diesel B7 and cheaper biodiesel B100 reached more than 10% it was a sufficient benefit for operators to use biodiesel but this fuel had not been approved for all vehicles types by their manufacturers. Despite this problem, some operators have begun to use biodiesel also for vehicles not having the approval. To prevent operational problems and misgiving of engines damage, the transition to alternative fuel was organized as field tests of one or more vehicles from the operator's fleet. The tests usually started with B30 fuel and if no operational problems occurred the second stage continued with B100. The tested vehicles were under permanent surveillance at least during one year of operation and once a month and later once in a quarter a deeper inspections were made including engine diagnostics, emissions testing, engine oil sampling for laboratory examination, injectors tenting and filters and fuel hoses condition evaluation. The presentation includes the results of vehicles inspections and the measures that had to be done to prevent engines failure and to ensure trouble-free operation of vehicles using biofuels. (orig.)

  20. Design considerations, operating and maintenance experience with wet storage of Ontario Hydro's used fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of Ontario Hydro's fuel and at-reactor used fuel storage water pools (or used fuel bays) are described. There are two types of bay, known respectively as primary bays and auxiliary bays, used for at- reactor used fuel storage. Used fuel is discharged remotely from Ontario Hydro's reactors to the primary bays for initial storage and cooling. The auxiliary bays are used to receive and store fuel after its initial cooling in the primary bay, and provide additional storage capacity as needed. With on- power fueling of reactors, each reactor of greater than 500 MW(e) net discharges an average of 10 or more used fuel bundles to bay storage every full power day. The logistics of handling such large quantities of used fuel bundles (corresponding to about 300 te/year of uranium for a 4 unit station) present a challenge to designers and operators. The major considerations in used fuel bay design, including site- specific requirements, reliability and quality assurance, are discussed

  1. Transporting spent fuel and reactor waste in Sweden experience from 5 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybeck, P.; Gustafsson, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that since the Final Repository for Reactor Waste, SFR, was taken into operation in 1988, the SKB sea transportation system is operating at full capacity by transporting spent fuel and now also reactor waste from the 12 Swedish reactors to CLAB and SFR. Transports from the National Research Center, Studsvik to the repository has recently also been integrated in the system. CLAB, the central intermediate storage for spent fuel, has been in operation since 1985. The SKB Sea Transportation System consists today of the purpose built ship M/s Sigyn, 10 transport casks for spent fuel, 2 casks for spent core components, 27 IP-2 shielded steel containers for reactor waste and 5 terminal vehicles. During an average year about 250 tonnes of spent fuel and 3 -- 4000 m 3 of reactor waste are transported to CLAB and SFR respectively, corresponding to around 30 sea voyages

  2. Implementation and operational experience of an integrated fuel information service at the BNFL THORP facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, D.N.; Ramsden, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    BNFL's THORP Plant, which started active operations early in 1994, has contracts to reprocess 7000t(U) of fuel belonging to 33 customers in 9 countries in the UK, Europe and Japan during its first 10 years of operation. Contracts are in place or being negotiated, and further business sought after, with the expectation of extending THORP's operations well beyond the initial 10 years. An integrated data management service, for the fuel storage areas of BNFL's THORP Division, is being implemented to replace several, independent, systems. This Fuel Information Service (FIS) will bring the Nuclear Materials Accountancy and Safeguards Records together with the Operating Records into one database from which all Safeguards Reports will be made. BNFL's contractual and commercial data and technical data on the stored fuel, required to support the reprocessing business, will also be brought into the common database. FIS is the first stage in a project to integrate the Materials Management systems throughout the THORP nuclear recycling business including irradiated fuel receipt and storage, reprocessing and storage of products, mixed oxide fuel manufacture and the conditioning and storage of wastes

  3. Operating experience feedback report: Assessment of spent fuel cooling. Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.; Ornstein, H.L.; Pullani, S.V.

    1997-02-01

    This report documents the results of an independent assessment by a team from the Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data of spent-fuel-pool (SFP) cooling in operating nuclear power plants. The team assessed the likelihood and consequences of an extended loss of SFP cooling and suggested corrective actions, based on their findings

  4. Fuel reliability experience in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kekkonen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Four nuclear reactors have operated in Finland now for 35-38 years. The two VVER-440 units at Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant are operated by Fortum and two BWR’s in Olkiluoto are operated by Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO). The fuel reliability experience of the four reactors operating currently in Finland has been very good and the fuel failure rates have been very low. Systematic inspection of spent fuel assemblies, and especially all failed assemblies, is a good practice that is employed in Finland in order to improve fuel reliability and operational safety. Investigation of the root cause of fuel failures is important in developing ways to prevent similar failures in the future. The operational and fuel reliability experience at the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant has been reported also earlier in the international seminars on WWER Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support. In this paper the information on fuel reliability experience at Loviisa NPP is updated and also a short summary of the fuel reliability experience at Olkiluoto NPP is given. Keywords: VVER-440, fuel reliability, operational experience, poolside inspections, fuel failure identification. (author)

  5. Shipment of spent research reactor fuel to US-operators experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krull, W.

    1999-01-01

    To ship 1500 spent fuel elements over more than 30 years to different reprocessing or storage sites a large amount of experience has been gotten. The most important partners for these activities have been US organizations. The development of the US policy for the receipt of foreign spent fuel elements of US origin is described briefly. The experience being made and lessons learned with the on May 13, 1996 renewed receipt program is described in detail, including US organizations, shipment and formal steps. (author)

  6. Spent fuel storage cask testing and operational experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslinger, L.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Spent-fuel storage cask research, development, and demonstration activities are being performed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) as a part of the storage cask testing program. The cask testing program at federal sites and other locations supports the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and DOE objectives for cooperative demonstrations with the cask vendors and utilities for development of at-reactor dry cask storage capabilities for spent nuclear fuel assemblies. One research and development program for the storage cask performance testing of metal storage cask was initiated through a cooperative agreement between Virginia Power and DOE in 1984. The performance testing was conducted for the DOE and the Electric Power Research Institute by the Pacific Northwest laboratory, operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), operated for DOE by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. In 1988 a cooperative agreement was entered into by DOE with Pacific Sierra Nuclear Associates (PSN) for performance testing of the PSN concrete Ventilated Storage Cask. Another closely related activity involving INEL is a transportable storage cask project identified as the Nuclear Fuel Services Spent-Fuel Shipping/Storage Cask Demonstration Project. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of packing, transporting, and storing commercial spent fuel in dual-purpose transport/storage casks

  7. Results on Technical and Consultants Service Meetings on Lessons Learned from Operating Experience in Wet and Dry Spent Fuel Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, B.; Zou, X.

    2015-01-01

    Spent fuel storage has been and will continue to be a vital portion of the nuclear fuel cycle, regardless of whether a member state has an open or closed nuclear fuel cycle. After removal from the reactor core, spent fuel cools in the spent fuel pool, prior to placement in dry storage or offsite transport for disposal or reprocessing. Additionally, the inventory of spent fuel at many reactors worldwide has or will reach the storage capacity of the spent fuel pool; some facilities are alleviating their need for additional storage capacity by utilizing dry cask storage. While there are numerous differences between wet and dry storage; when done properly both are safe and secure. The nuclear community shares lessons learned worldwide to gain knowledge from one another’s good practices as well as events. Sharing these experiences should minimize the number of incidents worldwide and increase public confidence in the nuclear industry. Over the past 60 years, there have been numerous experiences storing spent fuel, in both wet and dry mediums, that when shared effectively would improve operations and minimize events. These lessons learned will also serve to inform countries, who are new entrants into the nuclear power community, on designs and operations to avoid and include as best practices. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a technical and several consultants’ meetings to gather these experiences and produce a technical document (TECDOC) to share spent fuel storage lessons learned among member states. This paper will discuss the status of the TECDOC and briefly discuss some lessons learned contained therein. (author)

  8. Operational experience for the latest generation of ATRIUM trademark 10 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoss, Volker; Hoffmann, Petra Britt; Schaefer, Jens

    2011-01-01

    AREVA NP's ATRIUM trademark 10 product family was first introduced to the BWR market in 1992. Lead test campaigns confirmed the outstanding product performance and justified introduction of reload quantities. Further development of particular product features was demonstrated and implemented in the fuel design to meet highest expectations for reliability and fuel economics. The latest generation called ATRIUM trademark 10XP and subsequently ATRIUM trademark 10XM was introduced in 2002 and 2005, respectively. The first lead test assemblies completed their operation successfully after seven cycles. (orig.)

  9. Operational experience with the first eighteen slightly enriched uranium fuel assemblies in the Atucha-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, M.; Perez, R.; Pineyro, J.; Sidelnik, J.; Fink, J.; Casario, J.A.; Alvarez, L.

    1997-01-01

    Atucha I is a 357 Mwe nuclear station, moderated and cooled with heavy water, pressure vessel type of German design, located in Argentina. Fuel assemblies (FA) are 36 active natural UO2 rod clusters, 5.3 meters long and fuel is on power. Average FA exit burnup is 6 MWd/kg U. The reactor core contains 252 FA. To reduce the fuel costs about 6 MU$S/yr a program of utilization of SEU (0.85 %w U235) fuel was started at the beginning of 1995 with the introduction of 12 FA in the first step. The exit burnup of FA is approx. 10 MWd/kgU. It is planned to increase gradually the number of them up to having a full core with SEU fuel with an expected FA average exit burnup of 11 MWd/kgU. The SEU program has also the advantage of a strong reduction of spent fuel volume, and a moderate reduction of fuelling machine use. This paper presents the satisfactory operation experience with the introduction of the first 12 SEU fuel assemblies and the planned activities for the future. The fresh SEU fuel assemblies were introduced in six fuel channels located in an intermediate zone located 136 cm from the center of the reactor and selected because they have higher margins to the channel powers limits to accommodate the initial 15 to 20 % relative channel power increase. To verify the design and fuel management calculations, comparisons have been made of the calculated and measured values of the variation of channel ΔT, regulating rods insertion and flux reading in in-core detectors near to the refueled channel. The agreement was good and in most of the cases within the measurement errors. Cell calculations were made with WIMS-D4, and reactor calculations with PUMA. a fuel management 3D diffusion program developed in Argentina. With SEU fuel with a greater burnup in the central high power core region, new operating procedures were developed to prevent PCI failures in fuel power ramps that arise during operation. Some fuel rod and structural assembly design changes were introduced on the

  10. Operational experience gained with the failed fuel rod detection system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, H.H.; Forch, H.

    1985-01-01

    Brown Boveri Reaktor GmbH together with Krautkramer Company developed such a FAILED FUEL ROD DETECTION SYSTEM (FFRDS) which allows to located defective fuel rods without dismantling the fuel assembly or pulling of individual rods. Since 1979 the FFRDS is employed successfully in various nuclear power plants in Europe, USA, Japan, and Korea. The short inspection time and the high reliability of the method make the FFRDS a true competitor to the sipping method. In this paper the authors discuss the method and the design of the system, the equipment set-up, its features and the experience gained so far. The system has been performed and automated to such an extent that within a short installation period series of fuel assemblies can be tested with relatively short intervals of time (5 minutes for BWR and 7 minutes for PWR fuel assemblies per side). The ability of the system for deployment under various conditions and the experience gained during the past six years have made this system universally applicable and highly sensitive to the requirements of NDT during outages and for transport of FAs to intermediate storage facilities. Comparison of FFRDS to conventional sipping has indicated in several instances that the FFRDS is superior to the latter technique

  11. The agnion Heatpipe-Reformer - operating experiences and evaluation of fuel conversion and syngas composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallmetzer, Georg; Ackermann, Pascal [Highterm Research GmbH, Hettenshausen (Germany); Schweiger, Andreas; Kienberger, Thomas [Highterm Research GmbH, Graz (Austria); Groebl, Thomas; Walter, Heimo [Technische Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Energietechnik und Thermodynamik, Wien (Austria); Zankl, Markus; Kroener, Martin [Agnion Technologies GmbH, Hettenshausen (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Fluidized bed gasification of solid fuels is considered as one of the core technologies for future sustainable energy supply. Whereas autothermal oxygen-driven gasification is applied in large-scale substitute natural gas (SNG) and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) plants or small-scale combined heat and power (CHP) plants, the allothermal steam-reforming process of the agnion Heatpipe-Reformer is designed for cost- and fuel-efficient syngas generation at small scales for distributed applications. The Heatpipe-Reformer's pressurized syngas generation provides a number of benefits for SNG, biomass to liquid (BTL) and CHP applications. A modified gas engine concept uses the pressurized and hydrogen-rich syngas for increased performance and tar tolerance at decreased capital expenses. Agnion has installed and operated a 500-kW thermal input pilot plant in Pfaffenhofen, Germany, over the last 2 years, showing stable operation over a variety of operating points. The syngas composition has been measured at values expected by thermodynamic models. An influence of the steam-to-fuel ratio and reformer temperature was observed. Tar and sulphur contents have been monitored and correlated to operation parameters, showing influences on stoichiometry and carbon conversion. The mass and energy streams of the plant were balanced. One of the main observations in the monitoring programme is the fact that syngas output, efficiency and syngas quality correlate to high values if the carbon conversion is high. Carbon conversion rates and cold gas efficiencies are comparably high in respect to today's processes, promising economic and fuel-efficient operation of the Heatpipe-Reformer applications. (orig.)

  12. Nuclear fuel in water reactors: manufacturing technology operational experience and development activities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, R.; Knoedler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel industry in the F.R. Germany comprises the full range of manufacturing capabilities for pressurized - boiling- and heavy water reactor technology. The existing manufacturing companies are RBU and Alkem. RBU makes natural and enriched UO 2 -fuel assemblies, starting with powder preparation. Facilites to produce UO 2 -Gadolinia and UO 2 -ThO 2 fuel are also available. Alkem is manufacturing mixed oxide UO 2 /PuO 2 -fuel and -rods. Zircaloy cladding tubes are produced by NRG and MRW. This constitutes the largest single nuclear fuel manufacturing capacity outside the USA. The companies are interested in export and current capacity trends indicate some overcapacity caused by delays in plant schedules. Construction of a new fuel manufacturing plant in the FRG has been announced by Exxon. Supplementary to quality control in manufacturing an integrated quality assurance-system has been established between the reactor vendor KWU, fuel design and -engineering division, and the existing manufacturing companies for fuel and tubing. The operating experience with LWR and HWR fuel dates back to 1964/65 and proves good performance. No generic problems like densification or rod bow were encountered. Possible reasons for the small fraction of defective rods could be quickly identified by a fast feedback system incorporating a close cooperation between KWU and the utilities. KWU combines fuel development, hot-cell and poolside service facilities as well as fuel technology linking to manufacturing in one hand. The common responsibility of KWU for core- and fuel design which enabled an integral optimization was also an important reason for the successful operation and flexibility in design. Development efforts will be concentrated on tests to improve the understanding of power ramping capability under extreme operational and postulated abnormal conditions, on statistical evaluation of safety aspects and on improved economy. The LWR fuel development was sponsored by the

  13. Experience with respect to dose limitation in nuclear fuel service operations in the United Kingdom supporting civil nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Within the United Kingdom, the nuclear power generation programme is supported by nuclear fuel services including uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication and reprocessing, operated by British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL). These have entailed the processing of large quantities of uranium and of plutonium and fission products arising in the course of irradiation of fuel in nuclear power stations and have necessitated substantial programmes for the radiological protection of the public and of the workers employed in the industry. This paper presents and reviews the statistics of doses recorded in the various sectors of nuclear fuel services operations against the background of the standards to which the industry is required to operate. A description is given of the development of BNFL policy in keeping with the objective of being recognized as among those industries regarded as safe and the resource implications of measures to reduce doses received by workers are reviewed in the light of experience. Finally, the paper reviews the epidemiological data which have been, and continue to be, collected for workers who have been employed in these nuclear fuel services. (author)

  14. Operation databook of the fuel treatment system of the Static Experiment Critical Facility (STACY) and the Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY). JFY 2004 to JFY 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokusen, Junya; Sumiya, Masato; Seki, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Fuyumi; Ishii, Junichi; Umeda, Miki

    2013-02-01

    Uranyl nitrate solution fuel used in the Static Experiment Critical Facility (STACY) and the Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) is adjusted in the Fuel Treatment System, in which such parameters are varied as concentration of uranium, free nitric acid, soluble neutron poison, and so on. Operations for concentration and denitration of the solution fuel were carried out with an evaporator from JFY 2004 to JFY 2008 in order to adjust the fuel to the experimental condition of the STACY and the TRACY. In parallel, the solution fuel in which some kinds of soluble neutron poison were doped was also adjusted in JFY 2005 and JFY 2006 for the purpose of the STACY experiments to determine neutron absorption effects brought by fission products, etc. After these experiments in the STACY, a part of the solution fuel including the soluble neutron poison was purified by the solvent extraction method with mixer-settlers in JFY 2006 and JFY 2007. This report summarizes operation data of the Fuel Treatment System from JFY 2004 to JFY 2008. (author)

  15. Operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, L.P.; Six, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company began operating a first-generation integrated safeguards system in the Plutonium Finishing Plant storage vaults. This Vault Safety and Inventory System is designed to integrate data into a computer-based nuclear material inventory monitoring system. The system gathers, in real time, measured physical parameters that generate nuclear material inventory status data for thousands of stored items and sends tailored report to the appropriate users. These data include canister temperature an bulge data reported to Plant Operations and Material Control and Accountability personnel, item presence and identification data reported to Material Control and Accountability personnel, and unauthorized item movement data reported to Security response forces and Material Control and Accountability personnel. The Westinghouse Hanford Company's experience and operational benefits in using this system for reduce radiation exposure, increase protection against insider threat, and real-time inventory control are discussed in this paper

  16. Operational experience in the spent fuel receipt and storage facility at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, S.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Iimura, I.; Yamamura, O.; Ogata, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the double containment system led to the reduction of labor time for the cask decontamination to one-tenth compared to the original manner. And also it led to the great decrease of floor contamination in the receipt and storage facility. The decrease permitted as many as about 20,000 visitors to take tours in the fuel receipt and storage facility in the past three years without contamination trouble with the visitors. Different types of spent fuels can be easily handled and stored by the specially designed tools in the pool water. The exchange of the cooling water in the transport cask before unloading and the use of the storage container keep contamination of the pool water to a minimum. The pool water treatment system has been successfully operated. As result, the pool water condition has been well-controlled

  17. Fuel performance experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofer, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The history of LWR fuel supply has been characterized by a wide range of design developments and fuel cycle cost improvements. Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. has pursued an aggressive fuel research and development program aimed at improved fuel performance. Exxon Nuclear has introduced many design innovations which have improved fuel cycle economics and operating flexibility while fuel failures remain at very low levels. The removable upper tie plate feature of Exxon Nuclear assemblies has helped accelerate this development, enabling repeated inspections during successive plant outages. Also, this design feature has made it possible to repair damaged fuel assemblies during refueling outages, thereby minimizing the economic impact of fuel failure from all causes

  18. Safety evaluation of the NSRR facility relevant to the modification for improved pulse operation and preirradiated fuel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inabe, Teruo; Terakado, Yoshibumi; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hideo

    1988-11-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) is a pulse reactor for the inpile experiments to study the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident conditions. The present operation modes of the NSRR consist of the steady state operation up to 300 kW and the natural pulse operation in which a sharp pulsed power is generated from substantially zero power level. In addition to these, two new modes of shaped pulse operation and combined pulse operation will be conducted in the near future as the improved pulse operations. A transient power up to 10 MW will be generated in the shaped pulse operation, and a combination of a transient power up to 10 MW and a sharp pulsed power will be generated in the combined pulse operation. Furthermore, preirradiated fuel rods will be employed in the future experiments whereas the present experiments are confined to the test specimens of unirradiated fuel rods. To provide for these programs, the fundamental design works relevant to the modification of the reactor facility including the reactor instrumentation and control systems and experimental provision were developed. The reactor safety evaluation is prerequisite for confirming the propriety of the fundamental design of the reactor facility from the safety point of view. The safety evaluation was therefore conducted postulating such events that would bring about abnormal conditions in the reactor facility. As a result of the safety evaluation, it has been confirmed as to the NSRR facility after modification that the anticipated transients, the postulated accidents, the major accident and the hypothetical accident do not result respectively in any serious safety problem and that the fundamental design principles and the reactor siting are adequate and acceptable. (author)

  19. Operational experiences in radiation protection in fast reactor fuel reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenakshisundaram, V.; Rajagopal, V.; Santhanam, R.; Baskar, S.; Madhusoodanan, U.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Balasundar, S.; Suresh, K.; Ajoy, K.C.; Dhanasekaran, A.; Akila, R.; Indira, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Reprocessing facility for Advanced fuels in Lead cells (CORAL), situated at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam is a pilot plant to reprocess the mixed carbide fuel, for the first time in the world. Reprocessing of fuel with varying burn-ups up to 155 G Wd/t, irradiated at Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR), has been successfully carried out at CORAL. Providing radiological surveillance in a fuel reprocessing facility itself is a challenging task, considering the dynamic status of the sources and the proximity of the operator with the radioactive material and it is more so in a fast reactor fuel reprocessing facility due to handling of higher burn-up fuels associated with radiation fields and elevated levels of fissile material content from the point of view of criticality hazard. A very detailed radiation protection program is in place at CORAL. This includes, among others, monitoring the release of 85 Kr and other fission products and actinides, if any, through stack on a continuous basis to comply with the regulatory limits and management of disposal of different types of radioactive wastes. Providing radiological surveillance during the operations such as fuel transport, chopping and dissolution and extraction cycle was without any major difficulty, as these were carried out in well-shielded and high integrity lead cells. Enforcement of exposure control assumes more importance during the analysis of process samples and re-conversion operations due to the presence of fission product impurities and also since the operations were done in glove boxes and fume hoods. Although the radiation fields encountered in process area were marginally higher, due to the enforcement of strict administrative controls, the annual exposure to the radiation workers was well within the regulatory limit. As the facility is being used as test bed for validation of prototype equipment, periodic inspection and maintenance of components such as centrifuge

  20. CANDU reactor experience: fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truant, P.T.; Hastings, I.J.

    1985-07-01

    Ontario Hydro has more than 126 reactor-years experience in operating CANDU reactors. Fuel performance has been excellent with 47 000 channel fuelling operations successfully completed and 99.9 percent of the more than 380 000 bundles irradiated operating as designed. Fuel performance limits and fuel defects have had a negligible effect on station safety, reliability, the environment and cost. The actual incapability charged to fuel is less than 0.1 percent over the stations' lifetimes, and more recently has been zero

  1. FFTF operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newland, D.J.; Krupar, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    In April 1982, the FFTF began its first nominally 100 day irradiation cycle. Since that time the plant has operated very well with steadily increasing plant capacity factors during its first four cycles. One hundred fifty fuel assemblies (eighty of which are experiments) and over 32,000 individual fuel pins have been irradiated, some in excess of 100 MWd/Kg burnup. Specialized equipment and systems unique to sodium cooled reactor plants have performed well

  2. ENEL's experience in the management of irradiated fuel. Old and new problems encountered by nuclear station operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariemma, A.; Cuzzaniti, M.; Zaffiro, B.; Bertini, A.

    1983-01-01

    The experience acquired in recent years in the management of spent fuel discharged from ENEL's reactors has revealed a substantial change in the attitude of nuclear station operators in connection with the end of the fuel cycle downstream from the reactor (back-end). While in the past, after President Carter's outline of US policy in April 1977, the utilities had to face great difficulty in reprocessing their fuel owing to inadequate capacity, today the same problem is regarded as a matter of cost-benefit analysis from an industrial standpoint and of appropriate planning for the utilization of the recovered fissile materials. Since the present technology allows spent fuel storage (dry or underwater) to be planned for rather long periods and plutonium utilization requires a very stringent schedule, the present trend is to ensure medium-term storage of spent fuel and to seek a greater flexibility in the final reprocessing stages so as to render plutonium availability consistent with the programmes for its utilization. As a consequence, the solution to the problems posed by high-activity waste disposal is being delayed, thus allowing an exhaustive and detailed analysis of all the possible solutions to be made. The paper describes a number of solutions to the problems ENEL has encountered in the fuel cycle back-end. (author)

  3. Operating experience with a 250 kW el molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Manfred; Huppmann, Gerhard

    The MTU MCFC program is carried out by a European consortium comprising the German companies MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH, Ruhrgas AG and RWE Energie AG as well as the Danish company Energi E2 S/A. MTU acts as consortium leader. The company shares a license and technology exchange agreement with Fuel Cell Energy Inc., Danbury, CT, USA (formerly Energy Research Corp., ERC). The program was started in 1990 and covers a period of about 10 years. The highlights of this program to date are: Considerable improvements regarding component stability have been demonstrated on laboratory scale. Manufacturing technology has been developed to a point which enables the consortium to fabricate the porous components on a 250 cm 2 scale. Several large area stacks with 5000-7660 cm 2 cell area and a power range of 3-10 kW have been tested at the facilities in Munich (Germany) and Kyndby (Denmark). These stacks have been supplied by FCE. As far as the system design is concerned it was soon realized that conventional systems do not hold the promise for competitive power plants. A system analysis led to the conclusion that a new innovative design approach is required. As a result the "Hot Module" system was developed by the consortium. A Hot Module combines all the components of a MCFC system operating at the similar temperatures and pressures into a common thermally insulated vessel. In August 1997 the consortium started its first full size Hot Module MCFC test plant at the facilities of Ruhrgas AG in Dorsten, Germany. The stack was assembled in Munich using 292 cell packages purchased from FCE. The plant is based on the consortium's unique and proprietary "Hot Module" concept. It operates on pipeline natural gas and was grid connected on 16 August 1997. After a total of 1500 h of operation, the plant was intentionally shut down in a controlled manner in April 1998 for post-test analysis. The Hot Module system concept has demonstrated its functionality. The safety concept has been

  4. Operational experience in the non-destructive assay of fissile material in General Electric's nuclear fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Operational experience in the non-destructive assay of fissile material in a variety of forms and containers and incorporation of the assay devices into the accountability measurement system for General Electric's Wilmington Fuel Fabrication Facility measurement control programme is detailed. Description of the purpose and related operational requirements of each non-destructive assay system is also included. In addition, the accountability data acquisition and processing system is described in relation to its interaction with the various non-destructive assay devices and scales used for accountability purposes within the facility. (author)

  5. French experience of regulation and operation on reprocessing facilities of LWR spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, J P [DES/SESUL (France)

    1992-02-01

    This presentation describes the French experience of regulation and operation on reprocessing facilities: how the safety assessment was made of UP3-A plant of the La Hague establishment for the building permit and operating license within the context of French nuclear regulations and the national debate on the need for reprocessing. Other factors discussed are how the public was involved, how the regulations were improved in the process and what the different stages of commissioning consisted of. In the design studies of a reprocessing facility, three complementary approaches are used: - observance of regulations born of technical considerations, and good practice, - analysis of the hazards, using deterministic and probabilistic methods, within the framework of a safety report, - review of experience feedback from such a facility or like plants. The design of the facility must permit the prevention of accidents and limit their consequences. Moreover, during all foreseeable cases (normal operating, incidents and accidents), the safety of the staff, the public and the environment with regard to consequences of radioactive releases and ionising radiations must be ensured. In the evaluation of these consequences, the approach used is voluntarily pessimistic in order to take into account every possible case. It is based on the main following principles: definition of the events considered for the dimensioning of the facility; redundancy and diversification; defense in depth which consists of the multiplication of the barriers. The experience feedback comes, on the one hand from operator's findings aiming at improving its facility, on the other hand from incidents, the lessons of which being taken into account after careful analysis. These incidents are analyzed by the Safety Authority upon presentation of the data by the operator and on site findings of inspections. In other respects, the aim of inspections is to check that the plant and its operating practices are

  6. GNF2 Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, John

    2007-01-01

    GNF's latest generation fuel product, GNF2, is designed to deliver improved nuclear efficiency, higher bundle and cycle energy capability, and more operational flexibility. But along with high performance, our customers face a growing need for absolute fuel reliability. This is driven by a general sense in the industry that LWR fuel reliability has plateaued. Too many plants are operating with fuel leakers, and the impact on plant operations and operator focus is unacceptable. The industry has responded by implementing an INPO-coordinated program aimed at achieving leaker-free reliability by 2010. One focus area of the program is the relationship between fuel performance (i.e., duty) and reliability. The industry recognizes that the right balance between performance and problem-free fuel reliability is critical. In the development of GNF2, GNF understood the requirement for a balanced solution and utilized a product development and introduction strategy that specifically addressed reliability: evolutionary design features supported by an extensive experience base; thoroughly tested components; and defense-in-depth mitigation of all identified failure mechanisms. The final proof test that the balance has been achieved is the application of the design, initially through lead use assemblies (LUAs), in a variety of plants that reflect the diversity of the BWR fleet. Regular detailed surveillance of these bundles provides the verification that the proper balance between performance and reliability has been achieved. GNF currently has GNF2 lead use assemblies operating in five plants. Included are plants that have implemented extended power up-rates, plants on one and two-year operating cycles, and plants with and without NobleChem TM and zinc injection. The leading plant has undergone three pool-side inspections outages to date. This paper reviews the actions taken to insure GNF2's reliability, and the lead use assembly surveillance data accumulated to date to validate

  7. Design ampersand operational experience of the NUHOMS reg-sign-24P spent fuel storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConaghy, W.J.; Lehnert, R.A.; Rasmussen, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    The NUHOMS reg-sign Spent Fuel Storage System provides a safe and economical method for the dry storage of spent fuel assemblies either at an at-reactor Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) or at a centralized away-from-reactor (AFR) storage facility. The system consists of three major safety related components: a dry shielded canister (DSC) which provides a high integrity containment boundary and a controlled storage environment for the fuel; a reinforced concrete horizontal storage module (HSM) which houses the stored DSC and provides radiation shielding, protection against natural phenomena, and an efficient means for decay heat removal; and a transfer cask which provides for the safe shielded transfer of the DSC from the plant spent fuel pool to the HSM. The NUHOMS reg-sign system is designed and licensed to the requirements of 10 CFR 72 and ANS/ANSI 57.9 for ISFSIs

  8. Comparison of problems and experience of core operation with distorted fuel element assemblies in VVER-1000 and PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, A.

    1999-01-01

    The main reactors leading to distortion of fuel element assemblies during reactor operation were studied. A series of actions which compensate this effect was proposed. Criteria of operation limitation in VVER-1000 and PWR reactors are described

  9. Operating experiences in the reprocessing of LWR fuels in the WAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert, K.L.

    40 tons of fuel have been processed in the WAK. Problems encountered are reviewed. Through constant control and advance preparation for nonroutine procedures, the average monthly dosage has dropped from more than 100 mrem to 40 to 50 mrem

  10. Final report on development and operation of instrumented irradiation capsules for creep experiments on nuclear fuels at FR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, H.E.; Philipp, K.; Blumhofer, M.

    1980-02-01

    The capsule test rig No. 154 removed from FR2 in April 1979 was the last irradiation rig in a long series of creep experiments. The target of the irradiation tests, started exactly ten years ago, was to investigate the creep behaviour of various ceramic nuclear fuels under different in-pile irradiation conditions. An irradiation test rig had been developed for this purpose which allowed the continuous measurement of changes in length of fuel specimens. A total of 28 capsule test rigs each containing two packages of creep specimens have been irradiated in FR2 during this decade. They included 23 specimen stacks of UO 2 , 16 specimen stacks of UO 2 -PuO 2 , 4 specimen stacks of UN, 10 specimen stacks of (U,Pu) C, and 13 reference specimens of molybdenum. Besides the description of the test facility, the report provides above all a survey of the operation data applicable to the specimens and of the operating experience gathered as well as of the findings obtained in post-irradiation examinations. (orig.) [de

  11. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. Operating experience with pulsed-column holdup estimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehinger, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating pulsed-column holdup are being investigated as part of the Safeguards Assessment task of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The CFRP was a major sponsor of test runs at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel plant (BNFP) in 1980 and 1981. During these tests, considerable measurement data were collected for pulsed columns in the plutonium purification portion of the plant. These data have been used to evaluate and compare three available methods of holdup estimation

  12. Operating experience in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, W.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1953, reprocessing has accumulated 180 years of operating experience in ten plants, six of them with 41 years of operation in reprocessing oxide fuel from light water reactors. After abortive, premature attempts at what is called commercial reprocessing, which had been oriented towards the market value of recoverable uranium and plutonium, non-military reprocessing technologies have proved their technical feasibility, since 1966 on a pilot scale and since 1976 on an industrial scale. Reprocessing experience obtained on uranium metal fuel with low and medium burnups can now certainly be extrapolated to oxide fuel with high burnup and from pilot plants to industrial scale plants using the same technologies. The perspectives of waste management of the nuclear power plants operated in the Federal Republic of Germany should be viewed realistically. The technical problems still to be solved are in a balanced relationship to the benefit arising to the national economy out of nuclear power generation and can be solved in time, provided there are clearcut political boundary conditions. (orig.) [de

  13. Operating experience with a near-real-time inventory balance in a nuclear fuel cycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armento, W.J.; Box, W.D.; Kitts, F.G.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Morrison, G.W.; Pike, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The principal objective of the ORNL Integrated Safeguards Program (ISP) is to provide enhanced material accountability, improved process control, and greater security for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With the improved instrumentation and computer interfacing currently installed, the ORNL 233 U Pilot Plant has demonstrated capability of a near-real-time liquid-volume balance in both the solvent-extraction and ion-exchange systems. Future developments should include the near-real-time mass balancing of special nuclear materials as both a static, in-tank summation and a dynamic, in-line determination. In addition, the aspects of site security and physical protection can be incorporated into the computer monitoring

  14. The safety of operations in the Dragon fuel element production building during the manufacture of thorium fuel for the first charge of the Dragon Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, H.; Gardham, B.; Holliday, J.

    1965-04-01

    The first charge of fuel and fuel elements for the Dragon Reactor has been completed without significant difficulty. This report covers the safety of operations during the production of the 10 thorium elements together with the final 2 driver elements needed to complete the 37 element charge. (author)

  15. Design, Fabrication, and Operation of Innovative Microalgae Culture Experiments for the Purpose of Producing Fuels: Final Report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for a 1000-acre (water surface) algae culture facility for the production of fuels. The system is modeled after the shallow raceway system with mixing foils that is now being operated at the University of Hawaii. A computer economic model was created to calculate the discounted breakeven price of algae or fuels produced by the culture facility. A sensitivity analysis was done to estimate the impact of changes in important biological, engineering, and financial parameters on product price.

  16. Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.; Howard, R.; Corporan, E.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The rising cost of oil coupled with the need to reduce pollution and dependence on foreign suppliers has spurred great interest and activity in developing alternative aviation fuels. Although a variety of fuels have been produced that have similar properties to standard Jet A, detailed studies are required to ascertain the exact impacts of the fuels on engine operation and exhaust composition. In response to this need, NASA acquired and burned a variety of alternative aviation fuel mixtures in the Dryden Flight Research Center DC-8 to assess changes in the aircraft s CFM-56 engine performance and emission parameters relative to operation with standard JP-8. This Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment, or AAFEX, was conducted at NASA Dryden s Aircraft Operations Facility (DAOF) in Palmdale, California, from January 19 to February 3, 2009 and specifically sought to establish fuel matrix effects on: 1) engine and exhaust gas temperatures and compressor speeds; 2) engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) gas phase and particle emissions and characteristics; and 3) volatile aerosol formation in aging exhaust plumes

  17. U.S. Department of Energy operational experience with shipments of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, Charles E.; Massey, Charles D.; Mustin, Tracy P.

    1998-01-01

    On May 13, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Record of Decision on a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. The goal of the long-term policy is to recover enriched uranium exported from the United States, while giving foreign research reactor operators sufficient time to develop their own long-term solutions for storage and disposal of spent fuel. The spent fuel accepted by the U.S. DOE under the policy must be out of the research reactors by May 12, 2006 and returned to the United States by May 12, 2009. (author)

  18. Management of legacy spent nuclear fuel wastes at the Chalk River Laboratories: operating experience and progress towards waste remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.S.; Bainbridge, I.B.; Greenfield, K.R.

    2006-01-01

    AECL has been managing and storing a diversity of spent nuclear fuel, arising from operations at its Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site over more than 50 years. A subset of about 22 tonnes of research reactor fuels, primarily metallic uranium, have been identified as a high priority for remediation, based on monitoring and inspection that has determined that these fuels and their storage containers are corroding. This paper describes the Fuel Packaging and Storage (FPS) project, which AECL has launched to retrieve these fuels from current storage, and to emplace them in a new above-ground dry storage system, as a prerequisite step to decommissioning some of the early-design waste storage structures at CRL. The retrieved fuels will be packaged in a new storage container, and subjected to a cold vacuum drying process that will remove moisture, and thereby reduce the extent of future corrosion and degradation. The FPS project will enable improved interim storage to be implemented for legacy fuels at CRL, until a decision is made on the ultimate disposition of legacy fuels in Canada. (author)

  19. French LEU fuel for research reactor with emphasis on the Osiris experience of core conversion and reactor operation with the new fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerles, J.-M.

    1981-09-01

    One of the various activities carried out in France concerned with the design, fabrication and development of nuclear fuels was the development by the CEA of a plate type fuel (Caramel fuel). A Caramel fuel element is in the form of a plate consisting of two tight covering zircaloy sheets in which the UO 2 platelets are confined themselves within the network of a zircaloy grid. The plane geometry provides an effective means of overcoming the drawback of poor uranium oxide conductivity, and makes it possible to combine high specific power with low fuel temperature. The chief advantages of this fuel are the following: it is a very low enriched fuel. It can be used in research reactors demanding high volumetric powers and neutron fluxes, with a required enrichment significantly lower than 20% 235 U. The difference between the densities of UO 2 matrix and U-Al, 10.3 and 1.6 g/cm respectively, leads to a higher uranium charge, making it possible to reduce the enrichment to between 3 and 10%. Owing to fuel dispersion, any loss of tightness only puts a small amount of fissile material in contact with the coolant, thus limiting any contamination of the primary circuit. Another safety factor is the operating temperature, which is considerably lower than the temperature at which fission gases are liberated

  20. Fuel improvement and WWER-1000 FA main operational results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhkov, V.; Enin, A.; Bezborodov, Y.; Petrov, V.

    2003-01-01

    The JSC NCCP experience of WWER-1000 Fuel Assemblies (FAs) fabrication and operation confirms the adequate feasibility and efficiency of fuel operation in 3-4-x fuel cycles, high operating reliability and competitive capacity as compared with foreign analogues. The work on fuel improvement is aimed at an improvement of the operating reliability and an enhancement of the fuel use efficiency in WWER-1000 advanced FAs

  1. Operational limitations of light water reactors relating to fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.

    1976-07-01

    General aspects of fuel performance for typical Boiling and Pressurized Water Reactors are presented. Emphasis is placed on fuel failures in order to make clear important operational limitations. A discussion of fuel element designs is first given to provide the background information for the subsequent discussion of several fuel failure modes that have been identified. Fuel failure experiences through December 31, 1974, are summarized. The operational limitations that are required to mitigate the effects of fuel failures are discussed

  2. KNF's fuel service technologies and experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jung Cheol; Kwon, Jung Tack; Kim, Jaeik; Park, Jong Youl; Kim, Yong Chan

    2009-01-01

    In Korea, since 1978, the commercial nuclear power plant was operated. After 10 years, from 1988, the nuclear fuel was produced by KNF (Korea Nuclear Fuel). The Fuel Service Team was established at KNF in 1995. Through the technical self reliance periods in cooperate with advanced foreign companies for 5 years, KNF has started to carry out fuel service activities onsite in domestic nuclear power plants. By ceaseless improving and advancing our own methodologies, after that, KNF is able to provide the most safe and reliable fuel repair services and poolside examinations including the root cause analysis of failed fuels. Recently, KNF developed the fuel cleaning system using ultrasonic technique for crud removal, and the CANDU fuel sipping system to detect a failed fuel bundle in PHWR. In this paper, all of KNF's fuel service technologies are briefly described, and the gained experience in shown

  3. Status and operational experience report of spent fuel storage facility in Kozloduy NPP for the period 1990 - 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalimanov, M [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria)

    1994-12-31

    Spent Fuel Storage Facility (SFSF) of Kozloduy NPP is designed for a long-term storage of 4920 spent fuel assemblies which are generated by all units for ten year operational period. The assemblies are stored in SFSF after 3 year storage in the reactor cooling pool. The SFSF operational safety is ensured by a number of strictly followed regulations related to: arrangement of the assemblies and conditions at which they are stored; transportation of the assemblies to the facility; residual heat removal; quality of the water used in the storage pool; water temperature and level control. Two independent groups of experts have carried out investigations to study the building safety. Their reports have been considered and accepted by the council of the Ministry of Environment which was the final step in licensing the SFSF.

  4. UK experience on fuel and cladding interaction in oxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batey, W [Dounreay Experimental Reactor Establishment, Thurso, Caithness (United Kingdom); Findlay, J R [AERE, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    The occurrence of fuel cladding interactions in fast reactor fuels has been observed in UK irradiations over a period of years. Chemical incompatibility between fuel and clad represents a potential source of failure and has, on this account, been studied using a variety of techniques. The principal fuel of interest to the UK for fast reactor application is mixed uranium plutonium oxide clad in stainless steel and it is in this field that the majority of work has been concentrated. Some consideration has been given to carbide fuels, because of their application as an advanced fuel. This experience is described in the accompanying paper. Several complementary initiatives have been followed to investigate the interactions in oxide fuel. The principal source of experimental information is from the experimental fuel irradiation programme in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). Supporting information has been obtained from irradiation programmes in Materials Testing Reactors (MTR). Conditions approaching those in a fast reactor are obtained and the effects of specific variables have been examined in specifically designed experiments. Out-of-reactor experiments have been used to determine the limits of fuel and cladding compatibility and also to give indications of corrosion The observations from all experiments have been examined in the light of thermo-dynamic predictions of fuel behaviour to assess the relative significance of various observations and operating conditions. An experimental programme to control and limit the interactions in oxide fuel is being followed.

  5. UK experience on fuel and cladding interaction in oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batey, W.; Findlay, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The occurrence of fuel cladding interactions in fast reactor fuels has been observed in UK irradiations over a period of years. Chemical incompatibility between fuel and clad represents a potential source of failure and has, on this account, been studied using a variety of techniques. The principal fuel of interest to the UK for fast reactor application is mixed uranium plutonium oxide clad in stainless steel and it is in this field that the majority of work has been concentrated. Some consideration has been given to carbide fuels, because of their application as an advanced fuel. This experience is described in the accompanying paper. Several complementary initiatives have been followed to investigate the interactions in oxide fuel. The principal source of experimental information is from the experimental fuel irradiation programme in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). Supporting information has been obtained from irradiation programmes in Materials Testing Reactors (MTR). Conditions approaching those in a fast reactor are obtained and the effects of specific variables have been examined in specifically designed experiments. Out-of-reactor experiments have been used to determine the limits of fuel and cladding compatibility and also to give indications of corrosion The observations from all experiments have been examined in the light of thermo-dynamic predictions of fuel behaviour to assess the relative significance of various observations and operating conditions. An experimental programme to control and limit the interactions in oxide fuel is being followed

  6. The spent fuel safety experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmms, G.A.; Davis, F.J.; Ford, J.T.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy is conducting an ongoing investigation of the consequences of taking fuel burnup into account in the design of spent fuel transportation packages. A series of experiments, collectively called the Spent Fuel Safety Experiment (SFSX), has been devised to provide integral benchmarks for testing computer-generated predictions of spent fuel behavior. A set of experiments is planned in which sections of unirradiated fuel rods are interchanged with similar sections of spent PWR fuel rods in a critical assembly. By determining the critical size of the arrays, one can obtain benchmark data for comparison with criticality safety calculations. The integral reactivity worth of the spent fuel can be assessed by comparing the measured delayed critical fuel loading with and without spent fuel. An analytical effort to model the experiments and anticipate the core loadings required to yield the delayed critical conditions runs in parallel with the experimental effort

  7. Fort Saint Vrain operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain (FSV), on the system of the Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high temperature gas-cooled (HTGR) power reactor in the United States. The plant features a helium-cooled reactor with a uranium-thorium fuel cycle. The paper describes the experience made during its operation. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Nuclear fuel operation at Balakovo NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation addressed the positive experience of the TVS-2M assemblies implementation at Balakovo NPP in 18 month fuel cycles, at uprated power (104%) and the usage of the axial profiled Gd-rods in order to minimize the power peaking factors and linear heat rate in the upper part in some of the fuel rods. The results of the test operation of fuel rods with different claddings, made by E110M, E125 and E635M alloys at Balakovo NPP were also provided. The recently observed problem with the “white crust” on the cladding surfaces was also discussed

  9. The modeling experience of fuel element units operation under MSC.MARC and MENTAT 2008R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakov, G.; Kashirin, B.; Kosaurov, A.; Konovalov, Y.; Kuznetsov, A.; Medvedev, A.; Novikov, V.; Vatulin, A.

    2009-01-01

    MSC Software is leading developer of CAE-software in the world, so behaviour of fuel elements modeling with MSC.MARC use is of great practical importance. Behaviour of fuel elements usually is modeled in the elastic-viscous-plastic statement with account on fuel swelling during irradiation. For container type fuel elements contact interaction between fuel pellets and cladding or other parts of fuel element in top and bottom plugs must be in account. Results of simulated behaviour of various type fuel elements - container type fuel elements for PWR and RBMK reactors, dispersion type fuel elements for research reactors are presented. (authors)

  10. Experience with nuclear fuel utilization in Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harizanov, Y [Committee on the Use of Atomic Energy for Peaceful Purposes, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-12-01

    The presentation on experience with nuclear fuel utilization in Bulgaria briefly reviews the situation with nuclear energy in Bulgaria and then discusses nuclear fuel performance (amount of fuel loaded, type of fuel, burnup, fuel failures, assemblies deformation). 2 tabs.

  11. Apparatus and method for grounding compressed fuel fueling operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joseph Perry; Farese, David John; Xu, Jianguo

    2002-06-11

    A safety system for grounding an operator at a fueling station prior to removing a fuel fill nozzle from a fuel tank upon completion of a fuel filling operation is provided which includes a fuel tank port in communication with the fuel tank for receiving and retaining the nozzle during the fuel filling operation and a grounding device adjacent to the fuel tank port which includes a grounding switch having a contact member that receives physical contact by the operator and where physical contact of the contact member activates the grounding switch. A releasable interlock is included that provides a lock position wherein the nozzle is locked into the port upon insertion of the nozzle into the port and a release position wherein the nozzle is releasable from the port upon completion of the fuel filling operation and after physical contact of the contact member is accomplished.

  12. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, L.G.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.; Thurygill, E.W.

    1980-05-01

    The CANDU-PHW program is based upon 38 years of heavy water reactor experience with 35 years of operating experience. Canada has had 72 reactor years of nuclear-electric operations experience with 10 nuclear units in 4 generating stations during a period of 18 years. All objectives have been met with outstanding performance: worker safety, public safety, environmental emissions, reliable electricity production, and low electricity cost. The achievement has been realized through total teamwork involving all scientific disciplines and all project functions (research, design, manufacturing, construction, and operation). (auth)

  13. Status report: Nuclear fuel operating experience in implementing the program for power generation increase at VVER NPPs of JSC concern Rosenergoatom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabinin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The power uprate program of operating WWER-1000 plants was performed by Rosenergoatom using FA-2M and FAA-PLUS for 18-month fuel cycles. Their operation was justified at 104% of the rated power, and extension to 18-month fuel cycles was carried out at WWER-1000 units (except for Kalinin NPP-1). The analysis of actual performance data confirmed the efficiency of the actions implemented, and issues addressed related to the introduction of new fuel type, extended fuel cycles and spent nuclear fuel storage and removal

  14. Tailoring Vantage 5 (fuel) to suit each operator's need

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapin, D L; Secker, J R [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Philadelphia, PA (USA)

    1990-03-01

    By the end of 1989, Westinghouse Vantage 5 fuel had been reloaded into 36 nuclear power plants. The fuel offers a number of features operators can choose from to suit their own particular needs. Experience so far has shown the fuel to have performed well, with coolant activity levels remaining low. (author).

  15. Operational support of a safe operating envelope for fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, T.J.; Gibb, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The mandate of a station safety analysis group is to ensure that the station is operated and maintained in a manner consistent with the basis for our understanding of the safety consequences of process or human failures. As operating experience has developed an awareness of the significance of fuel manufacture and operating conditions on safety consequences has also grown. This awareness has led to a program that is designed to ensure that these influences are appropriately considered. This paper describes the projects that make up this program. (author)

  16. CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, L.G.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1982-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This paper highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations both to the workers and the public

  17. Design, construction and operating experience of demonstration LMFBRs. The application of core and fuel performance experience in British reactors to commercial fast reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, K.Q.

    1978-01-01

    The Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) sub-assembly design is described with particular emphasis on the choice of factors that are important in determining satisfactory performance. Reasons for the adoption of specific clad and fuel design details are given in their historical context, and irradiation experience - mostly from the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) - in support of the choices is described. The implications of factors that are now better understood than when the PFR fuel was designed, notably neutron-induced void swelling and irradiation creep, are then considered. It is shown that the 'free-standing' core design used in PFR, in which the sub-assembly is unsupported above the level of the lower axial breeder, relies on the availability of low-swelling, preferably irradiation-creep-resistant alloys as sub-assembly structural materials in order to achieve the prescribed burn-up target. The advantages of a 'restrained core', which makes use of irradiation creep to redress the effects of material swelling, are noted briefly, and the application of this concept to the Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) core design is described. Probable future trends in pin and sub-assembly design are reviewed and the scope of associated irradiation testing programmes defined. Arrangements for monitoring and evaluating fuel performance, both in reactor and post-irradiation, are outlined and the provisions for endorsement of CDFR pin, sub-assembly and core design details in PFR are indicated. (author)

  18. MOX fuel transport: the French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchis, H.; Verdier, A.; Sanchis, H.

    1999-01-01

    In the back-end of the fuel cycle, several leading countries have chosen the Reprocessing, Conditioning, Recycling (RCR) option. Plutonium recycling in the form of MOX fuel is a mature industry, with successful operational experience and large-scale fabrication plants an several European countries. The COGEMA Group has developed the industrialized products to master the RCR operation including transport COGEMA subsidiary, TRANSNUCLEAIRE has been operating MOX fuel transports on an industrial scale for more than 10 years. In 1998, around 200 transports of Plutonium materials have been organised by TRANSNUCLEAIRE. These transports have been carried out by road between various facilities in Europe: reprocessing plants, manufacturing plants and power plants. The materials transported are either: PuO 2 and MOX powder; BWR and PWR MOX fuel rods; BWR and PWR MOX fuel assemblies. Because MOX fuel transport is subject to specific safety, security and fuel integrity requirements, the MOX fuel transport system implemented by TRANSNUCLEAIRE is fully dedicated. Packaging have been developed, licensed and manufactured for each kind of MOX material in compliance with relevant regulations. A fleet of vehicles qualified according to existing physical protection regulations is operated by TRANSNUCLEAIRE. TRANSNUCLEAIRE has gained a broad experience in MOX transport in 10 years. Technical and operational know-how has been developed and improved for each step: vehicles and packaging design and qualification; vehicle and packaging maintenance; transport operations. Further developments are underway to increase the payload of the packaging and to improve the transport conditions, safety and security remaining of course top priority. (authors)

  19. Experience related to the safety of advanced LMFBR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1975-07-01

    Experiments and experience relative to the safety of advanced fuel elements for the liquid metal fast breeder reactor are reviewed. The design and operating parameters and some of the unique features of advanced fuel elements are discussed breifly. Transient and steady state overpower operation and loss of sodium bond tests and experience are discussed in detail. Areas where information is lacking are also mentioned

  20. Operating experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimesa, S.

    2007-01-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has developed its own system for tracking, screening and evaluating the operating experiences of the nuclear installations. The SNSA staff regularly tracks the operating experiences throughout the world and screens them on the bases of applicability for the Slovenian nuclear facilities. The operating experiences, which pass the screening, are thoroughly evaluated and also recent operational events in these facilities are taken into account. If needed, more information is gathered to evaluate the conditions of the Slovenian facilities and appropriate corrective actions are considered. The result might be the identification of the need for modification at the licensee, the need for modification of internal procedures in the SNSA or even the proposal for the modification of regulations. Information system helps everybody to track the process of evaluation and proper logging of activities. (author)

  1. Spent Fuel Storage Operation - Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    Experience gained in planning, constructing, licensing, operating, managing and modifying spent fuel storage facilities in some Member States now exceeds 50 years. Continual improvement is only achieved through post-project review and ongoing evaluation of operations and processes. This publication is aimed at collating and sharing lessons learned. Hopefully, the information provided will assist Member States that already have a developed storage capability and also those considering development of a spent nuclear fuel storage capability in making informed decisions when managing their spent nuclear fuel. This publication is expected to complement the ongoing Coordinated Research Project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III); the scope of which prioritizes facility operational practices in lieu of fuel and structural components behaviour over extended durations. The origins of the current publication stem from a consultants meeting held on 10-12 December 2007 in Vienna, with three participants from the IAEA, Slovenia and USA, where an initial questionnaire on spent fuel storage was formulated (Annex I). The resultant questionnaire was circulated to participants of a technical meeting, Spent Fuel Storage Operations - Lessons Learned. The technical meeting was held in Vienna on 13-16 October 2008, and sixteen participants from ten countries attended. A consultants meeting took place on 18-20 May 2009 in Vienna, with five participants from the IAEA, Slovenia, UK and USA. The participants reviewed the completed questionnaires and produced an initial draft of this publication. A third consultants meeting took place on 9-11 March 2010, which six participants from Canada, Hungary, IAEA, Slovenia and the USA attended. The meeting formulated a second questionnaire (Annex II) as a mechanism for gaining further input for this publication. A final consultants meeting was arranged on 20-22 June 2011 in Vienna. Six participants from Hungary, IAEA, Japan

  2. Operational results of WWER fuel fabricated by MSZ (Elektrostal, Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asatiani, I.; Balabanov, S.; Beglov, A.; Khryashchev, D.

    2009-01-01

    The presentation brings forth a statistical analysis of the WWER fuel manufactured by OAO MSZ, operational experience. A necessity of such an analysis is determined by the fact that objective operational results prove the appropriateness of the solutions and decisions made by vendor, designer, manufacturer and utility, as well as motivates further fuel improvements. (authors)

  3. NPD Operating Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, E. P. [Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, Rolphton, ON (Canada)

    1968-04-15

    NPD has demonstrated high-capacity factor operation and for the past three years has achieved an average net capacity factor of 98% for the ''winter-peak'' period. The net capacity factor for the year 1966 was 88% and for the period from the end of commissioning (October 1962) to the end of 1966 was 71%. The output of the station has been stretched from 22 MW(e) gross to 25 MW(e) gross. This was aided by the installation of an internal steam separator in the turbine but no basic modifications to the reactor-boiler systems were required. The turbine has also been modified by the installation of chrome steel diaphragms as a solution to an erosion problem. The station also continues as a test facility to develop new components and techniques. This includes the recent successful replacement of two reactor pressure tubes and the conversion of the reactor vault ventilation system to a ''dry'' atmosphere using a molecular sieve to collect heavy-water leakage and control the concentration of acidic oxides of nitrogen. Fuel performance has been excellent and the average burn-up in the core is now 84 MWh/kg U which is slightly above the equilibrium design value. Only three fuel bundles have been found with sheath failures and none of these was due to a deficiency in the fuel but was as a result of handling problems with the refuelling equipment. In spite of undesirably high maintenance time, the fuelling machines have now inserted over 1000 fuel bundles into the reactor ''on power''. Heavy-water loss rates have been acceptable and are improving. The average loss rate from leaks during 1966 was 210 g/h. A proposal to modify the NPD heavy-water heat transport system to allow boiling is under consideration. (author)

  4. Operating experience with snubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.; Cudlin, R.

    1978-06-01

    Recent operating experience with hydraulic and mechanical snubbers has indicated that there is a need to evaluate current practice in the industry associated with snubber qualification testing programs, design and analysis procedures, selection and specification criteria, and the preservice inspection and inservice surveillance programs. The report provides a summary of operational experiences that represent problems that are generic throughout the industry. Generic Task A-13 is part of the NRC Program for the Resolution of Generic Issues Related to Nuclear Power Plants described in NUREG-0410. The report is based upon a rather large amount of data that have become available in the past four years. These data have been evaluated by the Division of Operating Reactors to develop a data base for use in connection with several NRC activities including Category A, Technical Activity A-13 (Snubbers); the Standard Review Plan; future Regulatory Guides; ASME Code Provisions; and various technical specifications of operating nuclear power plants

  5. Operating experience: safety perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piplani, Vivek; Krishnamurthy, P.R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Upadhyay, Devendra

    2015-01-01

    Operating Experience (OE) provides valuable information for improving NPP safety. This may include events, precursors, deviations, deficiencies, problems, new insights to safety, good practices, lessons and corrective actions. As per INSAG-10, an OE program caters as a fundamental means for enhancing the defence-in-depth at NPPs and hence should be viewed as ‘Continuous Safety Performance Improvement Tool’. The ‘Convention on Nuclear Safety’ also recognizes the OE as a tool of high importance for enhancing the NPP safety and its Article 19 mandates each contracting party to establish an effective OE program at operating NPPs. The lessons drawn from major accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi NPPs had prompted nuclear stalwarts to change their safety perspective towards NPPs and to frame sound policies on issues like safety culture, severe accident prevention and mitigation. An effective OE program, besides correcting current/potential problems, help in proactively improving the NPP design, operating and maintenance procedures, practices, training, etc., and thus plays vital role in ensuring safe and efficient operation of NPPs. Further it enhances knowledge with regard to equipment operating characteristics, system performance trends and provides data for quantitative and qualitative safety analysis. Besides all above, an OE program inculcates a learning culture in the organisation and thus helps in continuously enhancing the expertise, technical competency and knowledge base of its staff. Nuclear and Radiation Facilities in India are regulated by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Operating Plants Safety Division (OPSD) of AERB is involved in managing operating experience activities. This paper provides insights about the operating experience program of OPSD, AERB (including its on-line data base namely OPSD STAR) and its utilisation in improving the regulations and safety at Indian NPPs/projects. (author)

  6. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.; Ohta, M.M.; Simmons, G.R.; Whitaker, S.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs

    1997-12-31

    This paper covers the overview of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program, the general approach to the siting, design, construction, operation and closure of a geological disposal facility, the implementing disposal, and the public involvement in implementing geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste. And two appendices are included. 45 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  7. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.; Ohta, M.M.; Simmons, G.R.; Whitaker, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper covers the overview of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program, the general approach to the siting, design, construction, operation and closure of a geological disposal facility, the implementing disposal, and the public involvement in implementing geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste. And two appendices are included. 45 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs

  8. ATLAS IBL operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237659; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the inner most pixel layer in the ATLAS experiment, which was installed at 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis in 2014 to improve the tracking performance. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed for the IBL. After the long shut-down period over 2013 and 2014, the ATLAS experiment started data-taking in May 2015 for Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IBL has been operated successfully since the beginning of Run-2 and shows excellent performance with the low dead module fraction, high data-taking efficiency and improved tracking capability. The experience and challenges in the operation of the IBL is described as well as its performance.

  9. ERB-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.N.; Cissel, D.W.; Smith, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    As originally designed and operated, EBR-II successfully demonstrated the concept of a sodium-cooled fast breeder power plant with a closed fuel reprocessing cycle (mini-nuclear park). Subsequent operation has been as an irradiation facility, a role which will continue into the foreseeable future. Since the beginning of operation in 1961, operating experience of EBR-II has been very satisfactory. Most of the components and systems have performed well. In particular, the mechanical performance of heat-removal systems has been excellent. A review of the operating experience reveals that all the original design objectives have been successfully demonstrated. To date, no failures or incidents resulting in serious in-core or out-of-core consequences have occurred. No water-to-sodium leaks have been detected over the life of the plant. At the present time, the facility is operating very well and continuously except for short shutdowns required by maintenance, refueling, modification, and minor repair. A plant factor of 76.9% was achieved for the calendar year 1976

  10. Full core operation in JRR-3 with LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Y.; Issiki, M.

    1995-01-01

    The new JRR-3 a 20MWT swimming pool type research reactor, is made up of plate type LEU fuel elements with U-Al x fuel at 2.2 gU/cm 3 . Reconstruction work for the new JR-3 was a good success, and common operation started in November 1990, and 7 cycles (26 days operation/cycle) have passed. We have no experience in using such a high uranium density fuel element with aluminide fuel. So we plan to examine the condition of the irradiated fuel elements with three methods, that is, measurement of the value of FFD in operation, observation of external view of the fuels in refueling work and postirradiation examination after maximum burn-up will be established. In the results of the first two methods, the fuel elements of JRR-3 is burned up normally and have no evidence of failure. (author)

  11. Operating experience with a near-real-time inventory balance in a nuclear-fuel-cycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armento, W.J.; Box, W.D.; Kitts, F.G.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Morrison, G.W.; Pike, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    The principal objective of the ORNL Integrated Safeguards Program (ISP) is to provide enhanced material accountability, improved process control, and greater security for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With the improved instrumentation and computer interfacing currently installed, the ORNL 233 U Pilot Plant has demonstrated capability of a near-real-time liquid-volume balance in both the solvent-extraction and ion-exchange systems. Future developments should include the near-real-time mass balancing of special nuclear materials as both a static, in-tank summation and a dynamic, in-line determination. In addition, the aspects of site security and physical protection can be incorporated into the computer monitoring

  12. BWR fuel experience with zinc injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.A.; Garcia, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    In 1982 a correlation between low primary recirculation system dose rates in BWR's and the presence of ionic zinc in reactor water was identified. The source of the zinc was primarily from Admiralty brass condensers. Plants with brass condensers are called ''natural zinc'' plants. Brass condensers were also a source of copper that was implicated in crude induced localized corrosion (CILC) fuel failures. In 1986 the first BWR intentionally injected zinc for the benefits of dose rate control. Although zinc alone was never implicated in fuel degradation of failures, a comprehensive fuel surveillance program was initiated to monitor fuel performance. Currently there are 14 plants that are injecting zinc. Six of these plants are also on hydrogen water chemistry. This paper describes the effect on both Zircaloy corrosion and the cruding characteristics as a result of these changes in water chemistry. Fuel rod corrosion was found to be independent of the specific water chemistry of the plants. The corrosion behavior was the same with the additions of zinc alone or zinc plus hydrogen and well within the operating experience for fuel without either of these additions. No change was observed in the amounts of crude deposited on the fuel rods, both for the adherent and loosely held deposits. One of the effects of the zinc addition was the trend to form more of the zinc rich iron spinel in the fuel deposits rather than the hematite deposits that are predominantly formed with non additive water chemistry

  13. Fuel performance experience at TVO nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrakka, E.T.

    1985-01-01

    TVO nuclear power plant consists of two BWR units of ASEA-ATOM design. The fuel performance experience extending through six cycles at TVO I and four cycles at TVO II is reported. The experience obtained so far is mainly based on ASEA-ATOM 8 x 8 fuel and has been satisfactory. Until autumn 1984 one leaking fuel assembly had been identified at TVO I and none at TVO II. Most of the problems encountered have been related to leaf spring screws and channel screws. The experience indicates that satisfactory fuel performance can be achieved when utilizing strict operational rules and proper control of fuel design and manufacture. (author)

  14. Indian experience in fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.N.; Kumar, S.V.

    1977-01-01

    Plant scale experience in fuel reprocessing in India was started with the successful design, execution and commissioning of the Trombay plant in 1964 to reprocess aluminium clad metallic uranium fuel from the 40 MWt research reactor. The plant has helped in generating expertise and trained manpower for future reprocessing plants. With the Trombay experience, a larger plant of capacity 100 tonnes U/year to reprocess spent oxide fuels from the Tarapur (BWR) and Rajasthan (PHWR) power reactors has been built at Tarapur which is undergoing precommissioning trial runs. Some of the details of this plant are dealt with in this paper. In view of the highly corrosive chemical attack the equipment and piping are subjected to in a fuel reprocessing plant, some of them require replacement during their service if the plant life has to be extended. This calls for extensive decontamination for bringing the radiation levels low enough to establish direct accesss to such equipment. For making modifications in the plant to extend its life and also to enable expansion of capacity, the Trombay plant has been successfully decontaminated and partially decommissioned. Some aspects of thi decontamination campaign are presented in this paper

  15. Review of thorium fuel reprocessing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; McDuffee, W.T.; Rainey, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    The review reveals that experience in the reprocessing of irradiated thorium materials is limited. Plants that have processed thorium-based fuels were not optimized for the operations. Previous demonstrations of several viable flowsheets provide a sound technological base for the development of optimum reprocessing methods and facilities. In addition to the resource benefit by using thorium, recent nonproliferation thrusts have rejuvenated an interest in thorium reprocessing. Extensive radiation is generated as the result of 232 U-contamination produced in the 233 U, resulting in the remote operation and fabrication operations and increased fuel cycle costs. Development of the denatured thorium flowsheet, which is currently of interest because of nonproliferation concerns, represents a difficult technological challenge

  16. Reviewing operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide detailed supplementary guidance to OSART experts to aid in the evaluation of operational experience feedback (OEF) programmes at nuclear power plants. The document begins by describing the objectives of an OEF programme. It goes on to indicate preparatory work and investigatory guidance for the expert. Section 5 describes attributes of an excellent OEF programme. Appended to these guidelines are examples of OEF documents from various plants. These are intended to help the expert by demonstrating the actual implementation of OEF in practice. These guidelines are in no way intended to conflict with existing national regulations and rules. A comprehensive OEF programme, as described in Section 2, would be impossible to evaluated in detail in the amount of time typically allocated for assessing OEF in an OSART review. The expert must use his or her time wisely by concentrating on those areas that appear to be the weakest

  17. Operating experience at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legg, R.

    1996-01-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, is a 5-pass, recirculating, superconducting rf linac designed to provide exceptional beam quality at 4 GeV up to 200 μA CW. It is made up of an injector, two 400-MeV linacs, and 9 recirculation arcs having a total beamline length of more than 4.5 km. On Nov. 5, 1995, CEBAF delivered a 4 GeV, 25-μA CW electron beam to the first of 3 experimental halls and the experimental physics program was started 10 days later. Accelerator availability during the first month of the experimental run exceeded 75%. Beam properties measured in the experimental hall to date are a one sigma momentum spread of 5x10 -5 and an rms emittance of 0.2 nanometer-radians, better than design specification. CW beam has been provided from all 5 passes at 800 MeV intervals. Outstanding performance of the superconducting linacs suggests a machine energy upgrade to 6 GeV in the near term with eventual machine operation at 8-10 GeV. Results from commissioning and operations experience since the last conference are presented

  18. Quality surveillance experience of PHWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.G.; Bandyopadhyay, A.K.; Shah, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    Quality Surveillance activities are being carried out for PHWR fuel for over 25 years in India. A large number of fuel bundles of 19 element design have been produced and successfully irradiated. The quality surveillance practices follow the guidelines given in various Quality Assurance Codes and Guides. An independent third party surveillance is provided to cover major manufacturing and quality control operations. A system of design basis review periodic quality audit and regulatory safety review is in place. Over the years there have been modifications in the quality assurance procedures to comply with changing requirements. Also many innovative improvements have been introduced in the manufacturing procedures. Similarly quality control activities are also modified. Developments in fuel has remained a continuous activity. The paper summarizes the experience gathered over many years in this exciting process of innovation and improvement. (author)

  19. Operating a fuel cell using landfill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippel, C.E.; Preston, J.L. Jr.; Trocciola, J.; Spiegel, R.

    1996-12-31

    An ONSI PC25{trademark}, 200 kW (nominal capacity) phosphoric acid fuel cell operating on landfill gas is installed at the Town of Groton Flanders Road landfill in Groton, Connecticut. This joint project by the Connecticut Light & Power Company (CL&P) which is an operating company of Northeast Utilities, the Town of Groton, International Fuel Cells (IFC), and the US EPA is intended to demonstrate the viability of installing, operating and maintaining a fuel cell operating on landfill gas at a landfill site. The goals of the project are to evaluate the fuel cell and gas pretreatment unit operation, test modifications to simplify the GPU design and demonstrate reliability of the entire system.

  20. KNF's fuel service technologies and experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Cheol; Kwon, Jung Tack; Kim, Jaeik; Park, Jong Youl; Kim, Yong Chan [KNF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    In Korea, since 1978, the commercial nuclear power plant was operated. After 10 years, from 1988, the nuclear fuel was produced by KNF (Korea Nuclear Fuel). The Fuel Service Team was established at KNF in 1995. Through the technical self reliance periods in cooperate with advanced foreign companies for 5 years, KNF has started to carry out fuel service activities onsite in domestic nuclear power plants. By ceaseless improving and advancing our own methodologies, after that, KNF is able to provide the most safe and reliable fuel repair services and poolside examinations including the root cause analysis of failed fuels. Recently, KNF developed the fuel cleaning system using ultrasonic technique for crud removal, and the CANDU fuel sipping system to detect a failed fuel bundle in PHWR. In this paper, all of KNF's fuel service technologies are briefly described, and the gained experience in shown.

  1. Efficiency improvement of nuclear power plant operation: the significant role of advanced nuclear fuel technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Velde, AA. de; Burtak, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper authors deals with nuclear fuel cycle and their economic aspects. At Siemens, the developments focusing on the reduction of fuel cycle costs are currently directed on .further batch average burnup increase, .improvement of fuel reliability, .enlargement of fuel operation margins, .improvement of methods for fuel design and core analysis. These items will be presented in detail in the full paper and illustrated by the global operating experience of Siemens fuel for both PWRs and BWRs. (authors)

  2. Fuel management for TRIGA reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totenbier, R.E.; Levine, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    One responsibility of the Supervisor of Reactor Operations is to follow the TRIGA core depletion and recommend core loading changes for refueling and special experiments. Calculations required to analyze such changes normally use digital computers and are extremely difficult to perform for one who is not familiar with computer language and nuclear reactor diffusion theory codes. The TRICOM/SCRAM program developed to perform such calculations for the Penn State TRIGA Breazeale Reactor (PSBR), has a very simple input format and is one which can be used by persons having no knowledge of computer codes. The person running the program need not understand computer language such as Fortran, but should be familiar with reactor core geometry and effects of loading changes. To further simplify the input requirements but still allow for all of the studies normally needed by the reactor operations supervisor, the options required for input have been isolated to two. Given a master deck of computer cards one needs to change only three cards; a title card, core energy history information card and one with core changes. With this input, the program can provide individual fuel element burn-up for a given period of operation and the k eff of the core. If a new loading is desired, a new master deck containing the changes is also automatically provided. The life of a new core loading can be estimated by feeding in projected core burn-up factors and observing the resulting loss in individual fuel elements. The code input and output formats have now been made sufficiently convenient and informative as to be incorporated into a standard activity for the Reactor Operations Supervisor. (author)

  3. Mechanical and Instrumental Experiences from the Erection, Commissioning, and Operation of a Small Pilot Plant for Development Work on Aqueous Reprocessing of Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, K.

    1965-05-01

    A radio chemical pilot plant for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels has been built by AB Atomenergi at Kjeller in Norway. In the report a short description of the main equipment is given as well as of the procedure during the erection of the plant. Finally the results and experiences from the cold tests, tracer tests and active runs are indicated

  4. Mechanical and Instrumental Experiences from the Erection, Commissioning, and Operation of a Small Pilot Plant for Development Work on Aqueous Reprocessing of Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, K

    1965-05-15

    A radio chemical pilot plant for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels has been built by AB Atomenergi at Kjeller in Norway. In the report a short description of the main equipment is given as well as of the procedure during the erection of the plant. Finally the results and experiences from the cold tests, tracer tests and active runs are indicated.

  5. Fuel utilization experience in Slovak Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petenyi, V [Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic, Bajkalska (Slovakia)

    1997-12-01

    The paper summarizes shortly the gained experience in utilization of the fuel in the four-year fuel cycles and describes the future activities in fuel management. The spent fuel management is also included. (author). 2 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab.

  6. Reliabilityy and operating margins of LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasser, A.A.; Lindquist, K.O.

    1977-01-01

    The margins to fuel thermal operating limits under normal and accident conditions are key to plant operating flexibility and impact on availability and capacity factor. Fuel performance problems that do not result in clad breach, can reduce these margins. However, most have or can be solved with design changes. Regulatory changes have been major factors in eroding these margins. Various methods for regaining the margins are discussed

  7. Experience of TVSA fuel implementation at Kozloduy NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenov, K.; Kamenov, AI.; Hristov, D.

    2011-01-01

    The base design of the Russian fuel assemblies TVSA have been under operation at Kozloduy NPP WWER-1000 reactors since 2004. The old type fuel assemblies TVS-M were gradually substituted till 2008. The TVSA assembly distinguishes itself with much stronger construction. As a burnable absorber it has a mixture of uranium and uniformly distributed Gd in 6 or more fuel rods. This enables to increase the safety and effectiveness of fuel cycles. The experience gained during TVSA fuel implementation on units 5 and 6 and KASKAD code package validation was presented at the eightieth International conference on WWER 'Fuel performance, modelling and experimental support in 2009'. Additional information about TVSA fuel implementation at Kozloduy NPP WWER-1000 units in a 4-year fuel cycle with 42 and 48 fresh fuel assemblies reloading scheme is presented in the paper. (Authors)

  8. Fuel cracking in relation to fuel oxidation in support of an out-reactor instrumented defected fuel experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quastel, A.; Thiriet, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Lewis, B., E-mail: brent.lewis@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Oshawa, ON (Canada); Corcoran, E., E-mail: emily.corcoran@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    An experimental program funded by the CANDU Owners Group (COG) is studying an out-reactor instrumented defected fuel experiment in Stern Laboratories (Hamilton, Ontario) with guidance from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). The objective of this test is to provide experimental data for validation of a mechanistic fuel oxidation model. In this experiment a defected fuel element with UO{sub 2} pellets will be internally heated with an electrical heater element, causing the fuel to crack. By defecting the sheath in-situ the fuel will be exposed to light water coolant near normal reactor operating conditions (pressure 10 MPa and temperature 265-310{sup o}C) causing fuel oxidation, especially near the hotter regions of the fuel in the cracks. The fuel thermal conductivity will change, resulting in a change in the temperature distribution of the fuel element. This paper provides 2D r-θ plane strain solid mechanics models to simulate fuel thermal expansion, where conditions for fuel crack propagation are investigated with the thermal J integral to predict fuel crack stress intensity factors. Finally since fuel crack geometry can affect fuel oxidation this paper shows that the solid mechanics model with pre-set radial cracks can be coupled to a 2D r-θ fuel oxidation model. (author)

  9. Operations monitoring concept. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    Operations monitoring is a safeguards concept which could be applied in future fuel cycle facilities to significantly enhance the effectiveness of an integrated safeguards system. In general, a variety of operations monitoring techniques could be developed for both international and domestic safeguards application. The goal of this presentation is to describe specific examples of operations monitoring techniques as may be applied in a fuel reprocessing facility. The operations monitoring concept involves monitoring certain in-plant equipment, personnel, and materials to detect conditions indicative of the diversion of nuclear material. An operations monitoring subsystem should be designed to monitor operations only to the extent necessary to achieve specified safeguards objectives; there is no intent to monitor all operations in the facility. The objectives of the operations monitoring subsystem include: verification of reported data; detection of undeclared uses of equipment; and alerting the inspector to potential diversion activities. 1 fig

  10. Nuclear power plant operating experience, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports issued annually that summarize the operating experience of U.S. nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure and radioactive effluents for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1976 data from 55 plants--23 boiling water reactor plants and 32 pressurized water reactor plants

  11. Operating experience with the DRAGON High Temperature Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.A.; Capp, P.D.

    2002-01-01

    The Dragon Reactor Experiment in Winfrith/UK was a materials test facility for a number of HTR projects pursued in the sixties and seventies of the last century. It was built and managed as an OECD/NEA international joint undertaking. The reactor operated successfully between 1964 and 1975 to satisfy the growing demand for irradiation testing of fuels and fuel elements as well as for technological tests of components and materials. The paper describes the reactor's main experimental features and presents results of 11 years of reactor operation relevant for future HTRs. (author)

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project operational staffing plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debban, B.L.

    1996-03-01

    Using the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project's current process flow concepts and knowledge from cognizant engineering and operational personnel, an initial assessment of the SNF Project radiological exposure and resource requirements was completed. A small project team completed a step by step analysis of fuel movement in the K Basins to the new interim storage location, the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This analysis looked at fuel retrieval, conditioning of the fuel, and transportation of the fuel. This plan describes the staffing structure for fuel processing, fuel movement, and the maintenance and operation (M ampersand O) staffing requirements of the facilities. This initial draft does not identify the support function resources required for M ampersand O, i.e., administrative and engineering (technical support). These will be included in future revisions to the plan. This plan looks at the resource requirements for the SNF subprojects, specifically, the operations of the facilities, balances resources where applicable, rotates crews where applicable, and attempts to use individuals in multi-task assignments. This plan does not apply to the construction phase of planned projects that affect staffing levels of K Basins

  13. Tevatron operational experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, B.L.; Theilacker, J.C.

    1989-02-01

    Fermilabs superconducting accelerator, the Tevatron has been operational for nearly six years. The history of its operation is presented. Several long shutdowns for superconducting dipole repairs are discussed. The dominant factor influencing the repair was conductor motion which fatigued the cable in the magnet ends. Borescoping and x-raying techniques were used to determine which magnet ends required repair. Detailed downtime logs were kept for each of the running periods. A discussion of the sources of downtime and a comparison for different operating modes is presented

  14. Storage experience in Hungary with fuel from research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, J.; Hargitai, T.

    1996-01-01

    In Hungary several critical assemblies, a training reactor and a research reactor have been in operation. The fuel used in the research and training reactors are of Soviet origin. Though spent fuel storage experience is fairly good, medium and long term storage solutions are needed. (author)

  15. Operating a locomotive on liquid methane fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolz, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that several years ago, Burlington Northern Railroad looked into the feasibility of operating a diesel railroad locomotive to also run on compressed natural gas in a dual-fuel mode. Recognizing the large volume of on-board storage required and other limitations of CNG in the application, a program was begun to fuel a locomotive with liquefied natural gas. Because natural gas composition can vary with source and processing, it was considered desirable to use essentially pure liquid methane as the engine fuel. Initial testing results show the locomotive system achieved full diesel-rated power when operating on liquid methane and with equivalent fuel efficiency. Extended testing, including an American Association of Railroad 500-hour durability test, was undertaken to obtain information on engine life, wear rate and lubrication oil life

  16. Operating experience feedback in TVO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piirto, A [Teollisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    TVO is a power company operating with two 710 MW BWR units at Olkiluoto. For operating experience feedback TVO has not established a separate organizational unit but rather relies on a group of persons representing various technical disciplines. The ``Operating Experience Group`` meets at about three-week intervals to handle the reports of events (in plant and external) which have been selected for handling by an engineer responsible for experience feedback. 7 charts.

  17. TRIGA reactor operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.

    1970-01-01

    The Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been in operation 3 years. Last August it was upgraded from 250 kW to 1000 kW. This was accomplished with little difficulty. During the 3 years of operation no major problems have been experienced. Most of the problems have been minor in nature and easily corrected. They came from lazy susan (dry bearing), Westronics Recorder (dead spots in the range), The Reg Rod Magnet Lead-in Circuit (a new type lead-in wire that does not require the lead-in cord to coil during rod withdrawal hss been delivered, much better than the original) and other small corrections

  18. EBR-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.F.

    1978-07-01

    Operation of the EBR-2 reactor is presented concerning the performance of the heat removal system; reactor materials; fuel handling system; sodium purification and sampling system; cover-gas purification; plant diagnostics and instrumentation; recent improvements in identifying fission product sources in EBR-2; and EBR-2 safety

  19. Trends in Operational Fuel Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    prices , to around $140 per bbl, that had the Chief of Naval Operations worried about whether the Navy could afford sufficient steaming days and flying...kt full power rate), and with rates less than 7 bbl/hour (7 is the burn rate of the Allison501-K34 generator at 2000 kw – a basic hotel load) [5...modeling, and simulation—to help develop, evaluate, and implement policies, practices, and programs that make people, budgets , and assets more

  20. Operation of spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the IAEA's programme on safety of spent fuel storage. This is for interim spent fuel storage facilities that are not integral part of an operating nuclear power plant. Following the introduction, Section 2 describes key activities in the operation of spent fuel storage facilities. Section 3 lists the basic safety considerations for storage facility operation, the fundamental safety objectives being subcriticality, heat removal and radiation protection. Recommendations for organizing the management of a facility are contained in Section 4. Section 5 deals with aspects of training and qualification; Section 6 describes the phases of the commissioning of a spent fuel storage facility. Section 7 describes operational limits and conditions, while Section 8 deals with operating procedures and instructions. Section 9 deals with maintenance, testing, examination and inspection. Section 10 presents recommendations for radiation and environmental protection. Recommendations for the quality assurance (QA) system are presented in Section 11. Section 12 describes the aspects of safeguards and physical protection to be taken into account during operations; Section 13 gives guidance for decommissioning. 15 refs, 5 tabs

  1. Novel materials for fuel cells operating on liquid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. C. Sequeira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Towards commercialization of fuel cell products in the coming years, the fuel cell systems are being redefined by means of lowering costs of basic elements, such as electrolytes and membranes, electrode and catalyst materials, as well as of increasing power density and long-term stability. Among different kinds of fuel cells, low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are of major importance, but their problems related to hydrogen storage and distribution are forcing the development of liquid fuels such as methanol, ethanol, sodium borohydride and ammonia. In respect to hydrogen, methanol is cheaper, easier to handle, transport and store, and has a high theoretical energy density. The second most studied liquid fuel is ethanol, but it is necessary to note that the highest theoretically energy conversion efficiency should be reached in a cell operating on sodium borohydride alkaline solution. It is clear that proper solutions need to be developed, by using novel catalysts, namely nanostructured single phase and composite materials, oxidant enrichment technologies and catalytic activity increasing. In this paper these main directions will be considered.

  2. HANARO operation experience in the year 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Soo-Youl; Kim, Heonil; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2006-01-01

    The experiences of the HANARO operation and maintenance in the year 2004 are presented in this article. The operation of HANARO, a 30 MW research reactor operated by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), aims at a safe and effective operation to enhance its utilization in various fields of scientific research and industry. Regardless of its importance of the routine operation, this article is devoted to rather unusual matters such as irregular maintenance events and incidents. Since the first criticality in 1995, it has been a long-cherished task to reach the designed power level of 30 MW from the temporarily approved 24 MW. By resolving the concern on the fuel integrity, the designed level could be licensed and, eventually, it was achieved last November. On the other hand, after its 9 years of operation, the mechanical integrity of the heavy water reflector tank was checked. The measurement of the vertical straightness of the tank inner shell indicated its integrity. Meanwhile, the HANARO fuel production facility was completed at the KAERI site, and it will begin to supply centrifugally atomized fuels, instead of conventional comminuted fuels, to HANARO shortly. There were several incidents in 2004, which have all been cleared, including a leak of heavy water, melting of a sample in an irradiation hole for the neutron activation analysis, and a condensation problem in a horizontal beam tube. The progress of and lessons from each incident are presented. The utilization of HANARO is expanding every year and the trend will also continue in 2005. The operation mode has been changed from an 18-day continuous operation and 10-day shutdown (18-10 mode) to the 23-12 mode since the end of 2004, and a further extension is planned to the 30-12 mode. Thanks to this extended operation term, an increased power level and, most importantly, a reliable operation, the HANARO is gaining more and more credit from the end users. (author)

  3. Regulatory experience with fuel failures in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the main ENSI activities like: supervision of reactor and radiation safety and security; supervision of safety of transports of nuclear materials and assess the safety of proposed solutions for the geological disposal are listed. Recent events concerning the reactor core, common causes for fuel failures, findings during inspections and potential root cause for fuel failures are discussed. Management of fuel failures, started from reporting of the event – evaluation of the need of imminent action; identification of the fuel element if possible till evaluation by the plant and fuel vendor and allowance by ENSI for repair of the fuel element and definition of measures (short and long term) are also presented. The following Conclusions by ENSI about status of fuel failures are made: 1) Number of fuel failures was reduced regardless more economic operation in all plants; 2) Old PWR and BWR reactors achieved 15 to 29 years operation without leakers, but two minor fuel damage during fuel handling appeared; 3) Newer plants are not better in achieving operation without leakers than older plants; 4) Technical improvements at fuel elements parallel to changes in operation strategy and improvements in manufacturing quality but single effects difficult to judge. The issues about how to implement “Zero Failure Rates” in regulations and how to achieve “Zero Failure Rates” as well as some future measures by ENSI are discussed

  4. Framatome experience in fuel assembly repair and reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, G.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1985, FRAMATOME has build up extensive experience in the poolside replacement of fuel rods for repair or R and D purposes and the reconstitution of fuel assemblies (i.e. replacement of a damaged structure to enable reuse of the fuel rod bundle). This experience feedback enables FRAMATOME to improve in steps the technical process and the equipment used for the above operations in order to enhance their performance in terms of setup, flexibility, operating time and safety. In parallel, the fuel assembly and fuel rod designs have been modified to meet the same goals. The paper will describe: - the overall experience of FRAMATOME with UO 2 fuel as well as MOX fuel; the usual technical process used for fuel replacement and the corresponding equipment set; - the usual technical process for fuel assembly reconstitution and the corresponding equipment set. This process is rather unique since it takes profit of the specific FRAMATOME fuel assembly design with removable top and bottom nozzles, so that fuel rods insertion by pulling through in the new structure is similar to what is done in the manufacturing plant; - the usual inspections done on the fuel rods and/or the fuel assembly; - the design of the new reconstitution equipment (STAR) compared with the previous one as well as their comparative performance. The final section will be a description of the alternative reconstitution process and equipment used by FRAMATOME in reactors in which the process cannot be used for several reasons such as compatibility or administrative authorization. This process involves the pushing of fuel rods into the new structure, requiring further precautions. (author)

  5. Operating Experience at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavsek, D.; Bach, B.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic analysis of operational experience by assessment of internal and industry events and the feedback of lessons learned is one of the essential activities in the improvement of the operational safety and reliability of the nuclear power plant. At NPP Krsko we have developed a document called ''Operating Experience Assessment Program''. Its purpose is to establish administrative guidance for the processing of operating events including on-site and industry events. Assessment of internal events is based on the following methods: Event and Causal Factor Charting, Change Analysis, Barrier Analysis, MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree Analysis) and Human Performance Evaluation. The operating experience group has developed a sophisticated program entitled ''Operating experience tracking system'' (OETS) in response to the need for a more efficient way of processing internal and industry operating experience information. The Operating Experience Tracking System is used to initiate and track operational events including recommended actions follow up. Six screens of the system contain diverse essential information which allows tracking of operational events and enables different kinds of browsing. OETS is a part of the NPP Krsko nuclear network system and can be easily accessed by all plant personnel. (author)

  6. Fission gas release in LWR fuel measured during nuclear operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Skattum, E.; Osetek, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A series of fuel behavior experiments are being conducted in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Halden, Norway, to measure the release of Xe, Kr, and I fission products from typical light water reactor design fuel pellets. Helium gas is used to sweep the Xe and Kr fission gases out of two of the Instrumented Fuel Assembly 430 fuel rods and to a gamma spectrometer. The measurements of Xe and Kr are made during nuclear operation at steady state power, and for 135 I following reactor scram. The first experiments were conducted at a burnup of 3000 MWd/t UO 2 , at bulk average fuel temperatures of approx. 850 K and approx. 23 kW/m rod power. The measured release-to-birth ratios (R/B) of Xe and Kr are of the same magnitude as those observed in small UO 2 specimen experiments, when normalized to the estimated fuel surface-to-volume ratio. Preliminary analysis indicates that the release-to-birth ratios can be calculated, using diffusion coefficients determined from small specimen data, to within a factor of approx. 2 for the IFA-430 fuel. The release rate of 135 I is shown to be approximately equal to that of 135 Xe

  7. Fuel failure detection in operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigel, B.; Hagen, H.H.

    1977-12-01

    Activity detectors in commercial BWRs and PWRs are examined to determine their capability to detect a small number of fuel rod failures during reactor operation. The off-gas system radiation monitor in a BWR and the letdown line radiation monitor in a PWR are calculated to have this capability, and events are cited that support this analysis. Other common detectors are found to be insensitive to small numbers of fuel failures. While adequate detectors exist for normal and transient operation, those detectors would not perform rapidly enough to be useful during accidents; in most accidents, however, primary system sensors (pressure, temperature, level) would provide adequate warning. Advanced methods of fuel failure detection are mentioned

  8. 14 CFR 27.961 - Fuel system hot weather operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.961 Fuel system hot weather operation. Each suction lift fuel system and other fuel systems with features conducive to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system hot weather operation. 27.961...

  9. 14 CFR 29.961 - Fuel system hot weather operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.961 Fuel system hot weather operation. Each suction lift fuel system and other fuel systems conducive to vapor... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system hot weather operation. 29.961...

  10. Analysis of recent fuel-disruption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.M.; Kraft, T.E.; DiMelfi, R.J.; Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent USDOE-sponsored DEH, FGR, and TREAT F series fuel-disruption experiments are analyzed with existing analytical models. The experiments are interpreted and the results used to evaluate the models. Calculations are presented using the FRAS3 fission-gas-behavior code and the DiMelfi-Deitrich fuel-response model

  11. An analysis of recent fuel disruption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.M.; Kraft, T.E.; Dimelfi, R.J.; Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent USDOE-Sponsored DEH, FGR, and TREAT F series fuel disruption experiments are analyzed with existing analytical models. The experiments are interpreted and the results used to evaluate the models. Calculations are presented using the FRAS3 fission gas behavior code and the DiMelfi-Deitrich fuel response model

  12. Injection of zinc in plants of ANAV. Impact on fuel and operation experience; Inyeccion de cinc en las plantas de ANAV. Impacto sobre el combustible y experiencia de operacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doncell, N.; Gago, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Zinc injection performed in the three ANAV (Asociacion Nuclear Asco-Vandellos) plants is part of an overall primary water chemistry program, material management and dose reduction program. The application of zinc shown significant benefits in radiation field reduction as well as in mitigation of PWSCC initiation. Although zinc injection also reduces general corrosion rates and consequently reduces corrosion product transport to the fuel, and evaluation of the risks with respect to fuel performance should be done. ANAV and ENUSA, following industry recommendations, have coordinated the task related to the viability of the program in Asco and Vandellos including monitoring, inspections and control parameters. finally, this article includes a comprehensive review of operating experience and an assessment of fuel performance effects. (Author)

  13. 14 CFR 25.961 - Fuel system hot weather operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.961 Fuel system hot weather operation. (a) The fuel system must perform satisfactorily in hot weather operation. This... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system hot weather operation. 25.961...

  14. Environmental impact of nuclear fuel cycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, W.L.

    1989-09-01

    This paper considers the environmental impact of nuclear fuel cycle operations, particularly those operated by British Nuclear Fuels plc, which include uranium conversion, fuel fabrication, uranium enrichment, irradiated fuel transport and storage, reprocessing, uranium recycle and waste treatment and disposal. Quantitative assessments have been made of the impact of the liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment from all stages in the fuel cycle. An upper limit to the possible health effects is readily obtained using the codified recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. This contrasts with the lack of knowledge concerning the health effects of many other pollutants, including those resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. Most of the liquid and gaseous discharges result at the reprocessing stage and although their impact on the environment and on human health is small, they have given rise to much public concern. Reductions in discharges at Sellafield over the last few years have been quite dramatic, which shows what can be done provided the necessary very large investment is undertaken. The cost-effectiveness of this investment must be considered. Some of it has gone beyond the point of justification in terms of health benefit, having been undertaken in response to public and political pressure, some of it on an international scale. The potential for significant off-site impact from accidents in the fuel cycle has been quantitatively assessed and shown to be very limited. Waste disposal will also have an insignificant impact in terms of risk. It is also shown that it is insignificant in relation to terrestrial radioactivity and therefore in relation to the human environment. 14 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Evaluation of design and operation of fuel handling systems for 25 MW biomass fueled CFB power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, D.

    1991-01-01

    Two circulating fluidized bed, biomass fueled, 25MW power plants were placed into operation by Thermo Electron Energy Systems in California during late 1989. This paper discusses the initial fuel and system considerations, system design, actual operating fuel characterisitics, system operation during the first year and modifications. Biomass fuels handled by the system include urban/manufacturing wood wastes and agricultural wastes in the form of orchard prunings, vineyard prunings, pits, shells, rice hulls and straws. Equipment utilized in the fuel handling system are described and costs are evaluated. Lessons learned from the design and operational experience are offered for consideration on future biomass fueled installations where definition of fuel quality and type is subject to change

  16. Design of experiments for test of fuel element reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmert, J.; Juettner, C.; Linek, J.

    1989-01-01

    Changes of fuel element design and modifications of the operational conditions have to be tested in experiments and pilot projects for nuclear safety. Experimental design is an useful statistical method minimizing costs and risks for this procedure. The main problem of our work was to investigate the connection between failure rate of fuel elements, sample size, confidence interval, and error probability. Using the statistic model of the binomial distribution appropriate relations were derived and discussed. A stepwise procedure based on a modified sequential analysis according to Wald was developed as a strategy of introduction for modifications of the fuel element design and of the operational conditions. (author)

  17. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.; Ohta, M.M.; Simmons, G.R.; Whitaker, S.H.

    1997-12-01

    The siting, design, construction, operation, decommissioning, and closure of a geological facility for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste is a complex undertaking that will span many decades. Both technical and social issues must be taken into account simultaneously and many factors must be considered. Based on studies carried out in Canada and elsewhere, it appears that these factors can be accommodated and that geological disposal is both technically and socially feasible. But throughout the different stages of implementing disposal, technical and social issues will continue to arise and these will have to be dealt with successfully if progress is to continue. This paper discusses these issues and a proposed approach for dealing with them. (author)

  18. Fuel irradiation experience at Halden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitanza, Carlo

    1996-01-01

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project is an international organisation devoted to improved safety and reliability of nuclear power station through an user-oriented experimental programme. A significant part of this programme consists of studies addressing fuel performance issues in a range of conditions realised in specialised irradiation. The key element of the irradiation carried out in the Halden reactor is the ability to monitor fuel performance parameters by means of in-pile instrumentation. The paper reviews some of the irradiation rigs and the related instrumentation and provides examples of experimental results on selected fuel performance items. In particular, current irradiation conducted on high/very high burn-up fuels are reviewed in some detail

  19. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.A.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1984-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations for the workers and the public

  20. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, R.W.; Woodhead, L.W.; Horton, E.P.; Nichols, M.J.; Daly, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on worker and public safety, operating performance and costs, and reliability of system components

  1. MOX fuel development: Experience in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchi, D.E.; Adelfang, P.; Menghini, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1973, when a laboratory conceived for the safe manipulation of a few hundred grams of plutonium was built, the CNEA (Argentinean Atomic Energy Commission) has been involved in the small-scale development of MOX fuel technology. The plutonium laboratory consists in a glove box facility (α Facility) featuring the necessary equipment to prepare MOX fuel rods for experimental irradiations and to carry out studies on preparative processes development and chemical and physical characterization. The irradiation of the first prototypes of (U,Pu)O 2 fuels fabricated in Argentina began in 1986. These experiments were carried out in the HFR (High Flux Reactor)- Petten , Holland. The rods were prepared and controlled in the CNEA's a Facility. The post-irradiation examinations (PIE) were performed in the KFK (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe), Germany and the JRC (Joint Research Center), Petten. In the period 1991-1995, the development of new laboratory methods of co-conversion of uranium and plutonium were carried out: reverse strike co-precipitation of ADU-Pu(OH) 4 and direct denitration using microwaves. The reverse strike process produced pellets with a high sintered density, excellent micro-homogeneity and good solubility in nitric acid. Liquid wastes showed a very low content of actinides and the process is easy to operate in a glove box environment. The microwave direct denitration was optimized with uranium alone and the conditions to obtain high density pellets, with a good microstructure, without using a milling step, have been developed. At present, new experiments are being carried out to improve the reverse strike co-precipitation process and direct microwave denitration. A new glove box is being installed at the plutonium laboratory, this glove box has process equipment designed to recover scrap from previous fabrication campaigns, and to co-convert mixed U-Pu solutions by direct microwave denitration. (author)

  2. Nuclear spent fuel management. Experience and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely for long periods at relatively low cost, but some form of permanent disposal will eventually be necessary. This report examines the options for spent fuel management, explores the future prospects for each stage of the back-end of the fuel cycle and provides a thorough review of past experience and the technical status of the alternatives. Current policies and practices in twelve OECD countries are surveyed

  3. Critical experiments with mixed oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper very briefly outlines technical considerations in performing critical experiments on weapons-grade plutonium mixed oxide fuel assemblies. The experiments proposed would use weapons-grade plutonium and Er 2 O 3 at various dissolved boron levels, and for specific fuel assemblies such as the ABBCE fuel assembly with five large water holes. Technical considerations described include the core, the measurements, safety, security, radiological matters, and licensing. It is concluded that the experiments are feasible at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Reactor Critical Facility. 9 refs

  4. West Valley facility spent fuel handling, storage, and shipping experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-11-01

    The result of a study on handling and shipping experience with spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The purpose of the study was to document the experience with handling and shipping of relatively old light-water reactor (LWR) fuel that has been in pool storage at the West Valley facility, which is at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center at West Valley, New York and operated by DOE. A subject of particular interest in the study was the behavior of corrosion product deposits (i.e., crud) deposits on spent LWR fuel after long-term pool storage; some evidence of crud loosening has been observed with fuel that was stored for extended periods at the West Valley facility and at other sites. Conclusions associated with the experience to date with old spent fuel that has been stored at the West Valley facility are presented. The conclusions are drawn from these subject areas: a general overview of the West Valley experience, handling of spent fuel, storing of spent fuel, rod consolidation, shipping of spent fuel, crud loosening, and visual inspection. A list of recommendations is provided. 61 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  5. 14 CFR 23.961 - Fuel system hot weather operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system hot weather operation. 23.961... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.961 Fuel system hot weather operation. Each fuel system must be free from vapor lock...

  6. Spent fuel storage and transportation - ANSTO experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has operated the 10 MW DIDO class High Flux Materials Test Reactor (HIFAR) since 1958. Refuelling the reactor produces about 38 spent fuel elements each year. Australia has no power reactors and only one operating research reactor so that a reprocessing plant in Australia is not an economic proposition. The HEU fuel for HIFAR is manufactured at Dounreay using UK or US origin enriched uranium. Spent fuel was originally sent to Dounreay, UK for reprocessing but this plant was shutdown in 1998. ANSTO participates in the US Foreign Research Reactor Spent Fuel Return program and also has a contract with COGEMA for the reprocessing of non-US origin fuel

  7. Experience in WWER fuel assemblies vibration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovtcharov, O.; Pavelko, V.; Usanov, A.; Arkadov, G.; Dolgov, A.; Molchanov, V.

    2003-01-01

    It is stated that the vibration studies of internals and the fuel assemblies should be conducted during the reactor designing, commissioning and commercial operation stages and the analysis methods being used should complement each other. The present paper describes the methods and main results of the vibration noise studies of internals and the fuel assemblies of the operating NPPs with WWER reactors, as an example of the implementation of the comprehensive approach to the analysis on equipment flow-induced vibration. At that, the characteristics of internals and fuel assemblies vibration loading were dealt jointly as they are elements of the same compound oscillating system and their vibrations have the interrelated nature

  8. Operator aid system for Dhruva fueling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, S.M.; Ramaswamy, L.R.; Gohel, N.; Bharadwaj, G.; Ranade, M.R.; Khadilkar, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Systems with significant software contents are replacing the old hardware logic systems. These systems not only are versatile but are easy to make changes in the program. Extensive use of such systems in critical real-time operation environment warrants not only excessive training on simulators, documentation but also fault tolerant system to bring the operation to a safe state in case of error. With new graphic user software interface and advancement in personal computer hardware design, the dynamic status of the physical environment can be shown on the visual display at near real time. These visual aids along with the software covering all the interlocks aids an operator in his professional work. This paper highlights the operator aid system for Dhruva fueling machine. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig

  9. Thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Akbari, F.; Thompson, D.M.; Thurgood, C.; Higgs, J.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical treatment has been developed to predict the fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective nuclear fuel elements. The equilibrium stoichiometry deviation in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel has been derived from thermodynamic considerations using a self-consistent set of thermodynamic properties for the U-O system, which emphasizes replication of solubilities and three-phase invariant conditions displayed in the U-O binary phase diagram. The kinetics model accounts for multi-phase transport including interstitial oxygen diffusion in the solid and gas-phase transport of hydrogen and steam in the fuel cracks. The fuel oxidation model is further coupled to a heat conduction model to account for the feedback effect of a reduced thermal conductivity in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel. A numerical solution has been developed using a finite-element technique with the FEMLAB software package. The model has been compared to available data from several in-reactor X-2 loop experiments with defective fuel conducted at the Chalk River Laboratories. The model has also been benchmarked against an O/U profile measurement for a spent defective fuel element discharged from a commercial reactor

  10. Design and operational behaviour of the SNR-reactor fuel element structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, W.; Toebbe, H.

    1985-01-01

    The fuel element and core concept of a fast breeder reactor is described by the example of the SNR 300 (1st core), and the requirements made on the fuel elements with respect to burnup and neutron dose are listed for existing and projected plants. Irradiation experiments carried out and operational experience gained with fuel elements show that the residence time of the fuel elements is influenced mainly by the stability of shape of the fuel element components. The requirements made with reference to neutron loading for future advanced high-performance fuel elements can not be anticipated from the present state of experience. Besides optimization of fuel element design and checking-out of the limits of operation by PFADFINDERELEMENTE elements, R and D work for the improvement of fuel element materials is also necessary. (orig.) [de

  11. International experience in conditioning spent fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, P.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to compile and present in a clear form international experience (USA, Canada, Sweden, FRG, UK, Japan, Switzerland) gained to date in conditioning spent fuel elements. The term conditioning is here taken to mean the handling and packaging of spent fuel elements for short- or long-term storage or final disposal. Plants of a varying nature fall within this scope, both in terms of the type of fuel element treated and the plant purpose eg. experimental or production plant. Emphasis is given to plants which bear some similarity to the concept developed in Germany for direct disposal of spent fuel elements. Worldwide, however, relatively few conditioning plants are in existence or have been conceived. Hence additional plants have been included where aspects of the experience gained are also of relevance eg. plants developed for the consolidation of spent fuel elements. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Experiences of an operating association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zefferer, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Austrian Draukraftwerke operate a coal power station with a capacity 110 MW el at St. Andraein Kaernten. In 1989, the first stage of a scheme for supplying the town St. Andraewith long-distance energy was started from this power station. To provide for the intermittent downtimes between the plant's operating times, which total an annual 2000 hours, a substitute aggregate was designed consisting of two biomass (chiefly bark)-fueled grate-firing boilers (4 MW th and 2.5 MW th ). The problems that arose during the first years in the areas of biomass storage, conveyor systems, slagging, emission values, and ash removal have meanwhile been solved satisfactorily. Moreover, the Draukraftwerke intend to use biomass for electricity generation in their coal power stations. (orig.) [de

  13. Transit experience with hydrogen fueled hybrid electric buses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P.B.; Mazaika, D.M.; Levin, J.; Edwards, T.

    2006-01-01

    Both AC Transit and SunLine Transit operate hybrid electric hydrogen fueled buses in their transit service. ACT presently operates three fuel cell buses in daily revenue service, and SunLine operates a fuel cell bus and a HHICE (Hybrid Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine) bus. All these buses use similar electric drive train and electric accessories, although the detailed design differs notably between the fuel cell and the hybrid ICE buses. The fuel cell buses use a 120kW UTC fuel cell and a Van Hool Chassis, whereas the HHICE bus uses a turbocharged Ford engine which is capable of 140kW generator output in a New Flyer Chassis. The HHICE bus was the first in service, and has been subjected to both winter testing in Manitoba, Canada and summer testing in the Palm Springs, CA region. The winter testing included passenger sampling using questionnaires to ascertain passenger response. The fuel cell buses were introduced to service at the start of 2006. All five buses are in daily revenue service use. The paper will describe the buses and the experience of the transit properties in operating the buses. (author)

  14. Recent fuel handling experience in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, good operation of the fuel handling system at Ontario Hydro's nuclear stations has been taken for granted with the unavailability of the station arising from fuel handling system-related problems usually contributing less than one percent of the total unavailability of the stations. While the situation at the newer Hydro stations continues generally to be good (with the specific exception of some units at Pickering B) some specific and some general problems have caused significant loss of availability at the older plants (Pickering A and Bruce A). Generally the experience at the 600 MWe units in Canada has also continued to be good with Point Lepreau leading the world in availability. As a result of working to correct identified deficiencies, there were some changes for the better as some items of equipment that were a chronic source of trouble were replaced with improved components. In addition, the fuel handling system has been used three times as a delivery system for large-scale non destructive examination of the pressure tubes, twice at Bruce and once at Pickering and performing these inspections this way has saved many days of reactor downtime. Under COG there are several programs to develop improved versions of some of the main assemblies of the fuelling machine head. This paper will generally cover the events relating to Pickering in more detail but will describe the problems with the Bruce Fuelling Machine Bridges since the 600 MW 1P stations have a bridge drive arrangement that is somewhat similar to Bruce

  15. Operating practical experience at Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quihillalt, Oscar

    1997-01-01

    Operating experiences of Atucha-1 and Embalse Nuclear Power Plants were discussed in this work. The technical and economic aspects, such as reliability, availability, personnel training, operating costs, prices and market, which exercise influence upon Argentina nuclear energy policy, mainly on the power electric generation by nuclear power plants were considered. Finally the current status of the nucleoelectric sector in Argentina and forecasting were analysed

  16. 46 CFR 108.487 - Helicopter deck fueling operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Helicopter deck fueling operations. 108.487 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fire Protection for Helicopter Facilities § 108.487 Helicopter deck fueling operations. (a) Each helicopter landing deck on which fueling operations are...

  17. Operational method for demonstrating fuel loading integrity in a reactor having accessible 235U fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.R.

    1979-07-01

    The Health Physics Research Reactor is a small pulse reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is desirable for the operator to be able to demonstrate on a routine basis that all the fuel pieces are present in the reactor core. Accordingly, a technique has been devised wherein the control rod readings are recorded with the reactor at delayed critical and corrections are made to compensate for the effects of variations in reactor height above the floor, reactor power, core temperature, and the presence of any massive neutron reflectors. The operator then compares these readings with the values expected based on previous operating experience. If this routine operational check suggests that the core fuel loading might be deficient, a more rigorous follow-up may be made

  18. Comparing PRAs with operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.; Martz, H.F.

    1998-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment is widely used to estimate the frequencies of rare events, such as nuclear power plant accidents. An obvious question concerns the extent to which PRAs conform to operating experience--that is, do PRAs agree with reality? The authors discuss a formal methodology to address this issue and examine its performance using plant-specific data

  19. Evaluation of LWR fuel rod behavior under operational transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Hiramoto, K.; Maru, A.

    1984-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of fission gas flow and diffusion in the fuel-cladding gap on fuel rod thermal and mechanical behaviors in light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods under operational transient conditions, computer sub-programs which can calculate the gas flow and diffusion have been developed and integrated into the LWR fuel rod performance code BEAF. This integrated code also calculates transient temperature distribution in the fuel-pellet and cladding. The integrated code was applied to an analysis of Inter Ramp Project data, which showed that by taking into account the gas flow and diffusion effects, the calculated cladding damage indices predicted for the failed rods in the ramp test were consistent with iodine-SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) failure conditions which were obtained from out-of-reactor pressurized tube experiments with irradiated Zircaloy claddings. This consistency was not seen if the gas flow and diffusion effects were neglected. Evaluation were also made for the BWR 8x8 RJ fuel rod temperatures under power ramp conditions. (orig.)

  20. Emergency planning and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, O.; Breniere, J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive lessons from operating experience for the planning of emergency measures. This operating experience has two facets: it is obtained not only from the various incidents and accidents which have occurred in countries with nuclear power programmes and from the resulting application of emergency plans but also from the different exercises and simulations carried out in France and in other countries. Experience generally confirms the main approaches selected for emergency plans. The lessons to be derived are of three types: first, it appears necessary to set forth precisely the responsibilities of each person involved in order to prevent a watering-down of decisions in the event of an accident; secondly, considerable improvements need to be made in the different communication networks to be used; and thirdly, small accidents with minor radiological consequences deserve as systematic and thorough an approach as large and more improbable accidents. (author)

  1. MELOX fuel fabrication plant: Operational feedback and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugelmann, D.; Greneche, D.

    2000-01-01

    As of December 1, 1998, 32 Europeans LWRs are loaded with MOX fuel. It clearly means that plutonium recycling in MOX fuels is a mature industry, with successful operational experience in fabrication plants in some European countries, especially in France. Indeed, the recycling of plutonium generated in LWRs is one of the objectives of the full Reprocessing-Conditioning-Recycling (RCR) strategy chosen by France in the 70's. The most impressive results of this strategy, is the fact that 31 of the 32 reactors are loaded with MOX fuels supplied by the COGEMA Group from the same efficient fabrication process, the MIMAS process, improved for the MELOX plant to become the A-MIMAS process. In France, 17 reactors are already loaded and 11 additional reactors are technically suited to do so. Indeed, the EDF MOX program plans to use MOX in 28 of its 57 reactors. An EDF 900 MWe reactor core contains 157 assemblies of 264 rods each. 52 fuel assemblies per year are necessary for a 'UO 2 3-batches-MOX 3-batches' core management. In this case, a third of the UO 2 and a third of the MOX assemblies are replaced yearly, that means 36 UO 2 fuel assemblies and 16 MOX fuel assemblies. Some MOX fuelled reactors have now switched from the previously described core management to a so-called 'hybrid core management'. In this case, a quarter of UO 2 assemblies is replaced yearly. The first EDF reactor loaded with MOX fuel was Saint-Laurent B1, in 1987. The in-core experience, based on several hundred assemblies loaded, with reloading on a 1/3 cycle basis, shows that there is no operational difference between UO 2 and MOX fuels, both in terms of performance and safety. MOX fueling of 900 MWe EDF's PWRs, with a limited in-core MOX ratio of 30%, has needed only minor adaptations, such as addition of control rods, modification of the boron concentration in the cooling system and precaution against radiation exposure, easy to set up (optimisation of the fresh MOX fuel handling process, remote

  2. Commentary on spent fuel storage at Morris operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eger, K.J.; Zima, G.E.

    1979-10-01

    The General Electric Company is providing technical support to Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in the analysis of the design, operation, and maintenance experience in the handling of nuclear fuel at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Facility. The purpose of this report is to provide a description of spent fuel handling activities and systems, and an analysis of the storage performance as developed over the seven year operational history of the Morris Operation. Design considerations and performance are analyzed for both the basin and key supporting systems. The bases for this analysis are the provisions for containing radioactive by-product materials, for shielding from the radiation they emit, and for preventing the formation of a critical array. These provisions have been met effectively over the history of storage at Morris. The release of radioactive materials is minimized by the protection of the cladding integrity, the containment of the basin water, the removal of radioactive and other contaminants from the water, and by filtering and then dispersing the basin air. Four auxiliary systems are provided to accomplish this, the basin leak detection system, the filter, the coolers, and the building ventilation system. This successful history notwithstanding, action to reduce personnel exposure, to improve fuel handling reliability and to lessen the potential for accidents continues to be taken

  3. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: October - December 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation; Tobin, J. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1960-01-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  4. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: January - March 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J. J. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation; Tobin, J. C. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1958-04-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  5. Quarterly Progress Report Fuels Development Operation: July - September 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S. H. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Physical Metallurgy; Minor, J. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuel Element Design; Evans, E. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Ceramic Fuels Development; Wallace, W. P. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States). Fuels Development Operation. Fuels Fabrication Development

    1957-10-15

    The present Quarterly Report is the continuation of a series issued by the new Fuels Development operation. Reports in this series combine portions of the quarterly reports by the former Metallurgy Research and Fuel Technology Sub-Sections. Work reported includes research conducted by the Physical Metallurgy Operation, and research and development conducted by Fuel Design, Fuels Fabrication Development and Ceramic Fuels Development Operations. Studies formerly reported by the Radiometallurgy, Metallography, and Welding and Corrosion Units, in addition to portions of the Fuels Technology work, are reported elsewhere.

  6. Experience with unconventional gas turbine fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, D K [ABB Power Generation Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    Low grade fuels such as Blast Furnace Gas, biomass, residual oil, coke, and coal - if used in conjunction with appropriate combustion, gasification, and clean-up processes and in combination with a gas turbine combined cycle -offer attractive and environmentally sound power generation. Recently, the Bao Shan Iron and Steel Company in Shanghai placed an order with Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Japan, to supply a combined-cycle power plant. The plant is to employ ABB`s GT 11N2 with a combustor modified to burn blast furnace gas. Recent tests in Shanghai and at Kawasaki Steel, Japan, have confirmed the burner design. The same basic combustor concept can also be used for the low BTU gas derived from airblown gasification processes. ABB is also participating in the API project: A refinery-residual gasification combined-cycle plant in Italy. The GT 13E2 gas turbine employees MBTU EV burners that have been successfully tested under full operating conditions. These burners can also handle the MBTU gas produced in oxygenblown coal gasification processes. ABB`s vast experience in burning blast furnace gas (21 plants built during the 1950s and 1960s), residuals, crude, and coal in various gas turbine applications is an important asset for building such power plants. This presentation discusses some of the experience gained in such plants. (orig.) 6 refs.

  7. Experience with unconventional gas turbine fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, D.K. [ABB Power Generation Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    Low grade fuels such as Blast Furnace Gas, biomass, residual oil, coke, and coal - if used in conjunction with appropriate combustion, gasification, and clean-up processes and in combination with a gas turbine combined cycle -offer attractive and environmentally sound power generation. Recently, the Bao Shan Iron and Steel Company in Shanghai placed an order with Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Japan, to supply a combined-cycle power plant. The plant is to employ ABB`s GT 11N2 with a combustor modified to burn blast furnace gas. Recent tests in Shanghai and at Kawasaki Steel, Japan, have confirmed the burner design. The same basic combustor concept can also be used for the low BTU gas derived from airblown gasification processes. ABB is also participating in the API project: A refinery-residual gasification combined-cycle plant in Italy. The GT 13E2 gas turbine employees MBTU EV burners that have been successfully tested under full operating conditions. These burners can also handle the MBTU gas produced in oxygenblown coal gasification processes. ABB`s vast experience in burning blast furnace gas (21 plants built during the 1950s and 1960s), residuals, crude, and coal in various gas turbine applications is an important asset for building such power plants. This presentation discusses some of the experience gained in such plants. (orig.) 6 refs.

  8. CERCA'S experience in UMO fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarousse, Ch.; Lavastre, Y.; Grasse, M.

    2003-01-01

    Considered as a suitable solution for non-proliferation and reprocessing purposes, UMo fuel has been chosen and studied by the RERTR program since 1996. Involved in the RERTR fuel developments since 1978, with more than 20 years of U 3 SI 2 fuel production, and closely linked to the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CERCA was able to define properly, from the beginning, the right R and D actions plan for UMo fuel development. CERCA has already demonstrated during the last 4 years its ability to manufacture plates and fuel elements with high density UMo fuel. UMo full size plates produced for 4 irradiation experiments in 3 European reactors afforded us a unique experience. In addition, as a main part of our R and D effort, we have always studied in depth a key part of the CERCA process outline which is the plate rolling stage. After some preliminary investigation in order to define the phenomenological model describing the behavior of the fuel core when rolling, we have developed a rolling digital simulator. (author)

  9. Cracking and relocation of UO2 fuel during nuclear operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Dagbjartsson, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cracking and relocation of light water reactor (LWR) fuel pellets affect the axial gas flow path within nuclear reactor fuel rods and the thermal performance of the fuel. As part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Water Reactor Safety Research Fuel Behavior Program, the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc., is conducting fuel rod behavior studies in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Halden, Norway. The Instrumental Fuel Assembly-430 (IFA-430) operated in that facility is a multipurpose assembly designed to provide information on fuel cracking and relocation, the long-term thermal response of LWR fuel rods subjected to various internal pressures and gas compositions, and the release of fission gases. This report presents the results of an analysis of fuel cracking and relocation phenomena as deduced from fuel rod axial gas flow and fuel temperature data from the first 6.5 GWd/tUO 2 burnup of the IFA-430

  10. Spent fuel and HLW transportation the French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Charles, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    With 53 nuclear power plants in operation at EDF and a fuel cycle with recycling policy of the valuable materials, COGEMA is faced with the transport of a wide range of radioactive materials. In this framework, the transport activity is a key link in closing the fuel cycle. COGEMA has developed a comprehensive Transport Organization System dealing with all the sectors of the fuel cycle. The paper will describe the status of transportation of spent fuel and HLW in France and the experience gathered. The Transport Organization System clearly defines the role of all actors where COGEMA, acting as the general coordinator, specifies the tasks to be performed and brings technical and commercial support to its various subcontractors: TRANSNUCLEAIRE, specialized in casks engineering and transport operations, supplies packaging and performs transport operations, LEMARECHAL and CELESTIN operate transport by truck in the Vicinity of the nuclear sites while French Railways are in charge of spent fuel transport by train. HLW issued from the French nuclear program is stored for 30 years in an intermediate storage installation located at the La Hague reprocessing plant. Ultimately, these canisters will be transported to the disposal site. COGEMA has set up a comprehensive transport organization covering all operational aspects including adapted procedures, maintenance programs and personnel qualification

  11. Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use in Corps of Engineers Floating Plant Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6- 11 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use... Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use in Corps of Engineers Floating Plant Operations Michael Tubman and Timothy Welp Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory...sensitive emissions, increase use of renewable energy, and reduce the use of fossil fuels was conducted with funding from the U.S. Army Corps of

  12. Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology for use in fuel cell vehicles and other applications has been intensively developed in recent decades. Besides the fuel cell stack, air and fuel control and thermal and water management are major challenges in the development of the fuel cell for vehicle applications. The air supply system can have a major impact on overall system efficiency. In this paper a fuel cell system model for optimizing system operating conditions was developed wh...

  13. Alternate aircraft fuels prospects and operational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses NASA studies of the potentials of coal-derived aviation fuels, specifically synthetic aviation kerosene, liquid methane, and liquid hydrogen. Topics include areas of fuel production, air terminal requirements for aircraft fueling (for liquid hydrogen only), and the performance characteristics of aircraft designed to utilize alternate fuels. Energy requirements associated with the production of each of the three selected fuels are determined, and fuel prices are estimated. Subsonic commercial air transports using liquid hydrogen fuel have been analyzed, and their performance and the performance of aircraft which use commercial aviation kerosene are compared. Environmental and safety issues are considered.

  14. Operating experiences with 1 MW steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, A; Kanamori, A; Tsuchiya, T

    1975-07-01

    1 MW steam generator, which was planned as the first stage of steam generator development in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Corp. (PNC) in Japan, is a single-unit, once-through, integrated shell and tube type with multi-helical coil tubes. It was completed in Oarai Engineering Center of PNC in March of 1971, and the various performance tests were carried out up to April, 1972. After the dismantle of the steam generator for structural inspection and material test, it was restored with some improvements. In this second 1 MW steam generator, small leak occurred twice during normal operation. After repairing the failure, the same kind of performance tests as the first steam generator were conducted in order to verify the thermal insulation effect of argon gas in downcomer zone from March to June, 1974. In this paper the above operating experiences were presented including the outline of some performance test results. (author)

  15. Operation of the nuclear fuel cycle test facilities -Operation of the hot test loop facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, S. Y.; Jeong, M. K.; Park, C. K.; Yang, S. K.; Won, S. Y.; Song, C. H.; Jeon, H. K.; Jeong, H. J.; Cho, S.; Min, K. H.; Jeong, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    A performance and reliability of a advanced nuclear fuel and reactor newly designed should be verified by performing the thermal hydraulics tests. In thermal hydraulics research team, the thermal hydraulics tests associated with the development of an advanced nuclear fuel and reactor haven been carried out with the test facilities, such as the Hot Test Loop operated under high temperature and pressure conditions, Cold Test Loop, RCS Loop and B and C Loop. The objective of this project is to obtain the available experimental data and to develop the advanced measuring techniques through taking full advantage of the facilities. The facilities operated by the thermal hydraulics research team have been maintained and repaired in order to carry out the thermal hydraulics tests necessary for providing the available data. The performance tests for the double grid type bottom end piece which was improved on the debris filtering effectivity were performed using the PWR-Hot Test Loop. The CANDU-Hot Test Loop was operated to carry out the pressure drop tests and strength tests of CANFLEX fuel. The Cold Test Loop was used to obtain the local velocity data in subchannel within HANARO fuel bundle and to study a thermal mixing characteristic of PWR fuel bundle. RCS thermal hydraulic loop was constructed and the experiments have been carried out to measure the critical heat flux. In B and C Loop, the performance tests for each component were carried out. (author). 19 tabs., 78 figs., 19 refs

  16. Operation of the nuclear fuel cycle test facilities -Operation of the hot test loop facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, S. Y.; Jeong, M. K.; Park, C. K.; Yang, S. K.; Won, S. Y.; Song, C. H.; Jeon, H. K.; Jeong, H. J.; Cho, S.; Min, K. H.; Jeong, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    A performance and reliability of a advanced nuclear fuel and reactor newly designed should be verified by performing the thermal hydraulics tests. In thermal hydraulics research team, the thermal hydraulics tests associated with the development of an advanced nuclear fuel and reactor haven been carried out with the test facilities, such as the Hot Test Loop operated under high temperature and pressure conditions, Cold Test Loop, RCS Loop and B and C Loop. The objective of this project is to obtain the available experimental data and to develop the advanced measuring techniques through taking full advantage of the facilities. The facilities operated by the thermal hydraulics research team have been maintained and repaired in order to carry out the thermal hydraulics tests necessary for providing the available data. The performance tests for the double grid type bottom end piece which was improved on the debris filtering effectivity were performed using the PWR-Hot Test Loop. The CANDU-Hot Test Loop was operated to carry out the pressure drop tests and strength tests of CANFLEX fuel. The Cold Test Loop was used to obtain the local velocity data in subchannel within HANARO fuel bundle and to study a thermal mixing characteristic of PWR fuel bundle. RCS thermal hydraulic loop was constructed and the experiments have been carried out to measure the critical heat flux. In B and C Loop, the performance tests for each component were carried out. (author). 19 tabs., 78 figs., 19 refs.

  17. Review of BNFL's operational experience of wet type flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliam, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    BNFL International Transport's operational experience includes shipping 6000te of spent fuel from Japan to Sellafield, through its dedicated terminal at Barrow, and to Cogema La Hague. This fuel was shipped under the PNTL (Pacific Nuclear Transport Ltd) banner for which BNFL is responsible. PNTL owned and operated a fleet of 5 ships for Japanese business and a fleet of 80 wet and 58 dry flasks, for the transport of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel, from both Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). ''Wet'' or ''dry'' flask is the common terminology used to distinguish between spent fuel flasks transporting fuel where the fuel is immersed in water, or spent fuel flasks that have been drained of water and dried. This paper concentrates on the wet type of flask utilised to transport fuel to Sellafield, that is the Excellox type (including similar type NTL derivatives). It aims to provide a summary of operational experience during handling at power stations, shipment, unloading at reprocessors and from scheduled maintenance

  18. Trial operation of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PC25) for CHP applications in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhrig, M.; Droste, W.; Wolf, D. [Ruhrgas AG, Dorsten (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    In Europe, ten 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) produced by ONSI (PC25) are currently in operation. Their operators collaborate closely in the European Fuel Cell Users Group (EFCUG). The experience gained from trial operation by the four German operators - HEAG, HGW/HEW, Thyssengas and Ruhrgas - coincides with that of the other European operators. This experience can generally be regarded as favourable. With a view to using fuel cells in combined heat and power generation (CHP), the project described in this report, which was carried out in cooperation with the municipal utility of Bochum and Gasunie of the Netherlands, aimed at gaining experience with the PC 25 in field operation under the specific operating conditions prevailing in Europe. The work packages included heat-controlled operation, examination of plant behavior with varying gas properties and measurement of emissions under dynamic load conditions. The project received EU funding under the JOULE programme.

  19. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean; Hayes, Steven Lowe; Dempsey, Douglas; Harp, Jason Michael

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  20. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dempsey, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  1. Operation experience at the UWTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Kazuhiro; Inada, Kameji; Ohmori, Kouji; Usui, Kazuya; Irinouchi, Sigenori; Asami, Makoto; Tohchi, Katsunori

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the operation experience on the volume reduction of metal wastes and used air filters contaminated with uranium at the Uranium contaminated Waste Treatment Facility (UWTF) in JNC Tokai Works. The UWTF consists of the metal waste treatment system and the filter-waste treatment system. The former treats metal wastes, the latter treats used air filters. Metal wastes are unpacked from drums, cut, and then compacted. Used air filters are separated into filter media and frames. Then the filter media are compacted and the frames are crushed. The operation of the UWTF was started in June 1998. The following volumes of wastes had been treated at the UWTF from the beginning of the operation to March 2003 (for about 5 years). (1) 1,524 drums of the metal wastes had been reduced to 410 drums. The volume reduction factor was 3.7. (2) 372 drums of the used air filters had been reduced to 39 drums. The volume reduction factor was 9.5. These systems have been operated without trouble for 5 years and have demonstrated to be able to reduce the volumes of the wastes to designed values. The volume reduction technologies for metal wastes and used air filters contaminated with uranium were successfully demonstrated at the UWTF. (author)

  2. ATLAS Pixel Detector Operational Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Di Girolamo, B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.9% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  3. Characteristics of Subfreezing Operation of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishler, Jeffrey Harris

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells are capable of high efficiency operation, and are free of NOx, SOx, and CO2 emissions when using hydrogen fuel, and ideally suited for use in transportation applications due to their high power density and low operating temperatures. However, under subfreezing conditions which may be encountered during winter seasons in some areas, product water will freeze within the membrane, cathode side catalyst layer and gas diffusion media, leading to voltage loss and operation failure. Experiments were undertaken in order to characterize the amount and location of water during fuel cell operation. First, in-situ neutron radiography was undertaken on the fuel cells at a normal operating temperature for various operating current densities, inlet relative humidities, and diffusion media hydrophobicities. It was found that more hydrophobic cathode microporous layer (MPL) or hydrophilic anode MPL may result in a larger amount of water transporting back to the anode. The water profiles along the channels were measured and the point of liquid water emergence, where two phase flow begins, was compared to previous models. Secondly, under subfreezing temperatures, neutron imaging showed that water ice product accumulates because of lack of a water removal mechanism. Water was observed under both the lands and channels, and increased almost linearly with time. It is found that most ice exists in the cathode side. With evidence from experimental observation, a cold start model was developed and explained, following existing approaches in the literature. Three stages of cold start are explained: membrane saturation, ice storage in catalyst layer pores, and then ice melting. The voltage losses due to temperature change, increased transport resistance, and reduced electrochemical surface area. The ionic conductivity of the membrane at subfreezing temperatures was modeled. Voltage evolution over time for isothermal cold starts was predicted and

  4. Fuel supply shutdown facility interim operational safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besser, R.L.; Brehm, J.R.; Benecke, M.W.; Remaize, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    These Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSR) for the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls to ensure safe operation. The IOSRs apply to the fuel material storage buildings in various modes (operation, storage, surveillance)

  5. Effect of wood fuels on power plant operability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orjala, M.; Ingalsuo, R.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the research is to determine the critical properties of wood fuels on the basis of power plant operability, to determine the optimal conditions for reduction of harmful detriments, and to study how the storage and processing of wood fuels effect on the operability. Both the CFB and BFB technologies are studied. The project started in December 2000 and it will be ended by the end of 2002. Experts of the Fuels and Combustion research field of VTT Energy carry out the main parts of the research. Experts of the research field of Mineral Processing of VTT Chemical Technology, located in Outokumpu, and Kemian tutkimuspalvelut Oy/Oulu University, located in Outokumpu, participate in the analytics, and the research field of Materials and Manufacturing Technology of VTT Manufacturing Technology in Otaniemi participates in the research on material effects. System Technology Laboratory of Oulu University carries out the power plant automation and boiler control technology research under supervision of Professor Urpo Kortela. Co-operation with the materials research unit of EU's JRC, located in Petten, which started in the research 'Combustion of Forest Chips', will be continues in this research. Co-operation will be made with Swedish Vaermeforsk in the field of information exchange on experiences in utilisation of wood fuels in Swedish power plants and possibilities to join in the projects of Vaermeforsk in this research field. Following companies participate in the project: Etelae-Savon Energia Oy, Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Kvaerner Pulping Oy, Simpele pasteboard factory of M-Real Oyj and Vaermeforsk AB (Sweden). (orig.)

  6. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Bruyere, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative 'all modes' failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  7. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoxing; Quan, Wenying; Xiao, Jing; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Fujii, Mamoru; Sun, Funxia; Shalaby, Cigdem; Li, Yan; Xie, Chao; Ma, Xiaoliang; Johnson, David; Lee, Jeong; Fedkin, Mark; LaBarbera, Mark; Das, Debanjan; Thompson, David; Lvov, Serguei; Song, Chunshan

    2014-09-30

    This DOE project at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) initially involved Siemens Energy, Inc. to (1) develop new fuel processing approaches for using selected alternative and renewable fuels – anaerobic digester gas (ADG) and commercial diesel fuel (with 15 ppm sulfur) – in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation systems; and (2) conduct integrated fuel processor – SOFC system tests to evaluate the performance of the fuel processors and overall systems. Siemens Energy Inc. was to provide SOFC system to Penn State for testing. The Siemens work was carried out at Siemens Energy Inc. in Pittsburgh, PA. The unexpected restructuring in Siemens organization, however, led to the elimination of the Siemens Stationary Fuel Cell Division within the company. Unfortunately, this led to the Siemens subcontract with Penn State ending on September 23rd, 2010. SOFC system was never delivered to Penn State. With the assistance of NETL project manager, the Penn State team has since developed a collaborative research with Delphi as the new subcontractor and this work involved the testing of a stack of planar solid oxide fuel cells from Delphi.

  8. Analysis of fuel operational reliability and fuel failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smiesko, I.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the fuel failure (loss of fuel rod (cladding) integrity, corruption of second barrier for fission product release from duel and their consequences (increase of primary coolant activity; increase of fission product releases to environment; increase of rad-waste activities and potential increase of personnel exposure) are discussed

  9. Operation experience with elevated ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankova, Katerina; Kysela, Jan; Malac, Miroslav; Petrecky, Igor; Svarc, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The 10 VVER units in the Czech and Slovak Republics are all in very good water chemistry and radiation condition, yet questions have arisen regarding the optimization of cycle chemistry and improved operation in these units. To address these issues, a comprehensive experimental program for different water chemistries of the primary circuit was carried out at the Rez Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, with the goal of judging the influence of various water chemistries on radiation build-up. Four types of water chemistries were compared: standard VVER water chemistry (in common use), direct hydrogen dosing without ammonia, standard VVER water chemistry with elevated ammonia levels, and zinc dosing to standard VVER water chemistry. The test results showed that the types of water chemistry other than the common one have benefits for the operation of the nuclear power plant (NPP) primary circuit. Operation experience with elevated ammonia at NPP Dukovany Units 3 and 4 is presented which validates the experimental results, demonstrating improved corrosion product volume activity. (orig.)

  10. Fuel canister and blockage pin fabrication for SLSF Experiment P4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhude, H.V.; Folkrod, J.R.; Noland, R.A.; Schaus, P.S.; Benecke, M.W.; Delucchi, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    As part of its fast breeder reactor safety research program, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has conducted an experiment (SLSF Experiment P4) to determine the extent of fuel-failure propagation resulting from the release of molten fuel from one or more heat-generating fuel canisters. The test conditions consisted of 37 full-length FTR fuel pins operating at FTR rated core nominal peak fuel/reduced coolant conditions. Thirty-four of the the fuel pins were prototypical FTR mixed-oxide fuel pins. The other three fuel pins were fabricated with a mid-core section having an enlarged canister containing fully enriched UO 2 . Two of the canisters were cylindrical and one was fluted. The cylindrical canisters were designed to fail and release molten fuel into the 37-pin fuel cluster at near full power

  11. Fuel reprocessing experience in India: Technological and economic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.N.; Kumar, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    The approach to the reprocessing of irradiated fuel from power reactors in India is conditioned by the non-availability of highly enriched uranium with the consequent need for plutonium for the fast-reactor programme. With this in view, the fuel reprocessing programme in India is developing in stages matching the nuclear power programme. The first plant was set up in Trombay to reprocess the metallic uranium fuel from the research reactor CIRUS. The experience gained in the construction and operation of this plant, and in its subsequent decommissioning and reconstruction, has not only provided the know-how for the design of subsequent plants but has indicated the fruitful areas of research and development for efficient utilization of limited resources. The Trombay plant also handled successfully, on a pilot scale, the reprocessing of irradiated thorium fuel to separate uranium-233. The second plant at Tarapur has been built for reprocessing spent fuels from the power reactors at Tarapur (BWR) and Rajasthan (PHWR). The third plant, at present under design, will reprocess the spent fuels from the power reactors (PHWR) and the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) located at Kalpakkam. Through the above approach experience has been acquired which will be useful in the design and construction of even larger plants which will become necessary in the future as the nuclear power programme grows. The strategies considered for the sizing and siting of reprocessing plants extend from the idea of small plants, located at nuclear power station sites, to a large-size central plant, located at an independent site, serving many stations. The paper discusses briefly the experience in reprocessing uranium and thorium fuels and also in decommissioning. An attempt is made to outline the technological and economic aspects which are relevant under different circumstances and which influence the size and siting of the fuel reprocessing plants and the expected lead times for construction

  12. Post operation: The changing characteristics of nuclear fuel cycle costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Fundamental changes have occurred in the nuclear fuel cycle. These changes forged by market forces, legislative action, and regulatory climate appear to be a long term characteristic of the nuclear fuel cycle. The nature of these changes and the resulting emerging importance of post-operation and its impact on fuel cycle costs are examined

  13. KUCA critical experiments using MEU fuel (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Keiji; Hayashi, Masatoshi; Shiroya, Seiji; Kobayashi, Keiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Mishima, Kaichiro; Shibata, Toshikazu

    1983-01-01

    Due to mutual concerns in the USA and Japan about the proliferation potential of highly-enriched uranium (HEU), a joint study program I was initiated between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL and Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) in 1978. In accordance with the reduced enrichment for research and test reactor (RERTR) program, the alternatives were studied for reducing the enrichment of the fuel to be used in the Kyoto University High Flux Reactor (KUHFR). The KUHFR has a distinct feature in its core configuration it is a coupled-core. Each annular shaped core is light-water-moderated and placed within a heavy water reflector with a certain distance between them. The phase A reports of the joint ANL-KURRI program independently prepared by two laboratories in February 1979, 3,4 concluded that the use of medium-enrichment uranium (MEU, 45%) in the KUHFR is feasible, pending results of the critical experiments in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) 5 and of the burnup test in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor 6 (ORR). An application of safety review (Reactor Installation License) for MEU fuel to be used in the KUCA was submitted to the Japanese Government in March 1980, and a license was issued in August 1980. Subsequently, the application for 'Authorization before Construction' was submitted and was authorized in September 1980. Fabrication of MEU fuel-elements for the KUCA experiments by CERCA in France was started in September 1980, and was completed in March 1981. The critical experiments in the KUCA with MEU fuel were started on a single-core in May 1981 as a first step. The first critical state of the core using MEU fuel was achieved at 312 p.m. in May 12, 1981. After that, the reactivity effects of the outer side-plates containing boron burnable poison were measured. At Munich Meeting in Sept., 1981, we presented a paper on critical mass and reactivity of burnable poison in the MEU core. Since then we carried out the following experiments

  14. KUCA critical experiments using MEU fuel (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Keiji; Hayashi, Masatoshi; Shiroya, Seiji; Kobayashi, Keiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Mishima, Kaichiro; Shibata, Toshikazu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka (Japan)

    1983-09-01

    Due to mutual concerns in the USA and Japan about the proliferation potential of highly-enriched uranium (HEU), a joint study program I was initiated between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL and Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) in 1978. In accordance with the reduced enrichment for research and test reactor (RERTR) program, the alternatives were studied for reducing the enrichment of the fuel to be used in the Kyoto University High Flux Reactor (KUHFR). The KUHFR has a distinct feature in its core configuration it is a coupled-core. Each annular shaped core is light-water-moderated and placed within a heavy water reflector with a certain distance between them. The phase A reports of the joint ANL-KURRI program independently prepared by two laboratories in February 1979, 3,4 concluded that the use of medium-enrichment uranium (MEU, 45%) in the KUHFR is feasible, pending results of the critical experiments in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) 5 and of the burnup test in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor 6 (ORR). An application of safety review (Reactor Installation License) for MEU fuel to be used in the KUCA was submitted to the Japanese Government in March 1980, and a license was issued in August 1980. Subsequently, the application for 'Authorization before Construction' was submitted and was authorized in September 1980. Fabrication of MEU fuel-elements for the KUCA experiments by CERCA in France was started in September 1980, and was completed in March 1981. The critical experiments in the KUCA with MEU fuel were started on a single-core in May 1981 as a first step. The first critical state of the core using MEU fuel was achieved at 312 p.m. in May 12, 1981. After that, the reactivity effects of the outer side-plates containing boron burnable poison were measured. At Munich Meeting in Sept., 1981, we presented a paper on critical mass and reactivity of burnable poison in the MEU core. Since then we carried out the following experiments

  15. European experience with spent fuel transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, I.A.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Transport Ltd has transported 5000 tonnes of spent fuel from 35 reactors in 8 European countries since 1972. Transport management is governed by the Quality Plan for: transport administration, packaging and shipment procedures at the shipping plant, operations at the power plant, and packaging and shipment organization at the power plant. Selection of a suitable carrier device is made with regard to the shipping plant requirements, physical limitations of the reactor, fuel characteristics, and transport route constraints. The transport plan is set up taking into account exploitation of the casks, reactor shut-down requirements, fuel acceptance plans at the reprocessing plant, and cask maintenance periods. A transport cycle involving spent fuel shipment to La Hague or to Sellafield takes typically two or four weeks, respectively. Most transports through Europe are by rail. A special-design railway ferry boat serves transports to the United Kingdom. Both wet or dry casks are employed. Modern casks are designed for high burnups and for oxide fuels. (J.B.)

  16. Fuel cells in industrial use. EnBW's experiences from three years' pilot operation at Michelin; Brennstoffzellen im industriellen Einsatz. EnBW-Erfahrungen aus drei Jahren Pilotbetrieb bei Michelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, A. [EnBW AG, Karlsruhe (Germany); Berger, P. [MTU CFC Solutions GmbH, Ottobrunn (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    For three years a molten carbonate fuel cell of MTU CFC Solutions GmbH supplied Michelin tyre plant at Karlsruhe with power and 200 C process heat for the vulcanisation of truck tyres. In about 24.000 operating hours the plant produced more than four million kWh power. Aim of the fuel cell project at Michelin was to gain deepened cognitions concerning suitability for daily use of fuel cells in industrial processes. Operator of the plant was EnBW Energie Baden-Wuerttenberg AG. (orig.)

  17. Industrial experience of irradiated nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delange, M.

    1981-01-01

    At the moment and during the next following years, France and La Hague plant particularly, own the greatest amount of industrial experience in the field of reprocessing, since this experience is referred to three types of reactors, either broadly spread all through the world (GCR and LWR) or ready to be greatly developed in the next future (FBR). Then, the description of processes and technologies used now in France, and the examination of the results obtained, on the production or on the security points of view, are a good approach of the actual industrial experience in the field of spent fuel reprocessing. (author)

  18. Operating experiences at the Finnish TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmenhaara, Seppo

    1988-01-01

    The Finnish TRIGA reactor has been in operation since March 1962. There are still 57 original Al-clad fuel elements in the core. So far we have had only two fuel cladding failures in 1981 and 1988. The first one was an Al-clad element and the second one a SS-clad. The low rate of fuel cladding failures has made it possible to use continuously also the Al-clad fuel elements. Although some conventional irradiations of certain type have been repeated successfully tens of times, new and unexpected incidents can still take place. As an example an event of a leaking irradiation capsule is described

  19. Safety analysis to support a safe operating envelope for fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibb, R.A.; Reid, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for defining a safe operating envelope for fuel. 'Safe operating envelope' is defined as an envelope of fuel parameters defined for application in safety analysis that can be related to, or used to define, the acceptable range of fuel conditions due to operational transients or deviations in fuel manufacturing processes. The paper describes the motivation for developing such a methodology. The methodology involved four steps: the update of fission product inventories, the review of sheath failure criteria, a review of input parameters to be used in fuel modelling codes, and the development of an improved fission product release code. This paper discusses the aspects of fuel sheath failure criteria that pertain to operating or manufacturing conditions and to the evaluation and selection of modelling input data. The other steps are not addressed in this paper since they have been presented elsewhere. (author)

  20. Operating Experiences with a Small-scale CHP Pilot Plant based on a 35 kWel Hermetic Four Cylinder Stirling Engine for Biomass Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biedermann, F.; Carlsen, Henrik; Schoech, M.

    2003-01-01

    Within the scope of the RD&D project presented a small-scale CHP plant with a hermetic four cylinder Stirling engine for biomass fuels was developed and optimised in cooperation with the Technical University of Denmark, MAWERA Holzfeuerungsanlagen GesmbH, an Austrian biomass furnace and boiler...... exchanger of the Stirling engine, of the air preheater and of the entire combustion system. Furthermore, the optimisation of the pneumatic cleaning system to reduce ash deposition in the hot heat exchanger is of great relevance....... manufacturer, and BIOS BIOENERGIESYSTEME GmbH, an Austrian development and engineering company. Based on the technology developed, a pilot plant was designed and erected in Austria. The nominal electric power output of the plant is 35 kWel and the nominal thermal output amounts to approx. 220 kWth. The plant...

  1. Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility Interim Operational Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements for the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management of administrative controls to ensure safe operation of the facility

  2. Spent fuel receipt and storage at the Morris Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrom, K.A.; Eger, K.J.

    1978-06-01

    Operating and maintenance activities in an independent spent fuel storage facility are described, and current regulations governing such activities are summarized. This report is based on activities at General Electric's licensed storage facility located near Morris, Illinois, and includes photographs of cask and fuel handling equipment used during routine operations

  3. Method of operating a direct dme fuel cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of operating a fuel cell system comprising one or more fuel cells with a proton exchange membrane, wherein the membrane is composed of a polymeric material comprising acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI). The method comprises adjusting the operating...

  4. Regulatory challenges in using nuclear operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    There can be no doubt that the systematic evaluation of operating experience by the operator and the regulator is essential for continued safe operation of nuclear power plants. Recent concerns have been voiced that the operating experience information and insights are not being used effectively to promote safety. If these concerns foreshadow a real trend in OECD countries toward complacency in reporting and analysing operating events and taking corrective actions, then past experience suggests that similar or even more serious events will recur. This report discusses how the regulator can take actions to assure that operators have effective programmes to collect and analyse operating experience and, just as important, for taking steps to follow up with actions to prevent the events and conditions from recurring. These regulatory actions include special inspections of an operator operating experience programme and discussion with senior plant managers to emphasize the importance of having an effective operating experience programme. In addition to overseeing the operator programmes, the regulator has the broader responsibility for assuring that industry-wide trends, both national and international are monitored. To meet these responsibilities, the regulatory body must have its own operating experience programme, and this report discusses the important attributes of such regulatory programmes. It is especially important for the regulator to have the capability for assessing the full scope of operating experience issues, including those that may not be included in an operator operating experience programme, such as new research results, international operating experience, and broad industry trend information. (author)

  5. Operations experience with the NAC-1 legal weight truck cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viebrock, J.M.; Hoffman, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    The first three years of operation of Nuclear Assurance Corporation's (NAC) four (4) NAC-1 Casks have demonstrated that shipments of spent fuel, fuel rods and other highly irradiated reactor components can be moved routinely by legal weight truck transport. Shipments of these materials have involved some 800,000 miles of highway travel and cask handling at some fifteen different nuclear facilities. This paper presents details on NAC's operations experience with these casks including cask description, cask handling (loading and unloading), pre-shipment testing, facility turnaround and transit times, operator exposure, transport vehicles and shipper/carrier/cask owner responsibilities, actual experience with regard to facility interfacing requirements and operational procedures. Cask and equipment utilization is discussed together with the methods used to control operation costs and to improve the economics of truck transport

  6. Gadolinia experience and design for PWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe Siemens Power Corporation's (SPC) current experience with the burnable absorber gadolinia in PWR fuel assemblies, including optimized features of SPC's PWR gadolinia designs, and comparisons with other burnable absorbers. Siemens is the world leader in PWR gadolinia experience. More than 5,900 Siemens PWR gadolinia-bearing fuel assemblies have been irradiated. The use of gadolinia-bearing fuel provides significant flexibility in fuel cycle designs, allows for low radial leakage fuel management and extended operating cycles, and reduces BOC (beginning-of-cycle) soluble boron concentrations. The optimized use of an integral burnable neutron absorber is a design feature which provides improved economic performance for PWR fuel assemblies. This paper includes a comparison between three different types of integral burnable absorbers: gadolinia, Zirconium diboride and erbia. Fuel cycle design studies performed by Siemens have shown that the enrichment requirements for 18-24 month fuel cycles utilizing gadolinia or zirconium diboride integral fuel burnable absorbers can be approximately the same. Although a typical gadolinia residual penalty for a cycle design of this length is as low as 0.02-0.03 wt% U-235, the design flexibility of gadolinia allows for very aggressive low-leakage core loading plans which reduces the enrichment requirements for gadolinia-bearing fuel. SPC has optimized its use of gadolinia in PWR fuel cycles. Typically, low (2-4) weight percent Gd 2 O 3 is used for beginning to middle of cycle reactivity hold down as well as soluble boron concentration holddown at BOC. Higher concentrations of Gd 2 O 3 , such as 6 and 8 wt%, are used to control power peaking in assemblies later in the cycle. SPC has developed core strategies that maximize the use of lower gadolinia concentrations which significantly reduces the gadolinia residual reactivity penalty. This optimization includes minimizing the number of rods with

  7. Operating experience of Fugen-HWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, F.

    1991-01-01

    Fugen is a 165 MWe prototype heavy water reactor which mainly uses plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has taken responsibility for the advanced thermal reactor (ATR) project, with its name 'FUGEN' taken from the Buddhist God of Mercy. The project started in October 1967, to develop and establish the technology for this new type of reactor and to clarify MOX fuel performance in the reactor. Site construction began in December 1970 at Tsuruga and the plant commenced commercial operation on March 20, 1979. Since then, Fugen has been operated successfully for more than twelve years. The plant performance and reliability of this type of reactor has been demonstrated through the operation. All these operational experiences have contributed to the establishment of the ATR technology

  8. Operating experience of Fugen-HWR in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, F [Reactor Regulation Division, Nuclear Safety Bureau, Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-04-01

    Fugen is a 165 MWe prototype heavy water reactor which mainly uses plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has taken responsibility for the advanced thermal reactor (ATR) project, with its name 'FUGEN' taken from the Buddhist God of Mercy. The project started in October 1967, to develop and establish the technology for this new type of reactor and to clarify MOX fuel performance in the reactor. Site construction began in December 1970 at Tsuruga and the plant commenced commercial operation on March 20, 1979. Since then, Fugen has been operated successfully for more than twelve years. The plant performance and reliability of this type of reactor has been demonstrated through the operation. All these operational experiences have contributed to the establishment of the ATR technology.

  9. A Method of Operating a Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of determining the net water drag coefficient (rd) in a fuel cell. By measuring the velocity of the fluid stream at the outlet of the anode, rd can be determined. Real time monitoring and adjustments of the water balance of a fuel cell may be therefore...

  10. In situ quantification of the in-plane water content in the Nafion {sup registered} membrane of an operating polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell using {sup 1}H micro-magnetic resonance imaging experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Mingtao; Feindel, Kirk W.; Bergens, Steven H.; Wasylishen, Roderick E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, E3-24 Gunning/Lemieux Chemistry Center, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-11-01

    Spatial, quantitative, and temporal information regarding the water content distribution in the transverse-plane between the catalyst layers of an operating polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is essential to develop a fundamental understanding of water dynamics in these systems. We report {sup 1}H micro-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments that measure the number of water molecules per SO{sub 3}H group, {lambda}, within a Nafion {sup registered} -117 membrane between the catalyst stamps of a membrane-electrode assembly, MEA. The measurements were made both ex situ, and inside a PEMFC operating on hydrogen and oxygen. The observed {sup 1}H MRI T{sub 2} relaxation time of water in the PEM was measured for several known values of {lambda}. The signal intensity of the images was then corrected for T{sub 2} weighting to yield proton density-weighted images, thereby establishing a calibration curve that correlates the {sup 1}H MRI density-weighted signal with {lambda}. Subsequently, the calibration curve was used with proton density weighted (i.e., T{sub 2}-corrected) signal intensities of transverse-plane {sup 1}H MRI images of water in the PEM between the catalyst stamps of an operating PEMFC to determine {lambda} under various operational conditions. For example, the steady state, transverse-plane {lambda} was 9 {+-} 1 for a PEMFC operating at {proportional_to}26.4 mW cm{sup -2} ({proportional_to}20.0 mA, {proportional_to}0.661 V, 20 C, flow rates of the dry H{sub 2}(g) and O{sub 2}(g) were 5.0 and 2.5 mL min{sup -1}, respectively). (author)

  11. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO 2 oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO 2 pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs

  12. End plug welding of nuclear fuel elements-AFFF experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, R.B.; Singh, S.; Aniruddha Kumar; Amit; Arun Kumar; Panakkal, J.P.; Kamath, H.S.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility is engaged in the fabrication of mixed oxide (U,Pu)O 2 fuel elements of various types of nuclear reactors. Fabrication of fuel elements involves pellet fabrication, stack making, stack loading and end plug welding. The requirement of helium bonding gas inside the fuel elements necessitates the top end plug welding to be carried out with helium as the shielding gas. The severity of the service conditions inside a nuclear reactor imposes strict quality control criteria, which demands for almost defect free welds. The top end plug welding being the last process step in fuel element fabrication, any rejection at this stage would lead to loss of effort prior to this step. Moreover, the job becomes all the more difficult with mixed oxide (MOX) as the entire fabrication work has to be carried out in glove box trains. In the case of weld rejection, accepted pellets are salvaged by cutting the clad tube. This is a difficult task and recovery of pellets is low (requiring scrap recovery operation) and also leads to active metallic waste generation. This paper discusses the experience gained at AFFF, in the past 12 years in the area of end plug welding for different types of MOX fuel elements

  13. Spent fuel reprocessing past experience and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.

    1983-09-01

    A large experience has been gathered from the early fifties till now in the field of spent fuel reprocessing. As the main efforts in the world have been made for developping the reactors and the fuel fabrication industry to feed them, the spent fuel reprocessing activities came later and have not yet reached the industrial maturity existing to day for plants such as PWRs. But in the principal nuclear countries spent fuel reprocessing is to day considered as a necessity with two simultaneous targets: 1. Recovering the valuable materials, uranium and plutonium. 2. Conditionning the radioactive wastes to ensure safe definitive storage. The paper reviews the main steps: 1. Reprocessing for thermal reactor fuels: large plants are already operating or in construction, but in parallel a large effort of R and D is still under way for improvements. 2. The development of fast breeder plants implies associated fuel reprocessing facilities: pilot plants have demonstrated the closing of the cycle. The main difficulties encountered will be examined and particularly the importance of taking into account the problems of effluents processing and wastes storage [fr

  14. Safeguards operations in the integral fast reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, K.M.; Benedict, R.W.; Brumbach, S.B.; Dickerman, C.E.; Tompot, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently demonstrating the fuel cycle for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), an advanced reactor concept that takes advantage of the properties of metallic fuel and liquid metal cooling to offer significant improvements in reactor safety, operation, fuel-cycle economics, environmental protection, and safeguards. The IFR fuel cycle employs a pyrometallurgical process using molten salts and liquid metals to recover actinides from spent fuel. The safeguards aspects of the fuel cycle demonstration must be approved by the United States Department of Energy, but a further goal of the program is to develop a safeguards system that could gain acceptance from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and International Atomic Energy Agency. This fuel cycle is described with emphasis on aspects that differ from aqueous reprocessing and on its improved safeguardability due to decreased attractiveness and diversion potential of all process streams, including the fuel product

  15. Experiment operations plan for the MT-4 experiment in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Webb, B.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-06-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for MT-4 - the fourth materials deformation experiment conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. A major objective of MT-4 was to simulate a pressurized water reactor LOCA that could induce fuel rod cladding deformation and rupture due to a short-term adiabatic transient and a peak fuel cladding temperature of 1200K (1700 0 F)

  16. Fuel deposits, chemistry and CANDU® reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    'Hot conditioning' is a process which occurs as part of commissioning and initial start-up of each CANDU® reactor, the first being the Nuclear Power Demonstration - 2 reactor (NPD). Later, understanding of the cause of the failure of the Pickering Unit 1 G16 fuel channelled to a revised approach to 'hot conditioning', initially demonstrated on Bruce Unit 5. The difference being that during 'hot conditioning' of CANDU® heat transport systems fuel was not in-core until Bruce Unit 5. The 'hot conditioning' processes will be briefly described along with the consequences to fuel. (author)

  17. Operation control device for a nuclear reactor fuel exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Takashi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a operation control device for a nuclear reactor fuel exchanger with reduced size and weight capable of optionally meeting the complicated and versatile mode of the operation scope. Constitution: The operation range of a fuel exchanger is finely divided so as to attain the state capable of discriminating between operation-allowable range and operation-inhibitive range, which are stored in a memory circuit. Upon operating the fuel exchanger, the position is detected and a divided range data corresponding to the present position is taken out from the memory circuit so as to determine whether the fuel exchanger is to be run or stopped. Use of reduced size and compact IC circuits (calculation circuit, memory circuit, data latch circuit) and input/output interface circuits or the likes contributes to the size reduction of the exchanger control system to enlarge the floor maintenance space. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Alternate aircraft fuels: Prospects and operational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The potential use of coal-derived aviation fuels was assessed. The studies addressed the prices and thermal efficiencies associated with the production of coal-derived aviation kerosene, liquid methane and liquid hydrogen and the air terminal requirements and subsonic transport performance when utilizing liquid hydrogen. The fuel production studies indicated that liquid methane can be produced at a lower price and with a higher thermal efficiency than aviation kerosene or liquid hydrogen. Ground facilities of liquefaction, storage, distribution and refueling of liquid hydrogen fueled aircraft at airports appear technically feasibile. The aircraft studies indicate modest onboard energy savings for hydrogen compared to conventional fuels. Liquid hydrogen was found to be superior to both aviation kerosene and liquid methane from the standpoint of aircraft engine emissions.

  19. Worldwide experience with light water reactor fuel - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasser, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Continued attention to fuel performance has over the years improved fuel reliability and reduced fuel related failures. But further improvements can still be made by increased attention to reactor operating and maintenance methods, as well as to quality control during fuel fabrication. (author)

  20. Small-scale CHP Plant based on a 35 kWel Hermetic Four Cylinder Stirling Engine for Biomass Fuels- Development, Technology and Operating Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obernberger, I.; Carlsen, Henrik; Biedermann, F.

    2003-01-01

    ) process and the Stirling engine process. The ORC process represents an economically interesting technology for small-scale biomass-fired combined heat and power plants in a power range between 400 and 1,500 kWel. A newly developed ORC technology with a nominal electric capacity of 1,000 kW was implemented...... in the biomass CHP plant Lienz (A) in the framework of an EU demonstration project. This plant was put in operation in February 2002. Stirling engines are a promising solution for installations with nominal electric capacities between 10 and 150 kW. A biomass CHP pilot plant based on a 35 kWel-Stirling engine...

  1. Reprocessing on the whole fuel cycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.

    1983-11-01

    Spent fuel reprocessing, in France, is become an industrial reality which takes an importance place in several fields: place surely essential in the fuel cycle from the energetic material economy and waste management point of view; place priority in the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) research and development programs; place in the industry where it is an important activity sector with the realizations in progress [fr

  2. Results of trial operation of the WWER advanced fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Dragunov, Y.; Mikhalchuk, A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes results from experimental operation of advanced WWER-1000 fuel assemblies (AFA) at five units in Balakovo NPP. Advanced fuel is developed according to the concept of standard WWER-1000 fuel assembly (jacket-free). The new features includes: 1) zirconium guiding channels (alloy E-635 and E-110) and spacer grids (alloy E-110); 2) integrated burnable absorber gadolinium; 3) extended service life of fuel assemblies (FA) and absorber rods (possibility of repair of FA); 4) improved adoption to reactor conditions. Some results of AFA pilot operation of a three year operation are presented and analyses of effectiveness of improvements are made concerning application of zirconium channels and grids; application of integrated burnable absorbers; extension of FA and absorbing rods service life and FA repairability. These new features of WWER-1000 fuel design allow: 1) to reduce the average fuel enrichment to the 3.77% instead of 4.31% in U-235; 2) to reduce the FA axial load in reactor hot state by 40%,; 3) increasing of fuel operation in reactor to the 30000 effective days with possibility to have a 5-year residence time in the reactor. The design of new generation FA for WWER-440 reactors involves few key changes. Fuel inventory in new fuel design is increased due to elongation of fuel stack and reducing the diameter of the central hole. Vibration stability is enhanced as a result of: no-play junction of the fuel rod with the lower grid; change of SG arrangements; strengthening of the lower grid unit; secure of the central tube in the gap. Water-uranium ration is increased. Introduction of all these kinds of modernization in a 5-year fuel cycle reduces fuel component in the energy cost to the 7%

  3. Development of wireless vehicle remote control for fuel lid operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, N.; Jadin, M. S.; Najib, M. S.; Mustafa, M.; Azmi, S. N. F.

    2018-04-01

    Nowadays, the evolution of the vehicle technology had made the vehicle especially car to be equipped with a remote control to control the operation of the locking and unlocking system of the car’s door and rear’s bonnet. However, for the fuel or petrol lid, it merely can be opened from inside the car’s cabin by handling the fuel level inside the car’s cabin to open the fuel lid. The petrol lid can be closed by pushing the lid by hand. Due to the high usage of using fuel lever to open the fuel lid when refilling the fuel, the car driver might encounter the malfunction of fuel lid (fail to open) when pushing or pulling the fuel lever. Thus, the main aim of the research is to enhance the operation of an existing car remote control where the car fuel lid can be controlled using two techniques; remote control-based and smartphone-based. The remote control is constructed using Arduino microcontroller, wireless sensors and XCTU software to set the transmitting and receiving parameters. Meanwhile, the smartphone can control the operation of the fuel lid by communicating with Arduino microcontroller which is attached to the fuel lid using Bluetooth sensor to open the petrol lid. In order to avoid the conflict of instruction between wireless systems with the existing mechanical-based system, the servo motor will be employed to release the fuel lid merely after receiving the instruction from Arduino microcontroller and smartphone. As a conclusion, the prototype of the multipurpose vehicle remote control is successfully invented, constructed and tested. The car fuel lid can be opened either using remote control or smartphone in a sequential manner. Therefore, the outcome of the project can be used to serve as an alternative solution to solve the car fuel lid problem even though the problem rarely occurred.

  4. TSTA Piping and Flame Arrestor Operating Experience Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; Willms, R. Scott

    2014-10-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium handling technology and experiment research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility operated from 1984 to 2001, running a prototype fusion fuel processing loop with ~100 grams of tritium as well as small experiments. There have been several operating experience reports written on this facility’s operation and maintenance experience. This paper describes analysis of two additional components from TSTA, small diameter gas piping that handled small amounts of tritium in a nitrogen carrier gas, and the flame arrestor used in this piping system. The operating experiences and the component failure rates for these components are discussed in this paper. Comparison data from other applications are also presented.

  5. Software in support of fuel operation in WWERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimov, I.A; Novikov, V.V; Ugrumov, A.V; Shishkin, A.A

    2013-01-01

    A software package comprising computer codes and fuel monitoring tools is under development in Russia in support of WWER fuel operation. The software package includes an expert computer system designed for failure diagnosis in course of reactor operation, prediction of activity evolution in primary coolant and express analysis of pellet-to-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) on rod-by-rod basis under normal and transient modes of operation. Coupled with the expert system, the first version of a graphical interface computer program is developed for NPP operating bodies. One of the features of this program is to launch automatically a fuel performance code for a series of detailed calculations for fuel rods with severe PCMI. The particular rods for calculations are determined by the expert system during the express core analysis. A greater attention is paid to recent results in prediction of fuel behavior after a primary failure has occurred. One of the major risks to further operation of leaking fuel comes from secondary fuel degradation due to massive cladding hydriding. Threshold conditions for initiation of secondary hydriding have been found on the basis of physical modeling. Final criteria of secondary failure occurrence were deduced by applying the model to analysis of post-irradiation examinations of leaking WWER fuel. (authors)

  6. Plutonium-enriched thermal fuel production experience in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Taking into account the strategic aspects of nuclear energy such as availability and sufficiency of resources and independence of energy supply, most countries planning to use plutonium look mainly to its use in fast reactors. However, by recycling the recovered uranium and plutonium in light water reactors, the saving of the uranium that would otherwise be required could already be higher than 35%. Therefore, until fast reactors are introduced, for macro- or microeconomic reasons, the plutonium recycle option seems to be quite valuable for countries having the plutonium technology. In Belgium, Belgonucleaire has been developing the plutonium technology for more than 20 yr and has operated a mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant since 1973. The past ten years of plant operation have provided for many improvements and relevant new documented experiences establishing a basis for new modifications that will be beneficial to the intrinsic quality, overall safety, and economy of the fuel

  7. Current operations and experiments at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) has continued to move toward operation of a fully-integrated, full-sized, computer-controlled fusion fuel processing loop. Concurrent, nonloop experiments have answered important questions on new components and issues such as palladium diffusion membranes, ceramic electrolysis cells, regenerable tritium getters, laser Raman spectroscopy, unregenerable tritium inventory on molecular sieves, tritium contamination problems and decontamination methods, and operating data on reliability, emissions, doses, and wastes generated. 4 refs., 2 figs

  8. Experiences from Swedish demonstration projects with phosphoric acid fuel cells; Erfarenheter fraan svenska demonstrationsprojekt med fosforsyrabraensleceller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Per [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sarkoezi, Laszlo [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-10-01

    In Sweden, there are today two phosphoric acid fuel cells installed, one PC25A which have been in operation in more than 4 years, and one PC25C which have been in operation for two years. The aim with this project has been two compare operation characteristics, performance, and operation experiences for these two models.

  9. The experience of five years operation of Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.; Lacroix, A.

    1980-01-01

    Two long periods of exceptional operation have satisfied the hopes of the designers and all parameters, power, efficiency, load factor, fuel behaviour, were better than was expected. The experience resulting from the only major incident provided a series of complementary data. Modern technology has need of sanction by experiment. The Phenix type reactor is a tool which is convenient to operate and to maintain. The two aspects of the demonstration, correct operation and ease of maintenance, take a concrete form in the harmlessness of Phenix on men and on the environment. There is no irradiation and few releases. (orig./DG)

  10. Operational reliability testing of FBR fuel in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaga, Takeo; Ukai, Shigeharu; Nomura, Shigeo; Shikakura, Sakae

    1991-01-01

    The operational reliability testing of FBR fuel has been conducting in EBR-II as a DOE/PNC collaboration program. This paper reviews the achieved summary of Phase-I test as well as outline of progressing Phase-II test. In Phase-I test, the reliability of FBR fuel pins including 'MONJU' fuel was demonstrated at the event of operational transient. Continued operation of the failed pins was also shown to be feasible without affecting the plant operation. The objectives of the Phase-II test is to extend the data base relating with the operational reliability for long life fuel, and to supply the highly quantitative evaluation. The valuable insight obtained in Phase-II test are considerably expected to be useful toward the achievement of commercial FBR. (author)

  11. Wide Operating Voltage Range Fuel Cell Battery Charger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Sen, Gokhan

    2014-01-01

    DC-DC converters for fuel cell applications require wide voltage range operation due to the unique fuel cell characteristic curve. Primary parallel isolated boost converter (PPIBC) is a boost derived topology for low voltage high current applications reaching an efficiency figure up to 98...... by two the converter input-to-output voltage gain. This allows covering the conditions when the fuel cell stack operates in the activation region (maximum output voltage) and increases the degrees of freedom for converter optimization. The transition between operating modes is studied because represents...

  12. Wetted foam liquid fuel ICF target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R E; Leeper, R J; Yi, S A; Kline, J L; Zylstra, A B; Peterson, R R; Shah, R; Braun, T; Biener, J; Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Biener, M M; Hamza, A V; Nikroo, A; Hopkins, L Berzak; Ho, D; LePape, S; Meezan, N B

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a new NIF experimental platform that employs wetted foam liquid fuel layer ICF capsules. We will use the liquid fuel layer capsules in a NIF sub-scale experimental campaign to explore the relationship between hot spot convergence ratio (CR) and the predictability of hot spot formation. DT liquid layer ICF capsules allow for flexibility in hot spot CR via the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density. Our hypothesis is that the predictive capability of hot spot formation is robust and 1D-like for a relatively low CR hot spot (CR∼15), but will become less reliable as hot spot CR is increased to CR>20. Simulations indicate that backing off on hot spot CR is an excellent way to reduce capsule instability growth and to improve robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries. In the initial experiments, we will test our hypothesis by measuring hot spot size, neutron yield, ion temperature, and burn width to infer hot spot pressure and compare to predictions for implosions with hot spot CR's in the range of 12 to 25. Larger scale experiments are also being designed, and we will advance from sub-scale to full-scale NIF experiments to determine if 1D-like behavior at low CR is retained as the scale-size is increased. The long-term objective is to develop a liquid fuel layer ICF capsule platform with robust thermonuclear burn, modest CR, and significant α-heating with burn propagation. (paper)

  13. Fuel deposits, chemistry and CANDU reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    'Hot conditioning' is a process which occurs as part of commissioning and initial start-up of each CANDU reactor, the first being the Nuclear Power Demonstration-2 reactor (NPD). Later, understanding of the cause of the failure of the Pickering Unit 1 G16 fuel channel led to a revised approach to 'hot conditioning', initially demonstrated on Bruce Unit 5, and subsequently utilized for each CANDU unit since. The difference being that during 'hot conditioning' of CANDU heat transport systems fuel was not in-core until Bruce Unit 5. The 'hot conditioning' processes will be briefly described along with the consequences to fuel. (author)

  14. Operational indices of WWER-1000 fuel assemblies and their improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Demin, E.

    1994-01-01

    The most general design features of WWER-1000 fuel assembly are discussed. The following advantages of design are stated as well as their operational confirmation and occurrences: 1) 'packing' density (tight-lattice) of fuel rods within the fuel assemblies; 2) simple handling of fuel assemblies and its small vulnerability; 3) good conditions for coolant mixing; 4) protection of the absorber rods against coolant effect; 5) adaptability to manufacture that provides stable quality. The main operational indices gathered during a ten-year period (1982-1992) at 17 WWER-1000 units in Russia and Ukraine are outlined. Provisions for emergency protection reliability are described. Future directions to improve fuel economy and control rod operability are discussed. 1 fig

  15. Operational indices of WWER-1000 fuel assemblies and their improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilchenko, I; Demin, E [Opytno-Konstruktorskoe Byuro Gidropress, Podol` sk (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The most general design features of WWER-1000 fuel assembly are discussed. The following advantages of design are stated as well as their operational confirmation and occurrences: (1) `packing` density (tight-lattice) of fuel rods within the fuel assemblies; (2) simple handling of fuel assemblies and its small vulnerability; (3) good conditions for coolant mixing; (4) protection of the absorber rods against coolant effect; (5) adaptability to manufacture that provides stable quality. The main operational indices gathered during a ten-year period (1982-1992) at 17 WWER-1000 units in Russia and Ukraine are outlined. Provisions for emergency protection reliability are described. Future directions to improve fuel economy and control rod operability are discussed. 1 fig.

  16. Fuel element failure detection experiments, evaluation of the experiments at KNK II/1 (Intermediate Report)

    CERN Document Server

    Bruetsch, D

    1983-01-01

    In the frame of the fuel element failure detection experiments at KNK II with its first core the measurement devices of INTERATOM were taken into operation in August 1981 and were in operation almost continuously. Since the start-up until the end of the first KNK II core operation plugs with different fuel test areas were inserted in order to test the efficiency of the different measuring devices. The experimental results determined during this test phase and the gained experiences are described in this report and valuated. All three measuring techniques (Xenon adsorption line XAS, gas-chromatograph GC and precipitator PIT) could fulfil the expectations concerning their susceptibility. For XAS and GC the nuclide specific sensitivities as determined during the preliminary tests could be confirmed. For PIT the influences of different parameters on the signal yield could be determined. The sensitivity of the device could not be measured due to a missing reference measuring point.

  17. A comparison of low-pressure and supercharged operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell systems for aircraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C.; Preiß, G.; Gores, F.; Griebenow, M.; Heitmann, S.

    2016-08-01

    Multifunctional fuel cell systems are competitive solutions aboard future generations of civil aircraft concerning energy consumption, environmental issues, and safety reasons. The present study compares low-pressure and supercharged operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells with respect to performance and efficiency criteria. This is motivated by the challenge of pressure-dependent fuel cell operation aboard aircraft with cabin pressure varying with operating altitude. Experimental investigations of low-pressure fuel cell operation use model-based design of experiments and are complemented by numerical investigations concerning supercharged fuel cell operation. It is demonstrated that a low-pressure operation is feasible with the fuel cell device under test, but that its range of stable operation changes between both operating modes. Including an external compressor, it can be shown that the power demand for supercharging the fuel cell is about the same as the loss in power output of the fuel cell due to low-pressure operation. Furthermore, the supercharged fuel cell operation appears to be more sensitive with respect to variations in the considered independent operating parameters load requirement, cathode stoichiometric ratio, and cooling temperature. The results indicate that a pressure-dependent self-humidification control might be able to exploit the potential of low-pressure fuel cell operation for aircraft applications to the best advantage.

  18. Operational requirements of spherical HTR fuel elements and their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roellig, K.; Theymann, W.

    1985-01-01

    The German development of spherical fuel elements with coated fuel particles led to a product design which fulfils the operational requirements for all HTR applications with mean gas exit temperatures from 700 deg C (electricity and steam generation) up to 950 deg C (supply of nuclear process heat). In spite of this relatively wide span for a parameter with strong impact on fuel element behaviour, almost identical fuel specifications can be used for the different reactor purposes. For pebble bed reactors with relatively low gas exit temperatures of 700 deg C, the ample design margins of the fuel elements offer the possibility to enlarge the scope of their in-service duties and, simultaneously, to improve fuel cycle economics. This is demonstrated for the HTR-500, an electricity and steam generating 500 MWel eq plant presently proposed as follow-up project to the THTR-300. Due to the low operating temperatures of the HTR-500 core, the fuel can be concentrated in about 70% of the pebbles of the core thus saving fuel cycle costs. Under all design accident conditions fuel temperatures are maintained below 1250 deg C. This allows a significant reduction in the engineered activity barriers outside the primary circuit, in particular for the loss of coolant accident. Furthermore, access to major primary circuit components and the reuse of the fuel elements after any design accident are possible. (author)

  19. Application of robotics in remote fuel fabrication operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, D.H.; Nagamoto, T.T.

    1984-01-01

    The Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) line, an automated and remotely controlled manufacturing process, is scheduled for startup in 1987 and will produce mixed uranium/plutonium oxide fuel pins for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The application of robotics in the fuel fabrication and supporting operations is described

  20. Operating experience feedback program at Olkiluoto NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosonen, Mikko

    2002-01-01

    Recent review and development of the operating experience feedback program will be described. The development of the program has been based on several reviews by outside organizations. Main conclusions from these review reports and from the self assessment of safety performance, safety problems and safety culture on the basis of the operational events made by ASSET-method will be described. An approach to gather and analyze small events - so-called near misses - will be described. The operating experience program has been divided into internal and external operating experience. ASSET-methodology and a computer program assisting the analysis are used for the internal operating experience events. Noteworthy incidents occurred during outage are analyzed also by ASSET-method. Screening and pre analysis of the external operating experience relies on co-operation with ERFATOM, an organization of Nordic utilities for the exchange of nuclear industry experience. A short presentation on the performance of the Olkiluoto units will conclude the presentation. (author)

  1. Recent U.S. reactor operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stello, V. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative assessment of U.S. and foreign reactor operating experience is provided. Recent operating occurrences having potentially significant safety impacts on power operation are described. An evaluation of the seriousness of each of these issues and the plans for resolution is discussed. A quantitative report on U.S. reactor operational experience is included. The details of the NRC program for evaluating and applying operating reactor experience in the regulatory process is discussed. A review is made of the adequacy of operating reactor safety and environmental margins based on actual operating experience. The Regulatory response philosophy to operating reactor experiences is detailed. This discussion indicates the NRC emphasis on the importance of a balanced action plan to provide for the protection of public safety in the national interest

  2. Vented fuel experiment for gas-cooled fast reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longest, A.W.; Gat, U.; Conlin, J.A.; Campana, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A pressure-equalized and vented fuel rod is being irradiated in an instrumented capsule designated GB-10 to approximately 100MWd/kg-heavy metal. The fuel is a sol-gel-derived 88 at.% uranium (approximately 9% 235 U) and 12 at.% plutonium oxide, and the cladding is 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel. The capsule is being irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and has exceeded a burnup of 70MWd/kg. The fuel has been operated at linear power rates of 39 and 44kW/m, and peak outer cladding temperature of 565 and 630 0 C respectively. A similar fuel rod in a previous capsule (GB-9) was subjected to 48kW/m (685 0 C). Helium gas sweeps through any portion of the three regions of the fuel rod, namely: fuel, blanket, and charcoal trap. The charcoal trap is operated at about 300 0 C. An on-line Ge(Li) detector is used to analyse release rates of several gamma-emitting noble gas isotopes. Analyses are performed primarily on sweep gas flowing through the entire fuel rod, and for sweeps over the top of the charcoal trap. Sweep gas samples are analyzed for stable noble gas isotopes. Results in the form of ratios of release rate over birth rate (R/B) and venting rate over birth rate (V/B) are derived. R/B rates range from 10 -4 % to 30% while V/B ranges from 10 -6 % to 30%. Flow conductance in the capsule was monitored by recording the flow rate and pressure drop across the fuel rod and inlet sweep line. The flow conductance has been falling with increasing burnup, currently restricting the flow to about 20ml (s.t.p.)/min at a pressure difference of about 1.5MPa. Venting rates of the gaseous fission products as a function of gas pressure in the range 6.9 to 1.4MPa have also been measured. Planned future experiments include the monitoring of tritium release, venting and cladding permeation rates, and its molecular form. First measurements have been made. A simulated leak experiment will determine the mixture of fission gases as a function of flow rate and the most

  3. BWR and ABWR operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Kimio; Takayama, Yoshito; Shimizu, Shunichi

    1998-01-01

    The first commercial operation of a nuclear power plant in Japan was in 1969. At present, there are 52 nuclear power plants operating in the country, accounting for about 35% of the total electricity generated and about 20 % of the total capacity of electricity generation facilities in Japan. Moreover, Japan has had the highest facility utilization rate, which is an indicator of operational safety, among the top four nuclear-generation countries (U.S.A., France, Germany, and Japan) every year since 1993, and has maintained a utilization rate of more than 80% since 1995. Toshiba has supported plant operation and maintenance in 19 nuclear power plants. The overall facility utilization rate of these plants attained a record of 86.4% in fiscal 1996. Furthermore, the averaged rates over the past three fiscal years from 1995 to 1997 have been the highest in the world among plant constructors such as GE, WH, and Siemens. (author)

  4. Nuclear units operating improvement by using operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Bilegan, I.C.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents how the information experience can be used to improve the operation of nuclear units. This areas include the following items: conservative decision making; supervisory oversight; teamwork; control room distraction; communications; expectations and standards; operator training and fundamental knowledge, procedure quality and adherence; plant status awareness. For each of these topics, the information illustrate which are the principles, the lessons learned from operating experience and the most appropriate exemplifying documents. (authors)

  5. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring

  6. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comparisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for the conventional Main Ring

  7. Operation and maintenance of spent fuel storage and transportation casks/containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Member States have a growing need for casks for spent fuel storage and transportation. A variety of casks has been developed and is in use at an increasing number of sites. This has resulted in an accumulation of experience that will provide valuable information for other projects in spent fuel management. This publication provides a comprehensive review of information on the cask operation and maintenance associated with spent fuel storage. It draws upon generic knowledge from industrial experience and applications and is intended to serve as a basis for better planning and implementation in future projects

  8. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries

  9. Typical IAEA operations at a fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, S.

    1984-01-01

    The IAEA operations performed at a typical Fuel Fabrication Plant are explained. To make the analysis less general the case of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel Fabrication Plants is considered. Many of the conclusions drawn from this analysis could be extended to other types of fabrication plants. The safeguards objectives and goals at LEU Fuel Fabrication Plants are defined followed by a brief description of the fabrication process. The basic philosophy behind nuclear material stratification and the concept of Material Balance Areas (MBA's) and Key Measurement Points (KMP's) is explained. The Agency operations and verification methods used during physical inventory verifications are illustrated

  10. Experience of safety and performance improvement for fuel handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoon Chang, Sang; Hee Lee, Dae

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide experience of safety and performance improvement of fuel handling equipment for nuclear power plants in Korea. The fuel handling equipment, which is used as an important part of critical processes during the refueling outage, has been improved to enhance safety and to optimize fuel handling procedures. Results of data measured during the fuel reloading are incorporated into design changes. The safety and performance improvement for fuel handling equipment could be achieved by simply modifying the components and improving the interlock system. The experience provided in this study can be useful lessons for further improvement of the fuel handling equipment. (authors)

  11. Fuel element structure - design, production and operational behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pott, G.; Dietz, W.

    1985-01-01

    The lectures held at the meeting of the fuel element section of the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft gives a survey of developments in fuel element structure design for PWR-type, BWR-type and fast breeder reactors. For better utilization of the fuel, concepts have been developed for re-usable, removable and thus repairable fuel elements. Furthermore, the manufacturing methods for fuel element structures were refined to achieve better quality and more efficient manufacturing methods. Statements on the dimensional behaviour and on the mechanical stability of fuel element structures in normal and accident operation could be made on the basis of post-irradiation inspections. Finally, the design, manufacture and irradiation behaviour of graphite reflectors in HTGR-type reactors are described. The 12 lectures have been recorded in the data base separately. (RF) [de

  12. Niobia-doped UO2 fuel manufacturing experience at British nuclear fuels Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.; Wood, G.A.; Perkins, C.P.

    1998-01-01

    BNFL Fuel Division has made niobia doped fuel for over twenty years in its Springfields Research and Development facilities. This paper reviews this experience together with feedback from successful in-reactor and laboratory tests. Recent experience in qualifying and manufacturing niobia doped fuel pellets for a European PWR will be described. (author)

  13. MOX use in PWRs. EDF operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, Jean-Luc; Debes, Michel

    2011-01-01

    From the origin, EDF back-end fuel cycle strategy has focused on 'closing the fuel cycle', in other words integrating fuel reprocessing, with vitrification of high level waste concentrated within small volumes, and the recycling of valuable materials. The implementation of this policy was marked in 1987 by the first loading of sixteen MOX. By December 2010, 20 reactors have been loaded with 1750 tHM of MOX. EDF current strategy is to match the reprocessing program with MOX manufacturing capacity to limit the quantity of separated plutonium. This is routinely called the 'flow ad-equation' strategy. Currently, the MOX Parity core management achieves balance of MOX and UOX performance with a significant increase of the MOX discharge burn-up. Globally, the behavior under irradiation of MOX fuel assemblies has been satisfactory. So far, from the beginning of MOX use in EDF PWRs, only 6 MOX FAs with rod leakage have been identified, which gives a very satisfactory level of reliability. The industrial maturity of MOX fuel, with increased performances, allows the improvement of nuclear KWh competitiveness and of the plant operation performance, while maintaining in operation the same safety level, without significant impact on environment and radiological protection. (author)

  14. Experience of developments and implementation of advanced fuel cycles of WWER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinski, A.A.; Lizorkin, M.P.; Novikov, A.N.; Proselkov, V.N.; Saprykin, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the experience of development and implementation of advanced four- and five-year fuel cycles in the WWER-440 reactors, the results of experimental operation of the new fuel design and the main neutronic characteristics of the core. (Authors)

  15. Practical experience with the leaky-fuel monitoring at Bohunice NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacmar, M.; Cizek, J.

    2001-01-01

    The first part of this paper describes practical experience with the fuel monitoring in operating reactors from point of view possible leakages. Summarized in the paper are numbers leaky fuel assemblies both for NPP and for particular units. Some failure causes are discussed for operational conditions of Bohunice NPP. In the second part of paper critical power ramps on hot fuel rod of leaky fuel assemblies are analysed to eliminate failures from PCI. The main aim of the paper is the need to understand the mechanism and causes of failures (Authors)

  16. AECL experience in fuel channel inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Drunen, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Gunn, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Mayo, W.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Scott, D.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-06-01

    Inspection of CANDU fuel channels (FC) is performed to ensure safe and economic reactor operation. CANDU reactor FCs have features that make them a unique non-destructive testing (NDT) challenge. The thin, 4 mm pressure-tube wall means flaws down to about 0.1 mm deep must be reliably detected and characterized. This is one to two orders of magnitude smaller than is usually considered of significant concern for steel piping and pressure vessels. A second unique feature is that inspection sensors must operate in the reactor core--often within 20 cm of highly radioactive fuel. Work on inspection of CANDU reactor FCs at AECL dates back over three decades. In that time, AECL staff have provided equipment and conducted or supervised in-service inspections in about 250 FCs, in addition to over 8000 pre-service FCs. These inspections took place at every existing CANDU reactor except those in India and Romania. Early FC inspections focussed on measurement of changes in dimensions (gauging) resulting from exposure to a combination of neutrons, stress and elevated temperature. Expansion of inspection activities to include volumetric inspection (for flaws) started in the mid-1970s with the discovery of delayed hydride cracking in Pickering 3 and 4 rolled joints. Recognition of other types of flaw mechanisms in the 1980s led to further expansion in both pre-service and in-service inspections. These growing requirements, to meet regulatory as well as economic needs, led to the development of a wide spectrum of inspection technology that now includes tests for hydrogen concentration, structural integrity of core components, flaws, and dimensional change. This paper reviews current CANDU reactor FC inspection requirements. The equipment and techniques developed to satisfy these requirements are also described. The paper concludes with a discussion of work in progress in AECL aimed at providing state-of-the-art FC inspection services. (author)

  17. Reactor operator screening test experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, W.J.; Penkala, J.L.; Witzig, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    When it became apparent to Duquesne Light Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that the throughput of their candidate selection-Phase I training-reactor operator certification sequence was something short of acceptable, the utility decided to ask consultants to make recommendations with respect to candidate selection procedures. The recommendation implemented was to create a Nuclear Training Test that would predict the success of a candidate in completing Phase I training and subsequently qualify for reactor operator certification. The mechanics involved in developing and calibrating the Nuclear Training Test are described. An arbitration decision that resulted when a number of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers union employees filed a grievance alleging that the selection examination was unfair, invalid, not job related, inappropriate, and discriminatorily evaluated is also discussed. The arbitration decision favored the use of the Nuclear Training Test

  18. CORA-13 experiment on severe fuel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firnhaber, M.; Trambauer, K.; Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Schanz, G.; Sepold, L.

    1993-07-01

    The major objectives of the experiment were to investigate the behavior of PWR fuel elements during early core degradation and fast cooldown due to refill. Measured quantities are boundary conditions, bundle temperatures, hydrogen generation and the final bundle configuration. Boundary conditions which could not be measured, but which are necessary for simplified test simulation (axial power profile, shroud insulation temperature, bundle refill flow) were estimated using ATHLET-CD. The capability of the codes in calculating the main degradation phenomena has been clearly illustrated and weaknesses concerning the modelling of some degradation processes have been identified. Among the degradation phenomena involved in the test, the more severe limitations concern the UO 2 -ZrO 2 dissolution by molten Zr, the solubility limits in the resulting U-Zr-O mixture and the cladding failure by the molten mixture. There is a lack concerning the Inconel spacer-grid interactions with the rods, the material interaction between control rod material and fuel rods, and in the modelling of hydrogen generation during cooldown. (orig./DG)

  19. Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. Arizona Strip Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    Founded in 1975 by uranium pioneer, Robert W. Adams, Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. (EFNI) emerged as the largest US uranium mining company by the mid-1980s. Confronting the challenges of declining uranium market prices and the development of high-grade ore bodies in Australia and Canada, EFNI aggressively pursued exploration and development of breccia-pipe ore bodies in Northwestern Arizona. As a result, EFNI's production for the Arizona Strip of 18.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 over the period 1980 through 1991, maintained the company's status as a leading US uranium producer

  20. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation

  1. Emission and operating performance of a biomethane tractor with dual fuel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautner, Sebastian; Emberger, Peter; Thuneke, Klaus; Remmele, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    The use of biomethane as fuel for agricultural machinery with dual fuel technology is contributing to climate protection and ensures safe fuel supply. So far, hardly any documented operational experiences are known. The aim of the project, funded by the Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Media, Energy and Technology, was to investigate practicability for daily use and the emission behaviour of a Valtra N101 prototype tractor (exhaust stage IIIA). The retrofitted dual-fuel technology of the former conventional diesel tractor simultaneously uses biomethane or natural gas and diesel as ignition fuel. During the field test over 590 working hours, the tractor showed overall high reliability. On average the operating range in dual-fuel mode with one complete filling of the gas tanks was about 11.5 hours. On the tractor test bench a significant improvement of the exhaust emissions could be observed, since the gas ECU had been optimized and changed by the manufacturer. For dual-fuel operation, nitrogen oxides (NO x ) are lower, whereas carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC) and particulate matter emissions (PM) are higher compared to solely diesel operation. In particular, HC emissions exceed the proposed limiting value, submitted by the European Commission. This is due to incomplete gas combustion and insufficient conversion by the exhaust after-treatment-system (methane slip). A big potential for optimization is expected by adjusting the operating point-specific gasdiesel ratio and improving the exhaust gas aftertreatment system.

  2. The Wonderland of Operating the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Augustinus, A; Pinazza, O; Rosinský, P; Lechman, M; Jirdén, L; Chochula, P

    2011-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. Composed of 18 sub-detectors each with numerous subsystems that need to be controlled and operated in a safe and efficient way. The Detector Control System (DCS) is the key to this and has been used by detector experts with success during the commissioning of the individual detectors. During the transition from commissioning to operation, more and more tasks were transferred from detector experts to central operators. By the end of the 2010 datataking campaign, the ALICE experiment was run by a small crew of central operators, with only a single controls operator. The transition from expert to non-expert operation constituted a real challenge in terms of tools, documentation and training. A relatively high turnover and diversity in the operator crew that is specific to the HEP experiment environment (as opposed to the more stable operation crews for accelerators) made this challenge even bigger. Thi...

  3. Nevada commercial spent nuclear fuel transportation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an historic overview of commercial reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipments that have occurred in the state of Nevada, and to review the accident and incident experience for this type of shipments. Results show that between 1964 and 1990, 309 truck shipments covering approximately 40,000 miles moved through Nevada; this level of activity places Nevada tenth among the states in the number of truck shipments of SNF. For the same period, 15 rail shipments moving through the State covered approximately 6,500 miles, making Nevada 20th among the states in terms of number of rail shipments. None of these shipments had an accident or an incident associated with them. Because the data for Nevada are so limited, national data on SNF transportation and the safety of truck and rail transportation in general were also assessed

  4. Visual in-pile fuel disruption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, G.L.; Ostensen, R.W.; Young, M.F.

    1978-01-01

    In a loss-of-flow (LOF) accident in an LMFBR, the mode of disruption of fuel may determine the probability of a subsequent energetic excursion. To investigate these phenomena, in-pile disruption of fission-heated irradiated fuel pellets was recorded by high speed cinematography. Instead of fuel frothing or dust-cloud breakup (as used in the SAS code) massive and very rapid fuel swelling, not predicted by analytical models, occurred. These tests support massive fuel swelling as the initial mode of fuel disruption in a LOF accident. (author)

  5. Experience of developing the imitators of the fuel element for the WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashov, S.M.; Boltenko, Eh.A.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Peculiarities of designs of fuel elements imitators for the WWER-type reactors of nominal capacity and with single-ended current feed positioning are considered. The data on the filler heat conductivity and the results of tests and application of the fuel elements imitators at various testing facilities are presented. The possibility of equipping one of the non operating WWER reactors with the fuel element imitators for conduct of large-scale experiment is indicated

  6. Operational experience in underwater photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherdale, John D.; John Turner, D.

    Underwater photogrammetry has become established as a cost-effective technique for inspection and maintenance of platforms and pipelines for the offshore oil industry. A commercial service based in Scotland operates in the North Sea, USA, Brazil, West Africa and Australia. 70 mm cameras and flash units are built for the purpose and analytical plotters and computer graphics systems are used for photogrammetric measurement and analysis of damage, corrosion, weld failures and redesign of underwater structures. Users are seeking simple, low-cost systems for photogrammetric analysis which their engineers can use themselves.

  7. Experiments of progressive replacement in Cesar at operation temperature. Uranium-plutonium fuels. Study performed within the frame of the CEA-EURATOM - No. 002 64 9 TRUF contract - 'Plutonium recycling'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosser, Roland; Cuny, Gerard; Hoffmann, Alain; Langlet, Gerard; Laponche, Bernard; Morier, Francis; Penet, Francois; Charbonneau, Serge

    1969-08-01

    Experiments of progressive replacement (or substitution) of uranium-plutonium alloy fuels are part of a general program of experimental studies which are aimed at testing the methods used by the CEA to calculate the evolution of nuclear power reactors (calculation of spectrum in plutonium-containing fuels and validity of data used in these calculations, calculation of cross sections). Such progressive replacements have been performed in Aquilon (with heavy water as moderator) and measurements have been performed by oscillation in Marius and Cesar (graphite moderator). Herein reported experiments have been performed at 20, 100 and 200 C during a first campaign in 1966, and at 300, 400 and 450 C during a second campaign in 1968. Measurements are interpreted by means of the Coregraf 2 code. The report presents experimental conditions in Cesar, the measurement principle and the interpretation method (substitution experiments, enriched uranium calibration, interpretation steps, and temperature coefficient measurement), the obtained results and their discussion [fr

  8. US remote monitoring operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupree, S.A.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Under international partnerships and bilateral agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, other national laboratories, and international partner organizations have emplaced remote monitoring systems in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world for the purpose of conducting field trials of remote monitoring. The purpose of the present report is to review the results from these field trials and draw general conclusions regarding the trials. Many thousands of hours of sensor and system operation have been logged, and data have been retrieved from many locations. In virtually all cases the system components have functioned as intended and data have been successfully collected and transmitted for review. Comparisons between front-end-triggered video and time-lapse video have shown that the triggered record has captured all relevant monitored operations at the various nuclear facilities included in the field trials. We believe the utility and functional reliability of remote monitoring for international safeguards has been shown. However, it should be kept in mind that openness and transparency, including some form of short-notice inspections, are likely to be prerequisites to the safeguards implementation of remote monitoring in any State

  9. Design improvements, construction and operating experience with BWRs in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchigasaki, G.; Yokomi, M.; Sasaki, M.; Aoki, R.; Hashimoto, H.

    1983-01-01

    (1) The first domestic-made 1100-MW(e) BWR in Japan commenced commercial operation in April 1982. The unit is the leading one of the subsequent three in Fukushima Daini nuclear power station owned by the Tokyo Electric Power Company Inc. (Tepco). Based on the accumulated construction and operation experience of 500-MW(e) and 800-MW(e) class BWRs, improvements in various aspects during both the design and construction stages were introduced in core and fuel design with advanced gadolinia distribution, reactor feedwater treatment technology for crud reduction, a radwaste island, control and instrumentation to cope with the lessons learned through Three Mile Island assessment etc. (2) Based on many operating experiences with BWRs, an improved BWR core, which has easier operability and higher load factor than the conventional core, has been developed. The characteristic of the improved core is ''axially two-zoned uranium enrichment distribution''; the enrichment of the upper part of the fuel is slightly higher than that of the lower part. Through the improved core it became possible to optimize the axial power flattening and core reactivity control separately by axial enrichment distribution and burnable poison content. The improved fuels were loaded into operating BWRs and successfully proved the performance by this experience. (3) To shorten annual outage time, to reduce radiation exposure, to save manpower, and to achieve high reliability and safety of inspection operation, the remote automatic service and inspection equipment were developed in Japan. This paper presents the concept, distinctive features, and actual operation experience of the automatic refuelling machine, control-rod drive (CRD) remote-handling machine, improved main steam line isolation plug, and the automated ultrasonic inspection system with a computerized data processing unit, which have been developed by Hitachi, Ltd. with excellent results. (author)

  10. The cost of operating with failed fuel at Virginia power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Virginia Power has completed a study of the costs incurred due to fuel failures in its pressurized water reactors. This study was prompted by histories of high primary coolant activity and subsequent fuel inspections at the North Anna and Surry power stations. The study included an evaluation of the total costs of fuel failures as well as an evaluation of the economics of postirradiation fuel inspections. The major costs of fuel failures included personnel radiation exposure, permanently discharged failed fuel, radwaste generation, increased labor requirements, containment entry delays due to airborne radioactivity, and ramp rate restrictions. Although fuel failures affect a utility in several other areas, the items evaluated in the study were thought to be the most significant of the costs. The study indicated that performing a postirradiation failed fuel examination can be economically justified at tramp-corrected 131 I levels of > 0.015 μCi/g. The savings to the utility can be on the order of several million dollars. Additionally, the cost penalty of performing a fuel inspection at lower iodine levels is generally in the range of $200,000. This economic penalty is expected to be outweighed by the intangible benefits of operating with a defect-free core

  11. Implementation of ICRP recommendation in nuclear fuel cycle operations: challenges and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    The operating experience with regard to occupational exposure and environmental releases in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities are described. The achievements of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in adhering to the revised radiological protection standards are highlighted, with particular reference to Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The downward trend of occupational and public doses due to nuclear power plant operation is emphasised. Some of the important radiologically significant jobs executed at NPPs are listed. With the vast experiences in the field of radiological protection, vis-a-vis stringent regulatory requirements, and design modifications envisaged in future facilities the radiological impact, both in the occupational and public domain is bound to be minimum. (author)

  12. Mutual influences of reactor operation and fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewiner, C.; Schaerer, R.

    1989-01-01

    OPEN (Organisation des Producteurs d'Energie Nucleaire) comprises the electricity producers from seven European countries which now operate or intend to operate nuclear power plants. Its activities include the study of technical, economic and legal subjects related to nuclear electricity. A continuous analysis of the fuel cycle market has been pursued within OPEN for almost 15 years. For the past few years, OPEN has also been concerned with the subject of fuel management in the reactors operated by its members. The purpose of this effort was to obtain an overall picture of possible fuel improvements and to evaluate the effects, in particular the economic ones, of diverse fuel reload managements and of reprocessed uranium and plutonium recycling. The conclusions of this study are as follows: Increase in burn-ups produces notable savings in electricity generating costs. It also permits adaptation of fuel loading mode to the desirable irradiation campaign length. This allows for better management of the country's overall means of electricity generation (nuclear, fossil-fuelled or hydro plants), and adjustment to the electrical demand. These new reload schemes have various impacts on natural uranium consumption and enrichment, but, above all, they affect directly all fuel cycle operations linked to the number of assemblies (fabrication, reprocessing, etc.). 6 figs

  13. International co-operation in the supply of nuclear fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper draws on British Nuclear Fuels' (BNFL) wide experience of international collaboration in nuclear fuel process activities to examine the pros and cons of international agreements. Initially, the factors that influence the need to co-operate, the extent of possible co-operation and the alternative types of agreement, are reviewed. Next, the benefits, problems and risks associated with each function, such as management, financial R and D, marketing and operations that could be covered within the scope of an international agreement, are examined in detail. The paper continues by calling upon specific experience obtained by BNFL in the co-operation with other organizations over several years in both major and much smaller agreements, illustrating the rationale behind the co-operation, the resolution of 'teething' troubles and the present status of these organizations. In conclusion, the paper comments upon the effectiveness of collaboration agreements and identifies several requirements for international co-operation to succeed. (author)

  14. Cask operation and maintenance for spent fuel storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.S. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Interim storage is an essential platform for any option to be chosen later as an endpoint for spent fuel management. In view of such a circumstance, the most imminent service required for the spent fuel management worldwide is to provide adequate storage for the future spent fuel inventory arising either from the continued operation of nuclear power plants or from the removal of spent fuel in preparation for plant decommissioning. While the bulk of the global inventory of spent fuel are still stored in AR pools, dry storage has become a prominent alternative especially for newly built AFR facilities, with more than 17,000 t HM already stored in dry storage facilities worldwide. Storage in cask under inert conditions has become the preferred option, given the advantages including passive cooling features and modular mode of capacity increase. In terms of economics, dry storage is particularly propitious for long-term storage in that operational costs are minimized by the passive cooling features. The trend toward dry storage, especially in cask type, is likely to continue with an implication that and the supply will closely follow the increasing demand for storage by incremental additions of casks to the effect of minimizing cost penalty of the idle capacities typical of pool facilities. A variety of storage systems have been developed to meet specific requirements of different reactor fuels and a large number of designs based on these generic technologies are now available for the spent fuel containers (horizontal, vertical etc) and storage facilities. Multi-purpose technologies (i.e. a single technology for storage, transportation and disposal) have also been studied. Recent concern on security measures for protection of spent fuel has prompted a consideration on the possibility of placing storage facility underground. The future evolution of requirements and technologies will bring important impacts on cask operation and maintenance for spent fuel storage.

  15. Cask operation and maintenance for spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    Interim storage is an essential platform for any option to be chosen later as an endpoint for spent fuel management. In view of such a circumstance, the most imminent service required for the spent fuel management worldwide is to provide adequate storage for the future spent fuel inventory arising either from the continued operation of nuclear power plants or from the removal of spent fuel in preparation for plant decommissioning. While the bulk of the global inventory of spent fuel are still stored in AR pools, dry storage has become a prominent alternative especially for newly built AFR facilities, with more than 17,000 t HM already stored in dry storage facilities worldwide. Storage in cask under inert conditions has become the preferred option, given the advantages including passive cooling features and modular mode of capacity increase. In terms of economics, dry storage is particularly propitious for long-term storage in that operational costs are minimized by the passive cooling features. The trend toward dry storage, especially in cask type, is likely to continue with an implication that and the supply will closely follow the increasing demand for storage by incremental additions of casks to the effect of minimizing cost penalty of the idle capacities typical of pool facilities. A variety of storage systems have been developed to meet specific requirements of different reactor fuels and a large number of designs based on these generic technologies are now available for the spent fuel containers (horizontal, vertical etc) and storage facilities. Multi-purpose technologies (i.e. a single technology for storage, transportation and disposal) have also been studied. Recent concern on security measures for protection of spent fuel has prompted a consideration on the possibility of placing storage facility underground. The future evolution of requirements and technologies will bring important impacts on cask operation and maintenance for spent fuel storage

  16. Analysis of WWER-440 fuel performance under normal operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunduz, Oe; Koese, S; Akbas, T [Atomenerjisi Komisyonu, Ankara (Turkey); Colak, Ue [Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Center (Turkey)

    1994-12-31

    FRAPCON-2 code originally developed for LWR fuel behaviour simulation is used to analyse the WWER-440 fuel rod behaviour at normal operational conditions. The code is capable of utilizing different models for mechanical analysis and gas release calculations. Heat transfer calculations are accomplished through a collocation technique by the method of weighted residuals. Temperature and burnup element properties are evaluated using MATPRO package. As the material properties of Zr-1%Nb used as cladding in WWER-440s are not provided in the code, Zircaloy-4 is used as a substitute for Zr-1%Nb. Mac-Donald-Weisman model is used for gas release calculation. FRACAS-1 and FRACAS-2 models are used in the mechanical calculations. It is assumed that the reactor was operated for 920 days (three consecutive cycles), the burnup being 42000 Mwd/t U. Results of the fuel rod behaviour analysis are given for three axial nodes: bottom node, central node and top node. The variations of the following characteristic fuel rod parameters are studied through the prescribed power history: unmoved gap thickness, gap heat transfer coefficient, fuel axial elongation, cladding axial elongation, fuel centerline temperature and ZrO-thickness at cladding surface. The value of each parameter is calculated as a function of the effective power days for the three nodes by using FRACAS-1 and FRACAS-2 codes for comparison.The results show that calculations with deformable pellet approximation with FRACAS-II model could provide better information for the behaviour of a typical fuel rod. Calculations indicate that fuel rod failure is not observed during the operation. All fuel rod parameters investigated are found to be within the safety limits. It is concluded, however, that for better assessment of reactor safety these calculations should be extended for transient conditions such as LOCA. 1 tab., 10 figs., 4 refs.

  17. Introduction of HTR-PM Operation and Fuel Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fucheng; Luo Yong; Gao Qiang

    2014-01-01

    There is a big difference between High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Pebble-modules Demonstration Project(HTR-PM) and PWR in operation mode. HTR-PM is a continually refuelled reactor, and the operation and fuel management of it, which affect each other, are inseparable. Therefore, the analysis of HTR-PM fuel management needs to be carried out “in real time”. HTR-PM operation and fuel management system is developed for on-power refuelling mode of HTR-PM. The system, which calculates the core neutron flux and power distribution, taking high-temperature reactor physics analysis software-VSOP as a basic tool, can track and predict the core state online, and it has the ability to restructure core power distribution online, making use of ex-core detectors to correct and check tracking calculation. Based on the ability to track and predict, it can compute the core parameters to provide support for the operation of the reactor. It can also predict the operation parameters of the reactor to provide reference information for the fuel management.The contents of this paper include the development purposes, architecture, the main function modules, running process, and the idea of how to use the system to carry out HTR-PM fuel management. (author)

  18. EBR-II: summary of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, W.H.; Leman, J.D.; Lentz, G.L.; Longua, K.J.; Olson, W.H.; Shields, J.A.; Wolz, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. The primary cooling system is a submerged-pool type. The early operation of the reactor successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor operating as an integrated reactor, power plant, and fuel-processing facility. In 1967, the role of EBR-II was reoriented from a demonstration plant to an irradiation facility. Many changes have been made and are continuing to be made to increase the usefulness of EBR-II for irradiation and safety tests. A review of EBR-II's operating history reveals a plant that has demonstrated high availability, stable and safe operating characteristics, and excellent performance of sodium components. Levels of radiation exposure to the operating and maintenance workers have been low; and fission-gas releases to the atmosphere have been minimal. Driver-fuel performance has been excellent. The repairability of radioactive sodium components has been successfully demonstrated a number of times. Recent highlights include installation and successful operation of (1) the hydrogen-meter leak detectors for the steam generators, (2) the cover-gas-cleanup system and (3) the cesium trap in the primary sodium. Irradiations now being conducted in EBR-II include the run-beyond-cladding breach fuel tests for mixed-oxide and carbide elements. Studies are in progress to determine EBR-II's capability for conducting important ''operational safety'' tests. These tests would extend the need and usefulness of EBR-II into the 1980's

  19. Fuel Consumption and Emissions from Airport Taxi Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Developed a method to calculate fuel consumption and emissions of phases of taxi operations. Results at DFW showed that up to 18% of fuel can be saved by eliminating stop-and-go situations. Developed an energy efficient and environmentally friendly surface concept: Spot and Runway Departure Advisory (SARDA) tool. The SARDA tool has been identified as a potential candidate for a technology transfer to the FAA.

  20. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells physical principles of materials and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Eikerling, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a systematic and profound account of scientific challenges in fuel cell research. The introductory chapters bring readers up to date on the urgency and implications of the global energy challenge, the prospects of electrochemical energy conversion technologies, and the thermodynamic and electrochemical principles underlying the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The book then presents the scientific challenges in fuel cell research as a systematic account of distinct components, length scales, physicochemical processes, and scientific disciplines. The main part of t

  1. Fuel performance-experience to date and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proebstle, R.A.; Klepfer, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    The experience in the USA to date, as reported in the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission data, conforms a very favorable cost trend for nuclear fuel costs relative to fossil fuel costs. The nuclear fuel cost promose relative to other fuels looks even better in future. Uranium supply surplus and advances in enrichment technology suggest that this trend should continue. Threats to the economic potential for nuclear fuel costs include unexpected problems in actural versus projected core and fuel technical performance. The New designs for BWR's nuclear fuel are extended to 38,000 MWd/MTU and the fuel rod reliabilities of 0.999994 are achievable. This reliability is equivalent to less than 3 fuel rod failures over the 40 year life of a reactor. (Liu)

  2. Experience with oxide fuel for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use and potential of oxide fuel systems for the LMFBR. The flawless performance of mixed oxide (UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuel in FFTF to 100,000 MWd/MTM is reviewed and means for achieving 200,000 MWd/MTM are presented. This includes using non-swelling alloys for cladding and ducts to overcome the limitations caused by swelling of the current alloys. Examples are provided of the inherently safe characteristics of oxide fuel including a large negative Doppler coefficient, its dispersive nature under hypothetical accident scenarios, and the low energy molten fuel-coolant interaction. Developments in fuel fabrication and reprocessing that stress safety and reduced personnel exposure are presented. Lastly, the flexibility to design for maximum fuel supply (high breeding gain) or minimum fuel cost (long lifetime) is shown

  3. Experience with oxide fuel for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.D.

    1984-04-01

    This paper focuses on the use and potential of oxide fuel system for the LMFBR. The flawless performance of mixed oxide (UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuel in FFTF to 100,000 MWd/MTM is reviewed and means for achieving 200,000 MWd/MTM are presented. This includes using non-swelling alloys for cladding and ducts to overcome the limitations caused by swelling of the current alloys. Exampled are provided of the inherently safe characteristics of oxide fuel including a large negative Doppler coefficient, its dispersive nature under hypothetical accident scenarios, and the low energy molten fuel-coolant interaction. Developments in fuel fabrication and reprocessing that stress safety and reduced personnel exposure are presented. Lastly, the flexibility to design for maximum fuel supply (high breeding gain) or minimum fuel cost (long lifetime) is shown

  4. Operator training and the training simulator experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.

    The author outlines the approach used by Ontario Hydro to train operators from the day they are hired as Operators-in-Training until they are Authorized Unit First Operators. He describes in detail the use of the simulator in the final year of the authorization program, drawing on experience with the Pickering NGS A simulator. Simulators, he concludes, are important aids to training but by no means all that is required to guarantee capable First Operators

  5. FFTF operating experience, 1982-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldo, J.B.; Franz, G.R.; Loika, E.F.; Krupar, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 Mwt sodium-cooled fast reactor operating at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Richland, Washington, to conduct fuels and materials testing in support of the US Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. Startup and initial power testing included a comprehensive series of nonnuclear and nuclear tests to verify the thermal, hydraulic, and neutronic characteristics of the plant. A specially designed series of natural circulation tests were then performed to demonstrate the inherent safety features of the plant. Early in 1982, the FFTF began its first 100-day irradiation cycle. Since that time the plant has operated very well, achieving a cycle capacity factor of 94% in the most recent irradiation cycle. Seventy-five specific test assemblies and 25,000 individual fuel pins have been irradiated, some in excess of 80 MWd/Kg

  6. Industry Operating Experience Process at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, B.; Bozin, B.; Cizmek, R.

    2012-01-01

    Experience has shown that number of minor events and near misses, usually without immediate or significant impact to plant safety and reliability, are precursors of significant or severe events due to the same or similar root or apparent cause(s). It is therefore desirable to identify and analyze weaknesses of the precursor problems (events) in order to prevent occurrence of significant events. Theoretically, significant events could be prevented from occurring if the root cause(s) of these precursor problems could be identified and eliminated. The Operating Experience Program identifies such event precursors and by reporting them to the industry, plant specific corrective actions can be taken to prevent events at other operational plants. The intent of the Operating Experience Program is therefore to improve nuclear power plant safety and reliability of the operating nuclear power plants. Each plant develops its own Operating Experience Program in order to learn from the in-house operating experience as well as from the world community of nuclear plants. The effective use of operating experience includes analyzing both plant and industry events in order to identify fundamental weaknesses and then determining appropriate plant-specific actions that will minimize the likelihood of similar events. Learning and applying the lessons from operating experience is an integral part of station safety culture and is encouraged by managers throughout the top plant administrative programs and procedures. Krsko NPP is developed it own Operating Experience Program by using the most relevant INPO/WANO/IAEA guidelines as well as its own knowledge, skills an operating practice. The Operating Experience Program is a part of the Corrective Action Program, which is among top management programs, thus program is strongly encouraged by top management. The purpose of Operating Experience Program is to provide guidance for using, sharing, and evaluating operating experience information

  7. FFTF fuel pin design procedure verification for transient operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baars, R.E.

    1975-05-01

    The FFTF design procedures for evaluating fuel pin transient performance are briefly reviewed, and data where available are compared with design procedure predictions. Specifically, burst conditions derived from Fuel Cladding Transient Tester (FCTT) tests and from ANL loss-of-flow tests are compared with burst pressures computed using the design procedure upon which the cladding integrity limit was based. Failure times are predicted using the design procedure for evaluation of rapid reactivity insertion accidents, for five unterminated TREAT experiments in which well characterized fuel failures were deliberately incurred. (U.S.)

  8. System for controlling the operating temperature of a fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabis, Thomas R.; Makiel, Joseph M.; Veyo, Stephen E.

    2006-06-06

    A method and system are provided for improved control of the operating temperature of a fuel cell (32) utilizing an improved temperature control system (30) that varies the flow rate of inlet air entering the fuel cell (32) in response to changes in the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32). Consistent with the invention an improved temperature control system (30) is provided that includes a controller (37) that receives an indication of the temperature of the inlet air from a temperature sensor (39) and varies the heat output by at least one heat source (34, 36) to maintain the temperature of the inlet air at a set-point T.sub.inset. The controller (37) also receives an indication of the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32) and varies the flow output by an adjustable air mover (33), within a predetermined range around a set-point F.sub.set, in order to maintain the operating temperature of the fuel cell (32) at a set-point T.sub.opset.

  9. Recent TMX-U central cell heating and fueling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Barter, J.; Dimonte, G.; Falabella, S.; Molvik, A.W.; Pincosy, P.; Turner, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments have begun to test new methods of heating and fueling of the TMX-U central cell plasma. Heating is with ICRH and 2kV neutral beams. Fueling is by the 2kV beams and by gas puffing. The ICRH system used for fundamental-frequency slow-wave heating consists of two double half-turn antennas, with one on each side of the central cell midplane at mirror ratios of 1:3 and 1:5. Gas fueling is between these two antennas to ensure that recently ionized particles pass through an ICRH resonance before entering the thermal barrier and cells. In recent gas-fed experiments with 100 to 200kW power on each antenna, the end loss temperature was measured to increase from 30eV to above 150eV with perpendicular (cc) temperatures of >500eV. The TMX-U central cell has been equipped with 10 low energy neutral-beam injectors (LENI). These beams are designed to operate at 2kV (net) accel-voltage and deliver 17 atom amperes each to the TMX-U plasma. This low energy was selected to improve trapping (relative to higher energy) on the initial ICRH heated plasma (2X10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/). At 2keV the beams are predicted to be capable of building up and fueling to 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ density, with ion-ion scattering providing a warm, isotropic ion component in the central cell

  10. Fuel conditioning facility electrorefiner cadmium vapor trap operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    Processing sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West involves an electrometallurgical process employing a molten LiCl-KCl salt covering a pool of molten cadmium. Previous research has shown that the cadmium dissolves in the salt as a gas, diffuses through the salt layer and vaporizes at the salt surface. This cadmium vapor condenses on cool surfaces, causing equipment operation and handling problems. Using a cadmium vapor trap to condense the cadmium vapors and reflux them back to the electrorefiner has mitigated equipment problems and improved electrorefiner operations

  11. Study of Exhaust Emissions Reduction of a Diesel Fuel Operated Heater During Transient Mode of Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklánek Ľubomír

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diesel fuel operated heaters (FOHs are generally used as an independent heat source for any system in which a diesel fuel and battery power is available. Based on the fact that future engines will become even more efficient and thus less waste heat will be available to heat the passenger compartment, independent heat sources will be even more necessary.

  12. Regulatory challenges in using nuclear operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear utilities operate their plants in an acceptably safe manner at all times. Learning from experience has been a key element in meeting this objective. It is therefore very important for nuclear power plant operators to have an active programme for collecting, analysing and acting on the lessons of operating experience that could affect the safety of their plants. NEA experts have noted that almost all of the recent, significant events reported at international meetings have occurred earlier in one form or another. Counteractions are usually well-known, but information does not always seem to reach end users, or corrective action programmes are not always rigorously applied. Thus, one of the challenges that needs to be met in order to maintain good operational safety performance is to ensure that operating experience is promptly reported to established reporting systems, preferably international in order to benefit from a larger base of experience, and that the lessons from operating experience are actually used to promote safety. This report focuses on how regulatory bodies can ensure that operating experience is used effectively to promote the safety of nuclear power plants. While directed at nuclear power plants, the principles in this report may apply to other nuclear facilities as well. (author)

  13. Mox fuel experience: present status and future improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanpain, P.; Chiarelli, G.

    2001-01-01

    Up to December 2000, more than 1700 MOX fuel assemblies have been delivered by Framatome ANP/Fragema to 20 French, 2 Belgian and 3 German PWRs. More than 1000 MOX fuel assemblies have been delivered by Framatome ANP GmbH (formerly Siemens) to 11 German PWRs and BWRs and to 3 Swiss PWRs. Operating MOX fuel up to discharge burnups of about 45,000 MWd/tM is done without any penalty on core operating conditions and fuel reliability. Performance data for fuel and materials have been obtained from an outstanding surveillance program. The examinations have concluded that there have been no significant differences in MOX fuel assembly characteristics relative to UO 2 fuel. The data from these examinations, combined with a comprehensive out-of-core and in-core analytical test program on the current fuel products, are being used to confirm and upgrade the design models necessary for the continuing improvement of the MOX product. As MOX fuel has reached a sufficient maturity level, the short term step is the achievement of the parity between UO 2 and MOX fuels in the EdF French reactors. This involves a single operating scheme for both fuels with an annual quarter core reload type and an assembly discharge burnup goal of 52,000 MWd/tM. That ''MOX parity'' product will use the AFA-3G assembly structure which will increase the fuel rod design margins with regards to the end-of-life internal pressure criteria. But the fuel development objective is not limited to the parity between the current MOX and UO 2 products: that parity must remain guaranteed and the MOX fuel managements must evolve in the same way as the UO 2 ones. The goal of the MOX product development program underway in France is the demonstration over the next ten years of a fuel capable of reaching assembly burnups of 70,000 MWd/tM. (author)

  14. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are being conducted on nuclear power plant (NPP) control room training simulators by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, its subcontractor, General Physics Corporation, and participating utilities. The experiments are sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Human Factors and Safeguards Branch, Division of Risk Analysis and Operations, and are a continuation of prior research using simulators, supported by field data collection, to provide a technical basis for NRC human factors regulatory issues concerned with the operational safety of nuclear power plants. During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE boiling water reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of (a) senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, (b) operating crew augmentation with an STA and (c) practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator. Methodology and results to date are reported

  15. Influence of the fuel operational parameters on the aluminium cladding quality of discharged fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwaszczewski, S.; Czajkowski, W.; Borek-Kruszewska, E. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock Swierk (POLAND)

    2002-07-01

    In the last two years, the new MR6 type fuel containing 1550 g of U with 36% enrichment has been loaded into MARIA reactor core. Its aluminium cladding thickness is 0,6 mm and typical burnup -about 4080 MWh (as compared to 2880 MWh for the 80% enriched fuel used). However, increased fission product release from these assemblies was observed near the end of its operational time. The results presented earlier [1] show that the corrosion behaviour of aluminium cladding depends on the conditions of fuel operation in the reactor. The corrosion process in the aluminum of fuel cladding proceeds faster then in the aluminum of constructional elements. This tendency was also observed in MR-6/80% and in WWR- SM fuel assemblies. Therefore the visual tests of discharged MR-6/36% fuel elements were performed. Some change of appearance of aluminum cladding was observed, especially in the regions with large energy generation i.e. in the centre of reactor core and in the strong horizontal gradient of neutron flux. In the present paper, the results of visual investigation of discharged fuel assemblies are presented. The results of the investigation are correlated with the operational parameters. (author)

  16. Experiments in MARIUS on HTR tubular fuel with loose particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosser, R; Langlet, G

    1972-06-15

    The work described on HTR tubular fuel with loose particles is the first part of a program in three points. The cell is the same in the three experiments, only particles in the fuel container are changed. The aim of the experiment is to achieve the buckling in a critical facility. A description of the techniques of measurements, calculations, and results are presented.

  17. Storage of spent fuel from power reactors in India management and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changrani, R.D.; Bajpai, D.D.; Kodilkar, S.S.

    1999-01-01

    The spent fuel management programme in India is based on closing the nuclear fuel cycle with reprocessing option. This will enable the country to enhance energy security through maximizing utilization of available limited uranium resources while pursuing its Three Stage Nuclear Power Programme. Storage of spent fuel in water pools remains as prevailing mode in the near term. In view of inventory build up of spent fuel, an Away-From-Reactor (AFR) On-Site (OS) spent fuel storage facility has been made operational at Tarapur. Dry storage casks also have been developed as 'add on' system for additional storage of spent fuels. The paper describes the status and experience pertaining to spent fuel storage practices in India. (author)

  18. Operational experience with the Daresbury accelerator tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, T.W.; Eastham, D.A.; Joy, T.; Leese, J.M.; Tait, N.R.S.; Thorn, R.

    1986-01-01

    Operational experience with the Daresbury MKI accelerator tube is reviewed with particular attention to conditioning and high voltage performance. The effects of surges and transients on the tube are described and lines of future development are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Material Control and Accountability Experience at the Fuel Conditioning Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D.; Fredrickson, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: 1) it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security, and 2) it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and materials are within control limits. Material Control and Accountability is also a Department of Energy (DOE) requirement (DOE Order 474.1). The FCF employs a computer based Mass Tracking (MTG) System to collect, store, retrieve, and process data on all operations that directly affect the flow of materials through the FCF. The MTG System is important for the operations of the FCF because it supports activities such as material control and accountability, criticality safety, and process modeling. To conduct material control and accountability checks and to monitor process performance, mass balances are routinely performed around the process equipment. The equipment used in FCF for pyro-processing consists of two mechanical choppers and two electro-refiners (the Mark-IV with the accompanying element chopper and Mark-V with the accompanying blanket chopper for processing driver fuel and blanket, respectively), and a cathode processor (used for processing both driver fuel and blanket) and casting furnace (mostly used for processing driver fuel). Performing mass balances requires the measurement of the masses and compositions of several process streams and equipment inventories. The masses of process streams are obtained via in-cell balances (i.e., load cells) that weigh containers entering and leaving the process equipment. Samples taken at key locations are analyzed to determine the composition of process streams and equipment inventories. In cases where equipment or containers cannot be

  20. Nuclear power plant operating experience. Annual report, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, M.R.

    1979-12-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of reports issued annually that summarizes the operating experience of US nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1978 data from 65 plants - 25 boiling water reactor plants and 40 pressurized water reactor plants. Discussion of radioactive effluents which has been a part of this report in previous years, has not been included in this issue because of late acquisition of data

  1. Performance of Combustion Engineering fuel in operating PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.G.; Freeburn, H.R.; Wohlsen, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    Performance data on fuel assembly components from seven (7) operating reactors are presented, and discussed in detail where potential problems have occurred and been resolved. Fuel rod performance has continually improved over the last four (4) years with the gradual changeover to the current C-E fuel design. The reliability level is estimated at better than 99.99%, based on activity levels obtained through January 1979 at each plant. Control rod guide tubes have shown various degrees of wear caused by vibration of the control rods in their fully-withdrawn position. The retrofit of wear sleeves within the top portion of the affected guide tubes during routine refueling has permitted the use of these fuel assemblies with no significant loss in performance or safety margins

  2. Conventional transport fuels quality and ATF : recent Asian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desbiens, R. [Consultec, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The experience gained in Manila, Philippines, with regard to transport fuels, was discussed during this presentation. It is estimated that 70 to 80 per cent of air pollution in the city of Manila is generated by vehicular traffic. Diesel-fueled vehicles operate all hours of the day, and motorized tricycles powered by a two-stroke engine, are cause for concern for local authorities. Several factors play a role in the problems experienced: vehicle ownership, poor air, congestion and noise in urban areas, poor transport infrastructure, coupled with policy problems such as fuel and vehicle quality standards, poor monitoring, ancient technologies, etc. The motorization of cities was examined, and special emphasis was places on the situation in Asia. The situation in China was looked at, where approximately 15 million automobiles are in use, with an annual increase of 11 to 13 per cent. The air pollution caused by motor vehicles in China was discussed, and new vehicle emission standards for China were presented. The issue of fuel injection systems for motorcycles in China was discussed, and the author mentioned that cost and reliability problems require further improvement. The use of compressed natural gas vehicles in Beijing was looked at, and some of the barriers are lack of public awareness, capital shortages, high price of natural gas, and shortage of advanced technologies. A feasibility study for the introduction of compressed natural gas vehicles in Beijing was conducted and the main findings presented. Public transport management in Hong Kong was reviewed, including the use of alternative environmentally friendly vehicles and fuel. A look at India, and specifically Delhi, was presented. The norms concerning vehicle emissions in India were briefly reviewed, followed by fuel quality improvements, and compressed natural gas vehicles. The author then discussed alternative fuels in Korea and the country's compressed natural gas bus promotion policy. The next

  3. Combining risk analysis and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the systematic utilization of operating experience in the decision making process concerning large industrial facilities. Even before the advent of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), operating experience had always played an important role in such decisions. Of course, operating experience has always been an input to PSA also; however, as PSA becomes more mature and the quality and quantity of operating experience improve, greater emphasis is now being placed on the use of operating experience to update and validate PSA and thereby provide a more rational basis for decision making. This report outlines the ways in which data are collected, processed using mathematical techniques and utilized in decision making. It is not intended to provide details of the methods and procedures to be used in these areas, but is rather intended as an introduction to these topics and some of the relevant literature. The meeting presentations were divided into three sessions devoted to the following topics: evaluation of nuclear power plants operational experience (5 papers); uncertainties (2 papers); probabilistic safety assessment studies in Member States (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  4. Power ramping/cycling experience and operational recommendations in KWU power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, R. von; Wunderlich, F.; Holzer, R.

    1980-01-01

    The power cycling and ramping experience of KWU is based on experiments in test and commercial reactors, and on evaluation of plant operation (PHWR, PWR and BWR). Power cycling of fuel rods have never lead to PCI failures. In ramping experiments, for fast ramps PCI failure thresholds of 480/420 W/cm are obtained at 12/23 GWd/t(U) burn-up for pressurized PWR fuel. No failures occurred during limited exceedance of the threshold with reduced ramp rate. Operational recommendations used by KWU are derived from experiments and plant experience. The effects of ramping considerations on plant operation is discussed. No rate restrictions are required for start-ups during an operating cycle or load follow operation within set limits for the distortion of the local power distribution. In a few situations, e.g. start-up after refueling, ramp rates of 1 to 5 %/h are recommended depending on plant and fuel design

  5. Recent advances in PWR fuel design and performance experience at ABB-CENF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsetti, Lawrence V.

    2004-01-01

    Utilities in the United States continue to move towards longer cycles and higher burnups to improve fuel cycle economics. This has placed increased demands for improved burnable absorber concepts. Zircaloy-4 corrosion behavior remains a high burnup performance concern. Over the past several years there has also been increasing utility interest in fuel reliability improvements. The development and application of erbia as a burnable absorber mixed directly with urania fuel will be discussed. Debris resistant fuel assembly designs and operating experience are reviewed. Oxide thickness measurements showing the improved corrosion resistance of optimized, low-tin Zircaloy-4 are presented. (author)

  6. Experience in producing LEU fuel elements for the RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Soentono, S.

    1991-01-01

    To achieve a self-reliance in the operation of the 30 MW Multipurpose Research Reactor at Serpong (the RSG-GAS), a fuel element production facility has been constructed nearby. The main task of the facility is to produce MTR type fuel and control elements containing U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion LEU fuel for the RSG-GAS. The hot commissioning activity has started in early 1988 after completion of the cold commissioning using depleted uranium in 1987, marking the beginning of the real production activity. This paper briefly describes the main features of the fuel production facility, the production experience gained so far, and its current production activity. (orig.)

  7. A Mobile Robot for Emergency Operation of Fuel Exchange Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yongchil; Lee, Sunguk; Kim, Changhoi; Shin, Hochul; Jung, Seungho; Choi, Changhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    A Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) uses a heavy water as the coolant and moderator because it does not attenuate the neutron inside the reactor, which makes it possible to use natural uranium for nuclear fuels. However, since the uranium ratio is too low within the natural uranium, the reactor should be refueled everyday while the reactor is working. For that purpose, there is a fuel exchange machine. However as the time passes by, the durability and reliability become a problem. While the fuel handling machine exchanges the reactor fuel, it can be stuck to the pressure tube attached in the Calandra. Although this kind of situation is rarely happen, it can make the reactor be shutdown for normalizing the operation. Since the refueling is performed while the reactor is working, the radiation level is extremely high and the machine can be located at a high position up to nine meters from the floor, that is, the human worker can not approach the machine, so the fuel handling machine should be released remotely. To cope with this situation, the fuel handling machine has a manual drive mechanism at the rear side of it as shown in the circled images. If the worker can handle these manual drive mechanisms, the fuel handling machine can be released form the pressure tube. The KAERI had developed a long-reach manipulator system with a telescophic mast mechanism which can be deployed in the basement of the reactor room and manipulate the manual lever of the fuel exchange machine. Since the manipulator is located in the basement, there are several problems for its application such that the plug hole should be removed before the operation and the vibration of the mast mechanism make it difficult to locate the end effecter of the manipulator.

  8. A Mobile Robot for Emergency Operation of Fuel Exchange Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yongchil; Lee, Sunguk; Kim, Changhoi; Shin, Hochul; Jung, Seungho; Choi, Changhwan

    2007-01-01

    A Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) uses a heavy water as the coolant and moderator because it does not attenuate the neutron inside the reactor, which makes it possible to use natural uranium for nuclear fuels. However, since the uranium ratio is too low within the natural uranium, the reactor should be refueled everyday while the reactor is working. For that purpose, there is a fuel exchange machine. However as the time passes by, the durability and reliability become a problem. While the fuel handling machine exchanges the reactor fuel, it can be stuck to the pressure tube attached in the Calandra. Although this kind of situation is rarely happen, it can make the reactor be shutdown for normalizing the operation. Since the refueling is performed while the reactor is working, the radiation level is extremely high and the machine can be located at a high position up to nine meters from the floor, that is, the human worker can not approach the machine, so the fuel handling machine should be released remotely. To cope with this situation, the fuel handling machine has a manual drive mechanism at the rear side of it as shown in the circled images. If the worker can handle these manual drive mechanisms, the fuel handling machine can be released form the pressure tube. The KAERI had developed a long-reach manipulator system with a telescophic mast mechanism which can be deployed in the basement of the reactor room and manipulate the manual lever of the fuel exchange machine. Since the manipulator is located in the basement, there are several problems for its application such that the plug hole should be removed before the operation and the vibration of the mast mechanism make it difficult to locate the end effecter of the manipulator

  9. Operational experience of the Marcoule reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.

    1963-01-01

    The results obtaining from three years operation of the reactors G-2, G-3 have made it possible to accumulate a considerable amount of operational experience of these reactors. The main original points: - the pre-stressed concrete casing - the possibility of loading while under power - automatic temperature control have been perfectly justified by the results of operation. The author confirms the importance of these original solutions and draws conclusions concerning the study of future nuclear power stations. (author) [fr

  10. MIT January Operational Internship Experience 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLatte, Danielle; Furhmann, Adam; Habib, Manal; Joujon-Roche, Cecily; Opara, Nnaemeka; Pasterski, Sabrina Gonzalez; Powell, Christina; Wimmer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the 2011 January Operational Internship experience (JOIE) program which allows students to study operational aspects of spaceflight, how design affects operations and systems engineering in practice for 3 weeks. Topics include: (1) Systems Engineering (2) NASA Organization (3) Workforce Core Values (4) Human Factors (5) Safety (6) Lean Engineering (7) NASA Now (8) Press, Media, and Outreach and (9) Future of Spaceflight.

  11. Increasing Fuel Efficiency of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems with Feedforward Control of the Operating Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngseung Na

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the R&D on fuel cells for portable applications concentrates on increasing efficiencies and energy densities to compete with other energy storage devices, especially batteries. To improve the efficiency of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC systems, several modifications to system layouts and operating strategies are considered in this paper, rather than modifications to the fuel cell itself. Two modified DMFC systems are presented, one with an additional inline mixer and a further modification of it with a separate tank to recover condensed water. The set point for methanol concentration control in the solution is determined by fuel efficiency and varies with the current and other process variables. Feedforward concentration control enables variable concentration for dynamic loads. Simulation results were validated experimentally with fuel cell systems.

  12. Operating manual for the critical experiments facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The operation of the Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) requires careful attention to procedures in order that all safety precautions are observed. Since an accident could release large amounts of radioactivity, careful operation and strict enforcement of procedures are necessary. To provide for safe operation, detailed procedures have been written for all phases of the operation of this facility. The CEF operating procedures are not to be construed to constitute a part ofthe Technical Specifications. In the event of any discrepancy between the information given herein and the Technical Specifications, limits set forth in the Technical Specifications apply. All normal and most emergency operation conditions are covered by procedures presented in this manual. These procedures are designed to be followed by the operating personnel. Strict adherence to these procedures is expected for the following reasons. (1) To provide a standard, safe method of performing all operations, the procedures were written by reactor engineers experienced in supervising the operation of reactors and were reviewed by an organization with over 30 years of reactor operating experience. (2) To have an up-to-date description of operating techniques available at all times for reference and review, it is necessary that the procedures be written

  13. Operating manual for the critical experiments facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The operation of the Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) requires careful attention to procedures in order that all safety precautions are observed. Since an accident could release large amounts of radioactivity, careful operation and strict enforcement of procedures are necessary. To provide for safe operation, detailed procedures have been written for all phases of the operation of this facility. The CEF operating procedures are not to be construed to constitute a part ofthe Technical Specifications. In the event of any discrepancy between the information given herein and the Technical Specifications, limits set forth in the Technical Specifications apply. All normal and most emergency operation conditions are covered by procedures presented in this manual. These procedures are designed to be followed by the operating personnel. Strict adherence to these procedures is expected for the following reasons. (1) To provide a standard, safe method of performing all operations, the procedures were written by reactor engineers experienced in supervising the operation of reactors and were reviewed by an organization with over 30 years of reactor operating experience. (2) To have an up-to-date description of operating techniques available at all times for reference and review, it is necessary that the procedures be written.

  14. Experience of Areva in fuel services for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, I.

    2015-01-01

    AREVA being an integrated supplier of fuel assemblies has included in its strategy to develop services and solutions to customers who desire to improve the performance and safety of their fuel. These services go beyond the simple 'after sale' services that can be expected from a fuel supplier: The portfolio of AREVA includes a wide variety of services, from scientific calculations to fuel handling services in a nuclear power plant. AREVA is committed to collaborate and to propose best-in-class solutions that really make the difference for the customer, based on 40 years of Fuel design and manufacturing experience. (Author)

  15. Fuel cell bus operation, system investigation H2 bus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The WP covers two tasks: - Prepartion of Technical Catalogue: In cooperation with ICIL, AR have compiled a technical catalogue, providing the impartial descriptions, both of existing technology and regulations, and the likely future developments of these, as to remedy the first problem faced by a potential hydrogen bus fleet operator viz the absence of an impartial description of the available vehicle and fuels systems together with the absence of a description of regulatory and safety factors which need consideration. - Fuel Cell Bus Operation - System Investigation H 2 Bus: The application of fuel cell electric generation systems to hybrid electrical buses or electrical busses without any storage system on board is considered. The task will cover safety and environmental aspects, a cost estimate and a market evaluation. (orig.)

  16. AREVA 10x10 BWR fuel experience feedback and on going upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, Hans Joachim; Rentmeister, Thomas; Garner, Norman; Tandy, Jay; Mollard, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Established with engineering and manufacturing operations in the US and Europe, AREVA NP has been and is supplying nuclear fuel assemblies and associated core components to boiling water reactors worldwide, representing today more than 63 000 fuel assemblies. The evolution of BWR fuel rod arrays from early 6x6 designs to the 10x10 designs first introduced in the mid 1990's yielded significant improvements in thermal mechanical operating limits, critical power level, cold shutdown margin, discharge burnup, as well as other key operational capabilities. Since first delivered in 1992, ATRIUM T M 1 0 fuel assemblies have now been supplied to a total of 32 BWR plants in the US, Europe, and Asia resulting in an operating experience over 20 000 fuel assemblies. This article presents in detail the operational experience consolidated by these more than 20 000 ATRIUM T M 1 0 BWR assemblies already supplied to utilities. Within the different 10x10 fuel assemblies available, the Fuel Assembly design is chosen and tailored to the operating strategies of each reactor. Among them, the latest versions of ATRIUM T M a re ATRIUM T M 1 0XP and ATRIUM T M 1 0XM fuel assemblies which have been delivered to several utilities worldwide. The article details key aspects of ATRIUM T M 1 0 fuel assemblies in terms of reliability and performance. Special attention is paid to key proven features, ULTRAFLOW T M s pacer grids, the use of part length fuel rods (PLFRs) and their geometrical optimization, water channel and load chain, upgraded features available for inclusion with most advanced designs. Regular upgrading of the product has been made possible thanks to a continuous improvement process with the aim of further upgrading BWR fuel assembly performance and reliability. Regarding thermal mechanical behavior of fuel rods, chromia (Cr2O3) doped fuel pellets, described in Reference 1, well illustrate this improvement strategy to reduce fission gas release, increase power thresholds for PCI

  17. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, operating crew augmentation with an STA and practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. Sixteen two-man crews of licensed operators were employed in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The SROs leading the crews were split into high and low experience groups on the basis of their years of experience as an SRO. One half of the high- and low-SRO experience groups were assisted by an STA. The crews responded to four simulated plant casualties. A five-variable set of content-referenced performance measures was derived from task analyses of the procedurally correct responses to the four casualties. System parameters and control manipulations were recorded by the computer controlling the simulator. Data on communications and procedure use were obtained from analysis of videotapes of the exercises. Questionnaires were used to collect subject biographical information and data on subjective workload during each simulated casualty. For four of the five performance measures, no significant differences were found between groups led by high (25 to 114 months) and low (1 to 17 months as an SRO) experience SROs. However, crews led by low experience SROs tended to have significantly shorter task performance times than crews led by high experience SROs. The presence of the STA had no significant effect on overall team performance in responding to the four simulated casualties. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator

  18. One year of operation of the Belgonucleaire (Dessel) plutonium fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Based on experience with plutonium since 1958, Belgonucleaire has successively launched a pilot plant and then a fuel fabrication plant for mixed uranium and plutonium oxides in 1968 and 1973 respectively. After describing briefly the plants and the most important stages in the planning, construction and operation of the Dessel plant, the present document describes the principal problems which were met during the course of operation of the plant and their direct incidence on the capacity and quality of the production of fuel elements

  19. Experiences on operation, maintenance and utilization in JRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Japan Research Reactor No.2 (JRR-2) is a high performance 10 MW multi purpose research reactor, heavy water moderated and cooled enriched uranium fuel used. Since the first criticality was attained in October, 1960, JRR-2 has been operated to satisfy the utilization demands, such as irradiation of fuel and materials, neutron beam experiments, radio isotope production and B.N.C.T (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). During the operation, various kinds of troubles mainly caused by the old design concept had been occurred at the JRR-2 systems and components. Those troubles were solved with adequate countermeasures of timely repairs and large scale modifications with newest techniques. The works above were completely carried out by the staff of JRR-2 and related divisions. As a result, JRR-2 became one of the oldest research reactors which are still under operation in the world. Since JRR-2 has been utilized for more than 30 years, the operation mode was changed from 12 days-one cycle to 3 days-one cycle in April, 1994, taking into consideration aging of the reactor systems. In this paper, the experiences of JRR-2 for more than 30 years such as operation, maintenance, repair, modifications and utilization on JRR-2 are described. (author)

  20. 14 CFR 121.639 - Fuel supply: All domestic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... nontransport category airplanes type certificated after December 31, 1964, to fly for 30 minutes at normal... § 121.639 Fuel supply: All domestic operations. No person may dispatch or take off an airplane unless it has enough fuel— (a) To fly to the airport to which it is dispatched; (b) Thereafter, to fly to and...

  1. The nuclear fuel cycle associated with the operation of nuclear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nuclear power option has been mentioned as an alternative for Ghana but the issue of waste management worries both policy makers and the public. In this paper, the nuclear fuel cycle associated with the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) for electric power generation has been extensively reviewed. Different ...

  2. Computerised programming of the Dragon reactor fuel handling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, P.

    1976-11-01

    Two suites of FORTRAN IV computer programs have been written to produce check lists for the operation of the two remote control fuel handling machines of the Dragon Reactor. This document describes the advantages of these programs over the previous manual system of writing check lists, and provides a detailed guide to the programs themselves. (author)

  3. Kayenta advanced series compensation operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The world's first three-phase, thyristor-controlled series compensation scheme with continuously variable impedance has been introduced into a transmission system. Energized and dedicated in September 1992, the installation was placed into commercial operation in January 1993 and has provided over one year of operating experience. This paper describes the 230 kV, 330 MVAr (60 Hz) advanced series compensation (ASC) project, located in north-eastern Arizona at Kayenta Substation on the 320 km Glen Canyon-Shiprock transmission line. The paper describes operating experiences, coordination with phase shifting transformer, phase shifter failure, platform power, system disturbances, and future plans.

  4. Experience feedback from the transportation of Framatome fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, M.E.; Gaillard, G.; Aubin, C.

    1998-01-01

    Framatome, the foremost world nuclear fuel manufacturer, has for 25 years been delivering fuel elements from its three factories (Dessel, Romans, Pierrelatte) to the various sites in France and abroad (Germany, Sweden, Belgium, China, Korea, South Africa, Switzerland). During this period, Framatome has built up experience and expertise in fuel element transportation by road, rail and sea. In this filed, the range of constraints is very wide: safety and environmental protection constraints; constraints arising from the control and protection of nuclear materials, contractual and financial constraints, media watchdogs. Through the experience feedback from the transportation of FRAMATOME assemblies, this paper addresses all the phases in the transportation of fresh fuel assemblies. (authors)

  5. Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

    2005-11-01

    A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

  6. Fuel utilization experience in Bohunice NPP and regulatory requirements for implementation of progressive fuel management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patenyi, V [Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Bratislava (Slovakia); Darilek, P; Majercik, J [Vyskumny Ustav Jadrovych Elektrarni, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1994-12-31

    The experience gained in fuel utilization and the basic requirements for fuel licensing in the Slovak NPPs is described. The original project of WWER-440 reactors supposes 3-year fuel cycle with cycle length of about 320 full power days (FPD). Since 1984 it was reduced to 290 FPD. Based on the experience of other countries, a 4-year fuel cycle utilization started in 1987. It is illustrated with data from the Bohunice NPP units. Among 504 fuel assemblies left for the fourth burnup cycle no leakage was observed. The mean burnup achieved in the different units varied from 33.1 to 38.5 Mwd/kg U. The new fuel assemblies used are different from the recent ones in construction, thermohydraulics, water-uranium ratio, enrichment and material design. To meet the safety criteria, regulatory requirements for exploitation of new fuel in WWER-440 were formulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Slovak Republic. 1 tab., 5 refs.

  7. Fuel coolant interaction experiment by direct electrical heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tsuneo; Hirano, Kenmei

    1979-01-01

    In the PCM (Power Cooling Mismatch) experiments, the FCI (Fuel Coolant Interaction) test is one of necessary tests in order to predict various phenomena that occur during PCM in the core. A direct electrical heating method is used for the FCI tests for fuel pellet temperature of over 1000 0 C. Therefore, preheating is required before initiating the direct electrical heating. The fuel pin used in the FCI tests is typical LWR fuel element, which is surrounded by coolant water. It is undersirable to heat up the coolant water during preheating of the fuel pin. Therefore, a zirconia (ZrO 2 ) pellet which is similar to a UO 2 pellet in physical and chemical properties is used. Electric property (electric conductivity) of ZrO 2 is particularly suitable for direct electrical heating as in the case of UO 2 . In this experiment, ZrO 2 pellet (melting point 2500 0 C) melting was achieved by use of both preheating and direct electrical heating. Temperature changes of coolant and fuel surface, as well as the pressure change of coolant water, were measured. The molten fuel interacted with the coolant and generated shock waves. A portion of this molten fuel fragmented into small particles during this interaction. The peak pressure of the observed shock wave was about 35 bars. The damaged fuel pin was photographed after disassembly. This report shows the measured coolant pressure changes and the coolant temperature changes, as well as photographs of damaged fuel pin and fuel fragments. (author)

  8. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokr, A.M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abouzabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor; Rao, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2015-05-15

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  9. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokr, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  10. Tests of the SNR fuel pin behaviour in case of operational transients in the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plitz, H.

    1989-05-01

    The loadings on fast reactor fuel pins under operational transients (power and temperature increases in the design area) have been studied in the High-Flux-Reactor HFR in Petten with sodium cooled irradiation capsules. The results of the first campaign of transient experiments are described in the report. No cladding defects have been observed, and the fuel pins of the Mark-I and Mark-II type resisted to linear power levels of more than 800 W/cm, thus demonstrating the required design margins. The plans for further experiments are outlined

  11. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov)

  12. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  13. International co-operation in the supply of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievering, N.F. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Recent changes in the United States' nuclear policy, in recognition of the increased proliferation risk, have raised questions of US intentions in international nuclear fuel and fuel-cycle service co-operation. This paper details those intentions in relation to the key elements of the new policy. In the past, the USA has been a world leader in peaceful nuclear co-operation with other nations and, mindful of the relationships between civilian nuclear technology and nuclear weapon proliferation, remains strongly committed to the Non-Proliferation Treaty, IAEA safeguards and other elements concerned with international nuclear affairs. Now, in implementing President Carter's nuclear initiatives, the USA will continue its leading role in nuclear fuel and fuel-cycle co-operation in two ways, (1) by increasing its enrichment capacity for providing international LWR fuel supplies and (2) by taking the lead in solving the problems of near and long-term spent fuel storage and disposal. Beyond these specific steps, the USA feels that the international community's past efforts in controlling the proliferation risks of nuclear power are necessary but inadequate for the future. Accordingly, the USA urges other similarly concerned nations to pause with present developments and to join in a programme of international co-operation and participation in a re-assessment of future plans which would include: (1) Mutual assessments of fuel cycles alternative to the current uranium/plutonium cycle for LWRs and breeders, seeking to lessen proliferation risks; (2) co-operative mechanisms for ensuring the ''front-end'' fuel supply including uranium resource exploration, adequate enrichment capacity, and institutional arrangements; (3) means of dealing with short-, medium- and long-term spent fuel storage needs by means of technical co-operation and assistance and possibly establishment of international storage or repository facilities; and (4) for reprocessing plants, and related fuel

  14. Optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions for compression ignition engine fueled with pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seokhwon; Jeon, Joonho; Park, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel was used with direct injection system. • KIVA-CHEMKIN code modeled dual-fuel fuel spray and combustion processes with discrete multi-component model. • The characteristics of Combustion and emission on pre-blended fuel was investigated with various fuel reactivities. • Optimization of combustion chamber shape improved combustion performance of the gasoline-diesel blended fuel engine. - Abstract: In this study, experiments and numerical simulations were used to improve the fuel efficiency of compression ignition engine using a gasoline-diesel blended fuel and an optimization technology. The blended fuel is directly injected into the cylinder with various blending ratios. Combustion and emission characteristics were investigated to explore the effects of gasoline ratio on fuel blend. The present study showed that the advantages of gasoline-diesel blended fuel, high thermal efficiency and low emission, were maximized using the numerical optimization method. The ignition delay and maximum pressure rise rate increased with the proportion of gasoline. As the gasoline fraction increased, the combustion duration and the indicated mean effective pressure decreased. The homogeneity of the fuel-air mixture was improved due to longer ignition delay. Soot emission was significantly reduced up to 90% compared to that of conventional diesel. The nitrogen oxides emissions of the blended fuel increased slightly when the start of injection was retarded toward top dead center. For the numerical study, KIVA-CHEMKIN multi-dimensional CFD code was used to model the combustion and emission characteristics of gasoline-diesel blended fuel. The micro genetic algorithm coupled with the KIVA-CHEMKIN code were used to optimize the combustion chamber shape and operating conditions to improve the combustion performance of the blended fuel engine. The optimized chamber geometry enhanced the fuel efficiency, for a level of nitrogen oxides

  15. Operating experience and TPA: the Italian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, G.

    1990-01-01

    Collection and analysis of operating experience from the Italian plants and utilization of abroad data both to plants in operation and in construction are presented. Some results are also referred, aimed to evidence the role of the international cooperation to safe operation of nuclear plants. The approach to the Trend and Pattern analyses is described as well, and the use of computerized techniques of analysis on personal computer. Finally on going activities are introduced, specifically application of operating experience of plants in operation to small sized reactors and to ones with more intrinsic safety characteristics; review of the reporting system for future application and comparative analysis of the different realization of selected safety systems

  16. Experience in operation of heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ion; Bilegan, Iosif; Ghitescu, Petre

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the main topics of the CANDU owners group (COG) meeting held in Mangalia, Romania on 7-10 September 1998. These meetings are part of the IAEA program for exchange of information related mainly to CANDU reactor operation safety. The first meeting for PHWR reactors took place in Vienna in 1989, followed by those in Argentina (1991), India (1994) and Korea (1996). The topics discussed at the meeting in Romania were: operation experience and recent major events, performances of CANDU reactors and safe operation, nuclear safety and operation procedures of PHWR, programs and strategies of lifetime management of installations and components of NPPs, developments and updates

  17. Data sheets of fission product release experiments for light water reactor fuel, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Nasumi; Nagai, Hitoshi; Takeda, Tsuneo; Yamamoto, Katsumune; Nakazaki, Chozaburo.

    1979-07-01

    This is the second data sheets of fission products (FP) release experiments for light water reactor fuel. Results of five FP release experiments from the third to the seventh are presented: results of pre-examinations of UO 2 pellets, photographs of parts of fuel rod assemblies for irradiation and the assemblies, operational conditions of JMTR and OWL-1, variations of radioiodine-131 level in the main loop coolant during experimental periods, and representative results of post-irradiation examinations of respective fuel rods. (author)

  18. Experience with a fuel rod enrichment scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubik, R.N.; Pettus, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    This enrichment scanner views all fuel rods produced at B and W's Commercial Nuclear Fuel Plant. The scanner design is derived from the PAPAS System reported by R. A. Forster, H. D. Menlove, and their associates at Los Alamos. The spatial resolution of the system and smoothing of the data are discussed in detail. The cost-effectiveness of multi-detector versus single detector scanners of this general design is also discussed

  19. Palliative effects of H2 on SOFCs operating with carbon containing fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeping, Kyle W.; Bohn, Jessie M.; Walker, Robert A.

    2017-12-01

    Chlorine can accelerate degradation of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) Ni-based anodes operating on carbon containing fuels through several different mechanisms. However, supplementing the fuel with a small percentage of excess molecular hydrogen effectively masks the degradation to the catalytic activity of the Ni and carbon fuel cracking reaction reactions. Experiments described in this work explore the chemistry behind the "palliative" effect of hydrogen on SOFCs operating with chlorine-contaminated, carbon-containing fuels using a suite of independent, complementary techniques. Operando Raman spectroscopy is used to monitor carbon accumulation and, by inference, Ni catalytic activity while electrochemical techniques including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltammetry are used to monitor overall cell performance. Briefly, hydrogen not only completely hides degradation observed with chlorine-contaminated carbon-containing fuels, but also actively removes adsorbed chlorine from the surface of the Ni, allowing for the methane cracking reaction to continue, albeit at a slower rate. When hydrogen is removed from the fuel stream the cell fails immediately due to chlorine occupation of methane/biogas reaction sites.

  20. The qualification of a new fuel - the operator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonen, E.

    2001-01-01

    Operators of a research reactor generally have as their primary mission to provide the users with a safe, reliable and economic source of neutrons. They have to assure the availability of that source, while respecting the requirements of the license. The fuel management is one of the major aspects they have to tackle in order to fulfill their mission. This sometimes includes the qualification of a new fuel and the core conversion. The operator has to assure that the whole process is conducted in such manner that the availability of the neutron source is only minimally disturbed, that the costs are kept under control and the characteristics of the neutron source are preserved. This paper gives an overview of the various issues that the operator has to consider. (author)

  1. HDS unit revamp and operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, J. [Veba Oel Verarbeitungs-GmbH, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Balfanz, U. [Aral Forschung, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Dimmig, T. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Ruhr Oel GmbH, a joint venture between BP and PDVSA, operates a HDS unit at its Gelsenkirchen-Scholven site. The unit produces a major blend component for diesel fuel. Driven by ambitious German environmental policy and by an agreement between the German car and oil industries on the one hand and the government on the other, more stringent low sulphur fuel specifications will be enforced in Germany much earlier than in the rest of the European Union. In view of this situation a project was developed to fulfill the new product specifications with minimum investment. In a joint effort involving the refinery, the company research facilities and the catalyst supplier (AKZO NOBEL), pilot plant tests were performed to develop the best catalyst system and the new process conditions. Based on these results, an existing HDS unit was accordingly revamped. After the revamp, the unit produced diesel fuel with 50 ppm sulphur content and furthermore test runs at 10 ppm were carried out successfully. These results are displayed in this article. (orig.)

  2. CANDU fuel - fifteen years of power reactor experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjoy, G.R.; Bain, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) fuel has operated in power reactors since 1962. Analyses of performance statistics, supplemented by examinations of fuel from power reactors and experimental loops have yielded: (a) A thorough understanding of the fundamental behaviour of CANDU fuel. (b) Data showing that the predicted high utilization of uranium has been achieved. Actual fuelling costs in 1976 at the Pickering Generating Station are 1.2 m$/kWh (1976 Canadian dollars) with the simple oncethrough natural-UO 2 fuel cycle. (c) Criteria for operation, which have led to the current very low defect rate of 0.03% of all assemblies and to ''CANLUB'' fuel, which has a graphite interlayer between the fuel and sheath to reduce defects on power increases. (d) Proof that the short length (500 mm), collapsible cladding features of the CANDU bundle are successful and that the fuel can operate at high-power output (current peak outer-element linear power is 58 +- 15% kW/m). Involvement by the utility in all stages of fuel development has resulted in efficient application of this fundamental knowledge to ensure proper fuel specifications, procurement, scheduling into the reactor and feedback to developers, designers and manufacturers. As of mid-1976 over 3 x 10 6 individual elements have been built in a well-estabilished commercially competitive fuel fabrication industry and over 2 x 10 6 elements have been irradiated. Only six defects have been attributed to faulty materials or fabrication, and the use of high-density UO 2 with low-moisture content precluded defects from hydrogen contamination and densification. Development work on UO 2 and other fuel cycles (plutonium and thorium) is continuing, and, because CANDU reactors use on-power fuelling, bundles can be inserted into power reactors for testing. Thus new fuel designs can be quickly adopted to ensure that the CANDU system continues to provide low-cost energy with high reliability

  3. Risk management for operations of the LANL Critical Experiments Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Butterfield, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) currently operates two burst reactors (Godiva-IV and Skua), one solution assembly [the Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA)], two fast-spectrum benchmark assemblies (Flattop and Big Ten), and five general-purpose remote assembly machines that may be configured with nuclear materials and assembled by remote control. Special nuclear materials storage vaults support these and other operations at the site. With this diverse set of operations, several approaches are possible in the analysis and management of risk. The most conservative approach would be to write a safety analysis report (SAR) for each assembly and experiment. A more cost-effective approach is to analyze the probability and consequences of several classes of operations representative of operations on each critical assembly machine and envelope the bounding case accidents. Although the neutron physics of these machines varies widely, the operations performed at LACEF fall into four operational modes: steady-state mode, approach-to-critical mode, prompt burst mode, and nuclear material operations, which can include critical assembly fuel loading. The operational sequences of each mode are very nearly identical, whether operated on one assembly machine or another. The use of an envelope approach to accident analysis is facilitated by the use of classes of operations and the use of bounding case consequence analysis. A simple fault tree analysis of operational modes helps resolve which operations are sensitive to human error and which are initiated by hardware of software failures. Where possible, these errors and failures are blocked by TSR LCOs. Future work will determine the probability of accidents with various initiators

  4. Physics experiments with the operating reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullington, G R; King, D C

    1973-09-27

    Experimental techniques have been developed and used on Dragon to give consistent information on excess reactivity and shut down margin. The reactivity measurements have been correlated with the theoretical calculations and have led to improvements in the calculations. The methods used and the results obtained are accepted by the Safety Committee as sufficient evidence for compliance with the fuel loading safety rules. Although the reactor was not designed as an experimental facility, flux and dose measurements experiments have been successfully carried out. Mass flow and negative reactivity transient measurements have been carried out. These are valuable for demonstration of the flexibility of the reactor system and for giving confidence in theoretical calculations.

  5. Operating experience insights supporting ageing assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitoi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Be effective in ageing management means looking at the right aspects, with the right techniques, and one of the most effective tool which could be used for that purpose is the analysis of operating experience. The paper has as objective to perform a review of available operating experience, with the aim to provide a better picture about the impact of ageing effects. The IAEA International Reporting System and NRC Licensee Event Reports were chosen as reference databases, both databases being internationally recognized as important sources of information about events occurrences in the nuclear power plants. The ageing related events identified in the selected time window were analyzed in detail, and the contributions of each major degradation mechanisms that have induced the ageing related events (specific to each defined group of components) was represented and discussed. The paper demonstrates the possibility to use operating experience insights in highlighting the ageing effects. (authors)

  6. Three years operational experience with biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.

    2008-01-01

    TSI Terminal Systems Inc. is the largest container terminal operator in Canada, and has an annual payroll exceeding $150 million. The company started a biodiesel test program with the Canadian Bioenergy Corporation in order to assess the emission reduction impacts of using biodiesel. The pilot was tested with 6 different pieces of equipment used at the terminal over an initial period of 3 weeks. Emissions testing was then conducted for different biodiesel blend levels and compared with baseline data in relation to particulate matter, total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and nitrous oxides (NO x ). Results of the tests confirmed that the biodiesel blends significantly reduced emissions at the terminal and confirmed the operability of biodiesel. Overall emissions were reduced by 30 per cent. The fuel is now being used in all the company's equipment. The use of the biodiesel has not resulted in any engine failures or power losses. tabs., figs

  7. Spent fuel cask handling at an operating nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The importance of spent fuel handling at operating nuclear power plants cannot be overstated. Because of its highly radioactive nature, however, spent fuel must be handled in thick, lead-lined containers or casks. Thus, all casks for spent fuel handling are heavy loads by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's definition, and any load-drop must be evaluated for its potential to damage safety-related equipment. Nuclear Regulatory Guide NUREG-0612 prescribes the regulatory requirements of alternative heavy-load-handling methodologies such as (a) by providing cranes that meet the requirements of NUREG-0554, which shall be called the soft path, or (b) by providing protective devices at all postulated load-drop areas to prevent any damage to safety-related equipment, which shall be called the hard path. The work reported in this paper relates to cask handling at New York Power Authority's James A. FitzPatrick (JAF) plant

  8. Idling operation apparatus for multicylinder fuel injection engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanahira, A

    1974-11-20

    A device to cut off the fuel supply to a number of cylinders at idling is described for those engines equipped with multicylinder fuel injection systems. The discontinuation of the fuel gas supply to the cylinders is made by a magnetically operated valve which is related to the accelerator. When the engine is idling, a switch activates the magnetic valve and the tube leading to the cylinder closes while a valve on the tube leading to a dual tank opens, and the pumped gas returns to the tank. This valve is installed on several cylinders, but not on all. Thus, at idling only a certain number of cylinders are firing, which lowers the hydrocarbon levels in the exhaust gas since non-firing cylinders intake and discharge only air.

  9. Hydrazine - hydrate water regime and operation of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashevitch, V.I.; Pashevitch, D.V.; Bogancs, J.; Tilky, P.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistries currently used in WWER reactors are potassium based water chemistry (KOH) to adjust the pH with ammonia or hydrazine as oxygen scavenger. Based on the measurements of Zr 95 which is a corrosion product of the zirconium cladding, it is shown in this paper that the amount of corrosion products accompanying the reactor shutdown is smaller when hydrazine is used. This is particularly obvious on PAKS 1 and 2 when Zr 95 measurements are performed before and after switching the water chemistry from ammonia to hydrazine. It is concluded that the main advantage of using the hydrazine water chemistry is to decrease the thickness of the corrosion product layer formed on the fuel cladding, therefore the fuel temperature can be kept low. It is estimated that the fuel temperature increase due to the layer of corrosion products is 120 deg. C for KOLA 3 which is operated with ammonia water chemistry. (author). 5 figs

  10. Hydrazine - hydrate water regime and operation of fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashevitch, V I; Pashevitch, D V [Pand Co. (Russian Federation); Bogancs, J; Tilky, P [Paks NPP (Hungary)

    1997-02-01

    Water chemistries currently used in WWER reactors are potassium based water chemistry (KOH) to adjust the pH with ammonia or hydrazine as oxygen scavenger. Based on the measurements of Zr 95 which is a corrosion product of the zirconium cladding, it is shown in this paper that the amount of corrosion products accompanying the reactor shutdown is smaller when hydrazine is used. This is particularly obvious on PAKS 1 and 2 when Zr 95 measurements are performed before and after switching the water chemistry from ammonia to hydrazine. It is concluded that the main advantage of using the hydrazine water chemistry is to decrease the thickness of the corrosion product layer formed on the fuel cladding, therefore the fuel temperature can be kept low. It is estimated that the fuel temperature increase due to the layer of corrosion products is 120 deg. C for KOLA 3 which is operated with ammonia water chemistry. (author). 5 figs.

  11. The SM and MIR reactors operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprienko, V.A.; Klinov, A.V.; Svyatkin, M.N.; Shamardin, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The SM and MIR operation experience show that continuous work on the problem of ageing, in all its aspects, allows for prolongation of the research plant life cycle by several folds as compared to the initial project. The redesigned SM-3 reactor will operate for another 20 years. The similar result is expected from the MIR planned reconstruction which scope will be the topic of future presentations. (orig.)

  12. French experience in research reactor fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisonnier, Daniele

    1996-01-01

    Since 1963 Transnucleaire has safely performed a large number of national and international transports of radioactive material. Transnucleaire has also designed and supplied suitable packaging for all types of nuclear fuel cycle radioactive material from front-end and back-end products and for power or for research reactors. Transportation of spent fuel from power reactors are made on a regular and industrial basis, but this is not yet the case for the transport of spent fuel coming from research reactors. Each shipment is a permanent challenge and requires a reactive organization dealing with all the transportation issues. This presentation will explain the choices made by Transnucleaire and its associates to provide and optimize the corresponding services while remaining in full compliance with the applicable regulations and customer requirements. (author)

  13. Operational experience with SLAC's beam containment electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, T.N.; Crook, K.; Heggie, D.

    1977-03-01

    Considerable operating experience was accumulated at SLAC with an extensive electronic system for the containment of high power accelerated beams. Average beam power at SLAC can approach 900 kilowatts with the potential for burning through beam stoppers, protection collimators, and other power absorbers within a few seconds. Fast, reliable, and redundant electronic monitoring circuits have been employed to provide some of the safeguards necessary for minimizing the risk to personnel. The electronic systems are described, and the design philosophy and operating experience are discussed

  14. Assess How Changes in Fuel Cycle Operation Impact Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Stephen Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division; Adigun, Babatunde John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division; Fugate, Michael Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division; Trellue, Holly Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division; Sprinkle, James K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division

    2016-10-31

    Since the beginning of commercial nuclear power generation in the 1960s, the ability of researchers to understand and control the isotopic content of spent fuel has improved. It is therefore not surprising that both fuel assembly design and fuel assembly irradiation optimization have improved over the past 50+ years. It is anticipated that the burnup and isotopics of the spent fuel should exhibit less variation over the decades as reactor operators irradiate each assembly to the optimum amount. In contrast, older spent fuel is anticipated to vary more in burnup and resulting isotopics for a given initial enrichment. Modern fuel therefore should be more uniform in composition, and thus, measured safeguards results should be easier to interpret than results from older spent fuel. With spent fuel ponds filling up, interim and long-­term storage of spent fuel will need to be addressed. Additionally after long periods of storage, spent fuel is no longer self-­protecting and, as such, the IAEA will categorize it as more attractive; in approximately 20 years many of the assemblies from early commercial cores will no longer be considered self-­protecting. This study will assess how more recent changes in the reactor operation could impact the interpretation of safeguards measurements. The status quo for spent fuel assay in the safeguards context is that the overwhelming majority of spent fuel assemblies are not measured in a quantitative way except for those assemblies about to be loaded into a difficult or impossible to access location (dry storage or, in the future, a repository). In other words, when the assembly is still accessible to a state actor, or an insider, when it is cooling in a pool, the inspectorate does not have a measurement database that could assist them in re-­verifying the integrity of that assembly. The spent fuel safeguards regime would be strengthened if spent fuel assemblies were measured from discharge to loading into a difficult or impossible

  15. Strategies for Lowering Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tarancón

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Lowering the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs to the intermediate range (500–700 ºC has become one of the main SOFC research goals. High operating temperatures put numerous requirements on materials selection and on secondary units, limiting the commercial development of SOFCs. The present review first focuses on the main effects of reducing the operating temperature in terms of materials stability, thermo-mechanical mismatch, thermal management and efficiency. After a brief survey of the state-of-the-art materials for SOFCs, attention is focused on emerging oxide-ionic conductors with high conductivity in the intermediate range of temperatures with an introductory section on materials technology for reducing the electrolyte thickness. Finally, recent advances in cathode materials based on layered mixed ionic-electronic conductors are highlighted because the decreasing temperature converts the cathode into the major source of electrical losses for the whole SOFC system. It is concluded that the introduction of alternative materials that would enable solid oxide fuel cells to operate in the intermediate range of temperatures would have a major impact on the commercialization of fuel cell technology.

  16. Operating Experience of MACSTOR Modules at CANDU 6 Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaudoin, Robert R.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three decades, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has contributed to the technology development and implementation of dry spent fuel management facilities in Canada, Korea and Romania During that period, AECL has developed a number of concrete canister models and the MACSTOR200 module, a medium size air-cooled vault with a 228 MgU (Mega grams of Uranium) capacity. AECL's dry storage technologies were used for the construction of eight large-scale above ground dry storage facilities for CANDU spent fuel. As of 2005, those facilities have an installed capacity in excess of 5,000 MgU. Since 1995, the two newest dry storage installations built for CANDU 6 reactors at Gentilly 2 (Canada) and Cernavoda (Romania) used the MACSTOR 200 module. Seven such modules have been built at Gentilly 2 during the 1995 to 2004 period and one at Cernavoda in 2003. The construction and operating experience of those modules is reviewed in this paper. The MACSTOR 200 modules were initially designed for a 50-year service life, with recent units at Gentilly 2 licensed for a 100-year service life in a rural (non-maritime) climate. During the 1995-2005 period, six of the eight modules were loaded with fuel. Their operation has brought a significant amount of experience on loading operations, performance of fuel handling equipment, radiation shielding, heat transfer, monitoring of the two confinement boundaries and radiation dose to personnel. Heat dissipation performance of the MACSTOR 200 was initially licensed using values derived from full scale tests made at AECL's Whiteshell Research Laboratories, that were backed-up by temperature measurements made on the first two modules. Results and computer models developed for the MACSTOR 200 module are described. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) and its subsidiary Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC), in collaboration with Hyundai Engineering Company Ltd. (HEC) and AECL, are developing a new dry storage module to

  17. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several metallic fuel element designs which have been tested and used as driver fuel in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The most recent advanced designs have all performed acceptably in EBR-H and can provide reliable performance to high burnups. Fuel elements tested have included use of U-l0Zr metallic fuel with either D9, 316 or HT9 stainless steel cladding; the D9 and 316-clad designs have been used as standard driver fuel. Experimental data indicate that fuel performance characteristics are very similar for the various designs tested. Cladding materials can be selected that optimize performance based on reactor design and operational goals

  18. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, S.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Holmes, S.; James, C.; Lee, W.; Louis, W.; Moore, C.; Plunkett, R.; Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2006. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2006 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam in neutrino and antineutrino modes, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and SY 120 activities.

  19. Survey of experience with dry storage of spent nuclear fuel and update of wet storage experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Spent fuel storage is an important part of spent fuel management. At present about 45,000 t of spent water reactor fuel have been discharged worldwide. Only a small fraction of this fuel (approximately 7%) has been reprocessed. The amount of spent fuel arisings will increase significantly in the next 15 years. Estimates indicate that up to the year 2000 about 200,000 t HM of spent fuel could be accumulated. In view of the large quantities of spent fuel discharged from nuclear power plants and future expected discharges, many countries are involved in the construction of facilities for the storage of spent fuel and in the development of effective methods for spent fuel surveillance and monitoring to ensure that reliable and safe operation of storage facilities is achievable until the time when the final disposal of spent fuel or high level wastes is feasible. The first demonstrations of final disposal are not expected before the years 2000-2020. This is why the long term storage of spent fuel and HLW is a vital problem for all countries with nuclear power programmes. The present survey contains data on dry storage and recent information on wet storage, transportation, rod consolidation, etc. The main aim is to provide spent fuel management policy making organizations, designers, scientists and spent fuel storage facility operators with the latest information on spent fuel storage technology under dry and wet conditions and on innovations in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Test results for fuel cell operation on anaerobic digester gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, R. J.; Preston, J. L.

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI, embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the process of treating sewage anaerobically to reduce solids. ADG is primarily comprised of methane (57-66%), carbon dioxide (33-39%), nitrogen (1-10%), and a small amount of oxygen (sulfur-bearing compounds (principally hydrogen sulfide) and halogen compounds (chlorides). The project has addressed two major issues: development of a cleanup system to remove fuel cell contaminants from the gas and testing/assessing of a modified ONSI PC25 C fuel cell power plant operating on the cleaned, but dilute, ADG. Results to date demonstrate that the ADG fuel cell power plant can, depending on the energy content of the gas, produce electrical output levels close to full power (200 kW) with measured air emissions comparable to those obtained by a natural gas fuel cell. The cleanup system results show that the hydrogen sulfide levels are reduced to below 10 ppbv and halides to approximately 30 ppbv.

  1. Experience with quality assurance in fuel design and manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, R.; Nilson, F.

    1984-01-01

    The Quality Assurance/Quality Control activities for nuclear fuel design and manufacturing described here are coordinated under a common ''Quality Assurance System For Fuel Assemblies and Associated Core Components'' which regulates the QA-functions of the development, design and manufacturing of fuel assemblies independent of the organizational assignment of the contributing technical groups. Some essential characteristics of the system are shown, using examples from design control, procurement, manufacturing and qualification of special processes. The experience is very good, it allowed a flexible and well controlled implementation of design and manufacturing innovations and contributed to the overall good fuel behavior. (orig.)

  2. Some UK experience and practice in the packaging and transport of irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edney, C.J.; Rutter, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The origin and growth of irradiated fuel transport within and to the U.K. is described and the role of the organisations presently carrying out transport operations is explained. An explanation of the relevant U.K. regulations and laws affecting irradiated fuel transport and the role of the controlling body, the Department of the Environment is given. An explanation is given of the technical requirements for the transport of irradiated Magnox fuel and of the type of flask used, and the transport arrangements, both within the U.K. and to the U.K., from overseas is discussed. The technical requirements for the transport of C.A.G.R. fuel are outlined and the flask and transport arrangements are discussed. The transport requirements of oxide fuel from water reactors is outlined and the flask and shipping arrangements under which this fuel is brought to the U.K. from overseas is explained. The shipping arrangements are explained with particular reference to current international and national requirements. The requirements of the transport of M.T.R. fuel are discussed and the flask type explained. The expected future expansion of the transport of irradiated fuel within and to the U.K. is outlined and the proposed operating methods are briefly discussed. A summary is given of the U.K. experience and the lessons to be drawn from that experience

  3. Gaseous fuels: past experiences and future expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M. van der

    1996-01-01

    During the fifties, the use of LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) was promoted in Italy and the Netherlands. The Dutch government promulgated tax regulations which made the use of LPG, available in large quentities as a by-product in the refineries, attractive as an automotive fuel. Dedicated heavy-duty

  4. Shielding considerations for advanced fuel irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Moon; Kim, Bong-Goo; Kim, Hark-Rho; Lee, Dong-Soo

    2008-01-01

    An in-pile test program for the development of a high burn-up fuel is planned for the HANARO reactor. The source term originates from a leakage of fission products from the anticipated failed fuels into the gas flow tubes and around the instrumentation and control system. In order to quantify the fuel composition in the event of a fuel failure, the isotope generation and depletion code ORIGEN 2.0 was used. The computer program Microshield 6.2 was used to calculate the doses from specific locations, where a high radioactivity is expected during an irradiation. The results indicate that the equivalent dose in the investigated working areas is less than the permitted dose rate of 6.25 μSv/hr. However, access to the area of a decay vessel may need to be limited, and the installation of a Pb wall with a 20.5 cm thickness is recommended. From the analysis of a radioactive decay with time, most of the concerned gaseous nuclides with short half-lives after 3 months, were decayed, with one exception which was Kr-85, thus it should be released in accordance with applicable government laws after measuring its activity in individual holding vessels. (author)

  5. CANDU-PHW fuel channel replacement experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, J.T.; Kakaria, B.K.

    1982-09-01

    One of the main characteristics of the CANDU pressurized heavy water reactor is the use of pressure tubes rather than one large pressure vessel to contain the fuel and coolant. This provides an inherent design capability to permit their replacement in an expeditious manner, without seriously affecting the high capacity factors of the reactor units. Of th eight Ontario Hydro commercial nuclear generating units, the lifetime performance places seven of them (including two that have had some of their fuel channels replaced), in the top ten positions in the world's large nuclear-electric unit performance ranking. Pressure tube cracks in the rolled joint region have resulted in 70 fuel channels being replaced in three reactor units, the latest being at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A', Unit 2 in February 1982. The rolled joint design and rolling procedures have been modified to eliminate this problem on CANDU units subsequent to Bruce 'A'. This paper describes the CANDU pressure tube performance history and expectations, and the tooling and procedures used to carry out the fuel channel replacement

  6. Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G.; Bounds, J.A.; Kimpland, R.H.; Damjanovich, R.P.; Jaegers, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were performed to measure a variety of parameters for SHEBA: behavior of the facility during transient and steady-state operation; characteristics of the SHEBA fuel; delayed-critical solution height vs solution temperature; initial reactor period and reactivity vs solution height; calibration of power level vs reactor power instrumentation readings; flux profile in SHEBA; radiation levels and neutron spectra outside the assembly for code verification and criticality alarm and dosimetry purposes; and effect on reactivity of voids in the fuel

  7. US spent fuel research and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machiels, A [EPRI and USDOE (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The structural performance of high-burnup spent fuel cladding during dry storage and transportation has been the subject of research and evaluation at EPRI for several years. The major issues addressed in this research program have included the following: Characterization and development of predictive models for damage mechanisms perceived to be potentially active during dry storage; Modeling and analysis of deformation processes during long-term dry storage; Development of cladding failure models and failure criteria, considering cladding material and physical conditions during dry storage and transportation; Failure analysis, considering end-of-dry-storage conditions, of spent fuel systems subjected to normal and accident conditions of transport, prescribed in Part 71 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR71) While issues related to dry storage have largely been resolved, transportation issues have not, at least for spent fuel with discharge burnups greater than 45 GWd/MTU. A research program was launched in late 2002 following two NRC-industry meetings held on September 6, 2002 and October 23, 2002. The aim of the research program was to assess the performance of high-burnup spent fuel cladding under normal and accident conditions of transportation, as prescribed by 10CFR71, considering the physical characteristics and mechanical properties of cladding at the end of dry storage. The objective is to present a synthesis of the information that collectively forms a part of a technical basis intended to facilitate resolution of regulatory issues associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel characterized by discharge burnups greater than 45 GWd/MTU.

  8. Storage of water reactor spent fuel in water pools. Survey of world experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent fuel has to be stored in water pools at the reactor site to allow for radioactive decay and cooling. After this initial storage period, the future treatment of spent fuel depends on the fuel cycle concept chosen. Spent fuel can either be treated by chemical processing or conditioning for final disposal at the relevant fuel cycle facilities, or be held in interim storage - at the reactor site or at a central storage facility. Recent forecasts predict that, by the year 2000, more than 150,000 tonnes of heavy metal from spent LWR fuel will have been accumulated. Because of postponed commitments regarding spent fuel treatment, a significant amount of spent fuel will still be held in storage at that time. Although very positive experience with wet storage has been gained over the past 40 years, making wet storage a proven technology, it appears desirable to summarize all available data for the benefit of designers, storage pool operators, licensing agenices and the general public. Such data will be essential for assessing the viability of extended water pool storage of spent nuclear fuel. In 1979, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD jointly issued a questionnaire dealing with all aspects of water pool storage. This report summarizes the information received from storage pool operators

  9. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarapata, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2015-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2015 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  10. Experiments simulation and design to set traffic lights operation rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Garcia, J.A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper it is used the experimental design to minimize the travel time of motor vehicles, in one of the most important avenues of Celaya City in Guanajuato, Mexico, by means of optimal synchronization of existing traffic lights. In the optimization process three factors are considered: the traffic lights’ cycle times, the synchrony defined as stepped, parallel and actual, and speed limit, each one with 3 evaluation levels. The response variables to consider are: motor vehicles’ travel time, fuel consumption and greenhouse effect gas (CO2) emissions. The different experiments are performed using the simulation model developed in the PTV-VISSIM software, which represents the vehicle traffic system. The obtained results for the different proposed scenarios allow to find proper levels at which the vehicle traffic system must be operated in order to improve mobility, to reduce contamination rates and decrease the fuel consumption for the different motor vehicles that use the avenue. (Author)

  11. Characteriztion of particulate plutonium released in fuel cycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seefeldt, W.B.; Mecham, W.J.; Steindler, M.J.

    1976-05-01

    An estimate of the plutonium source terms is made for the fuel cycles of three reactor types on the basis of currently applied, currently available, and estimated future technology. The three reactors are LWR-U, LWR-Pu, and LMFBR. The source terms are characterized as to quantity, form, and particle size distribution. Historical operating data for existing plants and the state of the art of the technology of air cleaning are reviewed

  12. Behaviour of short-lived iodines in operating UO2 fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.; Hastings, I.J.; Hunt, C.E.L.

    1984-11-01

    Sweep gas experiments have been done to determine the behaviour of short-lived fission products within operating UO 2 fuel elements at linear powers of 45, 54, and 60 KW/m, and to burnups of 70, 80, and 50 MWh/kgU respectively. Although radioiodine transport was not observed directly during normal operation, equilibrium gap inventories for I-131 were deduced from the shutdown decay behaviour of the fission gases. These inventories were a strong function of fuel power and ranged from 10 GBq (0.27 Ci) to 100 GBq (2.7 Ci) over the range tested. We conclude that the iodine inventory was adsorbed onto the fuel and/or sheath surfaces with a volatile fraction of less than 10 -2 and a charcoal-filter-penetrating fraction of less than 2x10 -4

  13. Failed fuel diagnosis during WWER reactor operation using the RTOP-CA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, V.; Afanasieva, E.; Sorokin, A.; Evdokimov, I.; Kanukova, V.; Khromov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanistic code RTOP-CA is developed for objectives of failed fuel diagnosis during WWER reactor operation. The RTOP-CA code enables to solve a direct problem: modelling the failed fuel behavior and prediction of primary coolant activity if characteristics of failures in the reactor core are known. Results of verification of the RTOP-CA code are presented. Separate physical models were verified on small-scale in-pile and out-of-pile experiments. Integral verification cases included data obtained at research reactors and at nuclear power plants. The RTOP-CA code is used for development of a neural-network approach to the inverse problem: detection of failure characteristics on the base of data on primary coolant activity during reactor operation. Preliminary results of application of the neural-network approach for evaluation of fuel failure characteristics are presented. (authors)

  14. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-10-15

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4-8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  15. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-10-15

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000 kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4 -8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear , plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  16. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, A.; Convery, M.; Geer, S.; Geesaman, D.; Harris, D.; Johnson, D.; Lang, K.; McFarland, K.; Messier, M.; Moore, C. D.; Newhart, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Plunkett, R.; Rominsky, M.; Sanchez, M.; Schmidt, J. J.; Shanahan, P.; Tate, C.; Thomas, J.; Donatella Torretta, Donatella Torretta; Matthew Wetstein, Matthew Wetstein

    2016-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2016. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2016 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MicroBooNE experiment and the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment, LArIAT experiment and Meson Test Beam activities in the 120 GeV external switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was then edited for inclusion in this summary.

  17. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Convery, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geer, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Geesaman, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harris, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lang, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); McFarland, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Messier, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moore, C. D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Newhart, D. [Fermilab; Reimer, P. E. [Argonne; Plunkett, R. [Fermilab; Rominsky, M. [Fermilab; Sanchez, M. [Iowa State U.; Schmidt, J. J. [Fermilab; Shanahan, P. [Fermilab; Tate, C. [Fermilab; Thomas, J. [University Coll. London; Donatella Torretta, Donatella Torretta [Fermilab; Matthew Wetstein, Matthew Wetstein [Iowa State University

    2016-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2016. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2016 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MicroBooNE experiment and the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment, LArIAT experiment and Meson Test Beam activities in the 120 GeV external switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was then edited for inclusion in this summary.

  18. The achivements of Japanese fuel irradiation experiments in HBWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Michio; Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Domoto, Kazunari

    1984-02-01

    OECD Halden Reactor Project celebrated the 25th anniversary in 1983. The JAERI has been participating in the Project since 1967 on behalf of Japanese Government. Since the participation, thirty-six Japanese instrumented fuel assemblies have been irradiated in HBWR. The irradiation experiments were either sponsored by JAERI or by domestic organizations under the joint research agreements with JAERI, beeing steered by the Committee for the Joint Research Programme. The cooperative efforts have attained significant contributions to the development of water reactor fuel technology in Japan. This report review the irradiation experiments of Japanese fuel assemblies. (author)

  19. Modelling of WWER-440 fuel rod behaviour under operational conditions with the PIN-micro code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, S; Vitkova, M; Simeonova, V; Passage, G; Manolova, M [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Haralampieva, Z [National Electric Company Ltd., Kozloduy (Bulgaria); Scheglov, A; Proselkov, V [Institute of Nuclear Reactors, RSC Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-08-01

    The report summarizes the first practical experience obtained by fuel rod performance modelling at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The results of application of the PIN-micro code and the code modification PINB1 for thermomechanical analysis of WWER-440 fuel assemblies (FAs) are presented. The aim of this analysis is to study the fuel rod behaviour of the operating WWER reactors. The performance of two FAs with maximal linear power and varying geometrical and technological parameters is analyzed. On the basis of recent publications on WWER fuel performance modelling at extended burnup, a modified PINB1 version of the standard PIN-micro code is shortly described and applied for the selected FAs. Comparison of the calculated results is performed. The PINB1 version predicts higher fuel temperatures and more adequate FGR rate, accounting for the extended burnup. The results presented in this paper prove the existence of sufficient safety margins, for the fuel performance limiting parameters during the whole considered period of core operation. (author). 8 refs, 16 figs, 1 tab.

  20. Modelling of WWER-440 fuel rod behaviour under operational conditions with the PIN-micro code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, S.; Vitkova, M.; Simeonova, V.; Passage, G.; Manolova, M.; Haralampieva, Z.; Scheglov, A.; Proselkov, V.

    1997-01-01

    The report summarizes the first practical experience obtained by fuel rod performance modelling at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The results of application of the PIN-micro code and the code modification PINB1 for thermomechanical analysis of WWER-440 fuel assemblies (FAs) are presented. The aim of this analysis is to study the fuel rod behaviour of the operating WWER reactors. The performance of two FAs with maximal linear power and varying geometrical and technological parameters is analyzed. On the basis of recent publications on WWER fuel performance modelling at extended burnup, a modified PINB1 version of the standard PIN-micro code is shortly described and applied for the selected FAs. Comparison of the calculated results is performed. The PINB1 version predicts higher fuel temperatures and more adequate FGR rate, accounting for the extended burnup. The results presented in this paper prove the existence of sufficient safety margins, for the fuel performance limiting parameters during the whole considered period of core operation. (author). 8 refs, 16 figs, 1 tab

  1. TSTA piping and flame arrestor operating experience data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee C., E-mail: Lee.Cadwallader@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Willms, R. Scott [ITER International Organization, Cadarache (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Experiences from the Tritium Systems Test Assembly were examined. • Failure rates of copper piping and a flame arrestor were calculated. • The calculated failure rates compared well to similar data from the literature. • Tritium component failure rate data support fusion safety assessment. - Abstract: The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium handling technology and experiment research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility was operated with tritium for its research and development program from 1984 to 2001, running a prototype fusion fuel processing loop with ∼100 g of tritium as well as small experiments. There have been several operating experience reports written on this facility's operation and maintenance experience. This paper describes reliability analysis of two additional components from TSTA, small diameter copper gas piping that handled tritium in a nitrogen carrier gas, and the flame arrestor used in this piping system. The component failure rates for these components are discussed in this paper. Comparison data from other applications are also presented.

  2. Operational experience with CMS Tier-2 sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Caballero, I

    2010-01-01

    In the CMS computing model, more than one third of the computing resources are located at Tier-2 sites, which are distributed across the countries in the collaboration. These sites are the primary platform for user analyses; they host datasets that are created at Tier-1 sites, and users from all CMS institutes submit analysis jobs that run on those data through grid interfaces. They are also the primary resource for the production of large simulation samples for general use in the experiment. As a result, Tier-2 sites have an interesting mix of organized experiment-controlled activities and chaotic user-controlled activities. CMS currently operates about 40 Tier-2 sites in 22 countries, making the sites a far-flung computational and social network. We describe our operational experience with the sites, touching on our achievements, the lessons learned, and the challenges for the future.

  3. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: flow field for efficient air operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechi, F N; Tsukada, A; Haas, O; Scherer, G G [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    A new flow field was designed for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack with an active area of 200 cm{sup 2} for operation at low air stoichiometry and low air over pressure. Optimum of gas flow and channel dimensions were calculated based on the required pressure drop in the fluid. Single cells and a bi-cell stack with the new flow field show an improved current/voltage characteristic when operated at low air stoichiometries as compared to that of the previous non optimized design. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  4. Advanced operator interface design for CANDU-3 fuel handling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arapakota, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Operator Interface for the CANDU 3 Fuel Handling (F/H) System incorporates several improvements over the existing designs. A functionally independent sit-down CRT (cathode-ray tube) based Control Console is provided for the Fuel Handling Operator in the Main Control Room. The Display System makes use of current technology and provides a user friendly operator interface. Regular and emergency control operations can be carried out from this control console. A stand-up control panel is provided as a back-up with limited functionality adequate to put the F/H System in a safe state in case of an unlikely non-availability of the Plant Display System or the F/H Control System'. The system design philosophy, hardware configuration and the advanced display system features are described in this paper The F/H Operator Interface System developed for CANDU 3 can be adapted to CANDU 9 as well as to the existing stations. (author)

  5. Advanced operator interface design for CANDU-3 fuel handling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arapakota, D [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The Operator Interface for the CANDU 3 Fuel Handling (F/H) System incorporates several improvements over the existing designs. A functionally independent sit-down CRT (cathode-ray tube) based Control Console is provided for the Fuel Handling Operator in the Main Control Room. The Display System makes use of current technology and provides a user friendly operator interface. Regular and emergency control operations can be carried out from this control console. A stand-up control panel is provided as a back-up with limited functionality adequate to put the F/H System in a safe state in case of an unlikely non-availability of the Plant Display System or the F/H Control System`. The system design philosophy, hardware configuration and the advanced display system features are described in this paper The F/H Operator Interface System developed for CANDU 3 can be adapted to CANDU 9 as well as to the existing stations. (author).

  6. California's experience with alternative fuel vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, C.

    1993-01-01

    California is often referred to as a nation-state, and in many aspects fits that description. The state represents the seventh largest economy in the world. Most of California does not have to worry about fuel to heat homes in the winter. What we do worry about is fuel for our motor vehicles, approximately 24 million of them. In fact, California accounts for ten percent of new vehicle sales in the United States each year, much of it used in the transportation sector. The state is the third largest consumer of gasoline in the world, only exceeded by the United States as a whole and the former Soviet Union. California is also a leader in air pollution. Of the nine worst ozone areas in the country cited in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, two areas the Los Angeles Basin and San Diego are located in California. Five of California's cities made the top 20 smoggiest cities in the United States. In reality, all of California's major metropolitan areas have air quality problems. This paper will discuss the beginnings of California's investigations of alternative fuels use in vehicles; the results of the state's demonstration programs; and future plans to improve California's air quality and energy security in the mobile sector

  7. X447 EBR-II Experiment Benchmark for Verification of Audit Code of SFR Metal Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Won; Bae, Moo-Hoon; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), to prepare audit calculation of PGSFR licensing review, the project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. In this study, to verify the new code system, the benchmark analysis is performed. In the benchmark, X447 EBR-II experiment data are used. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis according to mass flux change of coolant is performed. In case of LWR fuel performance modeling, various and advanced models have been proposed and validated based on sufficient in-reactor test results. However, due to the lack of experience of SFR operation, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. In this study, X447 EBR-II Experiment data are used for benchmark. The fuel composition of X447 assembly is U-10Zr and PGSFR also uses this composition in initial phase. So we select X447 EBR-II experiment for benchmark analysis. Due to the lack of experience of SFR operation and data, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. However, in order to prepare the licensing of PGSFR, regulatory audit technologies of SFR must be secured. So, in this study, to verify the new audit fuel performance analysis code, the benchmark analysis is performed using X447 EBR-II experiment data. Also, the sensitivity analysis with mass flux change of coolant is performed. In terms of verification, it is considered that the results of benchmark and sensitivity analysis are reasonable.

  8. X447 EBR-II Experiment Benchmark for Verification of Audit Code of SFR Metal Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Won; Bae, Moo-Hoon; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk

    2016-01-01

    In KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), to prepare audit calculation of PGSFR licensing review, the project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. In this study, to verify the new code system, the benchmark analysis is performed. In the benchmark, X447 EBR-II experiment data are used. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis according to mass flux change of coolant is performed. In case of LWR fuel performance modeling, various and advanced models have been proposed and validated based on sufficient in-reactor test results. However, due to the lack of experience of SFR operation, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. In this study, X447 EBR-II Experiment data are used for benchmark. The fuel composition of X447 assembly is U-10Zr and PGSFR also uses this composition in initial phase. So we select X447 EBR-II experiment for benchmark analysis. Due to the lack of experience of SFR operation and data, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. However, in order to prepare the licensing of PGSFR, regulatory audit technologies of SFR must be secured. So, in this study, to verify the new audit fuel performance analysis code, the benchmark analysis is performed using X447 EBR-II experiment data. Also, the sensitivity analysis with mass flux change of coolant is performed. In terms of verification, it is considered that the results of benchmark and sensitivity analysis are reasonable

  9. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Operations Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report Annex B--Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1999, (Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements), Rev. 4. and the CVDF Final Design Report. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence and references to the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDDs). This manual has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved

  10. Operational experience at Fort St. Vrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramblett, G. C.; Fisher, C. R.; Swart, F. E. [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)

    1981-01-15

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) station, a 330-MW(e) single reheat steam cycle powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is the first HTGR to enter commercial operation. Designed and built by General Atomic Company (GA), the plant is owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). Many unique design features have been incorporated into this reactor system, including high-pressure helium as the primary system coolant, a graphite-moderated prismatic block core design, fission-product-containing carbide coatings on both fissile and fertile fuel particles, steam-driven helium circulators turning on water bearings, and once-through steam generators. All of these systems are contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Extensive testing has been conducted during the rise to power following first criticality early in 1974 to verify system design performance. During this period, the plant has operated at power levels up to 70% and produced over one billion kilowatt hours of electricity. In 1979, the first refueling was conducted in conjunction with an extensive in-core inspection, the addition of in-core instrumentation, and a planned removal of a circulator for inspection.

  11. Lessons learned from MELOX plant operation and support to design of new MOX fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourre, Joel; Gattegno, Robert; Guay, Philippe; Bariteau, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    AREVA is participating in the design of the US MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). To support this project and allow the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) client to reap full benefit from the MELOX operating experience, AREVA, through COGEMA and its engineering subsidiary SGN have implemented a rigorous process to prudently apply MELOX Lessons Learned to the MFFF design. This paper describes the Lessons Learned process, how the process supports the advancement of fuel fabrication technology and, how the results of the process are benefiting the client. (author)

  12. Aluminum cladding oxidation of prefilmed in-pile fueled experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcum, W.R., E-mail: marcumw@engr.orst.edu [Oregon State University, School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Wachs, D.M.; Robinson, A.B.; Lillo, M.A. [Idaho National Laboratory, Nuclear Fuels & Materials Department, 2525 Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    A series of fueled irradiation experiments were recently completed within the Advanced Test Reactor Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) and Gas Test Loop (GTL) campaigns. The conduct of the AFIP experiments supports ongoing efforts within the global threat reduction initiative (GTRI) to qualify a new ultra-high loading density low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel. This study details the characterization of oxide growth on the fueled AFIP experiments and cross-correlates the empirically measured oxide thickness values to existing oxide growth correlations and convective heat transfer correlations that have traditionally been utilized for such an application. This study adds new and valuable empirical data to the scientific community with respect to oxide growth measurements of highly irradiated experiments, of which there is presently very limited data. Additionally, the predicted oxide thickness values are reconstructed to produce an oxide thickness distribution across the length of each fueled experiment (a new application and presentation of information that has not previously been obtainable in open literature); the predicted distributions are compared against experimental data and in general agree well with the exception of select outliers. - Highlights: • New experimental data is presented on oxide layer thickness of irradiated aluminum fuel. • Five oxide growth correlations and four convective heat transfer correlations are used to compute the oxide layer thickness. • The oxide layer thickness distribution is predicted via correlation for each respective experiment. • The measured experiment and predicted distributions correlate well, with few outliers.

  13. Spent Fuel Test - Climax data acquisition system operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyholm, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of the retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercially generated, spent nuclear reactor fuel in granite rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies, together with 6 electrical simulators and 20 guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below the surface in the Climax granite at the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site. On June 2, 1978, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) secured funding for the SFT-C, and completed spent fuel emplacement May 28, 1980. The multi-year duration test is located in a remote area and is unattended much of the time. An extensive array of radiological safety and geotechnical instrumentation is deployed to monitor the test performance. A dual minicomputer-based data acquisition system (DAS) collects and processes data from more than 900 analog instruments. This report documents the software element of the LLNL developed SFT-C Data Acquisition System. It defines the operating system and hardware interface configurations, the special applications software and data structures, and support software

  14. Increasing the flexibility of base-load generating units in operation on fossil fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girshfel' d, V Ya; Khanaev, V A; Volkova, E D; Gorelov, V A; Gershenkroi, M L

    1979-01-01

    Increasing the flexibility of base-load generating units operating on fossil fuel by modifying them is a necessary measure. The highest economic effect is attained with modification of gas- and oil-fired generating units in the Western United Power Systems of the European part of the SPSS. On the basis of available experience, 150- and 200-MW units can be extensively used to regulate the power in the European part of the SPSS through putting them into reserve for the hours of the load dip at night. The change under favorable conditions of 150- and 200-MW units operating on coal to a district-heating operating mode does not reduce the possibilities for flexible operation of these units because it is possible greatly to unload the turbines while the minimum load level of the pulverized fuel fired boiler is retained through transferring a part of the heat load to the desuperheater. It is necessary to accumulate and analyze experience with operation of generating units (especially of supercritical units) with regular shutdowns and starts of groups of units and to solve the problems of modification of generating units, with differentiation with respect to types of fuel and to the united power supply system.

  15. JSC Case Study: Fleet Experience with E-85 Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Kirck

    2009-01-01

    JSC has used E-85 as part of an overall strategy to comply with Presidential Executive Order 13423 and the Energy Policy Act. As a Federal fleet, we are required to reduce our petroleum consumption by 2 percent per year, and increase the use of alternative fuels in our vehicles. With the opening of our onsite dispenser in October 2004, JSC became the second federal fleet in Texas and the fifth NASA center to add E-85 fueling capability. JSC has a relatively small number of GSA Flex Fuel fleet vehicles at the present time (we don't include personal vehicles, or other contractor's non-GSA fleet), and there were no reasonably available retail E-85 fuel stations within a 15-minute drive or within five miles (one way). So we decided to install a small 1000 gallon onsite tank and dispenser. It was difficult to obtain a supplier due to our low monthly fuel consumption, and our fuel supplier contract has changed three times in less than five years. We experiences a couple of fuel contamination and quality control issues. JSC obtained good information on E-85 from the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC). We also spoke with Defense Energy Support Center, (DESC), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and US Army Fort Leonard Wood. E-85 is a liquid fuel that is dispensed into our Flexible Fuel Vehicles identically to regular gasoline, so it was easy for our vehicle drivers to make the transition.

  16. Operational experience of the ATLAS accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, P K; Bogaty, J M; Bollinger, L M; Clifft, B E; Craig, S L; Harden, R E; Markovich, P; Munson, F H; Nixon, J M; Pardo, R C; Phillips, D R; Shepard, K W; Tilbrook, I R; Zinkmann, G P [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Physics Div.

    1990-02-01

    The ATLAS accelerator consists of a HVEC model FN tandem accelerator injecting into a linac of independently-phased niobium superconducting resonators. The accelerator provides beams with masses 6 {le} A {le} 127 and with energies ranging up to 20 MeV/A for the lightest ions and 4 MeV/A for the heaviest ions. Portions of the linac have been in operation since 1978 and, over the last decade, more than 35000 h of operating experience have been accumulated. The long-term stability of niobium resonators, and their feasibility for use in heavy-ion accelerators is now well established. (orig.).

  17. Operational experience of extreme wind penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estanqueiro, Ana [INETI/LNEG - National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisbon (Portugal); Mateus, Carlos B. [Instituto de Meteorologia, Lisboa (Portugal); Pestana, Rui [Redes Energeticas Nacionais (REN), Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the operational experience from the Portuguese Power System during the 2009/2010 winter months when record wind penerations were observed: the instantaneous wind power penetration peaked at 70% of consumption during no-load periods and the wind energy accounted for more than 50% of the energy consumed for a large period. The regulation measures taken by the TSO are presented in the paper, together with the additional reserves operated for added system security. Information on the overall power system behavior under such extreme long-term wind power penetrations will also be addressed. (org.)

  18. Operating procedures: Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, R.A.; Carey, R.W.

    1984-03-20

    The Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility (FEAF) is a computer facility based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer. It became operational in late 1982. At that time two manuals were written to aid users and staff in their interactions with the facility. This manual is designed as a reference to assist the FEAF staff in carrying out their responsibilities. It is meant to supplement equipment and software manuals supplied by the vendors. Also this manual provides the FEAF staff with a set of consistent, written guidelines for the daily operation of the facility.

  19. Operating procedures: Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Carey, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility (FEAF) is a computer facility based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer. It became operational in late 1982. At that time two manuals were written to aid users and staff in their interactions with the facility. This manual is designed as a reference to assist the FEAF staff in carrying out their responsibilities. It is meant to supplement equipment and software manuals supplied by the vendors. Also this manual provides the FEAF staff with a set of consistent, written guidelines for the daily operation of the facility

  20. Preheat operating experiences at the FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    The rather extensive test program performed on the FFTF preheat control system resulted in successful sodium fill of one secondary heat transport loop on July 2, 1978. The data obtained during testing and the attendant operating experience gained resulted in some design changes and provided the information necessary to fully characterize system performance. Temperature excursions and deviations from preset limits of only a minor nature were encountered during preheat for sodium fill. The addition of the rate alarm feature was beneficial to operation of the preheat system and allowed early detection and correction of impending excursions

  1. Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation experience with BWR and PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reparaz, A.; Smith, M.H.; Stephens, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    The large data base of fuel performance parameters available to Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP), and the excellent track record of innovation and fuel reliability accumulated over the last twenty-three years, allows SNP to have a clear insight on the characteristics of future developments in the area of fuel design. Following is a description of some of SNP's recent design innovations to prevent failures and to extend burnup capabilities. A goal paramount to the design and manufacture of BWR and PWR fuel is that of zero defects from any case during its operation in the reactor. Progress has already been made in achieving this goal. This paper summarized the cumulative failure rate of SNP fuel rod through January 1992

  2. Operational experience with Dragon reactor experiment of relevance to commercial reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capp, P.D.; Simon, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    An important part of the experience gained during the first ten years of successful power operation of the Dragon Reactor is relevant to the design and operation of future High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). The aspects presented in this paper have been chosen as being particularly applicable to larger HTR systems. Core performance under a variety of conditions is surveyed with particular emphasis on a technique developed for the identification and location of unpurged releasing fuel and the presence of activation and fission products in the core area. The lessons learned during the reflector block replacement are presented. Operating experience with the primary circuit identifies the lack of mixing of gas streams within the hot plenum and the problems of gas streaming in ducts. Helium leakage from the circuit is often greater than the optimum 0.1%/d. Virtually all the leakage problems are associated with the small bore instrument pipework essential for the many experiments associated with the Dragon Reactor Experiment (DRE). Primary circuit maintenance work confirms the generally clean state of the DRE circuit but identifies 137 Cs and 110 Agsup(m) as possible hazards if fuel emitting these isotopes is irradiated. (author)

  3. Experiences of operation for Ikata Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimoto, Shigeyuki

    1979-01-01

    No. 1 plant in the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., is a two-loop PWR unit with electric output of 566 MW, and it began the commercial operation on September 30, 1977, as the first nuclear power station in Shikoku. It is the 13th LWR and 7th PWR in Japan. The period of construction was 52 months since it had been started in June, 1973. During the period, it became the object of the first administrative litigation to seek the cancellation of permission to install the reactor, and it was subjected to the influence of the violent economical variation due to the oil shock, but it was completed as scheduled. After the start of operation, it continued the satisfactory operation, and generated about 2.35 billion KWh for 4300 operation hours. It achieved the rate of utilization of 96.7%. Since March 28, 1978, the first periodical inspection was carried out, and abnormality was not found in the reactor, the steam generator and the fuel at all. The period of inspection was 79 days and shorter than expected. The commercial operation was started again on June 14. The outline of the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, its state of operation, and the periodical inspection are reported. Very good results were able to be reported on the operation for one year, thanks to the valuable experiences offered by other electric power companies. (Kako, I.)

  4. Operating results and experience and operating regimes in changing demands of energy world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobza, L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, there are stated some operating results and experience obtained from trial operation of Temelin NPP. In Europe, Temelin NPP is presently one of the latest implemented projects of the series of VVER 1000 nuclear units with proven V-320 pressurized water reactor. The distinction between Temelin NPP and original project lays mainly in supply of nuclear fuel and in I and C systems delivered by Westinghouse Company. Temelin NPP has passed through commissioning period and trial operation. The main goal of the trial operation was to meet the requirements of section 2, par. 4, point b) of Decree No. 106/98 Sb. and verification of project parameters and stability of operation, and the situation leading to violation of safety functions fulfilment according to Pre-operational Safety Report should not occur. The integral part of trial operation assessment was also successful performing of determined monitoring programmes, first refuelling and performing of prescribed tests and operational inspections. Simultaneously, first experience was obtained with nuclear fuel; providing of ancillary services; reliability of important components; operation of turbine-generator 1000 MW; chemical regime; influence to environment; and quality of contractors. As safety is the most important indicator, it can be stated that: no facts which would lead to decreasing of safety systems operability have been detected; no facts which would lead to negative affecting of barriers against fading the radioactivity into both working areas and environment, have been detected; good condition of fire safety has been continuously documented; requirements of limits for releasing waste water into environment have been continuously complied with; requirements of limits for releasing radioactive substances (in gaseous and/or liquid state) into environment have been continuously complied with. From the operation regimes point of view is clear, that it would be suitable for the power plant if the

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell performance under severe operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren; Hendriksen, P.V.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2006-01-01

    The performance and degradation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) were studied under severe operating conditions. The cells studied were manufactured in a small series by ECN, in the framework of the EU funded CORE-SOFC project. The cells were of the anode-supported type with a double layer LSM...... cathode. They were operated at 750 °C or 850 °C in hydrogen with 5% or 50% water at current densities ranging from 0.25 A cm–2 to 1 A cm–2 for periods of 300 hours or more. The area specific cell resistance, corrected for fuel utilisation, ranged between 0.20 Ω cm2 and 0.34 Ω cm2 at 850 °C and 520 m......V, and between 0.51 Ω cm2 and 0.92 Ω cm2 at 750 °C and 520 mV. The degradation of cell performance was found to be low (ranging from 0 to 8%/1,000 hours) at regular operating conditions. Voltage degradation rates of 20 to 40%/1,000 hours were observed under severe operating conditions, depending on the test...

  6. Validating the BISON fuel performance code to integral LWR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, R.L., E-mail: Richard.Williamson@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Gamble, K.A., E-mail: Kyle.Gamble@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Perez, D.M., E-mail: Danielle.Perez@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Novascone, S.R., E-mail: Stephen.Novascone@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Pastore, G., E-mail: Giovanni.Pastore@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Gardner, R.J., E-mail: Russell.Gardner@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Hales, J.D., E-mail: Jason.Hales@inl.gov [Fuel Modeling and Simulation, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Liu, W., E-mail: Wenfeng.Liu@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation, 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Mai, A., E-mail: Anh.Mai@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation, 5435 Oberlin Dr., San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The BISON multidimensional fuel performance code is being validated to integral LWR experiments. • Code and solution verification are necessary prerequisites to validation. • Fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable. • Accuracy in predicting fission gas release is consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and the involved uncertainties. • Rod diameter comparisons are not satisfactory and further investigation is underway. - Abstract: BISON is a modern finite element-based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behavior and has been used to analyze a variety of fuel forms in 1D spherical, 2D axisymmetric, or 3D geometries. Code validation is underway and is the subject of this study. A brief overview of BISON's computational framework, governing equations, and general material and behavioral models is provided. BISON code and solution verification procedures are described, followed by a summary of the experimental data used to date for validation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Validation comparisons focus on fuel centerline temperature, fission gas release, and rod diameter both before and following fuel-clad mechanical contact. Comparisons for 35 LWR rods are consolidated to provide an overall view of how the code is predicting physical behavior, with a few select validation cases discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrate that (1) fuel centerline temperature comparisons through all phases of fuel life are very reasonable with deviations between predictions and experimental data within ±10% for early life through high burnup fuel and only slightly out of these bounds for power ramp experiments, (2) accuracy in predicting fission gas release appears to be consistent with state-of-the-art modeling and with the involved uncertainties and (3) comparison

  7. Operational experience at Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramblett, G.C.; Fisher, C.R.; Swart, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) station, a 330-MW(e) single reheat steam cycle powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is the first HTGR to enter commercial operation. Designed and built by General Atomic Company (GA), the plant is owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). Many unique design features have been incorporated into this reactor system, including high-pressure helium as the primary system coolant, a graphite-moderated prismatic block core design, fission-product-containing carbide coatings on both fissile and fertile fuel particles, steam-driven helium circulators turning on water bearings, and once-through steam generators. All of these systems are contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Extensive testing has been conducted during the rise to power following first criticality early in 1974 to verify system design performance. During this period, the plant has operated at power levels up to 70% and produced over one billion kilowatt hours of electricity. In 1979, the first refueling was conducted in conjunction with an extensive in-core inspection, the addition of in-core instrumentation, and a planned removal of a circulator for inspection. Later in the year, a scheduled shutdown was undertaken for surveillance tests, insertion of core region constraint devices (RCDs), and other maintenance. Fort St. Vrain has encountered problems of the type that would be expected in a first-of-a-kind system. The plant is currently restricted to 70% of design power by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pending resolution of the core region gas outlet temperature fluctuation problem. Even so, the basic performance of the HTGR concept and all of the unique design features have been successfully demonstrated. The system has been characterized by low personnel radiation exposures, operational flexibility, and long time afforded for status evaluation and response. (author)

  8. The FLIP fuel experience at Washington State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, Thomas A.

    1977-01-01

    The Washington State University TRIGA-fueled modified G.E. reactor was refueled with a partial TRIGA-FLIP core in February, 1976. The final core loading consisted of 35 FLIP and 75 Standard TRIGA fuel rods and provided a core excess reactivity of $7.98. The observed performance of the reactor did not deviate significantly from the design predictions and specifications. Pulsing tests revealed a maximum power output of 1850 MW with a fuel temperature of 449 deg. C from a $2.50 pulse. Slight power fluctuations at 1 Megawatt steady-state operation and post-pulse power oscillations were observed. (author)

  9. Operational and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, F.; Gow, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    In the last 15 years the CEGB has experienced progressive plant development, integration and changes in operating regime through nine nuclear (gas-cooled reactor) power stations with corresponding instrumentation advances leading towards more refined centralized control. Operation and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation is reported in this paper with reference to the progressive changes related to the early magnox, late magnox and AGR periods. Data on instrumentation reliability in terms of reactor forced outages are presented and show that the instrumentation contributions to loss of generating plant availability are small. Reactor safety circuits, neutron flux and temperature measurements, gas analysis and vibration monitoring are discussed. In reviewing the reactor instrumentation the emphasis is on reporting recent experience, particularly on AGR equipment, but overall performance and changes to magnox equipment are included so that some appreciation can be obtained of instrumentation requirements with respect to plant lifetimes. (author)

  10. Performance and emissions of a dual-fuel pilot diesel ignition engine operating on various premixed fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousefi, Amin; Birouk, Madjid; Lawler, Benjamin; Gharehghani, Ayatallah

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Natural gas/diesel, methanol/diesel, and hydrogen/diesel cases were investigated. • For leaner mixtures, the hydrogen/diesel case has the highest IMEP and ITE. • The methanol/diesel case has the maximum IMEP and ITE for richer mixtures. • Hydrogen/diesel case experiences soot and CO free combustion at rich regions. - Abstract: A multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model coupled with chemical kinetics mechanisms was applied to investigate the effect of various premixed fuels and equivalence ratios on the combustion, performance, and emissions characteristics of a dual-fuel indirect injection (IDI) pilot diesel ignition engine. The diesel fuel is supplied via indirect injection into the cylinder prior to the end of the compression stroke. Various premixed fuels were inducted into the engine through the intake manifold. The results showed that the dual-fuel case using hydrogen/diesel has a steeper pressure rise rate, higher peak heat release rate (PHRR), more advanced ignition timing, and shorter ignition delay compared to the natural gas/diesel and methanol/diesel dual-fuel cases. For leaner mixtures (Φ_P 0.32). For instance, with an equivalence ratio of 0.35, the ITE is 56.24% and 60.85% for hydrogen/diesel and methanol/diesel dual-fuel cases, respectively. For an equivalence ratio of 0.15, the natural gas/diesel simulation exhibits partial burn combustion and thus results in a negative IMEP. At equivalence ratios of 0.15, 0.2, and 0.25, the methanol/diesel case experiences misfiring phenomenon which consequently deteriorates the engine performance considerably. As for the engine-out emissions, the hydrogen/diesel results display carbon monoxide (CO) free combustion relative to natural gas/diesel and methanol/diesel engines; however, considerable amount of nitrogen oxides (NO_x) emissions are produced at an equivalence ratio of 0.35 which exceeds the Euro 6 NO_x limit. Due to the larger area exposed to high temperature regions

  11. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC collider sets new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction because of its higher energy, pileup and luminosity. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector. Therefore, in view of Run 2, the ATLAS collaboration has constructed the first 4-layer pixel detector in Particle Physics by installing a new pixel layer, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Operational experience and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector during Run 2 are presented.

  12. BNFL's experience in the sea transport of irradiated research reactor fuel to the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, I.A.; Porter, I.

    2000-01-01

    BNFL provides worldwide transport for a wide range of nuclear materials. BNFL Transport manages an unique fleet of vessels, designed, built, and operated to the highest safety standards, including the highest rating within the INF Code recommended by the International Maritime Organisation. The company has some 20 years of experience of transporting irradiated research reactor fuel in support of the United States' programme for returning US obligated fuel from around the world. Between 1977 and 1988 BNFL performed 11 shipments of irradiated research reactor fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to the US. Since 1997, a further 3 shipments have been performed as part of an ongoing programme for Japanese research reactor operators. Where possible, shipments of fuel from European countries such as Sweden and Spain have been combined with those from Japan for delivery to the US. (author)

  13. Operational Experience from Solar Thermal Energy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  14. Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Bruyere, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average 'all modes' failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment

  15. Practical experience with the fuel monitoring at Dukovany NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kment, J.; Svoboda, R.; Valach, M.

    1994-01-01

    A brief description of the following activities of Dukovany NPP is given: fuel state monitoring during cycles; fuel state inspection during outages; fuel damage predictions and reality; prevention against fuel damage caused by PCI. The fuel state monitoring during cycles is conducted by on-line gamma spectrometer located under the by-pass pipelines of the water cleaning system. The system enables to carry out determination of the equilibrium activities of practically all significant gaseous fission products for energies from 80 KeV to 2 MeV. On-line activity measurements give reliable indication of a defect origin with the 133 Xe activity level of the order of tens k Bk/l. The gamma spectroscopy data are processed by KGO and PEPA software packages installed into the chemistry information system. KGO estimates the number of the damaged fuel elements and the extent of their damage. The activities of 133 Xe, 135 Xe, 137 Xe, 138 Xe, 87 Kr, 88 Kr and 89 Kr are used for evaluation of the number of 'leakers'. PEPA code predicts radiation set-up development, i.e. the activity levels of cca 20 radiologically significant nuclides in the primary coolant for the assumed reactor power mode. The fuel damage predictions during cycles are illustrated on two examples from the operational history of the Dukovany NPP. The utilization of the KGO-PEPA software contributes to a more high exploitation culture of the core from the point of view of fuel integrity maintenance. 3 refs

  16. Sludge behavior in centrifugal contactor operation for nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Sano, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Okamura, Nobuo; Koizumi, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing the centrifugal contactor for spent fuel reprocessing. In this study, we investigated the sludge behavior in centrifugal contactors at three different scales. The operational conditions (the flow rate and rotor speed) were varied. Most insoluble particles such as sludge remained in the rotor via centrifugal force. The capture ratio of sludge in the contactor was measured as a function of particle size at various flow rates, rotor speeds, and contactor scales. The sludge adhered and accumulated inside the rotor as the operational time increased, and the operational conditions influenced the capture ratio of the sludge; a lower flow rate and higher rotor speed increased the capture ratio. The results confirmed that Stokes' law can be applied to estimate the experimental result on the behavior of the capture ratio for centrifugal contactors with different scales. (author)

  17. Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Jabbar, Mohammed Hussain

    An important issue that has limited the potential of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) for portable applications is its high operating temperatures (800-1000 ºC). Lowering the operating temperature of SOFCs to 400-600 ºC enable a wider material selection, reduced degradation and increased lifetime....... On the other hand, low-temperature operation poses serious challenges to the electrode performance. Effective catalysts, redox stable electrodes with improved microstructures are the prime requisite for the development of efficient SOFC anodes. The performance of Nb-doped SrT iO3 (STN) ceramic anodes...... at 400ºC. The potential of using WO3 ceramic as an alternative anode materials has been explored. The relatively high electrode polarization resistance obtained, 11 Ohm cm2 at 600 ºC, proved the inadequate catalytic activity of this system for hydrogen oxidation. At the end of this thesis...

  18. Experiments on contrail formation from fuels with different sulfur content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busen, R; Kuhn, M; Petzold, A; Schroeder, F; Schumann, U [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Baumgardner, D [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Borrmann, S [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Hagen, D; Whitefield, Ph [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Bureau of Mines; Stroem, J [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    A series of both flight tests and ground experiments has been performed to evaluate the role of the sulfur contained in kerosene in condensation trail (contrail) formation processes. The results of the first experiments are compiled briefly. The last SULFUR 4 experiment dealing with the influence of the fuel sulfur content and different appertaining conditions is described in detail. Different sulfur mass fractions lead to different particle size spectra. The number of ice particles in the contrail increases by about a factor of 2 for 3000 ppm instead of 6 ppm sulfur fuel content. (author) 10 refs.

  19. Experiments on contrail formation from fuels with different sulfur content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busen, R.; Kuhn, M.; Petzold, A.; Schroeder, F.; Schumann, U. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Baumgardner, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Borrmann, S. [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Hagen, D.; Whitefield, Ph. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Bureau of Mines; Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    A series of both flight tests and ground experiments has been performed to evaluate the role of the sulfur contained in kerosene in condensation trail (contrail) formation processes. The results of the first experiments are compiled briefly. The last SULFUR 4 experiment dealing with the influence of the fuel sulfur content and different appertaining conditions is described in detail. Different sulfur mass fractions lead to different particle size spectra. The number of ice particles in the contrail increases by about a factor of 2 for 3000 ppm instead of 6 ppm sulfur fuel content. (author) 10 refs.

  20. Evaluation of radiation exposures to personnel during maintenance operations and fuel recharging at NPP with the WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskrestnov, N.V.; Vasil'ev, Eh.S.; Kozlov, V.F.; Odinokov, Yu.Yu.; Romanov, V.P.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1983-01-01

    A unified data acquisition and analysis system is presented. The system is intended to assess radiation exposures to personnel and perform radiation monitoring during periodic maintenance operations sna fuel recharging at NPPs with WWER-440 reactors. The basic principles of developing this system, patterns of danita collection are considered, points of radiation motoring chosen with account of the NPP operating experience are pointed out

  1. 14 CFR 121.434 - Operating experience, operating cycles, and consolidation of knowledge and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operating experience, operating cycles, and... Qualifications § 121.434 Operating experience, operating cycles, and consolidation of knowledge and skills. (a... position, the operating experience, operating cycles, and the line operating flight time for consolidation...

  2. Operational experience feedback with precursor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncar, M.; Ferjancic, M.; Muehleisen, A.; Vojnovic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Experience of practical operation is a valuable source of information for improving the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. Operational experience feedback (Olef) system manages this aspect of NPP operation. The traditional ways of investigating operational events, such as the root cause analysis (RCA), are predominantly qualitative. RCA as a part of the Olef system provides technical guidance and management expectations in the conduct of assessing the root cause to prevent recurrence, covering the following areas: conditions preceding the event, sequence of events, equipment performance and system response, human performance considerations, equipment failures, precursors to the event, plant response and follow-up, radiological considerations, regulatory process considerations and safety significance. The root cause of event is recognized when there is no known answer on question 'why has it happened?' regarding relevant condition that may have affected the event. At that point the Olef is proceeding by actions taken in response to events, utilization, dissemination and exchange of operating experience information and at the end reviewing the effectiveness of the Olef. Analysis of the event and the selection of recommended corrective/preventive actions for implementation and prioritization can be enhanced by taking into account the information and insights derived from Pasa-based analysis. A Pasa based method, called probabilistic precursor event analysis (PPE A) provides a complement to the RCA approach by focusing on how an event might have developed adversely, and implies the mapping of an operational event on a probabilistic risk model of the plant in order to obtain a quantitative assessment of the safety significance of the event PSA based event analysis provides, due to its quantitative nature, appropriate prioritization of corrective actions. PPEA defines requirements for PSA model and code, identifies input requirements and elaborates following

  3. Experience with failed or damaged spent fuel and its impacts on handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-12-01

    Spent fuel management planning needs to include consideration of failed or damaged spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel. Described in this paper, which was prepared under the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program that is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are the following: the importance of fuel integrity and the behavior of failed fuel, the quantity and burnup of failed or damaged fuel in storage, types of defects, difficulties in evaluating data on failed or damaged fuel, experience with wet storage, experience with dry storage, handling of failed or damaged fuel, transporting of fuel, experience with higher burnup fuel, and conclusions. 15 refs

  4. Operating results and simulations on a fuel cell for residential energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Yasuhiro; Goto, Ryuichiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Kubota, Hideki; Ochifuji, Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the performance evaluation of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) prototype and demonstration experiments of the electric power and domestic hot water system using it from a pragmatic view-point. Three types of demonstration experiments were carried out applying standard electric power and hot water demands. It was shown that the primary energy reduction rate of this system as compared to the conventional system reached up to 24% under double daily start and stop (DSS) operation. The amount of primary energy reduction in experiments using the energy demand of a household in Sapporo in winter exceeded the experimental results of the standard energy demand, demonstrating that the effects of the introduction of a fuel cell in cold regions could be considerable, in particular, during the winter season

  5. LWR mox fuel experience in Belgium and France with special emphasis on results obtained in BR3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.; Haas, D.; Lippens, M.; Motte, F.; Lebastard, G.; Marin, J.F.

    1986-09-01

    The course of the paper reflects two main topics: LWR MOX fuel experience in Belgium and France, summarizing the fabrication techniques, the references, the underlying MOX fuel technology and the current R and D programs for expanding the data base; behaviour of MOX fuel rods irradiated under steady state and transient operating conditions, focusing on MOX fuel technology features acquired through the irradiations performed in the BR3 PWR, supplemented by tests in the BR2 MTR. This paper focuses on the thermomechanical behaviour of LWR MOX fuel rods, which is intimately related to the fabrication technique and vice-versa. 22 refs

  6. Dual fuel mode operation in diesel engines using renewable fuels: Rubber seed oil and coir-pith producer gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramadhas, A.S.; Jayaraj, S.; Muraleedharan, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Calicut-673601 (India)

    2008-09-15

    Partial combustion of biomass in the gasifier generates producer gas that can be used as supplementary or sole fuel for internal combustion engines. Dual fuel mode operation using coir-pith derived producer gas and rubber seed oil as pilot fuel was analyzed for various producer gas-air flow ratios and at different load conditions. The engine is experimentally optimized with respect to maximum pilot fuel savings in the dual fuel mode operation. The performance and emission characteristics of the dual fuel engine are compared with that of diesel engine at different load conditions. Specific energy consumption in the dual-fuel mode of operation with oil-coir-pith operation is found to be in the higher side at all load conditions. Exhaust emission was found to be higher in the case of dual fuel mode of operation as compared to neat diesel/oil operation. Engine performance characteristics are inferior in fully renewable fueled engine operation but it suitable for stationary engine application, particularly power generation. (author)

  7. Experimental study on the impact of operating conditions and fuel composition on PCCI combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leermakers, C.A.J.

    2010-03-15

    Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) is a combustion concept that holds the promise of combining emission levels of a spark-ignition (SI) engine with the efficiency of a compressionignition (CI) engine. In a short term scenario, PCCI combustion will be used in the low load part of the engine operating range only. This would guarantee low engine-out emission levels at operating conditions where exhaust temperatures are too low for effective NOx reduction through catalytic after treatment. At higher loads, the engine would run in conventional CI combustion mode, with emission requirements met through catalytic NOx reduction. Implicit with this scenario is that engine hardware design would be very close to that of current modern diesel engines. Compression ratio could be made load dependent through implementation of variable valve actuation. The PCCI experiments presented here have been performed using a modified 6 cylinder 12.6 liter heavy duty DI DAF XE 355 C engine. Experiments are conducted in one dedicated cylinder, which is equipped with a stand-alone fuel injection system, EGR circuit, and air compressor. For the low to medium load operating range the compression ratio has been lowered to 12:1 by means of a thicker head gasket. As engine hardware should - in the short term - preferably remain close to current diesel engines, optimizing operating conditions should focus on parameters like EGR level, intake temperature, intake pressure and injection timing. While past work in the Combustion Technology group has focused on low load PCCI combustion, in this report the effects on engine performance and emission behavior are investigated for both low and medium load PCCI combustion, up to 40% of full load. In the interpretation of experimental results, emphasis lies on the effect on combustion phasing and maximum pressure rise rate, which are inherent challenges to enable viable PCCI combustion. As in the short term scenario fuels will be used that are not too

  8. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios; GERDA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set (T-0ν1/2 > 2.1 · 1025 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats.

  9. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76 Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76 Ge was set (T- 0ν 1/2 > 2.1 · 10 25 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats. (paper)

  10. Transit experience with hydrogen fueled hybrid electric buses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P.B.; Mazaika, D.M. [ISE Corp., Poway, CA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Mass transit buses are ideal candidates for hydrogen implementation due to their capability of carrying 30 to 60 kg of hydrogen. ISE Corporation is a supplier of hydrogen fueled buses, including the first hybrid electric fuel cell bus which was commercialized in 2002, the hybrid electric fuel cell bus, and the hybrid hydrogen internal combustion engine (HHICE) bus which was commercialized in 2004. The configuration of a HHICE bus was illustrated with reference to its engine, control system, energy storage, generator, drive motor, inverter and accessories. Although these vehicles are expensive, the cost is amortized over a large base of hours used and passengers carried. The buses are operated primarily in urban areas where quiet and clean operation is needed the most. ISE has established a joint venture with Thor industries to develop a series of fuel cell buses equipped with a 60 kW PEM fuel cell. A schematic illustrating the energy flow in HHICE bus was also presented. It was shown that regenerative braking recovers the energy of motion. When using regenerative braking, most of the braking energy is saved in the battery. ISE drive systems convert 30 per cent or more of the bus energy to electrical energy to be used in later acceleration. Reduced fuel consumption also reduces the vehicle emissions. Testing of HHICE buses in both summer and winter operating conditions have shown that the range needs to be improved along with engine component reliability and durability. Fuel supply is also a major issue. A comparison with a fuel cell hybrid system was also presented. In the United States, more than 100,000 miles have been logged for the use of hydrogen hybrid buses, fuel cell buses and HHICE buses. The HHICE bus offers low capital cost, familiar technologies, but some NOx. CAT absorber technology offers the possibility of near zero emission capability. The fuel cell bus was found to be more fuel efficient, and can travel nearly twice as far per unit energy as

  11. Assessment of radiological and non-radiological hazards in the nuclear fuel cycle - The Indian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamony, S.; Gopinath, D.V.

    1996-01-01

    Design and operational aspects of nuclear fuel cycle facilities have several features that distinguish them from nuclear power plants. These are related to (i) the nature of operations which are chiefly mining, metallurgical and chemical; (ii) the nature and type of radio-active materials handled, their specific activities and inventories; and (iii) the physical and chemical processes involved and the associated containment provisions. Generally the radioactive materials are present in an already highly dispersible or mobile form, in the form of solutions, slurries and powders, often associated with a wide variety of reactive and corrosive chemicals. There are further marked differences between the front-end and back-end of the fuel cycle. Whereas the front-end is characterized by the presence of large quantities of low specific activity naturally occurring radioactive materials, the back-end is characterized by high specific activities and concentrations of fission products and actinides. Radioactive characteristics of waste arisings are also different in different phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. Potential for internal exposure in the occupational environment is another distinguishing feature as compared with the more common designs of nuclear power reactors. Potential for accidents, their phenomenology and the resulting consequences are also markedly different in fuel cycle operations. The non-radiological hazards in fuel cycle operations are also of significance, since the operations are mostly mining, metallurgical and chemical in nature. These aspects are examined and evaluated in this paper, based on the Indian experience. (author). 12 refs, 10 tabs

  12. BR3/Vulcain Nuclear Power Station. Construction and Operational Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrer, J. [Belgonucleaire, S.A., Brussels (Belgium)

    1968-04-15

    A full-scale reactor experiment was set out as the main objective of the Vulcain research and development programme agreed in May 1962 between the UKAEA and BelgoNucleaire, manager of ''Syndicat Vulcain''. Vulcain uses variable moderation as the long-term method to control reactivity: the reactor is cooled and moderated by a mixture of heavy and light water, the D{sub 2}O content being stepwise reduced to permit power operation with all control rods completely out of the core. To carry out the Vulcain power experiment it was decided to modify the BR3 nuclear power plant located at Mol, Belgium, which had operated from 1962 to 1964 as a conventional PWR with outputs of 40.9 MW(th) and 11.45 MW(e). The BR3/Vulcain plant was started in December 1966 and since then is running with a load factor around 90%. It is the first time that such a reactor type has been built and operated and the experience gained by its design, construction, commissioning and operation has proven to be most valuable. D{sub 2}O is being used at a pressure (2000 lb/in{sup 2} abs.) never before achieved in a heavy-water reactor and the leak rate from the HP primary systems to the atmosphere has been kept to a negligible value, around 1 to 2 grams/h. Commissioning of the primary plant had been carried out with light water first without fuel, and thereafter with fuel, at which time the water was poisoned with boric acid. The reactor vessel contains experimental devices such as 65 in-pile instrumentation detectors and four hydraulically operated Zircaloy control rods. They required the interposition of a collar between the vessel and its lid. Refuelling is performed under boronated light water, the interchange between the primary water and the H{sub 2}O being carried out by means of a draining and spraying system. The reactor had been operated for two years before its modifications for Vulcain: many lessons have therefore been learned about working on irradiated systems. The BR3/Vulcain core has a

  13. Irradiation experience with KNK II Fast Breeder Fuel Subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, B.

    1993-02-01

    During the operation of the second core of KNK II fuel pin failures occurred, which were caused by local cladding weakening due to mechanical interaction between fuel pins and pin spacers. The present report gives a summarizing presentation of the consequences of these interactions, of the experimental and theoretical investigations to clarify the reason for the interactions and of measures to reduce their consequences in the extended residence time of the second core of KNK II. This type of interaction is caused by thermo-elastic instabilities of the fuel pin bundle, and its strength depends sensitively on the geometry of the pin bundle and the pin power. Finally, measures are described, which were taken for the fuel subassemblies of the third core of KNK II to avoid the wear causing instabilities [de

  14. Vented fuel experiment for gas-cooled fast reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longest, A.W.; Gat, U.; Conlin, J.A.; Campana, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A pressure-equalized and vented fuel rod is being irradiated in an instrumented capsule designated GB-10 to approximately 100 MWd/kg-heavy metal. The fuel is a sol-gel derived 88 atom-percent uranium (approximately 9 percent 235 U) 12 atom-percent plutonium oxide, and the cladding is 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel. The capsule is being irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and has exceeded a burnup of 70 MWd/kg. The fuel has been operated at linear power rates of 39 and 44 kW/ m, and peak outer cladding temperature of 565 0 and 630 0 C respectively. A similar fuel rod in a previous capsule (GB-9) was subjected to 48 kW/m (685 0 C). 4 references. (auth)

  15. Experience of development of the methods and equipment and the prospects for creation of WWER fuel examination stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, S.; Smirnov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The report presents the basic methods and equipment developed for inspection of the fuel elements and fuel assemblies in the spent fuel pools. It considers their characteristics and results of the tests under laboratory and experimental fuel examination stand conditions. In particular, the following techniques are presented: visual inspection, measurement of the geometrical dimensions, definition of the form change in fuel assemblies and fuel elements, detection of the failed fuel elements, etc. The experience of the experimental fuel examination stand operation is generalized. The concept of the creation of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 FA and FE inspection stands is presented. The concept is based on the modular principle which runs as follows. A set of the basic functional blocks is being developed based on which it is possible to make such a stand configuration which is necessary to fulfil the specific program of the examination at the particular nuclear power plant. (author)

  16. Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

    2008-09-01

    Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

  17. Operational experience of the ATLAS accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, P.K.; Bogaty, J.M.; Bollinger, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The ATLAS accelerator consists of a HVEC model FN tandem accelerator injecting into a linac of independently-phased niobium superconducting resonators. The accelerator provides beams with masses from 6≤A≤127 and with energies ranging up to 20 MeV/A for the lightest ions and 4 MeV/A for the heaviest ions. Portions of the linac have been in operation since 1978 and, over the last decade, more than 35,000 hours of operating experience have been accumulated. The long-term stability of niobium resonators, and their feasibility for use in heavy-ion accelerators is now well established. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Selection of operations staff, qualifications and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Requirements and suggestions have been made by authorities and various organisations in a number of countries which define necessary experience and training for the various groups of nuclear power plant personnel. For two countries, the USA and the FRG, a comparison has been made which shows that there is only a slight deviation, taking into account the different education systems. With the example of the Biblis nuclear power plant the training on the job is described. Especially the production or operation department is looked at in more detail. The training is split up into several parts: a general part, such as nuclear physics, reactor physics and engineering, reactor safety, radiation protection and so on and a plant related part, such as arrangement and mode of operation of the plant under normal and accident conditions, license conditions and so on. (orig.) [de

  19. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost element of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  20. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschbuehl, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  1. Operational experience of the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Marcisovsky, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this talk, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97,5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, an...

  2. The LHC test string first operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Casas-Cubillos, J; Coull, L; Cruikshank, P; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Faugeras, Paul E; Flemsæter, B; Guinaudeau, H; Hagedorn, Dietrich; Hilbert, B; Krainz, G; Kos, N; Lavielle, D; Lebrun, P; Leo, G; Mathewson, A G; Missiaen, D; Momal, F; Parma, Vittorio; Quesnel, Jean Pierre; Richter, D; Riddone, G; Rijllart, A; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Rohmig, P; Saban, R I; Schmidt, R; Serio, L; Skiadelli, M; Suraci, A; Tavian, L; Walckiers, L; Wallén, E; Van Weelderen, R; Williams, L; McInturff, A

    1996-01-01

    CERN operates the first version of the LHC Test String which consists of one quadrupole and three 10-m twin aperture dipole magnets. An experimental programme aiming at the validation of the LHC systems started in February 1995. During this programme the string has been powered 100 times 35 of which at 12.4 kA or above. The experiments have yielded a number of results some of which, like quench recovery for cryogenics, have modified the design of subsystems of LHC. Others, like controlled helium leaks in the cold bore and quench propagation bewteen magnets, have given a better understanding on the evolution of the phenomena inside a string of superconducting magnets cooled at superfluid helium temperatures. Following the experimental programme, the string will be powered up and powered down in one hour cycles as a fatigue test of the structure thus simulating 20 years of operation of LHC.

  3. Safety of operations in the manufacture of driver fuel for the first charge of the Dragon Reactor and modifications to the safety document for the Dragon Fuel Element Production Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, H.; Cross, J.; Flamm, J.

    1965-01-01

    The manufacture of the zirconium containing 'driver' fuel and fuel elements for the First Charge of the Dragon Reactor Experiment has been completed without incident. This is a report on the safety of operations in the Dragon Fuel Element Production Building during an approximately six month period when the 'driver' fuel was manufactured and 25 elements containing this fuel were assembled and exported to the Reactor Building. The opportunity is taken to bring the Safety Document up-to-date and to report on any significant operational failures of equipment. (author)

  4. Small sodium valve design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGough, C.B.

    1974-01-01

    The United States Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor program (LMFBR) includes an extensive program devoted to the development of small sodium valves. This program is now focused on the development and production of valves for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) now under construction near Richland, Washington. Other AEC support facilities, such as various test loops located at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC), Los Angeles, California, and at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), Richland, Washington, also have significant requirements for small sodium valves, and valves similar in design to the FFTF valves are being supplied to these AEC laboratories for use in their critical test installations. A principal motivation for these valve programs, beyond the immediate need to provide high-reliability valves for FFTF and the support facilities, is the necessity to develop small valve technology for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). FFTF small sodium valve design and development experience will be directly applied to the CRBRP program. Various test programs have been, and are being, conducted to verify the performance and integrity of the FFTF valves, and to uncover any potential problems so that they can be corrected before the valves are placed in service in FFTF. The principal small sodium valve designs being utilized in current U.S. programs, the test and operational experience obtained to date on them, problems uncovered, and future development and testing efforts being planned are reviewed. The standards and requirements to which the valves are being designed and fabricated, the valve designs in current use, valve operators, test and operating experience, and future valve development plans are summarized. (U.S.)

  5. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The total production of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 70.5 TWh during 1998, which is the second highest yearly production ever. Production losses due to low demand totaled 5.1 TWh combined for all twelve units and production losses due to coastdown operation totaled an additional 0.5 TWh. The reason for this low power demand was a very good supply of water to the hydropower system. Hydroelectric power production was 73.6 TWh, an increase by roughly 5 TWh since 1997. Hence, the hydroelectric power production substantially exceeded the 64 TWh expected during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. Remaining production sources, mainly fossil fuel electricity production combined with district heating, contributed with 10 TWh. The total electricity production was 154.2 TWh, the highest yearly production ever. The total electricity consumption including transmission losses was 143.5 TWh. This is also the highest consumption ever and an increase by one percent compared to 1997. The preliminary net result of the electric power trade shows a net export by 10.7 TWh. The figures above are calculated from the preliminary production results. A comprehensive report on electric power supply and consumption in Sweden is given in the 1998 Annual Report from the Swedish Power Association. Besides Oskarshamn 1, all plants have periodically been operated in load-following mode, mostly because of the abundant supply of hydropower. The energy availability for the three boiling water reactors at Forsmark averaged 93.3 % and for the three pressure water reactors at Ringhals 91.0 %, both figures are the highest ever noted. In the section `Special Reports` three events of importance to safety that occurred during 1998 are reported. The events were all rated as level 1 according to the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) Figs, tabs.; Also available in Swedish

  6. Operating experience from Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The total production of electricity from Swedish nuclear power plants was 70.5 TWh during 1998, which is the second highest yearly production ever. Production losses due to low demand totaled 5.1 TWh combined for all twelve units and production losses due to coastdown operation totaled an additional 0.5 TWh. The reason for this low power demand was a very good supply of water to the hydropower system. Hydroelectric power production was 73.6 TWh, an increase by roughly 5 TWh since 1997. Hence, the hydroelectric power production substantially exceeded the 64 TWh expected during a normal year, i.e. a year with average rainfall. Remaining production sources, mainly fossil fuel electricity production combined with district heating, contributed with 10 TWh. The total electricity production was 154.2 TWh, the highest yearly production ever. The total electricity consumption including transmission losses was 143.5 TWh. This is also the highest consumption ever and an increase by one percent compared to 1997. The preliminary net result of the electric power trade shows a net export by 10.7 TWh. The figures above are calculated from the preliminary production results. A comprehensive report on electric power supply and consumption in Sweden is given in the 1998 Annual Report from the Swedish Power Association. Besides Oskarshamn 1, all plants have periodically been operated in load-following mode, mostly because of the abundant supply of hydropower. The energy availability for the three boiling water reactors at Forsmark averaged 93.3 % and for the three pressure water reactors at Ringhals 91.0 %, both figures are the highest ever noted. In the section 'Special Reports' three events of importance to safety that occurred during 1998 are reported. The events were all rated as level 1 according to the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES)

  7. Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S.; Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding

  8. Operating experience with BWR nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonsdorf, Magnus von.

    1986-01-01

    The two-unit nuclear power station in Olkiluoto on the western coast of Finland produces about 20 per cent of the electricity consumption of the country. The first unit, TVO-I was first connected to the national grid in September 1978 and TVO-II in February 1980. The original rated power output of each unit was 660 MWe, corresponding to the thermal power of 2000 MW from the reactor. Technical modifications allowed the power to be uprated by 8%. The operating statistics (load factors etc.) are given and the outage experience discussed. The radiological history shows very low radioactivity and dose levels have been maintained at the plant. (UK)

  9. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lantzsch, Kerstin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In addition the Pixel detector was refurbished with new service quarter panels to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run 1 and a new optical readout system to readout the data at higher speed while reducing the occupancy when running with increased luminosity. The commissioning, operation and performance of the 4-layer Pixel Detector will be presented.

  10. Basis for Interim Operation for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    This document establishes the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) for the Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility (FSS) as managed by the 300 Area Deactivation Project (300 ADP) organization in accordance with the requirements of the Project Hanford Management Contract procedure (PHMC) HNF-PRO-700, ''Safety Analysis and Technical Safety Requirements''. A hazard classification (Benecke 2003a) has been prepared for the facility in accordance with DOE-STD-1027-92 resulting in the assignment of Hazard Category 3 for FSS Facility buildings that store N Reactor fuel materials (303-B, 3712, and 3716). All others are designated Industrial buildings. It is concluded that the risks associated with the current and planned operational mode of the FSS Facility (uranium storage, uranium repackaging and shipment, cleanup, and transition activities, etc.) are acceptable. The potential radiological dose and toxicological consequences for a range of credible uranium storage building have been analyzed using Hanford accepted methods. Risk Class designations are summarized for representative events in Table 1.6-1. Mitigation was not considered for any event except the random fire event that exceeds predicted consequences based on existing source and combustible loading because of an inadvertent increase in combustible loading. For that event, a housekeeping program to manage transient combustibles is credited to reduce the probability. An additional administrative control is established to protect assumptions regarding source term by limiting inventories of fuel and combustible materials. Another is established to maintain the criticality safety program. Additional defense-in-depth controls are established to perform fire protection system testing, inspection, and maintenance to ensure predicted availability of those systems, and to maintain the radiological control program. It is also concluded that because an accidental nuclear criticality is not credible based on the low uranium enrichment

  11. Operating experience with gamma ray irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, F.M.; Ouwerkerk, T.

    1980-01-01

    The experience of Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) with radioisotopes dates back to the mid-1940s when radium was marketed for medical purposes. Cobalt-60 came on the scene in 1949 and within a few years a thriving business in cancer teletherapy machines and research irradiators was developed. AECL's first full-scale cobalt-60 gamma ray sterilizer for medical products was installed in 1964. AECL now has over 50 plants and 30 million curies in service around the world. Sixteen years of design experience in cobalt-60 sources, radiation shielding, safety interlock systems, and source pass mechanisms have made gamma irradiators safe, reliable, and easy to operate. This proven technology is being applied in promising new fields such as sludge treatment and food preservation. Cesium-137 is expected to be extensively utilized as the gamma radiation source for these applications

  12. Operational Experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Djama, Fares; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC is providing new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction imposed by the higher collision energy, pileup and luminosity that are being delivered. The ATLAS tracking performance relies critically on the Pixel Detector, therefore, in view of Run-2 of LHC, the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Pixel detector was refurbished with a new service quarter panel to recover about 3% of defective modules lost during run-1 and an additional optical link per module was added to overcome in some layers the readout bandwidth limitation when LHC will exceed the nominal peak luminosity by almost a factor of 3. The key features and challenges met during the IBL project will be presented, as well as its operational experience and Pixel Detector performance in LHC.

  13. Particle fueling experiments with a series of pellets in LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldzuhn, J.; Damm, H.; Dinklage, A.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Yasuhara, R.; Ida, K.; Yamada, H.; LHD Experiment Group; Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2018-03-01

    Ice pellet injection is performed in the heliotron Large Helical Device (LHD). The pellets are injected in short series, with up to eight individual pellets. Parameter variations are performed for the pellet ice isotopes, the LHD magnetic configurations, the heating scenario, and some others. These experiments are performed in order to find out whether deeper fueling can be achieved with a series of pellets compared to single pellets. An increase of the fueling efficiency is expected since pre-cooling of the plasma by the first pellets within a series could aid deeper penetration of later pellets in the same series. In addition, these experiments show which boundary conditions must be fulfilled to optimize the technique. The high-field side injection of pellets, as proposed for deep fueling in a tokamak, will not be feasible with the same efficiency in a stellarator or heliotron because there the magnetic field gradient is smaller than in a tokamak of comparable size. Hence, too shallow pellet fueling, in particular in a large device or a fusion reactor, will be an issue that can be overcome only by extremely high pellet velocities, or other techniques that will have to be developed in the future. It turned out by our investigations that the fueling efficiency can be enhanced by the injection of a series of pellets to some extent. However, further investigations will be needed in order to optimize this approach for deep particle fueling.

  14. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Brown, N. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Baek, J. S [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Hanson, A. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Cuadra, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Cheng, L. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.

    2014-04-30

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-Enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size-Plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). A summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented. Fuel element tolerance assumptions and hot channel factors used in the safety analysis are also given.

  15. Experience with underwater storage of spent fuel in CIRUS and DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    CIRUS, a 40 MWt Research Reactor and DHRUVA, a 100 MWt Research Reactor have been in operation since 1960 and 1985 respectively at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Bombay. Over three decades of experience in handling and storage of irradiated fuel in Cirus has been extensively utilized for making several design improvements in Dhruva. Details of some of the important experiences in Cirus and the design improvements made in Dhruva are presented in this paper. (author)

  16. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim [Multipurpose Reactor Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (PRSG-BATAN), Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1999-08-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  17. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim

    1999-01-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  18. In-pile observations of fuel and clad relocation during LMFBR initiation phase accident experiments - the STAR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Schumacher, G.; Henkel, P.R.; Royl, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of seven in-pile experiments (the STAR experiments) were performed in which clad motion and fuel dispersal were observed in small pin bundles with high-speed cinematography. The experimental heating conditions reproduced a range of Loss of Flow (LOF) accident scenarios for the lead subassemblies in LMFBRs. The experiments show strong tendencies for limited clad motion in multiple pin bundles, early fuel disruption and dispersal (prior to fuel melting) in moderate power transients having simultaneous clad melting and fuel disruption. The more recent experiments indicate a possibility of steel vapor driven fuel dispersal after fuel breakup and intimate fuel/steel mixing. (author)

  19. Operating experience of steam generator test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sureshkumar, V.A.; Madhusoodhanan, G.; Noushad, I.B.; Ellappan, T.R.; Nashine, B.K.; Sylvia, J.I.; Rajan, K.K.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2006-01-01

    Steam Generator (SG) is the vital component of a Fast Reactor. It houses both water at high pressure and sodium at low pressure separated by a tube wall. Any damage to this barrier initiates sodium water reaction that could badly affect the plant availability. Steam Generator Test Facility (SGTF) has been set up in Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) to test sodium heated once through steam generator of 19 tubes similar to the PFBR SG dimension and operating conditions. The facility is also planned as a test bed to assess improved designs of the auxiliary equipments used in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR). The maximum power of the facility is 5.7 MWt. This rating is arrived at based on techno economic consideration. This paper covers the performance of various equipments in the system such as Electro magnetic pumps, Centrifugal sodium pump, in-sodium hydrogen meters, immersion heaters, and instrumentation and control systems. Experience in the system operation, minor modifications, overall safety performance, and highlights of the experiments carried out etc. are also brought out. (author)

  20. Fuel operation of EDF nuclear fleet presentation of the centralized organization for operational engineering at the nuclear generation division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    The main feature of EDF Nuclear Fleet is the standardization, with 'series' of homogeneous plants (same equipment, fuel and operation technical documents). For fuel operation, this standardization is related to the concept of 'fuel management scheme' (typical fuel reloads with fixed number and enrichment of fresh assemblies) for a whole series of plants. The context of the Nuclear Fleet lead to the choice of a centralized organization for fuel engineering at the Nuclear Generation Division (DPN), located at UNIPE (National Department for Fleet Operation Engineering) in Lyon. The main features of this organization are the following: - Centralization of the engineering activities for fuel operation support in the Fuel Branch of UNIPE, - Strong real-time link with the nuclear sites, - Relations with various EDF Departments in charge of design, nuclear fuel supply and electricity production optimization. The purposes of the organization are: - Standardization of operational engineering services and products, - Autonomy with independent methods and computing tools, - Reactivity with a technical assistance for sites (24 hours 'hot line'), - Identification of different levels (on site and off site) to solve core operation problems, - Collection, analysis and valorization of operation feedback, - Contribution to fuel competence global management inside EDF. This paper briefly describes the organization. The main figures of annual engineering production are provided. A selection of examples illustrates the contribution to the Nuclear Fleet performance. (authors)

  1. CANDU fuel - fifteen years of power reactor experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjoy, G.R.; Bain, A.S.

    1977-05-01

    Analyses of performance statistics, supplemented by examinations of fuel from power reactors and experimental loops have yielded: (a) a thorough understanding of the fundamental behaviour of CANDU fuel; (b) data showing that the predicted high utilization of uranium has been achieved; (c) criteria for operation, which have led to the current very low defect rate of 0.03% of all assemblies and to 'CANLUB' fuel, which has a graphite interlayer between the fuel and sheath to reduce defects on power increases; (d) proof that the short length (500 mm), collapsible cladding features of the CANDU bundle are successful and that the fuel can operate at high-power output (current peak outer-element linear power is 58 +- 15% kW/m). As of mid-1976 over 3 x 10 6 individual elements have been built and over 2 x 10 6 elements have been irradiated. Only six defects have been attributed to faulty materials or fabrication, and the use of high-density UO 2 with low-moisture content precluded defects from hydrogen contamination and densification

  2. Irradiation experience with HTGR fuels in the Peach Bottom Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, W.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1974-01-01

    Fuel performance in the Peach Bottom High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is reviewed, including (1) the driver elements in the second core and (2) the test elements designed to test fuel for larger HTGR plants. Core 2 of this reactor, which is operated by the Philadelphia Electric Company, performed reliably with an average nuclear steam supply availability of 85 percent since its startup in July 1970. Core 2 had accumulated a total of 897.5 equivalent full power days (EFPD), almost exactly its design life-time of 900 EFPD, when the plant was shut down permanently on October 31, 1974. Gaseous fission product release and the activity of the main circulating loop remained significantly below the limits allowed by the technical specifications and the levels observed during operation of Core 1. The low circulating activity and postirradiation examination of driver fuel elements have demonstrated the improved irradiation stability of the coated fuel particles in Core 2. Irradiation data obtained from these tests substantiate the performance predictions based on accelerated tests and complement the fuel design effort by providing irradiation data in the low neutron fluence region

  3. Operator decision aid for breached fuel operation in liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.; Hawkins, R.E.; Nickless, W.K.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the development of an expert system that provides continuous assessment of the safety significance and technical specification conformance of Delayed Neutron (DN) signals during breached fuel operation. The completed expert system has been parallelized on an innovative distributed-memory network-computing system that enables the computationally intensive kernel of the expert system to run in parallel on a group of low-cost Unix workstations. 1 ref

  4. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  5. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  6. Simulation with GOTHIC of experiments Oxidation of fuel in Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Murillo Mendez, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work has been addressed for the first time la simulation with the GOTHIC code, experiments oxidation and ignition of SFP in phase 1. This work represents a solid starting point for analysis of specific degradation of fuel in the pools of our facilities.

  7. Applications and experience with a new instrumented fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, F.M.

    1972-01-01

    Previously reported information to TRIGA Reactor Conference I concerning the development of a new concept in an instrumented fuel element is updated and expanded. The evaluation of these new instrumented elements is discussed and some areas of application to reactor behavior are described. Experiments concerning temperature and flux mapping under varying conditions are investigated and conclusions are given. (author)

  8. Experiments of JRR-4 low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuel core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirane, Nobuhiko; Ishikuro, Yasuhiro; Nagadomi, Hideki; Yokoo, Kenji; Horiguchi, Hironori; Nemoto, Takumi; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Yagi, Masahiro; Arai, Nobuyoshi; Watanabe, Shukichi; Kashima, Yoichi

    2006-03-01

    JRR-4, a light-water-moderated and cooled, swimming pool type research reactor using high-enriched uranium plate-type fuels had been operated from 1965 to 1996. In order to convert to low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuels, modification work had been carried out for 2 years, from 1996 to 1998. After the modification, start-up experiments were carried out to obtain characteristics of the low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuel core. The measured excess reactivity, reactor shutdown margin and the maximum reactivity addition rate satisfied the nuclear limitation of the safety report for licensing. It was confirmed that conversion to low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuels was carried out properly. Besides, the necessary data for reactor operation were obtained, such as nuclear, thermal hydraulic and reactor control characteristics. This report describes the results of start-up experiments and burnup experiments. The first criticality of low-enriched-uranium-silicied core was achieved on 14th July 1998, and the operation for joint-use has been carried out since 6th October 1998. (author)

  9. Low stoichiometry operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell employing the interdigitated flow field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A multiphase fuel cell model based on computational fluid dynamics is used to investigate the possibility of operating a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at low stoichiometric flow ratios (ξ gases. A case study...

  10. Dual-fuel HCCI operation with DME/LPG/gasoline/hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, C.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines include usage of the different type of fuels, ultra low nitrogen oxide and particulate matter emissions and improved fuel economy. Disadvantages include an excessive combustion rate, engine noise, and hydrocarbon and carbon emissions. An experiment on dual-fuel HCCI operation with dimethyl ether (DME)/liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)/gasoline/hydrogen was presented. The advantages and disadvantages were first presented and the dual-fuel HCCI combustion engine was illustrated through an experimental apparatus. The experimental conditions were also presented in terms of engine speed, DME injection quantity, LPC injection quantity, and LPC composition. Experimental results were discussed for output performance and indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). It was concluded that the effect of LPG composition in a DME-LPG dual-fueled HCCI engine at various injection quantity and injective timing were observed. Specifically, it was found that propane was a more effective way to increase IMEP in this study, and that in a DME HCCI engine, higher load limit was extended by using LPG as an ignition inhibitor. tabs., figs.

  11. Special considerations on operating a fuel cell power plant using natural gas with marginal heating value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, L. Ng; Chien-Liang Lin [Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan (China); Ya-Tang Cheng [Power Research Institute, Taiwan (China)

    1996-12-31

    In realizing new power generation technologies in Taiwan, a phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant (model PC2513, ONSI Corporation) has been installed in the premises of the Power Research Institute of the Taiwan Power Company in Taipei County of Taiwan. The pipeline gas supplying to the site of this power plant has a high percentage of carbon dioxide and thus a slightly lower heating value than that specified by the manufacturer. Because of the lowering of heating value of input gas, the highest Output power from the power plant is understandably less than the rated power of 200 kW designed. Further, the transient response of the power plant as interrupted from the Grid is also affected. Since this gas is also the pipeline gas supplying to the heavily populated Taipei Municipal area, it is conceivable that the success of the operations of fuel cells using this fuel is of vital importance to the promotion of the use of this power generation technology in Taiwan. Hence, experiments were set up to assess the feasibility of this fuel cell power plant using the existing pipeline gas in this part of Taiwan where fuel cells would most likely find useful.

  12. Regulated and unregulated emissions from an internal combustion engine operating on ethanol-containing fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulopoulos, S. G.; Samaras, D. P.; Philippopoulos, C. J.

    In the present work, the effect of ethanol addition to gasoline on regulated and unregulated emissions is studied. A 4-cylinder OPEL 1.6 L internal combustion engine equipped with a hydraulic brake dynamometer was used in all the experiments. For exhaust emissions treatment a typical three-way catalyst was used. Among the various compounds detected in exhaust emissions, the following ones were monitored at engine and catalyst outlet: methane, hexane, ethylene, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, toluene, acetic acid and ethanol. Addition of ethanol in the fuel up to 10% w/w had as a result an increase in the Reid vapour pressure of the fuel, which indicates indirectly increased evaporative emissions, while carbon monoxide tailpipe emissions were decreased. For ethanol-containing fuels, acetaldehyde emissions were appreciably increased (up to 100%), especially for fuel containing 3% w/w ethanol. In contrast, aromatics emissions were decreased by ethanol addition to gasoline. Methane and ethanol were the most resistant compounds to oxidation while ethylene was the most degradable compound over the catalyst. Ethylene, methane and acetaldehyde were the main compounds present at engine exhaust while methane, acetaldehyde and ethanol were the main compounds in tailpipe emissions for ethanol fuels after the catalyst operation.

  13. Evaluation of gap heat transfer model in ELESTRES for CANDU fuel element under normal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Moon; Ohn, Myung Ryong; Im, Hong Sik; Choi, Jong Hoh; Hwang, Soon Taek

    1995-01-01

    The gap conductance between the fuel and the sheath depends strongly on the gap width and has a significant influence on the amount of initial stored energy. The modified Ross and Stoute gap conductance model in ELESTRES is based on a simplified thermal deformation model for steady-state fuel temperature calculations. A review on a series of experiments reveals that fuel pellets crack, relocate, and are eccentrically positioned within the sheath rather than solid concentric cylinders. In this paper, the two recently-proposed gap conductance models (offset gap model and relocated gap model) are described and are applied to calculate the fuel-sheath gap conductances under experimental conditions and normal operating conditions in CANDU reactors. The good agreement between the experimentally-inferred and calculated gap conductance values demonstrates that the modified Ross and Stoute model was implemented correctly in ELESTRES. The predictions of the modified Ross and Stoute model provide conservative values for gap heat transfer and fuel surface temperature compared to the offset gap and relocated gap models for a limiting power envelope. 13 figs., 3 tabs., 16 refs. (Author)

  14. Practical experience with the fuel monitoring at Dukovany NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kment, J [Jaderna Elektrarna, Dukovany (Czech Republic); Svoboda, R; Valach, M [Ustav Jaderneho Vyzkumu a.s., Rez (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    A brief description of the following activities of Dukovany NPP is given: fuel state monitoring during cycles; fuel state inspection during outages; fuel damage predictions and reality; prevention against fuel damage caused by PCI. The fuel state monitoring during cycles is conducted by on-line gamma spectrometer located under the by-pass pipelines of the water cleaning system. The system enables to carry out determination of the equilibrium activities of practically all significant gaseous fission products for energies from 80 KeV to 2 MeV. On-line activity measurements give reliable indication of a defect origin with the {sup 133}Xe activity level of the order of tens k Bk/l. The gamma spectroscopy data are processed by KGO and PEPA software packages installed into the chemistry information system. KGO estimates the number of the damaged fuel elements and the extent of their damage. The activities of {sup 133}Xe, {sup 135}Xe, {sup 137}Xe, {sup 138}Xe, {sup 87}Kr, {sup 88}Kr and {sup 89}Kr are used for evaluation of the number of `leakers`. PEPA code predicts radiation set-up development, i.e. the activity levels of cca 20 radiologically significant nuclides in the primary coolant for the assumed reactor power mode. The fuel damage predictions during cycles are illustrated on two examples from the operational history of the Dukovany NPP. The utilization of the KGO-PEPA software contributes to a more high exploitation culture of the core from the point of view of fuel integrity maintenance. 3 refs.

  15. Initial cathode processing experiences and results for the treatment of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Laug, D.V.; Brunsvold, A.R.; Roach, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment demonstration at Argonne National Laboratory, a vacuum distillation process is being employed for the recovery of uranium following an electrorefining process. Distillation of a salt electrolyte, primarily consisting of a eutectic mixture of lithium and potassium chlorides, from uranium is achieved by a batch operation termed ''cathode processing.'' Cathode processing is performed in a retort furnace which enables the production of a stable uranium product that can be isotopically diluted and stored. To date, experiments have been performed with two distillation units; one for prototypical testing and the other for actual spent fuel treatment operations. The results and experiences from these initial experiments with both units will be discussed as well as problems encountered and their resolution

  16. Operation and maintenance manuals for VEGA apparatus on radionuclide release from irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Retsu; Hidaka, Akihide; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kudo, Tamotsu; Ohtomo, Takashi; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    2001-03-01

    An experimental program, Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release (VEGA), was initiated at JAERI from September 1999 to improve source term predictabilities for hypothetical severe accidents. In the experiment, a short fuel segment taken from LWR fuels irradiated in Japanese power reactors is inductively heated to high temperatures (∼3273K) in a hot cell under high pressure conditions up to 1.0MPa. Particularly, a focus will be placed on the release and transport behaviors of low-volatile fission products (FP), actinides and short-life FP which have not been well investigated in previous studies. This experimental apparatus was completed in February 1999 and three experiments were performed by the end of 2000. Most of these experiments were successfully conducted, but some problems were also found. Especially, in the first VEGA-1 test with the purpose of shakedown and reference data acquisition, there were problems such as flow blockage at the outlet of furnace due to structure melting, malfunction of heaters and so on. Therefore, the design for these defective parts was changed for future experiments. Moreover, the apparatus is not so big but the entire processes are very complicated. Accordingly, the operators should well understand the details of the apparatus including the recent change of design. This report describes outlines of the VEGA apparatus and the procedures for operation and maintenance. (author)

  17. Proposed plan for critical experiments supporting thorium fuel cycle development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, B.F.

    1978-09-01

    A preliminary plan is proposed for critical experiments to provide data needed for the recycle of thorium based nuclear fuels. The sequence of experimentation starts with well moderated solutions followed by highly concentrated low moderated solutions. It then progresses through lattices moderated by water, by water plus soluble poisons, and by fissile solutions, to solutions poisoned by raschig rings and soluble poisons. Final experiments would treat lattices moderated by poisoned fissile solution, and arrays of stored fissile units

  18. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles (∼30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller (∼ mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced ∼100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was ≥343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water

  19. Canadian experience with wet and dry fuel storage concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayman, S.A.

    1978-07-01

    Canada has been storing fuel in water-filled pools for 30 years. There have been no significant problems, but until recently little effort has been invested in quantitative assessment of fuel performance under storage conditions. Work is now in progress to provide such information. Storage pools at nuclear generating stations have operated satisfactorily. The Canadian nuclear industry has nevertheless been studying methods for reducing storage costs and/or increasing reliability. Various concepts, using both water and air cooling, have been suggested. One such concept - the air-cooled concrete canister - is presently under test at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. (author)

  20. Combustion and exhaust emission characteristics of a dual fuel compression ignition engine operated with pilot Diesel fuel and natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papagiannakis, R.G.; Hountalas, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    Towards the effort of reducing pollutant emissions, especially soot and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solutions, one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liquid Diesel fuel. These engines are known as dual fuel combustion engines, i.e. they use conventional Diesel fuel and a gaseous fuel as well. This technology is currently reintroduced, associated with efforts to overcome various difficulties of HCCI engines, using various fuels. The use of natural gas as an alternative fuel is a promising solution. The potential benefits of using natural gas in Diesel engines are both economical and environmental. The high autoignition temperature of natural gas is a serious advantage since the compression ratio of conventional Diesel engines can be maintained. The present contribution describes an experimental investigation conducted on a single cylinder DI Diesel engine, which has been properly modified to operate under dual fuel conditions. The primary amount of fuel is the gaseous one, which is ignited by a pilot Diesel liquid injection. Comparative results are given for various engine speeds and loads for conventional Diesel and dual fuel operation, revealing the effect of dual fuel combustion on engine performance and exhaust emissions