WorldWideScience

Sample records for frictional targets implications

  1. Frictional and morphological properties of Au-MoS2 films sputtered from a compact target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1984-01-01

    AuMoS2 films 0.02 to 1.2 microns thick were sputtered from target compacted from 5 wt % Au + 95 wt % MoS2, to investigate the frictional and morphological film growth characteristics. The gold dispersion effects in MoS2 films are of interest to increase the densitification and strengthening of the film structure. Three microstructural growth stages were identified on the nano-micro-macrostructural level. During sliding both sputtered Au-MoS2 and MoS2 films have a tendency to break within the columner region. The remaining or effective film, about 0.2 microns thick, performs the lubrication. The Au-MoS2 films displayed a lower friction coefficient with a high degree of frictional stability and less wear debris generation as compared to pure MoS2 films. The more favorable frictional characteristics of the Au-MoS2 films are attributed to the effective film thickness and the high density packed columner zone which has a reduced effect on the fragmentation of the tapered crystallites during fracture.

  2. Experimental evidence for friction-enhancing integumentary modifications of chameleons and associated functional and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khannoon, Eraqi R; Endlein, Thomas; Russell, Anthony P; Autumn, Kellar

    2014-01-22

    The striking morphological convergence of hair-like integumentary derivatives of lizards and arthropods (spiders and insects) demonstrates the importance of such features for enhancing purchase on the locomotor substrate. These pilose structures are responsible for the unique tractive abilities of these groups of animals, enabling them to move with seeming ease on overhanging and inverted surfaces, and to traverse inclined smooth substrates. Three groups of lizards are well known for bearing adhesion-promoting setae on their digits: geckos, anoles and skinks. Similar features are also found on the ventral subdigital and distal caudal skin of chameleons. These have only recently been described in any detail, and structurally and functionally are much less well understood than are the setae of geckos and anoles. The seta-like structures of chameleons are not branched (a characteristic of many geckos), nor do they terminate in spatulate tips (which is characteristic of geckos, anoles and skinks). They are densely packed and have attenuated blunt, globose tips or broad, blade-like shafts that are flattened for much of their length. Using a force transducer, we tested the hypothesis that these structures enhance friction and demonstrate that the pilose skin has a greater frictional coefficient than does the smooth skin of these animals. Our results are consistent with friction being generated as a result of side contact of the integumentary filaments. We discuss the evolutionary and functional implications of these seta-like structures in comparison with those typical of other lizard groups and with the properties of seta-mimicking synthetic structures.

  3. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  4. An empirically based steady state friction law and implications for fault stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, E.; Nielsen, S.; Violay, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2016-04-01

    Empirically based rate-and-state friction laws (RSFLs) have been proposed to model the dependence of friction forces with slip and time. The relevance of the RSFL for earthquake mechanics is that few constitutive parameters define critical conditions for fault stability (i.e., critical stiffness and frictional fault behavior). However, the RSFLs were determined from experiments conducted at subseismic slip rates (V 0.1 m/s) remains questionable on the basis of the experimental evidence of (1) large dynamic weakening and (2) activation of particular fault lubrication processes at seismic slip rates. Here we propose a modified RSFL (MFL) based on the review of a large published and unpublished data set of rock friction experiments performed with different testing machines. The MFL, valid at steady state conditions from subseismic to seismic slip rates (0.1 µm/s arrest.

  5. Implications of Market Frictions : Serial Correlations in Indexes on the Emerging Stock Markets in Central and Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Olbrys

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Implications of market frictions in the context of serial correlations in indexes on the Central and Eastern European (CEE stock markets have been analysed. Market frictions, such as non-trading effects, bid/ask spreads, other transaction costs, etc., may be detected by direct measurement, or by indirect identification. Direct measurement of frictions is difficult as intraday trading data are unavailable in the case of most of the emerging CEE stock markets. Indirect identification may be conducted by detecting some empirical phenomena. One of them is evidence of serial correlations in indexes, the so-called the Fisher effect. We explore the problem of serial correlations in indexes on the eight CEE stock markets using data samples from each CEE market separately, as well as a "common trading window" approach, which is widely applied in the case of databases with multivariate time series. The evidence is that nonsynchronous trading effect II between markets may substantially disrupt the analysis of index returns on a domestic market. Using a synchronized database, one may erroneously conclude that the Fisher effect does not exist, although it is present. (original abstract

  6. Coseismic slip and early afterslip of the 2015 Illapel, Chile, earthquake: Implications for frictional heterogeneity and coastal uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, William D.; Murray, Jessica R.; Briggs, Richard W.; Gomez, Francisco; Miles, Charles P. J.; Svarc, Jerry; Riquelme, Sebastian; Stressler, Bryan J.

    2016-08-01

    Great subduction earthquakes are thought to rupture portions of the megathrust, where interseismic coupling is high and velocity-weakening frictional behavior is dominant, releasing elastic deformation accrued over a seismic cycle. Conversely, postseismic afterslip is assumed to occur primarily in regions of velocity-strengthening frictional characteristics that may correlate with lower interseismic coupling. However, it remains unclear if fixed frictional properties of the subduction interface, coseismic or aftershock-induced stress redistribution, or other factors control the spatial distribution of afterslip. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar and Global Position System observations to map the distribution of coseismic slip of the 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel, Chile, earthquake and afterslip within the first 38 days following the earthquake. We find that afterslip overlaps the coseismic slip area and propagates along-strike into regions of both high and moderate interseismic coupling. The significance of these observations, however, is tempered by the limited resolution of geodetic inversions for both slip and coupling. Additional afterslip imaged deeper on the fault surface bounds a discrete region of deep coseismic slip, and both contribute to net uplift of the Chilean Coastal Cordillera. A simple partitioning of the subduction interface into regions of fixed frictional properties cannot reconcile our geodetic observations. Instead, stress heterogeneities, either preexisting or induced by the earthquake, likely provide the primary control on the afterslip distribution for this subduction zone earthquake. We also explore the occurrence of coseismic and postseismic coastal uplift in this sequence and its implications for recent hypotheses concerning the source of permanent coastal uplift along subduction zones.

  7. Frictional properties of simulated anhydrite-dolomite fault gouge and implications for seismogenic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluymakers, A.M.H.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Spiers, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    The frictional properties of anhydrite-dolomite fault gouges, and the effects of CO2 upon them, are of key importance in assessing the risks associated with CO2 storage in reservoir formations capped by anhydrite-dolomite sequences, and in understanding seismicity occurring in such formations (such

  8. Targeting in Advertising Markets: Implications for Offline Versus Online Media

    OpenAIRE

    Bergemann, Dirk; Bonatti, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We develop a model with many advertisers (products) and many advertising markets (media). Each advertiser sells to a different segment of consumers, and each medium is targeting a different audience. We characterize the competitive equilibrium in the advertising markets and evaluate the implications of targeting. An increase in targeting leads to an increase in the total number of consumer-product matches, and hence in the social value of advertising. Yet, targeting also increases the concent...

  9. Targeting in Advertising Markets: Implications for Offline Versus Online Media

    OpenAIRE

    Bergemann, Dirk; Bonatti , Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We develop a model with many advertisers (products) and many advertising markets (media). Each advertiser sells to a different segment of consumers, and each medium is targeting a different audience. We characterize the competitive equilibrium in the advertising markets and evaluate the implications of targeting. An increase in targeting leads to an increase in the total number of consumer-product matches, and hence in the social value of advertising. Yet, targeting also increases the concent...

  10. Resource implications of a national health target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Peter; Sopina, Liza Elizaveta; Ashton, Toni

    2014-01-01

    of clinical/service managers in ED throughout New Zealand determined the type and cost of resources used for the target. Responses to the target were classified according to their impact in ED, the hospital and the community. Quantifiable resource changes were assigned a financial value and grouped......, with estimated total expenditure of over NZ$52 m. The majority of expenditure occurred in ED (60.8%) and hospital (38.7%) with little spent in the community. New staff accounted for 76.5% of expenditure. Per capita expenditure in the ED was associated with improved target performance (r = 0.48, P = 0...

  11. The frictional properties of faults at shallow depths: implications for rupture propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paola, Nicola; Bullock, Rachael; Unwin, Rachel; Murray, Rosanne; Stillings, Mark; Holdsworth, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Most synoptic models of faults assume the presence of a shallow stable, velocity-strengthening aseismic region due to the presence of incohesive gouges, poorly lithified continental sediments (continental faults) and phyllosilicate-rich rocks (accretionary prisms at subduction zones). The near-surface portions of faults are therefore viewed as effective energy sinks with the potential to arrest/slow down the propagation of earthquakes, preventing them from reaching the surface. However, recent events, such as the 2009 Mw 6.3 L'Aquila and 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquakes, have demonstrated that moderate/large co-seismic ruptures can propagate to the surface causing vast damage and destructive tsunamis. In order to better understand rupture propagation at shallow depths, we investigated the frictional properties of a range of bedrock lithologies, typical of the oceanic (gabbros) and continental crusts (granite, limestone), together with phyllosilicate-bearing lithologies typical of subduction zones and continental sedimentary deposits. Laboratory experiments have been performed in a low to high velocity rotary shear apparatus, on granular materials with grainsize up to 200 μm, under dry, water- and brine-saturated conditions, at slip rates ranging from 10 μm/s up to 1 m/s, with normal loads up to 18 MPa and displacements up to 1 m. Velocity step experiments performed at sub-seismic slip rates (10-100 μm/s) on dry, water- and brine-saturated granite and calcite rocks show that velocity strengthening behaviour evolves to velocity-neutral/-weakening behaviour due to slip localization attained after critical displacements of a few tens to hundreds of mm. The critical displacement value is inversely proportional to the applied normal load. Dry, water- and brine-saturated gabbros show velocity-weakening behaviour and slip localization regardless of the displacement attained and applied normal load. Dry, water- and brine-saturated phyllosilicate-rich gouges show

  12. Liposarcoma: molecular targets and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Kate Lynn J; Casadei, Lucia; Prudner, Bethany C; Iwenofu, Hans; Strohecker, Anne M; Pollock, Raphael E

    2016-10-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma and accounts for approximately 20 % of all adult sarcomas. Current treatment modalities (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) all have limitations; therefore, molecularly driven studies are needed to improve the identification and increased understanding of genetic and epigenetic deregulations in LPS if we are to successfully target specific tumorigenic drivers. It can be anticipated that such biology-driven therapeutics will improve treatments by selectively deleting cancer cells while sparing normal tissues. This review will focus on several therapeutically actionable molecular markers identified in well-differentiated LPS and dedifferentiated LPS, highlighting their potential clinical applicability.

  13. Effects of moisture feedback in a frictional coupled Kelvin-Rossby wave model and implication in the Madden-Julian oscillation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The authors extend the original frictional wave dynamics and implement the moisture feedback (MF) to explore the effects of planetary boundary layer (PBL) process and the MF on the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). This new system develops the original frictional wave dynamics by including the moisture tendency term (or the MF mode), along with a parameterized precipitation based on the Betts-Miller scheme. The linear instability analysis of this model provides solutions to elucidate the behaviors of the "pure" frictional convergence (FC) mode and the "pure" MF mode, respectively, as well as the behaviors of the combined FC-MF mode or the dynamical moisture mode. These results show that without the PBL frictional moisture convergence, the MF mode is nearly stationary and damped. Not only does the PBL frictional feedback make the damping MF mode grow with preferred planetary scale but it also enables the nearly stationary MF mode to move eastward slowly, resulting in an oscillation with a period of 30-90 days. This finding suggests the important role of the frictional feedback in generating eastward propagating unstable modes and selecting the preferred planetary scales. The MF process slows down the eastward-propagating short-wave FC mode by delaying the occurrence of deep convection and by enhancing the Rossby wave component. However, the longest wave (wavenumber one) is insensitive to the MF or the convective adjustment time, indicating that the unstable longest wave is primarily controlled by PBL frictional feedback process. Implications of these theoretical results in MJO simulation in general circulation models are discussed.

  14. Force and repetition in cycling: possible implications for iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Kevin C; Reisinger, Kim D; Tillman, Mark D

    2003-03-01

    This study examined force and repetition during simulated distance cycling with regard to how they may possibly influence the on-set of the overuse injury at the knee called iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS). A 3D motion analysis system was used to track lower limb kinematics during cycling. Forces between the pedal and foot were collected using a pressure-instrumented insole that slipped into the shoe. Ten recreational athletes (30.6+/-5.5 years) with no known history of ITBFS participated in the study. Foot-pedal force, knee flexion angle and crank angle were examined as they relate to the causes of ITBFS. Specifically, foot-pedal force, repetition and impingement time were calculated and compared with the same during running. A minimum knee flexion angle of approximately 33 degrees occurred at a crank angle of 170 degrees. The foot-pedal force at this point was 231 N. This minimum knee flexion angle falls near the edge of the impingement zone of the iliotibial band (ITB) and the femoral epicondyle, and is the point at which ITBFS is aggravated causing pain at the knee. The foot-pedal forces during cycling are only 18% of those occurring during running while the ITB is in the impingement zone. Thus, repetition of the knee in the impingement zone during cycling appears to play a more prominent role than force in the on-set of ITBFS. The results also suggest that ITBFS may be further aggravated by improper seat position (seat too high), anatomical differences, and training errors while cycling.

  15. Geodetic observations of fault creep in the Imperial Valley: hidden faults, earthquake hazard and implications for frictional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, E. O.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present new observations of the pattern of fault creep and interseismic deformation in the Imperial Valley, California using a combination of multiple InSAR viewing geometries and survey-mode GPS. We combine more than 100 survey-mode GPS velocities (Crowell et al., 2013) with Envisat InSAR observations from descending tracks 84 and 356 and ascending tracks 77 and 306 (149 total acquisitions), processed using the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) package (Hooper et al., 2007). The result is a dense map of surface velocities across the Imperial fault and surrounding areas. The data suggest that a previously little-known extension of the Superstition Hills fault through the town of El Centro may accommodate a significant portion of the slip previously attributed to the Imperial Fault. We investigate a suite of possible models for the transfer of this slip to the Imperial and Cerro Prieto faults to the south, yielding a range of plausible hazard scenarios. Finally, we compare the geodetic data to models of earthquake cycles with rate- and state-dependent friction to assess the implications for creep depth, moment accumulation rate, and recurrence interval of large events on these faults.

  16. A note on the stochastic nature of particle cohesive force and implications to threshold friction velocity for aerodynamic dust entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is considerable interest to determine the threshold for aeolian dust emission on Earth and Mars. Existing schemes for threshold friction velocity are all deterministic in nature, but observations show that in the dust particle size range the threshold friction velocity scatters strongly due t...

  17. Investigating students’ mental models and knowledge construction of microscopic friction. II. Implications for curriculum design and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar D. Corpuz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Our previous research showed that students’ mental models of friction at the atomic level are significantly influenced by their macroscopic ideas. For most students, friction is due to the meshing of bumps and valleys and rubbing of atoms. The aforementioned results motivated us to further investigate how students can be helped to improve their present models of microscopic friction. Teaching interviews were conducted to study the dynamics of their model construction as they interacted with the interviewer, the scaffolding activities, and/or with each other. In this paper, we present the different scaffolding activities and the variation in the ideas that students generated as they did the hands-on and minds-on scaffolding activities. Results imply that through a series of carefully designed scaffolding activities, it is possible to facilitate the refinement of students’ ideas of microscopic friction.

  18. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting AKT Signaling in Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SubbaRao V. Madhunapantula

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of key enzymes regulating melanoma progression and drug resistance has the potential to lead to the development of novel, more effective targeted agents for inhibiting this deadly form of skin cancer. The Akt3, also known as protein kinase B gamma, pathway enzymes regulate diverse cellular processes including proliferation, survival, and invasion thereby promoting the development of melanoma. Accumulating preclinical evidence demonstrates that therapeutic agents targeting these kinases alone or in combination with other pathway members could be effective for the long-term treatment of advanced-stage disease. However, currently, no selective and effective therapeutic agent targeting these kinases has been identified for clinical use. This paper provides an overview of the key enzymes of the PI3K pathway with emphasis placed on Akt3 and the negative regulator of this kinase called PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10. Mechanisms regulating these enzymes, their substrates and therapeutic implications of targeting these proteins to treat melanoma are also discussed. Finally, key issues that remain to be answered and future directions for interested researchers pertaining to this signaling cascade are highlighted.

  19. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  20. Financial Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Jensen, Mads

    frictions, a call option should never be exercised early, but only at expiration or just before the underlying stock pays a dividend. Chapter one of this thesis shows that suffciently severe frictions can make early exercise optimal. Short-sale costs especially represent an important driver of early...

  1. Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0032 TITLE: Targeting Premalignant Lesions : Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention...2015 – 31 Mar 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0032 Targeting Premalignant Lesions : Implications for Early Breast...carcinoma. In this study, we aimed to identify peptides that specifically recognize premalignant lesions in the mammary tissue. To achieve this goal, we

  2. Target weight achievement and ultrafiltration rate thresholds: potential patient implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flythe, Jennifer E; Assimon, Magdalene M; Overman, Robert A

    2017-06-02

    Higher ultrafiltration (UF) rates and extracellular hypo- and hypervolemia are associated with adverse outcomes among maintenance hemodialysis patients. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently considered UF rate and target weight achievement measures for ESRD Quality Incentive Program inclusion. The dual measures were intended to promote balance between too aggressive and too conservative fluid removal. The National Quality Forum endorsed the UF rate measure but not the target weight measure. We examined the proposed target weight measure and quantified weight gains if UF rate thresholds were applied without treatment time (TT) extension or interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) reduction. Data were taken from the 2012 database of a large dialysis organization. Analyses considered 152,196 United States hemodialysis patients. We described monthly patient and dialysis facility target weight achievement patterns and examined differences in patient characteristics across target weight achievement status and differences in facilities across target weight measure scores. We computed the cumulative, theoretical 1-month fluid-related weight gain that would occur if UF rates were capped at 13 mL/h/kg without concurrent TT extension or IDWG reduction. Target weight achievement patterns were stable over the year. Patients who did not achieve target weight (post-dialysis weight ≥ 1 kg above or below target weight) tended to be younger, black and dialyze via catheter, and had shorter dialysis vintage, greater body weight, higher UF rate and more missed treatments compared with patients who achieved target weight. Facilities had, on average, 27.1 ± 9.7% of patients with average post-dialysis weight ≥ 1 kg above or below the prescribed target weight. In adjusted analyses, facilities located in the midwest and south and facilities with higher proportions of black and Hispanic patients and higher proportions of patients with shorter TTs were more likely to

  3. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  4. Hypoxia-regulated target genes implicated in tumor metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Ya-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxia is an important microenvironmental factor that induces cancer metastasis. Hypoxia/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α regulates many important steps of the metastatic processes, especially epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT that is one of the crucial mechanisms to cause early stage of tumor metastasis. To have a better understanding of the mechanism of hypoxia-regulated metastasis, various hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes are categorized into different classes including transcription factors, histone modifiers, enzymes, receptors, kinases, small GTPases, transporters, adhesion molecules, surface molecules, membrane proteins, and microRNAs. Different roles of these target genes are described with regards to their relationship to hypoxia-induced metastasis. We hope that this review will provide a framework for further exploration of hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes and a comprehensive view of the metastatic picture induced by hypoxia.

  5. Molecular targeting of acid ceramidase: implications to cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Youssef H; Jenkins, Russell W; Korman, John B; Liu, Xiang; Obeid, Lina M; Norris, James S; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2008-08-01

    Increasingly recognized as bioactive molecules, sphingolipids have been studied in a variety of disease models. The impact of sphingolipids on cancer research facilitated the entry of sphingolipid analogues and enzyme modulators into clinical trials. Owing to its ability to regulate two bioactive sphingolipids, ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, acid ceramidase (AC) emerges as an attractive target for drug development within the sphingolipid metabolic pathway. Indeed, there is extensive evidence supporting a pivotal role for AC in lipid metabolism and cancer biology. In this article, we review the current knowledge of the biochemical properties of AC, its relevance to tumor promotion, and its molecular targeting approaches.

  6. Steam sterilization effect on the accuracy of friction-style mechanical torque limiting devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalil Sadr

    2014-01-01

    Clinical Implication: Within the limitation of this study the torque output of each individual device deviated in varying degrees from target torque values. However, the majority of the new frictional-style devices tested in this study, delivered fairly consistent torque output within 10% of their preset target values after sterilization. Astra Tech devices were the only one showing more than 10% difference from their torque values in 5% of the measurements. Combined effects of sterilization and aging still needs to be determined.

  7. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  8. Drug targeting to myofibroblasts: Implications for fibrosis and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Saleh; Bansal, Ruchi; Prakash, Jai

    2017-07-16

    Myofibroblasts are the key players in extracellular matrix remodeling, a core phenomenon in numerous devastating fibrotic diseases. Not only in organ fibrosis, but also the pivotal role of myofibroblasts in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis has recently been highlighted. Myofibroblast targeting has gained tremendous attention in order to inhibit the progression of incurable fibrotic diseases, or to limit the myofibroblast-induced tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we outline the origin of myofibroblasts, their general characteristics and functions during fibrosis progression in three major organs: liver, kidneys and lungs as well as in cancer. We will then discuss the state-of-the art drug targeting technologies to myofibroblasts in context of the above-mentioned organs and tumor microenvironment. The overall objective of this review is therefore to advance our understanding in drug targeting to myofibroblasts, and concurrently identify opportunities and challenges for designing new strategies to develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics against fibrosis and cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. New developments in demographic targeting--the implications of 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humby, C R

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines benefits that systems such as ACORN, a demographic marketing system that classifies neighborhoods, offer today and monitors some of the trends. It then considers the impact of the 1992 UK census and gives a view of what marketeers can expect in the next 5 years. Neighborhood classifications represent a summary of the consumption patterns of a set of neighbors. If we could reach individuals based on the current life stage the gains to be had would be as great again as that offered by the neighborhood classifications themselves. The greatest weakness of all the neighborhood-based systems is their inability to target at life stage or age.

  10. Acoustics of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  11. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  12. Financial frictions and the reaction of stock prices to monetary policy shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Ozdagli, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This paper reveals and tests a new theoretical implication of the credit channel of monetary policy: as financial frictions (monitoring or auditing costs) increase, the reaction of stock prices to monetary policy shocks decreases. Correspondingly, towards the end of the Enron accounting scandal, the stock prices of firms sharing the same auditor as Enron responded by about 50 to 60 basis points less than other firms to a 10 basis point reduction in the federal funds target rate. This effect i...

  13. Frictional properties of sediments entering the Costa Rica subduction zone offshore the Osa Peninsula: implications for fault slip in shallow subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, Yuka; Tsutsumi, Akito; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kameda, Jun

    2014-12-01

    We examined the frictional properties of sediments on the Cocos plate offshore the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica, and explored variations in the intrinsic frictional properties of the sediment inputs to the Costa Rica subduction zone. Sediment samples were collected at Site U1381A during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 334, and include hemipelagic clay to silty clay material (Unit I) and pelagic silicic to calcareous ooze (Unit II). The frictional properties of the samples were tested at a normal stress of 5 MPa under water-saturated conditions and with slip velocities ranging from 0.0028 to 2.8 mm/s for up to 340 mm of displacement. The experimental results reveal that the steady-state friction coefficient values of clay to silty clay samples are as low as ~0.2, whereas those of silicic to calcareous ooze samples are as high as 0.6 to 0.8. The clay to silty clay samples show a positive dependence of friction on velocity for all tested slip velocities. In contrast, the silicic to calcareous ooze samples show a negative dependence of friction on velocity at velocities of 0.0028 to 0.28 mm/s and either neutral or positive dependence at velocities higher than 0.28 mm/s. Given the low frictional coefficient values observed for the clay to silty clay samples of Unit I, the décollement at the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project transect offshore the Osa Peninsula likely initiates in Unit I and is initially very weak. In addition, the velocity-strengthening behavior of the clay to silty clay suggests that faults in the very shallow portion of the Costa Rica subduction zone are stable and thus behave as creeping segments. In contrast, the velocity-weakening behavior of the silicic to calcareous ooze favors unstable slip along faults. The shallow seismicity occurred at a depth as shallow as ~9 km along the Costa Rica margin offshore the Osa Peninsula (Mw 6.4, June 2002), indicating that materials characterized by velocity-weakening behavior constitute the fault

  14. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisko Salomaa [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  15. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation—Implications for low dose risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadhim, Munira; Salomaa, Sisko; Wright, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Non-DNA targeted effects of ionising radiation, which include genomic instability, and a variety of bystander effects including abscopal effects and bystander mediated adaptive response, have raised concerns about the magnitude of low-dose radiation risk. Genomic instability, bystander effects...... with respect to systemic (human health) consequences at low and intermediate doses of ionising radiation. Other outstanding questions include links between the different non-targeted responses and the variations in response observed between individuals and cell lines, possibly a function of genetic background......) Integrated Project funded by the European Union. Here we critically examine the evidence for non-targeted effects, discuss apparently contradictory results and consider implications for low-dose radiation health effects. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  16. Frictional Sliding without Geometrical Reflection Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldam, Michael; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A.; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces plays an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism, and rupture directionality. In contrast, it is traditionally assumed that interfaces separating identical materials do not feature such a coupling because of symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces that separate bodies made of macroscopically identical materials but lack geometrical reflection symmetry generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct, and previously unexplained, experimentally observed weakening effect in frictional cracks. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding, which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applications in a broad range of systems.

  17. Frictional sliding with geometrically broken reflection symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Aldam, Michael; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces play an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well-known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism and rupture directionality. In contrast, interfaces separating identical materials are traditionally assumed not to feature such a coupling due to symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces which separate bodies made of identical materials, but lack geometric reflection symmetry, generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct and previously unexplained weakening effect in frictional cracks observed experimentally. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applicatio...

  18. Solid-state lighting : lamp targets and implications for the semiconductor chip.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien

    2003-08-01

    A quiet revolution is underway. Over the next 5-10 years inorganic-semiconductor-based solid-state lighting technology is expected to outperform first incandescent, and then fluorescent and high-intensity-discharge, lighting. Along the way, many decision points and technical challenges will be faced. To help understand these challenges, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association recently updated the U.S. Solid-State Lighting Roadmap. In the first half of this paper, we present an overview of the high-level targets of the inorganic-semiconductor part of that update. In the second half of this paper, we discuss some implications of those high-level targets on the GaN-based semiconductor chips that will be the 'engine' for solid-state lighting.

  19. The impact of particle shape on the angle of internal friction and the implications for sediment dynamics at a steep, mixed sand-gravel beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, N.; Hay, A. E.; Cheel, R.; Lake, C. B.

    2014-08-01

    The impact of particle shape on the angle of internal friction, and the resulting impact on beach sediment dynamics, is still poorly understood. In areas characterized by sediments of specific shape, particularly non-rounded particles, this can lead to large departures from the expected sediment dynamics. The steep slope (1 : 10) of the mixed sand-gravel beach at Advocate Harbour is stable in large-scale morphology over decades, despite a high tidal range of 10 m or more, and intense shore-break action during storms. The Advocate sand (d plate-like shape (Corey Shape Index, CSI ≈ 0.2-0.6). High angles of internal friction of this material were determined using direct shear, ranging from φ ≈ 41 to 49°, while the round to angular gravel was characterized as φ = 33°. The addition of 25% of the elliptic plate-like sand-sized material to the gravel led to an immediate increase in friction angle to φ = 38°. Furthermore, re-organization of the particles occurred during shearing, characterized by a short phase of settling and compaction, followed by a pronounced strong dilatory behavior and an accompanying strong increase of resistance to shear and, thus, shear stress. Long-term shearing (24 h) using a ring shear apparatus led to destruction of the particles without re-compaction. Finally, submerged particle mobilization was simulated using a tilted tray submerged in a water-filled tank. Despite a smooth tray surface, particle motion was not initiated until reaching tray tilt angles of 31° and more, being ≥7° steeper than for motion initiation of the gravel mixtures. In conclusion, geotechnical laboratory experiments quantified the important impact of the elliptic, plate-like shape of Advocate Beach sand on the angles of internal friction of both pure sand and sand-gravel mixtures. The resulting effect on initiation of particle motion was confirmed in tilting tray experiments. This makes it a vivid example of how particle shape can contribute to the

  20. Torsional friction damper optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shaochun; Williams, Keith A.

    2006-06-01

    A new approach for the analysis of friction dampers is presented in this work. The exact form of the steady-state solution for a friction damper implemented on a primary system is developed and numerical solutions are used to determine the optimum friction in a friction damper applied to a specific primary system. When compared to classical results presented by earlier authors, the new approach provides a more optimal solution. In addition, viscous damping in the primary system may be included with the new analysis approach. The ability to optimize a friction damper when viscous damping is included in the primary system is a significant improvement over earlier methods and shows potential for serving as a guide to realizing a more accurate estimate of the optimal damping for friction dampers.

  1. Let-7a is a direct EWS-FLI-1 target implicated in Ewing's sarcoma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio De Vito

    Full Text Available Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFT are the second most common bone malignancy in children and young adults, characterized by unique chromosomal translocations that in 85% of cases lead to expression of the EWS-FLI-1 fusion protein. EWS-FLI-1 functions as an aberrant transcription factor that can both induce and suppress members of its target gene repertoire. We have recently demonstrated that EWS-FLI-1 can alter microRNA (miRNA expression and that miRNA145 is a direct EWS-FLI-1 target whose suppression is implicated in ESFT development. Here, we use miRNA arrays to compare the global miRNA expression profile of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and ESFT cell lines, and show that ESFT display a distinct miRNA signature that includes induction of the oncogenic miRNA 17-92 cluster and repression of the tumor suppressor let-7 family. We demonstrate that direct repression of let-7a by EWS-FLI-1 participates in the tumorigenic potential of ESFT cells in vivo. The mechanism whereby let-7a expression regulates ESFT growth is shown to be mediated by its target gene HMGA2, as let-7a overexpression and HMGA2 repression both block ESFT cell tumorigenicity. Consistent with these observations, systemic delivery of synthetic let-7a into ESFT-bearing mice restored its expression in tumor cells, decreased HMGA2 expression levels and resulted in ESFT growth inhibition in vivo. Our observations provide evidence that deregulation of let-7a target gene expression participates in ESFT development and identify let-7a as promising new therapeutic target for one of the most aggressive pediatric malignancies.

  2. The 2007 M7.7 Tocopilla northern Chile earthquake sequence: Implications for along-strike and downdip rupture segmentation and megathrust frictional behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, B.; Asch, G.; Rosenau, M.; Wang, R.; Oncken, O.; Barrientos, S.; Salazar, P.; Vilotte, J.-P.

    2012-05-01

    In 2007 a M7.7 earthquake occurred near the town of Tocopilla within the northern Chile seismic gap. Main shock slip, derived from coseismic surface deformation, was confined to the depth range between 30 and 55 km. We relocated ˜1100 events during six months before and one week after the main shock. Aftershock seismicity is first congruent to the main shock slip and then it spreads offshore west and northwest of Mejillones Peninsula (MP). Waveform modeling for 38 aftershocks reveals source mechanisms that are in the majority similar to the main shock. However, a few events appear to occur in the upper plate, some with extensional mechanisms. Juxtaposing the Tocopilla aftershocks with those following the neighboring 1995 Antofagasta earthquake produces a striking symmetry across an EW axis in the center of MP. Events seem to skirt around MP, probably due to a shallower Moho there. We suggest that the seismogenic coupling zone in northern Chile changes its frictional behavior in the downdip direction from unstable to mostly conditionally stable. For both earthquake sequences, aftershocks agglomerate in the conditionally stable region, whereas maximum inter-seismic slip deficit and co-seismic slip occurs in the unstable region. The boundary between the unstable and conditionally stable zones parallels the coastline. We identify a similar segmentation for other earthquakes in Chile and Peru, where the offshore segments break in great M > 8 earthquakes, and the onshore segments in smaller M < 8 earthquakes. Using critical taper analysis, we demonstrate a causal relationship between varying slip behavior on the interface and forearc wedge anatomy that can be attributed to spatial variations in the rate-dependency of friction.

  3. Modified-Atmospheric Pressure-Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Identification of Friction Modifier Additives Oleamide and Ethoxylated Tallow Amines on Varied Metal Target Materials and Tribologically Stressed Steel Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widder, Lukas; Ristic, Andjelka; Brenner, Florian; Brenner, Josef; Hutter, Herbert

    2015-11-17

    For many tasks in failure and damage analysis of surfaces deteriorated in heavy tribological contact, the detailed characterization of used lubricants and their additives is essential. The objective of the presented work is to establish accessibility of tribostressed surfaces for direct characterization via modified atmospheric pressure-matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (m-AP-MALDI-MS). Special target holders were constructed to allow target samples of differing shape and form to fit into the desorption/ionization chamber. The best results of desorption and ionization on different target materials and varying roughnesses were achieved on smooth surfaces with low matrix/substrate interaction. M-AP-MALDI characterization of tribologically stressed steel surfaces after pin-on-disc sliding wear tests (SRV-tribotests) yielded positive identification of used friction modifier additives. Further structure elucidation by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and measurements of worn surfaces by time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) accompanied findings about additive behavior and deterioration during tribological contact. Using m-AP-MALDI for direct offline examinations of worn surfaces may set up a quick method for determination of additives used for lubrication and general characterization of a tribological system.

  4. Friction in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  5. Influence of Stress History on Elastic and Frictional Properties of Core Material from IODP Expeditions 315 and 316, NanTroSEIZE Transect: Implications for the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; Marone, C.; Saffer, D. M.; Hashimoto, Y.

    2009-12-01

    We present results of ultrasonic P and S-wave velocity measurements on core material recovered during NanTroSEIZE Stage 1 Expeditions 315 and 316 to the Nankai Trough Accretionary Margin, focusing on how different stress paths during subduction and exhumation along regional thrust faults influence the elastic moduli and anisotropy of various components of the accretionary prism. The influence of changes in pore pressure and confining pressure on the elastic properties of prism material has important implications for its mechanical strength, and understanding how elastic properties change along various stress paths will help us use 3D seismic tomography to draw inferences about overpressurization and fluid flow within the accretionary prism. We compare the velocities measured during shipboard physical properties characterization and logging-while-drilling data from Expedition 314 with 3D seismic velocity data and the results of previous shore-based studies to establish in situ conditions for material at various locations within the prism. We test both intact core material and disaggregated gouge and unlithified sediments from the upper prism, subjecting both samples types to a progression of confining pressure, pore pressure, and axial loading conditions representing normal consolidation and overconsolidation stress paths due to compaction and dewatering during burial and subsequent uplift by thrust faulting. While making continuous ultrasonic velocity measurements to determine changes in dynamic and quasistatic elastic moduli during axial and isotropic loading, we also subject granular material to frictional shear in a biaxial double-direct shearing configuration to measure how its frictional properties vary as a function of stress history.

  6. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  7. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  8. NPPB and ACAN, two novel SHOX2 transcription targets implicated in skeletal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Aza-Carmona

    Full Text Available SHOX and SHOX2 transcription factors are highly homologous, with even identical homeodomains. Genetic alterations in SHOX result in two skeletal dysplasias; Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD and Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD, while no human genetic disease has been linked to date with SHOX2. SHOX2 is, though, involved in skeletal development, as shown by different knockout mice models. Due to the high homology between SHOX and SHOX2, and their functional redundancy during heart development, we postulated that SHOX2 might have the same transcriptional targets and cofactors as SHOX in limb development. We selected two SHOX transcription targets regulated by different mechanisms: 1 the natriuretic peptide precursor B gene (NPPB involved in the endochondral ossification signalling and directly activated by SHOX; and 2 Aggrecan (ACAN, a major component of cartilage extracellular matrix, regulated by the cooperation of SHOX with the SOX trio (SOX5, SOX6 and SOX9 via the protein interaction between SOX5/SOX6 and SHOX. Using the luciferase assay we have demonstrated that SHOX2, like SHOX, regulates NPPB directly whilst activates ACAN via its cooperation with the SOX trio. Subsequently, we have identified and characterized the protein domains implicated in the SHOX2 dimerization and also its protein interaction with SOX5/SOX6 and SHOX using the yeast-two hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Immunohistochemistry of human fetal growth plates from different time points demonstrated that SHOX2 is coexpressed with SHOX and the members of the SOX trio. Despite these findings, no mutation was identified in SHOX2 in a cohort of 83 LWD patients with no known molecular defect, suggesting that SHOX2 alterations do not cause LWD. In conclusion, our work has identified the first cofactors and two new transcription targets of SHOX2 in limb development, and we hypothesize a time- and tissue-specific functional redundancy between SHOX and SHOX2.

  9. WISDOM-II: Screening against multiple targets implicated in malaria using computational grid infrastructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Colin

    2009-05-01

    on computational grids in finding hits against three different targets (PfGST, PfDHFR, PvDHFR (wild type and mutant forms implicated in malaria. Grid-enabled virtual screening approach is proposed to produce focus compound libraries for other biological targets relevant to fight the infectious diseases of the developing world.

  10. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  11. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  12. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  13. A review of dynamics modelling of friction draft gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Luo, Shihui; Spiryagin, Maksym

    2014-06-01

    Longer and heavier trains mean larger in-train forces and more complicated force patterns. Practical experience indicates that the development of fatigue failure of coupling systems in long heavy trains may differ from conventional understanding. The friction-type draft gears are the most widely used draft gears. The ever developing heavy haul transport environment requires further or new understanding of friction draft gear behaviour and its implications for train dynamics as well as fatigue damage of rolling stock. However, modelling of friction draft gears is a highly nonlinear question. Especially the poor predictability, repeatability and the discontinuity of friction make this task more challenging. This article reviews current techniques in dynamics modelling of friction draft gears to provide a starting point that can be used to improve existing or develop new models to achieve more accurate force amplitude and pattern predictions.

  14. Free radicals: properties, sources, targets, and their implication in various diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaniendra, Alugoju; Jestadi, Dinesh Babu; Periyasamy, Latha

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals and other oxidants have gained importance in the field of biology due to their central role in various physiological conditions as well as their implication in a diverse range of diseases. The free radicals, both the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), are derived from both endogenous sources (mitochondria, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, phagocytic cells etc.) and exogenous sources (pollution, alcohol, tobacco smoke, heavy metals, transition metals, industrial solvents, pesticides, certain drugs like halothane, paracetamol, and radiation). Free radicals can adversely affect various important classes of biological molecules such as nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins, thereby altering the normal redox status leading to increased oxidative stress. The free radicals induced oxidative stress has been reported to be involved in several diseased conditions such as diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease-PD, Alzheimer's disease-AD and Multiple sclerosis-MS), cardiovascular diseases (atherosclerosis and hypertension), respiratory diseases (asthma), cataract development, rheumatoid arthritis and in various cancers (colorectal, prostate, breast, lung, bladder cancers). This review deals with chemistry, formation and sources, and molecular targets of free radicals and it provides a brief overview on the pathogenesis of various diseased conditions caused by ROS/RNS.

  15. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  16. Statistical analysis of friction sleeve length effects on soil classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saussus, D. R.; Frost, J. D.; Dejong, J. T.

    2004-10-01

    The cone penetration test (CPT) provides profiles of the tip resistance, sleeve friction, and pore water pressure encountered while penetrating the subsurface. These parameters are used either directly or indirectly to classify the soil types present and to obtain geotechnical design parameters. However, fundamental discrepancies exist in the manner by which these parameters are measured. This paper describes the results of a study that shows the sleeve friction measurement introduces unnecessary redundancy due to the length of the standard friction sleeve compared to the measurement increment. Further, the high sleeve length to measurement increment ratio results in filtering and smoothing of the friction data, thereby causing the variability of the friction between the soil and the cone sleeve to be underestimated. The importance of understanding the role of the sleeve length on measurements is demonstrated using synthetically generated friction profiles and estimating the profiles that would be measured using sleeves of different lengths. Differences in how the soils are classified as a function of the sleeve length used to obtain each profile are illustrated. Solutions are presented to validate the synthetic sleeve friction profiles, to demonstrate the filtering and smoothing effects of the friction sleeve on the data, and to explain the implications of the sleeve length on soil classification. Copyright

  17. Wet Friction-Elements Boundary Friction Mechanism and Friction Coefficient Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yanzhong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The friction mechanism for the boundary friction course of friction elements engagement was explicitly expressed. The boundary friction model was built up by the surface topography. The model contained the effect of boundary film, adhesion, plough and lubrication. Based on the model, a coefficient for weakening plough for the lubrication was proposed. The modified model could fit for the working condition of wet friction elements. The friction coefficient as a function curve of rotating speed could be finally obtained by the data k and s/sm. The method provides a well interpretation of friction condition and friction coefficient prediction and the agreement between theoretical and experimental friction coefficients is reasonably good.

  18. Energy Balance of Friction and Friction Coefficient in Energetical Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Fedorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction energy model is proposed. In this model, generalized mechanism of transformation and dissipation of energy under friction the model of elastic-plastic deformation and fracture contact volumes is considered. Energy model of the process of plastic deformation and destruction of solid bodies is based on the concept of ergodynamic of deformable bodies. Equations of energy balance of friction within the structural and energetic interpretation of deformation are proposed. The energy interpretation of the coefficient of friction is showed. From this position the friction coefficient is the most informative characteristic of the process. Experimental friction curves have been generalized. As a result of the energy analysis of friction, the energy diagram of the structural evolution of the friction surfaces is suggested.

  19. Targeting N-cadherin through fibroblast growth factor receptor-4: distinct pathogenetic and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Shereen; Zheng, Lei; Winer, Daniel; Asa, Sylvia L

    2006-11-01

    Several molecular aberrations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors, but few have proven thus far to be of therapeutic value. Pituitary tumor-derived fibroblast growth factor receptor-4 (ptd-FGFR4) is an alternatively transcribed cytoplasmic isoform lacking most of the extracellular domain. This oncogene recapitulates the morphological features of human pituitary tumors in transgenic mice. To investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting ptd-FGFR4, we examined the impact of FGFR4 tyrosine kinase inhibition in xenografted mice. GH4 pituitary cells expressing ptd-FGFR4 develop into invasive tumors. Systemic treatment of mice bearing ptd-FGFR4 tumors with the FGFR-selective inhibitor PD173074 resulted in recovery of membranous N-cadherin staining and a significant reduction in tumor volume with less invasive growth behavior. Mutation of tyrosine Y754F in ptd-FGFR4 abrogated the effect of PD173074-mediated inhibition. The pivotal role of N-cadherin as a mediator of this pituitary cell growth was demonstrated by small interfering RNA mediated down-regulation, which promoted invasive growth in xenografted mice. To validate this model in primary human pituitary tumors, we examined the expression of ptd-FGFR4, N-cadherin, and clinical behavior. Loss of membranous N-cadherin correlated with cytoplasmic FGFR4 expression and with tumor invasiveness in surgically resected human pituitary tumors. Primary human pituitary tumor cells treated with PD173074 showed restoration of N-cadherin to the membrane with dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. These data highlight the pathogenetic significance of N-cadherin misexpression and emphasize the importance of FGFR partnership in mediating its functions.

  20. [Overview of patents on targeted genome editing technologies and their implications for innovation and entrepreneurship education in universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyu, Fan; Yanping, Lin; Guojian, Liao; Jianping, Xie

    2015-12-01

    Zinc finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 nuclease are important targeted genome editing technologies. They have great significance in scientific research and applications on aspects of functional genomics research, species improvement, disease prevention and gene therapy. There are past or ongoing disputes over ownership of the intellectual property behind every technology. In this review, we summarize the patents on these three targeted genome editing technologies in order to provide some reference for developing genome editing technologies with self-owned intellectual property rights and some implications for current innovation and entrepreneurship education in universities.

  1. Targeted mutagenesis of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases VA and VB implicates both enzymes in ammonia detoxification and glucose metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Gul N.; Rubbelke, Timothy S.; Hendin, Joshua; Nguyen, Hien; Waheed, Abdul; Shoemaker, James D.; Sly, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies with carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors implicated mitochondrial CA in ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. Subsequent studies identified two mitochondrial CAs. To distinguish the contribution of each enzyme, we studied the effects of targeted disruption of the murine CA genes, called Car5A and Car5B. The Car5A mutation had several deleterious consequences. Car5A null mice were smaller than wild-type littermates and bred poorly. However, on sodium–potassium citrate-supplemented wate...

  2. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  3. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der E.; Zeng, X.; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is fre

  4. Gravitomagnetic dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Cashen, Benjamin; Kesden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A supermassive black hole moving through a field of stars will gravitationally scatter the stars, inducing a backreaction force on the black hole known as dynamical friction. In Newtonian gravity, the axisymmetry of the system about the black hole's velocity $\\mathbf{v}$ implies that the dynamical friction must be anti-parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$. However, in general relativity the black hole's spin $\\mathbf{S}$ need not be parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$, breaking the axisymmetry of the system and generating a new component of dynamical friction similar to the Lorentz force $\\mathbf{F} = q\\mathbf{v} \\times \\mathbf{B}$ experienced by a particle with charge $q$ moving in a magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$. We call this new force gravitomagnetic dynamical friction and calculate its magnitude for a spinning black hole moving through a field of stars with Maxwellian velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, assuming that both $v$ and $\\sigma$ are much less than the speed of light $c$. We use post-Newtonian equations of motion accurate to $...

  5. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomaa, S. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  6. TARGET:?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James M Acton

    2014-01-01

      By 2003. as military planners had become worried that the country's long-range conventional weapons, such as cruise missiles, might be too slow to reach hypothetical distant targets that needed to be struck urgently...

  7. EURISOL 100 kW Target Stations Operation and Implications for its Proton Driver Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Noah, Etam; Lettry, Jacques; Lindroos, Mats; Stora, Thierry

    EURISOL, the next European radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility calls for the development of target and ion source assemblies to dissipate deposited heat and to extract and ionize isotopes of interest efficiently. The EURISOL 100 kW direct targets should be designed for a goal lifetime of up to three weeks. Target operation from the moment it is installed on a target station until its exhaustion involves several phases with specific proton beam intensity requirements. This paper discusses operation of the 100 kW targets within the ongoing EURISOL Design Study, with an emphasis on the requirements for the proton driver beam.

  8. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  9. Friction in rail guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of friction is included in the present equations describing the performance of an inductively driven rail gun. These equations, which have their basis in an empirical formulation, are applied to results from two different experiments. Only an approximate physical description of the problem is attempted, in view of the complexity of details in the interaction among forces of this magnitude over time periods of the order of milisecs.

  10. A sensitive and rapid assay for homologous recombination in mosquito cells: impact of vector topology and implications for gene targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yuguang

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent progress in insect transgenesis has been dramatic but existing transposon-based approaches are constrained by position effects and potential instability. Gene targeting would bring a number of benefits, however progress requires a better understanding of the mechanisms involved. Much can be learned in vitro since extrachromosomal recombination occurs at high frequency, facilitating the study of multiple events and the impact of structural changes among the recombining molecules. We have investigated homologous recombination in mosquito cells through restoration of luciferase activity from deleted substrates. The implications of this work for the construction of insect gene targeting vectors are discussed. Results We show that linear targeting vectors are significantly more efficient than circular ones and that recombination is stimulated by introducing double-strand breaks into, or near, the region of homology. Single-strand annealing represents a very efficient pathway but may not be feasible for targeting unbroken chromosomes. Using circular plasmids to mimic chromosomal targets, one-sided invasion appears to be the predominant pathway for homologous recombination. Non-homologous end joining reactions also occur and may be utilised in gene targeting if double-strand breaks are first introduced into the target site. Conclusions We describe a rapid, sensitive assay for extrachromosomal homologous recombination in mosquito cells. Variations in substrate topology suggest that single-strand annealing and one-sided invasion represent the predominant pathways, although non-homologous end joining reactions also occur. One-sided invasion of circular chromosomal mimics by linear vectors might therefore be used in vitro to investigate the design and efficiency of gene targeting strategies.

  11. Disentangling Mathematics Target and Access Skills: Implications for Accommodation Assignment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne R.; Jamgochian, Elisa M.; Nelson-Walker, Nancy J.; Geller, Joshua P.

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate assignment of accommodations is predicated on a clear distinction between target skills and access skills. In this study, we examine the agreement between test developer/researchers' and educators' classification of target and access skills as a possible explanatory mechanism for assigning accommodations. Findings indicate that…

  12. High Speed Friction Microscopy and Nanoscale Friction Coefficient Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, James L.; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for Friction Coefficient Mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true...

  13. Macroeconomic implications of labor market frictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedláček, P.

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations in economic activity, business cycles, are a fact of life. An important factor shaping the character of economic fluctuations is the labor market. However, the labor market does not operate smoothly. Neither workers, nor firms are all the same. Therefore, it often requires a substantial

  14. Macroeconomic implications of labor market frictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedláček, P.

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations in economic activity, business cycles, are a fact of life. An important factor shaping the character of economic fluctuations is the labor market. However, the labor market does not operate smoothly. Neither workers, nor firms are all the same. Therefore, it often requires a substantial

  15. Friction laws for lubricated nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzio, R.; Boragno, C.; Valbusa, U.

    2006-09-01

    We have used friction force microscopy to probe friction laws for nanoasperities sliding on atomically flat substrates under controlled atmosphere and liquid environment, respectively. A power law relates friction force and normal load in dry air, whereas a linear relationship, i.e., Amontons' law, is observed for junctions fully immersed in model lubricants, namely, octamethylciclotetrasiloxane and squalane. Lubricated contacts display a remarkable friction reduction, with liquid and substrate specific friction coefficients. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulations suggests that load-bearing boundary layers at junction entrance cause the appearance of Amontons' law and impart atomic-scale character to the sliding process; continuum friction models are on the contrary of limited predictive power when applied to lubrication effects. An attempt is done to define general working conditions leading to the manifestation of nanoscale lubricity due to adsorbed boundary layers.

  16. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  17. Solid friction between soft filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  18. Limbic, associative, and motor territories within the targets for deep brain stimulation: potential clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Bova, Frank J; Foote, Kelly D; Rosado, Christian A; Kirsch-Darrow, Lindsey; Okun, Michael S

    2007-07-01

    The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) has recently been expanding for the treatment of many neurologic disorders such as Parkinson disease, dystonia, essential tremor, Tourette's syndrome, cluster headache, epilepsy, depression, and obsessive compulsive disorder. The target structures for DBS include specific segregated territories within limbic, associative, or motor regions of very small subnuclei. In this review, we summarize current clinical techniques for DBS, the cognitive/mood/motor outcomes, and the relevant neuroanatomy with respect to functional territories within specific brain targets. Future development of new techniques and technology that may include a more direct visualization of "motor" territories within target structures may prove useful for avoiding side effects that may result from stimulation of associative and limbic regions. Alternatively, newer procedures may choose and specifically target non-motor territories for chronic electrical stimulation.

  19. Colocalization of Fc gamma RI-targeted antigen with class I MHC: implications for antigen processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyre, C A; Barreda, M E; Swink, S L; Fanger, M W

    2001-02-15

    The high-affinity receptor for IgG (CD64 or FcgammaRI) is constitutively expressed exclusively on professional APCs (monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells). When Ag is targeted specifically to FcgammaRI, Ag presentation is markedly enhanced, although the mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. In an effort to elucidate the pathways involved in FcgammaRI targeting, we developed a model targeted Ag using enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). This molecule, wH22xeGFP, consists of the entire humanized anti-FcgammaRI mAb H22 with eGFP genetically fused to the C-terminal end of each CH3 domain. wH22xeGFP binds within the ligand-binding region by its Fc end, as well as outside the ligand-binding region by its Fab ends, thereby cross-linking FcgammaRI. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that wH22xeGFP was rapidly internalized by the high-FcgammaRI-expressing cell line U937 10.6, but did not associate with intracellular proteins Rab4, Rab5a, or Lamp-1, suggesting that the targeted fusion protein was not localized in early endosomes, recycling vesicles, or lysosomes. Interestingly, wH22xeGFP was found colocalized with intracellular MHC class I, suggesting that FcgammaRI-targeted Ags may converge upon a class I processing pathway. These data are in agreement with studies in the mouse showing that FcgammaRI targeting can lead to Ag-specific activation of cytotoxic T cells. Data obtained from these studies should lead to a better understanding of how Ags targeted to FcgammaRI are processed and under what conditions they lead to presentation of antigenic peptides in MHC class I, as a foundation for the use of FcgammaRI-targeted Ags as vaccines.

  20. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Rothenburg, L.; Gutkowski, Witold; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle fri

  1. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  2. Free Radicals: Properties, Sources, Targets, and Their Implication in Various Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals and other oxidants have gained importance in the field of biology due to their central role in various physiological conditions as well as their implication in a diverse range of diseases. The free radicals, both the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), are derived from both endogenous sources (mitochondria, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, phagocytic cells etc.) and exogenous sources (pollution, alcohol, tobacco smoke, heavy metals, transition m...

  3. Friction or Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundahl, Mikela

    2014-01-01

    . The anthropologist Anna Tsing has developed the concept-metaphor friction as a way to discuss the energy created when various actors narrate “the same” event(s) in different ways, and see the other participants’ accounts as fantasies or even fabrications. I will use my position as researcher and my relations...... is Stone Town in Zanzibar and the de-velopment and dissolution going on under the shadow of the UNESCO World Heritage flag; a growing tourism; a global and local increase in islamisation; and the political tension within the Tanzanian union. My main focus is narratives of the identity of Zanzibar since...

  4. Control of friction at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhen, Jacob; Braiman, Yehuda Y.; Protopopescu, Vladimir

    2010-04-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for control of friction at the nanoscale. A method of controlling frictional dynamics of a plurality of particles using non-Lipschitzian control includes determining an attribute of the plurality of particles; calculating an attribute deviation by subtracting the attribute of the plurality of particles from a target attribute; calculating a non-Lipschitzian feedback control term by raising the attribute deviation to a fractionary power .xi.=(2m+1)/(2n+1) where n=1, 2, 3 . . . and m=0, 1, 2, 3 . . . , with m strictly less than n and then multiplying by a control amplitude; and imposing the non-Lipschitzian feedback control term globally on each of the plurality of particles; imposing causes a subsequent magnitude of the attribute deviation to be reduced.

  5. Epidemiological Trends for HIV in Southern Africa: Implications for Reaching the Elimination Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian G; Gouws, Eleanor; Somse, Pierre; Mmelesi, Mpho; Lwamba, Chibwe; Chikoko, Trouble; Fazito, Erika; Turay, Mohamed; Kiwango, Eva; Chikukwa, Pepukai; Damisoni, Henry; Gboun, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Southern Africa is the region worst affected by HIV in the world and accounts for one third of the global burden of HIV. Achieving the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target by 2020 and ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 depend on success in this region. We review epidemiological trends in each country in southern Africa with respect to the prevalence, incidence, mortality, coverage of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and TB notification rates, to better understand progress in controlling HIV and TB and to determine what needs to be done to reach the UNAIDS targets. Significant progress has been made in controlling HIV. In all countries in the region, the prevalence of HIV in people not on ART, the incidence of HIV, AIDS-related mortality and, in most countries, TB notification rates, are falling. In some countries, the risk of infection began to fall before biomedical interventions such as ART became widely available as a result of effective prevention measures or people's awareness of, and response to, the epidemic but the reasons for these declines remain uncertain. Some countries have achieved better levels of ART coverage than others, but all are in a position to reach the 2020 and 2030 targets if they accelerate the roll-out of ART and of targeted prevention efforts. Achieving the HIV treatment targets will further reduce the incidence of HIV-related TB, but efforts to control TB in HIV-negative people must be improved and strengthened.

  6. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  7. FRICTION ANALYSIS OF KINETIC SCHEMES - THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOLKEMA, JS

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  8. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  9. Genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity of epithelial ovarian cancer and the clinical implications for molecular targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Huimin; Cao, Dongyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Shen, Keng

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynaecological malignancy, and tumoural heterogeneity (TH) has been blamed for treatment failure. The genomic and epigenomic atlas of EOC varies significantly with tumour histotype, grade, stage, sensitivity to chemotherapy and prognosis. Rapidly accumulating knowledge about the genetic and epigenetic events that control TH in EOC has facilitated the development of molecular-targeted therapy. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, designed to target homologous recombination, are poised to change how breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA)-related ovarian cancer is treated. Epigenetic treatment regimens being tested in clinical or preclinical studies could provide promising novel treatment approaches and hope for improving patient survival.

  10. Concepts and targets in triple-negative breast cancer: recent results and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Poornima; Nanda, Rita

    2016-09-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease in which tumors are defined by lack of expression of the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor. No targeted therapies are available for the treatment of TNBC, and chemotherapy remains the standard of care. Gene expression profiling has identified six distinct molecular subtypes of TNBC. The identification of novel targets, coupled with the development of therapies for different subsets of TNBC, holds great promise for the future treatment of this aggressive form of breast cancer. This review focuses on novel therapies in development for the treatment of TNBC.

  11. Impact cratering experiments in brittle targets with variable thickness: Implications for deep pit craters on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikami, T.; Hagermann, A.; Miyamoto, H.; Miura, S.; Haruyama, J.; Lykawka, P. S.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution images reveal that numerous pit craters exist on the surface of Mars. For some pit craters, the depth-to-diameter ratios are much greater than for ordinary craters. Such deep pit craters are generally considered to be the results of material drainage into a subsurface void space, which might be formed by a lava tube, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. Morphological studies indicate that the formation of a pit crater might be triggered by the impact event, and followed by collapse of the ceiling. To test this hypothesis, we carried out laboratory experiments of impact cratering into brittle targets with variable roof thickness. In particular, the effect of the target thickness on the crater formation is studied to understand the penetration process by an impact. For this purpose, we produced mortar targets with roof thickness of 1-6 cm, and a bulk density of 1550 kg/m3 by using a mixture of cement, water and sand (0.2 mm) in the ratio of 1:1:10, by weight. The compressive strength of the resulting targets is 3.2±0.9 MPa. A spherical nylon projectile (diameter 7 mm) is shot perpendicularly into the target surface at the nominal velocity of 1.2 km/s, using a two-stage light-gas gun. Craters are formed on the opposite side of the impact even when no target penetration occurs. Penetration of the target is achieved when craters on the opposite sides of the target connect with each other. In this case, the cross section of crater somehow attains a flat hourglass-like shape. We also find that the crater diameter on the opposite side is larger than that on the impact side, and more fragments are ejected from the crater on the opposite side than from the crater on the impact side. This result gives a qualitative explanation for the observation that the Martian deep pit craters lack a raised rim and have the ejecta deposit on their floor instead. Craters are formed on the opposite impact side even when no penetration

  12. Concepts and targets in triple-negative breast cancer: recent results and clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Poornima; Nanda, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease in which tumors are defined by lack of expression of the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor. No targeted therapies are available for the treatment of TNBC, and chemotherapy remains the standard of care. Gene expression profiling has identified six distinct molecular subtypes of TNBC. The identification of novel targets, coupled with the development of therapies for different subsets of TNBC, holds great promise for the future treatment of this aggressive form of breast cancer. This review focuses on novel therapies in development for the treatment of TNBC. PMID:27583027

  13. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  14. Lethal ovitrap deployment for Aedes aegypti control: potential implications for non-target organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sharron A; Jacups, Susan P; Ritchie, Scott A

    2015-06-01

    In Australia, dengue control combines source reduction with lethal ovitraps to reduce Aedes aegypti populations during outbreaks. Lethal ovitraps are considered a sustainable and environmentally friendly method of controlling container-inhabiting mosquitoes, however, to-date, this claim has not been quantified. This study assesses the potential impact of lethal ovitraps on non-target organisms when used to control Ae. aegypti in tropical Australia. For retention of specimens, we substituted standard sticky ovitraps for lethal ovitraps. We collected 988 Ae. aegypti and 44,132 non-target specimens over 13 months from 16 sites. Although Ae. aegypti comprised only 2.2% of the total collection, they were were the eighth most dominant taxa collected, on the 93(rd) percentile. Of the non-target organisms, Collembola were the dominant taxa, 44.2%, with 36.8% and 10.5% Diptera and Hymenoptera, respectively. Of the Dipterans, 61% were family Phoridae. Lethal ovitraps were visited by 90 insect or invertebrate families in total. Ovitraps are attractive to Collembola, Phoridae, Sciaridae, Formicidae, and Culicidae, with minimal attraction by Apidae and other commonly monitored non-target organisms. For container-inhabiting mosquitoes, LOs are cost effective operationally, requiring minimal staff resources for placement and retrieval.

  15. Characterization of Rad51 from apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii: an implication for inefficient gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achanta, Sita Swati; Varunan, Shalu M; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal Kanti

    2012-01-01

    Repairing double strand breaks (DSBs) is absolutely essential for the survival of obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Thus, DSB repair mechanisms could be excellent targets for chemotherapeutic interventions. Recent genetic and bioinformatics analyses confirm the presence of both homologous recombination (HR) as well as non homologous end joining (NHEJ) proteins in this lower eukaryote. In order to get mechanistic insights into the HR mediated DSB repair pathway in this parasite, we have characterized the key protein involved in homologous recombination, namely TgRad51, at the biochemical and genetic levels. We have purified recombinant TgRad51 protein to 99% homogeneity and have characterized it biochemically. The ATP hydrolysis activity of TgRad51 shows a higher K(M) and much lower k(cat) compared to bacterial RecA or Rad51 from other related protozoan parasites. Taking yeast as a surrogate model system we have shown that TgRad51 is less efficient in gene conversion mechanism. Further, we have found that TgRad51 mediated gene integration is more prone towards random genetic loci rather than targeted locus. We hypothesize that compromised ATPase activity of TgRad51 is responsible for inefficient gene targeting and poor gene conversion efficiency in this protozoan parasite. With increase in homologous flanking regions almost three fold increments in targeted gene integration is observed, which is similar to the trend found with ScRad51. Our findings not only help us in understanding the reason behind inefficient gene targeting in T. gondii but also could be exploited to facilitate high throughput knockout as well as epitope tagging of Toxoplasma genes.

  16. Characterization of Rad51 from apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii: an implication for inefficient gene targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Swati Achanta

    Full Text Available Repairing double strand breaks (DSBs is absolutely essential for the survival of obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Thus, DSB repair mechanisms could be excellent targets for chemotherapeutic interventions. Recent genetic and bioinformatics analyses confirm the presence of both homologous recombination (HR as well as non homologous end joining (NHEJ proteins in this lower eukaryote. In order to get mechanistic insights into the HR mediated DSB repair pathway in this parasite, we have characterized the key protein involved in homologous recombination, namely TgRad51, at the biochemical and genetic levels. We have purified recombinant TgRad51 protein to 99% homogeneity and have characterized it biochemically. The ATP hydrolysis activity of TgRad51 shows a higher K(M and much lower k(cat compared to bacterial RecA or Rad51 from other related protozoan parasites. Taking yeast as a surrogate model system we have shown that TgRad51 is less efficient in gene conversion mechanism. Further, we have found that TgRad51 mediated gene integration is more prone towards random genetic loci rather than targeted locus. We hypothesize that compromised ATPase activity of TgRad51 is responsible for inefficient gene targeting and poor gene conversion efficiency in this protozoan parasite. With increase in homologous flanking regions almost three fold increments in targeted gene integration is observed, which is similar to the trend found with ScRad51. Our findings not only help us in understanding the reason behind inefficient gene targeting in T. gondii but also could be exploited to facilitate high throughput knockout as well as epitope tagging of Toxoplasma genes.

  17. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  18. Elastic model of dry friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E., E-mail: dekl2@cam.ac.uk [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  19. Oblique impact cratering experiments in brittle targets: Implications for elliptical craters on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikami, Tatsuhiro; Hagermann, Axel; Morota, Tomokatsu; Haruyama, Junichi; Hasegawa, Sunao

    2017-01-01

    Most impact craters observed on planetary bodies are the results of oblique impacts of meteoroids. To date, however, there have only been very few laboratory oblique impact experiments for analogue targets relevant to the surfaces of extraterrestrial bodies. In particular, there is a lack of laboratory oblique impact experiments into brittle targets with a material strength on the order of 1 MPa, with the exception of ice. A strength on the order of 1 MPa is considered to be the corresponding material strength for the formation of craters in the 100 m size range on the Moon. Impact craters are elliptical if the meteoroid's trajectory is below a certain threshold angle of incidence, and it is known that the threshold angle depends largely on the material strength. Therefore, we examined the threshold angle required to produce elliptical craters in laboratory impact experiments into brittle targets. This work aims to constrain current interpretations of lunar elliptical craters and pit craters with sizes below a hundred meters. We produced mortar targets with compressive strength of 3.2 MPa. A spherical nylon projectile (diameter 7.14 mm) was shot into the target surface at a nominal velocity of 2.3 km/s, with an impact angle of 5°-90° from horizontal. The threshold angle of this experiment ranges from 15° to 20°. We confirmed that our experimental data agree with previous empirical equations in terms of the cratering efficiency and the threshold impact angle. In addition, in order to simulate the relatively large lunar pit craters related to underground cavities, we conducted a second series of experiments under similar impact conditions using targets with an underground rectangular cavity. Size and outline of craters that created a hole are similar to those of craters without a hole. Moreover, when observed from an oblique angle, a crater with a hole has a topography that resembles the lunar pit craters. The relation between the impact velocity of meteoroids on

  20. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small

  1. Friction in surface micromachined microengines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; LaVigne, G.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding the frictional properties of advanced Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is essential in order to develop optimized designs and fabrication processes, as well as to qualify devices for commercial applications. We develop and demonstrate a method to experimentally measure the forces associated with sliding friction of devices rotating on a hub. The method is demonstrated on the rotating output gear of the microengine recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In-situ measurements of an engine running at 18300 rpm give a coefficient of friction of 0.5 for radial (normal) forces less than 4 {mu}N. For larger forces the effective coefficient of friction abruptly increases, suggesting a fundamental change in the basic nature of the interaction between the gear and hub. The experimental approach we have developed to measure the frictional forces associated with the microengine is generically applicable to other MEMS devices.

  2. Implications of a dynamic target of greenhouse gases emission reduction: the case of Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, V. [Universidad de Beunos Aires (Argentina); Grand, M.C. [Universidad del CEMA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the greenhouse gases (GHG) emission target adopted by Argentina. It contains a summary of the process that led to the formulation of the emission target, including GHG inventories, macroeconomic and sectoral projections, and mitigation options. Fixed and dynamic indexes such as the Carbon Intensity Index are discussed, concluding that the latter is not appropriate for most developing countries. This is the case, in particular, for countries whose GHG emissions are not solely dependent on GDP growth, but also on other variables, such as international prices and market conditions for their agricultural products. The index recommended for Argentina was based on the square root of GDP. It went a step further by producing, for the chosen level of reduction, not only a positive relation between GDP and allowable emissions, but also a relation of the same sign between GDP and emission reductions. (author)

  3. Potential synergistic implications for stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals in bone-metastatic prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor

    2011-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity and chemotherapy-resistant 'stem cells' represent two of the most pressing issues in devising new strategies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Though curative strategies have long been present for men with localized disease, metastatic prostate cancer is currently incurable. Though substantial improvements in outcomes are now possible through the utilization of newly approved therapies, novel combinations are clearly needed. Herein we describe potentially synergistic interactions between bone stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and other therapies for treatment of bone-metastatic prostate cancer. Radiation has long been known to synergize with cytotoxic chemotherapies and recent data also suggest the possibility of synergy when combining radiation and immune-based strategies. Combination therapies will be required to substantially improve survival for men with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer and we hypothesize that bone-targeted radiopharmaceuticals will play an important role in this process.

  4. KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and PTEN mutations: implications for targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roock, Wendy; De Vriendt, Veerle; Normanno, Nicola; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tejpar, Sabine

    2011-06-01

    The discovery of mutant KRAS as a predictor of resistance to epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies brought a major change in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. This seminal finding also highlighted our sparse knowledge about key signalling pathways in colorectal tumours. Drugs that inhibit oncogenic alterations such as phospho-MAP2K (also called MEK), phospho-AKT, and mutant B-RAF seem promising as single treatment or when given with EGFR inhibitors. However, our understanding of the precise role these potential drug targets have in colorectal tumours, and the oncogenic dependence that tumours might have on these components, has not progressed at the same rate. As a result, patient selection and prediction of treatment effects remain problematic. We review the role of mutations in genes other than KRAS on the efficacy of anti-EGFR therapy, and discuss strategies to target these oncogenic alterations alone or in combination with receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibition.

  5. NMDA-receptor trafficking and targeting: implications for synaptic transmission and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Reed C; Zukin, R Suzanne

    2002-11-01

    Dynamic regulation of synaptic efficacy is thought to play a crucial role in formation of neuronal connections and in experience-dependent modification of neural circuitry. The molecular and cellular mechanisms by which synaptic changes are triggered and expressed are the focus of intense interest. This articles reviews recent evidence that NMDA receptors undergo dynamically regulated targeting and trafficking, and that the physical transport of NMDA receptors in and out of the synaptic membrane contributes to several forms of long-lasting synaptic plasticity. The identification of targeting and internalization sequences in NMDA-receptor subunits has begun the unraveling of some mechanisms that underlie activity-dependent redistribution of NMDA receptors. Given that NMDA receptors are widely expressed throughout the CNS, regulation of NMDA-receptor trafficking provides a potentially important way to modulate efficacy of synaptic transmission.

  6. Herbicide impact on non-target plant reproduction: what are the toxicological and ecological implications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, C; Strandberg, B; Carpenter, D; Mathiassen, S K; Thomas, P J

    2014-02-01

    Declining plant diversity and abundance have been widely reported in agro-ecosystems of North America and Europe. Intensive use of herbicides within cropfields and the associated drift in adjacent habitats are partly responsible for this change. The objectives of this work were to quantify the phenological stages of non-target plants in in-situ field situations during herbicide spray and to compare plant susceptibility at different phenological stages. Results demonstrated that a large number of non-target plants had reached reproductive stages during herbicide spray events in woodlots and hedgerows, both in Canada and Denmark where vegetation varies considerably. In addition, delays in flowering and reduced seed production occurred widely on plants sprayed at the seedling stage or at later reproductive periods, with plants sprayed at reproductive stages often exhibiting more sensitivity than those sprayed as seedlings. Ecological risk assessments need to include reproductive endpoints.

  7. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Understanding and targeting cancer stem cells:therapeutic implications and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke CHEN; Ying-hui HUANG; Ji-long CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified as rare cell populations in many cancers,including leukemia and solid tumors.Accumulating evidence has suggested that CSCs are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into various types of cancer cells.Aberrant regulation of gene expression and some signaling pathways has been observed in CSCs compared to other tumor cells.CSCs are thought to be responsible for cancer initiation,progression,metastasis,recurrence and drug resistance.The CSC hypothesis has recently attracted much attention due to the potential for discovery and development of CSC-related therapies and the identification of key molecules involved in controlling the unique properties of CSC populations.Over the past several years,a tremendous amount of effort has been invested in the development of new drugs,such as nanomedicines,that can take advantage of the "Achilles'heel" of CSCs by targeting cell-surface molecular markers or various signaling pathways.Novel compounds and therapeutic strategies that selectively target CSCs have been identified,some of which have been evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies.In this article,we review new findings related to the investigation of the CSC hypothesis,and discuss the crucial pathways involved in regulating the development of CSC populations and the advances in studies of drug resistance.In addition,we review new CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aiming to eradicate malignancies.

  9. Vaccination targeting a surface sialidase of P. acnes: implication for new treatment of acne vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruaki Nakatsuji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acne vulgaris afflicts more than fifty million people in the United State and the severity of this disorder is associated with the immune response to Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes. Systemic therapies for acne target P. acnes using antibiotics, or target the follicle with retinoids such as isotretinoin. The latter systemic treatment is highly effective but also carries a risk of side effects including immune imbalance, hyperlipidemia, and teratogenicity. Despite substantial research into potential new therapies for this common disease, vaccines against acne vulgaris are not yet available. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we create an acne vaccine targeting a cell wall-anchored sialidase of P. acnes. The importance of sialidase to disease pathogenesis is shown by treatment of a human sebocyte cell line with recombinant sialidase that increased susceptibility to P. acnes cytotoxicity and adhesion. Mice immunized with sialidase elicit a detectable antibody; the anti-sialidase serum effectively neutralized the cytotoxicity of P. acnes in vitro and P. acnes-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8 production in human sebocytes. Furthermore, the sialidase-immunized mice provided protective immunity against P. acnes in vivo as this treatment blocked an increase in ear thickness and release of pro-inflammatory macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2 cytokine. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicated that acne vaccines open novel therapeutic avenues for acne vulgaris and other P. acnes-associated diseases.

  10. Mechanisms and Implications of Dual-Acting Methotrexate in Folate-Targeted Nanotherapeutic Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela T. Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rational design of a nanoplatform in drug delivery plays a crucial role in determining its targeting specificity and efficacy in vivo. A conventional approach relies on the surface conjugation of a nanometer-sized particle with two functionally distinct types of molecules, one as a targeting ligand, and the other as a therapeutic agent to be delivered to the diseased cell. However, an alternative simplified approach can be used, in which a single type of molecule displaying dual function as both a targeting ligand and therapeutic agent is conjugated to the nanoparticle. In this review, we evaluate the validity of this new strategy by using methotrexate, which displays multifunctional mechanisms of action. Methotrexate binds to the folate receptor, a surface biomarker frequently overexpressed in tumor cells, and also inhibits dihydrofolate reductase, an enzyme critical for cell survival and division. Thus we describe a series of fifth generation poly(amido amine dendrimers conjugated with methotrexate, and discuss several lines of evidence supporting the efficacy of this new platform strategy based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, enzyme activity assays, and cell-based studies with folate receptor (+ KB cancer cells.

  11. Inflammation and the glutamate system in schizophrenia: implications for therapeutic targets and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Norbert

    2008-12-01

    Despite the progress in antipsychotic therapy for schizophrenia, the effects are still not satisfactory. There is a high percentage of therapy-resistant patients and the overall course of the disease is unfavourable in many affected individuals. Therefore, other therapeutic targets than dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmitters are being considered. Glutamatergic hypofunction, mediated mainly by NMDA receptor blockade, is suggested to be indirectly responsible for dopaminergic dysfunction in schizophrenia. Increased levels of kynurenic acid (KYN-A), an endogenous NMDA receptor antagonist, resulting from disturbed tryptophan/kynurenine metabolism can explain psychotic symptoms and cognitive deterioration. The role of the immune system in the production of KYN-A and therapeutic targets in the immune and glutamate systems are outlined. Therapeutic consequences are discussed. Glutamate modulators that particularly influence the NMDA co-transmitters glycine and serine, including inhibitors of glycine transporters, are described and initial clinical evidence is discussed. Another target of the glutamate system is the metabotropic mGlu2/3 receptor; Preliminary clinical results of a study with a mGlu2/3 receptor agonist in schizophrenia are mentioned.

  12. Design challenges in nanoparticle-based platforms: Implications for targeted drug delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Douglas Gurnett

    Characterization and control of heterogeneous distributions of nanoparticle-ligand components are major design challenges for nanoparticle-based platforms. This dissertation begins with an examination of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-based targeted delivery platform. A folic acid targeted modular platform was developed to target human epithelial cancer cells. Although active targeting was observed in vitro, active targeting was not found in vivo using a mouse tumor model. A major flaw of this platform design was that it did not provide for characterization or control of the component distribution. Motivated by the problems experienced with the modular design, the actual composition of nanoparticle-ligand distributions were examined using a model dendrimer-ligand system. High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) resolved the distribution of components in samples with mean ligand/dendrimer ratios ranging from 0.4 to 13. A peak fitting analysis enabled the quantification of the component distribution. Quantified distributions were found to be significantly more heterogeneous than commonly expected and standard analytical parameters, namely the mean ligand/nanoparticle ratio, failed to adequately represent the component heterogeneity. The distribution of components was also found to be sensitive to particle modifications that preceded the ligand conjugation. With the knowledge gained from this detailed distribution analysis, a new platform design was developed to provide a system with dramatically improved control over the number of components and with improved batch reproducibility. Using semi-preparative HPLC, individual dendrimer-ligand components were isolated. The isolated dendrimer with precise numbers of ligands were characterized by NMR and analytical HPLC. In total, nine different dendrimer-ligand components were obtained with degrees of purity ≥80%. This system has the potential to serve as a platform to which a precise number of functional molecules

  13. Student figures in friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

      This thesis analyses how ‘the student', as a contested figure, is negotiated and enacted in a period of extensive university reform in Denmark. Through a combination of historical and anthropological research, it focuses on students' changing participation in the shaping of Danish society......, students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures......, the university and their own education. Detailed studies explore, first, politically active students' various attempts to influence national educational policies; second, student participation in the development of the university, especially regarding debates over consumer conduct versus co-ownership; and third...

  14. Representation of target-bound drugs by computed conformers: implications for conformational libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede Andrean

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing number of known protein structures provides valuable information about pharmaceutical targets. Drug binding sites are identifiable and suitable lead compounds can be proposed. The flexibility of ligands is a critical point for the selection of potential drugs. Since computed 3D structures of millions of compounds are available, the knowledge of their binding conformations would be a great benefit for the development of efficient screening methods. Results Integration of two public databases allowed superposition of conformers for 193 approved drugs with 5507 crystallised target-bound counterparts. The generation of 9600 drug conformers using an atomic force field was carried out to obtain an optimal coverage of the conformational space. Bioactive conformations are best described by a conformational ensemble: half of all drugs exhibit multiple active states, distributed over the entire range of the reachable energy and conformational space. A number of up to 100 conformers per drug enabled us to reproduce the bound states within a similarity threshold of 1.0 Å in 70% of all cases. This fraction rises to about 90% for smaller or average sized drugs. Conclusion Single drugs adopt multiple bioactive conformations if they interact with different target proteins. Due to the structural diversity of binding sites they adopt conformations that are distributed over a broad conformational space and wide energy range. Since the majority of drugs is well represented by a predefined low number of conformers (up to 100 this procedure is a valuable method to compare compounds by three-dimensional features or for fast similarity searches starting with pharmacophores. The underlying 9600 generated drug conformers are downloadable from the Super Drug Web site 1. All superpositions are visualised at the same source. Additional conformers (110,000 of 2400 classified WHO-drugs are also available.

  15. Implications of a Reduction in the Hemoglobin Target in Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent-Treated Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy V. Nguyen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs to a hemoglobin (Hb level >12.0 g/dl have increased risk of multiple complications, including death. The optimal Hb target for ESA use has not been established. We hypothesized that reducing the target Hb would prevent levels >12 g/dl and lead to significant cost savings. Methods: Our target Hb range was reduced to 9–11 g/dl from 10–12 g/dl. Thirty-five chronic hemodialysis (HD patients received erythropoietin (EPO and intravenous iron from January to December 2009. Data analysis included: Hb level, EPO dose, transferrin saturation and ferritin levels. EPO was administered via subcutaneous injection weekly or twice weekly. Results: The mean monthly Hb level changed from 11.2 to 10.6 g/dl. The percentages of patients with mean Hb >10.0, 12.0 and 13.0 g/dl were 82 ± 6.5, 10 ± 5.6 and 1.8 ± 1.9%, respectively. Weekly EPO dose decreased from 9,500 to 5,600 units, a 40% reduction per dose per patient and costs. The savings exceeded USD 60,000 per year for 35 patients. More than 80% of patients had transferrin saturation >20% and ferritin >200 ng/ml throughout the entire period. Conclusions: Lowering the target Hb range to 9–11 g/dl in HD patients achieved quality anemia management, avoided values >12.0 g/dl and resulted in cost savings. A minimal reduction in quality of life and no change in cardiovascular morbidity or mortality would be expected. The study has important implications in the new American bundled reimbursement model.

  16. Implication of dorsostriatal D3 receptors in motivational processes: a potential target for neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Mathieu; Carcenac, Carole; Drui, Guillaume; Vachez, Yvan; Boulet, Sabrina; Savasta, Marc; Carnicella, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    Beyond classical motor symptoms, motivational and affective deficits are frequently observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD), dramatically impairing the quality of life of patients. Using bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in rats, we have been able to reproduce these neuropsychiatric/non-motor impairments. The present study describes how bilateral 6-OHDA SNc lesions affect the function of the main striatal dopaminergic (DA) receptor subtypes. Autoradiography was used to measure the levels of striatal DA receptors, and operant sucrose self-administration and neuropharmacological approaches were combined to investigate the causal implication of specific DA receptors subtypes in the motivational deficits induced by a dorsostriatal DA denervation. We found that D3 receptors (D3R) exclusively are down-regulated within the dorsal striatum of lesioned rats. We next showed that infusion of a D3R antagonist (SB-277011A) in non-lesioned animals specifically disrupts preparatory, but not consummatory behaviors. Our findings reveal an unexpected involvement of dorsostriatal D3R in motivational processes. They strongly suggest an implication of dorsostriatal D3R in the neuropsychiatric symptoms observed in PD, highlighting this receptor as a potential target for pharmacological treatment. PMID:28134302

  17. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder Gill

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2, histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2, the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2, transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2, tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT, RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11, DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL, and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21. A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS.

  18. Targeting AIDS through information, education, and communications programs: implications for Africa and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W B

    1989-01-01

    IEC campaigns targeted at acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) must seek to achieve the maximum impact within a contest of extremely limited resources. This implies a careful assessment of population groups and behaviors that carry the highest risk. Rather than expending large sums of money on mass media campaigns, the approach should be to target IEC activities at the social networks of those most at risk. This may include, for example, prostitutes, homosexual men, hotel and tourist employees, students, and military personnel. Once epidemiologic studies have identified the at-risk population, volunteers form these groups should be recruited and trained to reach their peers through the networks available to them. This education component of IEC work takes priority. The second step involves information diffusion to health providers who are likely to come into contact with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, especially those who have access to pregnant women and mothers. Some of these providers are not aware of the risks involved in the reuse of immunization needles. The third step--communication with the general public--is aimed at making the population aware of the factors that place people at risk of HIV infection. Radio seems to be the media capable of reaching the greatest numbers, although traditional means of communication should not be neglected. The IEC effort should consider options at the community, institutional, and individual levels and address those factors that enable, reinforce, and predispose appropriate health behaviors.

  19. Kinetin in familial dysautonomia carriers: implications for a new therapeutic strategy targeting mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle; Goldberg, Judith D; Rolnitzky, Linda M; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Voustianiouk, Andrei; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Axelrod, Felicia B

    2009-03-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IkappaB kinase-associated protein gene (IKBKAP) that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction of IkappaB kinase-associated protein/elongator protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1 protein). Kinetin increases IKBKAP mRNA and protein expression in FD cell lines. To determine whether oral kinetin alters IKBKAP splicing in vivo, we administered kinetin to 29 healthy carriers of the major FD mutation for 8 d. Adverse effects, kinetin, and IKBKAP mRNA levels were monitored. In the highest dosing cohorts (23.5 mg/kg/d), the target plasma kinetin level was achieved in 91% of subjects at 2 h. After 8 d, IKBKAP mRNA expression in leukocytes increased as kinetin levels increased. There is a linear association between log plasma kinetin level and corresponding log change from baseline in IKBKAP mRNA expression that allows estimation of IKBKAP mRNA levels because of kinetin ingestion. Adverse effects were transient and mild. This is the first report of in vivo IKBKAP splicing modification and strongly suggests kinetin's therapeutic potential in FD and perhaps in other splicing disorders. Furthermore, our findings support our hypothesis that treatments, which target a particular splicing mutation, can be successfully developed.

  20. Targeting apoptosis pathway with natural terpenoids: implications for treatment of breast and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huanjie; Dou, Q Ping

    2010-06-01

    Terpenoids represent a large and diverse class of naturally occurring compounds found in a variety of fruits, vegetables and medicinal plants. Structurally some of the terpenoids are similar to human hormones. A diet rich in terpenoids is inversely related with the risk of chronic diseases including cancers. Breast and prostate cancers are hormone-related diseases and the second leading cause of female and male cancer mortality. Diterpenoid paclitaxel, and its semi-synthetic analogue docetaxel, have entered clinical use against established breast and prostate cancers. Here we reviewed potential molecular targets and biological properties of natural terpenoids, including monoterpenoids, diterpenoids, triterpenoids and tetraterpenoids, and their applications in treatment of human breast and prostate cancers. These terpenoids are able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce tumor cell death by inhibiting multiple cancer-specific targets including the proteasome, NF-kappaB, and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. The efficacy of these terpenoids against breast or prostate cancer cells, as demonstrated in pre-clinical studies support clinical application of these naturally occurring terpenoids in treatment of hormone-related human cancers.

  1. Molecular Targeting of Proteins by l-Homocysteine: Mechanistic Implications for Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushchenko, Alla V.; Jacobsen, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, complications of pregnancy, cognitive impairment, and osteoporosis. That elevated homocysteine leads to vascular dysfunction may be the linking factor between these apparently unrelated pathologies. Although a growing body of evidence suggests that homocysteine plays a causal role in atherogenesis, specific mechanisms to explain the underlying pathogenesis have remained elusive. This review focuses on chemistry unique to the homocysteine molecule to explain its inherent cytotoxicity. Thus, the high pKa of the sulfhydryl group (pKa, 10.0) of homocysteine underlies its ability to form stable disulfide bonds with protein cysteine residues, and in the process, alters or impairs the function of the protein. Studies in this laboratory have identified albumin, fibronectin, transthyretin, and metallothionein as targets for homocysteinylation. In the case of albumin, the mechanism of targeting has been elucidated. Homocysteinylation of the cysteine residues of fibronectin impairs its ability to bind to fibrin. Homocysteinylation of the cysteine residues of metallothionein disrupts zinc binding by the protein and abrogates inherent superoxide dismutase activity. Thus, S-homocysteinylation of protein cysteine residues may explain mechanistically the cytotoxicity of elevated l-homocysteine. PMID:17760510

  2. A Variety of Aftershock Decays in the Rate- and State-Friction Model Due to the Effect of Secondary Aftershocks: Implications Derived from an Analysis of Real Aftershock Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Takaki

    2016-01-01

    The model based on rate- and state-dependent friction law reproduces the temporal decay of an aftershock sequence with the p value of the Omori-Utsu law equal to 1, if we simply assume a constant stress rate over time. However, because p values vary in real aftershock sequences, this model requires some modification. This study examined the effect of secondary aftershocks on the variety of the p value. A large aftershock causes a stepwise stress increase in the aftershock area, and the expected seismicity rate derived from the friction law also increases abruptly. These multiple increases in the seismicity rate during its decay following a mainshock could cause variation in the apparent p value. In this study, a model incorporating this idea is applied to two aftershock sequences observed in Japan and is shown to substantially modify the modeling of aftershock activity.

  3. Potential implications of the bystander effect on TCP and EUD when considering target volume dose heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael J; Kirkby, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In light of in vitro evidence suggesting that radiation-induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing, there is potential for impact on radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms such as the goal of delivering a uniform dose throughout the clinical target volume (CTV). This work applies a bystander effect model to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) for external beam prostate treatment and compares the results with a more common model where local response is dictated exclusively by local absorbed dose. The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. EUD and TCP of a prostate cancer target volume under conditions of increasing dose heterogeneity were calculated using two models: One incorporating bystander effects derived from previously published in vitro bystander data ( McMahon et al. 2012 , 2013a); and one using a common linear-quadratic (LQ) response that relies exclusively on local absorbed dose. Dose through the CTV was modelled as a normal distribution, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). Also, a representative clinical dose distribution was examined as cold (low dose) sub-volumes were systematically introduced. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity throughout a target volume will yield as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. For a typical intermediate risk prostate prescription of 78 Gy over 39 fractions maxima in EUD and TCP as a function of increasing SD occurred at SD ∼ 5 Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. Small, but potentially significant differences in the outcome metrics between the models were identified in the clinically-derived dose distribution as cold sub-volumes were introduced. In terms of

  4. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  5. Frictional properties of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N; Persson, Bo N J

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force...

  6. The Context for Choice: Health Implications of Targeted Food and Beverage Marketing to African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Sonya A.; Kumanyika, Shiriki K.

    2008-01-01

    Targeted marketing of high-calorie foods and beverages to ethnic minority populations, relative to more healthful foods, may contribute to ethnic disparities in obesity and other diet-related chronic conditions. We conducted a systematic review of studies published in June 1992 through 2006 (n = 20) that permitted comparison of food and beverage marketing to African Americans versus Whites and others. Eight studies reported on product promotions, 11 on retail food outlet locations, and 3 on food prices. Although the evidence base has limitations, studies indicated that African Americans are consistently exposed to food promotion and distribution patterns with relatively greater potential adverse health effects than are Whites. The limited evidence on price disparities was inconclusive. PMID:18633097

  7. Viral Response to Specifically Targeted Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C and the Implications for Treatment Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis L Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV antiviral therapy is characterized by long duration, a multitude of side effects, difficult administration and suboptimal success; clearly, alternatives are needed. Collectively, specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C molecules achieve rapid viral suppression and very high rapid virological response rates, and improve sustained virological response rates. The attrition rate of agents within this class has been high due to various toxicities. Regardless, several STAT-C molecules are poised to become the standard of care for HCV treatment in the foreseeable future. Optimism must be tempered with concerns related to the rapid development of drug resistance with resulting HCV rebound. Strategies including induction dosing with interferon and ribavirin, use of combination high-potency STAT-C molecules and an intensive emphasis on adherence to HCV antiviral therapy will be critical to the success of this promising advance in HCV therapy.

  8. Important biology events and pathways in Brucella infection and implications for novel antibiotic drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangjun; Xu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis caused by Brucella spp. is a common zoonosis in many parts of the world. Humans are infected through contact with infected animals or their dirty products. Many mechanisms are needed for this successful infection, although the mechanisms are still unclear. Host immune response and some signaling molecules play an important role in the infection event. Bacterial pathogens operate by attacking crucial intracellular pathways or some important molecules in each of these pathways for survival in their hosts. The crucial components (molecules) of immunity or pathway play a critical role in the whole process of Brucella infection. Here we summarize the findings of the Brucella-host interactions' immune system and signaling molecular cascades involved in the TLR-initiated immune response to Brucella spp. infection. The paper serves to deepen our understanding of this complex process and to provide some clues regarding the discovery of drug targets for prevention and control.

  9. The context for choice: health implications of targeted food and beverage marketing to African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Sonya A; Kumanyika, Shiriki K

    2008-09-01

    Targeted marketing of high-calorie foods and beverages to ethnic minority populations, relative to more healthful foods, may contribute to ethnic disparities in obesity and other diet-related chronic conditions. We conducted a systematic review of studies published in June 1992 through 2006 (n = 20) that permitted comparison of food and beverage marketing to African Americans versus Whites and others. Eight studies reported on product promotions, 11 on retail food outlet locations, and 3 on food prices. Although the evidence base has limitations, studies indicated that African Americans are consistently exposed to food promotion and distribution patterns with relatively greater potential adverse health effects than are Whites. The limited evidence on price disparities was inconclusive.

  10. TP53 Alterations Correlate with Response to VEGF/VEGFR Inhibitors: Implications for Targeted Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Naing, Aung; Li, Yali; Stephen, Bettzy; Zinner, Ralph; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Karp, Daniel; Falchook, Gerald S; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Anderson, Roosevelt; Ke, Danxia; Miller, Vincent; Yelensky, Roman; Lee, J Jack; Hong, David; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-10-01

    TP53 tumor-suppressor gene mutations are among the most frequent abnormalities in cancer, affecting approximately 40% of patients. Yet, there is no accepted way to target these alterations in the clinic. At the same time, antagonists of VEGFR or its ligand are best-selling oncology drugs, with multiple, expensive compounds approved. Although only a subset of patients benefit from these antiangiogenesis agents, no relevant biomarker has been identified. Interestingly, TP53 mutations upregulate VEGF-A and VEGFR2. We prospectively enrolled 500 patients, to be interrogated by comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) (next-generation sequencing, 236 genes), and to be matched, whenever possible, with targeted agents. Herein, we analyze outcomes based on VEGF/VEGFR inhibitor treatment and presence of TP53 mutations. Of the 500 patients, 188 (37.6%; with ≥1 alteration) were treated; 106 (56% of 188) had tumors that harbored TP53 mutations. VEGF/VEGFR inhibitor therapy was independently associated with improvement in all outcome parameters [rate of stable disease (SD) ≥6 months/partial and complete remission (PR/CR); (31% versus 7%; TP53-mutant patients (who received no other molecular-matched agents) treated with versus without VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors), time-to-treatment failure, and overall survival (multivariate analysis: all P ≤ 0.01)] for the patients harboring TP53-mutant cancers, but improvement was not seen in any of these parameters for patients with TP53 wild-type neoplasms. We conclude that TP53 mutations predict sensitivity to VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors in the clinic. TP53 alterations may therefore be a ready biomarker for treatment with antiangiogenesis agents, a finding of seminal importance across the cancer field. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(10); 2475-85. ©2016 AACR.

  11. ErbB polymorphisms: Insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulay A Alaoui-Jamali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary and to acquired (secondary resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed.

  12. Inverse Faraday Effect driven by Radiation Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Liseykina, T V; Macchi, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of extremely intense ($>10^{23}~\\mbox{W cm}^{-2}$), circularly polarized laser pulses with thick targets, theory and simulations show that a major fraction of the laser energy is converted into incoherent radiation because of collective electron motion during the "hole boring" dynamics. The effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of an axial magnetic field of tens of gigagauss value. This peculiar "inverse Faraday effect" is demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations including radiation friction.

  13. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  14. Bcl-2—Enhanced Efficacy of Microtubule-Targeting Chemotherapy through Bim Overexpression: Implications for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Savry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bcl-2 is commonly overexpressed in tumors, where it is often associated with unfavorable outcome. However, it has also been linked to a favorable sensitivity to microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs. We show that Bcl-2– overexpressing lung and breast cancer cells were more sensitive to both paclitaxel and vinorelbine. Bcl-2 overexpression also significantly potentiated in vivo efficacy of paclitaxel, in terms of tumor volume decrease and survival benefits, in models of nude mice bearing lung cancer xenografts. To further investigate this favorable effect of Bcl-2, a genomic approach was taken. It revealed that Bcl-2 overexpression induced up-regulation of the proapoptotic protein Bim in lung cancer cells and that, conversely, Bcl-2 silencing decreased Bim expression level. A gene regulation study implicated the transcription factor Forkhead box-containing protein, class O3a in Bim up-regulation. Lastly, we show that Bim was responsible for MTA-triggered lung cancer cell death through a dynamin-related protein 1–mediated mitochondrial fragmentation. The Bcl-2–governed Bim induction evidence offers for the first time an explanation for the favorable higher sensitivity to treatment shown by Bcl-2–overexpressing cells. We suggest that Bim could be a powerful predictive factor for tumor response to MTA chemotherapy. Our data also give new insight into some failures in the efficacy of therapies targeted against Bcl-2.

  15. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using μPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer.

  16. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Pickett, Galen T

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  17. Infertile Partnersʼ Coping Strategies Are Interrelated – Implications for Targeted Psychological Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmer, L.; Rösner, S.; Toth, B.; Strowitzki, T.; Wischmann, T.

    2017-01-01

    Background Infertility patients often have high stress levels which, in some cases, represent a risk of developing depression or anxiety. The SCREENIVF questionnaire is a validated tool to evaluate such risks. Some coping strategies have been shown to be correlated with infertile couplesʼ levels of stress. Determining which strategies are correlated with higher levels of risk for depression or anxiety could be useful to offer targeted psychological counseling to reduce the risk of depression or anxiety. Materials and Methods A total of 296 women and men who attended the Fertility Center at Heidelberg University Hospital completed the SCREENIVF questionnaire and the COMPI coping scales. Data were analyzed first on an individual basis and focused on the couple, using the Actor Partner Interdependence Model. Results On an individual level, active avoidance coping was positively correlated with a higher risk of depression or anxiety in women, while meaning-based coping was negatively correlated with risk in men. When the results of couples were viewed together, women and men using active avoidance coping exhibited higher risk scores as individuals (actor effect), as did their partners (partner effect). Women who used meaning-based coping had positive actor and partner effects. Women using active-confronting coping had a negative partner effect (higher risk score for men). Conclusions These findings indicate that some coping strategies may have a protective effect while others may increase the risk of emotional maladjustment in infertile couples. Further analysis of coping strategies could help to identify new counseling approaches for infertile patients.

  18. Global land-use implications of first and second generation biofuel targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlik, Petr, E-mail: havlik.petr@gmail.com [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Forestry Program, Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg (Austria); Schneider, Uwe A. [University of Hamburg, Centre for Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Sustainability and Global Change (FNU) (Germany); Schmid, Erwin [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), Institute of Sustainable Economic Development (Austria); Boettcher, Hannes; Fritz, Steffen [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Forestry Program, Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg (Austria); Skalsky, Rastislav [Soil Science and Conservation Research Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Aoki, Kentaro [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Forestry Program, Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg (Austria); Cara, Stephane De [INRA, UMR 210 Economie Publique INRA-AgroParisTech, Thiverval-Grignon (France); Kindermann, Georg; Kraxner, Florian; Leduc, Sylvain; McCallum, Ian; Mosnier, Aline [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Forestry Program, Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg (Austria); Sauer, Timm [University of Hamburg, Centre for Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Sustainability and Global Change (FNU) (Germany); Obersteiner, Michael [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Forestry Program, Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    Recently, an active debate has emerged around greenhouse gas emissions due to indirect land use change (iLUC) of expanding agricultural areas dedicated to biofuel production. In this paper we provide a detailed analysis of the iLUC effect, and further address the issues of deforestation, irrigation water use, and crop price increases due to expanding biofuel acreage. We use GLOBIOM - an economic partial equilibrium model of the global forest, agriculture, and biomass sectors with a bottom-up representation of agricultural and forestry management practices. The results indicate that second generation biofuel production fed by wood from sustainably managed existing forests would lead to a negative iLUC factor, meaning that overall emissions are 27% lower compared to the 'No biofuel' scenario by 2030. The iLUC factor of first generation biofuels global expansion is generally positive, requiring some 25 years to be paid back by the GHG savings from the substitution of biofuels for conventional fuels. Second generation biofuels perform better also with respect to the other investigated criteria; on the condition that they are not sourced from dedicated plantations directly competing for agricultural land. If so, then efficient first generation systems are preferable. Since no clear technology champion for all situations exists, we would recommend targeting policy instruments directly at the positive and negative effects of biofuel production rather than at the production itself.

  19. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pss; Yallapu, Murali M; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B; Kumar, Santosh

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described.

  20. Genomic portfolio of Merkel cell carcinoma as determined by comprehensive genomic profiling: implications for targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R; Tomson, Brett N; Elkin, Sheryl K; Marchlik, Erica; Carter, Jennifer L; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-04-26

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an ultra-rare cutaneous neuroendocrine cancer for which approved treatment options are lacking. To better understand potential actionability, the genomic landscape of Merkel cell cancers was assessed. The molecular aberrations in 17 patients with Merkel cell carcinoma were, on physician request, tested in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratory (Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, MA) using next-generation sequencing (182 or 236 genes) and analyzed by N-of-One, Inc. (Lexington, MA). There were 30 genes harboring aberrations and 60 distinct molecular alterations identified in this patient population. The most common abnormalities involved the TP53 gene (12/17 [71% of patients]) and the cell cycle pathway (CDKN2A/B, CDKN2C or RB1) (12/17 [71%]). Abnormalities also were observed in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway (AKT2, FBXW7, NF1, PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN or RICTOR) (9/17 [53%]) and DNA repair genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, CHEK2, FANCA or MLH1) (5/17 [29%]). Possible cognate targeted therapies, including FDA-approved drugs, could be identified in most of the patients (16/17 [94%]). In summary, Merkel cell carcinomas were characterized by multiple distinct aberrations that were unique in the majority of analyzed cases. Most patients had theoretically actionable alterations. These results provide a framework for investigating tailored combinations of matched therapies in Merkel cell carcinoma patients.

  1. Tumor Microenvironment Modulation via Gold Nanoparticles Targeting Malicious Exosomes: Implications for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Raposo, Luís R.; Cabral, Rita; Paradinha, Fabiana; Baptista, Pedro V.; Fernandes, Alexandra R.

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles formed in the endosomal pathway with an important role in paracrine and autocrine cell communication. Exosomes secreted by cancer cells, malicious exosomes, have important roles in tumor microenvironment maturation and cancer progression. The knowledge of the role of exosomes in tumorigenesis prompted a new era in cancer diagnostics and therapy, taking advantage of the use of circulating exosomes as tumor biomarkers due to their stability in body fluids and targeting malignant exosomes’ release and/or uptake to inhibit or delay tumor development. In recent years, nanotechnology has paved the way for the development of a plethora of new diagnostic and therapeutic platforms, fostering theranostics. The unique physical and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) make them suitable vehicles to pursuit this goal. AuNPs’ properties such as ease of synthesis with the desired shape and size, high surface:volume ratio, and the possibility of engineering their surface as desired, potentiate AuNPs’ role in nanotheranostics, allowing the use of the same formulation for exosome detection and restraining the effect of malicious exosomes in cancer progression. PMID:28098821

  2. Mitochondria as a target for neuroprotection: implications for Alzheimer´s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Susana; Seiça, Raquel M; Moreira, Paula I

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is marked by progressive loss of memory and impairment of cognitive ability. Despite decades of intensive research and scientific advances, the intricate pathogenic mechanisms of AD are still not fully understood and, consequently, an effective treatment is yet to be developed. As widely accepted, the alterations of mitochondrial function are actively engaged in a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. With growing interest in the mitochondria as a potential target for understanding AD, it has even been hypothesized that deficits in these organelles may be at the heart of the progression of AD itself. Areas covered: The purpose of this review is to summarize relevant studies that suggest a role for mitochondrial (dys)function in AD and to provide a survey on latest developments regarding AD-related mitochondrial therapeutics. Expert commentary: As outlined in a plethora of studies, there is no doubt that mitochondria play a major role in several stages of AD progression. Even though more in-depth studies are needed before pharmaceutical industry can apply such knowledge to human medicine, the continuous advances in AD research field will certainly facilitate and accelerate the development of more effective preventive or therapeutic strategies to fight this devastating disease.

  3. Persistent growth of CO2 emissions and implications for reaching climate targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlingstein, P.; Andrew, R. M.; Rogelj, J.; Peters, G. P.; Canadell, J. G.; Knutti, R.; Luderer, G.; Raupach, M. R.; Schaeffer, M.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Le Quéré, C.

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to limit climate change below a given temperature level require that global emissions of CO2 cumulated over time remain below a limited quota. This quota varies depending on the temperature level, the desired probability of staying below this level and the contributions of other gases. In spite of this restriction, global emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion and cement production have continued to grow by 2.5% per year on average over the past decade. Two thirds of the CO2 emission quota consistent with a 2 °C temperature limit has already been used, and the total quota will likely be exhausted in a further 30 years at the 2014 emissions rates. We show that CO2 emissions track the high end of the latest generation of emissions scenarios, due to lower than anticipated carbon intensity improvements of emerging economies and higher global gross domestic product growth. In the absence of more stringent mitigation, these trends are set to continue and further reduce the remaining quota until the onset of a potential new climate agreement in 2020. Breaking current emission trends in the short term is key to retaining credible climate targets within a rapidly diminishing emission quota.

  4. Regulative change targeting energy performance of buildings in Sweden. Key drivers and main implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglseth, Bente Beckstroem

    2009-02-15

    This report has explored changes in two regulations targeting energy performance of buildings in Sweden, energy requirements and certification of buildings. The objective has been to investigate the effect of the implementation of the EU directive on energy performance of buildings (EPBD) on these two regulations and to what degree the directive can explain the regulative changes. The analytical framework has also included domestic factors; the influence of the national government and the organizational field. The analysis revealed that whereas the EPBD has acted only as facilitator in connection with the changes in energy requirements, it has been the sole driver of some of the changes in Sweden's new certification system. Several of the changes during the period studied can however be traced to the national government and the organizational field. But the EPBD has also worked as a facilitator of the changes promoted by domestic actors. The directive has been used to legitimize radical changes that would have been difficult to implement in other ways. (Author). 40 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Cholera cases cluster in time and space in Matlab, Bangladesh: implications for targeted preventive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debes, Amanda K; Ali, Mohammad; Azman, Andrew S; Yunus, Mohammad; Sack, David A

    2016-12-01

    : Cholera remains a serious public health threat in Asia, Africa and in parts of the Americas. Three World health Organization (WHO) pre-qualified oral cholera vaccines are now available but their supply is limited, so current supplies must be administered strategically. This requires an improved understanding of disease transmission and control strategies. : We used demographics and disease surveillance data collected from 1991 to 2000 in Matlab, Bangladesh, to estimate the spatial and temporal extent of the zone of increased risk around cholera cases. Specifically, we compare the cholera incidence among individuals living close to cholera cases with that among individuals living close to those without medically-attended cholera in this rural endemic setting. : Those living within 50 m of a confirmed cholera case had 36 times (95% confidence interval: 23-56) the risk of becoming a cholera case in the first 3 days (after case presentation) compared with risk elsewhere in the community. The relative risk gradually declined in space and time, but remained significantly high up to 450 me away within 3 days of case presentation, and up to 150 m away within 23 days from the date of presentation of the case. : These findings suggest that, if conducted rapidly, vaccinating individuals living close to a case (ring vaccination) could be an efficient and effective strategy to target vaccine to a high-risk population in an endemic setting.

  6. Tumor Microenvironment Modulation via Gold Nanoparticles Targeting Malicious Exosomes: Implications for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Roma-Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanovesicles formed in the endosomal pathway with an important role in paracrine and autocrine cell communication. Exosomes secreted by cancer cells, malicious exosomes, have important roles in tumor microenvironment maturation and cancer progression. The knowledge of the role of exosomes in tumorigenesis prompted a new era in cancer diagnostics and therapy, taking advantage of the use of circulating exosomes as tumor biomarkers due to their stability in body fluids and targeting malignant exosomes’ release and/or uptake to inhibit or delay tumor development. In recent years, nanotechnology has paved the way for the development of a plethora of new diagnostic and therapeutic platforms, fostering theranostics. The unique physical and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs make them suitable vehicles to pursuit this goal. AuNPs’ properties such as ease of synthesis with the desired shape and size, high surface:volume ratio, and the possibility of engineering their surface as desired, potentiate AuNPs’ role in nanotheranostics, allowing the use of the same formulation for exosome detection and restraining the effect of malicious exosomes in cancer progression.

  7. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  8. Friction and Shear Strength at the Nanowire–Substrate Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW–substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09–0.12 and 0.10–0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134–139 MPa and 78.9–95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW–substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  9. Frictional amyloidosis in Oman - A study of ten cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Macular amyloidosis is an important cause for cutaneous pigmentation, the aetiology of which is poorly understood. Friction has recently been implicated the causation of early lesions, referred to as frictional amyloidosis. Confirmation of diagnosis by the detect on of amyloid using histochemical stains is inconsistent. Ten patients with pigmentation suggestive of macular amyloidosis were studied with detailed history, clinical examination, biopsy for histochemistry and electron microscopy. Nine out of ten patients had a history of prolonged friction with various objects such as bath sponges, brushes, towels, plant sticks and leaves. Amyloid was demonstrated by histochemical staining in only six out of ten cases. In the remaining four cases, amyloid was detected by electron microscopy. These consisted of aggregates of non-branching, extracellular, intertwining fibres measuring between 200-500 nm in length and between 20-25 nm in diameter. The study confirms the role of friction in the causation of this condition. Histochemical stains are not always successful in the detection of amyloid and electron microscopy is helpful for confirming its presence. The term frictional amyloidosis aptly describes the condition.

  10. Kinetic Friction Coefficient of Ice,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    For the hardest ice tested (xi = 0.33 described by Rabinowicz (1965), where To is inter- mm, H, = 1525 kPa), the calculated values of a preted as...material with a low elastic pressures. The frictional force was measured at modulus ( Rabinowicz 1965). It has been observed the application point of...tion 10, pp. 8-16. Barnes, P. and D. Tabor (1966) Plastic flow and Rabinowicz , E. (1965) Friction and Wear of Mate- pressure melting in the deformation

  11. Peak mass and dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A

    1995-01-01

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock \\& Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  12. Tire/runway friction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  13. Labor Supply and Optimization Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Jakob Egholt

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I investigate the nature of optimization frictions by studying the labor market of Danish students. This particular labor market is an interesting case study as it features a range of special institutional settings that affect students’ incentive to earn income and comparing outcomes...... theory. More concretely I find the dominate optimization friction to be individuals’ inattention about their earnings during the year, while real adjustment cost and gradual learning appears to be of less importance....

  14. Attitudinal and demographic determinants of diet quality and implications for policy targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traill, W B; Chambers, S A; Butler, L

    2012-02-01

    Poor diet quality is a major public health concern that has prompted governments to introduce a range of measures to promote healthy eating. For these measures to be effective, they should target segments of the population with messages relevant to their needs, aspirations and circumstances. The present study investigates the extent to which attitudes and constraints influence healthy eating, as well as how these vary by demographic characteristics of the UK population. It further considers how such information may be used in segmented diet and health policy messages. A survey of 250 UK adults elicited information on conformity to dietary guidelines, attitudes towards healthy eating, constraints to healthy eating and demographic characteristics. Ordered logit regressions were estimated to determine the importance of attitudes and constraints in determining how closely respondents follow healthy eating guidelines. Further regressions explored the demographic characteristics associated with the attitudinal and constraint variables. People who attach high importance to their own health and appearance eat more healthily than those who do not. Risk-averse people and those able to resist temptation also eat more healthily. Shortage of time is considered an important barrier to healthy eating, although the cost of a healthy diet is not. These variables are associated with a number of demographic characteristics of the population; for example, young adults are more motivated to eat healthily by concerns over their appearance than their health. The approach employed in the present study could be used to inform future healthy eating campaigns. For example, messages to encourage the young to eat more healthily could focus on the impact of diets on their appearance rather than health. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  15. Mucocutaneous candidiasis: the IL-17 pathway and implications for targeted immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppler, Anna R; Bishu, Shrinivas; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2012-07-23

    IL-17 and related cytokines are direct and indirect targets of selective immunosuppressive agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and other diseases of pathologic inflammation. Insights into the potential adverse effects of IL-17 blockade can be drawn from the experience of patients with deficiencies in the IL-17 pathway. A unifying theme of susceptibility to mucocutaneous candidiasis is seen in both mice and humans with a variety of genetic defects that converge on this pathway. Mucocutaneous candidiasis is a superficial infection of mucosal, nail or skin surfaces usually caused by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. The morbidity of the disease includes significant pain, weight loss and secondary complications, including carcinoma and aneurysms. This review describes the known human diseases associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) as well as the known and proposed connections to IL-17 signaling. The human diseases include defects in IL-17 signaling due to autoantibodies (AIRE deficiency), receptor mutations (IL-17 receptor mutations) or mutations in the cytokine genes (IL17F and IL17A). Hyper-IgE syndrome is characterized by elevated serum IgE, dermatitis and recurrent infections, including CMC due to impaired generation of IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Mutations in STAT1, IL12B and IL12RB1 result in CMC secondary to decreased IL-17 production through different mechanisms. Dectin-1 defects and CARD9 defects result in susceptibility to C. albicans because of impaired host recognition of the pathogen and subsequent impaired generation of IL-17-producing T cells. Thus, recent discoveries of genetic predisposition to CMC have driven the recognition of the role of IL-17 in protection from mucosal fungal infection and should guide counseling and management of patients treated with pharmacologic IL-17 blockade.

  16. The Plasticity of Oncogene Addiction: Implications for Targeted Therapies Directed to Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinochani Pillay

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A common mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an extracellular truncation known as the de2-7 EGFR (or EGFRvIII. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is the ligand for the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK c-Met, and this signaling axis is often active in GBM. The expression of the HGF/c-Met axis or de2-7 EGFR independently enhances GBMgrowth and invasiveness, particularly through the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/pAkt pathway. Using RTK arrays, we show that expression of de2-7 EGFR in U87MG GBM cells leads to the coactivation of several RTKs, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor β and c-Met. A neutralizing antibody to HGF (AMG102 did not inhibit de2-7 EGFR-mediated activation of c-Met, demonstrating that it is ligand-independent. Therapy for parental U87MG xenografts with AMG 102 resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth, whereas U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts were profoundly resistant. Treatment of U87MG.Δ2-7 xenografts with panitumumab, an anti-EGFR antibody, only partially inhibited tumor growth as xenografts rapidly reverted to the HGF/c-Met signaling pathway. Cotreatment with panitumumab and AMG 102 prevented this escape leading to significant tumor inhibition through an apoptotic mechanism, consistent with the induction of oncogenic shock. This observation provides a rationale for using panitumumab and AMG 102 in combination for the treatment of GBM patients. These results illustrate that GBM cells can rapidly change the RTK driving their oncogene addiction if the alternate RTK signals through the same downstream pathway. Consequently, inhibition of a dominant oncogene by targeted therapy can alter the hierarchy of RTKs resulting in rapid therapeutic resistance.

  17. Modeling the Impact of Uganda's Safe Male Circumcision Program: Implications for Age and Regional Targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Kripke

    Full Text Available Uganda aims to provide safe male circumcision (SMC to 80% of men ages 15-49 by 2016. To date, only 2 million men have received SMC of the 4.2 million men required. In response to age and regional trends in SMC uptake, the country sought to re-examine its targets with respect to age and subnational region, to assess the program's progress, and to refine the implementation approach.The Decision Makers' Program Planning Tool, Version 2.0 (DMPPT 2.0, was used in conjunction with incidence projections from the Spectrum/AIDS Impact Module (AIM to conduct this analysis. Population, births, deaths, and HIV incidence and prevalence were used to populate the model. Baseline male circumcision prevalence was derived from the 2011 AIDS Indicator Survey. Uganda can achieve the most immediate impact on HIV incidence by circumcising men ages 20-34. This group will also require the fewest circumcisions for each HIV infection averted. Focusing on men ages 10-19 will offer the greatest impact over a 15-year period, while focusing on men ages 15-34 offers the most cost-effective strategy over the same period. A regional analysis showed little variation in cost-effectiveness of scaling up SMC across eight regions. Scale-up is cost-saving in all regions. There is geographic variability in program progress, highlighting two regions with low baseline rates of circumcision where additional efforts will be needed.Focusing SMC efforts on specific age groups and regions may help to accelerate Uganda's SMC program progress. Policy makers in Uganda have already used model outputs in planning efforts, proposing males ages 10-34 as a priority group for SMC in the 2014 application to the Global Fund's new funding model. As scale-up continues, the country should also consider a greater effort to expand SMC in regions with low MC prevalence.

  18. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li; Ken Mao

    2013-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented us...

  19. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  20. Response to Deep Brain Stimulation in Three Brain Targets with Implications in Mental Disorders: A PET Study in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casquero-Veiga, Marta; Hadar, Ravit; Pascau, Javier; Winter, Christine; Desco, Manuel; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate metabolic changes in brain networks by deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and dorsomedial thalamus (DM) using positron emission tomography (PET) in naïve rats. Methods 43 male Wistar rats underwent stereotactic surgery and concentric bipolar platinum-iridium electrodes were bilaterally implanted into one of the three brain sites. [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-PET (18FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) scans were performed at the 7th (without DBS) and 9th day (with DBS) after surgery. Stimulation period matched tracer uptake period. Images were acquired with a small-animal PET-CT scanner. Differences in glucose uptake between groups were assessed with Statistical Parametric Mapping. Results DBS induced site-specific metabolic changes, although a common increased metabolic activity in the piriform cortex was found for the three brain targets. mPFC-DBS increased metabolic activity in the striatum, temporal and amygdala, and reduced it in the cerebellum, brainstem (BS) and periaqueductal gray matter (PAG). NAcc-DBS increased metabolic activity in the subiculum and olfactory bulb, and decreased it in the BS, PAG, septum and hypothalamus. DM-DBS increased metabolic activity in the striatum, NAcc and thalamus and decreased it in the temporal and cingulate cortex. Conclusions DBS induced significant changes in 18FDG uptake in brain regions associated with the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry. Stimulation of mPFC, NAcc and DM induced different patterns of 18FDG uptake despite interacting with the same circuitries. This may have important implications to DBS research suggesting individualized target selection according to specific neural modulatory requirements. PMID:28033356

  1. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-González, Laura; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; del Campo, Antonio Rubio; Serrano-Oviedo, Leticia; Valero, María Llanos; Esparís-Ogando, Azucena; de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García-Cano, Jesús; Cimas, Francisco José; Hidalgo, María José Ruiz; Prado, Alfonso; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; Nam-Cha, Syong Hyun; Giménez-Bachs, José Miguel; Salinas-Sánchez, Antonio S; Pandiella, Atanasio; del Peso, Luis; Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well as the study of endogenous ERK5 in different experimental systems such as MCF7, HMEC, or Caki-2 cell lines. In fact, the specific knockdown of ERK5 in pVHL-negative cell lines promotes a decrease in proliferation and migration, supporting the role of this MAPK in cellular transformation. Furthermore, in a short series of fresh samples from human clear cell renal cell carcinoma, high levels of ERK5 correlate with more aggressive and metastatic stages of the disease. Therefore, our results provide new biochemical data suggesting that ERK5 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL, opening a new field of research on the role of ERK5 in renal carcinomas. PMID:23730213

  2. ABCC9/SUR2 in the brain: Implications for hippocampal sclerosis of aging and a potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Jicha, Gregory A; Wang, Wang-Xia; Ighodaro, Eseosa; Artiushin, Sergey; Nichols, Colin G; Fardo, David W

    2015-11-01

    The ABCC9 gene and its polypeptide product, SUR2, are increasingly implicated in human neurologic disease, including prevalent diseases of the aged brain. SUR2 proteins are a component of the ATP-sensitive potassium ("KATP") channel, a metabolic sensor for stress and/or hypoxia that has been shown to change in aging. The KATP channel also helps regulate the neurovascular unit. Most brain cell types express SUR2, including neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, vascular smooth muscle, pericytes, and endothelial cells. Thus it is not surprising that ABCC9 gene variants are associated with risk for human brain diseases. For example, Cantu syndrome is a result of ABCC9 mutations; we discuss neurologic manifestations of this genetic syndrome. More common brain disorders linked to ABCC9 gene variants include hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging), sleep disorders, and depression. HS-Aging is a prevalent neurological disease with pathologic features of both neurodegenerative (aberrant TDP-43) and cerebrovascular (arteriolosclerosis) disease. As to potential therapeutic intervention, the human pharmacopeia features both SUR2 agonists and antagonists, so ABCC9/SUR2 may provide a "druggable target", relevant perhaps to both HS-Aging and Alzheimer's disease. We conclude that more work is required to better understand the roles of ABCC9/SUR2 in the human brain during health and disease conditions.

  3. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arias-González

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5, also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well as the study of endogenous ERK5 in different experimental systems such as MCF7, HMEC, or Caki-2 cell lines. In fact, the specific knockdown of ERK5 in pVHL-negative cell lines promotes a decrease in proliferation and migration, supporting the role of this MAPK in cellular transformation. Furthermore, in a short series of fresh samples from human clear cell renal cell carcinoma, high levels of ERK5 correlate with more aggressive and metastatic stages of the disease. Therefore, our results provide new biochemical data suggesting that ERK5 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL, opening a new field of research on the role of ERK5 in renal carcinomas.

  4. Genes implicated in stem cell identity and temporal programme are directly targeted by Notch in neuroblast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharioudaki, Evanthia; Housden, Benjamin E; Garinis, George; Stojnic, Robert; Delidakis, Christos; Bray, Sarah J

    2016-01-15

    Notch signalling is involved in a multitude of developmental decisions and its aberrant activation is linked to many diseases, including cancers. One example is the neural stem cell tumours that arise from constitutive Notch activity in Drosophila neuroblasts. To investigate how hyperactivation of Notch in larval neuroblasts leads to tumours, we combined results from profiling the upregulated mRNAs and mapping the regions bound by the core Notch pathway transcription factor Su(H). This identified 246 putative direct Notch targets. These genes were highly enriched for transcription factors and overlapped significantly with a previously identified regulatory programme dependent on the proneural transcription factor Asense. Included were genes associated with the neuroblast maintenance and self-renewal programme that we validated as Notch regulated in vivo. Another group were the so-called temporal transcription factors, which have been implicated in neuroblast maturation. Normally expressed in specific time windows, several temporal transcription factors were ectopically expressed in the stem cell tumours, suggesting that Notch had reprogrammed their normal temporal regulation. Indeed, the Notch-induced hyperplasia was reduced by mutations affecting two of the temporal factors, which, conversely, were sufficient to induce mild hyperplasia on their own. Altogether, the results suggest that Notch induces neuroblast tumours by directly promoting the expression of genes that contribute to stem cell identity and by reprogramming the expression of factors that could regulate maturity.

  5. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  6. Smallest Archimedean Screw: Facet Dynamics and Friction in Multiwalled Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Roberto; Leven, Itai; Vanossi, Andrea; Hod, Oded; Tosatti, Erio

    2017-08-28

    We identify a new material phenomenon, where minute mechanical manipulations induce pronounced global structural reconfigurations in faceted multiwalled nanotubes. This behavior has strong implications on the tribological properties of these systems and may be the key to understand the enhanced interwall friction recently measured for boron-nitride nanotubes with respect to their carbon counterparts. Notably, the fast rotation of helical facets in these systems upon coaxial sliding may serve as a nanoscale Archimedean screw for directional transport of physisorbed molecules.

  7. Concerted dihedral rotations give rise to internal friction in unfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Ignacia; Makarov, Dmitrii E; Papoian, Garegin A

    2014-06-18

    Protein chains undergo conformational diffusion during folding and dynamics, experiencing both thermal kicks and viscous drag. Recent experiments have shown that the corresponding friction can be separated into wet friction, which is determined by the solvent viscosity, and dry friction, where frictional effects arise due to the interactions within the protein chain. Despite important advances, the molecular origins underlying dry friction in proteins have remained unclear. To address this problem, we studied the dynamics of the unfolded cold-shock protein at different solvent viscosities and denaturant concentrations. Using extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations we estimated the internal friction time scales and found them to agree well with the corresponding experimental measurements (Soranno et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2012, 109, 17800-17806). Analysis of the reconfiguration dynamics of the unfolded chain further revealed that hops in the dihedral space provide the dominant mechanism of internal friction. Furthermore, the increased number of concerted dihedral moves at physiological conditions suggest that, in such conditions, the concerted motions result in higher frictional forces. These findings have important implications for understanding the folding kinetics of proteins as well as the dynamics of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  8. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum electromagnetic fluctuations, which break time-reversal symmetry. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Partly because of the lack of contact with observations, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here, we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  9. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, K A; Brevik, I

    2015-01-01

    For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum fluctuations. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Because of the lack of contact with phenomena, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  10. The microphysics of phyllosilicate friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Sabine A. M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-04-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts most of the experimentally observed trends in frictional behaviour and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  11. Low temperature friction force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunckle, Christopher Gregory

    The application of friction force techniques within atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for direct measurements of friction forces at a sliding, single-asperity interface. The temperature dependence of such single-asperity contacts provides key insight into the comparative importance of dissipative mechanisms that result in dry sliding friction. A variable temperature (VT), ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) AFM was used with an interface consisting of a diamond coated AFM tip and diamond-like carbon sample in a nominal sample temperature range of 90 to 275K. The results show that the coefficient of kinetic friction, mu k, has a linear dependence that is monotonically increasing with temperature varying from 0.28 to 0.38. To analyze this data it is necessary to correlate the sample temperature to the interface temperature. A detailed thermal model shows that the sample temperature measured by a macroscopic device can be very different from the temperature at the contact point. Temperature gradients intrinsic to the design of VT, UHV AFMs result in extreme, non-equilibrium conditions with heat fluxes on the order of gigawatts per squared meter through the interface, which produce a discontinuous step in the temperature profile due to thermal boundary impedance. The conclusion from this model is that measurements acquired by VT, UHV AFM, including those presented in this thesis, do not provide meaningful data on the temperature dependence of friction for single-asperities. Plans for future work developing an isothermal AFM capable of the same measurements without the introduction of temperature gradients are described. The experimental results and thermal analysis described in this thesis have been published in the Journal of Applied Physics, "Temperature dependence of single-asperity friction for a diamond on diamondlike carbon interface", J. App. Phys., 107(11):114903, 2010.

  12. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2006-03-31

    reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is possible as current investigations continue.

  13. Design of new frictional testing machine for shallow fault materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadai, O.; Tanikawa, W.; Hirose, T.; Sakaguchi, M.; Lin, W.

    2009-12-01

    Subduction thrust faults at shallow depth mainly consist of granular and clay-rich materials which strengths are influenced by the presence of pore water. Dilatation and pore pressure generation of fault zones by the dynamic friction will increase the volumetric water content in fault zone, which can assist the fault weakening by acoustic fluidization or hydrodynamic lubrication mechanism. Therefore the evaluation of rheology for clay minerals rich in pore water is critical for understanding of seismic behaviors at shallow depth. Here, we introduce a new testing apparatus for the purpose of accurate evaluation of friction behavior for incohesive fault rock materials. Our machine can shear granular materials up to 80 mm of outer diameter and maximum thickness of 40 mm. The capacities of axial load, torque, and motor are 100kN, 500Nm and 30kW, respectively, and pore pressure is increased up to 50 MPa. Maximum rotation speed is 660 rpm, which is equivalent to 1 m/s of the average slip velocity when sample diameter is 60 mm. We can monitor the dynamic changes of pore pressure and temperature at sliding surface during the friction tests. We can also control the pore pressure, axial load, pore pressure and temperature independently. All parameters can be held at targeted values and be generated at constant incremental velocity. We can control the rotation more sensitively to program the complicated rotation history that slip velocity and acceleration change during the rotation. We used powdered smectite and illite in our friction tests. We measured normal stress dependence on shear stress at normal stress up to 25 MPa with a constant rotation speed from 0.01 to 1 rpm. Normal stress is proportional to shear stress for dry clay minerals, and the friction coefficients are from 0.3 to 0.5. On the other hand, very low friction is observed in clay minerals saturated by water, and shear strength is nearly constant at various normal stresses. Our results suggest that clay

  14. Superior control of HIV-1 replication by CD8+ T cells targeting conserved epitopes: implications for HIV vaccine design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratima Kunwar

    Full Text Available A successful HIV vaccine will likely induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, however, the enormous diversity of HIV has hampered the development of a vaccine that effectively elicits both arms of the adaptive immune response. To tackle the problem of viral diversity, T cell-based vaccine approaches have focused on two main strategies (i increasing the breadth of vaccine-induced responses or (ii increasing vaccine-induced responses targeting only conserved regions of the virus. The relative extent to which set-point viremia is impacted by epitope-conservation of CD8(+ T cell responses elicited during early HIV-infection is unknown but has important implications for vaccine design. To address this question, we comprehensively mapped HIV-1 CD8(+ T cell epitope-specificities in 23 ART-naïve individuals during early infection and computed their conservation score (CS by three different methods (prevalence, entropy and conseq on clade-B and group-M sequence alignments. The majority of CD8(+ T cell responses were directed against variable epitopes (p<0.01. Interestingly, increasing breadth of CD8(+ T cell responses specifically recognizing conserved epitopes was associated with lower set-point viremia (r = - 0.65, p = 0.009. Moreover, subjects possessing CD8(+ T cells recognizing at least one conserved epitope had 1.4 log10 lower set-point viremia compared to those recognizing only variable epitopes (p = 0.021. The association between viral control and the breadth of conserved CD8(+ T cell responses may be influenced by the method of CS definition and sequences used to determine conservation levels. Strikingly, targeting variable versus conserved epitopes was independent of HLA type (p = 0.215. The associations with viral control were independent of functional avidity of CD8(+ T cell responses elicited during early infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the next-generation of T-cell based HIV-1 vaccines should focus

  15. SURFACE DYNAMIC FRICTION OF POLYMER GELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.P.Gong; G.Kagata; Y.Iwasaki; Y.Osada

    2000-01-01

    The sliding friction of various kinds of hydrogels has been studied and it was found that the frictional behaviors of the hydrogels do not conform to Amonton's law F =μW which well describes the friction of solids. The frictional force and its dependence on the load are quite different depending on the chemical structures of the gels, surface properties of the opposing substrates, and the measurement condition. The gel friction is explained in terms of interfacial interaction, either attractive or repulsive, between the polymer chain and the solid surface. According to this model, the friction is ascribed to the viscous flow of solvent at the interface in the repulsive case. In the attractive case, the force to detach the adsorbing chain from the substrate appears as friction. The surface adhesion between glass particles and gels measured by AFM showed a good correlation with the friction, which supported the repulsion-adsorption model proposed by the authors.

  16. The Friction of Saline Ice on Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wallen-Russell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction of ice on other materials controls loading on offshore structures and vessels in the Arctic. However, ice friction is complicated, because ice in nature exists near to its melting point. Frictional heating can cause local softening and perhaps melting and lubrication, thus affecting the friction and creating a feedback loop. Ice friction is therefore likely to depend on sliding speed and sliding history, as well as bulk temperature. The roughness of the sliding materials may also affect the friction. Here we present results of a series of laboratory experiments, sliding saline ice on aluminium, and controlling for roughness and temperature. We find that the friction of saline ice on aluminium μice-al=0.1 typically, but that this value varies with sliding conditions. We propose physical models which explain the variations in sliding friction.

  17. Targeted mutagenesis of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases VA and VB implicates both enzymes in ammonia detoxification and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gul N; Rubbelke, Timothy S; Hendin, Joshua; Nguyen, Hien; Waheed, Abdul; Shoemaker, James D; Sly, William S

    2013-04-30

    Prior studies with carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors implicated mitochondrial CA in ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. Subsequent studies identified two mitochondrial CAs. To distinguish the contribution of each enzyme, we studied the effects of targeted disruption of the murine CA genes, called Car5A and Car5B. The Car5A mutation had several deleterious consequences. Car5A null mice were smaller than wild-type littermates and bred poorly. However, on sodium-potassium citrate-supplemented water, they produced offspring in expected numbers. Their blood ammonia concentrations were markedly elevated, but their fasting blood sugars were normal. By contrast, Car5B null mice showed normal growth and normal blood ammonia levels. They too had normal fasting blood sugars. Car5A/B double-knockout (DKO) mice showed additional abnormalities. Impaired growth was more severe than for Car5A null mice. Hyperammonemia was even greater as well. Although fertile, DKO animals were produced in less-than-predicted numbers even when supplemented with sodium-potassium citrate in their drinking water. Survival after weaning was also reduced, especially for males. In addition, fasting blood glucose levels for DKO mice were significantly lower than for controls (153 ± 33 vs. 230 ± 24 mg/dL). The enhanced hyperammonemia and lower fasting blood sugar, which are both seen in the DKO mice, indicate that both Car5A and Car5B contribute to both ammonia detoxification (ureagenesis) and regulation of fasting blood sugar (gluconeogenesis). Car5A, which is expressed mainly in liver, clearly has the predominant role in ammonia detoxification. The contribution of Car5B to ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis was evident only on a Car5A null background.

  18. Characterisation of a K390R ITK Kinase Dead Transgenic Mouse – Implications for ITK as a Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Angela; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Steve; Harrison, Steve; Latcham, Judi; Fulleylove, Mick; Fung, Sylvia; Smith, Jason; Pedrick, Mike; McKevitt, Tom; Felton, Leigh; Morley, Joanne; Quint, Diana; Fattah, Dilniya; Hayes, Brian; Gough, Jade; Solari, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-2 inducible tyrosine kinase (ITK) is expressed in T cells and plays a critical role in signalling through the T cell receptor. Evidence, mainly from knockout mice, has suggested that ITK plays a particularly important function in Th2 cells and this has prompted significant efforts to discover ITK inhibitors for the treatment of allergic disease. However, ITK is known to have functions outside of its kinase domain and in general kinase knockouts are often not good models for the behaviour of small molecule inhibitors. Consequently we have developed a transgenic mouse where the wild type Itk allele has been replaced by a kinase dead Itk allele containing an inactivating K390R point mutation (Itk-KD mice). We have characterised the immune phenotype of these naive mice and their responses to airway inflammation. Unlike Itk knockout (Itk−/−) mice, T-cells from Itk-KD mice can polymerise actin in response to CD3 activation. The lymph nodes from Itk-KD mice showed more prominent germinal centres than wild type mice and serum antibody levels were significantly abnormal. Unlike the Itk−/−, γδ T cells in the spleens of the Itk-KD mice had an impaired ability to secrete Th2 cytokines in response to anti-CD3 stimulation whilst the expression of ICOS was not significantly different to wild type. However ICOS expression is markedly increased on αβCD3+ cells from the spleens of naïve Itk-KD compared to WT mice. The Itk-KD mice were largely protected from inflammatory symptoms in an Ovalbumin model of airway inflammation. Consequently, our studies have revealed many similarities but some differences between Itk−/−and Itk-KD transgenic mice. The abnormal antibody response and enhanced ICOS expression on CD3+ cells has implications for the consideration of ITK as a therapeutic target. PMID:25250764

  19. Characterisation of a K390R ITK kinase dead transgenic mouse--implications for ITK as a therapeutic target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Deakin

    Full Text Available Interleukin-2 inducible tyrosine kinase (ITK is expressed in T cells and plays a critical role in signalling through the T cell receptor. Evidence, mainly from knockout mice, has suggested that ITK plays a particularly important function in Th2 cells and this has prompted significant efforts to discover ITK inhibitors for the treatment of allergic disease. However, ITK is known to have functions outside of its kinase domain and in general kinase knockouts are often not good models for the behaviour of small molecule inhibitors. Consequently we have developed a transgenic mouse where the wild type Itk allele has been replaced by a kinase dead Itk allele containing an inactivating K390R point mutation (Itk-KD mice. We have characterised the immune phenotype of these naive mice and their responses to airway inflammation. Unlike Itk knockout (Itk-/- mice, T-cells from Itk-KD mice can polymerise actin in response to CD3 activation. The lymph nodes from Itk-KD mice showed more prominent germinal centres than wild type mice and serum antibody levels were significantly abnormal. Unlike the Itk-/-, γδ T cells in the spleens of the Itk-KD mice had an impaired ability to secrete Th2 cytokines in response to anti-CD3 stimulation whilst the expression of ICOS was not significantly different to wild type. However ICOS expression is markedly increased on αβCD3+ cells from the spleens of naïve Itk-KD compared to WT mice. The Itk-KD mice were largely protected from inflammatory symptoms in an Ovalbumin model of airway inflammation. Consequently, our studies have revealed many similarities but some differences between Itk-/-and Itk-KD transgenic mice. The abnormal antibody response and enhanced ICOS expression on CD3+ cells has implications for the consideration of ITK as a therapeutic target.

  20. Characterisation of a K390R ITK kinase dead transgenic mouse--implications for ITK as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Angela; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Steve; Harrison, Steve; Latcham, Judi; Fulleylove, Mick; Fung, Sylvia; Smith, Jason; Pedrick, Mike; McKevitt, Tom; Felton, Leigh; Morley, Joanne; Quint, Diana; Fattah, Dilniya; Hayes, Brian; Gough, Jade; Solari, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-2 inducible tyrosine kinase (ITK) is expressed in T cells and plays a critical role in signalling through the T cell receptor. Evidence, mainly from knockout mice, has suggested that ITK plays a particularly important function in Th2 cells and this has prompted significant efforts to discover ITK inhibitors for the treatment of allergic disease. However, ITK is known to have functions outside of its kinase domain and in general kinase knockouts are often not good models for the behaviour of small molecule inhibitors. Consequently we have developed a transgenic mouse where the wild type Itk allele has been replaced by a kinase dead Itk allele containing an inactivating K390R point mutation (Itk-KD mice). We have characterised the immune phenotype of these naive mice and their responses to airway inflammation. Unlike Itk knockout (Itk-/-) mice, T-cells from Itk-KD mice can polymerise actin in response to CD3 activation. The lymph nodes from Itk-KD mice showed more prominent germinal centres than wild type mice and serum antibody levels were significantly abnormal. Unlike the Itk-/-, γδ T cells in the spleens of the Itk-KD mice had an impaired ability to secrete Th2 cytokines in response to anti-CD3 stimulation whilst the expression of ICOS was not significantly different to wild type. However ICOS expression is markedly increased on αβCD3+ cells from the spleens of naïve Itk-KD compared to WT mice. The Itk-KD mice were largely protected from inflammatory symptoms in an Ovalbumin model of airway inflammation. Consequently, our studies have revealed many similarities but some differences between Itk-/-and Itk-KD transgenic mice. The abnormal antibody response and enhanced ICOS expression on CD3+ cells has implications for the consideration of ITK as a therapeutic target.

  1. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...

  2. Frictional heating of tribological contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Johannes

    1995-01-01

    Wherever friction occurs, mechanical energy is transformed into heat. The tem­ perature rise associated with this heating can have an important influence on the tribological behaviour of the contacting components. Apart from determining per­ formance, thermal phenomena affect reliability and may cau

  3. Friction Sensitivity of Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan none tetrazene 407913 tetrazene 7902454 The mixes which were tested are: NOL 130 (basic lead styphnate , barium nitrate, lead...azide, tetrazene, and antimony sulfide); PA 100 (normal lead styphnate , barium nitrate, tetrazene, lead dioxide, calcium silicide, and antimony...styuhnate, basic lead styphnate , potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan, and tetrazene were tested to determine the- 10% and 50% probability of friction

  4. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  5. Rotary Engine Friction Test Rig Development Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    5  4.  Friction Rig Development 7  5.  AutoCAD ...Figure 4. Engine friction test rig AutoCAD model. ........................................................................8  Figure 5. Engine...top dead center. 8 5. AutoCAD Model Development A model of the rotary engine friction test rig was developed to determine the optimal

  6. Asbestos free friction composition for brake linings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Ganguly; Raji George

    2008-02-01

    An asbestos free friction material composite for brake linings is synthesized containing fibrous reinforcing constituents, friction imparting and controlling additives, elastomeric additives, fire retarding components and a thermosetting resin. The composite shows exemplary friction characteristics and has great resistance to wear and shows good temperature stability.

  7. Multiscale friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Felder, Eric; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The most often used friction model for sheet metal forming simulations is the relative simple Coulomb friction model. This paper presents a more advanced friction model for large scale forming simulations based on the surface change on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when

  8. A thermodynamic model of sliding friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Makkonen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A first principles thermodynamic model of sliding friction is derived. The model predictions are in agreement with the observed friction laws both in macro- and nanoscale. When applied to calculating the friction coefficient the model provides a quantitative agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements on a number of materials.

  9. Analysis of the moment caused by friction of cardan joint. Cardan joint no friction kishinryoku kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Yagi, Shida, T. (Atsugi Unisia Corp., Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    Analyzing the vibromotive force, generated by the friction, in generation morphology, level, dynamical characteristics, etc., through measurement of joint unit friction simulation of frictional vibromotive force and on-platform measurement of propeller shaft in vibromotive force, the present report investigated the influence of friction on the vehicle in sound vibration performance. By a vibromotive force measurement system, internally equipped with a piezoelectric type force meter, frictional vibromotive force could be quantitatively grasped. The friction must be appropriately controlled, because the moment, generated by it, is expected to be put in the vehicle by intermediation of a supporting point and adversely influence the sound vibration performance. Apart from the above, elucidation was made of relation between the ordinal number components of rotation of vibromotive force and friction, calculation of reaction force at the supporting point by the frictional measurement, relation between the joint angle and frictional vibromotive force, second couple force due to the friction, etc. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  10. The Wilms' tumor antigen is a novel target for human CD4+ regulatory T cells: implications for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehe, Cynthia; Ghebeh, Hazem; Al-Sulaiman, Abdullah; Al Qudaihi, Ghofran; Al-Hussein, Khaled; Almohareb, Fahad; Chaudhri, Naeem; Alsharif, Fahad; Al-Zahrani, Hazza; Tbakhi, Abdelghani; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Dermime, Said

    2008-08-01

    Compelling evidences indicate a key role for regulatory T cells (T(reg)) on the host response to cancer. The Wilms' tumor antigen (WT1) is overexpressed in several human leukemias and thus considered as promising target for development of leukemia vaccine. However, recent studies indicated that the generation of effective WT1-specific cytotoxic T cells can be largely affected by the presence of T(regs). We have generated T-cell lines and clones that specifically recognized a WT1-84 (RYFKLSHLQMHSRKH) peptide in an HLA-DRB1*0402-restricted manner. Importantly, they recognized HLA-DRB1*04-matched fresh leukemic cells expressing the WT1 antigen. These clones exerted a T helper 2 cytokine profile, had a CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)GITR(+)CD127(-) T(reg) phenotype, and significantly inhibited the proliferative activity of allogeneic T cells independently of cell contact. Priming of alloreactive T cells in the presence of T(regs) strongly inhibited the expansion of natural killer (NK), NK T, and CD8(+) T cells and had an inhibitory effect on NK/NK T cytotoxic activity but not on CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, priming of T cells with the WT1-126 HLA-A0201-restricted peptide in the presence of T(regs) strongly inhibited the induction of anti-WT1-126 CD8(+) CTL responses as evidenced by both very low cytotoxic activity and IFN-gamma production. Moreover, these T(reg) clones specifically produced granzyme B and selectively induced apoptosis in WT1-84-pulsed autologous antigen-presenting cells but not in apoptotic-resistant DR4-matched leukemic cells. Importantly, we have also detected anti-WT1-84 interleukin-5(+)/granzyme B(+)/Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T(regs) in five of eight HLA-DR4(+) acute myeloid leukemia patients. Collectively, our in vitro and in vivo findings strongly suggest important implications for the clinical manipulation of T(regs) in cancer patients.

  11. High temperature skin friction measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheng, Ping; Holmes, Harlan K.; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Skin friction measurement in the NASA Langley hypersonic propulsion facility is described. The sensor configuration utilized an existing balance, modified to provide thermal isolation and an increased standoff distance. For test run times of about 20 sec and ambient-air cooling of the test section and balance, the modified balance performed satisfactorily, even when it was subjected to acoustic and structural vibration. The balance is an inertially balanced closed-loop servo system where the current to a moving-coil motor needed to restore or null the output from the position sensor is a measure of the force or skin friction tending to displace the moving element. The accuracy of the sensor is directly affected by the position sensor in the feedback loop, in this case a linear-variable differential transformer which has proven to be influenced by temperature gradients.

  12. Thermodynamic aspects of rock friction

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsui, Noa

    2013-01-01

    Rate- and state-dependent friction law for velocity-step tests is analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A simple macroscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic model with a single internal variable reproduces instantaneous jump and relaxation. Velocity weakening appears as a consequence of a plasticity related nonlinear coefficient. Permanent part of displacement corresponds to plastic strain, and relaxation effects are analogous to creep in thermodynamic rheology.

  13. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  14. Friction characteristics of floppy disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This note presents the principle and structure of a tribological measure for floppy disks.The precision of the force measuring system is 1 mN in loading and 3×10-6 N in friction.The resolution of the film thickness between head and floppy disk is 0.5 nm in the vertical and 1.5 nm in the horizontal direction.In order to investigate the tribological characteristics of floppy disks,six types of floppy disks have been tested and the floating properties of these disks are also studied with film measuring system.The experimental results of the surface morphology and friction coefficient of these floppy disks using the atomic force microscope/friction force mcroscope (AFM/FFM) are in accordance with the conclusion made by our own measuring system.The experimental results show that the air film thickness between head and disk is of the same order as the surface roughness of floppy disks.

  15. Friction Induced Wear of Rapid Prototyping Generated Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tsouknidas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing has been introduced in the early 80s and has gained importance as a manufacturing process ever since. Even though the inception of the implicated processes predominantly focused on prototyping purposes, during the last years rapid prototyping (RP has emerged as a key enabling technology for the fabrication of highly customized, functionally gradient materials. This paper reviews friction-related wear phenomena and the corresponding deterioration mechanisms of RP-generated components as well as the potential of improving the implicated materials' wear resistance without significantly altering the process itself. The paper briefly introduces the concept of RP technologies and the implicated materials, as a premises to the process-dependent wear progression of the generated components for various degeneration scenarios (dry sliding, fretting, etc..

  16. Locked into Copenhagen pledges - Implications of short-term emission targets for the cost and feasibility of long-term climate goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riahi, Keywan; Kriegler, Elmar; Johnson, Nils; Bertram, Christoph; den Elzen, Michel; Eom, Jiyong; Schaeffer, Michiel; Edmonds, James A.; Isaac, Morna; Krey, Volker; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Mejean, Aurelie; McCollum, David; Mima, Silvana; Turton, Hal; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wada, Kenichi; Bosetti, Valentina; Capros, Pantelis; Criqui, Patrick; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kainuma, M.; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the AMPERE intermodeling comparison with focus on the implications of near-term policies for the costs and attainability of long-term climate objectives. Ten modeling teams participated in the project to explore the consequences of global emissions following the proposed policy stringency of the national pledges from the Copenhagen Accord and Cancún Agreements to 2030. Specific features compared to earlier assessments are the explicit consideration of near-term 2030 emissions targets as well as the systematic sensitivity analysis for the availability and potential of mitigation technologies. Our estimates show that a 2030 mitigation effort comparable to the pledges would result in a further "lock-in" of the energy system into fossil fuels and thus impede the required energy transformation to reach low greenhouse-gas stabilization levels (450ppm CO2e). Major implications include significant increases in mitigation costs, increased risk that low stabilization targets become unattainable, and reduced chances of staying below the proposed temperature change target of 2C. With respect to technologies, we find that following the pledge pathways to 2030 would narrow policy choices, and increases the risks that some currently optional technologies, such as nuclear or carbon capture and storage (CCS), will become "a must" by 2030.

  17. HARP targets pion production cross section and yield measurements. Implications for MiniBooNE neutrino flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickremasinghe, Don Athula Abeyarathna [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The prediction of the muon neutrino flux from a 71.0 cm long beryllium target for the MiniBooNE experiment is based on a measured pion production cross section which was taken from a short beryllium target (2.0 cm thick - 5% nuclear interaction length) in the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment at CERN. To verify the extrapolation to our longer target, HARP also measured the pion production from 20.0 cm and 40.0 cm beryllium targets. The measured production yields, d2Nπ± (p; θ )=dpd Ω, on targets of 50% and 100% nuclear interaction lengths in the kinematic rage of momentum from 0.75 GeV/c to 6.5 GeV/c and the range of angle from 30 mrad to 210 mrad are presented along with an update of the short target cross sections. The best fitted extended Sanford-Wang (SW) model parameterization for updated short beryllium target π+ production cross section is presented. Yield measurements for all three targets are also compared with that from the Monte Carlo predictions in the MiniBooNE experiment for different SW parameterization. The comparisons of vμ flux predictions for updated SW model is presented.

  18. Friction and Wear in Timing Belt Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Timing belt tooth goes into contact with a drive pulley, stretched to the maximum, because of the previous tension. When the contact begins the peak of the belt tooth makes the contact with the outer surface of the pulley teeth. The process of the teeth entering into the contact zone is accompanied with the relative sliding of their side surfaces and appropriate friction force. The normal force value is changing with the parabolic function, which also leads to the changes of the friction force. The biggest value of the normal force and of the friction force is at the tooth root. Hollow between teeth and the tip of the pulley teeth are also in contact. Occasionally, the face surface of the belt and the flange are also in contact. The friction occurs in those tribomechanical systems, also. Values of these friction forces are lower compared with the friction force, which occurs at the teeth root.

  19. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  20. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  1. Friction tensor concept for textured surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Y Simha; Anirudhan Pottirayil; Pradeep L Menezes; Satish V Kailas

    2008-06-01

    Directionality of grinding marks influences the coefficient of friction during sliding. Depending on the sliding direction the coefficient of friction varies between maximum and minimum for textured surfaces. For random surfaces without any texture the friction coefficient becomes independent of the sliding direction. This paper proposes the concept of a friction tensor analogous to the heat conduction tensor in anisotropic media. This implies that there exists two principal friction coefficients $\\mu_{1,2}$ analogous to the principal conductivities $k_{1,2}$. For symmetrically textured surfaces the principal directions are orthogonal with atleast one plane of symmetry. However, in the case of polished single crystalline solids in relative sliding motion, crystallographic texture controls the friction tensor.

  2. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mofidi, M; Prakash, B [Division of Machine Elements, Luleaa University of Technology, Luleaa SE-97187 (Sweden); Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Albohr, O [Pirelli Deutschland AG, 64733 Hoechst/Odenwald, Postfach 1120 (Germany)

    2008-02-27

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  3. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  4. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi, M.; Prakash, B.; Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.

    2008-02-01

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  5. Modelling cohesive, frictional and viscoplastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehossein, Habib; Qin, Zongyi

    2016-06-01

    Most materials in mining and civil engineering construction are not only viscoplastic, but also cohesive frictional. Fresh concrete, fly ash and mining slurries are all granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids, although solid concrete is normally considered as a cohesive frictional material. Presented here is both a formulation of the pipe and disc flow rates as a function of pressure and pressure gradient and the CFD application to fresh concrete flow in L-Box tests.

  6. The role of friction in orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Ribeiro Pacheco; Wellington Corrêa Jansen; Dauro Douglas de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sliding mechanics is widely used during orthodontic treatment. One of the disadvantages of this mechanics is the friction generated at the bracket/archwire interface, which may reduce the amount of desired orthodontic movement obtained. Due to the application and great acceptance of this type of mechanics, the role of friction in Orthodontics has been of interest for both clinicians and scientists. OBJECTIVE: Therefore, this article discussed how friction affects orthodontic too...

  7. Optimal targeting of HER2-PI3K signaling in breast cancer: mechanistic insights and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexer, Brent N; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-07-01

    The combination of a PI3K inhibitor with trastuzumab has been shown to be effective at overcoming trastuzumab resistance in models of HER2(+) breast cancer by inhibiting HER2-PI3K-FOXO-survivin signaling. In this review the potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. How to teach friction: Experiments and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Borghi, Lidia; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    Students generally have difficulty understanding friction and its associated phenomena. High school and introductory college-level physics courses usually do not give the topic the attention it deserves. We have designed a sequence for teaching about friction between solids based on a didactic reconstruction of the relevant physics, as well as research findings about student conceptions. The sequence begins with demonstrations that illustrate different types of friction. Experiments are subsequently performed to motivate students to obtain quantitative relations in the form of phenomenological laws. To help students understand the mechanisms producing friction, models illustrating the processes taking place on the surface of bodies in contact are proposed.

  9. Noise and vibration in friction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sergienko, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The book analyzes the basic problems of oscillation processes and theoretical aspects of noise and vibration in friction systems. It presents generalized information available in literature data and results of the authors in vibroacoustics of friction joints, including car brakes and transmissions. The authors consider the main approaches to abatement of noise and vibration in non-stationary friction processes. Special attention is paid to materials science aspects, in particular to advanced composite materials used to improve the vibroacoustic characteristics of tribopairs The book is intended for researchers and technicians, students and post-graduates specializing in mechanical engineering, maintenance of machines and transport means, production certification, problems of friction and vibroacoustics.

  10. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented using finite element method. Nonlinear finite element model for gear tooth contact with rolling/sliding is then developed. The contact zones for multiple tooth pairs are identified and the associated integration situation is derived. The illustrated bending stress and transmission error results with static and dynamic boundary conditions indicate the significant effects due to the sliding friction between the surfaces of contacted gear teeth, and the friction effect can not be ignored. To understand the particular static and dynamic frictional effects on gear tooth contact analysis, some significant phenomena of gained results will also be discussed. The potentially significant contribution of tooth frictional shear stress is presented, particularly in the case of gear tooth contact analysis with both static and dynamic boundary conditions.

  11. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  12. An Assessment of Database-Validated microRNA Target Genes in Normal Colonic Mucosa: Implications for Pathway Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E

    2017-01-01

    Determination of functional pathways regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs), while an essential step in developing therapeutics, is challenging. Some miRNAs have been studied extensively; others have limited information. In this study, we focus on 254 miRNAs previously identified as being associated with colorectal cancer and their database-identified validated target genes. We use RNA-Seq data to evaluate messenger RNA (mRNA) expression for 157 subjects who also had miRNA expression data. In the replication phase of the study, we replicated associations between 254 miRNAs associated with colorectal cancer and mRNA expression of database-identified target genes in normal colonic mucosa. In the discovery phase of the study, we evaluated expression of 18 miR-NAs (those with 20 or fewer database-identified target genes along with miR-21-5p, miR-215-5p, and miR-124-3p which have more than 500 database-identified target genes) with expression of 17 434 mRNAs to identify new targets in colon tissue. Seed region matches between miRNA and newly identified targeted mRNA were used to help determine direct miRNA-mRNA associations. From the replication of the 121 miRNAs that had at least 1 database-identified target gene using mRNA expression methods, 97.9% were expressed in normal colonic mucosa. Of the 8622 target miRNA-mRNA associations identified in the database, 2658 (30.2%) were associated with gene expression in normal colonic mucosa after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Of the 133 miRNAs with database-identified target genes by non-mRNA expression methods, 97.2% were expressed in normal colonic mucosa. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, 2416 miRNA-mRNA associations remained significant (19.8%). Results from the discovery phase based on detailed examination of 18 miRNAs identified more than 80 000 miRNA-mRNA associations that had not previously linked to the miRNA. Of these miRNA-mRNA associations, 15.6% and 14.8% had seed matches for CRCh38 and CRCh37

  13. Fitness cost implications of PhiC31-mediated site-specific integrations in target-site strains of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, José S; Díaz-Fleischer, Francisco; Sánchez-Velásquez, Lázaro R; Zepeda-Cisneros, Cristina Silvia; Handler, Alfred M; Schetelig, Marc F

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific recombination technologies are powerful new tools for the manipulation of genomic DNA in insects that can improve transgenesis strategies such as targeting transgene insertions, allowing transgene cassette exchange and DNA mobilization for transgene stabilization. However, understanding the fitness cost implications of these manipulations for transgenic strain applications is critical. In this study independent piggyBac-mediated attP target-sites marked with DsRed were created in several genomic positions in the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens. Two of these strains, one having an autosomal (attP_F7) and the other a Y-linked (attP_2-M6y) integration, exhibited fitness parameters (dynamic demography and sexual competitiveness) similar to wild type flies. These strains were thus selected for targeted insertion using, for the first time in mexfly, the phiC31-integrase recombination system to insert an additional EGFP-marked transgene to determine its effect on host strain fitness. Fitness tests showed that the integration event in the int_2-M6y recombinant strain had no significant effect, while the int_F7 recombinant strain exhibited significantly lower fitness relative to the original attP_F7 target-site host strain. These results indicate that while targeted transgene integrations can be achieved without an additional fitness cost, at some genomic positions insertion of additional DNA into a previously integrated transgene can have a significant negative effect. Thus, for targeted transgene insertions fitness costs must be evaluated both previous to and subsequent to new site-specific insertions in the target-site strain.

  14. Job Heterogeneity and Coordination Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Daniel

    the job ladder, how the identification of assortative matching is fundamentally different in directed and undirected search models, how our theory accounts for business cycle facts related to inter-temporal changes in job offer distributions, and how our model could also be used to identify......We develop a new directed search model of a frictional labor market with a continuum of heterogenous workers and firms. We estimate two versions of the model - auction and price posting - using Danish data on wages and productivities. Assuming heterogenous workers with no comparative advantage, we...

  15. Friction of Plastic Rotating Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    for speeds eve ., the rdnge: 10 - 300 cm/s. Overwhelming evidence was presented to support a melt phenomena. Melt depth of: polymer, pins on a glass disk...Polymers," Proc. Roy. Soc., (London),. A291 (1966), p. 186. 24. Rabinowicz , S., et al., "The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on the Shear Yield Behavior of...34 Proc. Roy.,Soc., (London), A269. (19620 p. 368. 51. Carignan, F. J., and Rabinowicz , E., "Friction and Wear at ligh Sliding Speeds," ASLE Trans., 24

  16. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  17. Geochemistry of impact glasses and target rocks from the Zhamanshin impact structure, Kazakhstan: Implications for mixing of target and impactor matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonášová, Šárka; Ackerman, Lukáš; Žák, Karel; Skála, Roman; Ďurišová, Jana; Deutsch, Alexander; Magna, Tomáš

    2016-10-01

    Internal structure and element chemistry including contents of highly siderophile elements (HSE) and Os isotope ratios have been studied in target rocks and several groups of impact glasses of the Zhamanshin impact structure, Kazakhstan. These include larger irregularly-shaped fragments and blocks of impact glass (zhamanshinites), and three types of tektite-like splash-form glasses, part of fallback ejecta. These glassy objects typically are up to 30 mm large and are shaped as teardrops, irregularly bent and curved glass rods and fibers. They can be subdivided into acidic types (irghizites; typically 69-76 wt.% SiO2), basic splash-forms (typically 53-56 wt.% SiO2), and rarely occurring highly inhomogeneous composites with abundant mineral inclusions. A comparison with the target rocks shows that zhamanshinites and basic splash-forms usually have no detectable admixture of the projectile matter, indicated by major and trace elements as well as highly siderophile element contents, with the exception of one sample containing Fe-, Cr-, Ni- and Ti-enriched particles and elevated HSE contents. In contrast, irghizites exhibit clear admixture of the projectile matter, which was incorporated by complex processes accompanied by strong element fractionations. Microscopic investigations confirm that irghizites were formed mainly by coalescence of smaller molten glass droplets sized typically below 1 mm. Irghizites exhibit significant enrichments in Ni, Co and Cr, whose concentrations are locally elevated in the rims of the original small droplets. A portion of these elements and also part of Fe and Mn and other elements were derived from the impactor, most likely a Ni-rich carbonaceous chondrite. The contents of HSE are low and strongly fractionated, with moderate depletions of Pt and Pd and strong depletions of other HSE with respect to chondritic element ratios. Osmium shows the strongest depletion, likely related to the presence of oxygen in the post-impact atmosphere

  18. Financial Stability, Target Inflation as a Monetary Rule and Concepts of Money Policy: Implications for the Optimal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Brahmi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, basing on offensive lecturing research articles of famous authors on financial instability and monetary policy, we propose as aim of this paper to discuss the controversial rule vs. discretion in monetary policy and the new institutional framework of inflation targeting as a remedy for inflationary pressures after the cause of the intermediate target of monetary anchors and exchange rate policy, since the year 70's of the last Century. To do this, we treated a literature review in the field, assigning the work of various economists thus handling of monetary policy favors the discretion/rule to the new inflation target strategy in 90's and 2000. We put particular emphasis on the second step of this paper on the possibility of inflation targeting as an anti-inflationary objective defended for its main defendants.

  19. Biomechanical analysis of the circular friction hand massage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jeseong; Son, Jongsang; Ahn, Soonjae; Shin, Isu; Kim, Youngho

    2015-01-01

    A massage can be beneficial to relieve muscle tension on the neck and shoulder area. Various massage systems have been developed, but their motions are not uniform throughout different body parts nor specifically targeted to the neck and shoulder areas. Pressure pattern and finger movement trajectories of the circular friction hand massage on trapezius, levator scapulae, and deltoid muscles were determined to develop a massage system that can mimic the motion and the pressure of the circular friction massage. During the massage, finger movement trajectories were measured using a 3D motion capture system, and finger pressures were simultaneously obtained using a grip pressure sensor. Results showed that each muscle had different finger movement trajectory and pressure pattern. The trapezius muscle experienced a higher pressure, longer massage time (duration of pressurization), and larger pressure-time integral than the other muscles. These results could be useful to design a better massage system simulating human finger movements.

  20. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuan; Burns, Janine A.; Carol A Cheney; Zhang, Ningyan; Vitelli, Salvatore; Wang, Fubao; Bett, Andrew; Chastain, Michael; Audoly, Laurent P.; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effective therapeutic approach in oncology. In considering Notch-1 receptor as a potential target, we performed immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to determine 1) whether the receptor is overexpressed in tumor cells as compared to their corresponding normal tissues and 2) the clinical significance of its expression levels in human breast, colorectal, lung and prosta...

  1. ERK5/BMK1 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL: Implication in clear cell renal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arias-González, Laura; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; del Campo, Antonio Rubio; Leticia, Serrano-Oviedo; Valero, María Llanos; Esparís-Ogando, Azucena; de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García-Cano, Jesús; Cimas, Francisco José; Hidalgo, María José Ruiz; Prado, Alfonso; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; Nam-Cha, Syong Hyun; Giménez-Bachs, José Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well a...

  2. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma12

    OpenAIRE

    Arias-González, Laura; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; del Campo, Antonio Rubio; Serrano-Oviedo, Leticia; Valero, María Llanos; Esparís-Ogando, Azucena; de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García-Cano, Jesús; Cimas, Francisco José; Hidalgo, María José Ruiz; Prado, Alfonso; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; Nam-Cha, Syong Hyun; Giménez-Bachs, José Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well a...

  3. Comparison of Frictional Heating Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Nicholas R [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

  4. MHC-I Ligand Discovery Using Targeted Database Searches of Mass Spectrometry Data: Implications for T-Cell Immunotherapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, J. Patrick; Konda, Prathyusha; Kowalewski, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    we offer a solution to this problem whereby we developed a targeted database search approach and accompanying tool SpectMHC, that is based on a priori-predicted MHC-I peptides. We first validated the approach using MS data from two different allotype-specific immunoprecipitates for the C57BL/6 mouse...... background. We then developed allotype-specific HLA databases to search previously published MS data sets of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This targeted search strategy improved peptide identifications for both mouse and human ligandomes by greater than 2-fold and is superior...... to traditional “no enzyme” searches of reference proteomes. Our targeted database search promises to uncover otherwise missed novel T-cell epitopes of therapeutic potential....

  5. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of…

  6. On the Blasius correlation for friction factors

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Khanh Tuoc

    2010-01-01

    The Blasius empirical correlation for turbulent pipe friction factors is derived from first principles and extended to non-Newtonian power law fluids. Two alternative formulations are obtained that both correlate well with the experimental measurements of Dodge, Bogue and Yoo. Key words: Blasius, turbulent friction factor, power law fluids

  7. FACTORS INFLUENCING FRICTION OF PHOSPHATE COATINGS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    surface roughness, crystalline structure , and velocity. The coefficients of friction for manganese phosphate coatings did not differ to any practical...The coefficient of friction was independent of the applied load. Velocity during dynamic testing, surface finish, and crystalline structure influenced

  8. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  9. The Gulf Stream: Inertia and friction

    OpenAIRE

    ASSAF, GAD

    2011-01-01

    The inertial theory of the Gulf Stream (Charney, 1955) is extended to include vertical friction in the cyclonic shear zone (the western side) of the stream. The vertical friction is assumed to be controlled by local Froude conditions.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1977.tb00717.x

  10. Graphite friction coefficient for various conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The friction coefficient the graphite used in the Tsinghua University 10MW High Tem-perature Gas-Cooled Reactor was analyzed for various conditions. The variation of the graphitefriction coefficient was measured for various sliding velocities, sliding distances, normal loads, en-vironments and temperatures. A scanning elector microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the fric-tion surfaces.

  11. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  12. EGFR and HER2 expression in primary cervical cancers and corresponding lymph node metastases: Implications for targeted radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhengyan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins overexpressed on the surface of tumor cells can be selectively targeted. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 are among the most often targeted proteins. The level and stability of expression in both primary tumors and corresponding metastases is crucial in the assessment of a receptor as target for imaging in nuclear medicine and for various forms of therapy. So far, the expression of EGFR and HER2 has only been determined in primary cervical cancers, and we have not found published data regarding the receptor status in corresponding metastatic lesions. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether any of these receptors are suitable as target for clinical diagnosis and therapy. Methods Expression of EGFR and HER2 was investigated immunohistochemically in both lymph node metastases and corresponding primary cervical cancers (n = 53. HER2 and EGFR expression was scored using HercepTest criteria (0, 1+, 2+ or 3+. Results EGFR overexpression (2+ or 3+ was found in 64% (35/53 of the primary cervical tumors and 60% (32/53 of the corresponding lymph node metastases. There was a good concordance between the primary tumors and the paired metastases regarding EGFR expression. Only four patients who had 2+ or 3+ in the primary tumors changed to 0 or 1+ in lymph node metastases, and another two cases changed the other way around. None of the primary tumors or the lymph node metastases expressed HER2 protein. Conclusion The EGFR expression seems to be common and stable during cervical cancer metastasis, which is encouraging for testing of EGFR targeted radiotherapy. HER2 appears to be of poor interest as a potential target in the treatment of cervical cancer.

  13. Trial manufacture of rotary friction tester and frictional force measurement of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Kanari, M; Tanzawa, S

    2002-01-01

    In the plasma confinement type fusion reactor, in-vessel structures such as a blanket module slide at the joints each other when plasma disruption occurs, and then frictional heat is generated there. Therefore, for the selection of material and the use as the design data, it is important to understand the frictional characteristics of metals and ceramic films in the vacuum. In the present study, we have manufactured a prototype of rotary friction tester and examined the performances of the tester. The frictional characteristics of metals in the room air was measured using the friction tester, and the results obtained are as follows. A drifting friction force for a constant time and a friction force during the idling were 98 mN and 225 mN, respectively. These values were sufficiently small as compared to pressing load (9.8 - 57.8 N) used in the friction test. In a friction force measurement of stainless steel, dynamic friction force obeyed Amontons' law which indicated that dynamic friction force is not depend...

  14. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional...... cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant...... shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity....

  15. Effects of target fragmentation on evaluation of LET spectra from space radiations: implications for space radiation protection studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badavi, F. F.; Badhwar, G. D.

    1996-01-01

    We present calculations of linear energy transfer (LET) spectra in low earth orbit from galactic cosmic rays and trapped protons using the HZETRN/BRYNTRN computer code. The emphasis of our calculations is on the analysis of the effects of secondary nuclei produced through target fragmentation in the spacecraft shield or detectors. Recent improvements in the HZETRN/BRYNTRN radiation transport computer code are described. Calculations show that at large values of LET (> 100 keV/micrometer) the LET spectra seen in free space and low earth orbit (LEO) are dominated by target fragments and not the primary nuclei. Although the evaluation of microdosimetric spectra is not considered here, calculations of LET spectra support that the large lineal energy (y) events are dominated by the target fragments. Finally, we discuss the situation for interplanetary exposures to galactic cosmic rays and show that current radiation transport codes predict that in the region of high LET values the LET spectra at significant shield depths (> 10 g/cm2 of Al) is greatly modified by target fragments. These results suggest that studies of track structure and biological response of space radiation should place emphasis on short tracks of medium charge fragments produced in the human body by high energy protons and neutrons.

  16. Expression of HIF-1α and Its Target Genes in the Nanorana parkeri Heart:Implications for High Altitude Adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiong ZHANG; Xingzhi HAN; Yinzi YE; Robert H S KRAUS; Liqing FAN; Le YANG; Yi TAO

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and its target genes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transferrins (TF) play an important role in native endothermic animals’ adaptation to the high altitude environments. For ectothermic animals – especially frogs – it remains undetermined whether HIF-1α and its target genes (VEGF and TF) play an important role in high altitude adaptation, too. In this study, we compared the gene sequences and expression of HIF-1α and its target genes (VEGF and TF) between three Nanorana parkeri populations from different altitudes (3008 m a.s.l., 3440 m a.s.l. and 4312 m a.s.l.). We observed that the cDNA sequences of HIF-1A exhibited high sequence similarity (99.38%) among the three altitudinally separated populations; but with increasing altitude, the expression of HIF-1A and its target genes (VEGF and TF) increased significantly. These results indicate that HIF-1αplays an important role in N. parkeri adaptation to the high altitude, similar to its role in endothermic animals.

  17. FRICTION-BOON OR BANE IN ORTHODONTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Most fixed appliance techniques involve some degree of sliding between brackets and arch wires. A sound knowledge of the various factors affecting the magnitude of friction is of paramount importance to the clinician. The present study was performed to evaluate and compare the frictional resistance and characteristics between self-ligating brackets and pre-adjusted edgewise brackets with different types of ligation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tidy's frictional test design was used to simulate retraction of tooth along with artificial saliva to simulate wet conditions in oral cavity. The jig with this assembly was mounted on the Instron machine with the cross head moving upwards at a speed of 5mm/min. The movable bracket was suspended from the load cell of the testing machine, while the jig was mounted on cross head of machine and the load cell readings were recorded on digital display. Following wires are used 0.016 HANT, 0.019X 0.025HANT, 0.019X 0.025 SS, 0.021X 0.025 SS wires are used. The brackets used were 0.022 slot Damon, 0.022 Smart clip and 0.022 slot MBT system. RESULTS: Self ligating brackets were shown to produce lesser friction when compared to the conventional brackets used with modules, and stainless steel ligatures. Damon self-ligating brackets produce a least friction of all the brackets used in the study. Stainless steel ligatures produced the least friction compared to elastomeric. CONCLUSION: Self ligation brackets produce lesser friction than the conventional brackets ligated with elastomeric modules and stainless steel ligature. Damon self-ligating brackets produce a least friction of all the brackets used in the study width of the bracket was also found to be directly proportional to the friction produced 0.0016HANT with elastomeric modules produce more friction due increase in flexibility of wire.

  18. Spectroscopic signatures of quantum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Juliane; Bennett, Robert; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a formula for the spectroscopically accessible level shifts and decay rates of an atom moving at an arbitrary angle relative to a surface. Our Markov formulation leads to an intuitive analytic description whereby the shifts and rates are obtained from the coefficients of the Heisenberg equation of motion for the atomic flip operators but with complex Doppler-shifted (velocity-dependent) transition frequencies. Our results conclusively demonstrate that for the limiting case of parallel motion the shifts and rates are quadratic or higher in the atomic velocity. We show that a stronger, linear velocity dependence is exhibited by the rates and shifts for perpendicular motion, thus opening the prospect of experimentally probing the Markovian approach to the phenomenon of quantum friction.

  19. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  20. Mapping Instabilities in Polymer Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Charles; Crosby, Alfred

    2005-03-01

    Schallamach waves are instabilities that occur as interfaces between a soft elastomer and rigid surface slide past each other.(1) The presence of Schallamach waves can lead to drastic changes in frictional properties. Although the occurrence of Schallamach waves has been studied for the past several decades, a general map relating fundamental material properties, geometry, and operating conditions (i.e. speed and temperature) has not been established. Using a combinatorial approach, we illustrate the role of modulus, testing velocity and surface energetics of crosslinked poly(dimethyl siloxane) on the generation Schallamach waves. This knowledge will be used with polymer patterning processes to fabricate responsive coatings for applications such as anti-fouling coatings. (1)Schallamach, A.;Wear 1971,17, 301-312.

  1. Dynamical Friction on extended perturbers

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2008-01-01

    Following a wave-mechanical treatment we calculate the drag force exerted by an infinite homogeneous background of stars on a perturber as this makes its way through the system. We recover Chandrasekhar's classical dynamical friction (DF) law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. We take into account a range of models that encompasses all plausible density distributions for satellite galaxies by considering the DF exerted on a Plummer sphere and a perturber having a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

  2. Magnetic properties of friction stir processed composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-03-29

    There are many existing inspection systems each with their own advantages and drawbacks. These usually comprise of semi-remote sensors which frequently causes difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites. Through this route, embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and can be periodically interrogated by a reading device. The “reinforcement rich” processed areas can then be utilized to record properties like strain, temperature, stress state etc. depending on the reinforcement material. In this work, friction stir processing (FSP) was utilized to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum (Al) matrix. It targets to develop a composite that produces strain in a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were observed to be distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). A simple and cheap setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and ways to improve the magnetic properties discussed.

  3. Substrate profiling of human vaccinia-related kinases identifies coilin, a Cajal body nuclear protein, as a phosphorylation target with neurological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-García, Marta; Vázquez-Cedeira, Marta; Kellerman, Efrat; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Lazo, Pedro A

    2011-12-21

    Protein phosphorylation by kinases plays a central role in the regulation and coordination of multiple biological processes. In general, knowledge on kinase specificity is restricted to substrates identified in the context of specific cellular responses, but kinases are likely to have multiple additional substrates and be integrated in signaling networks that might be spatially and temporally different, and in which protein complexes and subcellular localization can play an important role. In this report the substrate specificity of atypical human vaccinia-related kinases (VRK1 and VRK2) using a human peptide-array containing 1080 sequences phosphorylated in known signaling pathways has been studied. The two kinases identify a subset of potential peptide targets, all of them result in a consensus sequence composed of at least four basic residues in peptide targets. Linear peptide arrays are therefore a useful approach in the characterization of kinases and substrate identification, which can contribute to delineate the signaling network in which VRK proteins participate. One of these target proteins is coilin; a basic protein located in nuclear Cajal bodies. Coilin is phosphorylated in Ser184 by both VRK1 and VRK2. Coilin colocalizes and interacts with VRK1 in Cajal bodies, but not with the mutant VRK1 (R358X). VRK1 (R358X) is less active than VRK1. Altered regulation of coilin might be implicated in several neurological diseases such as ataxias and spinal muscular atrophies.

  4. MHC-I Ligand Discovery Using Targeted Database Searches of Mass Spectrometry Data: Implications for T-Cell Immunotherapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, J. Patrick; Konda, Prathyusha; Kowalewski, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    we offer a solution to this problem whereby we developed a targeted database search approach and accompanying tool SpectMHC, that is based on a priori-predicted MHC-I peptides. We first validated the approach using MS data from two different allotype-specific immunoprecipitates for the C57BL/6 mouse......-I peptides, wherein MS spectra are compared against a reference proteome. Unfortunately, matching these spectra to reference proteome databases is hindered by inflated search spaces attributed to a lack of enzyme restriction in the searches, limiting the efficiency with which MHC ligands are discovered. Here...... background. We then developed allotype-specific HLA databases to search previously published MS data sets of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This targeted search strategy improved peptide identifications for both mouse and human ligandomes by greater than 2-fold and is superior...

  5. Clinical Implications of the 2013 ESH/ESC Hypertension Guidelines: Targets, Choice of Therapy, and Blood Pressure Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.; Aksnes, Tonje A.; Ruilope, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension included simplified blood pressure (BP) targets across patient groups, more balanced discussion on monotherapy vs. combination therapy, as well as reconfirmation of the importance of out-of-office BP measurements. In light of these updates, we wished to review some issues raised and take a fresh look at the role of calcium channel blocker (CCB) therapy; a...

  6. Targeting multiple pathogenic mechanisms with polyphenols for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease-experimental approach and therapeutic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Jun eWang; Weina eBi; Alice eCheng; Daniel eFreire; Prashant eVempati; Wei eZhao; Bing eGong; Elsa eJanle; Tzu-Ying eChen; Mario eFerruzzi; James eSchmeidler; Lap eHo; Giulio Maria Pasinetti

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease of aging and currently has no cure. Its onset and progression are influenced by multiple factors. There is growing consensus that successful treatment will rely on simultaneously targeting multiple pathological features of AD. Polyphenol compounds have many proven health benefits. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that combining three polyphenolic preparations (grape seed extract, resveratrol and Concord grape ju...

  7. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan Li; Burns, Janine A.; Carol A Cheney; et al

    2010-01-01

    Yuan Li1, Janine A Burns1, Carol A Cheney1, Ningyan Zhang1, Salvatore Vitelli1, Fubao Wang1, Andrew Bett2, Michael Chastain2, Laurent P Audoly1, Zhi-Qiang Zhang1,31Department of Biologics Research, 2Department of Vaccine Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA, USA; 3Clinical Development Laboratory, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ, USAAbstract: Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effecti...

  8. RIP4 is a target of multiple signal transduction pathways in keratinocytes: Implications for epidermal differentiation and cutaneous wound repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Stephanie [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Institute of Physiology, Arnimallee 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Munz, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.munz@charite.de [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Institute of Physiology, Arnimallee 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    Receptor interacting protein 4 (RIP4) is an important regulator of epidermal morphogenesis during embryonic development. We could previously show that expression of the rip4 gene is strongly downregulated in cutaneous wound repair, which might be initiated by a broad variety of growth factors and cytokines. Here, we demonstrate that in keratinocytes, rip4 expression is controlled by a multitude of different signal transduction pathways, such as the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) cascade, in a unique and specific manner. Furthermore, we show that the steroid dexamethasone abolishes the physiological rip4 downregulation after injury and might thus contribute to the phenotype of reduced and delayed wound reepithelialization seen in glucocorticoid-treated patients. As a whole, our data indicate that rip4 expression is regulated in a complex manner, which might have therapeutic implications.

  9. Recurrence pattern of squamous cell carcinoma in the midthoracic esophagus: implications for the clinical target volume design of postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Wang,1,2,* Yijun Luo,1,2,* Minghuan Li,2 Hongjiang Yan,2 Mingping Sun,2 Tingyong Fan2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, Jinan University-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Postoperative radiotherapy has shown positive efficacy in lowering the recurrence rate and improving the survival rate for patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. However, controversies still exist about the postoperative prophylactic radiation target volume. This study was designed to analyze the patterns of recurrence and to provide a reference for determination of the postoperative radiotherapy target volume for patients with midthoracic ESCC.Patients and methods: A total of 338 patients with recurrent or metastatic midthoracic ESCC after radical surgery were retrospectively examined. The patterns of recurrence including locoregional and distant metastasis were analyzed for these patients.Results: The rates of lymph node (LN metastasis were 28.4% supraclavicular, 77.2% upper mediastinal, 32.0% middle mediastinal, 50.0% lower mediastinal, and 19.5% abdominal LNs. In subgroup analyses, the rate of abdominal LN metastasis was significantly higher in patients with histological node-positive than that in patients with histological node-negative (P=0.033. Further analysis in patients with histological node-positive demonstrated that patients with three or more positive nodes are more prone to abdominal LN metastasis, compared with patients with one or two positive nodes (χ2=4.367, P=0.037. The length of tumor and histological differentiation were also the high-risk factors for abdominal LN metastasis.Conclusion: For midthoracic ESCC with histological node-negative, or one or two positive nodes, the supraclavicular and

  10. Temperature dependent effective friction coefficient estimation in friction stir welding with the bobbin tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction coefficient in many friction stir welding researches is generally used as an effective, constant value without concern on the adaptable and changeable nature of the friction during welding sequence. This is understandable because the main problem in analyzing friction in friction stir welding are complex nature of the friction processes, case-dependent and time dependent contact between the bodies, influence of the temperature, sliding velocity, etc. This paper is presenting a complex experimental-numerical-analytical model for estimating the effective friction coefficient on contact of the bobbin tool and welding plates during welding, considering the temperature at the contact as the most influencing parameter on friction. The estimation criterion is the correspondence of the experimental temperature and temperature from the numerical model. The estimation procedure is iterative and parametric - the heat transport parameters and friction coefficient are adapted during the estimation procedure in a realistic manner to achieve relative difference between experimental and model’s temperature lower than 3%. The results show that friction coefficient varies from 0.01 to 0.21 for steel-aluminium alloy contact and temperature range from 406°C to 22°C.

  11. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is quite possible.

  12. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is quite possible.

  13. Thermal activation in boundary lubricated friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, P.C. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rabinowicz, E. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Iwasa, Y. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The friction coefficients for copper pairs lubricated with fatty acids and fluorinated fatty acids have been measured over a wide range of sliding speeds and temperatures. Sliding speeds in the range 10{sup -7}-10{sup -2} m s{sup -1} and temperatures in the range 4.2-300 K were used. The friction coefficients near 300 K are generally low and increase with sliding speed, while the friction coefficients at low temperatures are markedly higher and relatively independent of velocity. Each lubricant`s friction vs. velocity behavior over the temperature range 150-300 K can be described by a friction-velocity master curve derived from a thermal activation model for the lubricant`s shear strength. The activation energies deduced from this friction model are identical to those obtained in the same temperature range for a vibrational mode associated with low temperature mechanical relaxations in similarly structured polymers. These results suggest that thermally activated interfacial shear is responsible for the fatty acids` positive-sloped friction vs. velocity characteristics at low sliding speeds near room temperature. (orig.)

  14. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading.

  15. Assessment of semi-active friction dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Braga; Coelho, Humberto Tronconi; Lepore Neto, Francisco Paulo; Mafhoud, Jarir

    2017-09-01

    The use of friction dampers has been widely proposed for a variety of mechanical systems for which applying viscoelastic materials, fluid based dampers or other viscous dampers is impossible. An important example is the application of friction dampers in aircraft engines to reduce the blades' vibration amplitudes. In most cases, friction dampers have been studied in a passive manner, but significant improvements can be achieved by controlling the normal force in the contact region. The aim of this paper is to present and study five control strategies for friction dampers based on three different hysteresis cycles by using the Harmonic Balance Method (HBM), a numerical and experimental analysis. The first control strategy uses the friction force as a resistance when the system is deviating from its equilibrium position. The second control strategy maximizes the energy removal in each harmonic oscillation cycle by calculating the optimal normal force based on the last displacement peak. The third control strategy combines the first strategy with the homogenous modulation of the friction force. Finally, the last two strategies attempt to predict the system's movement based on its velocity and acceleration and our knowledge of its physical properties. Numerical and experimental studies are performed with these five strategies, which define the performance metrics. The experimental testing rig is fully identified and its parameters are used for numerical simulations. The obtained results show the satisfactory performance of the friction damper and selected strategy and the suitable agreement between the numerical and experimental results.

  16. A cytotoxic anti-IL-3Rα antibody targets key cells and cytokines implicated in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, Shereen; Huynh, Huy; Tai, Tsin Yee; Ng, Milica; Monaghan, Katherine; Biondo, Mark; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Nash, Andrew D.; Wicks, Ian P.; Wilson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    To date, the major target of biologic therapeutics in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been the B cell, which produces pathogenic autoantibodies. Recently, targeting type I IFN, which is elaborated by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in response to endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation by SLE immune complexes, has shown promising results. pDCs express high levels of the IL-3Rα chain (CD123), suggesting an alternative potential targeting strategy. We have developed an anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody, CSL362, and show here that it affects key cell types and cytokines that contribute to SLE. CSL362 potently depletes pDCs via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, markedly reducing TLR7, TLR9, and SLE serum-induced IFN-α production and IFN-α-upregulated gene expression. The antibody also inhibits TLR7- and TLR9-induced plasmablast expansion by reducing IFN-α and IL-6 production. These effects are more pronounced than with IFN-α blockade alone, possibly because pDC depletion reduces production of other IFN subtypes, such as type III, as well as non-IFN proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. In addition, CSL362 depletes basophils and inhibits IL-3 signaling. These effects were confirmed in cells derived from a heterogeneous population of SLE donors, various IFN-dependent autoimmune diseases, and healthy controls. We also demonstrate in vivo activity of CSL362 following its s.c. administration to cynomolgus monkeys. This spectrum of effects provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic evaluation of CSL362 in SLE. PMID:27699260

  17. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Li1, Janine A Burns1, Carol A Cheney1, Ningyan Zhang1, Salvatore Vitelli1, Fubao Wang1, Andrew Bett2, Michael Chastain2, Laurent P Audoly1, Zhi-Qiang Zhang1,31Department of Biologics Research, 2Department of Vaccine Research, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA, USA; 3Clinical Development Laboratory, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ, USAAbstract: Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effective therapeutic approach in oncology. In considering Notch-1 receptor as a potential target, we performed immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to determine 1 whether the receptor is overexpressed in tumor cells as compared to their corresponding normal tissues and 2 the clinical significance of its expression levels in human breast, colorectal, lung and prostate cancers. We found that the expression of Notch-1 protein was overexpressed in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, but not in primary ductal breast carcinoma or prostate adenocarcinoma. Further analysis revealed that higher levels of Notch-1 protein expression were significantly associated with poorer differentiation of breast and prostate tumors. Strikingly, for NSCLC, the expression levels of Notch-1 protein were found to be inversely correlated with tumor differentiation and progression. For colorectal tumors, however, no correlation of Notch-1 protein expression was found with any tumor clinicopathological parameters, in spite of its overexpression in tumor cells. Our data demonstrated the complexity of Notch-1 protein expression in human solid tumors and further supported the notion that the roles of Notch-1 expression in tumorigenesis are highly context-dependent. The findings could provide the basis for development of distinct therapeutic strategies of Notch-1 mAbs for its applications in the treatment of suitable types of human cancers.Keywords: Notch

  18. Clinical implications of the 2013 ESH/ESC hypertension guidelines: targets, choice of therapy, and blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Aksnes, Tonje A; Ruilope, Luis M

    2014-06-01

    The European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension included simplified blood pressure (BP) targets across patient groups, more balanced discussion on monotherapy vs. combination therapy, as well as reconfirmation of the importance of out-of-office BP measurements. In light of these updates, we wished to review some issues raised and take a fresh look at the role of calcium channel blocker (CCB) therapy; an established antihypertensive class that appears to be a favorable choice in many patients. Relaxed BP targets for high-risk hypertensive patients in the 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines were driven by a lack of commanding evidence for an aggressive approach. However, substantial evidence demonstrates cardiovascular benefits from more intensive BP lowering across patient groups. Individualized treatment of high-risk patients may be prudent until more solid evidence is available. Individual patient profiles and preferences and evidence for preferential therapy benefits should be considered when deciding upon the optimal antihypertensive regimen. CCBs appear to be a positive choice for monotherapy, and in combination with other agent classes, and may provide specific benefits beyond BP lowering. Ambulatory and home BP monitoring have an increasing role in defining the diagnosis and prognosis of hypertension (especially non-sustained); however, their value for comprehensive diagnosis and appropriate treatment selection should be more widely acknowledged. In conclusion, further evidence may be required on BP targets in high-risk patients, and optimal treatment selection based upon individual patient profiles and comprehensive diagnosis using out-of-office BP measurements may improve patient management.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Pac1/LIS1-mediated Dynein Targeting: Implications for Regulation of Dynein Activity in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Markus, Steven M.; Plevock, Karen M.; St. Germain, Bryan J.; Punch, Jesse J.; Meaden, Christopher W.; Lee, Wei-Lih

    2011-01-01

    LIS1 is a critical regulator of dynein function during mitosis and organelle transport. Here, we investigated how Pac1, the budding yeast LIS1 homologue, regulates dynein targeting and activity during nuclear migration. We show that Pac1 and Dyn1 (dynein heavy chain) are dependent upon each other and upon Bik1 (budding yeast CLIP-170 homologue) for plus end localization, whereas Bik1 is independent of either. Dyn1, Pac1 and Bik1 interact in vivo at the plus ends, where an excess amount of Bik...

  20. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  1. An inquiry-based laboratory on friction

    CERN Document Server

    Montalbano, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Sliding friction is usually introduced in high school, but rarely through activities in laboratory. A qualitative introduction to friction is presented by proposing exploration of different kind of materials in order to suggest which aspects can be relevant and which interaction is involved. Different quantitative experiments are proposed for studying Leonardo's laws for friction. The learning path was tested with two high school classes during an instruction trip at department. Students were engaged in the inquiry-based introductory activity and seemed to realize with care the measurements. However, the analysis of their reports shows some learning difficulties.

  2. Methods and Devices used to Measure Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, Jack; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2004-01-01

    The physical condition at the work-piece/die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals, yet it remains the least understood. Hence the need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms....... To gain a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure friction-stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods, which have...

  3. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander M.; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    Ionic liquids, salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions, are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition.

  4. Forming of aluminium alloy friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating, through analytical models, numerical models and experiments, the effect of the warm deformation phase, realised with an in temperature upsetting, on the weld previously performed by friction stir lap welding on aluminium alloy blanks. The investigation allows to show the deformation zones after upsetting that determine the homogenisation of the weld section. The analytical model allows to relate the friction factor with the upsetting load. The presence on the weld of not elevated friction factor values determines the deformation and localisation levels very useful for the weld. Such methodology allows to improve the weld itself with the forming phase.

  5. Study on the Friction Coefficient in Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The friction between the abrasive grains and workpi ec e is a crutial factor determining the main grinding output. Few studies have bee n carried out investigating the values of the friction coefficient in grinding, due to the difficulty of direct measurement. In this paper, a mathematical model of the friction coefficient in grinding has been established with the aid of a new grinding parameter C ge, which has close relations to wheel wear rate Z s, metal removal rate Z w, specific energy u and gr...

  6. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander M; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    2013-10-07

    Ionic liquids - salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions - are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition.

  7. New insights into schizophrenia disease genes interactome in the human brain: emerging targets and therapeutic implications in the postgenomics era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Avijit; Latha, Narayanan

    2014-12-01

    Schizophrenia, a complex neurological disorder, is comprised of interactions between multiple genetic and environmental factors wherein each of the factors individually exhibits a small effect. In this regard a network-based strategy is best suited to capture the combined effect of multiple genes with their definite pattern of interactions. Given that schizophrenia affects multiple regions of the brain, we postulated that instead of any single specific tissue, a mutual set of interactions occurs between different regions of brain in a well-defined pattern responsible for the disease phenotype. To validate, we constructed and compared tissue specific co-expression networks of schizophrenia candidate genes in twenty diverse brain tissues. As predicted, we observed a common interaction network of certain genes in all the studied brain tissues. We examined fundamental network topologies of the common network to sequester essential common candidates for schizophrenia. We also performed a gene set analysis to identify the essential biological pathways enriched by the common candidates in the network. Finally, the candidate drug targets were prioritized and scored against known available schizophrenic drugs by molecular docking studies. We distinctively identified protein kinases as the top candidates in the network that can serve as probable drug targets for the disease. Conclusively, we propose that a comprehensive study of the connectivity amongst the disease genes themselves may turn out to be more informative to understand schizophrenia disease etiology and the underlying complexity.

  8. Phenotypic Screening of Small-Molecule Inhibitors: Implications for Therapeutic Discovery and Drug Target Development in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2016-01-01

    The inability of central nervous system (CNS) neurons to regenerate damaged axons and dendrites following traumatic brain injury (TBI) creates a substantial obstacle for functional recovery. Apoptotic cell death, deposition of scar tissue, and growth-repressive molecules produced by glia further complicate the problem and make it challenging for re-growing axons to extend across injury sites. To date, there are no approved drugs for the treatment of TBI, accentuating the need for relevant leads. Cell-based and organotypic bioassays can better mimic outcomes within the native CNS microenvironment than target-based screening methods and thus should speed the discovery of therapeutic agents that induce axon or dendrite regeneration. Additionally, when used to screen focused chemical libraries such as small-molecule protein kinase inhibitors, these assays can help elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in neurite outgrowth and regeneration as well as identify novel drug targets. Here, we describe a phenotypic cellular (high content) screening assay that utilizes brain-derived primary neurons for screening small-molecule chemical libraries.

  9. Implication of Caspase-3 as a Common Therapeutic Target for Multineurodegenerative Disorders and Its Inhibition Using Nonpeptidyl Natural Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Caspase-3 has been identified as a key mediator of neuronal apoptosis. The present study identifies caspase-3 as a common player involved in the regulation of multineurodegenerative disorders, namely, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Huntington’s disease (HD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. The protein interaction network prepared using STRING database provides a strong evidence of caspase-3 interactions with the metabolic cascade of the said multineurodegenerative disorders, thus characterizing it as a potential therapeutic target for multiple neurodegenerative disorders. In silico molecular docking of selected nonpeptidyl natural compounds against caspase-3 exposed potent leads against this common therapeutic target. Rosmarinic acid and curcumin proved to be the most promising ligands (leads mimicking the inhibitory action of peptidyl inhibitors with the highest Gold fitness scores 57.38 and 53.51, respectively. These results were in close agreement with the fitness score predicted using X-score, a consensus based scoring function to calculate the binding affinity. Nonpeptidyl inhibitors of caspase-3 identified in the present study expeditiously mimic the inhibitory action of the previously identified peptidyl inhibitors. Since, nonpeptidyl inhibitors are preferred drug candidates, hence, discovery of natural compounds as nonpeptidyl inhibitors is a significant transition towards feasible drug development for neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Contamination of wild plants near neonicotinoid seed-treated crops, and implications for non-target insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botías, Cristina; David, Arthur; Hill, Elizabeth M; Goulson, Dave

    2016-10-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are commonly-used as seed treatments on flowering crops such as oilseed rape. Their persistence and solubility in water increase the chances of environmental contamination via surface-runoff or drainage into areas adjacent to the crops. However, their uptake and fate into non-target vegetation remains poorly understood. In this study, we analysed samples of foliage collected from neonicotinoid seed-treated oilseed rape plants and also compared the levels of neonicotinoid residues in foliage (range: 1.4-11ng/g) with the levels found in pollen collected from the same plants (range: 1.4-22ng/g). We then analysed residue levels in foliage from non-target plants growing in the crop field margins (range: ≤0.02-106ng/g). Finally, in order to assess the possible risk posed by the peak levels of neonicotinoids that we detected in foliage for farmland phytophagous and predatory insects, we compared the maximum concentrations found against the LC50 values reported in the literature for a set of relevant insect species. Our results suggest that neonicotinoid seed-dressings lead to widespread contamination of the foliage of field margin plants with mixtures of neonicotinoid residues, where levels are very variable and discontinuous, but sometimes overlap with lethal concentrations reported for some insect species. Understanding the distribution of pesticides in the environment and their potential effects on biological communities is crucial to properly assess current agricultural management and schemes with biodiversity conservation aims in farmland.

  11. Targeting multiple pathogenic mechanisms with polyphenols for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: Experimental approach and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eWang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease of aging and currently has no cure. Its onset and progression are influenced by multiple factors. There is growing consensus that successful treatment will rely on simultaneously targeting multiple pathological features of AD. Polyphenol compounds have many proven health benefits. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that combining three polyphenolic preparations (grape seed extract, resveratrol and Concord grape juice extract, with different polyphenolic compositions and partially redundant bioactivities, may simultaneously and synergistically mitigate amyloid-β (Aβ mediated neuropathology and cognitive impairments in a mouse model of AD. We found that administration of the polyphenols in combination did not alter the profile of bioactive polyphenol metabolites in the brain. We also found that combination treatment resulted in better protection against cognitive impairments compared to individual treatments, in J20 AD mice. Electrophysiological examination showed that acute treatment with select brain penetrating polyphenol metabolites, derived from these polyphenols, improved oligomeric Aβ (oAβ-induced long term potentiation (LTP deficits in hippocampal slices. Moreover, we found greatly reduced total amyloid content in the brain following combination treatment. Our studies provided experimental evidence that application of polyphenols targeting multiple disease-mechanisms may yield a greater likelihood of therapeutic efficacy.

  12. Predictive Malaria Risk and Uncertainty Mapping in Nchelenge District, Zambia: Evidence of Widespread, Persistent Risk and Implications for Targeted Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchoff, Jessie; Chaponda, Mike; Shields, Timothy; Lupiya, James; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Mulenga, Modest; Moss, William J; Curriero, Frank C

    2015-12-01

    Malaria risk maps may be used to guide policy decisions on whether vector control interventions should be targeted and, if so, where. Active surveillance for malaria was conducted through household surveys in Nchelenge District, Zambia from April 2012 through December 2014. Households were enumerated based on satellite imagery and randomly selected for study enrollment. At each visit, participants were administered a questionnaire and a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT). Logistic regression models were used to construct spatial prediction risk maps and maps of risk uncertainty. A total of 461 households were visited, comprising 1,725 participants, of whom 48% were RDT positive. Several environmental features were associated with increased household malaria risk in a multivariable logistic regression model adjusting for seasonal variation. The model was validated using both internal and external evaluation measures to generate and assess root mean square error, as well as sensitivity and specificity for predicted risk. The final, validated model was used to predict and map malaria risk including a measure of risk uncertainty. Malaria risk in a high, perennial transmission setting is widespread but heterogeneous at a local scale, with seasonal variation. Targeting malaria control interventions may not be appropriate in this epidemiological setting.

  13. Evolving Insights into the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Neuropathy: Implications of Malfunctioning Glia and Discovery of Novel Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy subsequent to chronic high blood glucose-induced nerve damage is one of the most frustrating and debilitating complications of diabetes, which affects the quality of life in patients with diabetes. Approximately 60-70% of patients with diabetes suffer from a distal symmetrical form of mild to severe neuropathy that progresses in a fiber-length-dependent pattern, with sensory and autonomic manifestations predominating. High glucose and oxidative stress-mediated damage in neurons and glial cells, as well as neuroinflammation and crosstalk between these disease processes, have garnered immense attention as the essential mechanisms underlying the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy. Although the metabolic causes of diabetic neuropathy are well understood and documented, treatment options for this disorder are still limited, highlighting the need for further studies to identify new molecular and therapeutic targets. This review covers recent advances in our knowledge of the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy, discusses how persistent hyperglycemic conditions and malfunctioning glia drive disease progression, and finally explores the possibilities and challenges offered by several potential novel therapeutic targets for both preventing and reversing diabetic neuropathy.

  14. An autoantibody is modified for use as a delivery system to target the cell nucleus: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbart, R H; Stempniak, M; Harris, S; Zack, D J; Ferreri, K

    1998-10-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibody was found to penetrate living cells and localize in the nucleus without pathologic effects. A single mutation in VH markedly enhanced cellular penetration. The mutant antibody was produced as recombinant Fab and single chain antibody fragments to investigate its use as a delivery system to target the cell nucleus. Complexes were made containing Fab fragments and alkaline phosphatase conjugated goat antibodies to mouse |gk chains. Fab fragments transported 305 kDa goat antibody-enzyme complexes into the nucleus in COS-7 and CHO cells. A single chain antibody cDNA was constructed by splice overlap extension PCR and expressed in COS-7 cells. Binding of the single chain antibody to dsDNA was shown by ELISA, and cellular penetration and nuclear localization were demonstrated in COS-7 and CHO cells. The single chain antibody cDNA was ligated into the expression vector, pEGFP, to produce a fusion protein with green fluorescent protein. The fusion protein penetrated COS-7 cells and localized in the cell nucleus. The single chain antibody produced during sustained expression in CHO cells re-entered antibody-producing cells and localized in the nucleus without affecting cell viability. Our results demonstrate the potential use of a modified autoantibody as a delivery system to target the cell nucleus.

  15. High friction and low wear properties of laser-textured ceramic surface under dry friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Youqiang; Deng, Jianxin; Wu, Ze; Wu, Fengfang

    2017-08-01

    Two kinds of grooved textures with different spacing were fabricated on Al2O3/TiC ceramic surface by an Nd:YAG laser. The dry tribological properties of the textured samples were investigated by carrying out unidirectional rotary sliding friction and wear tests using a ball-on-disk tribometer. Results show that the laser textured samples exhibit higher friction coefficient and excellent wear resistance compared with the smooth sample under dry friction conditions. Furthermore, the texture morphology and spacing have a significant influence on the tribological properties. The sample with small texture spacing may be beneficial to increasing the friction coefficient, and the wavy-grooved sample exhibits the highest friction coefficient and shallowest wear depth. The increasing friction coefficient and anti-wear properties are attributed to the combined effects of the increased surface roughness, reduced real contact area, micro-cutting effect by the texture edges and entrapment of wear debris.

  16. Frictional torque numbers for ball cup and journal bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Plastic bearing material wears in ball cup and journal bearings. Contact areas in the ball cup and the journal bearing increase. The frictional torque needed to rotate the ball or journal also increases. When the coefficient of friction is assumed to be constant during wearing out, the frictional torque increases to a maximum of 1.273 times the frictional torque at zero wear.

  17. Effects of friction on forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackbourn, Luke A. K.; Tran, Chuong V.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale dissipation mechanisms have been routinely employed in numerical simulations of two-dimensional turbulence to absorb energy at large scales, presumably mimicking the quasisteady picture of Kraichnan in an unbounded fluid. Here, “side effects” of such a mechanism—mechanical friction—on the small-scale dynamics of forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence are elaborated by both theoretical and numerical analysis. Given a positive friction coefficient α, viscous dissipation of enstrophy has been known to vanish in the inviscid limit ν→0. This effectively renders the scale-neutral friction the only mechanism responsible for enstrophy dissipation in that limit. The resulting dynamical picture is that the classical enstrophy inertial range becomes a dissipation range in which the dissipation of enstrophy by friction mainly occurs. For each α>0, there exists a critical viscosity νc, which depends on physical parameters, separating the regimes of predominant viscous and frictional dissipation of enstrophy. It is found that νc=[η'1/3/(Ckf2)]exp[-η'1/3/(Cα)], where η' is half the enstrophy injection rate, kf is the forcing wave number, and C is a nondimensional constant (the Kraichnan-Batchelor constant). The present results have important theoretical and practical implications. Apparently, mechanical friction is a poor choice in numerical attempts to address fundamental issues concerning the direct enstrophy transfer in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence. Furthermore, as relatively strong friction naturally occurs on the surfaces and at lateral boundaries of experimental fluids as well as at the interfaces of shallow layers in geophysical fluid models, the frictional effects discussed in this study are crucial in understanding the dynamics of these systems.

  18. MicroRNAs upregulated during HIV infection target peroxisome biogenesis factors: Implications for virus biology, disease mechanisms and neuropathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaikun Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND represent a spectrum neurological syndrome that affects up to 25% of patients with HIV/AIDS. Multiple pathogenic mechanisms contribute to the development of HAND symptoms including chronic neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Among the factors linked to development of HAND is altered expression of host cell microRNAs (miRNAs in brain. Here, we examined brain miRNA profiles among HIV/AIDS patients with and without HAND. Our analyses revealed differential expression of 17 miRNAs in brain tissue from HAND patients. A subset of the upregulated miRNAs (miR-500a-5p, miR-34c-3p, miR-93-3p and miR-381-3p, are predicted to target peroxisome biogenesis factors (PEX2, PEX7, PEX11B and PEX13. Expression of these miRNAs in transfected cells significantly decreased levels of peroxisomal proteins and concomitantly decreased peroxisome numbers or affected their morphology. The levels of miR-500a-5p, miR-34c-3p, miR-93-3p and miR-381-3p were not only elevated in the brains of HAND patients, but were also upregulated during HIV infection of primary macrophages. Moreover, concomitant loss of peroxisomal proteins was observed in HIV-infected macrophages as well as in brain tissue from HIV-infected patients. HIV-induced loss of peroxisomes was abrogated by blocking the functions of the upregulated miRNAs. Overall, these findings point to previously unrecognized miRNA expression patterns in the brains of HIV patients. Targeting peroxisomes by up-regulating miRNAs that repress peroxisome biogenesis factors may represent a novel mechanism by which HIV-1 subverts innate immune responses and/or causes neurocognitive dysfunction.

  19. Functional variability of snake venom metalloproteinases: adaptive advantages in targeting different prey and implications for human envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardoni, Juliana L; Sousa, Leijiane F; Wermelinger, Luciana S; Lopes, Aline S; Prezoto, Benedito C; Serrano, Solange M T; Zingali, Russolina B; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are major components in most viperid venoms that induce disturbances in the hemostatic system and tissues of animals envenomated by snakes. These disturbances are involved in human pathology of snake bites and appear to be essential for the capture and digestion of snake's prey and avoidance of predators. SVMPs are a versatile family of venom toxins acting on different hemostatic targets which are present in venoms in distinct structural forms. However, the reason why a large number of different SVMPs are expressed in some venoms is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the interference of five isolated SVMPs in blood coagulation of humans, birds and small rodents. P-III class SVMPs (fractions Ic, IIb and IIc) possess gelatinolytic and hemorrhagic activities, and, of these, two also show fibrinolytic activity. P-I class SVMPs (fractions IVa and IVb) are only fibrinolytic. P-III class SVMPs reduced clotting time of human plasma. Fraction IIc was characterized as prothrombin activator and fraction Ic as factor X activator. In the absence of Ca2+, a firm clot was observed in chicken blood samples with fractions Ic, IIb and partially with fraction IIc. In contrast, without Ca2+, only fraction IIc was able to induce a firm clot in rat blood. In conclusion, functionally distinct forms of SVMPs were found in B. neuwiedi venom that affect distinct mechanisms in the coagulation system of humans, birds and small rodents. Distinct SVMPs appear to be more specialized to rat or chicken blood, strengthening the current hypothesis that toxin diversity enhances the possibilities of the snakes for hunting different prey or evading different predators. This functional diversity also impacts the complexity of human envenoming since different hemostatic mechanisms will be targeted by SVMPs accounting for the complexity of the response of humans to venoms.

  20. Functional variability of snake venom metalloproteinases: adaptive advantages in targeting different prey and implications for human envenomation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana L Bernardoni

    Full Text Available Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs are major components in most viperid venoms that induce disturbances in the hemostatic system and tissues of animals envenomated by snakes. These disturbances are involved in human pathology of snake bites and appear to be essential for the capture and digestion of snake's prey and avoidance of predators. SVMPs are a versatile family of venom toxins acting on different hemostatic targets which are present in venoms in distinct structural forms. However, the reason why a large number of different SVMPs are expressed in some venoms is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the interference of five isolated SVMPs in blood coagulation of humans, birds and small rodents. P-III class SVMPs (fractions Ic, IIb and IIc possess gelatinolytic and hemorrhagic activities, and, of these, two also show fibrinolytic activity. P-I class SVMPs (fractions IVa and IVb are only fibrinolytic. P-III class SVMPs reduced clotting time of human plasma. Fraction IIc was characterized as prothrombin activator and fraction Ic as factor X activator. In the absence of Ca2+, a firm clot was observed in chicken blood samples with fractions Ic, IIb and partially with fraction IIc. In contrast, without Ca2+, only fraction IIc was able to induce a firm clot in rat blood. In conclusion, functionally distinct forms of SVMPs were found in B. neuwiedi venom that affect distinct mechanisms in the coagulation system of humans, birds and small rodents. Distinct SVMPs appear to be more specialized to rat or chicken blood, strengthening the current hypothesis that toxin diversity enhances the possibilities of the snakes for hunting different prey or evading different predators. This functional diversity also impacts the complexity of human envenoming since different hemostatic mechanisms will be targeted by SVMPs accounting for the complexity of the response of humans to venoms.

  1. Human gene control by vital oncogenes: revisiting a theoretical model and its implications for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Rudolph E

    2012-01-01

    An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model predicted the

  2. Surface defects and temperature on atomic friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, O Y; Mazo, J J, E-mail: yovany@unizar.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-09-07

    We present a theoretical study of the effect of surface defects on atomic friction in the stick-slip dynamical regime of a minimalistic model. We focus on how the presence of defects and temperature change the average properties of the system. We have identified two main mechanisms which modify the mean friction force of the system when defects are considered. As expected, defects change the potential profile locally and thus affect the friction force. But the presence of defects also changes the probability distribution function of the tip slip length and thus the mean friction force. We corroborated both effects for different values of temperature, external load, dragging velocity and damping. We also show a comparison of the effects of surface defects and surface disorder on the dynamics of the system. (paper)

  3. Shell Galaxies, Dynamical Friction, and Dwarf Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrova, Ivana; Canalizo, Gabriela; Bennert, Nicola; Jilkova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    Using N-body simulations of shell galaxies created in nearly radial minor mergers, we investigate the error of collision dating, resulting from the neglect of dynamical friction and of gradual disruption of the cannibalized dwarf.

  4. Permeability equipment for porous friction surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standiford, D. L.; Graul, R. A.; Lenke, L. R.

    1985-04-01

    Hydroplaning is the loss of traction between tires and pavement due to the presence of a layer of water. This loss of traction can result in loss of vehicle control. A porous friction surface (PFS) applied over an existing pavement permits the water to drain laterally and vertically away from the tire path, effectively lowering hydroplaning potential. Equipment used to measure pavement drainage (permeability) is discussed with respect to usage on porous friction surface. Background information on hydroplaning, flow theory, and PFS field performance as they are affected by permeability are also presented. Two dynamic test devices and four static devices are considered for measuring PFS permeability. Permeability tests are recommended to measure PFS permeability for maintenance purposes and construction control. Dynamic devices cited could possibly estimate hydroplaning potential; further research must be done to determine this. Permeability devices cannot be used to accurately estimate friction of a pavement surface, however, decreased permeability of a pavement infers a decrease in friction.

  5. Torque Control of Friction Stir Welding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC and Vanderbilt University propose the innovation of torque control of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement to force control of...

  6. Transient effects in friction fractal asperity creep

    CERN Document Server

    Goedecke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Transient friction effects determine the behavior of a wide class of mechatronic systems. Classic examples are squealing brakes, stiction in robotic arms, or stick-slip in linear drives. To properly design and understand mechatronic systems of this type, good quantitative models of transient friction effects are of primary interest. The theory developed in this book approaches this problem bottom-up, by deriving the behavior of macroscopic friction surfaces from the microscopic surface physics. The model is based on two assumptions: First, rough surfaces are inherently fractal, exhibiting roughness on a wide range of scales. Second, transient friction effects are caused by creep enlargement of the real area of contact between two bodies. This work demonstrates the results of extensive Finite Element analyses of the creep behavior of surface asperities, and proposes a generalized multi-scale area iteration for calculating the time-dependent real contact between two bodies. The toolset is then demonstrated both...

  7. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  8. Composites materials for friction and braking application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciun, A. L.; Pinca-Bretotean, C.; Birtok-Băneasă, C.; Josan, A.

    2017-05-01

    The brake pads are an important component in the braking system of automotive. Materials used for brake pads should have stable and reliable frictional and wear properties under varying conditions of load, velocity, temperature and high durability. These factors must be satisfied simultaneously which makes it difficult to select effective brake pads material. The paper presents the results of the study for characterisation of the friction product used for automotive brake pads. In the study it was developed four frictional composites by using different percentages of coconut fibres (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%) reinforcement in aluminium matrix. The new composites tested in the laboratory, modelling appropriate percentage ratio between matrix and reinforcement volume and can be obtained with low density, high hardness properties, good thermal stability, higher ability to hold the compressive force and have a stable friction coefficient. These characteristics make them useful in automotive industry.

  9. Friction and friction-generated temperature at a polymer-metal interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Burks, H. D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of friction and thermal tests of molded polyimide and pyrrone polymers are presented. The coefficient of sliding friction up to surface velocities of 2 m/sec and the coefficient of thermal expansion from 300 to 500 K were measured. An apparatus was constructed to measure simultaneously the coefficient of sliding friction and the friction-generated temperature. Measurements were made at a nominal pressure-velocity product of 0.25 MN/msec and at temperatures between 300 and 500 K.

  10. Sliding without slipping under Coulomb friction: opening waves and inversion of frictional force

    CERN Document Server

    Yastrebov, Vladislav A

    2015-01-01

    An elastic layer slides on a rigid flat governed by Coulomb's friction law. We demonstrate that if the coefficient of friction is high enough, the sliding localizes within stick-slip pulses, which transform into opening waves propagating at intersonic speed in the direction of sliding or, for high Poisson's ratios, at supersonic speed in the opposite one. This sliding mode, characterized by small frictional dissipation, rapidly relaxes the shear elastic energy via stress waves and enables the contact surface slide ahead of the top one, resulting in inversion of the frictional force direction.

  11. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  12. Flexible Friction Stir Joining Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lim, Yong Chae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mahoney, Murray [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Larsen, Steve [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Steel, Russel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fleck, Dale [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Babb, Jon [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Higgins, Paul [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States)

    2015-07-23

    Reported herein is the final report on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) project with industry cost-share that was jointly carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (ExxonMobil), and MegaStir Technologies (MegaStir). The project was aimed to advance the state of the art of friction stir welding (FSW) technology, a highly energy-efficient solid-state joining process, for field deployable, on-site fabrications of large, complex and thick-sectioned structures of high-performance and high-temperature materials. The technology innovations developed herein attempted to address two fundamental shortcomings of FSW: 1) the inability for on-site welding and 2) the inability to weld thick section steels, both of which have impeded widespread use of FSW in manufacturing. Through this work, major advance has been made toward transforming FSW technology from a “specialty” process to a mainstream materials joining technology to realize its pervasive energy, environmental, and economic benefits across industry.

  13. Linearization of friction effects in vibration of two rotating blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of friction effects in blade shrouding which are realized by means of friction elements placed between blades. In order to develop a methodology of modelling, two blades with one friction element in between are considered only. Flexible blades fixed to a rotating disc are discretized by FEM using 1D Rayleigh beam elements derived in rotating space as well as the friction element modelled as a rigid body. The blades and the friction element are connected through two concurrent friction planes, where the friction forces arise on the basis of centrifugal force acting on the friction element. The linearization of friction is performed using the harmonic balance method to determine equivalent damping coefficients in dependence on the amplitudes of relative slip motion between the blades and the friction element. The methodology is applied to a model of two real blades and will be extended for the whole bladed disc with shrouding.

  14. Comparisons of friction models in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    A friction model is one of the key input boundary conditions in finite element simulations. It is said that the friction model plays an important role in controlling the accuracy of necessary output results predicted. Among the various friction models, which one is of higher accuracy is still...... unknown and controversial. In this paper, finite element analyses applying five different friction models to experiments of upsetting of AA 6082 lubricated with four lubricants are presented. Frictional parameter values are determined by fitness of data of friction area ratio from finite element analysis...... to experimental results. It is found that calibration curves of the friction area ratio for all of the five chosen friction models used in the finite element simulation do fit the experimental results. Usually, calbration curves of the friction area ratio are more sensitive to friction at the tool...

  15. Comparing numerically exact and modelled static friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krengel Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there exists no mechanically consistent “numerically exact” implementation of static and dynamic Coulomb friction for general soft particle simulations with arbitrary contact situations in two or three dimension, but only along one dimension. We outline a differential-algebraic equation approach for a “numerically exact” computation of friction in two dimensions and compare its application to the Cundall-Strack model in some test cases.

  16. THE FRICTION OF QUARTZ IN HIGH VACUUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    the effects of surface cleanliness . Ultra-high vacuums (to 10 to the minus 10th power torr) and high temperatures (to 350 deg C) were combined with...chemical cleaning and careful handling techniques to produce the maximum surface cleanliness . The coefficient of static friction under varying...on 30-40 mesh glass balls. The coefficient of friction of smooth quartz was found to vary from 0.1 to 1.0 depending on the surface cleanliness . The

  17. Network-Configurations of Dynamic Friction Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2012-01-01

    The complex configurations of dynamic friction patterns-regarding real time contact areas- are transformed into appropriate networks. With this transformation of a system to network space, many properties can be inferred about the structure and dynamics of the system. Here, we analyze the dynamics of static friction, i.e. nucleation processes, with respect to "friction networks". We show that networks can successfully capture the crack-like shear ruptures and possible corresponding acoustic features. We found that the fraction of triangles remarkably scales with the detachment fronts. There is a universal power law between nodes' degree and motifs frequency (for triangles, it reads T(k)\\proptok{\\beta} ({\\beta} \\approx2\\pm0.4)). We confirmed the obtained universality in aperture-based friction networks. Based on the achieved results, we extracted a possible friction law in terms of network parameters and compared it with the rate and state friction laws. In particular, the evolutions of loops are scaled with p...

  18. Role of Friction in Cold Ring Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He YANG; Lianggang GUO; Mei ZHAN

    2005-01-01

    Cold ring rolling is an advanced but complex metal forming process under coupled effects with multi-factors, such as geometry sizes of rolls and ring blank, material, forming process parameters and friction, etc. Among these factors,friction between rolls and ring blank plays animportant role in keeping the stable forming of cold ring rolling. An analytical method was firstly presented for proximately determining the critical friction coefficient of stable forming and then a method was proposed to determine thecritical friction coefficient by combining analytical method with numerical simulation. And the influence of friction coefficient on the quality of end-plane and side spread of ring,rolling force, rolling moment and metal flow characteristic in the cold ring rolling process have been explored using the three dimensional (3D) numerical simulation based on the elastic-plastic dynamic finite element method (FEM)under the ABAQUS software environment, and the results show that increasing the friction on the contact surfaces between rolls and ring blank is useful not only for improving the stability of cold ring rolling but also for improving the geometry and dimension precision of deformed ring.

  19. Trends in greenhouse gas emissions from consumption and production of animal food products - implications for long-term climate targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, C; Hedenus, F; Wirsenius, S; Sonesson, U

    2013-02-01

    -increase target of 2° might imply a severe constraint on the long-term global consumption of animal food. Due to the relatively limited potential for reducing food-related emissions by higher productivity and technological means, structural changes in food consumption towards less emission-intensive food might be required for meeting the 2° target.

  20. Reviewing the literature on access to prompt and effective malaria treatment in Kenya: implications for meeting the Abuja targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetteh Gladys

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective case management is central to reducing malaria mortality and morbidity worldwide, but only a minority of those affected by malaria, have access to prompt effective treatment. In Kenya, the Division of Malaria Control is committed to ensuring that 80 percent of childhood fevers are treated with effective anti-malarial medicines within 24 hours of fever onset, but this target is largely unmet. This review aimed to document evidence on access to effective malaria treatment in Kenya, identify factors that influence access, and make recommendations on how to improve prompt access to effective malaria treatment. Since treatment-seeking patterns for malaria are similar in many settings in sub-Saharan Africa, the findings presented in this review have important lessons for other malaria endemic countries. Methods Internet searches were conducted in PUBMED (MEDLINE and HINARI databases using specific search terms and strategies. Grey literature was obtained by soliciting reports from individual researchers working in the treatment-seeking field, from websites of major organizations involved in malaria control and from international reports. Results The review indicated that malaria treatment-seeking occurs mostly in the informal sector; that most fevers are treated, but treatment is often ineffective. Irrational drug use was identified as a problem in most studies, but determinants of this behaviour were not documented. Availability of non-recommended medicines over-the-counter and the presence of substandard anti-malarials in the market are well documented. Demand side determinants of access include perception of illness causes, severity and timing of treatment, perceptions of treatment efficacy, simplicity of regimens and ability to pay. Supply side determinants include distance to health facilities, availability of medicines, prescribing and dispensing practices and quality of medicines. Policy level factors are around

  1. Methods and devices used to measure friction in rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, J.; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure frictional stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods that have been used...... to measure friction in rolling in the past and discusses some of the recent sensor designs that can now be used to measure friction both in production situations and for research purposes....

  2. Numerical implementation of a state variable model for friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzekwa, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Boyce, D.E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A general state variable model for friction has been incorporated into a finite element code for viscoplasticity. A contact area evolution model is used in a finite element model of a sheet forming friction test. The results show that a state variable model can be used to capture complex friction behavior in metal forming simulations. It is proposed that simulations can play an important role in the analysis of friction experiments and the development of friction models.

  3. Nano-Sized Grain Refinement Using Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure produced as a result of dynamic recrystallization. The friction stir ... Friction Stir Processing, Magnesium, Nano-size grains Abstract A key characteristic of a friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure...state process developed on the basis of the friction stir welding (FSW) technique invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991 [2]. During

  4. The Role of the Tumor Vasculature in the Host Immune Response: Implications for Therapeutic Strategies Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Shona A.; Farnsworth, Rae H.; Solomon, Benjamin; Achen, Marc G.; Stacker, Steven A.; Fox, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed cancer immunotherapy approaches including immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor T cell transfer are showing promising results both in trials and in clinical practice. These approaches reflect increasing recognition of the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression. Cancer cells do not act alone, but develop a complex relationship with the environment in which they reside. The host immune response to tumors is critical to the success of immunotherapy; however, the determinants of this response are incompletely understood. The immune cell infiltrate in tumors varies widely in density, composition, and clinical significance. The tumor vasculature is a key component of the microenvironment that can influence tumor behavior and treatment response and can be targeted through the use of antiangiogenic drugs. Blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have important roles in the trafficking of immune cells, controlling the microenvironment, and modulating the immune response. Improving access to the tumor through vascular alteration with antiangiogenic drugs may prove an effective combinatorial strategy with immunotherapy approaches and might be applicable to many tumor types. In this review, we briefly discuss the host’s immune response to cancer and the treatment strategies utilizing this response, before focusing on the pathological features of tumor blood and lymphatic vessels and the contribution these might make to tumor immune evasion. PMID:28066431

  5. MEK/ERK activation plays a decisive role in yellow fever virus replication: implication as an antiviral therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarnaz, Jonas D; De Oliveira, Leonardo C; Torres, Alice A; Palhares, Rafael M; Casteluber, Marisa C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Cardozo, Pablo L; De Souza, Aryádina M R; Pacca, Carolina C; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Nogueira, Maurício L; Bonjardim, Cláudio A

    2014-11-01

    Exploiting the inhibition of host signaling pathways aiming for discovery of potential antiflaviviral compounds is clearly a beneficial strategy for the control of life-threatening diseases caused by flaviviruses. Here we describe the antiviral activity of the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 against Yellow fever virus 17D vaccine strain (YFV-17D). Infection of VERO cells with YFV-17D stimulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation early during infection. Pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 through U0126 treatment of VERO cells blockades not only the YFV-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but also inhibits YFV replication by ∼99%. U0126 was also effective against dengue virus (DENV-2 and -3) and Saint-Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Levels of NS4AB, as detected by immunofluorescence, are diminished upon treatment with the inhibitor, as well as the characteristic endoplasmic reticulum membrane invagination stimulated during the infection. Though not protective, treatment of YFV-infected, adult BALB/c mice with U0126 resulted in significant reduction of virus titers in brains. Collectively, our data suggest the potential targeting of the MEK1/2 kinase as a therapeutic tool against diseases caused by flaviviruses such as yellow fever, adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccination and dengue.

  6. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation (HTx is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response.

  7. Discrepancies Between Blood Glucose and Interstitial Glucose-Technological Artifacts or Physiology: Implications for Selection of the Appropriate Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Thorsten; Heinemann, Lutz; Kolassa, Ralf; Thomas, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    For decades, the major source of information used to make therapeutic decisions by patients with diabetes has been glucose measurements using capillary blood samples. Knowledge gained from clinical studies, for example, on the impact of metabolic control on diabetes-related complications, is based on such measurements. Different to traditional blood glucose measurement systems, systems for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) measure glucose in interstitial fluid (ISF). The assumption is that glucose levels in blood and ISF are practically the same and that the information provided can be used interchangeably. Thus, therapeutic decisions, that is, the selection of insulin doses, are based on CGM system results interpreted as though they were blood glucose values. We performed a more detailed analysis and interpretation of glucose profiles obtained with CGM in situations with high glucose dynamics to evaluate this potentially misleading assumption. Considering physical activity, hypoglycemic episodes, and meal-related differences between glucose levels in blood and ISF uncover clinically relevant differences that can make it risky from a therapeutic point of view to use blood glucose for therapeutic decisions. Further systematic and structured evaluation as to whether the use of ISF glucose is more safe and efficient when it comes to acute therapeutic decisions is necessary. These data might also have a higher prognostic relevance when it comes to long-term metabolic consequences of diabetes. In the long run, it may be reasonable to abandon blood glucose measurements as the basis for diabetes management and switch to using ISF glucose as the appropriate therapeutic target.

  8. Cholinergic nicotinic receptor genes implicated in a nicotine dependence association study targeting 348 candidate genes with 3713 SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, Scott F; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Saccone, Nancy L; Chase, Gary A; Konvicka, Karel; Madden, Pamela A F; Breslau, Naomi; Johnson, Eric O; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Pomerleau, Ovide; Swan, Gary E; Goate, Alison M; Rutter, Joni; Bertelsen, Sarah; Fox, Louis; Fugman, Douglas; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Wang, Jen C; Ballinger, Dennis G; Rice, John P; Bierut, Laura Jean

    2007-01-01

    Nicotine dependence is one of the world's leading causes of preventable death. To discover genetic variants that influence risk for nicotine dependence, we targeted over 300 candidate genes and analyzed 3713 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1050 cases and 879 controls. The Fagerström test for nicotine dependence (FTND) was used to assess dependence, in which cases were required to have an FTND of 4 or more. The control criterion was strict: control subjects must have smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetimes and had an FTND of 0 during the heaviest period of smoking. After correcting for multiple testing by controlling the false discovery rate, several cholinergic nicotinic receptor genes dominated the top signals. The strongest association was from an SNP representing CHRNB3, the beta3 nicotinic receptor subunit gene (P = 9.4 x 10(-5)). Biologically, the most compelling evidence for a risk variant came from a non-synonymous SNP in the alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunit gene CHRNA5 (P = 6.4 x 10(-4)). This SNP exhibited evidence of a recessive mode of inheritance, resulting in individuals having a 2-fold increase in risk of developing nicotine dependence once exposed to cigarette smoking. Other genes among the top signals were KCNJ6 and GABRA4. This study represents one of the most powerful and extensive studies of nicotine dependence to date and has found novel risk loci that require confirmation by replication studies.

  9. Expression of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A and hypusine forming enzymes in glioblastoma patient samples: implications for new targeted therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Preukschas

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are highly aggressive brain tumors of adults with poor clinical outcome. Despite a broad range of new and more specific treatment strategies, therapy of glioblastomas remains challenging and tumors relapse in all cases. Recent work demonstrated that the posttranslational hypusine modification of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A is a crucial regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and an important factor in tumor formation, progression and maintenance. Here we report that eIF-5A as well as the hypusine-forming enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH are highly overexpressed in glioblastoma patient samples. Importantly, targeting eIF-5A and its hypusine modification with GC7, a specific DHS-inhibitor, showed a strong antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines in vitro, while normal human astrocytes were not affected. Furthermore, we identified p53 dependent premature senescence, a permanent cell cycle arrest, as the primary outcome in U87-MG cells after treatment with GC7. Strikingly, combined treatment with clinically relevant alkylating agents and GC7 had an additive antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines. In addition, stable knockdown of eIF-5A and DHS by short hairpin RNA (shRNA could mimic the antiproliferative effects of GC7. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of eIF-5A may represent a novel concept to treat glioblastomas and may help to substantially improve the clinical course of this tumor entity.

  10. Expression of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A and hypusine forming enzymes in glioblastoma patient samples: implications for new targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preukschas, Michael; Hagel, Christian; Schulte, Alexander; Weber, Kristoffer; Lamszus, Katrin; Sievert, Henning; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Hauber, Joachim; Braig, Melanie; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly aggressive brain tumors of adults with poor clinical outcome. Despite a broad range of new and more specific treatment strategies, therapy of glioblastomas remains challenging and tumors relapse in all cases. Recent work demonstrated that the posttranslational hypusine modification of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is a crucial regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and an important factor in tumor formation, progression and maintenance. Here we report that eIF-5A as well as the hypusine-forming enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) are highly overexpressed in glioblastoma patient samples. Importantly, targeting eIF-5A and its hypusine modification with GC7, a specific DHS-inhibitor, showed a strong antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines in vitro, while normal human astrocytes were not affected. Furthermore, we identified p53 dependent premature senescence, a permanent cell cycle arrest, as the primary outcome in U87-MG cells after treatment with GC7. Strikingly, combined treatment with clinically relevant alkylating agents and GC7 had an additive antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines. In addition, stable knockdown of eIF-5A and DHS by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) could mimic the antiproliferative effects of GC7. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of eIF-5A may represent a novel concept to treat glioblastomas and may help to substantially improve the clinical course of this tumor entity.

  11. Retrograde labeling, transduction and genetic targeting allow cellular analysis of corticospinal motor neurons: Implications in health and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Hernan Jara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN have a unique ability to receive, integrate, translate, and transmit the cerebral cortex’s input toward spinal cord targets and therefore, act as a spokesperson for the initiation and modulation of voluntary movements that require cortical input. CSMN degeneration has an immense impact on motor neuron circuitry and is one of the underlying causes of numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as primary lateral sclerosis, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In addition, CSMN death results in long-term paralysis in spinal cord injury patients. Detailed cellular analyses are crucial to gain a better understanding of the pathologies underlying CSMN degeneration. However, visualizing and identifying these vulnerable neuron populations in the complex and heterogeneous environment of the cerebral cortex has proved challenging. Here, we will review recent developments and current applications of novel strategies that reveal the cellular and molecular basis of CSMN health and vulnerability. Such studies hold promise for building long-term effective treatment solutions in the near future.

  12. The Role of the Tumor Vasculature in the Host Immune Response: Implications for Therapeutic Strategies Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shona A Hendry

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed cancer immunotherapy approaches including immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell transfer are showing promising results both in trials and in clinical practice. These approaches reflect increasing recognition of the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression. Cancer cells do not act alone, but develop a complex relationship with the environment in which they reside. The host immune response to tumors is critical to the success of immunotherapy; however the determinants of this response are incompletely understood. The immune cell infiltrate in tumors varies widely in density, composition, and clinical significance. The tumor vasculature is a key component of the microenvironment that can influence tumor behavior and treatment response, and can be targeted through the use of anti-angiogenic drugs. Blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have important roles in the trafficking of immune cells and controlling the microenvironment, and modulate the immune response. Improving access to the tumor through vascular alteration with anti-angiogenic drugs may prove an effective combinatorial strategy with immunotherapy approaches, and might be applicable to many tumor types. In this review we briefly discuss the host’s immune response to cancer and the treatment strategies utilizing this response, before focusing on the pathological features of tumor blood and lymphatic vessels and the contribution these might make to tumor immune evasion.

  13. Dengue vector dynamics (Aedes aegypti) influenced by climate and social factors in Ecuador: implications for targeted control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart Ibarra, Anna M; Ryan, Sadie J; Beltrán, Efrain; Mejía, Raúl; Silva, Mercy; Muñoz, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti) population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011), conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in Spanish.

  14. Dengue Vector Dynamics (Aedes aegypti) Influenced by Climate and Social Factors in Ecuador: Implications for Targeted Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart Ibarra, Anna M.; Ryan, Sadie J.; Beltrán, Efrain; Mejía, Raúl; Silva, Mercy; Muñoz, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti) population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. Methods/Principal findings We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011), conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. Conclusions These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in Spanish. PMID:24324542

  15. Multifractal interpolation and spectrum-area fractal modeling of stream sediment geochemical data: Implications for mapping exploration targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Mohammad; Maghsoudi, Abbas; Yousefi, Mahyar; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.

    2017-04-01

    The spectrum-area (S-A) fractal model is a powerful tool for decomposition of complex anomaly patterns of gridded geochemical data. Ordinary moving average interpolation techniques are commonly being used for gridding geochemical data; however, these methods suffer from two major drawbacks of (1) ignoring the locally high values and (2) smoothing the interpolated surface. Multifractal moving average interpolation methods have been developed to overcome the shortcomings of ordinary moving average methods. This study seeks to compare two sets of multifractal and ordinary gridded geochemical data using success rate curves and applies the S-A fractal model to decompose anomalous geochemical patterns. A set of stream sediment geochemical data in Ahar area, NW Iran, was used as a case study. Then, a mineralization-related multi-element geochemical signature was gridded by ordinary and multifractal approaches and considered for further analyses. The S-A fractal method was applied to decompose anomaly and background components of the resultant multi-element geochemical signature. Exploration targets were delimited and further evaluated using two bivariate statistical procedures of Student's t-value and normalized density index. The results revealed that (a) application of multifractal gridded data enhances the predicting ability of geochemical signatures, (b) application of S-A fractal model on multifractal gridded data allows for superior discrimination of geochemical anomalies, and (c) the multi-element geochemical anomalies in the Ahar area related to porphyry-Cu deposits were properly delineated through sequence application of multifractal interpolation and S-A fractal model.

  16. Modeling the Impact of Uganda’s Safe Male Circumcision Program: Implications for Age and Regional Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripke, Katharine; Vazzano, Andrea; Kirungi, William; Musinguzi, Joshua; Opio, Alex; Ssempebwa, Rhobbinah; Nakawunde, Susan; Kyobutungi, Sheila; Akao, Juliet N.; Magala, Fred; Mwidu, George; Castor, Delivette

    2016-01-01

    Background Uganda aims to provide safe male circumcision (SMC) to 80% of men ages 15–49 by 2016. To date, only 2 million men have received SMC of the 4.2 million men required. In response to age and regional trends in SMC uptake, the country sought to re-examine its targets with respect to age and subnational region, to assess the program’s progress, and to refine the implementation approach. Methods and Findings The Decision Makers’ Program Planning Tool, Version 2.0 (DMPPT 2.0), was used in conjunction with incidence projections from the Spectrum/AIDS Impact Module (AIM) to conduct this analysis. Population, births, deaths, and HIV incidence and prevalence were used to populate the model. Baseline male circumcision prevalence was derived from the 2011 AIDS Indicator Survey. Uganda can achieve the most immediate impact on HIV incidence by circumcising men ages 20–34. This group will also require the fewest circumcisions for each HIV infection averted. Focusing on men ages 10–19 will offer the greatest impact over a 15-year period, while focusing on men ages 15–34 offers the most cost-effective strategy over the same period. A regional analysis showed little variation in cost-effectiveness of scaling up SMC across eight regions. Scale-up is cost-saving in all regions. There is geographic variability in program progress, highlighting two regions with low baseline rates of circumcision where additional efforts will be needed. Conclusion Focusing SMC efforts on specific age groups and regions may help to accelerate Uganda’s SMC program progress. Policy makers in Uganda have already used model outputs in planning efforts, proposing males ages 10–34 as a priority group for SMC in the 2014 application to the Global Fund’s new funding model. As scale-up continues, the country should also consider a greater effort to expand SMC in regions with low MC prevalence. PMID:27410234

  17. Dengue vector dynamics (Aedes aegypti influenced by climate and social factors in Ecuador: implications for targeted control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Stewart Ibarra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011, conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in

  18. Isolated CyaA-RTX subdomain from Bordetella pertussis: Structural and functional implications for its interaction with target erythrocyte membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Riyaz Ahmad; Meetum, Kanungsuk; Suvarnapunya, Kittipong; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2015-10-01

    The 126-kDa Bordetella pertussis CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) was previously expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble precursor that can be acylated to retain hemolytic activity. Here, we investigated structural and functional characteristics of a ∼100-kDa isolated RTX (Repeat-in-ToXin) subdomain (CyaA-RTX) of CyaA-Hly. Initially, we succeeded in producing a large amount with high purity of the His-tagged CyaA-RTX fragment and in establishing the interaction of acylated CyaA-Hly with sheep red blood cell (sRBC) membranes by immuno-localization. Following pre-incubation of sRBCs with non-acylated CyaA-Hly or with the CyaA-RTX fragment that itself produces no hemolytic activity, there was a dramatic decrease in CyaA-Hly-induced hemolysis. When CyaA-RTX was pre-incubated with anti-CyaA-RTX antisera, the capability of CyaA-RTX to neutralize the hemolytic activity of CyaA-Hly was greatly decreased. A homology-based model of the 100-kDa CyaA-RTX subdomain revealed a loop structure in Linker II sharing sequence similarity to human WW domains. Sequence alignment of Linker II with the human WW-domain family revealed highly conserved aromatic residues important for protein-protein interactions. Altogether, our present study demonstrates that the recombinant CyaA-RTX subdomain retains its functionality with respect to binding to target erythrocyte membranes and the WW-homologous region in Linker II conceivably serves as a functional segment required for receptor-binding activity.

  19. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant

  20. A Novel Dimeric Inhibitor Targeting Beta2GPI in Beta2GPI/Antibody Complexes Implicated in Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Kolyada; C Lee; A De Biasio; N Beglova

    2011-12-31

    {beta}2GPI is a major antigen for autoantibodies associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), an autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and recurrent pregnancy loss. Only the dimeric form of {beta}2GPI generated by anti-{beta}2GPI antibodies is pathologically important, in contrast to monomeric {beta}2GPI which is abundant in plasma. We created a dimeric inhibitor, A1-A1, to selectively target {beta}2GPI in {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes. To make this inhibitor, we isolated the first ligand-binding module from ApoER2 (A1) and connected two A1 modules with a flexible linker. A1-A1 interferes with two pathologically important interactions in APS, the binding of {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes with anionic phospholipids and ApoER2. We compared the efficiency of A1-A1 to monomeric A1 for inhibition of the binding of {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes to anionic phospholipids. We tested the inhibition of {beta}2GPI present in human serum, {beta}2GPI purified from human plasma and the individual domain V of {beta}2GPI. We demonstrated that when {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes are formed, A1-A1 is much more effective than A1 in inhibition of the binding of {beta}2GPI to cardiolipin, regardless of the source of {beta}2GPI. Similarly, A1-A1 strongly inhibits the binding of dimerized domain V of {beta}2GPI to cardiolipin compared to the monomeric A1 inhibitor. In the absence of anti-{beta}2GPI antibodies, both A1-A1 and A1 only weakly inhibit the binding of pathologically inactive monomeric {beta}2GPI to cardiolipin. Our results suggest that the approach of using a dimeric inhibitor to block {beta}2GPI in the pathological multivalent {beta}2GPI/antibody complexes holds significant promise. The novel inhibitor A1-A1 may be a starting point in the development of an effective therapeutic for antiphospholipid syndrome.

  1. A novel dimeric inhibitor targeting Beta2GPI in Beta2GPI/antibody complexes implicated in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kolyada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: β2GPI is a major antigen for autoantibodies associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, an autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and recurrent pregnancy loss. Only the dimeric form of β2GPI generated by anti-β2GPI antibodies is pathologically important, in contrast to monomeric β2GPI which is abundant in plasma. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We created a dimeric inhibitor, A1-A1, to selectively target β2GPI in β2GPI/antibody complexes. To make this inhibitor, we isolated the first ligand-binding module from ApoER2 (A1 and connected two A1 modules with a flexible linker. A1-A1 interferes with two pathologically important interactions in APS, the binding of β2GPI/antibody complexes with anionic phospholipids and ApoER2. We compared the efficiency of A1-A1 to monomeric A1 for inhibition of the binding of β2GPI/antibody complexes to anionic phospholipids. We tested the inhibition of β2GPI present in human serum, β2GPI purified from human plasma and the individual domain V of β2GPI. We demonstrated that when β2GPI/antibody complexes are formed, A1-A1 is much more effective than A1 in inhibition of the binding of β2GPI to cardiolipin, regardless of the source of β2GPI. Similarly, A1-A1 strongly inhibits the binding of dimerized domain V of β2GPI to cardiolipin compared to the monomeric A1 inhibitor. In the absence of anti-β2GPI antibodies, both A1-A1 and A1 only weakly inhibit the binding of pathologically inactive monomeric β2GPI to cardiolipin. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the approach of using a dimeric inhibitor to block β2GPI in the pathological multivalent β2GPI/antibody complexes holds significant promise. The novel inhibitor A1-A1 may be a starting point in the development of an effective therapeutic for antiphospholipid syndrome.

  2. Implications of targeted genomic disruption of β-catenin in BxPC-3 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Angell Olsen

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA is among the most aggressive human tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of <5% and available treatments are only minimal effective. WNT/β-catenin signaling has been identified as one of 12 core signaling pathways that are commonly mutated in PA. To obtain more insight into the role of WNT/β-catenin signaling in PA we established human PA cell lines that are deficient of the central canonical WNT signaling protein β-catenin by using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN mediated targeted genomic disruption in the β-catenin gene (CTNNB1. Five individual CTNNB1 gene disrupted clones (BxPC3ΔCTNNB1 were established from a BxPC-3 founder cell line. Despite the complete absence of β-catenin, all clones displayed normal cell cycle distribution profiles, overall normal morphology and no elevated levels of apoptosis although increased doubling times were observed in three of the five BxPC3ΔCTNNB1 clones. This confirms that WNT/β-catenin signaling is not mandatory for long term cell growth and survival in BxPC-3 cells. Despite a normal morphology of the β-catenin deficient cell lines, quantitative proteomic analysis combined with pathway analysis showed a significant down regulation of proteins implied in cell adhesion combined with an up-regulation of plakoglobin. Treatment of BxPC3ΔCTNNB1 cell lines with siRNA for plakoglobin induced morphological changes compatible with a deficiency in the formation of functional cell to cell contacts. In addition, a re-localization of E-cadherin from membranous in untreated to accumulation in cytoplasmatic puncta in plakoglobin siRNA treated BxPC3ΔCTNNB1 cells was observed. In conclusion we describe in β-catenin deficient BxPC-3 cells a rescue function for plakoglobin on cell to cell contacts and maintaining the localization of E-cadherin at the cellular surface, but not on canonical WNT signaling as measured by TFC/LEF mediated transcription.

  3. Frictional transfer and the self-organization phenomenon in the friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, I. V.; Manturov, D. S.

    2017-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface structures formation in the process of metal-polymer frictional contact. IR spectroscopy methods have showed that the formation kinetics of a frictionally transferred film is determined by the adhesion of the composite components and the direction of the electric field at the contact.

  4. Frictional stability-permeability relationships for fractures in shales: Friction-Permeability Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Elsworth, Derek [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Department of Geosciences, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Wang, Chaoyi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Ishibashi, Takuya [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Fukushima Renewable Energy Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koriyama Japan; Fitts, Jeffrey P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey USA

    2017-01-01

    There is wide concern that fluid injection in the subsurface, such as for the stimulation of shale reservoirs or for geological CO2 sequestration (GCS), has the potential to induce seismicity that may change reservoir permeability due to fault slip. However, the impact of induced seismicity on fracture permeability evolution remains unclear due to the spectrum of modes of fault reactivation (e.g., stable versus unstable). As seismicity is controlled by the frictional response of fractures, we explore friction-stability-permeability relationships through the concurrent measurement of frictional and hydraulic properties of artificial fractures in Green River shale (GRS) and Opalinus shale (OPS). We observe that carbonate-rich GRS shows higher frictional strength but weak neutral frictional stability. The GRS fracture permeability declines during shearing while an increased sliding velocity reduces the rate of permeability decline. By comparison, the phyllosilicate-rich OPS has lower friction and strong stability while the fracture permeability is reduced due to the swelling behavior that dominates over the shearing induced permeability reduction. Hence, we conclude that the friction-stability-permeability relationship of a fracture is largely controlled by mineral composition and that shale mineral compositions with strong frictional stability may be particularly subject to permanent permeability reduction during fluid infiltration.

  5. Ultralow Friction in a Superconducting Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, Hans J.; Siegel, Michael; Zaitsev, Oleg; Bareiss, Martin; Laschuetza, Helmut

    1996-01-01

    Passive levitation by superconducting magnetic bearings can be utilized in flywheels for energy storage. Basic design criteria of such a bearing are high levitation force, sufficient vertical and horizontal stability and low friction. A test facility was built for the measurement and evaluation of friction in a superconducting magnetic bearing as a function of operating temperature and pressure in the vacuum vessel. The bearing consists of a commercial disk shaped magnet levitated above single grain, melt-textured YBCO high-temperature superconductor material. The superconductor was conduction cooled by an integrated AEG tactical cryocooler. The temperature could be varied from 50 K to 80 K. The pressure in the vacuum chamber was varied from 1 bar to 10(exp -5) mbar. At the lowest pressure setting, the drag torque shows a linear frequency dependence over the entire range investigated (0 less than f less than 40 Hz). Magnetic friction, the frequency independent contribution, is very low. The frequency dependent drag torque is generated by molecular friction from molecule-surface collisions and by eddy currents. Given the specific geometry of the set-up and gas pressure, the molecular drag torque can be estimated. At a speed of 40 Hz, the coefficient of friction (drag-to-lift ratio) was measured to be mu = 1.6 x 10(exp -7) at 10(exp -5) mbar and T = 60 K. This is equivalent to a drag torque of 7.6 x 10(exp -10) Nm. Magnetic friction causes approx. 1% of the total losses. Molecular friction accounts for about 13% of the frequency dependent drag torque, the remaining 87% being due to eddy currents and losses from rotor unbalance. The specific energy loss is only 0.3% per hour.

  6. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  7. New design and the manufacturing techniques of the main friction pair of frictional dampers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander GOLUBENKO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of the main friction pair of the frictional oscillations damper of passenger car axle box stage suspension and its manufacturing techniques are described. The difference of the design of the main friction pair consists in replacement of a conicalcontact surface of the shpinton sleeve by a pyramidal surface as well as a cylindrical surface of the frictional slide block by a flat surface of the rectangular form. Technological ways of increase of strength and wear resistance were developed that allowed quantitatively to estimate a reserve of increase of strength and thermal wear resistance by methods of plastic deforming. With the purpose of increase of wear resistance and resource saving the new technology of producing the shpinton sleeve blank is offered by a method of cold die forging, and a frictional slide block – by hot dieforging.

  8. Torsional Vibrations of a Cantilever with Lateral Friction in a Resonance Friction Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-Song; GE Yun; ZHANG Hui

    2012-01-01

    A model of fundamental torsional vibration of a cantilever with lateral friction is presented by using the harmonic balance method. The model demonstrates that the torsional vibration has close relations with the lateral friction threshold, the lateral contact stiffness and the torsional vibration amplitude of the cantilever. When the threshold is larger than a product of the stiffness and the vibration amplitude, the lateral friction is a linear force with the amplitude. If the lateral friction threshold is less than the product, the motions of the tip on the sample can be stick-slip or slip motions. The results are useful to optimize and to manipulate the fundamental flexural vibration of the piezo-cantilever, and give an insight into the tribological characterization of the interface in a resonance friction microscope.%A model of fundamental torsional vibration of a cantilever with lateral friction is presented by using the harmonic balance method.The model demonstrates that the torsional vibration has close relations with the lateral friction threshold,the lateral contact stiffness and the torsional vibration amplitude of the cantilever.When the threshold is larger than a product of the stiffness and the vibration amplitude,the lateral friction is a linear force with the amplitude.If the lateral friction threshold is less than the product,the motions of the tip on the sample can be stick-slip or slip motions.The results are useful to optimize and to manipulate the fundamental flexural vibration of the piezo-cantilever,and give an insight into the tribological characterization of the interface in a resonance friction microscope.

  9. Time dependent friction in a free gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Cristiano; Sisti, Francesco; Stagno, Gabriele V.

    2016-03-01

    We consider a body moving in a perfect gas, described by the mean-field approximation and interacting elastically with the body, we study the friction exerted by the gas on the body fixed at constant velocities. The time evolution of the body in this setting was studied in Caprino et al. [Math. Phys. 264, 167-189 (2006)], Caprino et al. [Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci. 17, 1369-1403 (2007)], and Cavallaro [Rend. Mat. Appl. 27, 123-145 (2007)] for object with simple shape; the first study where a simple kind of concavity was considered was in Sisti and Ricciuti [SIAM J. Math. Anal. 46, 3759-3611 (2014)], showing new features in the dynamic but not in the friction term. The case of more general shape of the body was left out for further difficulties, and we believe indeed that there are actually non-trivial issues to be faced for these more general cases. To show this and in the spirit of getting a more realistic perspective in the study of friction problems, in this paper, we focused our attention on the friction term itself, studying its behavior on a body with a more general kind of concavity and fixed at constant velocities. We derive the expression of the friction term for constant velocities, we show how it is time dependent, and we give its exact estimate in time. Finally, we use this result to show the absence of a constant velocity in the actual dynamic of such a body.

  10. Velocity Dependence of Friction of Confined Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the f......We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence...... in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower. In all...... cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer (case b) the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant...

  11. Friction characteristics of trocars in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazmani, Ali; Roshan, Rupesh; Jayne, David G; Neville, Anne; Culmer, Peter

    2015-04-01

    This article investigates the friction characteristics of the instrument-trocar interface in laparoscopic surgery for varying linear instrument velocities, trocar seal design and material, and trocar tilt. Furthermore, the effect of applying lubrication at the instrument-trocar seal interface on friction was studied. A friction testing apparatus was designed and built to characterise the resistance force at the instrument-trocar interface as a function of the instrument's linear movement in the 12-mm trocar (at constant velocity) for different design, seal material, and angle of tilt. The resistance force depended on the trocar seal design and material properties, specifically surface roughness, elasticity, hardness, the direction of movement, and the instrument linear velocity, and varied between 0.25 and 8 N. Lubricating the shaft with silicone oil reduced the peak resistance force by 75% for all trocars and eliminated the stick-slip phenomenon evident in non-lubricated cases. The magnitude of fluctuation in resistance force depends on the trocar design and is attributed to stick-slip of the sealing mechanism and is generally higher during retraction in comparison to insertion. Trocars that have an inlet seal made of rubber/polyurethane showed higher resistance forces during retraction. Use of a lubricant significantly reduced frictional effects. Comparisons of the investigated trocars indicate that a low friction port, providing the surgeon with improved haptic feedback, can be designed by improving the tribological properties of the trocar seal interface.

  12. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching.

  13. Friction and wear in polymer-based materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bely, V A; Petrokovets, M I

    1982-01-01

    Friction and Wear in Polymer-Based Materials discusses friction and wear problems in polymer-based materials. The book is organized into three parts. The chapters in Part I cover the basic laws of friction and wear in polymer-based materials. Topics covered include frictional interaction during metal-polymer contact and the influence of operating conditions on wear in polymers. The chapters in Part II discuss the structure and frictional properties of polymer-based materials; the mechanism of frictional transfer when a polymer comes into contact with polymers, metals, and other materials; and

  14. Benchmarking of direct and indirect friction tests in micro forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rasmus Solmer; Calaon, Matteo; Arentoft, M.

    2012-01-01

    The sizeable increase in metal forming friction at micro scale, due to the existence of size effects, constitutes a barrier to the realization of industrial micro forming processes. In the quest for improved frictional conditions in micro scale forming operations, friction tests are applied...... to qualify the tribological performance of the particular forming scenario. In this work the application of a simulative sliding friction test at micro scale is studied. The test setup makes it possible to measure the coefficient of friction as a function of the sliding motion. The results confirm a sizeable...... increase in the coefficient of friction when the work piece size is scaled down. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications....

  15. Bni1p implicated in cytoskeletal control is a putative target of Rho1p small GTP binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, H; Tanaka, K; Mino, A; Umikawa, M; Imamura, H; Fujiwara, T; Fujita, Y; Hotta, K; Qadota, H; Watanabe, T; Ohya, Y; Takai, Y

    1996-11-15

    The RHO1 gene encodes a homolog of mammalian RhoA small GTP binding protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rho1p is localized at the growth sites, including the bud tip and the cytokinesis site, and is required for bud formation. We have recently shown that Pkc1p, a yeast homolog of mammalian protein kinase C, and glucan synthase are targets of Rho1p. Using the two-hybrid screening system, we cloned a gene encoding a protein which interacted with the GTP-bound form of Rho1p. This gene was identified as BNI1, known to be implicated in cytokinesis or establishment of cell polarity in S.cerevisiae. Bni1p shares homologous domains (FH1 and FH2 domains) with proteins involved in cytokinesis or establishment of cell polarity, including formin of mouse, capu and dia of Drosophila and FigA of Aspergillus. A temperature-sensitive mutation in which the RHO1 gene was replaced by the mammalian RhoA gene showed a synthetically lethal interaction with the bni1 mutation and the RhoA bni1 mutant accumulated cells with a deficiency in cytokinesis. Furthermore, this synthetic lethality was caused by the incapability of RhoA to activate Pkc1p, but not glucan synthase. These results suggest that Rho1p regulates cytoskeletal reorganization at least through Bni1p and Pkc1p.

  16. High rate of deficiency in the amino acids tryptophan and histidine in people with wounds: implication for nutrient targeting in wound management--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Beryl; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2009-02-01

    Malnutrition resulting from inadequate protein, energy, or micronutrient intake has been identified as an independent risk factor for the development of pressure ulcers in older adult patients and is associated with increased morbidity and death. To assess the relationship between albumin, the standard biochemical marker of nutritional adequacy, and amino acid status in people with wounds. The authors performed tests for serum albumin, prealbumin, and amino acid profiles on 18 consecutive hospital patients with wounds and 7 patients without wounds. A low level of the essential amino acids tryptophan and histidine was a common finding in older people with wounds. Of the 18 consecutive wound cases, 16 (88.9%) were found to be deficient in tryptophan, histidine, or both. Moreover, levels were generally found to be lower than those in the group without wounds. The levels of all other amino acids were essentially normal for all patients. Finally, although serum albumin is often used as a surrogate marker of amino acid adequacy or nutritional status, clinically abnormal albumin had poor specificity (63.2%), poor sensitivity (60.7%), and low positive predictive value (70.8%) for the identification of a low tryptophan or histidine level. People with wounds are a relatively at-risk group and are likely to be overlooked in terms of micronutrient deficiencies, and these findings have important implications in terms of potential specific targeting of nutrient supplementation.

  17. Proof-of-Concept Randomized Controlled Study of Cognition Effects of the Proprietary Extract Sceletium tortuosum (Zembrin) Targeting Phosphodiesterase-4 in Cognitively Healthy Subjects: Implications for Alzheimer's Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Simon; Gericke, Nigel; Farina-Woodbury, Michel; Badmaev, Vladimir; Raheb, Hana; Terpstra, Kristen; Antongiorgi, Joalex; Bureau, Yves; Cernovsky, Zack; Hou, Jirui; Sanchez, Veronica; Williams, Marissa; Copen, John; Husni, Mariwan; Goble, Liz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Converging evidence suggests that PDE-4 (phosphodiesterase subtype 4) plays a crucial role in regulating cognition via the PDE-4-cAMP cascade signaling involving phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Objective. The primary endpoint was to examine the neurocognitive effects of extract Sceletium tortuosum (Zembrin) and to assess the safety and tolerability of Zembrin in cognitively healthy control subjects. Method. We chose the randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design in our study. We randomized normal healthy subjects (total n = 21) to receive either 25 mg capsule Zembrin or placebo capsule once daily for 3 weeks, in a randomized placebo-controlled 3-week cross-over design. We administered battery of neuropsychological tests: CNS Vital Signs and Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D) at baseline and regular intervals and monitored side effects with treatment emergent adverse events scale. Results. 21 subjects (mean age: 54.6 years ± 6.0 yrs; male/female ratio: 9/12) entered the study. Zembrin at 25 mg daily dosage significantly improved cognitive set flexibility (P Zembrin was well tolerated. Conclusion. The promising cognitive enhancing effects of Zembrin likely implicate the PDE-4-cAMP-CREB cascade, a novel drug target in the potential treatment of early Alzheimer's dementia. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01805518.

  18. Direct friction measurement in draw bead testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2005-01-01

    The application of draw beads in sheet metal stamping ensures controlled drawing-in of flange parts. Lubrication conditions in draw beads are severe due to sliding under simultaneous bending. Based on the original draw bead test design by Nine [1] comprehensive studies of friction in draw beads...... have been reported in literature. A major drawback in all these studies is that friction is not directly measured, but requires repeated measurements of the drawing force with and without relative sliding between the draw beads and the sheet material. This implies two tests with a fixed draw bead tool...... and a freely rotating tool respectively, an approach, which inevitably implies large uncertainties due to scatter in the experimental conditions. In order to avoid this problem a new draw bead test is proposed by the authors measuring the friction force acting on the tool radius directly by a build...

  19. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  20. CAM/LIFTER forces and friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbey, D. J.; Lee, J.; Patterson, D. J.

    1992-02-01

    This report details the procedures used to measure the cam/lifter forces and friction. The present effort employed a Cummins LTA-10, and focuses on measurements and dynamic modeling of the injector train. The program was sponsored by the US Department of Energy in support of advanced diesel engine technology. The injector train was instrumented to record the instantaneous roller speed, roller pin friction torque, pushrod force, injector link force, and cam speed. These measurements, together with lift profiles for pushrod and injector link displacement, enabled the friction work loss in the injector train to be determined. Other significant design criteria such as camshaft roller follower slippage and maximum loads on components were also determined. Future efforts will concentrate on the dynamic model, with tests run as required for correlation.

  1. Physics of Friction in Disposable Plastic Syringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann-Vinson, A.; Vogler, E. A.; Martin, D. A.; Montgomery, D. B.; Sugg, H. W.; Monahan, L. A.

    1997-03-01

    Nosocomial applications of disposable plastic syringes demand excellent frictional behavior with no stick-slip over a broad velocity range and, simultaneously, a tight seal between stopper and barrel. However, when used in syringe pumps at slow injection speeds, stick-slip motion is frequently observed and high "break-out" forces are often necessary to initiate plunger movement after extended storage times. We have traced this frictional behavior to a velocity-dependent interaction between the elastomeric stopper and the plastic syringe barrel mediated by the syringe lubricant, almost universally a polydimethyl siloxane fluid. Lubricant properties were altered by crosslinking the surface of the silicone oil in an oxygen plasma. Changes in surface chemistry and morphology of the crosslinked oil were correlated with changes in frictional performance.

  2. Direct friction measurement in draw bead testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2005-01-01

    have been reported in literature. A major drawback in all these studies is that friction is not directly measured, but requires repeated measurements of the drawing force with and without relative sliding between the draw beads and the sheet material. This implies two tests with a fixed draw bead tool...... and a freely rotating tool respectively, an approach, which inevitably implies large uncertainties due to scatter in the experimental conditions. In order to avoid this problem a new draw bead test is proposed by the authors measuring the friction force acting on the tool radius directly by a build......-in piezoelectric torque transducer. This technique results in a very sensitive measurement of friction, which furthermore enables recording of lubricant film breakdown as function of drawing distance. The proposed test is validated in an experimental investigation of the influence of lubricant viscosity...

  3. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyáš, Robert; Šelešovský, Jakub; Musil, Tomáš

    2012-04-30

    The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Friction enhancement in concertina locomotion of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Hu, David L

    2012-11-07

    Narrow crevices are challenging terrain for most organisms and biomimetic robots. Snakes move through crevices using sequential folding and unfolding of their bodies in the manner of an accordion or concertina. In this combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate this effective means of moving through channels. We measure the frictional properties of corn snakes, their body kinematics and the transverse forces they apply to channels of varying width and inclination. To climb channels inclined at 60°, we find snakes use a combination of ingenious friction-enhancing techniques, including digging their ventral scales to double their frictional coefficient and pushing channel walls transversely with up to nine times body weight. Theoretical modelling of a one-dimensional n-linked crawler is used to calculate the transverse force factor of safety: we find snakes push up to four times more than required to prevent sliding backwards, presumably trading metabolic energy for an assurance of wall stability.

  5. Friction enhancement in concertina locomotion of snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Hu, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Narrow crevices are challenging terrain for most organisms and biomimetic robots. Snakes move through crevices using sequential folding and unfolding of their bodies in the manner of an accordion or concertina. In this combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate this effective means of moving through channels. We measure the frictional properties of corn snakes, their body kinematics and the transverse forces they apply to channels of varying width and inclination. To climb channels inclined at 60°, we find snakes use a combination of ingenious friction-enhancing techniques, including digging their ventral scales to double their frictional coefficient and pushing channel walls transversely with up to nine times body weight. Theoretical modelling of a one-dimensional n-linked crawler is used to calculate the transverse force factor of safety: we find snakes push up to four times more than required to prevent sliding backwards, presumably trading metabolic energy for an assurance of wall stability. PMID:22728386

  6. Static and dynamic friction of hierarchical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagliola, Gianluca; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-12-01

    Hierarchical structures are very common in nature, but only recently have they been systematically studied in materials science, in order to understand the specific effects they can have on the mechanical properties of various systems. Structural hierarchy provides a way to tune and optimize macroscopic mechanical properties starting from simple base constituents and new materials are nowadays designed exploiting this possibility. This can be true also in the field of tribology. In this paper we study the effect of hierarchical patterned surfaces on the static and dynamic friction coefficients of an elastic material. Our results are obtained by means of numerical simulations using a one-dimensional spring-block model, which has previously been used to investigate various aspects of friction. Despite the simplicity of the model, we highlight some possible mechanisms that explain how hierarchical structures can significantly modify the friction coefficients of a material, providing a means to achieve tunability.

  7. Adhesion and friction of thin metal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with thin films of titanium, chromium, iron, and platinum sputter deposited on quartz or mica substrates. A single crystal hemispherically tipped gold slider was used in contact with the films at loads of 1.0 to 30.0 and at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min at 23 C. Test results indicate that the friction coefficient is dependent on the adhesion of two interfaces, that between the film and its substrate and the slider and the film. There exists a relationship between the percent d bond character of metals in bulk and in thin film form and the friction coefficient. Oxygen can increase adhesive bonding of a metal film (platinum) to a substrate.

  8. The role of fluid pressure in frictional stability and earthquake triggering: insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Scuderi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Fluid overpressure has been proposed as one of the primary mechanisms that facilitate earthquake slip along faults. However, elastic dislocation theory combined with friction laws suggests that fluid overpressure may inhibit the dynamic instabilities that result in earthquakes, by controlling the critical fault stiffness (kc). This controversy poses a serious problem in our understanding of earthquake physics, with severe implications for both natural and human-induced seismic hazard. Nevertheless, currently, there are no systematic studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions for which the evolution of friction parameters and slip stability can be measured. We have used a state-of-the-art biaxial rock deformation apparatus within a pressure vessel, in order to allow a true triaxial stress field, in a double direct shear configuration. We tested carbonate fault gouge, Carrara marble, sieved to a grain size of 125 μm. Normal stresses and confining pressure were held constant throughout the experiment at values of 5 to 40 MPa, and the pore fluid pressure was varied from hydrostatic up to near lithostatic values. Shear stress was induced by a constant displacement rate and sliding velocities varied from 0.1-1000 μm/s, in order to evaluate slip stability via rate- and state- dependent frictional parameters, such as (a-b), Dc and kc. Our data show that sliding velocity controls the values of friction parameters. In addition we observe a general increase of (a-b) and a decrease of Dc with increasing fluid pressure. Our observations suggest that fluid overpressure does not only facilitate fault reactivation but it also influences frictional parameters with important implications for fault stability and earthquake triggering.

  9. 2-Deoxyglucose induces the expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) by increasing O-GlcNAcylation – Implications for targeting the Warburg effect in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Shin Yee; Hagen, Thilo, E-mail: bchth@nus.edu.sg

    2015-10-02

    The high proliferation rate of cancer cells and the microenvironment in the tumor tissue require the reprogramming of tumor cell metabolism. The major mechanism of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells is the Warburg effect, defined as the preferential utilization of glucose via glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. Targeting the Warburg effect is considered as a promising therapeutic strategy in cancer therapy. In this regard, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) has been evaluated clinically. 2DG exerts its effect by directly inhibiting glycolysis at the level of hexokinase and phosphoglucoisomerase. In addition, 2DG is also known to induce the expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP), a tumor suppressor protein and an important negative regulator of cellular glucose uptake. Hence, characterization of the mechanism through which 2DG regulates TXNIP expression may reveal novel approaches to target the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Therefore, in this study we sought to test various hypotheses for the mechanistic basis of the 2DG dependent TXNIP regulation. We have shown that 2DG induced TXNIP expression is independent of carbohydrate response element mediated transcription. Furthermore, the induction of TXNIP is neither dependent on the ability of 2DG to deplete cellular ATP nor to cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. We found that the 2DG induced TXNIP expression is at least in part dependent on the inhibition of the O-GlcNAcase enzyme and the accumulation of O-GlcNAc modified proteins. These results have implications for the identification of therapeutic targets to increase TXNIP expression in cancer. - Highlights: • 2DG increases TXNIP expression at the mRNA and protein level. • The effect of 2DG on TXNIP is independent of ChoRE mediated transcription. • 2DG induces TXNIP independent of ER stress induction and ATP depletion. • 2DG inhibits OGA and leads to accumulation of O-GlcNAcylated proteins. • The upregulation of

  10. High fidelity frictional models for MEMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpick, Robert W. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Bitsie, Fernando; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corwin, Alex David; Ashurst, William Robert (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Jones, Reese E.; Subhash, Ghatu S. (Michigan Technological Institute, Houghton, MI); Street, Mark D. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Sumali, Anton Hartono; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Starr, Michael James; Redmond, James Michael; Flater, Erin E. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

    2004-10-01

    The primary goals of the present study are to: (1) determine how and why MEMS-scale friction differs from friction on the macro-scale, and (2) to begin to develop a capability to perform finite element simulations of MEMS materials and components that accurately predicts response in the presence of adhesion and friction. Regarding the first goal, a newly developed nanotractor actuator was used to measure friction between molecular monolayer-coated, polysilicon surfaces. Amontons law does indeed apply over a wide range of forces. However, at low loads, which are of relevance to MEMS, there is an important adhesive contribution to the normal load that cannot be neglected. More importantly, we found that at short sliding distances, the concept of a coefficient of friction is not relevant; rather, one must invoke the notion of 'pre-sliding tangential deflections' (PSTD). Results of a simple 2-D model suggests that PSTD is a cascade of small-scale slips with a roughly constant number of contacts equilibrating the applied normal load. Regarding the second goal, an Adhesion Model and a Junction Model have been implemented in PRESTO, Sandia's transient dynamics, finite element code to enable asperity-level simulations. The Junction Model includes a tangential shear traction that opposes the relative tangential motion of contacting surfaces. An atomic force microscope (AFM)-based method was used to measure nano-scale, single asperity friction forces as a function of normal force. This data is used to determine Junction Model parameters. An illustrative simulation demonstrates the use of the Junction Model in conjunction with a mesh generated directly from an atomic force microscope (AFM) image to directly predict frictional response of a sliding asperity. Also with regards to the second goal, grid-level, homogenized models were studied. One would like to perform a finite element analysis of a MEMS component assuming nominally flat surfaces and to include the

  11. Friction stir welding of single crystal aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonda, Richard Warren; Wert, John A.; Reynolds, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution of crystallog......Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution...

  12. Ratchet device with broken friction symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norden, Bengt; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2002-01-01

    An experimental setup (gadget) has been made for demonstration of a ratchet mechanism induced by broken symmetry of a dependence of dry friction on external forcing. This gadget converts longitudinal oscillating or fluctuating motion into a unidirectional rotation, the direction of which is in ac......An experimental setup (gadget) has been made for demonstration of a ratchet mechanism induced by broken symmetry of a dependence of dry friction on external forcing. This gadget converts longitudinal oscillating or fluctuating motion into a unidirectional rotation, the direction of which...

  13. Analysis of nonlinear channel friction inverse problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Weiping; LIU Guohua

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Backus-Gilbert inverse theory, the singular value decomposition (SVD) for general inverse matrices and the optimization algorithm are used to solve the channel friction inverse problem. The resolution and covari- ance friction inverse model in matrix form is developed to examine the reliability of solutions. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that the convergence rate of the general Newton optimization algorithm is in the second-order. The Wiggins method is also incorporated into the algorithm. Using the method, noise can be suppressed effectively, and the results are close to accurate solutions with proper control parameters. Also, the numerical stability can be improved.

  14. Design of Piston Ring Friction Tester Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder

    2006-01-01

    the frictional behavior of a piston ring correctly is knowledge about the amount of lubricant present. For piston rings the external load may be established by measuring the pressure distribution, i.e. the pressure drop in the piston ring package. Speed and temperature may also be established. The amount...... and forces on piston rod. Since the frictional forces are small compared to the rest of the acting forces the main design idea is to fix the piston, while the cylinder liner moves. This approach makes it simple to measure the parameters mentioned above by putting the instrumentation in the piston....

  15. Frictional coupling between sliding and spinning motion

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, Z; Unger, T; Wolf, D E; Farkas, Zeno; Bartels, Guido; Unger, Tamas; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2002-01-01

    We show that the friction force and torque, acting at a dry contact of two objects moving and rotating relative to each other, are inherently coupled. As a simple test system, a sliding and spinning disk on a horizontal flat surface is considered. We calculate, and also measure, how the disk is slowing down, and find that it always stops its sliding and spinning motion at the same moment. We discuss the impact of this coupling between friction force and torque on the physics of granular materials.

  16. Monomeric Friction Coefficient of Metalnanodispersible Polymeric Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Kolupayev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of a nanodispersible metal excipient in number of 0    5,0 vol.% Cu for the size of a monomeric friction coefficient of polyvinylchloride (PVC systems in temperature range 298  Т  (Tg + 10 K is investigated. It is shown that various types of coordination movements of building blocks are described by a friction coefficient which serves as a measure of influence of external fields and ingredients on viscoelastic behavior of a composite. The analysis of processes of a relaxation on the basis of the theory of flexible chains taking into account power and entropic factors is carried out.

  17. Bifurcations in Systems with Friction : Basic Models and Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanov, A. P.

    2009-01-01

    Examples of irregular behavior of dynamical systems with dry friction are discussed. A classification of frictional contacts with respect to their dimensionality, associativity, and the possibility of interruptions is proposed and basic models showing typical features are stated. In particular,

  18. Micromechanisms of friction and wear introduction to relativistic tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Lyubimov, Dmitrij; Pinchuk, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    The modern vision of the micromechanism of friction and wear is explored, from the examination of ideal and real crystal structure and adhesion properties to the dynamics of solid frictional interaction. The fundamental quantum-mechanical and relativity principles of particle interaction are considered as basis of friction micro-process examination. The changes in solid structure originated from the influence of different kinds of force fields are considered. The principal possibility of relativity effect manifestation by friction is explained. The critical state of friction – triboplasma – was studied. Structural peculiarities of triboplasma, the kinetics of its transformation during frictional interaction as well as the influence of plasma and postplasma processes on tribojunction friction characteristics and complex formation by friction were examined. The book addresses to tribology researchers.

  19. Assessing slipperiness in fast-food restaurants in the USA using friction variation, friction level and perception rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Way Li, Kai; Filiaggi, Alfred; Courtney, Theodore K

    2008-05-01

    Although friction variation is speculated to be a significant contributor to slip and fall incidents, it has not been related to a measurement of slipperiness in the literature. This field study investigated the relationship among multiple friction variations, friction levels and the perception ratings of slipperiness in six major working areas of 10 fast-food restaurants in the USA. The mean perception rating score for each working area was correlated with various friction reduction variables across all the restaurants in comparison with its correlation with the mean friction coefficient of each working area. The results indicated that the absolute and relative reductions in friction over the whole working area, among 12 friction reduction variables evaluated, could have a slightly better correlation with the perception rating score (r=0.34 and 0.37, respectively) than the mean friction coefficient of each working area (0.33). However, in friction measurements, more effort and time are needed to quantify friction variations than to obtain the mean friction coefficient. The results of the multiple regression model on the perception rating indicated that adding friction reduction variables into the regression model, in addition to the mean friction coefficient, did not make a significant impact on the outcomes. The results further indicated a statistically significant correlation between the mean friction coefficient and the maximum relative friction reduction over the whole area in each working area across all the restaurants evaluated (r=0.80). Despite a slightly lower correlation with perception rating than the friction variation, the mean friction coefficient of an area is still a reasonably good indicator of slipperiness.

  20. Friction Stir Processing of ODS and FM Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young Bum; Noh, Sang Hoon; Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In ODS steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and martensite, and the oxide

  1. A HYBRID TECHNIQUE FOR FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION OF SERVO SYSTEM WITH FRICTION FORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAIK.RAFI KIRAN,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The system identification process in servo system with frictional force seems to be a complex task becauseof its non-linear nature. For such non-linear systems, a good choice is system identification in frequencydomain. However, most of the techniques are manual and are inappropriate for determination of systemparameters. This makes system identification ineffective for servo systems with frictional force. Toovercome this issue, a hybrid technique is proposed in this paper. The proposed technique exploits neuralnetwork and genetic algorithm to determine the system parameters of servo systems with friction. In theproposed technique, the target parameters are determined from the transfer function derived for thesystem. Subsequently, the system parameters are identified by a process formed by blending the neuralnetwork and genetic algorithm techniques. Prior to performing the identification procedure, backpropagation training is given to the neural network using a pre-examined dataset. Then with thecombined operation of neural network and genetic algorithm, the system parameters that are closer tothe target parameters for the servo system with frictional force are determined. The technique isimplemented and compared with the existing frequency domain identification technique. From thecomparative results, it is evident that the proposed technique outperforms the existing technique.

  2. An empirical model for friction in cold forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Eriksen, Morten; Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    With a system of simulative tribology tests for cold forging the friction stress for aluminum, steel and stainless steel provided with typical lubricants for cold forging has been determined for varying normal pressure, surface expansion, sliding length and tool/work piece interface temperature...... of normal pressure and tool/work piece interface temperature. The model is verified by process testing measuring friction at varying reductions in cold forward rod extrusion. KEY WORDS: empirical friction model, cold forging, simulative friction tests....

  3. Low-impact friction materials for brake pads

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art friction materials for applications in disc brake systems are constituted by composite materials, specifically formulated to ensure proper friction and wear performances, under the sliding contact conditions of braking events. The bases of typical friction compound formulations usually include 10 to 30 different components bonded with a polymeric binder cross-linked in situ. Main requests to be fulfilled during braking are an adequate friction efficiency and enough mechanical...

  4. Stick-slip at soft adhesive interfaces mediated by slow frictional waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-28

    Stick-slip is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from squealing automobile brakes to earthquakes. At soft adhesive interfaces, this instability has long been attributed to Schallamach waves, which are a type of slow frictional wave. We use a contact configuration capable of isolating single wave events, coupled with high speed in situ imaging, to demonstrate the existence of two new stick-slip modes. It is shown that these modes also correspond to the passage of slow waves-separation pulse and slip pulse-with distinct nucleation and propagation characteristics. The slip pulse, characterized by a sharp stress front, propagates in the same direction as the Schallamach wave. In contrast, the separation pulse, involving local interface detachment and resembling a tensile neck, travels in exactly the opposite direction. A change in the stick-slip mode from the separation to the slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Taken together, the three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in low-velocity sliding. The detailed observations enable us to present a phase diagram delineating the domains of occurrence of these waves. We suggest a direct analogy between the observed slow frictional waves and well known muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied organisms. Our work answers basic questions about adhesive mechanisms of frictional instabilities in natural and engineered systems, with broader implications for slow surface wave phenomena.

  5. Interfacial Friction and Adhesion of Polymer Brushes

    KAUST Repository

    Landherr, Lucas J. T.

    2011-08-02

    A bead-probe lateral force microscopy (LFM) technique is used to characterize the interfacial friction and adhesion properties of polymer brushes. Our measurements attempt to relate the physical structure and chemical characteristics of the brush to their properties as thin-film, tethered lubricants. Brushes are synthesized at several chain lengths and surface coverages from polymer chains of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polystyrene (PS), and a poly(propylene glycol)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer (PPG/PEG). At high surface coverage, PDMS brushes manifest friction coefficients (COFs) that are among the lowest recorded for a dry lubricant film (μ ≈ 0.0024) and close to 1 order of magnitude lower than the COF of a bare silicon surface. Brushes synthesized from higher molar mass chains exhibit higher friction forces than those created using lower molar mass polymers. Increased grafting density of chains in the brush significantly reduces the COF by creating a uniform surface of stretched chains with a decreased surface viscosity. Brushes with lower surface tension and interfacial shear stresses manifest the lowest COF. In particular, PDMS chains exhibit COFs lower than PS by a factor of 3.7 and lower than PPG/PEG by a factor of 4.7. A scaling analysis conducted on the surface coverage (δ) in relation to the fraction (ε) of the friction force developing from adhesion predicts a universal relation ε ∼ δ4/3, which is supported by our experimental data. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  6. Multiscaling behavior of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesar, M.; Jamali, T.; Sadeghi, A.; Movahed, S. M. S.; Fesler, G.; Meyer, E.; Khoshnevisan, B.; Jafari, G. R.

    2017-06-01

    The scaling behavior of friction between rough surfaces is a well-known phenomenon. It might be asked whether such a scaling feature also exists for friction at an atomic scale despite the absence of roughness on atomically flat surfaces. Indeed, other types of fluctuations, e.g., thermal and instrumental fluctuations, become appreciable at this length scale and can lead to scaling behavior of the measured atomic-scale friction. We investigate this using the lateral force exerted on the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) when the tip is dragged over the clean NaCl (001) surface in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Here the focus is on the fluctuations of the lateral force profile rather than its saw-tooth trend; we first eliminate the trend using the singular value decomposition technique and then explore the scaling behavior of the detrended data, which contains only fluctuations, using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. The results demonstrate a scaling behavior for the friction data ranging from 0.2 to 2 nm with the Hurst exponent H =0.61 ±0.02 at a 1 σ confidence interval. Moreover, the dependence of the generalized Hurst exponent, h (q ) , on the index variable q confirms the multifractal or multiscaling behavior of the nanofriction data. These results prove that fluctuation of nanofriction empirical data has a multifractal behavior which deviates from white noise.

  7. Modelling and Testing of Friction in Forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge about friction is still limited in forging. The theoretical models applied presently for process analysis are not satisfactory compared to the advanced and detailed studies possible to carry out by plastic FEM analyses and more refined models have to be based on experimental testing...

  8. [Penis friction edema: not a venereal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erceg, A.; Verlind, J.; Berretty, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a local swelling of the penis, which increased until the entire penis was thick and swollen. After infectious and obstructive causes had been eliminated, a diagnosis of 'penis friction oedema' was made. The swelling disappeared during several weeks of abstinence from

  9. Friction welding thermal and metallurgical characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    This book provides insight into the thermal analysis of friction welding incorporating welding parameters such as external, duration, breaking load, and material properties. The morphological and metallurgical changes associated with the resulting weld sites are analysed using characterization methods such as electron scanning microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Nuclear reaction analysis.

  10. Ratchet due to broken friction symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norden, Bengt; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2002-01-01

    A ratchet mechanism that occurs due to asymmetric dependence of the friction of a moving system on its velocity or a driving force is reported. For this kind of ratchet, instead of a particle moving in a periodic potential, the dynamics of which have broken space-time symmetry, the system must...

  11. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert, E-mail: robert.matyas@upce.cz [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Pardubice 532 10 (Czech Republic); Selesovsky, Jakub; Musil, Tomas [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Pardubice 532 10 (Czech Republic)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The friction sensitivity of 14 samples of primary explosives was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The same apparatus (small scale BAM) and the same method (probit analysis) was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal shapes and sizes were documented with microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost all samples are less sensitive than lead azide, which is commercially used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The organic peroxides (TATP, DADP, HMTD) are not as sensitive as often reported. - Abstract: The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature.

  12. On the superradiance-tidal friction correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Glampedakis, K; Kennefick, D

    2013-01-01

    Since the work of Hartle in the 1970s, and the subsequent development of the the Membrane Paradigm approach to black hole physics it has been widely accepted that superradiant scattering of gravitational waves bears strong similarities with the phenomenon of ``tidal friction'' (well-known from Newtonian gravity) operating in binary systems of viscous material bodies. In this paper we revisit the superradiance-tidal friction analogy within the context of ultracompact relativistic bodies. We advocate that as long as these bodies have non-zero viscosity they should undergo tidal friction that can be construed as a kind of superradiant scattering from the point of view of the dynamics of an orbiting test-body. In addition we consider the presence of anisotropic matter, which is required for at least some ultracompact bodies, if they are to sustain a radius very close to the gravitational radius. We find that the tidal friction/superradiance output is enhanced with increasing anisotropy and that strongly anisotrop...

  13. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    by gravity, and a vehicle (such as a car or bicycle ) accelerating along a level road is driven by a motor or by pedalling. In such cases, static...continuously roll. Consider a cart of mass m that is free rolling up an incline, as sketched in figure 1. The total frictional force f on the cart

  14. Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhi-hong; HE Di-qiu; WANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    Friction stir welding(FSW), a new solid-state welding technology invited in the early 1990s,enables us weld aluminum alloys and titanium alloys etc. The processing of FSW, the microstructure in FSW alloysand the factors influencing weld quality are introduced. The complex factors affecting the properties are researched.

  15. Frictional Dermatosis in a Courier Driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Frictional hypermelanosis is an uncommon finding in Caucasians. We report the unusual case of 56-year-old male courier driver who developed linear and patchy hypermelanosis of the back caused by the driver's seat. Histology has included other pathologies. Treatment of the asymptomatic hyper pigmentation was not warranted.

  16. Validation of measured friction by process tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Morten; Henningsen, Poul; Tan, Xincai;

    The objective of sub-task 3.3 is to evaluate under actual process conditions the friction formulations determined by simulative testing. As regards task 3.3 the following tests have been used according to the original project plan: 1. standard ring test and 2. double cup extrusion test. The task ...

  17. Frictional Torque on a Rotating Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to motion often includes a dry frictional term independent of the speed of an object and a fluid drag term varying linearly with speed in the viscous limit. (At higher speeds, quadratic drag can also occur.) Here, measurements are performed for an aluminium disc mounted on bearings that is given an initial twist and allowed to spin…

  18. Friction Force: From Mechanics to Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Christian; Gruber, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We study some mechanical problems in which a friction force is acting on a system. Using the fundamental concepts of state, time evolution and energy conservation, we explain how to extend Newtonian mechanics to thermodynamics. We arrive at the two laws of thermodynamics and then apply them to investigate the time evolution and heat transfer of…

  19. Tribology: Friction, lubrication, and wear technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: introduction and definitions of terms; friction concepts; lubrication technology concepts; wear technology concepts; and tribological transitions. This document is designed for educators who seek to teach these concepts to their students.

  20. [Penis friction edema: not a venereal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erceg, A.; Verlind, J.; Berretty, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a local swelling of the penis, which increased until the entire penis was thick and swollen. After infectious and obstructive causes had been eliminated, a diagnosis of 'penis friction oedema' was made. The swelling disappeared during several weeks of abstinence from

  1. Fibre Distribution in Friction-spun Yarns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Oyondi Nganyi; YU Chong-wen

    2006-01-01

    According to the yarn forming characteristics in friction spinning, the arrangement of fed sliver is designed, to get the desired fiber distribution in the resultant yarn. On the base of that, the relation between the theoretical fibre distribution and the actual fibre distribution is analyzed by use of electron microscope.

  2. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied. Ki...

  3. 30 CFR 57.19008 - Friction hoist synchronizing mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Friction hoist synchronizing mechanisms. 57... MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoists § 57.19008 Friction hoist synchronizing mechanisms. Where creep or slip may alter the effective position of safety devices, friction hoists shall be equipped with...

  4. 30 CFR 56.19008 - Friction hoist synchronizing mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Friction hoist synchronizing mechanisms. 56... Personnel Hoisting Hoists § 56.19008 Friction hoist synchronizing mechanisms. Where creep or slip may alter the effective position of safety devices, friction hoists shall be equipped with synchronizing...

  5. 30 CFR 56.19014 - Friction hoist overtravel protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Friction hoist overtravel protection. 56.19014 Section 56.19014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Hoisting Hoists § 56.19014 Friction hoist overtravel protection. In a friction hoist installation, tapered...

  6. 30 CFR 57.19014 - Friction hoist overtravel protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Friction hoist overtravel protection. 57.19014 Section 57.19014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Hoisting Hoists § 57.19014 Friction hoist overtravel protection. In a friction hoist installation, tapered...

  7. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative humidi

  8. Investigation of Friction-induced Damage to the Pig Cornea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Cruz Barros, Raquel; Van Kooten, Theo G.; Veeregowda, Deepak Halenahally

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical friction causes damage to the cornea. A friction measurement device with minimal intervention with the pig cornea tear film revealed a low friction coefficient of 0.011 in glycerine solution. Glycerine molecules presumably bind to water, mucins, and epithelial cells and therewith improve

  9. Milled Die Steel Surface Roughness Correlation with Steel Sheet Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, J.; Brown, C.A.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates correlations between the surface topography ofmilled steel dies and friction with steel sheet. Several die surfaces were prepared by milling. Friction was measured in bending under tension testing. Linear regression coefficients (R2) between the friction and texture...

  10. Investigation of Friction-induced Damage to the Pig Cornea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Cruz Barros, Raquel; Van Kooten, Theo G.; Veeregowda, Deepak Halenahally

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical friction causes damage to the cornea. A friction measurement device with minimal intervention with the pig cornea tear film revealed a low friction coefficient of 0.011 in glycerine solution. Glycerine molecules presumably bind to water, mucins, and epithelial cells and therewith improve

  11. Frictional torque numbers for ball cup and journal bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Plastic bearing material wears in ball cup and journal bearings. Contact areas in the ball cup and the journal bearing increase. The frictional torque needed to rotate the ball or journal also increases. When the coefficient of friction is assumed to be constant during wearing out, the frictional t

  12. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  13. CDC25A Protein Stability Represents a Previously Unrecognized Target of HER2 Signaling in Human Breast Cancer: Implication for a Potential Clinical Relevance in Trastuzumab Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Brunetto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The CDC25A-CDK2 pathway has been proposed as critical for the oncogenic action of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 in mammary epithelial cells. In particular, transgenic expression of CDC25A cooperates with HER2 in promoting mammary tumors, whereas CDC25A hemizygous loss attenuates the HER2-induced tumorigenesis penetrance. On the basis of this evidence of a synergism between HER2 and the cell cycle regulator CDC25A in a mouse model of mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated the role of CDC25A in human HER2-positive breast cancer and its possible implications in therapeutic response. HER2 status and CDC25A expression were assessed in 313 breast cancer patients and we found statistically significant correlation between HER2 and CDC25A (P = .007. Moreover, an HER2-positive breast cancer subgroup with high levels of CDC25A and very aggressive phenotype was identified (P = .005. Importantly, our in vitro studies on breast cancer cell lines showed that the HER2 inhibitor efficacy on cell growth and viability relied also on CDC25A expression and that such inhibition induces CDC25A down-regulation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and DNA damage response activation. In line with this observation, we found a statistical significant association between CDC25A overexpression and trastuzumab-combined therapy response rate in two different HER2-positive cohorts of trastuzumab-treated patients in either metastatic or neoadjuvant setting (P = .018 for the metastatic cohort and P = .021 for the neoadjuvant cohort. Our findings highlight a link between HER2 and CDC25A that positively modulates HER2- targeted therapy response, suggesting that, in HER2-positive breast cancer patients, CDC25A overexpression affects trastuzumab sensitivity.

  14. CDC25A Protein Stability Represents a Previously Unrecognized Target of HER2 Signaling in Human Breast Cancer: Implication for a Potential Clinical Relevance in Trastuzumab Treatment1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetto, Emanuela; Ferrara, Anna Maria; Rampoldi, Francesca; Talarico, Anna; Cin, Elena Dal; Grassini, Greta; Spagnuolo, Lorenzo; Sassi, Isabella; Ferro, Antonella; Cuorvo, Lucia Veronica; Barbareschi, Mattia; Piccinin, Sara; Maestro, Roberta; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Cangi, Maria Giulia

    2013-01-01

    The CDC25A-CDK2 pathway has been proposed as critical for the oncogenic action of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in mammary epithelial cells. In particular, transgenic expression of CDC25A cooperates with HER2 in promoting mammary tumors, whereas CDC25A hemizygous loss attenuates the HER2-induced tumorigenesis penetrance. On the basis of this evidence of a synergism between HER2 and the cell cycle regulator CDC25A in a mouse model of mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated the role of CDC25A in human HER2-positive breast cancer and its possible implications in therapeutic response. HER2 status and CDC25A expression were assessed in 313 breast cancer patients and we found statistically significant correlation between HER2 and CDC25A (P = .007). Moreover, an HER2-positive breast cancer subgroup with high levels of CDC25A and very aggressive phenotype was identified (P = .005). Importantly, our in vitro studies on breast cancer cell lines showed that the HER2 inhibitor efficacy on cell growth and viability relied also on CDC25A expression and that such inhibition induces CDC25A down-regulation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and DNA damage response activation. In line with this observation, we found a statistical significant association between CDC25A overexpression and trastuzumab-combined therapy response rate in two different HER2-positive cohorts of trastuzumab-treated patients in either metastatic or neoadjuvant setting (P = .018 for the metastatic cohort and P = .021 for the neoadjuvant cohort). Our findings highlight a link between HER2 and CDC25A that positively modulates HER2-targeted therapy response, suggesting that, in HER2-positive breast cancer patients, CDC25A overexpression affects trastuzumab sensitivity. PMID:23730206

  15. A Microphysical Model for Phyllosilicate Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartog, S. A. M.; Faulkner, D.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts the experimentally observed temperature dependence of (a-b) and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  16. A strain-based porosity model for use in hydrocode simulations of impacts and implications for transient crater growth in porous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünnemann, K.; Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.

    2006-02-01

    Numerical modelling of impact cratering has reached a high degree of sophistication; however, the treatment of porous materials still poses a large problem in hydrocode calculations. We present a novel approach for dealing with porous compaction in numerical modelling of impact crater formation. In contrast to previous attempts (e.g., P-alpha model, snowplow model), our model accounts for the collapse of pore space by assuming that the compaction function depends upon volumetric strain rather than pressure. Our new ɛ-alpha model requires only four input parameters and each has a physical meaning. The model is simple and intuitive and shows good agreement with a wide variety of experimental data, ranging from static compaction tests to highly dynamic impact experiments. Our major objective in developing the model is to investigate the effect of porosity and internal friction on transient crater formation. We present preliminary numerical model results that suggest that both porosity and internal friction play an important role in limiting crater growth over a large range in gravity-scaled source size.

  17. Measurement of friction coefficient in aluminum sheet warm forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zheng-hua; LI Zhi-gang; HUANG Chong-jiu; DONG Xiang-huai

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheets are used more and more to manufacture auto panels. Because the friction behavior is very complicated, it is necessary to study the friction during the aluminum sheet warm forming process. The author has designed a new probe sensor based on an online tribotest method which directly measures friction coefficient in the forming process. Experiments of cup drawing have been conducted and the friction coefficients under different forming conditions have been measured. The results indicate that the forming parameters, such as forming temperature, blankholding force and lubrication status have great effect upon the friction coefficient.

  18. A Damping Characteristics Calculation Method of Metal Dry Friction Isolators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hong-yuan; HAO De-gang; XIA Yu-hong; ULANOV A M; PONOMAREV Yu K

    2008-01-01

    The dry friction ring-type vibration isolator is considered as an isotropic continuous medium. A method of dry friction hysteresis loop calculation is proposed based on friction force analysis of contact beam. The friction force is modeled as an equivalent distributed moment to use the finite element method (FEM) to calculate the dry friction vibration isolator hysteresis loop, so the damping characteristics can be obtained. A comparison of the hysteresis loop calculation results and the experimental results shows the average relative error is 2.7%, it proves the calculation method is feasible.

  19. Measurement of Normal and Friction Forces in a Rolling Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Arentoft, Mogens; Wanheim, Tarras

    2004-01-01

    by the fric-tion conditions. To achieve this important informa-tion, measurements of the normal pressure and friction stresses in the deformation zone are re-quested. The direction of the friction stresses is changing during the rolling gap. At the entrance of the de-formation zone, the peripherical velocity...... of the roll is higher than for the incoming material, which causes frictional stresses at the material acting in the rolling direction. At the outlet of the rolling gap, the velocity of the deformed material exceeds the velocity of the roll, generating frictional stresses contrary to the direction of rolling...

  20. Friction Effects in Pedestrian Headform Impacts with Engine Hoods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qi; XIA Yong; ZHOU Qing

    2009-01-01

    In the pedestrian headform impact test mandated by the European pedestrian safety requirements, the contact friction between the headform and the engine hood affects the headform kinematics and head injury criterion (HIC) to some extent. This study shows that the friction effect is more significant with child headform impact than with adult headform impact and the relative angle between the headform impact di-rection and the hood surface greatly affects the headform impact sensitivity to the friction coefficient. The sensitivity of the headform kinematics to the friction coefficient is also analyzed. The results show that ac-curate friction coefficients are needed to improve predictions of pedestrian headform impacts with hoods.

  1. Ferrous friction stir weld physical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Seth Jason

    2006-04-01

    Traditional fusion welding processes have several drawbacks associated with the melting and solidification of metal. Weld defects associated with the solidification of molten metal may act as initiation sites for cracks. Segregation of alloying elements during solidification may cause local changes in resistance to corrosion. The high amount of heat required to produce the molten metal in the weld can produce distortion from the intended position on cooling. The heat from the electric arc commonly used to melt metal in fusion welds may also produce metal fumes which are a potential health hazard. Friction stir welding is one application which has the potential to make full thickness welds in a single pass, while eliminating fume, reducing distortion, and eliminating solidification defects. Currently the friction stir welding process is used in the aerospace industry on aluminum alloys. Interest in the process by industries which rely on iron and its alloys for structural material is increasing. While friction stir welding has been shown to be feasible with iron alloys, the understanding of friction stir welding process effects on these materials is in its infancy. This project was aimed to better that understanding by developing a procedure for physical simulation of friction stir welding. Friction stir weld material tracer experiments utilizing stainless steel markers were conducted with plates of ingot iron and HSLA-65. Markers of 0.0625" diameter 308 stainless steel worked well for tracing the end position of material moved by the friction stir welding tool. The markers did not produce measurable increases in the loading of the tool in the direction of travel. Markers composed of 0.25" diameter 304 stainless steel did not perform as well as the smaller markers and produced increased loads on the friction stir welding tool. The smaller markers showed that material is moved in a curved path around the tool and deposited behind the tool. Material near the surface

  2. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was

  3. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Wear is an inevitable product of frictional sliding of brittle rocks as evidenced by the ubiquitous occurrence of fault gouge and slickenside striations. We present here experimental observations designed to demonstrate the relationship between wear and friction and their governing mechanisms. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters. Stresses, wear and temperature were continuously monitored. We analyzed 86 experiments of Kasota dolomite, Sierra White granite, Pennsylvania quartzite, Karoo gabbro, and Tennessee sandstone at slip velocities ranging from 0.002 to 0.97 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. We conducted two types of runs: short slip experiments (slip distance mechanisms; and long slip experiments (slip distance > 3 m) designed to achieve mature wear conditions and to observe the evolution of wear and friction as the fault surfaces evolved. The experiments reveal three wear stages: initial, running-in, and steady-state. The initial stage is characterized by (1) discrete damage striations, the length of which is comparable to total slip , and local pits or plow features; (2) timing and magnitude of fault-normal dilation corresponds to transient changes of normal and shear stresses; and (3) surface roughness increasing with the applied normal stress. We interpret these observations as wear mechanisms of (a) plowing into the fresh rock surfaces; (b) asperity breakage; and (c) asperity climb. The running-in stage is characterized by (1) intense wear-rate over a critical wear distance of Rd = 0.3-2 m; (2) drop of friction coefficient over a weakening distance of Dc = 0.2-4 m; (3) Rd and Dc display positive, quasi-linear relation with each other. We interpret these observations as indicating the organizing of newly-created wear particles into a 'three-body' structure that acts to lubricate the fault (Reches & Lockner, 2010). The steady

  4. On Surface Structure and Friction Regulation in Reptilian Limbless Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aal, Hisham A

    2012-01-01

    One way of controlling friction and associated energy losses is to engineer a deterministic structural pattern on the surface of the rubbing parts (i.e., texture engineering). Custom texturing enhances the quality of lubrication, reduces friction, and allows the use of lubricants of lower viscosity. To date, a standardized procedure to generate deterministic texture constructs is virtually non-existent. Many engineers, therefore, study natural species to explore surface construction and to probe the role surface topography assumes in friction control. Snakes offer rich examples of surfaces where topological features allow the optimization and control of frictional behavior. In this paper, we investigate the frictional behavior of a constrictor type reptile, Python regius. The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakesk...

  5. Friction material composites copper-metal-free material design perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2015-01-01

    This book examines material composites used in connection with brake friction, their design and safety. To aid in understanding, the essentials of friction are explained. This second edition was extended to include friction material composites without copper, as they offer an environmentally friendlier option. The second edition is intended to support beginners by offering insights into the essentials of friction material composites, helping them to develop a broader understanding of brake friction materials. Friction materials find wide-ranging applications in household and industrial appliances, brake pads for automotive applications, rail brake friction pads and composition brake blocks. This second edition is an introductory volume to a set of related books, and is based on the author’s experience and expertise with various material manufacturers, brake manufacturers, vehicle manufacturers, researchers and testing labs around the world with which the author has been associated for the past 28 years.

  6. Device for Measuring Sliding Friction on Highloft Nonwovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Michielsen

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available When measuring the sliding friction on highly compliant materials such as fabric batting and foam rubber, a substantial portion of the apparent friction is due to the deformation of the substrate. A new friction instrument consisting of a sled within a sled has been developed that eliminates the contribution of this deformation and provides the true sliding friction as well as the force required to deform the substrate. The friction coefficient as measured using a conventional steel sled sliding on high loft polyester batts increased as the number of polyester batts increased. Using the new, guarded friction sled, the friction coefficient was independent of the number of supporting batts, thus separating the deformation forces from the sliding forces.

  7. Formation and rupture of capillary bridges in atomic scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barel, Itay; Filippov, Aleksander E.; Urbakh, M.

    2012-10-01

    While formation of capillary bridges significantly contributes to the adhesion and friction at micro- and nanoscales, many key aspects of dynamics of capillary condensation and its effect on friction forces are still not well understood. Here, by analytical model and numerical simulations, we address the origin of reduction of friction force with velocity and increase of friction with temperature, which have been experimentally observed under humid ambient conditions. These observations differ significantly from the results of friction experiments carried out under ultrahigh vacuum, and disagree with predictions of thermal Prandtl-Tomlinson model of friction. Our calculations demonstrate what information on the kinetics of capillary condensation can be extracted from measurements of friction forces and suggest optimal conditions for obtaining this information.

  8. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part II: analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-09-01

    The mechanics of the friction drive of a surface acoustic wave motor were investigated by means of contact mechanics theory. As a means to control the contact condition, the motor's slider had projections on its frictional surface. Assuming the projection was a rigid circular punch and the slider body was an elastic half-space allowed application of contact mechanics formulae to the analyses of the friction drive. Because the projection contacted the Rayleigh wave vibration, the projection's responses were considered dynamic; thus, the dynamics were also analyzed in the same framework of contact mechanics formulae. Moreover, the analyses were applied to measurements of the projection's displacement to examine the detailed mechanics during the friction drive. We calculated the contact/frictional forces based on the measurement and indicated the necessity of further investigation of the surface acoustic wave motor's friction drive, because the usual friction law was unable to explain the measurement.

  9. Effect of ZrSiO4 on the Friction Performance of Automotive Brake Friction Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Friction-wear properties of the ZrSiO4 reinforced samples were measured and compared with those of plain bronze based ones. For this purpose, density, hardness, friction coefficient wear behaviour of the samples were tested. Microstructures of samples before and after sintering and worn surfaces were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the wear types were determined. The optimum friction-wear behaviour was obtained in the sample compacted at 500 MPa and sintered at 820℃. Density of the final samples decreased with increasing the amount of reinforcing elements (ZrSiO4) before pre-sintering. However after sintering, there is no change in density of the samples including reinforcing elements (ZrSiO4). With increasing friction surface temperature, a reduction in the friction coefficient of the samples was observed.However, the highest reductions in the friction coefficients were observed in the as-received samples containing 0,5% reinforced ZrSiO4. The SEM images of the sample indicated that while bronze-based break lining material without ZrSiO4 showed abrasive wear behaviour, increasing the amount of ZrSiO4 resulted a change in abrasive to adhesive wear mechanism. All samples exhibited friction-wear values, which were within the values shown in SAE-J661 standard. With increasing the amount of reinforcing ZrSiO4, wear resistance of the samples was increased. However samples reinforced with 5% and 6% ZrSiO4 showed the best results.

  10. Effect of thermal friction on the generation and transport of interstitial defects in irradiated metals

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, S L

    2002-01-01

    Generation of interstitial and vacancy defects under 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation is expected to drive the evolution of microstructure of materials in a future fusion power station. We investigate effects of thermal friction associated with the interaction between mobile clusters of interstitial atoms produced in collision cascades and phonon excitations. Phonons give rise to the random Brownian motion of clusters in the crystal lattice. Phonon excitations are also responsible for the dissipation of energy of rapidly moving clusters formed at the periphery of collision cascades. We investigate how the coefficient of thermal friction depends on the structure of clusters. We also discuss implications of our findings for understanding the origin of higher resistance of bcc metals to irradiation and the connection between this phenomenon and the long-range effect observed in experiments on ion implantation.

  11. The role of gas dynamical friction in the evolution of embedded stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Indulekha, K

    2013-01-01

    Two puzzles associated with open clusters have attracted a lot of attention -- their formation, with densities and velocity dispersions that are not too different from those of the star forming regions in the Galaxy, given that the observed Star Formation Efficiencies (SFE) are low and, the mass segregation observed / inferred in some of them, at ages significantly less than the dynamical relaxation times in them. Gas dynamical friction has been considered before as a mechanism for contracting embedded stellar clusters, by dissipating their energy. This would locally raise the SFE which might then allow bound clusters to form. Noticing that dynamical friction is inherently capable of producing mass segregation, since here, the dissipation rate is proportional to the mass of the body experiencing the force, we explore further, some of the details and implications of such a scenario, vis-a-vis observations. Making analytical approximations, we obtain a boundary value for the density of a star forming clump of g...

  12. Frictional Impact Modeling of a Cereal Thresher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian O. Osueke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: There is no point producing cereal threshing models that cannot replicate its performance on the field. The frictional impact that occurs between the crop surface and threshing cylinder has been often neglected by most researchers in cereal threshing. Approach: Study proffers a solution to this issue by developing a model for threshing which in-cooperate friction. This was done by analyzing the crop/threshing cylinder behavior, hence establishing mathematical sub-models to characterize the performance of this model. Results: The model was further packaged with computer aided software based on visual basic programming language and finally applied. Conclusion: Upon application, it was discovered that at a moisture content of 15% v = 9 m sec-1, Q = 0.18 kg sec-1 the model yielded performance characteristics as Eff = 88.22%, TNL = 11.78% and CAPTH = 211.52 kg h-1.

  13. Mars - Wind friction speeds for particle movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, R.; Leach, R.; White, B.; Iversen, J.; Pollack, J.

    1976-01-01

    Wind friction threshold speeds for particle movement were determined in a low pressure boundary layer wind tunnel at an atmospheric pressure of 5.3 mb. The results imply that for comparable pressures on Mars, the minimum wind friction threshold speed is about 2.5 m/sec, which would require free-stream winds of 50 to 135 m/sec, depending on the character of the surface and the atmospheric conditions. The corresponding wind speeds at the height of the Viking lander meteorology instrument would be about a factor of two less than the free-stream wind speed. The particle size most easily moved by winds on Mars is about 160 microns; particles both larger and smaller than this (at least down to about 5 microns) require stronger winds to initiate movement.

  14. Friction Experiments for Dynamical Coefficient Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Arnoux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study, including three experimental devices, is presented in order to investigate dry friction phenomena in a wide range of sliding speeds for the steel on steel contact. A ballistic setup, with an air gun launch, allows to estimate the friction coefficient between 20 m/s and 80 m/s. Tests are completed by an adaptation of the sensor on a hydraulic tensile machine (0.01 m/s to 3 m/s and a pin-on-disk tribometer mounted on a CNC lathe (1 to 30 m/s. The interactions at the asperity scale are characterized by a white light interferometer surface analysis.

  15. Network Theory, Cracking and Frictional Sliding

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2012-01-01

    We have developed different network approaches to complex patterns of frictional interfaces (contact areas developments). Here, we analyze the dynamics of static friction. We found, under the correlation measure, the fraction of triangles correlates with the detachment fronts. Also, for all types of the loops (such as triangles), there is a universal power law between nodes' degree and motifs where motifs frequency follow a power law. This shows high energy localization is characterized by fast variation of the loops fraction. Also, this proves that the congestion of loops occurs around hubs. Furthermore, the motif distributions and modularity space of networks -in terms of within-module degree and participation coefficient- show universal trends, indicating an in common aspect of energy flow in shear ruptures. Moreover, we confirmed that slow ruptures generally hold small localization, while regular ruptures carry a high level of energy localization. We proposed that assortativity, as an index to correlation...

  16. Frictional Coulomb drag in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, Martin Christian; Flensberg, Karsten; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang;

    1997-01-01

    A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21) is eval......A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21......) is evaluated using diagrammatic techniques. The transresistivity is given by an integral over energy and momentum transfer weighted by the product of the screened interlayer interaction and the phase space for scattering events. We demonstrate, by a numerical analysis of the transresistivity, that for well...

  17. Friction boosted by spontaneous epitaxial rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Davide; Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2015-03-01

    It is well known in surface science that incommensurate adsorbed monolayers undergo a spontaneous, energy-lowering epitaxial rotation from aligned to misaligned relative to a periodic substrate. We show first of all that a model 2D colloidal monolayer in an optical lattice, of recent importance as a frictional model, also develops in full equilibrium a small rotation angle, easy to detect in the Moiré pattern. The colloidal monolayer misalignment is then shown by extensive sliding simulations to increase the dynamic friction by a considerable factor over the aligned case. More generally, this example suggests that spontaneous rotations are rather ubiquitous and should not be ignored in all tribological phenomena between mismatched lattices. This work was mainly supported by the ERC Advanced Grant No. 320796-MODPHYSFRICT, and partly by SINERGIA contract CRSII2 136287, by PRIN/COFIN Contract 2010LLKJBX 004, by COST Action MP1303.

  18. Uniform Design of Optimizing Formulation of Friction Materials with Composite Mineral Fiber (CMF) and Their Friction and Wear Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yazhou; Jiang, Man; Xu, Jie; Ma, Yunhai; Tong, Jin

    2012-04-01

    In this work, the uniform design method was applied to arrange the experimental scheme for optimizing formulation of friction materials. The friction and wear of the friction materials based on the optimized formulation was carried out on a constant speed friction tester (JF150D-II), using pad-on-disc contact mode against gray cast iron disc. The worn surfaces of the friction materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (JSM5310) and the friction mechanism was discussed. The results showed that the uniform design method was appropriate for finding the optimum formulation of the friction materials with better properties. Compared with two conventional friction materials, the friction materials based on the optimized formulation possessed higher and stable friction coefficient and higher wear resistance, even at the disc temperature of 350°C. The adhesion, strain fatigue and abrasive wear were the main wear mechanisms of the friction materials. Tribo-chemical phenomenon and plastic deformation existed on the worn surface layer.

  19. Fundamental Mechanisms Affecting Friction Welding under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    z Professor Koichi Masubuchi Ocean Engineering Dept., Thesis Supervisor ~Certified by - CProfessor Ltmest Rabinowicz Mechanical Engineering Dept...welding and oxide layer affects. 60 REFERENCES 1. Rabinowicz ,E., "Friction and Wear of Materials", Wiley, 1964 2. SmithM., "Effect of Vacuum on the...Professor ELnest Rabinowicz Mechanical Engineering Dept., Thesis Reader Accepted by- 14,~/G 1, ~ Z a- ’A. Douglas Carn-chtir,-hirman Departmental Graduate

  20. Aftershocks in a frictional earthquake model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, O M; Tosatti, Erio

    2014-09-01

    Inspired by spring-block models, we elaborate a "minimal" physical model of earthquakes which reproduces two main empirical seismological laws, the Gutenberg-Richter law and the Omori aftershock law. Our point is to demonstrate that the simultaneous incorporation of aging of contacts in the sliding interface and of elasticity of the sliding plates constitutes the minimal ingredients to account for both laws within the same frictional model.

  1. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  2. Biotribology :articular cartilage friction, wear, and lubrication

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Matthew O

    1995-01-01

    This study developed, explored, and refined techniques for the in vitro study of cartilage-on-cartilage friction, deformation, and wear. Preliminary results of in vitro cartilage-on- cartilage experiments with emphasis on wear and biochemistry are presented. Cartilage-bone specimens were obtained from the stifle joints of steers from a separate controlled study. The load, sliding speed, and traverse of the lower specimens were held constant as lubricant and test length were varied. Lubric...

  3. Frictional cooling of positively charged particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Greenwald

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the focuses of research and development towards the construction of a muon collider is muon beam preparation. Simulation of frictional cooling shows that it can achieve the desired emittance reduction to produce high-luminosity muon beams. We show that for positively charged particles, charge-exchange interactions necessitate significant changes to schemes previously developed for negatively charged particles. We also demonstrate that foil-based schemes are not viable for positive particles.

  4. Managing Friction Blisters of the Feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, M L

    1992-01-01

    In brief Active people often develop friction blisters on their feet. Although such blisters rarely create significant medical problems, they can be quite painful and can hinder athletic performance. People can decrease the chance of blister formation by wearing properly fitting shoes, doubling up on socks, and applying dressings or lubricants. If lesions do develop, conservative treatment will speed healing and lessen pain and disability.

  5. Simulating frictional contact in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jian; WU; Hao; GU; ChongShi; HUA; Hui

    2013-01-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a powerful tool for large deformation computation of soil flow. However, the method to simulate frictional contact in the framework of SPH is still absent and needs to be developed. This paper presents an algorithm to simulate frictional contact between soil and rigid or deformable structure in the framework of SPH. In this algo-rithm, the computational domain is divided into several sub-domains according to the existing contact boundaries, and contact forces are used as bridges of these sub-domains to fulfill problem solving. In the process of the SPH discretization for govern-ing equation of each sub-domain, the inherent problem of boundary deficiency of SPH is handled properly. Therefore, the par-ticles located at contact boundary can have precise acceleration, which is critical for contact detection. Then, based on the as-sumption that the SPH particle of soil can slightly penetrate into the structure, the contact forces along normal and tangential directions of the contact surface are computed by momentum principle, and the frictional force is modified if sliding occurs.Compared with previous methods, in which only particle-to-particle contact is considered or frictional sliding is just ignored,the method proposed in this study is more efficient and accurate, and is suitable for simulating interaction between soft materi-als and rigid or deformable structures, which are very common in geotechnical engineering. A number of numerical tests have been carried out to verify the accuracy and stability of the proposed algorithm, and the results have been compared with ana-lytical solutions or FEM results. The consistency obtained from these comparisons indicates that the algorithm is robust and can enhance the computing capability of SPH.

  6. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  7. Ramsey monetary policy with labour market frictions

    OpenAIRE

    Faia, Ester

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the design of optimal monetary policy (in terms of unconstrained Ramsey allocation) in a framework with sticky prices and matching frictions. Furthermore I consider the role of real wage rigidities. Optimal policy features significant deviations from price stability in response to various shocks. This is so since search externalities generate an unemployment/inflation trade-off. In response to productivity shocks optimal policy is pro-cyclical when the worker’s bargaining p...

  8. Rubber friction: comparison of theory with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J; Dieluweit, S; Tada, T

    2011-12-01

    We have measured the friction force acting on a rubber block slid on a concrete surface. We used both unfilled and filled (with carbon black) styrene butadiene (SB) rubber and have varied the temperature from -10 °C to 100 °C and the sliding velocity from 1 μm/s to 1000 μm/s. We find that the experimental data at different temperatures can be shifted into a smooth master-curve, using the temperature-frequency shifting factors obtained from measurements of the bulk viscoelastic modulus. The experimental data has been analyzed using a theory which takes into account the contributions to the friction from both the substrate asperity-induced viscoelastic deformations of the rubber, and from shearing the area of real contact. For filled SB rubber the frictional shear stress σ(f) in the area of real contact results mainly from the energy dissipation at the opening crack on the exit side of the rubber-asperity contact regions. For unfilled rubber we instead attribute σ(f) to shearing of a thin rubber smear film, which is deposited on the concrete surface during run in. We observe very different rubber wear processes for filled and unfilled SB rubber, which is consistent with the different frictional processes. Thus, the wear of filled SB rubber results in micrometer-sized rubber particles which accumulate as dry dust, which is easily removed by blowing air on the concrete surface. This wear process seams to occur at a steady rate. For unfilled rubber a smear film forms on the concrete surface, which cannot be removed even using a high-pressure air stream. In this case the wear rate appears to slow down after some run in time period.

  9. Low friction and wear resistant coating systems on Ti6Al4V alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G. Wendler

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Development of an original multiplex hybrid treatment of Ti6Al4V alloy: diffusion hardening+intermediate hard gradient TiCxNy layer with use of continuous CAE+top low friction and wear resistant hard amorphous a-C layer with use of pulsed CAE method.Design/methodology/approach: Ti6Al4V substrates were diffusion hardened with interstitial O or N atoms with use of glow discharge plasma in the atmosphere Ar+O2 or Ar+N2. Next they were deposited with a hard gradient TiCxNy layer and with a hard amorphous a-C coating as the top one. The morphology, microstructure, chemical and phase composition, chemical bonds, microhardness and tribological properties during dry friction of the alloy after multiplex treatment have been investigated with use of SEM, EDS, XRD, XPS, Vickers diamond indenter and ball-on-plate test.Findings: An important increase of hardness of the near surface zone of the Ti6Al4V alloy has been achieved (from ~350VHN to ~1000 VHN, good adhesion between the gradient TiCxNy coating and the Ti6Al4V substrate as well as an important decrease of dry friction coefficient (down to ~0.15 and a substantial increase of the resistance to wear (up to two orders of magnitude in comparison with non treated Ti alloy.Research limitations/implications: The research will be continued on greater number of specimens and against other counterbodies.Practical implications: It looks like that the Ti alloys can be used as mobile parts of machines due to high resistance to wear and low friction.Originality/value: A novel original multiplex hybrid treatment of Ti alloys has been developed at the Lodz University of Technology.

  10. Partial squeeze film levitation modulates fingertip friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiertlewski, Michaël; Fenton Friesen, Rebecca; Colgate, J Edward

    2016-08-16

    When touched, a glass plate excited with ultrasonic transverse waves feels notably more slippery than it does at rest. To study this phenomenon, we use frustrated total internal reflection to image the asperities of the skin that are in intimate contact with a glass plate. We observed that the load at the interface is shared between the elastic compression of the asperities of the skin and a squeeze film of air. Stroboscopic investigation reveals that the time evolution of the interfacial gap is partially out of phase with the plate vibration. Taken together, these results suggest that the skin bounces against the vibrating plate but that the bounces are cushioned by a squeeze film of air that does not have time to escape the interfacial separation. This behavior results in dynamic levitation, in which the average number of asperities in intimate contact is reduced, thereby reducing friction. This improved understanding of the physics of friction reduction provides key guidelines for designing interfaces that can dynamically modulate friction with soft materials and biological tissues, such as human fingertips.

  11. Friction and wear of human hair fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James; Johnson, Simon A.; Avery, Andrew R.; Adams, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental study of the tribological properties of hair fibres is reported, and the effect of surface treatment on the evolution of friction and wear during sliding. Specifically, orthogonally crossed fibre/fibre contacts under a compressive normal load over a series of 10 000 cycle studies are investigated. Reciprocating sliding at a velocity of 0.4 mm s-1, over a track length of 0.8 mm, was performed at 18 °C and 40%-50% relative humidity. Hair fibres retaining their natural sebum were studied, as well as those stripped of their sebum via hexane cleaning, and hair fibres conditioned using a commercially available product. Surface topography modifications resulting from wear were imaged using scanning electron microscopy and quantified using white light interferometry. Hair fibres that presented sebum or conditioned product at the fibre/fibre junction exhibited initial coefficients of friction at least 25% lower than those that were cleaned with hexane. Coefficients of friction were observed to depend on the directionality of sliding for hexane cleaned hair fibres after sufficient wear cycles that cuticle lifting was present, typically on the order 1000 cycles. Cuticle flattening was observed for fibre/fibre junctions exposed to 10 mN compressive normal loads, whereas loads of 100 mN introduced substantial cuticle wear and fibre damage.

  12. Controlling vortex motion and vortex kinetic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco; Savel'ev, Sergey

    2006-05-01

    We summarize some recent results of vortex motion control and vortex kinetic friction. (1) We describe a device [J.E. Villegas, S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, E.M. Gonzalez, J.V. Anguita, R. Garcìa, J.L. Vicent, Science 302 (2003) 1188] that can easily control the motion of flux quanta in a Niobium superconducting film on an array of nanoscale triangular magnets. Even though the input ac current has zero average, the resulting net motion of the vortices can be directed along either one direction, the opposite direction, or producing zero net motion. We also consider layered strongly anisotropic superconductors, with no fixed spatial asymmetry, and show [S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, Nature Materials 1 (2002) 179] how, with asymmetric drives, the ac motion of Josephson and/or pancake vortices can provide a net dc vortex current. (2) In analogy with the standard macroscopic friction, we present [A. Maeda, Y. Inoue, H. Kitano, S. Savel'ev, S. Okayasu, I. Tsukada, F. Nori , Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 077001] a comparative study of the friction force felt by vortices in superconductors and charge density waves.

  13. Theory of friction based on brittle fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1967-01-01

    A theory of friction is presented that may be more applicable to geologic materials than the classic Bowden and Tabor theory. In the model, surfaces touch at the peaks of asperities and sliding occurs when the asperities fail by brittle fracture. The coefficient of friction, ??, was calculated from the strength of asperities of certain ideal shapes; for cone-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.1 and for wedge-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.15. For actual situations which seem close to the ideal model, observed ?? was found to be very close to 0.1, even for materials such as quartz and calcite with widely differing strengths. If surface forces are present, the theory predicts that ?? should decrease with load and that it should be higher in a vacuum than in air. In the presence of a fluid film between sliding surfaces, ?? should depend on the area of the surfaces in contact. Both effects are observed. The character of wear particles produced during sliding and the way in which ?? depends on normal load, roughness, and environment lend further support to the model of friction presented here. ?? 1967 The American Institute of Physics.

  14. Friction and Wear Behaviors of Nanostructured Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong HAN; Yusheng ZHANG; Ke LU

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructured (ns) materials, i.e., polycrystalline materials with grain sizes in the nanometer regime (typically below 100 nm), have drawn considerable attention in the past decades due to their unique properties such as high strength and hardness. Wear resistance of ns materials, one of the most important properties for engineering materials, has been extensively investigated in the past decades. Obvious differences have been identified in friction and wear behaviors Between the ns materials and their corresponding coarse-grained (cg) counterparts, consistently correlating with their unique structure characteristics and mechanical properties. On the other hand, the superior tribological properties of ns materials illustrate their potential applications under contact loads. The present overview will summarize the important progresses achieved on friction and wear behaviors of ns metallic materials, including ultrafine-grained (ufg) materials in recent years. Tribological properties and effects on friction and wear behaviors of ns materials will be discussed under different wear conditions including abrasive wear, sliding wear, and fretting wear. Their correlations with mechanical properties will be analyzed. Perspectives on development of this field will be highlighted as well.

  15. Friction, force chains, and falling fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jacqueline; Behringer, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Friction is of great concern from both a national security and quality-of-life point of view, and the economic impact of energy efficiency, wear, and manufacturing cannot be underestimated. Theorists have always believed that friction plays a great role in avalanche-like collapse of a granular piles, but the predictions have proven difficult to test. We devised an experimentally controlled way to prove it, accessible to all who dare try, and report on it here [1,2]. With the aid of a middle school assistant, we studied and filmed piles of apples, oranges, and onions as one or more pieces of fruit were removed. Among other things, we discovered that increasing the friction of the onions (by peeling them) vastly decreased the likelihood of collapse. Our work includes videos written by, produced, and starring our seventh grade assistant, some of which are posted on the Physics Today YouTube channel [1] and featured in the Sept. 2009 issue of Physics Today [2]. [4pt] [1] Youtube.com, keywords ``unpeeled onions'', with full set at www.dukefruit.info. [0pt] [2] J. Krim and R.P. Berhinger, Physics Today (Sept., 2009) volume 62, pp.66-67

  16. Friction Modeling in Concentric Tube Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jesse; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-01-01

    Concentric tube robots are a novel class of continuum robots that are constructed by combining pre-curved elastic tubes such that the overall shape of the robot is a function of the relative rotations and translations of the constituent tubes. Frictionless kinematic and quasistatic force models for this class of robots have been developed that incorporate bending and twisting of the tubes. Experimental evaluation of these models has revealed, however, a directional dependence of tube rotation on robot shape that is not predicted by these models. To explain this behavior, this paper models the contributions of friction arising from two sources: the distributed forces of contact between the tubes along their length and the concentrated bending moments generated at discontinuities in curvature and at the boundaries. It is shown that while friction due to distributed forces is insufficient to explain the experimentally observed tube twisting, a simple model of frictional torque arising from concentrated moments provides a good match with the experimental data.

  17. Markov state modeling of sliding friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, F.; Landes, François P.; Laio, A.; Prestipino, S.; Tosatti, E.

    2016-11-01

    Markov state modeling (MSM) has recently emerged as one of the key techniques for the discovery of collective variables and the analysis of rare events in molecular simulations. In particular in biochemistry this approach is successfully exploited to find the metastable states of complex systems and their evolution in thermal equilibrium, including rare events, such as a protein undergoing folding. The physics of sliding friction and its atomistic simulations under external forces constitute a nonequilibrium field where relevant variables are in principle unknown and where a proper theory describing violent and rare events such as stick slip is still lacking. Here we show that MSM can be extended to the study of nonequilibrium phenomena and in particular friction. The approach is benchmarked on the Frenkel-Kontorova model, used here as a test system whose properties are well established. We demonstrate that the method allows the least prejudiced identification of a minimal basis of natural microscopic variables necessary for the description of the forced dynamics of sliding, through their probabilistic evolution. The steps necessary for the application to realistic frictional systems are highlighted.

  18. Dry friction avalanches: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Ferrante, John; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2006-12-01

    Experimental evidence and theoretical models are presented supporting the conjecture that dry friction stick-slip is described by self-organized criticality. We use the data, obtained with a pin-on-disk tribometer set to measure lateral force, to examine the variation of the friction force as a function of time. We study nominally flat surfaces of matching aluminum and steel. The probability distribution of force drops follows a negative power law with exponents μ in the range 3.2-3.5. The frequency power spectrum follows a 1/fα pattern with α in the range 1-1.8. We first compare these experimental results with the well-known Robin Hood model of self-organized criticality. We find good agreement between theory and experiment for the force-drop distribution but not for the power spectrum. We explain this on a physical basis and propose a model which takes explicitly into account the stiffness and inertia of the tribometer. Specifically, we numerically solve the equation of motion of a block on a friction surface pulled by a spring and show that for certain spring constants the motion is characterized by the same power law spectrum as in experiments. We propose a physical picture relating the fluctuations of the force drops to the microscopic geometry of the surface.

  19. Development of a Constitutive Friction Law based on the Frictional Interaction of Rough Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Beyer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction has a considerable impact in metal forming. This is in particular true for sheet-bulk metal-forming (SBMF in which local highly varying contact loads occur. A constitutive friction law suited to the needs of SBMF is necessary, if numerical investigations in SBMF are performed. The identification of the friction due to adhesion and ploughing is carried out with an elasto-plastic half-space model. The normal contact is verified for a broad range of normal loads. In addition, the model is used for the characterization of the occurring shear stress. Ploughing is determined by the work which is necessary to plastically deform the surface asperities of the new area that gets into contact during sliding. Furthermore, the surface patches of common half-space models are aligned orthogonally to the direction in which the surfaces approach when normal contact occurs. For a better reflection of the original surfaces, the element patches become inclined. This leads to a geometric share of lateral forces which also contribute to friction. Based on these effects, a friction law is derived which is able to predict the contact conditions especially for SBMF.

  20. Energy based optimization of viscous-friction dampers on cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, F.; Boston, C.

    2010-04-01

    This investigation optimizes numerically a viscous-friction damper connected to a cable close to one cable anchor for fastest reduction of the total mechanical cable energy during a free vibration decay test. The optimization parameters are the viscous coefficient of the viscous part and the ratio between the friction force and displacement amplitude of the friction part of the transverse damper. Results demonstrate that an almost pure friction damper with negligibly small viscous damping generates fastest cable energy reduction over the entire decay. The ratio between the friction force and displacement amplitude of the optimal friction damper differs from that derived from the energy equivalent optimal viscous damper. The reason for this is that the nonlinearity of the friction damper causes energy spillover from the excited to higher modes of the order of 10%, i.e. cables with attached friction dampers vibrate at several frequencies. This explains why the energy equivalent approach does not yield the optimal friction damper. Analysis of the simulation data demonstrates that the optimally tuned friction damper dissipates the same energy per cycle as if each modal component of the cable were damped by its corresponding optimal linear viscous damper.

  1. Comparative Frictional Analysis of Automobile Drum and Disc Brakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P. Khairnar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a comparative frictional behaviour of drum brakes and disc brakes in automobiles has been investigated. The influential factors; contact force and friction radius were modeled for the estimation of the friction coefficient for drum as well as disc brakes. The effect of contact force and friction radius is studied with varying conditions of parameters; longitudinal force, caliper force and torque on piston side as well as non-piston side. The numerical results obtained have been compared with the similar obtained from virtual Matlab/Simulink models for drum and disc brakes. The results evidenced that friction radius predominantly affects brake pressure and thus the friction coefficient, also the increase in contact force resulted with decrease in friction coefficient both for drum and disc brakes. Further it has been found that disc brakes exhibit gradual decrease of friction coefficient due to the equitable distribution of braking effort while drum brake presents sudden variations in friction coefficient. It can be revealed that frictional behaviour of disc brake is more consistent than drum brake.

  2. General Friction Model Extended by the Effect of Strain Hardening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris V.; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Bay, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An extension to the general friction model proposed by Wanheim and Bay [1] to include the effect of strain hardening is proposed. The friction model relates the friction stress to the fraction of real contact area by a friction factor under steady state sliding. The original model for the real co...... of friction in metal forming, where the material generally strain hardens. The extension of the model to cover strain hardening materials is validated by comparison to previously published experimental data.......An extension to the general friction model proposed by Wanheim and Bay [1] to include the effect of strain hardening is proposed. The friction model relates the friction stress to the fraction of real contact area by a friction factor under steady state sliding. The original model for the real......-ideally plastic material, and secondly, to extend the solution by the influence of material strain hardening. This corresponds to adding a new variable and, therefore, a new axis to the general friction model. The resulting model is presented in a combined function suitable for e.g. finite element modeling...

  3. PREFACE: The International Conference on Science of Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kouji; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    The first international conference on the science of friction in Japan was held at Irago, Aichi on 9-13 September 2007. The conference focused on the elementary process of friction phenomena from the atomic and molecular scale view. Topics covered in the conference are shown below.: Superlubricity and friction Electronic and phononic contributions to friction Friction on the atomic and molecular scales van der Waals friction and Casimir force Molecular motor and friction Friction and adhesion in soft matter systems Wear and crack on the nanoscale Theoretical studies on the atomic scale friction and energy dissipation Friction and chaos Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts Friction of powder The number of participants in the conference was approximately 100, registered from 11 countries. 48 oral and 29 poster talks were presented at the conference. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 23 papers devoted to the above topics of friction. The successful organization of the conference was made possible by the contribution of the members of the Organizing Committee and International Advisory Committee. The conference was made possible thanks to the financial support from Aichi University of Education and the Taihokogyo Tribology Research Foundation (TTRF), and moreover thanks to the approval societies of The Physical Society of Japan, The Surface Science Society of Japan, The Japanese Society of Tribologists and Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute. The details of the conference are available at http://www.science-of-friction.com . Finally we want to thank the speakers for the high quality of their talks and all participants for coming to Irago, Japan and actively contributing to the conference. Kouji Miura and Hiroshi Matsukawa Editors

  4. TMD FRICTION - a company profile; TMD FRICTION - ein Unternehmen stellt sich vor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, E.

    2000-07-01

    TMD FRICTION came into existence in August 2000 by separation of the friction material sector from BBA PLC. This transaction was supported by HSBC PE, the private equity branch of HSBC, the third largest bank world-wide. This report shall give some market background, the current position of the company and information about the strategic orientation of the new group regarding R and D and production - especially against the background of our customers' global activities. (orig.) [German] TMD FRICTION entstand im August 2000 durch Ausgliederung des Reibbelag-Bereichs aus der BBA PLC. Diese Transaktion wurde unterstuetzt durch HSBC, PE, dem Private Equity-Zweig von HSBC, der drittgroessten Bank weltweit. Der Bericht erlaeutert Markthintergruende, die aktuelle Positionierung des Unternehmens und gibt Hinweise auf die strategische Ausrichtung der neuen Gruppierung im Bereich Entwicklung und Produktion - insbesondere vor dem Hintergrund der globalen Ausrichtung unserer Kunden. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic friction of self-affine surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittbuhl, Jean; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Roux, Stéphane

    1994-02-01

    We investigate the velocity dependence of the friction between two rigid blocks limited by a self-affine surface such as the one generated by a crack. The upper solid is subjected either to gravity or to an external elastic stiffness, and is driven horizontally at constant velocity, V, while the lower solid is fixed. For low velocities, the apparent friction coefficient is constant. For high velocities, the apparent friction is shown to display a velocity weakening. The weakening can be related to the variation of the mean contact time due to the occurrence of jumps during the motions. The cross-over between these two regimes corresponds to a characteristic velocity which depends on the geometry of the surfaces and on the mean normal force. In the case of simple gravity loading, the velocity dependence of the apparent friction at high velocities is proportional to 1/V^2 where V is the imposed tangential velocity. In the case of external elastic stiffness, two velocity weakening regimes can be identified, the first is identical to the gravity case with a 1/V^2 dependence, the second appears at higher velocities and is characterized by a 1/V variation. The characteristic velocity of this second cross-over depends on the roughness and the elastic stiffness. The statistical distribution of ballistic flight distances is analysed, and is shown to reveal in all cases the self-affinity of the contacting surfaces. Nous analysons la dépendence en vitesse du frottement entre deux solides limités par une surface rugueuse auto-affine comme celle d'une surface de fracture. Le solide supérieur est soumis soit à la gravité, soit à une raideur élastique externe, et est entraîné à vitesse horizontale constante V sur le solide inférieur fixe. A faible vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent, est constant. A forte vitesse, le coefficient de friction apparent devient inversement proportionnel à la vitesse. Cette dépendance peut être reliée à la variation du temps

  6. Atomic-Scale Friction and Microfriction of Graphite and Diamond Using Friction Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-07

    19), 2642-2645 (1991). 21 [12] R. M. Overney, E. Meyer, J. Frommer , D. Brodbeck, R. Luithi, L. Howald, H. -J. GUntherodt, M. Fuji.,La, H. Takano, and Y...Meyer, R. Overney, D. Brodbeck, L. Howard, R. Luithi, J. Frommer , and H. -J. Guntherodt, "Friction and Wear of Langmuir-Blodgett Films Observed by...Friction Force Microscopy", Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol. 69(12), 1777-1780 (1992). [14] E. Meyer, R. Overney, R. Luthi, D. Brodbeck, L. Howald, J. Frommer , H

  7. On the nature of the static friction, kinetic friction and creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.; Mancosu, F.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the nature of the static and kinetic friction, and of (thermally activated) creep.We focus on boundary lubrication at high confining pressure (∼1GPa), as is typical for hard solids, where one or at most two layers of confined molecules separates the sliding surfaces. We...... may depend linearly on ln (v/v0), as usually observed experimentally, rather than non-linearly [−ln (v/v0)]2/3 as predicted by a simple theory of activated processes. We also discuss the role of elasticity at stop and start. We show that for "simple" rubber (at low start velocity), the static friction...

  8. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Sabina Luisa Campanelli; Giuseppe Casalino; Caterina Casavola; Vincenzo Moramarco

    2013-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the we...

  9. Road Friction Coefficient Real-Time Identification Based on the Tire Dynamic Friction Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiao-bin; DENG Pan; JIANG Yu; FAN Bing-xu

    2013-01-01

    Road friction coefficient real-time estimation methods is an important issue and problem in automotive active safety con-trol system development. First a fixed feedback gain sliding mode observer of road adhesion coefficient is designed through the es-tablishment of tire/road dynamic friction model in this article. The simulation results shows that the observer can well real-time iden-tify the current road adhesion characteristics. And more importantly, the observer only need wheel speed signal and the braking torque (brake pressure) signal, so the system is low cost, and its adaptability is good. There is no doubt this estimation method has a good application prospect.

  10. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  11. Friction laws from dimensional-analysis point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Hatano, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Friction laws, which are a key to the understanding of the diversity of earthquakes, are considered theoretically. Using dimensional analysis, the logarithmic dependence of the friction coefficient on the slip velocity and the state variable is derived without any knowledge of the underlying physical processes on the frictional surface. This is based on a simple assumption that the friction coefficient is expressed as the difference from a reference state. Therefore, the functional form of the rate and state dependent friction law itself does not necessarily mean that thermal activation processes dominate friction. It is also shown that, if there are two (or more) state variables having the same dimension, we need not assume the logarithmic dependence on the state variables.

  12. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veijgen, N K; Masen, M A; van der Heide, E

    2013-12-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the human skin, subject characteristics and environmental conditions on skin friction. The data are obtained on 50 subjects (34 males and 16 females). Friction measurements represent the friction between in vivo human skin and an aluminium sample, assessed on three anatomical locations. The coefficient of friction increased significantly (pskin and the height of the subject. Other outcome variables in this study were the hydration of the skin and the skin temperature.

  13. Anomalous friction of graphene nanoribbons on waved graphenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Friction plays a critical role in the function and maintenance of small-scale structures, where the conventional Coulomb friction law often fails. To probe the friction at small scales, here we present a molecular dynamics study on the process of dragging graphene nanoribbons on waved graphene substrates. The simulation shows that the induced friction on graphene with zero waviness is ultra-low and closely related to the surface energy barrier. On waved graphenes, the friction generally increases with the amplitude of the wave at a fixed period, but anomalously increases and then decreases with the period at a fixed amplitude. These findings provide insights into the ultra-low friction at small scales, as well as some guidelines into the fabrication of graphene-based nano-composites with high performance.

  14. Friction related size-effect in microforming – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chunju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a thorough literature review of the size effects of friction in microforming. During miniaturization, the size effects of friction occur clearly. The paper first introduces experimental research progress on size effects of friction in both micro bulk and sheet forming. The effects of several parameters are discussed. Based on the experimental results, several approaches have been performed to develop a model or functions to analyse the mechanism of size effects of friction, and simulate the micro deep drawing process by integrating them into an FE program. Following this, surface modification, e.g. a DLC film and a micro structure/textured surface, as a method to reduce friction are presented. Finally, the outlook for the size effect of friction in the future is assessed, based on the understanding of the current research progress.

  15. Friction Model for FEM Simulation of Sheet Metal Forming Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Y. T.; Wagoner, R. H.; Lee, J. K.

    2004-06-01

    In order to find the effect of frictional characteristics, lubricant viscosity, tool geometry, and forming speed on the sheet metal forming, a friction tester was designed and manufactured. Friction tests were performed using drawing oils, various tool radii and forming speeds for aluminum alloy sheets, galvanized steels sheets and cold rolled steel sheets. From the experimental observation, the mathematical friction model considering lubricant viscosity, sheet surface roughness and hardness, punch corner radii, and punch speed is developed. By comparing the punch load found by FEM using the proposed friction model with that of experimental measurement when the steel sheets are formed in 2-D geometry in dry and lubricating conditions, the validity and accuracy of the mathematical friction model are demonstrated.

  16. Frictional forces between hydrophilic and hydrophobic particle coated nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Petra M; Claesson, Per M.; Swerin, Agne;

    2013-01-01

    by utilizing the atomic force microscope (AFM). The chemistry of the surfaces and the probe was varied between hydrophilic silica and hydrophobized silica. For hydrophilic silica surfaces, the friction coefficient was significantly higher for the particle coated surfaces than on the flat reference surface. All...... the particle coated surfaces exhibited similar friction coefficients, from which it may be concluded that the surface geometry, and not the roughness amplitude per se, influenced the measured friction. During measurements with hydrophobic surfaces, strong adhesive forces related to the formation of a bridging...... air cavity were evident from both normal force and friction force measurements. In contrast to the frictional forces between the hydrophilic surfaces, the friction coefficient for hydrophobic surfaces was found to depend on the surface structure and we believe that this dependence is related...

  17. The Frictional Coefficient of Bovine Knee Articular Cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Shan-hua; Ge Shi-rong; Wang Qing-liang

    2006-01-01

    The normal displacement of articular cartilage was measured under load and in sliding, and the coefficient of friction during sliding was measured using a UMT-2 Multi-Specimen Test System. The maximum normal displacement under load and the start-up frictional coefficient have similar tendency of variation with loading time. The sliding speed does not significantly influence the frictional coefficient of articular cartilage.

  18. Paradoxical stabilization of forced oscillations by strong nonlinear friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Bulanov, Sergei V.

    2017-08-01

    In a dissipative dynamic system driven by an oscillating force, a strong nonlinear highly oscillatory friction force can create a quasi-steady tug, which is always directed opposite to the ponderomotive force induced due to a spatial inhomogeneity of oscillations. When the friction-induced tug exceeds the ponderomotive force, the friction stabilizes the system oscillations near the maxima of the oscillation spatial amplitude of the driving force.

  19. Self-Organization during Friction of Slide Bearing Antifriction Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif S. Gershman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the peculiarities of self-organization behavior and formation of dissipative structures during friction of antifriction alloys for slide bearings against a steel counterbody. It shows that during self-organization, the moment of friction in a tribosystem may be decreasing with the load growth and in the bifurcations of the coefficient of friction with respect to load. Self-organization and the formation of dissipative structures lead to an increase in the seizure load.

  20. Friction Buttering: A New Technique for Dissimilar Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, G. M.; Mastanaiah, P.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2017-02-01

    This work offers a fresh perspective on buttering, a technique often considered for fusion welding of dissimilar metals. For the first time, buttering was attempted in solid state using friction deposition. Using this new "friction buttering" technique, fusion welding of two different dissimilar metal pairs (austenitic stainless steel/borated stainless steel and Al-Cu-Mg/Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) was successfully demonstrated. The results show that friction buttering can simplify a tough dissimilar welding problem into a routine fusion welding task.

  1. PROGRAM-PATTERN MULTIPOLE BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD FOR FRICTIONAL CONTACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Chunxiao; Shen Guangxian; Liu Deyi

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical program is proposed for the highly nonlinear problem involving frictional contact. A program-pattern using the fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM) is given for 3-D elastic contact with friction to replace the Monte Carlo method. A new optimized generalized minimal residual (GMRES) algorithm is presented. Numerical examples demonstrate the validity of the program-pattern optimization model for node-to-surface contact with friction. The GMRES algorithm greatly improves the computational efficiency.

  2. Mathematical Programming Solution for the Frictional Contact Multipole BEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Chunxiao; SHEN Guangxian; LIU Deyi

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new mathematical model for the highly nonlinear problem of frictional contact. A programming model, multipole boundary element method (BEM), was developed for 3-D elastic contact with friction to replace the Monte Carlo method. A numerical example shows that the optimization programming model for the point-to-surface contact with friction and the fast optimization generalized minimal residual algorithm (GMRES(m)) significantly improve the analysis of such problems relative to the conventional BEM.

  3. Classical shear cracks drive the onset of dry frictional motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Fineberg, Jay

    2014-05-08

    Frictional processes entail the rupture of the ensemble of discrete contacts defining a frictional interface. There are a variety of views on how best to describe the onset of dry frictional motion. These range from modelling friction with a single degree of freedom, a 'friction coefficient', to theoretical treatments using dynamic fracture to account for spatial and temporal dynamics along the interface. We investigated the onset of dry frictional motion by performing simultaneous high-speed measurements of the real contact area and the strain fields in the region surrounding propagating rupture tips within the dry (nominally flat) rough interfaces formed by brittle polymer blocks. Here we show that the transition from 'static' to 'dynamic' friction is quantitatively described by classical singular solutions for the motion of a rapid shear crack. We find that these singular solutions, originally derived to describe brittle fracture, are in excellent agreement with the experiments for slow propagation, whereas some significant discrepancies arise as the rupture velocity approaches the Rayleigh wave speed. In addition, the energy dissipated in the fracture of the contacts remains nearly constant throughout the entire range in which the rupture velocity is less than the Rayleigh wave speed, whereas the size of the dissipative zone undergoes a Lorentz-like contraction as the rupture velocity approaches the Rayleigh wave speed. This coupling between friction and fracture is critical to our fundamental understanding of frictional motion and related processes, such as earthquake dynamics.

  4. Friction Joint Between Basalt-Reinforced Composite and Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costache, Andrei; Glejbøl, Kristian; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor basalt-reinforced polymers in an aluminum grip using dry friction. Dry friction clamping is considered the optimal solution for post-mounting of load-bearing terminations on composite structures. A new test method is presented for characterizing the frictio......The purpose of this study was to anchor basalt-reinforced polymers in an aluminum grip using dry friction. Dry friction clamping is considered the optimal solution for post-mounting of load-bearing terminations on composite structures. A new test method is presented for characterizing...

  5. Microstructure analysis in friction welding of copper and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, A. G. Wahyu; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Friction welding is a welding method with utilizing heat generated due to friction. Surfaces of two materials to be joined, one rotates the other being idle, is contacted by a pressure force. Friction on the second contact surface is done continuously so that the heat generated by the continuous friction will continue to rise. With the heat and the pressure force on the second surface to the second meeting of the material reaches its melting temperature then there is the process of welding. This paper examines the influence of the pressure force, rotational speed and contact time on friction welding of Aluminum (Al) and Copper (Cu) to the quality of welded joints. Friction welding process is performed on a friction welding machine that is equipped with the loading mechanism. The parameters used are the pressure force, rotational speed and friction time. Determination of the quality of welding is done by testing the tensile strength, hardness, and micro structure on the weld joint areas. The results showed that the friction welding quality is very good, this is evidenced by the results of a tensile strength test where the fault occurs outside the weld joint and increased violence in the weld joint. On the results visually cuts the welding area did not reveal any porosity so that it can be concluded that each metal contacts have melted perfectly and produce a connection with good quality.

  6. Friction Properties of Inkjet and Flexographic Prints on Different Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Grigaliūnienė

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction between different papers, inkjet and flexographic prints has been experimentally investigated. Flexographic prints have been made using an anilox roller, and inkjet prints have been produced covering paper with one and four toner layers. Static (SCOF and kinetic (KCOF friction coefficients between paper and paper, paper and prints, prints and prints have been determined. Friction properties have been discovered to be different in flexographic and laser prints. The dependence of SCOF and KCOF on pressure (both decrease together with roughness measurements enables to conclude that the friction of prints is mainly governed by adhesion forces.

  7. Friction Compensation in the Upsetting of Cylindrical Test Specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Martins, P. A. F.; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript presents a combined numerical andexperimental methodology for determining the stress-straincurve of metallic materials from the measurements of forceand displacement obtained in the axial compression of cylindrical test specimens with friction between the specimens and the platens...... model or combined friction models are utilized .Experimental results obtained from cylindrical and Rastegaev test specimens with different lubricants combined with the experimental determination of friction by means of ring compression tests allows compensating the effect of friction...... Appendix is provided for those readers interested in utilizing the associated numerical algorithm for determining the stress straincurves of metallic materials....

  8. MODIFICATION OF FLAKE REINFORCED FRICTION BRAKE COMPOSITE MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    According to the recent development trend and need of the friction brake material, the flake reinforced friction brake material has been made out by adjusting the recipe and techniques. The two-dimensional flake vermiculite is selected as the reinforced stuffing of the material; the modified resin is used as the basal bed of the material. The tests manifest that the properties of mechanics are high, the friction coefficients are suitable and stable,and especially in high temperatures the wear is low. It is an excellent friction brake material.

  9. Methods and devices used to measure friction in rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, J.; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    Friction at the workpiece-die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals; yet it remains the least understood. Hence there is a need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms. To gain...... a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure frictional stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods that have been used...

  10. Association between friction and wear in diarthrodial joints lacking lubricin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Gregory D; Torres, Jahn R; Rhee, David K; Helminen, Heikki J; Hytinnen, Mika M; Cha, Chung-Ja; Elsaid, Khaled; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Cui, Yajun; Warman, Matthew L

    2007-01-01

    Objective The glycoprotein lubricin (encoded by the gene Prg4) is secreted by surface chondrocytes and synovial cells, and has been shown to reduce friction in vitro. In contrast to man-made bearings, mammalian diarthrodial joints must endogenously produce friction-reducing agents. This study was undertaken to investigate whether friction is associated with wear. Methods The lubricating ability of synovial fluid (SF) samples from humans with genetic lubricin deficiency was tested in vitro. The coefficient of friction in the knee joints of normal and lubricin-null mice was measured ex vivo; these joints were also studied by light and electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to image and measure how lubricin reduces friction in vitro. Results SF lacking lubricin failed to reduce friction in the boundary mode. Joints of lubricin-null mice showed early wear and higher friction than joints from their wild-type counterparts. Lubricin self-organized and reduced the work of adhesion between apposing asperities. Conclusion These data show that friction is coupled with wear at the cartilage surface in vivo. They imply that acquired lubricin degradation occurring in inflammatory joint diseases predisposes the cartilage to damage. Lastly, they suggest that lubricin, or similar biomolecules, will have applications in man-made devices in which reducing friction is essential. PMID:17968947

  11. Skin friction related behaviour of artificial turf systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Sock Peng; Fleming, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Forrester, Steph

    2017-08-01

    The occurrence of skin friction related injuries is an issue for artificial turf sports pitches and remains a barrier to their acceptance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current industry standard Securisport® Sports Surface Tester that measures skin surface related frictional behaviour of artificial turf. Little research has been published about the device and its efficacy, despite its widespread use as a standard FIFA test instrument. To achieve a range of frictional behaviours, several "third generation" (3G) carpet and infill combinations were investigated; friction time profiles throughout the Securisport rotations were assessed in combination with independent measurements of skin roughness before and after friction testing via 3D surface scanning. The results indicated that carpets without infill had greatest friction (coefficients of friction 0.97-1.20) while those completely filled with sand or rubber had similar and lower values independent of carpet type (coefficient of friction (COF) ≈0.57). Surface roughness of a silicone skin (s-skin) decreased after friction testing, with the largest change on sand infilled surfaces, indicating an "abrasive" polishing effect. The combined data show that the s-skin is damaged in a surface-specific manner, thus the Securisport COF values appear to be a poor measure of the potential for skin abrasion. It is proposed that the change in s-skin roughness improves assessment of the potential for skin damage when players slide on artificial turf.

  12. Tool For Friction Stir Tack Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerald W.; Dingler, Johnny W.; Loftus, Zachary

    2003-01-01

    A small friction-stir-welding tool has been developed for use in tack welding of aluminum-alloy workpieces. It is necessary to tack-weld the workpieces in order to hold them together during friction stir welding because (1) in operation, a full-size friction-stir-welding tool exerts a large force that tends to separate the workpieces and (2) clamping the workpieces is not sufficient to resist this force. It is possible to tack the pieces together by gas tungsten arc welding, but the process can be awkward and time-consuming and can cause sufficient damage to necessitate rework. Friction stir tack welding does not entail these disadvantages. In addition, friction stir tack welding can be accomplished by use of the same automated equipment (except for the welding tool) used in subsequent full friction stir welding. The tool for friction stir tack welding resembles the tool for full friction stir welding, but has a narrower shoulder and a shorter pin. The shorter pin generates a smaller workpiece-separating force so that clamping suffices to keep the workpieces together. This tool produces a continuous or intermittent partial-penetration tack weld. The tack weld is subsequently consumed by action of the larger tool used in full friction stir welding tool.

  13. Experimental investigation of friction coefficient in tube hydroforming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyae Kyung YI; Hong Sup YIM; Gun Yeop LEE; Sung Mun LEE; Gi Suk CHUNG; Young-Hoon MOON

    2011-01-01

    The friction coefficient between tube and die in guide zone of tube hydroforming was obtained. In hydroforming, the tube is expanded by an internal pressure against the tool wall. By pushing the tube through tool, a friction force at the contact surface between the tube and the tool occurs. In guiding zone, the friction coefficients between tube and die can be estimated from the measured axial feeding forces. In expansion zone, the friction coefficients between tube and die can be evaluated from the measured geometries of expanded tubes and FE analysis.

  14. Progress and development in thermodynamic theory of friction and wear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Tribology theory lags well behind engineering needs because of those complex and multi-dimensional characteristics associated with friction and wear. The mechanism of friction is reviewed and discussed from a static thermodynamics perspective; research methods on the process of friction and wear and thermodynamic studies within the field of tribology are also reviewed. We propose that entropy can be a critical parameter in describing the evolution of friction and wear, and the entropy balance equation could be considered as a fundamental cornerstone for a systematic tribology theory. Applications of irreversible thermodynamic theory of tribology to various fields are reviewed.

  15. Progress and development in thermodynamic theory of friction and wear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI ZhenDong; XUE QunJi

    2009-01-01

    Tribology theory lags well behind engineering needs because of those complex and multi-dimensional characteristics associated with friction and wear. The mechanism of friction is reviewed end discussed from a static thermodynamics perspective; research methods on the process of friction and wear and thermodynamic studies within the field of tribology are also reviewed. We propose that entropy can be a critical parameter in describing the evolution of friction and wear, and the entropy balance equation could be considered as a fundamental cornerstone for a systematic tribology theory. Applications of irreversible thermodynamic theory of tribology to various fields are reviewed.

  16. Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Formation and Corrosion of Friction Stir Processed Nickel Aluminum Bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    friction stir welding (FSW) but is used for the purpose of refining...mechanical properties [11]. C. FRICTION STIR WELDING AND PROCESSING Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is derived from Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which was...Temple-Smith, and C. Dawes, Friction - stir butt welding , GB Patent No. 9125978.8, International patent application No. PCT/GB92/02203, 1991. [4

  17. Measuring Search Frictions Using Japanese Microdata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, Masaru; Kohara, Miki; Machikita, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    This paper estimates individual-level matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labour market and presents the determinants of search duration. We employ administrative microdata that track the job search process of job seekers who left or lost their job in August 2005...... and subsequently registered at their local public employment service. Our finding is that the matching function exhibits decreasing rather than constant returns-to-scale for job seekers and vacancies. We also find that after controlling for the benefits period, job seekers who lost their job involuntarily were...

  18. Measuring Search Frictions Using Japanese Microdata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, Masaru; Kohara, Miki; Machikita, Tomohiro

    This paper estimates matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labor market and presents determinants of search duration to explain the effect of unemployment benefits on a job seeker’s behavior. We employ administrative micro data that track the job search process...... unemployment benefits lengthen (shorten) the duration of job search for job seekers who voluntarily (involuntarily) leave employment....... of individuals who left or lost their job in August 2005 and subsequently registered at their local public employment service. Our finding is that the matching function would exhibit decreasing returns-to-scale for job seekers and vacancies, rather than constant return-to-scale. We also find that generous...

  19. Bioeconomy, Moral Friction and Symbolic Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    ‘symbolic’, treaties aimed at protecting the body are symbols with great impact. Similarly, the material preparation of body parts as tradable grafts involves symbolic work and this symbolism is an essential part of making a ‘market’. I argue that instances of ‘symbolic law’ can reflect situations in which...... several competing agendas are at play and to understand the effects, we therefore need to investigate empirically what emerges through this friction between competing governmental ambitions. My discussion is based on studies of tissue exchange in Europe and seeks to integrate theories of symbolic law...

  20. An Alternative Frictional Boundary Condition for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gaoqiang; Feng, Zhili; Zhu, Yucan; Shi, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    For better application of numerical simulation in optimization and design of friction stir welding (FSW), this paper presents a new frictional boundary condition at the tool/workpiece interface for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of FSW. The proposed boundary condition is based on an implementation of the Coulomb friction model. Using the new boundary condition, the CFD simulation yields non-uniform distribution of contact state over the tool/workpiece interface, as validated by the experimental weld macrostructure. It is found that interfacial sticking state is present over large area at the tool-workpiece interface, while significant interfacial sliding occurs at the shoulder periphery, the lower part of pin side, and the periphery of pin bottom. Due to the interfacial sticking, a rotating flow zone is found under the shoulder, in which fast circular motion occurs. The diameter of the rotating flow zone is smaller than the shoulder diameter, which is attributed to the presence of the interfacial sliding at the shoulder periphery. For the simulated welding condition, the heat generation due to friction and plastic deformation makes up 54.4 and 45.6% of the total heat generation rate, respectively. The simulated temperature field is validated by the good agreement to the experimental measurements.

  1. Frictional behavior of carbon fiber tows: a contact mechanics model of tow–tow friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo; Rooij, de Matthijn B.; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2014-01-01

    Composite-forming processes involve mechanical interactions at the ply, tow, and filament level. The deformations that occur during forming processes are governed by friction between the contacting tows on the mesoscopic level and consequently between filaments on the microscopic level. A thorough u

  2. Crawling scallop: Friction-based locomotion with one degree of freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Gregory L; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2013.01.021

    2013-01-01

    Fluid-based locomotion at low Reynolds number is subject to the constraints of the scallop theorem, which dictate that body kinematics identical under a time-reversal symmetry (in particular, those with a single degree of freedom) cannot display locomotion on average. The implications of the theorem naturally compel one to ask whether similar symmetry constraints exist for locomotion in different environments. In this work we consider locomotion along a surface where forces are described by isotropic Coulomb friction. To address whether motions with a single degree of freedom can lead to transport, we analyze a model system consisting of two bodies whose separation distance undergoes periodic time variations. The behavior of the two-body system is entirely determined by the kinematic specification of their separation, the friction forces, and the mass of each body. We show that the constraints of the scallop theorem can be escaped in frictional media if two asymmetry conditions are met at the same time: the f...

  3. Locked into Copenhagen pledges - Implications of short-term emission targets for the cost and feasibility of long-term climate goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riahi, Keywan; Kriegler, Elmar; Johnson, Nils; Bertram, Christoph; den Elzen, Michel; Eom, Jiyong; Schaeffer, Michiel; Edmonds, Jae; Isaac, Morna; Krey, Volker; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Méjean, Aurélie; McCollum, David L.; Mima, Silvana; Turton, Hal; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Wada, Kenichi; Bosetti, Valentina; Capros, Pantelis; Criqui, Patrick; Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem; Kainuma, Mikiko; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the AMPERE modeling comparison project with focus on the implications of near-term policies for the costs and attainability of long-term climate objectives. Nine modeling teams participated in the project to explore the consequences of global emissions following th

  4. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  5. Science friction: data, metadata, and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul N; Mayernik, Matthew S; Batcheller, Archer L; Bowker, Geoffrey C; Borgman, Christine L

    2011-10-01

    When scientists from two or more disciplines work together on related problems, they often face what we call 'science friction'. As science becomes more data-driven, collaborative, and interdisciplinary, demand increases for interoperability among data, tools, and services. Metadata--usually viewed simply as 'data about data', describing objects such as books, journal articles, or datasets--serve key roles in interoperability. Yet we find that metadata may be a source of friction between scientific collaborators, impeding data sharing. We propose an alternative view of metadata, focusing on its role in an ephemeral process of scientific communication, rather than as an enduring outcome or product. We report examples of highly useful, yet ad hoc, incomplete, loosely structured, and mutable, descriptions of data found in our ethnographic studies of several large projects in the environmental sciences. Based on this evidence, we argue that while metadata products can be powerful resources, usually they must be supplemented with metadata processes. Metadata-as-process suggests the very large role of the ad hoc, the incomplete, and the unfinished in everyday scientific work.

  6. Molecular friction in an actomyosin molecular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, H

    1990-10-07

    In muscle contraction, it has been widely recognized that a binding state exists between myosin and actin in the presence of Mg-ATP. To estimate the magnitude of binding strength, I introduce a concept of frictional phenomena which occurs between two sliding bodies in contact each other. In such cases, the sliding speed can be formulated as a function of the actin-myosin bond strength. In order to validate this, the present theory is applied for the two movement assay systems with no external load; one movement assay of Phalloidin Rhodamine bound F-actin on a myosin coated hydrophobic cover glass and another assay of myosin coated beads along actin cables of Nitella. If a coefficient of 0.005 is applied to the kinetic friction, 1pN for the sliding force per cross-bridge and 10 microns sec-1 for the sliding speed, it is found that the bond strength between actin and one myosin head is about 200 pN in the contracting state.

  7. Slip versus Friction : Modifying the Navier condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsalis, Evangelos; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-03-01

    The modeling of fluid-solid interfaces remains one of the key challenges in fluid mechanics. The prevailing model, attributed to Navier, defines the fluid ``slip'' velocity as proportional to the wall shear and a parameter defined as the slip length. Several works have in turn proposed models for this slip length but no universal model for the slip velocity has been accepted. We present results from large scale molecular dynamics simulations of canonical flow problems, indicating, that the inadequacy of this classic model, stems from not properly accounting for the pressure field. We propose and validate a new model, based on the fundamental observation that the finite ``slip'' velocity is a result of an imbalance between fluid and solid intermolecular forces. An excess force on the fluid elements will lead to their acceleration which in turn may result in a slip velocity at the interface. We formulate the slip velocity in terms of fluid-solid friction Ff and propose a generalized boundary condition: Ff= Fs+ Fp= λuus+ λpp where p denotes the pressure, and λuand λp the viscous and static friction coefficients, for which universal constants are presented. We demonstrate that the present model can overcome difficulties encountered by the classical slip model in canonical flow configurations.

  8. A frictional sliding algorithm for liquid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Roger A.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a new frictional sliding algorithm for liquid menisci in contact with solid substrates. In contrast to solid-solid contact, the liquid-solid contact behavior is governed by the contact line, where a contact angle forms and undergoes hysteresis. The new algorithm admits arbitrary meniscus shapes and arbitrary substrate roughness, heterogeneity and compliance. It is discussed and analyzed in the context of droplet contact, but it also applies to liquid films and solids with surface tension. The droplet is modeled as a stabilized membrane enclosing an incompressible medium. The contact formulation is considered rate-independent such that hydrostatic conditions apply. Three distinct contact algorithms are needed to describe the cases of frictionless surface contact, frictionless line contact and frictional line contact. For the latter, a predictor-corrector algorithm is proposed in order to enforce the contact conditions at the contact line and thus distinguish between the cases of advancing, pinning and receding. The algorithms are discretized within a monolithic finite element formulation. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate the numerical and physical behavior of sliding droplets.

  9. Origins of Shear Jamming for Frictional Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zheng, Hu; Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Granular systems have been shown to be able to behave like solids, under shear, even when their densities are below the critical packing fraction for frictionless isotropic jamming. To understand such a phenomena, called shear jamming, the question we address here is: how does shear bring a system from a unjammed state to a jammed state, where the coordination number, Z, is no less than 3, the isotropic jamming point for frictional grains? Since Z can be used to distinguish jammed states from unjammed ones, it is vital to understand how shear increases Z. We here propose a set of three particles in contact, denoted as a trimer, as the basic unit to characterize the deformation of the system. Trimers, stabilized by inter-grain friction, fail under a certain amount of shear and bend to make extra contacts to regain stability. By defining a projection operator of the opening angle of the trimer to the compression direction in the shear, O, we see a systematically linear decrease of this quantity with respect to shear strain, demonstrating the bending of trimers as expected. In addition, the average change of O from one shear step to the next shows a good collapse when plotted against Z, indicating a universal behavior in the process of shear jamming. We acknowledge support from NSF DMR1206351, NASA NNX15AD38G, the William M. Keck Foundation and a RT-MRSEC Fellowship.

  10. Thermomechanical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2009-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat ...... together with selected modelling results including prediction of material flow during welding, prediction of heat generation with the thermal-pseudo mechanical model as well as residual stress and deformation analysis combined with in-service loads.......Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat......, typically on a local scale, the latter will very often be based on a semi-coupled, global procedure where the transient temperatures drive the stresses but not vice-versa. However, in the latter, prior knowledge about the heat generation must be obtained somehow, and if experimental data are not available...

  11. Numerical simulation of friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is a solid-state welding technique that utilizes thermo-mechanical influence of the rotating welding tool on parent material resulting with monolith joint-weld. On the contact of welding tool and parent material, significant stirring and deformation of parent material appears, and during this process mechanical energy is partially transformed into heat. The paper describes the software for the numerical simulation of friction stir welding developed at Mechanical Engineering Faculty, University of Nis. Numerical solution for estimation of welding plates temperature is estimated using finite difference method-explicit scheme with adaptive grid, considering influence of temperature on material's conductivity, contact conditions between welding tool and parent material, material flow around welding tool etc. The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental results. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR35034: The research of modern non-conventional technologies application in manufacturing companies with the aim of increase efficiency of use, product quality, reduce of costs and save energy and materials

  12. Mechanical properties of friction stir butt-welded Al-5086 H32 plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Çam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to study Al-5086 H32 plates with a thickness of 3 mm friction stir butt-welded using different welding speeds at a tool rotational speed of 1600 rpm. Design/methodology/approach: The effect of welding speed on the weld performance of the joints was investigated by conducting optical microscopy, microhardness measurements and mechanical tests (i.e. tensile and bend tests. The effect of heat input during friction stir welding on the microstructure, and thus mechanical properties, of cold-rolled Al- 5086 plates was also determined.Findings: The experimental results indicated that the maximum tensile strength of the joints, which is about 75% that of the base plate, was obtained with a traverse speed of 200 mm/min at the tool rotational speed used, e.g. 1600 rpm, and the maximum bending angle of the joints can reach 180º. The maximum ductility performance of the joints was, on the other hand, relatively low, e.g. about 20%. These results are not unexpected due to the loss of the cold-work strengthening in the weld region as a result of the heat input during welding, and thus the confined plasticity within the stirred zone owing to strength undermatching. Higher joint performances can also be achieved by increasing the penetration depth of the stirring probe in butt-friction stir welding of Al-5086 H32 plates.Research limitations/implications: The results suggest that both strength and ductility performances can be increased by optimizing the tool penetration depth.Originality/value: Examination of mechanical properties of friction stir butt-welded Al-5086 H32 plate.

  13. Design and manufacture of intelligent Cu-based wet friction materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁华东; 韩文政; 傅苏黎; 杜建华; 遇元宏

    2004-01-01

    The friction sheets working process was analyzed. It is found that its characteristic is microregion instantaneous high temperature and the current cooling method, making the sheets cooled by the lubricating oil flowing through the friction surface, is not very efficient. Then, intelligent materials concept was introduced, the component and microstructure of intelligent Cu-based friction materials were designed, and the intelligent Cu-based wet friction materials as well as sheets were manufactured. And the intelligent friction materials working principle, i.e. the materials cooling the friction microregion in real time or the friction sheets cutting the peak value of microregion instantaneous high temperature during friction process, was given depending on the characteristics of the materials' and friction sheets' working process. Finally, it is indicated that the intelligent friction sheets excell the currently used friction sheets in properties, including anti-heating property, anti-wearing property as well as friction characteristic.

  14. Friction reduction using discrete surface textures: principle and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Stephen M.; Jing, Yang; Hua, Diann; Zhang, Huan

    2014-08-01

    There have been many reports on the use of dimples, grooves, and other surface textures to control friction in sliding interfaces. The effectiveness of surface textures in friction reduction has been demonstrated in conformal contacts under high speed low load applications such as mechanical seals and automotive water pump seals, etc., resulting in reduced friction and longer durability. For sliding components with higher contact pressures or lower speeds, conflicting results were reported. Reasons for the inconsistency may be due to the differences in texture fabrication techniques, lack of dimple size and shape uniformity, and different tester used. This paper examines the basic principles on which surface textural patterns influence friction under the three principle lubrication regimes: hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary lubrication regimes. Our findings suggest that each regime requires specific dimple size, shape, depth, and areal density to achieve friction reduction. Control experiments were also conducted to explore mechanisms of friction reduction. The dimple geometric shape and the dimple's orientation with respect to the sliding direction influence friction significantly. The underlying mechanisms for friction control via textures are discussed.

  15. Friction at seismic slip rates: testing thermal weakening models experimentally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S. B.; Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Recent experiments systematically explore rock friction under crustal earthquake conditions (fast slip rate 1desing an efficient and accurate wavenumber approximation for a solution of the temperature evolution on the fault. Finally, we propose a compact and paractical model based on a small number of memory variables for the implementation of thermal weakening friction in seismic fault simulations.

  16. Biomechanics of iliotibial band friction syndrome in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, J W; Fricker, P A; Abud, A T; Mason, B R

    1996-01-01

    We propose a biomechanical model to explain the pathogenesis of iliotibial band friction syndrome in distance runners. The model is based on a kinematic study of nine runners with iliotibial band friction syndrome, a cadaveric study of 11 normal knees, and a literature review. Friction (or impingement) occurs near footstrike, predominantly in the foot contact phase, between the posterior edge of the iliotibial band and the underlying lateral femoral epicondyle. The study subjects had an average knee flexion angle of 21.4 degrees +/- 4.3 degrees at footstrike, with friction occurring at, or slightly below, the 30 degrees of flexion traditionally described in the literature. In the cadavers we examined, there was substantial variation in the width of the iliotibial bands. This variation may affect individual predisposition to iliotibial band friction syndrome. Downhill running predisposes the runner to iliotibial band friction syndrome because the knee flexion angle at footstrike is reduced. Sprinting and faster running on level ground are less likely to cause or aggravate iliotibial band friction syndrome because, at footstrike, the knee is flexed beyond the angles at which friction occurs.

  17. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the main...

  18. Scale effects in metal-forming friction and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin; Calaon, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    equipment is developed for studies of the size effect in metal-forming friction in the range from macro-to microscale. Investigations confirm a significant friction increase when downscaling. Visual inspection of the workpieces shows this to be explained by the amount of open and closed lubricant pockets....

  19. Associated computational plasticity schemes for nonassociated frictional materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhoft, K.; Karim, M. R.; Lyamin, A. V.;

    2012-01-01

    A new methodology for computational plasticity of nonassociated frictional materials is presented. The new approach is inspired by the micromechanical origins of friction and results in a set of governing equations similar to those of standard associated plasticity. As such, procedures previously...

  20. Apparatus Measures Friction In Vacuum Or Pressurized Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevathan, Joseph R.

    1996-01-01

    Friction-testing apparatus in small test chamber contains special atmosphere, which could include vacuum or pressurized gas. Provides readings indicative of friction between pin specimen and plate specimen sliding under pin in reciprocating linear motion. Pin and plate specimens made of same or different material.