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Sample records for frictional contact method

  1. Large deformation frictional contact analysis with immersed boundary method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Jiménez, José Manuel; Tur, Manuel; Albelda, José; Ródenas, Juan José

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a method of solving 3D large deformation frictional contact problems with the Cartesian Grid Finite Element Method. A stabilized augmented Lagrangian contact formulation is developed using a smooth stress field as stabilizing term, calculated by Zienckiewicz and Zhu Superconvergent Patch Recovery. The parametric definition of the CAD surfaces (usually NURBS) is considered in the definition of the contact kinematics in order to obtain an enhanced measure of the contact gap. The numerical examples show the performance of the method.

  2. Method of dimensionality reduction in contact mechanics and friction

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Valentin L

    2015-01-01

    This book describes for the first time a simulation method for the fast calculation of contact properties and friction between rough surfaces in a complete form. In contrast to existing simulation methods, the method of dimensionality reduction (MDR) is based on the exact mapping of various types of three-dimensional contact problems onto contacts of one-dimensional foundations. Within the confines of MDR, not only are three dimensional systems reduced to one-dimensional, but also the resulting degrees of freedom are independent from another. Therefore, MDR results in an enormous reduction of the development time for the numerical implementation of contact problems as well as the direct computation time and can ultimately assume a similar role in tribology as FEM has in structure mechanics or CFD methods, in hydrodynamics. Furthermore, it substantially simplifies analytical calculation and presents a sort of “pocket book edition” of the entirety contact mechanics. Measurements of the rheology of bodies in...

  3. A fast nonlinear conjugate gradient based method for 3D concentrated frictional contact problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Zhao (Jing); E.A.H. Vollebregt (Edwin); C.W. Oosterlee (Cornelis)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper presents a fast numerical solver for a nonlinear constrained optimization problem, arising from 3D concentrated frictional shift and rolling contact problems with dry Coulomb friction. The solver combines an active set strategy with a nonlinear conjugate gradient method. One

  4. A fast nonlinear conjugate gradient based method for 3D frictional contact problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.; Vollebregt, E.A.H.; Oosterlee, C.W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fast numerical solver for a nonlinear constrained optimization problem, arising from a 3D frictional contact problem. It incorporates an active set strategy with a nonlinear conjugate gradient method. One novelty is to consider the tractions of each slip element in a polar

  5. Semi-Smooth Newton Method for Solving 2D Contact Problems with Tresca and Coulomb Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Motyckova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with contact problems for two elastic bodies with friction. After the description of the problem we present its discretization based on linear or bilinear finite elements. The semi--smooth Newton method is used to find the solution, from which we derive active sets algorithms. Finally, we arrive at the globally convergent dual implementation of the algorithms in terms of the Langrange multipliers for the Tresca problem. Numerical experiments conclude the paper.

  6. Mixed Finite Element Method for Static and Dynamic Contact Problems with Friction and Initial Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanhao Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel mixed finite element method is proposed for static and dynamic contact problems with friction and initial gaps. Based on the characteristic of local nonlinearity for the problem, the system of forces acting on the contactor is divided into two parts: external forces and contact forces. The displacement of structure is chosen as the basic variable and the nodal contact force in contact region under local coordinate system is selected as the iteration variable to confine the nonlinear iteration process in the potential contact surface which is more numerically efficient. In this way, the sophisticated contact nonlinearity is revealed by the variety of the contact forces which are determined by the external load and the contact state stick, slip, or separation. Moreover, in the case of multibody contact problem, the flexibility matrix is symmetric and sparse; thus, the iterative procedure becomes easily carried out and much more economical. In the paper, both the finite element formulations and the iteration process are given in detail for static and dynamic contact problems. Four examples are included to demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of the presented method.

  7. A nonlinear boundary integral equations method for the solving of quasistatic elastic contact problem with Coulomb friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii M. Streliaiev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional quasistatic contact problem of two linearly elastic bodies' interaction with Coulomb friction taken into account is considered. The boundary conditions of the problem have been simplified by the modification of the Coulomb's law of friction. This modification is based on the introducing of a delay in normal contact tractions that bound tangent contact tractions in the Coulomb's law of friction expressions. At this statement the problem is reduced to a sequence of similar systems of nonlinear integral equations describing bodies' interaction at each step of loading. A method for an approximate solution of the integral equations system corresponded to each step of loading is applied. This method consists of system regularization, discretization of regularized system and iterative process application for solving the discretized system. A numerical solution of a contact problem of an elastic sphere with an elastic half-space interaction under increasing and subsequently decreasing normal compressive force has been obtained.

  8. Existence for viscoplastic contact with Coulomb friction problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Amassad

    2002-01-01

    frictional contact between an elastic-viscoplastic body and a rigid obstacle. We model the frictional contact both by a Tresca's friction law and a regularized Coulomb's law. We assume, in a first part, that the contact is bilateral and that no separation takes place. In a second part, we consider the Signorini unilateral contact conditions. Proofs are based on a time-discretization method, Banach and Schauder fixed point theorems.

  9. Friction welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Ryuichi; Hatanaka, Tatsuo.

    1969-01-01

    A friction welding method for forming a lattice-shaped base and tie plate supporter for fuel elements is disclosed in which a plate formed with a concavity along its edge is pressure welded to a rotating member such as a boss by longitudinally contacting the projecting surfaces remaining on either side of the concavity with the rotating member during the high speed rotation thereof in the presence of an inert gas. Since only the two projecting surfaces of the plate are fused by friction to the rotary member, heat expansion is absorbed by the concavity to prevent distortion; moreover, a two point contact surface assures a stable fitting and promotes the construction of a rigid lattice in which a number of the abovementioned plates are friction welded between rotating members to form any desired complex arrangement. The inert has serves to protect the material quality of the contacting surfaces from air during the welding step. The present invention thus provides a method in which even Zircaloy may be friction welded in place of casting stainless steel in the construction of supporting lattices to thereby enhance neutron economy. (K. J. Owens)

  10. METHOD OF DIMENSIONALITY REDUCTION IN CONTACT MECHANICS AND FRICTION: A USERS HANDBOOK. I. AXIALLY-SYMMETRIC CONTACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin L. Popov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Method of Dimensionality Reduction (MDR is a method of calculation and simulation of contacts of elastic and viscoelastic bodies. It consists essentially of two simple steps: (a substitution of the three-dimensional continuum by a uniquely defined one-dimensional linearly elastic or viscoelastic foundation (Winkler foundation and (b transformation of the three-dimensional profile of the contacting bodies by means of the MDR-transformation. As soon as these two steps are completed, the contact problem can be considered to be solved. For axial symmetric contacts, only a small calculation by hand is required which does not exceed elementary calculus and will not be a barrier for any practically-oriented engineer. Alternatively, the MDR can be implemented numerically, which is almost trivial due to the independence of the foundation elements. In spite of their simplicity, all the results are exact. The present paper is a short practical guide to the MDR.

  11. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  12. Dynamic frictional contact for elastic viscoplastic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth L. Kuttler

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a general theory for evolution inclusions, existence and uniqueness theorems are obtained for weak solutions to a frictional dynamic contact problem for elastic visco-plastic material. An existence theorem in the case where the friction coefficient is discontinuous is also presented.

  13. Sliding friction: From microscopic contacts to Amontons’ law

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, B.A.

    2017-01-01

    Most engineers describe sliding friction using the friction coefficient, the ratio of frictional force to normal force. While this proportionality is very simple, its origin is not trivial at all and has been subject of investigation for more than a century. The current consensus is that both frictional and normal force are proportional to the 'real contact area'. Surface roughness prevents surfaces from coming into full contact; the real contact area is simply the fraction of the apparent co...

  14. Real-Time Dynamic Observation of Micro-Friction on the Contact Interface of Friction Lining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dekun; Chen, Kai; Guo, Yongbo

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the microscopic friction mechanism based on in situ microscopic observation in order to record the deformation and contact situation of friction lining during the frictional process. The results show that friction coefficient increased with the shear deformation and energy loss of the surfacee, respectively. Furthermore, the friction mechanism mainly included adhesive friction in the high-pressure and high-speed conditions, whereas hysteresis friction was in the low-pressure and low-speed conditions. The mixed-friction mechanism was in the period when the working conditions varied from high pressure and speed to low pressure and speed. PMID:29498677

  15. Effect of time derivative of contact area on dynamic friction

    OpenAIRE

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated dynamic friction during oblique impact of a golf ball by evaluating the ball’s angular velocity, contact force, and the contact area between the ball and target. The effect of the contact area on the angular velocities was evaluated, and the results indicated that the contact area plays an important role in dynamic friction. In this study, the dynamic friction force F was given by F= μN+μη.dA/dt, where μ is the coefficient of friction, N is the contact force, dA/dt is ...

  16. Dynamic contact with Signorini's condition and slip rate dependent friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kuttler

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Existence of a weak solution for the problem of dynamic frictional contact between a viscoelastic body and a rigid foundation is established. Contact is modelled with the Signorini condition. Friction is described by a slip rate dependent friction coefficient and a nonlocal and regularized contact stress. The existence in the case of a friction coefficient that is a graph, which describes the jump from static to dynamic friction, is established, too. The proofs employ the theory of set-valued pseudomonotone operators applied to approximate problems and a priori estimates.

  17. Static friction in elastic adhesive MEMS contacts, models and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Niels Roelof; Gui, C.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2000-01-01

    Static friction in shearing mode can be expressed as the product of the shear strength of the interface and the real contact area. The influence of roughness on friction in elastic adhesive contact is analyzed. Special attention is paid to low loading conditions, in which the number of contact

  18. Contact mechanics and friction physical principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Valentin L

    2017-01-01

    This application-oriented book introduces readers to the associations and relationships between contact mechanics and friction, providing them with a deeper understanding of tribology. It addresses the related phenomena of contacts, adhesion, capillary forces, friction, lubrication, and wear from a consistent point of view. The author presents (1) methods for rough estimates of tribological quantities, (2) simple and general methods for analytical calculations, and (3) the crossover into numerical simulation methods, the goal being to convey a consistent view of tribological processes at various scales of magnitude (from nanotribology to earthquake research). The book also explores the system dynamic aspects of tribological systems, such as squeal and its suppression, as well as other types of instabilities and spatial patterns. It includes problems and worked-out solutions for the respective chapters, giving readers ample opportunity to apply the theory to practical situations and to deepen their understandi...

  19. Static friction of stainless steel wire rope–rubber contacts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeve, A.J.; Krijger, T.; Mugge, W.; Breedveld, P.; Dodou, D.; Dankelman, J.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about static friction of stainless-steel wire ropes ('cables') in contact with soft rubbers, an interface of potential importance for rigidifiable medical instruments. Although friction theories imply that the size and profile of the cables affect static friction, there are no

  20. Assessing the accuracy of different simplified frictional rolling contact algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollebregt, E. A. H.; Iwnicki, S. D.; Xie, G.; Shackleton, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for assessing the accuracy of different frictional rolling contact theories. The main characteristic of the approach is that it takes a statistically oriented view. This yields a better insight into the behaviour of the methods in diverse circumstances (varying contact patch ellipticities, mixed longitudinal, lateral and spin creepages) than is obtained when only a small number of (basic) circumstances are used in the comparison. The range of contact parameters that occur for realistic vehicles and tracks are assessed using simulations with the Vampire vehicle system dynamics (VSD) package. This shows that larger values for the spin creepage occur rather frequently. Based on this, our approach is applied to typical cases for which railway VSD packages are used. The results show that particularly the USETAB approach but also FASTSIM give considerably better results than the linear theory, Vermeulen-Johnson, Shen-Hedrick-Elkins and Polach methods, when compared with the 'complete theory' of the CONTACT program.

  1. Static friction in elastic adhesion contacts in MEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Niels Roelof; Gui, C.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2003-01-01

    Static friction in a shearing mode can be expressed as the product of the shear strength of the interface and the real contact area. The influence of roughness on friction in elastic adhesion contact is analyzed. The effect of adhesion is included using Maugis' expansion of the Greenwood and

  2. The contact area and sliding friction in nanotribological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolloch, M.

    2014-01-01

    Although friction, wear, and lubrication have been investigated for hundreds of years, many important questions in the field, now dubbed tribology, remain open. Two of these are the determination of the real area of contact and the direction dependence of friction forces on the nanoscale, which are investigated in this thesis. The invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 by Binnig , Quate, and Gerber was invaluable for the investigation of frictional forces on the atomic scale, giving a boost to the emerging field of nanotribology. While experimental AFM set-ups where quickly modeled with classical molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, the use of 'ab-initio' methods on tribological problems remained scarce until recently. In this thesis density functional theory (DFT) is used to develop parameter free methods in the field of nanotribology. Since the discovery that the apparent area of contact can be orders of magnitude larger than the true area of contact, the definition and determination of the latter has been an important topic of research. While classical contact mechanics provides satisfactory theories and results for various macroscopic systems, the application of these methods to atomistic systems is dubious, as the contacting bodies are not continuous at this length scale. We developed a parameter free approach to define and calculate the real area of contact between two bodies depending on distance. Strong relaxations at distinct distances, like the j ump to contact , which is often observed in AFM experiments, are used to define the onset of contact and Bader-s Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules is used to calculate the real area of contact at a given distance. Bader's method partitions the charge density ρ unambiguously into atoms, which theoretically fill all space and thus give non zero contact areas for all distances. It is therefore necessary to use a density cutoff ρ cut which assigns all regions in space where ρ <

  3. Symmetric-Galerkin BEM simulation of fracture with frictional contact

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phan, AV

    2003-06-14

    Full Text Available FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 2003; 57:835?851 (DOI: 10.1002/nme.707) Symmetric-Galerkin BEM simulation of fracture with frictional contact A.-V. Phan1;asteriskmath;?, J. A. L. Napier2, L. J. Gray3 and T. Kaplan3 1Department... Methods in Engineering 1975; 9:495?507. 35. Barsoum RS. On the use of isoparametric FFnite elements in linear fracture mechanics. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 1976; 10:25?37. 36. Gray LJ, Phan A-V, Paulino GH, Kaplan T...

  4. Microscopic contact area and friction between medical textiles and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derler, S; Rotaru, G-M; Ke, W; El Issawi-Frischknecht, L; Kellenberger, P; Scheel-Sailer, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical contact between medical textiles and skin is relevant in the health care for patients with vulnerable skin or chronic wounds. In order to gain new insights into the skin-textile contact on the microscopic level, the 3D surface topography of a normal and a new hospital bed sheet with a regular surface structure was measured using a digital microscope. The topographic data was analysed concerning material distribution and real contact area against smooth surfaces as a function of surface deformations. For contact conditions that are relevant for the skin of patients lying in a hospital bed it was found that the order of magnitude of the ratio of real and apparent contact area between textiles and skin or a mechanical skin model lies between 0.02 and 0.1 and that surface deformations, i.e. penetration of the textile surface asperities into skin or a mechanical skin model, range from 10 to 50µm. The performed analyses of textile 3D surface topographies and comparisons with previous friction measurement results provided information on the relationship between microscopic surface properties and macroscopic friction behaviour of medical textiles. In particular, the new bed sheet was found to be characterised by a trend towards a smaller microscopic contact area (up to a factor of two) and by a larger free interfacial volume (more than a factor of two) in addition to a 1.5 times lower shear strength when in contact with counter-surfaces. The applied methods can be useful to develop improved and skin-adapted materials and surfaces for medical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Contact mechanics, friction and adhesion with application to quasicrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Bo; Carbone, Giuseppe; Samoilov, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the origin of friction and adhesion between hard solids such as quasicrystals. We emphasize the fundamental role of surface roughness in many contact mechanics problems, in particular for friction and adhesion between solid bodies. The most important property of rough surfaces...

  6. Contact and friction in systems with fibre reinforced elastomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Pareja, Natalia Valentina

    2012-01-01

    The tribological behaviour (contact and friction) of systems that include fibre reinforced elastomers is studied in this thesis. The elastomer composite is considered to behave as a viscoelastic anisotropic continuum material. In the defined tribo-system, the most influential friction mechanism is

  7. Modelling of static friction in rubber-metal contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, E.L.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2007-01-01

    A static friction model for contact between rough rubber and metal surfaces is developed. This model is based on the contact of a viscoelastic–rigid asperity couple. Single asperity contact is modelled in such a way that the asperities stick together in a central region and slip over an annulus at

  8. Universality in dynamic wetting dominated by contact-line friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Andreas; Bellani, Gabriele; Amberg, Gustav

    2012-04-01

    We report experiments on the rapid contact-line motion present in the early stages of capillary-driven spreading of drops on dry solid substrates. The spreading data fail to follow a conventional viscous or inertial scaling. By integrating experiments and simulations, we quantify a contact-line friction μ(f) which is seen to limit the speed of the rapid dynamic wetting. A scaling based on this contact-line friction is shown to yield a universal curve for the evolution of the contact-line radius as a function of time, for a range of fluid viscosities, drop sizes, and surface wettabilities.

  9. Kalker's algorithm Fastsim solves tangential contact problems with slip-dependent friction and friction anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents two extensions of Kalker's algorithm Fastsim of the simplified theory of rolling contact. The first extension is for solving tangential contact problems with the coefficient of friction depending on slip velocity. Two friction laws have been considered: with and without recuperation of the static friction. According to the tribological hypothesis for metallic bodies shear failure, the friction law without recuperation of static friction is more suitable for wheel and rail than the other one. Sample results present local quantities inside the contact area (division to slip and adhesion, traction) as well as global ones (creep forces as functions of creepages and rolling velocity). For the coefficient of friction diminishing with slip, the creep forces decay after reaching the maximum and they depend on the rolling velocity. The second extension is for solving tangential contact problems with friction anisotropy characterised by a convex set of the permissible tangential tractions. The effect of the anisotropy has been shown on examples of rolling without spin and in the presence of pure spin for the elliptical set. The friction anisotropy influences tangential tractions and creep forces. Sample results present local and global quantities. Both extensions have been described with the same language of formulation and they may be merged into one, joint algorithm.

  10. Friction modelling of preloaded tube contact dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.A.; Rogers, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Many loosely supported components are subjected to flow-induced vibration leading to localized wear. Life prediction depends on robust and accurate modelling of the nonlinear dynamics as the components interact with their supports. The output of such analysis is the component dynamic response and impact forces, including friction forces during stick-slip motions. Such results are used to determine the normal work rates, which are utilized to predict fretting wear damage. Accurate estimates of these parameters are essential. This paper presents simulations of a loosely supported fuel-channel tube subject to turbulence excitation. The effects of tube/support clearance and preload are investigated. Several friction models, including velocity-limited, spring-damper, and force-balance are utilized. A comparison of these models is carried out to investigate their accuracy. The results show good agreement with experimental work rates when a simple iterative procedure to update the friction forces is used. (authors)

  11. Friction modelling of preloaded tube contact dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.A.; Rogers, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Many loosely supported components are subjected to flow-induced vibration leading to localized wear. Life prediction depends on robust and accurate modelling of the nonlinear dynamics as the components interact with their supports. The output of such analysis is the component dynamic response and impact forces, including friction forces during stick-slip motions. Such results are used to determine the normal work rates, which are utilized to predict fretting wear damage. Accurate estimates of these parameters are essential. This paper presents simulations of a loosely supported fuel-channel tube subject to turbulence excitation. The effects of tube/support clearance and preload are investigated. Several friction models, including velocity-limited, spring-damper and force-balance are utilized. A comparison of these models is carried out to investigate their accuracy. The results show good agreement with experimental work rates when a simple iterative procedure to update the friction forces is used

  12. Probing into frictional contact dynamics by ultrasound and electrical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changshan Jin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction arises in the interface of friction pair, and therefore, it is difficult to detect it. Ultrasonic means, as a NDT, is the correct alternative. This paper introduces a means of detecting dynamic contact and an interpretation of behaviors of dry friction. It has been determined that frictional surfaces have a specific property of dynamic response hardening (DRH. Dynamic response forces and oscillation arise during static–kinetic transition process. While the contact zone of sliding surfaces appears “hard” in motion, it appears “soft” at rest. Consequently, a separation of the surfaces occurs and the real area of contact is decreased as sliding velocity increases. This is the cause of F–v descent phenomenon. When the friction comes to a rest, the remaining process of DRH and micro-oscillation do not disappear instantaneously, instead they gradually return to their original static position. The contact area, therefore, is increased by rest period (F–T ascent characteristics. Based on analogies between a solid unit (η–m–k and an R-L-C circuit, the DRH is demonstrated by electrical simulations.

  13. Cohesive delamination and frictional contact on joining surface via XFEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parrinello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the complex mechanical behaviour of the surfaces joining two differentbodies is analysed by a cohesive-frictional interface constitutive model. The kinematical behaviouris characterized by the presence of discontinuous displacement fields, that take place at the internalconnecting surfaces, both in the fully cohesive phase and in the delamination one. Generally, in order tocatch discontinuous displacement fields, internal connecting surfaces (adhesive layers are modelled bymeans of interface elements, which connect, node by node, the meshes of the joined bodies, requiringthe mesh to be conforming to the geometry of the single bodies and to the relevant connecting surface.In the present paper, the Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM is employed to model, both fromthe geometrical and from the kinematical point of view, the whole domain, including the connectedbodies and the joining surface. The joining surface is not discretized by specific finite elements, butit is defined as an internal discontinuity surface, whose spatial position inside the mesh is analyticallydefined. The proposed approach is developed for two-dimensional composite domains, formed by twoor more material portions joined together by means of a zero thickness adhesive layer. The numericalresults obtained with the proposed approach are compared with the results of the classical interfacefinite element approach. Some examples of delamination and frictional contact are proposed withlinear, circular and curvilinear adhesive layer.

  14. On the Modeling of Contact Interfaces with Frictional Slips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Munteanu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the contact interfaces between the scatterers and the matrix into the sonic composites, in the presence of the frictional slips. The sonic composite is a sonic liner designed in order to provide suppression of unwanted noise for jet engines, with emphases on the nacelle of turbofan engines for commercial aircraft.

  15. Predicting a contact's sensitivity to initial conditions using metrics of frictional coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flicek, Robert C.; Hills, David A.; Brake, Matthew Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting how sensitive a frictional contact’s steady-state behavior is to its initial conditions. Previous research has proven that if a contact is uncoupled, i.e. if slip displacements do not influence the contact pressure distribution, then its steady-state response is independent of initial conditions, but if the contact is coupled, the steady-state response depends on initial conditions. In this paper, two metrics for quantifying coupling in discrete frictional systems are examined. These metrics suggest that coupling is dominated by material dissimilarity due to Dundurs’ composite material parameter β when β ≥ 0.2, but geometric mismatch becomes the dominant source of coupling for smaller values of β. Based on a large set of numerical simulations with different contact geometries, material combinations, and friction coefficients, a contact’s sensitivity to initial conditions is found to be correlated with the product of the coupling metric and the friction coefficient. For cyclic shear loading, this correlation is maintained for simulations with different contact geometries, material combinations, and friction coefficients. Furthermore, for cyclic bulk loading, the correlation is only maintained when the contact edge angle is held constant.

  16. Direct measurement of friction of a fluctuating contact line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuo; Gao, Min; Xiong, Xiaomin; Wang, Yong Jian; Wang, Xiaoping; Sheng, Ping; Tong, Penger

    2013-07-12

    We report a direct measurement of the friction coefficient of a fluctuating (and slipping) contact line using a thin vertical glass fiber of diameter d with one end glued onto a cantilever beam and the other end touching a liquid-air interface. By measuring the broadening of the resonant peak of the cantilever system with varying liquid viscosity η, we find the friction coefficient of the contact line has a universal form, ξ(c)≃0.8πdη, independent of the liquid-solid contact angle. The obtained scaling law is further supported by the numerical simulation based on the phase field model under the generalized Navier boundary conditions.

  17. Frictional behavior of carbon fiber tows: a contact mechanics model of tow–tow friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2014-01-01

    Composite-forming processes involve mechanical interactions at the ply, tow, and filament level. The deformations that occur during forming processes are governed by friction between the contacting tows on the mesoscopic level and consequently between filaments on the microscopic level. A thorough

  18. Techniques for contact and contact with friction problems; Tecnicas para problemas de contacto y contacto con friccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velandia Arana, Gonzalo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1990-12-31

    Different numerical techniques are presented based in the finite element method to obtain numerical solutions to contact and contact with friction problems between solid bodies, and compared between each other. [Espanol] Se presentan diferentes tecnicas numericas basadas en el metodo de elementos finitos para la obtencion de soluciones numericas de problemas de contacto y contacto con friccion entre cuerpos solidos, y se comparan entre si.

  19. Techniques for contact and contact with friction problems; Tecnicas para problemas de contacto y contacto con friccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velandia Arana, Gonzalo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1989-12-31

    Different numerical techniques are presented based in the finite element method to obtain numerical solutions to contact and contact with friction problems between solid bodies, and compared between each other. [Espanol] Se presentan diferentes tecnicas numericas basadas en el metodo de elementos finitos para la obtencion de soluciones numericas de problemas de contacto y contacto con friccion entre cuerpos solidos, y se comparan entre si.

  20. Time-to-contact estimation modulated by implied friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuki; Sasaki, Kyoshiro; Miura, Kayo

    2014-01-01

    The present study demonstrated that friction cues for target motion affect time-to-contact (TTC) estimation. A circular target moved in a linear path with a constant velocity and was gradually occluded by a static rectangle. The target moved with forward and backward spins or without spin. Observers were asked to respond at the time when the moving target appeared to pass the occluder. The results showed that TTC was significantly longer in the backward spin condition than in the forward and without-spin conditions. Moreover, similar results were obtained when a sound was used to imply friction. Our findings indicate that the observer's experiential knowledge of motion coupled with friction intuitively modulated their TTC estimation.

  1. Rubber contact mechanics: adhesion, friction and leakage of seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A; Dorogin, L; Tahir, M; Stöckelhuber, K W; Heinrich, G; Espallargas, N; Persson, B N J

    2017-12-13

    We study the adhesion, friction and leak rate of seals for four different elastomers: Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Ethylene Propylene Diene (EPDM), Polyepichlorohydrin (GECO) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Adhesion between smooth clean glass balls and all the elastomers is studied both in the dry state and in water. In water, adhesion is observed for the NBR and PDMS elastomers, but not for the EPDM and GECO elastomers, which we attribute to the differences in surface energy and dewetting. The leakage of water is studied with rubber square-ring seals squeezed against sandblasted glass surfaces. Here we observe a strongly non-linear dependence of the leak rate on the water pressure ΔP for the elastomers exhibiting adhesion in water, while the leak rate depends nearly linearly on ΔP for the other elastomers. We attribute the non-linearity to some adhesion-related phenomena, such as dewetting or the (time-dependent) formation of gas bubbles, which blocks fluid flow channels. Finally, rubber friction is studied at low sliding speeds using smooth glass and sandblasted glass as substrates, both in the dry state and in water. The measured friction coefficients are compared to theory, and the origin of the frictional shear stress acting in the area of real contact is discussed. The NBR rubber, which exhibits the strongest adhesion both in the dry state and in water, also shows the highest friction both in the dry state and in water.

  2. Contact with friction modeling for the study of a bolted junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebon, F.; Raous, M.; Boulegues, D.

    1987-01-01

    Many structural analysis problems are concerned by contact phenomena. A good knowledge of the contact displacements and the contact forces between the different parts of the structure is generally essential in structure assembling. The special boundary behaviour has a strong influence on the distribution of the stresses in the whole structure and on his total fiability. The contact behaviour is strongly non linear because of the non penetration conditions on the one hand, and because of the friction on the other. On such problems the real contact zone and the contact forces are unknown 'a priori' and have to be determined during the resolution. The non-penetration is characterized by unilateral conditions and the friction is described by a constitutive law (Coulomb friction law). The application presented here concerns the assembling of the three parts of a bolted junction using a pressing ring. There are three contact zones in this program. A good description of the contact phenomena is essential to ensure tightness. Our methods are based on projection techniques coupled with overrelaxed Gauss-Seidel methods including condensation procedures (reduction of the number of variables). Non linear programming methods and iterative procedures on special boundary conditions are also used. (orig./HP)

  3. Friction and universal contact area law for randomly rough viscoelastic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaraggi, M; Persson, B N J

    2015-03-18

    We present accurate numerical results for the friction force and the contact area for a viscoelastic solid (rubber) in sliding contact with hard, randomly rough substrates. The rough surfaces are self-affine fractal with roughness over several decades in length scales. We calculate the contribution to the friction from the pulsating deformations induced by the substrate asperities. We also calculate how the area of real contact, A(v, p), depends on the sliding speed v and on the nominal contact pressure p, and we show how the contact area for any sliding speed can be obtained from a universal master curve A(p). The numerical results are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of an analytical contact mechanics theory.

  4. Friction-induced vibrations and self-organization mechanics and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of sliding contact

    CERN Document Server

    Nosonovsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many scientists and engineers do not realize that, under certain conditions, friction can lead to the formation of new structures at the interface, including in situ tribofilms and various patterns. In turn, these structures-usually formed by destabilization of the stationary sliding regime-can lead to the reduction of friction and wear. Friction-Induced Vibrations and Self-Organization: Mechanics and Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Sliding Contact combines the mechanical and thermodynamic methods in tribology, thus extending the field of mechanical friction-induced vibrations to non-mechanical instabilities and self-organization processes at the frictional interface. The book also relates friction-induced self-organization to novel biomimetic materials, such as self-lubricating, self-cleaning, and self-healing materials. Explore Friction from a Different Angle-as a Fundamental Force of Nature The book begins with an exploration of friction as a fundamental force of nature throughout the history of science....

  5. Conjugate gradient based projection - A new explicit methodology for frictional contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Li, Maocheng; Sha, Desong

    1993-01-01

    With special attention towards the applicability to parallel computation or vectorization, a new and effective explicit approach for linear complementary formulations involving a conjugate gradient based projection methodology is proposed in this study for contact problems with Coulomb friction. The overall objectives are focussed towards providing an explicit methodology of computation for the complete contact problem with friction. In this regard, the primary idea for solving the linear complementary formulations stems from an established search direction which is projected to a feasible region determined by the non-negative constraint condition; this direction is then applied to the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient method resulting in a powerful explicit methodology which possesses high accuracy, excellent convergence characteristics, fast computational speed and is relatively simple to implement for contact problems involving Coulomb friction.

  6. Shape Optimization in Contact Problems with Coulomb Friction and a Solution-Dependent Friction Coefficient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beremlijski, P.; Outrata, Jiří; Haslinger, Jaroslav; Pathó, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2014), s. 3371-3400 ISSN 0363-0129 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0671 Grant - others:GA MŠK(CZ) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0070; GA MŠK(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0070 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 ; RVO:68145535 Keywords : shape optimization * contact problems * Coulomb friction * solution-dependent coefficient of friction * mathematical programs with equilibrium constraints Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/MTR/outrata-0434234.pdf

  7. A frictional contact problem for an electro-viscoelastic body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Sofonea

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model which describes the quasistatic frictional contact between a piezoelectric body and a deformable conductive foundation is studied. A nonlinear electro-viscoelastic constitutive law is used to model the piezoelectric material. Contact is described with the normal compliance condition, a version of Coulomb's law of dry friction, and a regularized electrical conductivity condition. A variational formulation of the model, in the form of a coupled system for the displacements and the electric potential, is derived. The existence of a unique weak solution of the model is established under a smallness assumption on the surface conductance. The proof is based on arguments of evolutionary variational inequalities and fixed points of operators.

  8. A dynamic unilateral contact problem with adhesion and friction in viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocou, Marius; Schryve, Mathieu; Raous, Michel

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to study an interaction law coupling recoverable adhesion, friction and unilateral contact between two viscoelastic bodies of Kelvin-Voigt type. A dynamic contact problem with adhesion and nonlocal friction is considered and its variational formulation is written as the coupling between an implicit variational inequality and a parabolic variational inequality describing the evolution of the intensity of adhesion. The existence and approximation of variational solutions are analysed, based on a penalty method, some abstract results and compactness properties. Finally, some numerical examples are presented.

  9. Methods and Devices used to Measure Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, Jack; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2004-01-01

    . To gain a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure friction-stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods, which have...... been tried in the past and discusses some of the recent sensor designs, which can now be used to measure Friction in both production situations and for research purposes....

  10. Modeling and calculation of impact friction caused by corner contact in gear transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changjiang; Chen, Siyu

    2014-09-01

    Corner contact in gear pair causes vibration and noise, which has attracted many attentions. However, teeth errors and deformation make it difficulty to determine the point situated at corner contact and study the mechanism of teeth impact friction in the current researches. Based on the mechanism of corner contact, the process of corner contact is divided into two stages of impact and scratch, and the calculation model including gear equivalent error—combined deformation is established along the line of action. According to the distributive law, gear equivalent error is synthesized by base pitch error, normal backlash and tooth profile modification on the line of action. The combined tooth compliance of the first point lying in corner contact before the normal path is inversed along the line of action, on basis of the theory of engagement and the curve of tooth synthetic compliance & load-history. Combined secondarily the equivalent error with the combined deflection, the position standard of the point situated at corner contact is probed. Then the impact positions and forces, from the beginning to the end during corner contact before the normal path, are calculated accurately. Due to the above results, the lash model during corner contact is founded, and the impact force and frictional coefficient are quantified. A numerical example is performed and the averaged impact friction coefficient based on the presented calculation method is validated. This research obtains the results which could be referenced to understand the complex mechanism of teeth impact friction and quantitative calculation of the friction force and coefficient, and to gear exact design for tribology.

  11. Normal and friction stabilization techniques for interactive rigid body constraint-based contact force computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz-Hansen, Morten; Abel, Sarah Maria Niebe; Erleben, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel, yet simple, method for stabilization of normal forces. A normal stabilization term, carefully designed from hypotheses about interactive usability, is added to the contact force problem. Further, we propose friction stabilization as a completely new stabilization paradigm...

  12. Non-Amontons-Coulomb local friction law of randomly rough contact interfaces with rubber

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, D. T.; Wandersman, E.; Prevost, A.; Chenadec, Y. Le; Fretigny, C.; Chateauminois, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on measurements of the local friction law at a multi-contact interface formed between a smooth rubber and statistically rough glass lenses, under steady state friction. Using contact imaging, surface displacements are measured, and inverted to extract both distributions of frictional shear stress and contact pressure with a spatial resolution of about 10~$\\mu$m. For a glass surface whose topography is self-affine with a Gaussian height asperity distribution, the local frictional she...

  13. Frictional Compliant Haptic Contact and Deformation of Soft Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naci Zafer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with compliant haptic contact and deformation of soft objects. A human soft fingertip model is considered to act as the haptic interface and is brought into contact with and deforms a discrete surface. A nonlinear constitutive law is developed in predicting normal forces and, for the haptic display of surface texture, motions along the surface are also resisted at various rates by accounting for dynamic Lund-Grenoble (LuGre frictional forces. For the soft fingertip to apply forces over an area larger than a point, normal and frictional forces are distributed around the soft fingertip contact location on the deforming surface. The distribution is realized based on a kernel smoothing function and by a nonlinear spring-damper net around the contact point. Experiments conducted demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of our approach in real-time haptic rendering of a kidney surface. The resistive (interaction forces are applied at the user fingertip bone edge. A 3-DoF parallel robotic manipulator equipped with a constraint based controller is used for the implementation. By rendering forces both in lateral and normal directions, the designed haptic interface system allows the user to realistically feel both the geometrical and mechanical (nonlinear properties of the deforming kidney.

  14. The friction cost method: a comment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, M; Karlsson, G

    1997-04-01

    The friction cost method has been proposed as an alternative to the human-capital approach of estimating indirect costs. We argue that the friction cost method is based on implausible assumptions not supported by neoclassical economic theory. Furthermore consistently applying the friction cost method would mean that the method should also be applied in the estimation of direct costs, which would mean that the costs of health care programmes are substantially decreased. It is concluded that the friction cost method does not seem to be a useful alternative to the human-capital approach in the estimation of indirect costs.

  15. Film Thickness and Friction Relationship in Grease Lubricated Rough Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonçalves

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the film generation and the coefficient of friction in grease lubricated contacts was investigated. Ball-on-disc tests were performed under different operating conditions: entrainment speed, lubricant temperature and surface roughness. The tests were performed with fully formulated greases and their base oils. The greases were formulated with different thickener types and also different base oils natures and viscosities. Film thickness measurements were performed in ball-on-glass disc tests, and Stribeck curves were measured in ball-on-steel disc tests with discs of different roughness. The role of the thickener and the base oil nature/viscosity on the film thickness and coefficient of friction was addressed and the greases’ performance was compared based on their formulation.

  16. Rubber friction: The contribution from the area of real contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A; Miyashita, N; Espallargas, N; Persson, B N J

    2018-06-14

    There are two contributions to the friction force when a rubber block is sliding on a hard and rough substrate surface, namely, a contribution F ad = τ f A from the area of real contact A and a viscoelastic contribution F visc from the pulsating forces exerted by the substrate asperities on the rubber block. Here we present experimental results obtained at different sliding speeds and temperatures, and we show that the temperature dependency of the shear stress τ f , for temperatures above the rubber glass transition temperature T g , is weaker than that of the bulk viscoelastic modulus. The physical origin of τ f for T > T g is discussed, and we propose that its temperature dependency is determined by the rubber molecule segment mobility at the sliding interface, which is higher than in the bulk because of increased free-volume effect due to the short-wavelength surface roughness. This is consistent with the often observed reduction in the glass transition temperature in nanometer-thick surface layers of glassy polymers. For temperatures T contact regions and the contact area is determined by the rubber penetration hardness. For this case, we propose that the frictional shear stress is due to slip at the interface between the rubber and a transfer film adsorbed on the concrete surface.

  17. Experimental research on friction factor of end faces of contacting mechanical seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Long; Gu, Bo-qin; Feng, Xiu; Sun, Jian-jun

    2008-11-01

    The friction of the seal faces is the most important phenomenon in working process of contacting mechanical seals. The friction factor f is a key parameter for expressing the friction regime of the seal faces, the frictional power, the wearing capacity, the friction heat productivity, the temperature distortion of the end face and the temperature of the end face. The relationship between the friction factor f and the friction regime of the end faces of contacting mechanical seals was discussed from a microscopic point of view. The friction factor is usually worked out by the friction torque which is measured in the test. In the computer aided testing device of the mechanical seal system, the experimental investigations on the basic performance of the B104a-70 contacting mechanical seal was carried out. The test results indicate that the bigger the spring pressure of B104a-70 contacting mechanical seal, the bigger the friction factor. When the spring pressure is less, the bigger the rotational speed, the bigger the friction factor. But when the spring pressure is equal to 0.0866 MPa, the friction factor is not almost influenced by the rotational speed. When the rotational speed and spring pressure are less, the medium pressure has a less influence on the friction factor. When the rotational speed or spring pressure is bigger, the bigger the medium pressure, the less the friction factor.

  18. The thermoelastic Aldo contact model with frictional heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afferrante, L.; Ciavarella, M.

    2004-03-01

    In the study of the essential features of thermoelastic contact, Comninou and Dundurs (J. Therm. Stresses 3 (1980) 427) devised a simplified model, the so-called "Aldo model", where the full 3 D body is replaced by a large number of thin rods normal to the interface and insulated between each other, and the system was further reduced to 2 rods by Barber's Conjecture (ASME J. Appl. Mech. 48 (1981) 555). They studied in particular the case of heat flux at the interface driven by temperature differences of the bodies, and opposed by a contact resistance, finding possible multiple and history dependent solutions, depending on the imposed temperature differences. The Aldo model is here extended to include the presence of frictional heating. It is found that the number of solutions of the problem is still always odd, and Barber's graphical construction and the stability analysis of the previous case with no frictional heating can be extended. For any given imposed temperature difference, a critical speed is found for which the uniform pressure solution becomes non-unique and/or unstable. For one direction of the temperature difference, the uniform pressure solution is non-unique before it becomes unstable. When multiple solutions occur, outermost solutions (those involving only one rod in contact) are always stable. A full numerical analysis has been performed to explore the transient behaviour of the system, in the case of two rods of different size. In the general case of N rods, Barber's conjecture is shown to hold since there can only be two stable states for all the rods, and the reduction to two rods is always possible, a posteriori.

  19. Friction of human skin against smooth and rough glass as a function of the contact pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derler, S.; Gerhardt, L.C.; Lenz, A.; Bertaux, E.; Hadad, M.

    2009-01-01

    The friction behaviour of human skin was studied by combining friction measurements using a tri-axial force plate with skin contact area measurements using a pressure sensitive film. Four subjects carried out friction measurement series, in which they rubbed the index finger pad and the edge of the

  20. Friction Mapping as a Tool for Measuring the Elastohydrodynamic Contact Running-in Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    ARL-TR-7501 ● OCT 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Friction Mapping as a Tool for Measuring the Elastohydrodynamic Contact...Research Laboratory Friction Mapping as a Tool for Measuring the Elastohydrodynamic Contact Running-in Process by Stephen Berkebile Vehicle...YYYY) October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 January–30 June 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Friction Mapping as a Tool for

  1. A Class of time-fractional hemivariational inequalities with application to frictional contact problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shengda; Migórski, Stanisław

    2018-03-01

    In this paper a class of elliptic hemivariational inequalities involving the time-fractional order integral operator is investigated. Exploiting the Rothe method and using the surjectivity of multivalued pseudomonotone operators, a result on existence of solution to the problem is established. Then, this abstract result is applied to provide a theorem on the weak solvability of a fractional viscoelastic contact problem. The process is quasistatic and the constitutive relation is modeled with the fractional Kelvin-Voigt law. The friction and contact conditions are described by the Clarke generalized gradient of nonconvex and nonsmooth functionals. The variational formulation of this problem leads to a fractional hemivariational inequality.

  2. Sliding friction : From microscopic contacts to Amontons’ law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, B.A.

    2017-01-01

    Most engineers describe sliding friction using the friction coefficient, the ratio of frictional force to normal force. While this proportionality is very simple, its origin is not trivial at all and has been subject of investigation for more than a century. The current consensus is that both

  3. The Contact Dynamics method: A nonsmooth story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Frédéric; Acary, Vincent; Jean, Michel

    2018-03-01

    When velocity jumps are occurring, the dynamics is said to be nonsmooth. For instance, in collections of contacting rigid bodies, jumps are caused by shocks and dry friction. Without compliance at the interface, contact laws are not only non-differentiable in the usual sense but also multi-valued. Modeling contacting bodies is of interest in order to understand the behavior of numerous mechanical systems such as flexible multi-body systems, granular materials or masonry. These granular materials behave puzzlingly either like a solid or a fluid and a description in the frame of classical continuous mechanics would be welcome though far to be satisfactory nowadays. Jean-Jacques Moreau greatly contributed to convex analysis, functions of bounded variations, differential measure theory, sweeping process theory, definitive mathematical tools to deal with nonsmooth dynamics. He converted all these underlying theoretical ideas into an original nonsmooth implicit numerical method called Contact Dynamics (CD); a robust and efficient method to simulate large collections of bodies with frictional contacts and impacts. The CD method offers a very interesting complementary alternative to the family of smoothed explicit numerical methods, often called Distinct Elements Method (DEM). In this paper developments and improvements of the CD method are presented together with a critical comparative review of advantages and drawbacks of both approaches. xml:lang="fr"

  4. Shape optimization in 2D contact problems with given friction and a solution-dependent coefficient of friction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haslinger, J.; Outrata, Jiří; Pathó, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2012), s. 31-59 ISSN 1877-0533 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : shape optimization * Signorini problem * model with given frinction * solution-dependent coefficient of friction * mathematical probrams with equilibrium constraints Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.036, year: 2012 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/outrata-shape optimization in 2d contact problems with given friction and a solution-dependent coefficient of friction .pdf

  5. Experimental quantification of contact forces with impact, friction and uncertainty analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahriri, Said; Santos, Ilmar

    2013-01-01

    and whirl motions in rotor-stator contact investigations. Dry friction coefficient is therefore estimated using two different experimental setups: (a) standard pin-on-disk tests and (b) rotor impact test rig fully instrumented. The findings in both setups indicate that the dry friction coefficient for brass......During rotor-stator contact dry friction plays a significant role in terms of reversing the rotor precession. The frictional force causes an increase in the rotor's tangential velocity in the direction opposite to that of the angular velocity. This effect is crucial for defining ranges of dry whip......-aluminum configuration significantly varies in a range of 0.16-0.83. The rotor enters a full annular contact mode shortly after two impacts with a contact duration of approximately 0.004 s at each location. It is experimentally demonstrated that the friction force is not present when the rotor enters a full annular...

  6. Contact splitting and the effect of dimple depth on static friction of textured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Christian; Schäfer, Michael; Popp, Uwe; Gumbsch, Peter

    2014-06-11

    The morphological texturing of surfaces has demonstrated its high potential to maximize adhesion as well as to reduce friction and wear. A key to understanding such phenomena is a principle known as contact splitting. Here, we extend this concept to the static friction behavior of dimpled surfaces. Our results indicate that contact splitting does exist for such structures and that with certain dimple sizes and depths static friction values significantly exceeding those of untextured surfaces can be obtained. These results can be applied to all surfaces where friction forces are to be tuned, from nanoelectromechanical systems up to combustion engines.

  7. Characterization of friction and wear behavior of friction modifiers used in wheel-rail contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, M. A.; Bosman, R.; Lugt, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Reliable traction between wheel and rail is an important issue in the railway industry. To reduce variations in the coefficient of friction, so-called “friction modifiers” (carrier with particles) are used. Twin-disk tests were done with three commercial friction modifiers, based on different

  8. Friction behavior of glass and metals in contact with glass in various environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments have been conducted for heat-resistant glass and metals in contact with glass. These experiments were conducted in various environments including vacuum, moist air, dry air, octane, and stearic acid in hexadecane. Glass exhibited a higher friction force in moist air than it did in vacuum when in sliding contact with itself. The metals, aluminum, iron, and gold, all exhibited the same friction coefficient when sliding on glass in vacuum as glass sliding on glass. Gold-to-glass contacts were extremely sensitive to the environment despite the relative chemical inertness of gold.

  9. Effects of internal friction on contact formation dynamics of polymer chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yukun; Li, Peng; Zhao, Nanrong

    2018-04-01

    A theoretical framework is presented to study the contact formation dynamics of polymer chains, in accompany with an electron-transfer quenching. Based on a non-Markovian Smoluchowski equation supplemented with an exponential sink term, we derive the mean time of contact formation under Wilemski-Fixman approximation. Our particular attentions are paid to the effect of internal friction. We find out that internal friction induces a novel fractional viscosity dependence, which will become more remarkable as internal friction increases. Furthermore, we clarify that internal friction inevitably promotes a diffusion-controlled mechanism by slowing the chain relaxation. Finally, we apply our theory to rationalise the experimental investigation for contact formation of a single-stranded DNA. The theoretical results can reproduce the experimental data very well with quite reasonable estimation for the intrinsic parameters. Such good agreements clearly demonstrate the validity of our theory which has appropriately addressed the very role of internal friction to the relevant dynamics.

  10. Existence of solutions for quasistatic problems of unilateral contact with nonlocal friction for nonlinear elastic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mignot

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the existence of a solution of the quasi-static unilateral contact problem with nonlocal friction law for nonlinear elastic materials. We set up a variational incremental problem which admits a solution, when the friction coefficient is small enough, and then by passing to the limit with respect to time we obtain a solution.

  11. Shear thickening in suspensions: the lubricated-to-frictional contact scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey

    2017-11-01

    Suspensions of solid particles in viscous liquids can vary from low-viscosity liquids to wet granular materials or soft solids depending on the solids loading and the forces acting between particles. When the particles are very concentrated, these mixtures are ''dense suspensions.'' Dense suspensions often exhibit shear thickening, an increase in apparent viscosity as the shear rate is increased. In its most extreme form, order of magnitude increases in viscosity over such a narrow range in shear rate occur that the term discontinuous shear thickening (DST) is applied. DST is particularly striking as it occurs in the relatively simple case of nearly hard spheres in a Newtonian liquid, and is found to take place for submicron particles in colloidal dispersions to much larger particle corn starch dispersions. We focus on simulations of a recently developed ``lubricated-to-frictional'' rheology in which the interplay of viscous lubrication, repulsive surface forces, and contact friction between particle surfaces provides a scenario to explain DST. Our simulation method brings together elements of the discrete-element method from granular flow with a simplified Stokesian Dynamics, and can rationalize not only the abrupt change in properties with imposed shear rate (or shear stress), but also the magnitude of the change. The large change in properties is associated with the breakdown of lubricating films between particles, with activation of Coulomb friction between particles. The rate dependence is caused by the shearing forces driving particles to contact, overwhelming conservative repulsive forces between surfaces; the repulsive forces are representative of colloidal stabilization by surface charge or steric effects, e.g. due to adsorbed polymer. The results of simulation are compared to developments by other groups, including a number of experimental studies and a theory incorporating the same basic elements as the simulation. The comparison to experiments of the

  12. Modelling of the Contact Condition at the Tool/Matrix Interface in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blich; Hattel, Jesper; Wert, John

    2003-01-01

    a known contact condition at the contact interface, e.g. either as pure sliding or sticking. The present model uses Coulomb’s law of friction for the sliding condition and the material yield shear stress for the sticking condition to model the contact forces. The model includes heat generation...

  13. On the nature of surface roughness with application to contact mechanics, sealing, rubber friction and adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B N J; Albohr, O; Tartaglino, U; Volokitin, A I; Tosatti, E

    2005-01-01

    Surface roughness has a huge impact on many important phenomena. The most important property of rough surfaces is the surface roughness power spectrum C(q). We present surface roughness power spectra of many surfaces of practical importance, obtained from the surface height profile measured using optical methods and the atomic force microscope. We show how the power spectrum determines the contact area between two solids. We also present applications to sealing, rubber friction and adhesion for rough surfaces, where the power spectrum enters as an important input. (topical review)

  14. The Impact of One Heat Treated Contact Element on the Coefficient of Static Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Todorović, , , , , ,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the paper includes theoretical considerations, the conducting of experimental tests, and the analysis of exposed test results related to determination of the coefficient of static friction of previously heat-treated contact pairs. One contact element is previously, before the procedure of determining the coefficient of static friction, heated at temperatures in the range of ambient temperature to 280°C and then cooled down to ambient temperature. The results of experimental tests of five different materials show that depending on the heat treatment of one contact element, there is a significant decrease in the coefficient of static friction. The authors of the paper consider that the reasons for the decreasing coefficient of static friction are related to oxide formation and changes in the surface layer of the contact element which is previously heat-treated.

  15. The effect of a tribo-modified surface layer on friction in elastomer contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtari, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Friction between rubber and a counter surface has interested many researchers because of its huge practical importance. Rubber components are applied in various industrial applications such as tires, rubber seals, wiper blades, conveyor belts and syringes. The friction between a rubber surface in contact with a rigid surface is still not fully understood. The complexity lies partially in the viscoelastic nature of elastomers next to various parameters such as roughness, contact pressure and s...

  16. Prediction of static friction coefficient in rough contacts based on the junction growth theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinu, S.; Cerlinca, D.

    2017-08-01

    The classic approach to the slip-stick contact is based on the framework advanced by Mindlin, in which localized slip occurs on the contact area when the local shear traction exceeds the product between the local pressure and the static friction coefficient. This assumption may be too conservative in the case of high tractions arising at the asperities tips in the contact of rough surfaces, because the shear traction may be allowed to exceed the shear strength of the softer material. Consequently, the classic frictional contact model is modified in this paper so that gross sliding occurs when the junctions formed between all contacting asperities are independently sheared. In this framework, when the contact tractions, normal and shear, exceed the hardness of the softer material on the entire contact area, the material of the asperities yields and the junction growth process ends in all contact regions, leading to gross sliding inception. This friction mechanism is implemented in a previously proposed numerical model for the Cattaneo-Mindlin slip-stick contact problem, which is modified to accommodate the junction growth theory. The frictionless normal contact problem is solved first, then the tangential force is gradually increased, until gross sliding inception. The contact problems in the normal and in the tangential direction are successively solved, until one is stabilized in relation to the other. The maximum tangential force leading to a non-vanishing stick area is the static friction force that can be sustained by the rough contact. The static friction coefficient is eventually derived as the ratio between the latter friction force and the normal force.

  17. Tribo-chemical behavior of eutectoid steel during rolling contact friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y.; Cai, Z.B. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Peng, J.F. [Tribology Research Institute, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Cao, B.B. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Jin, X.S. [Tribology Research Institute, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhu, M.H., E-mail: zhuminhao@swjtu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Tribology Research Institute, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Tribo-chemical behavior was investigated during rolling contact friction. • Tribo-film may weaken the absorptive ability of O/C atoms on the surface. • Tribo-film is related to a low friction coefficient at rolling friction condition. - Abstract: The tribo-chemical behavior of the eutectoid steel during rolling contact friction is investigated via scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. The worn surface is divided into three zones: matrix zone (without friction), tribo-film zone (formed during friction) and delamination zone (tribo-film spalling). The different chemical states of atoms between those three zones and the air were investigated using the XPS analysis. The results showed that the matrix zone is composed of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeO and metallic Fe, while the tribo-film and delamination zones only contain Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and FeO. Where the tribo-film is formed, the absorptive ability of O and C atoms on the top 2–3 atomic layers is probably weakened, while the exposed fresh metal in the delamination zone tends to be continuously oxidized and form tribo-film. The tribo-chemical reaction in the delamination zone is more activated than that in the other two zones. The protective nature of the tribo-film probably maintains a low friction coefficient under rolling contact friction condition.

  18. On the Rotor to Stator Contact Dynamics with Impacts and Friction - Theoretical and Experimental Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahriri, Said

    The contact between a rotor and its stator can in some cases be considered as a serious malfunction that may lead to catastrophic failure. This major threat arises normally from full annular dry friction backward whirl and whip motion where the rotor runs and rubs at a high frequency on the inner...... of the friction coefficient behavior.......The contact between a rotor and its stator can in some cases be considered as a serious malfunction that may lead to catastrophic failure. This major threat arises normally from full annular dry friction backward whirl and whip motion where the rotor runs and rubs at a high frequency on the inner...... surface of the stator, and thereby traversing the full extent of the clearance. Normal and friction forces are exerted on the rotor at each impact and rubs. These particular forces can sustain the rotor in a persistent backward dry whirl or whip motion. In that case, the friction force plays a significant...

  19. Static or breakloose friction for lubricated contacts: the role of surface roughness and dewetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J; Krick, B A; Sawyer, W G; Rodriguez, N; Mangiagalli, P

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental data for the static or breakloose friction for lubricated elastomer contacts, as a function of the time of stationary contact. Due to fluid squeeze-out from the asperity contact regions, the breakloose friction force increases continuously with the time of stationary contact. We consider three different cases: (a) PDMS rubber balls against flat smooth glass surfaces, (b) PDMS cylinder ribs against different substrates (glass, smooth and rough PMMA and an inert polymer) and (c) application to syringes. Due to differences in the surface roughness and contact pressures the three systems exhibit very different time dependences of the breakloose friction. In case (a) for rough surfaces the dry contact area A is a small fraction of the nominal contact area A 0 , and the fluid squeeze-out is fast. In case (b) the dry contact area is close to the nominal contact area, A/A 0 ≈ 1, and fluid squeeze-out is very slow due to percolation of the contact area. In this case, remarkably, different fluids with very different viscosities, ranging from 0.005 Pa s (water–glycerol mixture) to 1.48 Pa s (glycerol), give very similar breakloose friction forces as a function of the time of stationary contact. In case (c) the contact pressure and the surface roughness are larger than in case (b), and the squeeze-out is very slow so that even after a very long time the area of real contact is below the percolation threshold. For all cases (a)–(c), the increase in the breakloose friction is mainly due to the increase in the area of real contact with increasing time, because of the fluid squeeze-out and dewetting. (paper)

  20. Static or breakloose friction for lubricated contacts: the role of surface roughness and dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, B; Krick, B A; Rodriguez, N; Sawyer, W G; Mangiagalli, P; Persson, B N J

    2013-11-06

    We present experimental data for the static or breakloose friction for lubricated elastomer contacts, as a function of the time of stationary contact. Due to fluid squeeze-out from the asperity contact regions, the breakloose friction force increases continuously with the time of stationary contact. We consider three different cases: (a) PDMS rubber balls against flat smooth glass surfaces, (b) PDMS cylinder ribs against different substrates (glass, smooth and rough PMMA and an inert polymer) and (c) application to syringes. Due to differences in the surface roughness and contact pressures the three systems exhibit very different time dependences of the breakloose friction. In case (a) for rough surfaces the dry contact area A is a small fraction of the nominal contact area A0, and the fluid squeeze-out is fast. In case (b) the dry contact area is close to the nominal contact area, A/A0 ≈ 1, and fluid squeeze-out is very slow due to percolation of the contact area. In this case, remarkably, different fluids with very different viscosities, ranging from 0.005 Pa s (water–glycerol mixture) to 1.48 Pa s (glycerol), give very similar breakloose friction forces as a function of the time of stationary contact. In case (c) the contact pressure and the surface roughness are larger than in case (b), and the squeeze-out is very slow so that even after a very long time the area of real contact is below the percolation threshold. For all cases (a)–(c), the increase in the breakloose friction is mainly due to the increase in the area of real contact with increasing time, because of the fluid squeeze-out and dewetting.

  1. Surface science. Adhesion and friction in mesoscopic graphite contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Elad; Lörtscher, Emanuel; Rawlings, Colin; Knoll, Armin W; Duerig, Urs

    2015-05-08

    The weak interlayer binding in two-dimensional layered materials such as graphite gives rise to poorly understood low-friction characteristics. Accurate measurements of the adhesion forces governing the overall mechanical stability have also remained elusive. We report on the direct mechanical measurement of line tension and friction forces acting in sheared mesoscale graphite structures. We show that the friction is fundamentally stochastic in nature and is attributable to the interaction between the incommensurate interface lattices. We also measured an adhesion energy of 0.227 ± 0.005 joules per square meter, in excellent agreement with theoretical models. In addition, bistable all-mechanical memory cell structures and rotational bearings have been realized by exploiting position locking, which is provided solely by the adhesion energy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Influences of preload on the friction and wear properties of high-speed instrument angular contact ball bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao ZHANG

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available For starved-oil or solid lubrication of high-speed instrument angular contact ball bearings, friction heating and wear are the main reasons of bearing failures. This paper presents a dynamic wear simulation model to investigate the impacts of different preload methods and the changes of preload caused by wear on bearing wear life. The integral value QV of stress and sliding velocity in the contact ellipses between a ball and the inner and outer races determines friction heating and wear. The changes of QV with the friction coefficient and the wear volume under constant-force preload and fixed-position preload are analyzed. Results show that under the same initial preload, the QV decreases with an increase of the friction coefficient for both preload methods, and the latter is slightly larger. The wear of the ball and the race is equivalent to the ball diameter reduction. The QV of constant-force preload is almost not changed with a decrease of the ball diameter, but for fixed-position preload, the value decreases firstly and then increases substantially due to insufficient preload, and slipping occurs, the ball diameter is reduced by 0.025%, while the preload is reduced by 60.33%. An estimation of the bearing wear life under different preload methods requires a consideration of the changes in the wear rate of bearing parts. Keywords: Angular contact ball bearings, Bearing life, Dynamic model, Preload methods, Wear rate

  3. Analysis of a Dynamic Viscoelastic Contact Problem with Normal Compliance, Normal Damped Response, and Nonmonotone Slip Rate Dependent Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Barboteu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a mathematical model which describes the dynamic evolution of a viscoelastic body in frictional contact with an obstacle. The contact is modelled with a combination of a normal compliance and a normal damped response law associated with a slip rate-dependent version of Coulomb’s law of dry friction. We derive a variational formulation and an existence and uniqueness result of the weak solution of the problem is presented. Next, we introduce a fully discrete approximation of the variational problem based on a finite element method and on an implicit time integration scheme. We study this fully discrete approximation schemes and bound the errors of the approximate solutions. Under regularity assumptions imposed on the exact solution, optimal order error estimates are derived for the fully discrete solution. Finally, after recalling the solution of the frictional contact problem, some numerical simulations are provided in order to illustrate both the behavior of the solution related to the frictional contact conditions and the theoretical error estimate result.

  4. Wear of Polished Steel Surfaces in Dry Friction Linear Contact on Polimer Composites with Glass Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is generally known that the friction and wear between polymers and polished steel surfaces has a special character, the behaviour to friction and wear of a certain polymer might not be valid for a different polymer, moreover in dry friction conditions. In this paper, we study the reaction to wear of certain polymers with short glass fibres on different steel surfaces, considering the linear friction contact, observing the friction influence over the metallic surfaces wear. The paper includes also its analysis over the steel’s wear from different points of view: the reinforcement content influence and tribological parameters (load, contact pressure, sliding speed, contact temperature, etc.. Thus, we present our findings related to the fact that the abrasive component of the friction force is more significant than the adhesive component, which generally is specific to the polymers’ friction. Our detections also state that, in the case of the polyamide with 30% glass fibres, the steel surface linear wear rate order are of 10-4 mm/h, respectively the order of volumetric wear rate is of 10-6 cm3 /h. The resulting volumetric wear coefficients are of the order (10-11 – 10-12 cm3/cm and respectively linear wear coefficients of 10-9 mm/cm.

  5. Adhesive friction for elastic-plastic contacting rough surfaces considering asperity interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasanta

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes a theoretical study of adhesive friction at the contact between rough surfaces taking asperity interaction into consideration and using an elastic-plastic model of contact deformation that is based on an accurate finite element analysis of an elastic-plastic single asperity contact. The micro-contact model of asperity interactions, developed by Zhao and Chang, is integrated into the improved elastic-plastic rough surface adhesive contact analysis to consider the adhesive friction behaviour of rough surfaces. The model considers a large range of interference values from fully elastic through elastic-plastic to fully plastic regimes of contacting asperities. Two well-established adhesion indices are used to consider different conditions that arise as a result of varying load, surface and material parameters. Results are obtained for the coefficient of friction against applied load for various combinations of these parameters. The results show that the coefficient of friction depends strongly on the applied load for the no-interaction case while it becomes insensitive to the load for interaction consideration. Moreover, the inclusion of elastic-plastic asperities further reduces the friction coefficient

  6. Time Dependent Frictional Changes in Ice due to Contact Area Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevostianov, V.; Lipovsky, B. P.; Rubinstein, S.; Dillavou, S.

    2017-12-01

    Sliding processes along the ice-bed interface of Earth's great ice sheets are the largest contributor to our uncertainty in future sea level rise. Laboratory experiments that have probed sliding processes have ubiquitously shown that ice-rock interfaces strengthen while in stationary contact (Schulson and Fortt, 2013; Zoet et al., 2013; McCarthy et al., 2017). This so-called frictional ageing effect may have profound consequences for ice sheet dynamics because it introduces the possibility of basal strength hysteresis. Furthermore this effect is quite strong in ice-rock interfaces (more than an order of magnitude more pronounced than in rock-rock sliding) and can double in frictional strength in a matter of minutes, much faster than most frictional aging (Dieterich, 1972; Baumberger and Caroli, 2006). Despite this importance, the underling physics of frictional ageing of ice remain poorly understood. Here we conduct laboratory experiments to image the microscopic points of contact along an ice-glass interface. We optically measure changes in the real area of contact over time using measurements of this reflected optical light intensity. We show that contact area increases with time of stationary contact. This result suggests that thermally enhanced creep of microscopic icy contacts is responsible for the much larger frictional ageing observed in ice-rock versus rock-rock interfaces. Furthermore, this supports a more physically detailed description of the thermal dependence of basal sliding than that used in the current generation of large scale ice sheet models.

  7. A comparison of Coulomb and pseudo-Coulomb friction implementations: Application to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M I; Hiley, M J; Yeadon, M R

    2011-10-13

    In the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting both dynamic and static friction act. The purpose of this study was to develop a method of simulating Coulomb friction that incorporated both dynamic and static phases and to compare the results with those obtained using a pseudo-Coulomb implementation of friction when applied to the table contact phase of gymnastics vaulting. Kinematic data were obtained from an elite level gymnast performing handspring straight somersault vaults using a Vicon optoelectronic motion capture system. An angle-driven computer model of vaulting that simulated the interaction between a seven segment gymnast and a single segment vaulting table during the table contact phase of the vault was developed. Both dynamic and static friction were incorporated within the model by switching between two implementations of the tangential frictional force. Two vaulting trials were used to determine the model parameters using a genetic algorithm to match simulations to recorded performances. A third independent trial was used to evaluate the model and close agreement was found between the simulation and the recorded performance with an overall difference of 13.5%. The two-state simulation model was found to be capable of replicating performance at take-off and also of replicating key contact phase features such as the normal and tangential motion of the hands. The results of the two-state model were compared to those using a pseudo-Coulomb friction implementation within the simulation model. The two-state model achieved similar overall results to those of the pseudo-Coulomb model but obtained solutions more rapidly. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Observation of proportionality between friction and contact area at the nanometer scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enachescu, M.; Oetelaar, van den R.J.A.; Carpick, R.W.; Ogletree, D.F.; Flipse, C.F.J.; Salmeron, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    The nanotribological properties of a hydrogen-terminated diamond(111)/tungsten-carbide interface have been studied using ultra-high vacuum atomic force microscopy. Both friction and local contact conductance were measured as a function of applied load. The contact conductance experiments provide a

  9. Frictional contact problems for electro-viscoelastic materials with long-term memory, damage, and adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedjani Hadj Ammar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider a quasistatic contact problem between two electro-viscoelastic bodies with long-term memory and damage. The contact is frictional and is modelled with a version of normal compliance condition and the associated Coulomb's law of friction in which the adhesion of contact surfaces is taken into account. We derive a variational formulation for the model and prove an existence and uniqueness result of the weak solution. The proof is based on arguments of evolutionary variational inequalities, a classical existence and uniqueness result on parabolic inequalities, and Banach fixed point theorem.

  10. Blade couple connected by damping element with dry friction contacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pešek, Luděk; Půst, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2014), s. 815-826 ISSN 1429-2955 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1166 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : dry friction * three masses system * damping of vibrations * irregular vibrations Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.636, year: 2014 http://www.ptmts.org.pl/article.xsl?vol=52&no=3&page=815

  11. Effect of Friction Model and Tire Maneuvering on Tire-Pavement Contact Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichao Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to simulate the effects of different friction models on tire braking. A truck radial tire (295/80R22.5 was modeled and the model was validated with tire deflection. An exponential decay friction model that considers the effect of sliding velocity on friction coefficients was adopted for analyzing braking performance. The result shows that the exponential decay friction model used for evaluating braking ability meets design requirements of antilock braking system (ABS. The tire-pavement contact stress characteristics at various driving conditions (static, free rolling, braking, camber, and cornering were analyzed. It is found that the change of driving conditions has direct influence on tire-pavement contact stress distribution. The results provide the guidance for tire braking performance evaluation.

  12. Frictional behaviour of high performance fibrouws tows: A contact mechanics model of tow -metal friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Composites forming processes involve mechanical interactions on the ply, tow, and filament level. The deformations that occur during forming processes are governed by friction between tows and tooling material on the mesoscopic level and consequently between filaments and a counterface on the

  13. Evolution of real contact area under shear and the value of static friction of soft materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahli, R; Pallares, G; Ducottet, C; Ben Ali, I E; Al Akhrass, S; Guibert, M; Scheibert, J

    2018-01-16

    The frictional properties of a rough contact interface are controlled by its area of real contact, the dynamical variations of which underlie our modern understanding of the ubiquitous rate-and-state friction law. In particular, the real contact area is proportional to the normal load, slowly increases at rest through aging, and drops at slip inception. Here, through direct measurements on various contacts involving elastomers or human fingertips, we show that the real contact area also decreases under shear, with reductions as large as 30[Formula: see text], starting well before macroscopic sliding. All data are captured by a single reduction law enabling excellent predictions of the static friction force. In elastomers, the area-reduction rate of individual contacts obeys a scaling law valid from micrometer-sized junctions in rough contacts to millimeter-sized smooth sphere/plane contacts. For the class of soft materials used here, our results should motivate first-order improvements of current contact mechanics models and prompt reinterpretation of the rate-and-state parameters.

  14. A Novel Time-Varying Friction Compensation Method for Servomechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction is an inevitable nonlinear phenomenon existing in servomechanisms. Friction errors often affect their motion and contour accuracies during the reverse motion. To reduce friction errors, a novel time-varying friction compensation method is proposed to solve the problem that the traditional friction compensation methods hardly deal with. This problem leads to an unsatisfactory friction compensation performance and the motion and contour accuracies cannot be maintained effectively. In this method, a trapezoidal compensation pulse is adopted to compensate for the friction errors. A generalized regression neural network algorithm is used to generate the optimal pulse amplitude function. The optimal pulse duration function and the pulse amplitude function can be established by the pulse characteristic parameter learning and then the optimal friction compensation pulse can be generated. The feasibility of friction compensation method was verified on a high-precision X-Y worktable. The experimental results indicated that the motion and contour accuracies were improved greatly with reduction of the friction errors, in different working conditions. Moreover, the overall friction compensation performance indicators were decreased by more than 54% and this friction compensation method can be implemented easily on most of servomechanisms in industry.

  15. Micro friction stir welding of copper electrical contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of micro friction stir welding (μFSW of electrolytic tough pitch copper (CuETP in a lap and butt joint. Experimental plan was done in order to investigate the influence of tool design and welding parameters on the formation of defect free joints. The experiments were done using universal milling machine where the tool rotation speed varied between 600 and 1 900 rpm, welding speed between 14 and 93 mm/min and tilt angle between 3° and 5°. From the welds samples for analysis of microstructure and samples for tensile tests were prepared. The grain size in the nugget zone was greatly reduced compared to the base metal and the joint tensile strength exceeded the strength of the base metal.

  16. Experimental Validation of a Differential Variational Inequality-Based Approach for Handling Friction and Contact in Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-20

    terrain modeled using the discrete element method (DEM). Experimental Validation of a Differential Variational Inequality -Based Approach for Handling...COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Validation of a Differential Variational Inequality -Based Approach for...sinkage, and single wheel tests. 1.1. Modeling Frictional Contact Via Differential Variational Inequalities Consider a three dimensional (3D) system of

  17. The wheel-rail contact friction influence on high speed vehicle model stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław DUSZA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Right estimating of the coefficient of friction between the wheel and rail is essential in modelling rail vehicle dynamics. Constant value of coefficient of friction is the typical assumption in theoretical studies. But it is obvious that in real circumstances a few factors may have significant influence on the rails surface condition and this way on the coefficient of friction value. For example the weather condition, the railway location etc. Influence of the coefficient of friction changes on high speed rail vehicle model dynamics is presented in this paper. Four axle rail vehicle model were built. The FASTSIM code is employed for calculation of the tangential contact forces between wheel and rail. One coefficient of friction value is adopted in the particular simulation process. To check the vehicle model properties under the influence of wheel-rail coefficient of friction changes, twenty four series of simulations were performed. For three curved tracks of radii R = 3000m, 6000m and  (straight track, the coefficient of friction was changed from 0.1 to 0.8. The results are presented in form of bifurcation diagrams.

  18. Solvability of Static Contact Problems with Coulomb Friction for Orthotropic Material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eck, C.; Jarušek, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 1 (2008), s. 93-104 ISSN 0374-3535 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1075402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : contact problem * Coulomb friction * orthotropic elasticity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.277, year: 2008

  19. Static friction in rubber-metal contacts with application to rubber pad forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, E.L.

    2006-01-01

    A static friction model suitable for rubber-metal contact is presented in this dissertation. In introduction, the motivation and the aims of the research are introduced together with the background regarding the related industrial application, which is the rubber pad forming process.

  20. CRITICAL VELOCITY OF CONTROLLABILITY OF SLIDING FRICTION BY NORMAL OSCILLATIONS IN VISCOELASTIC CONTACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Popov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction can be reduced substantially by applying ultrasonic vibration in the sliding plane or in the normal direction. This effect is well known and used in many applications ranging from press forming to ultrasonic actuators. One of the characteristics of the phenomenon is that, at a given frequency and amplitude of oscillation, the observed friction reduction diminishes with increasing sliding velocity. Beyond a certain critical sliding velocity, there is no longer any difference between the coefficients of friction with or without vibration. This critical velocity depends on material and kinematic parameters and is a key characteristic that must be accounted for by any theory of influence of vibration on friction. Recently, the critical sliding velocity has been interpreted as the transition point from periodic stick-slip to pure sliding and was calculated for purely elastic contacts under uniform sliding with periodic normal loading. Here we perform a similar analysis of the critical velocity in viscoelastic contacts using a Kelvin material to describe viscoelasticity. A closed-form solution is presented, which contains previously reported results as special cases. This paves the way for more detailed studies of active control of friction in viscoelastic systems, a previously neglected topic with possible applications in elastomer technology and in medicine.

  1. Contact compliance effects in the frictional response of bioinspired fibrillar adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, Marco; Chateauminois, Antoine; Fretigny, Christian; Pugno, Nicola M.; Sitti, Metin

    2013-01-01

    The shear failure and friction mechanisms of bioinspired adhesives consisting of elastomer arrays of microfibres terminated by mushroom-shaped tips are investigated in contact with a rigid lens. In order to reveal the interplay between the vertical and lateral loading directions, experiments are carried out using a custom friction set-up in which normal stiffness can be made either high or low when compared with the stiffness of the contact between the fibrillar adhesive and the lens. Using in situ contact imaging, the shear failure of the adhesive is found to involve two successive mechanisms: (i) cavitation and peeling at the contact interface between the mushroom-shaped fibre tip endings and the lens; and (ii) side re-adhesion of the fibre's stem to the lens. The extent of these mechanisms and their implications regarding static friction forces is found to depend on the crosstalk between the normal and lateral loading directions that can result in contact instabilities associated with fibre buckling. In addition, the effects of the viscoelastic behaviour of the polyurethane material on the rate dependence of the shear response of the adhesive are accounted for. PMID:23554349

  2. A comparison of two methods of measuring static coefficient of friction at low normal forces: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Na Jin; Armstrong, Thomas J; Drinkaus, Philip

    2009-01-01

    This study compares two methods for estimating static friction coefficients for skin. In the first method, referred to as the 'tilt method', a hand supporting a flat object is tilted until the object slides. The friction coefficient is estimated as the tangent of the angle of the object at the slip. The second method estimates the friction coefficient as the pull force required to begin moving a flat object over the surface of the hand, divided by object weight. Both methods were used to estimate friction coefficients for 12 subjects and three materials (cardboard, aluminium, rubber) against a flat hand and against fingertips. No differences in static friction coefficients were found between the two methods, except for that of rubber, where friction coefficient was 11% greater for the tilt method. As with previous studies, the friction coefficients varied with contact force and contact area. Static friction coefficient data are needed for analysis and design of objects that are grasped or manipulated with the hand. The tilt method described in this study can easily be used by ergonomic practitioners to estimate static friction coefficients in the field in a timely manner.

  3. A frictional contact problem with damage and adhesion for an electro elastic-viscoplastic body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Aissaoui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a quasistatic frictional contact problem for an electro elastic-viscopalastic body with damage and adhestion. The contact is modelled with normal compliance. The adhesion of the contact surfaces is taken into account and modelled by a surface variable. We derive variational formulation for the model which is in the form of a system involving the displacement field, the electric potential field, the damage field and the adhesion field. We prove the existence of a unique weak solution to the problem. The proof is based on arguments of time-dependent variational inequalities, parabolic inequalities, differential equations and fixed point.

  4. Dynamic mortar finite element method for modeling of shear rupture on frictional rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Yuval; Hager, Bradford H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a mortar-based finite element formulation for modeling the dynamics of shear rupture on rough interfaces governed by slip-weakening and rate and state (RS) friction laws, focusing on the dynamics of earthquakes. The method utilizes the dual Lagrange multipliers and the primal-dual active set strategy concepts, together with a consistent discretization and linearization of the contact forces and constraints, and the friction laws to obtain a semi-smooth Newton method. The discretization of the RS friction law involves a procedure to condense out the state variables, thus eliminating the addition of another set of unknowns into the system. Several numerical examples of shear rupture on frictional rough interfaces demonstrate the efficiency of the method and examine the effects of the different time discretization schemes on the convergence, energy conservation, and the time evolution of shear traction and slip rate.

  5. Methods and devices used to measure friction in rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, J.; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    Friction at the workpiece-die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals; yet it remains the least understood. Hence there is a need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms. To gain...... a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure frictional stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods that have been used...... to measure friction in rolling in the past and discusses some of the recent sensor designs that can now be used to measure friction both in production situations and for research purposes....

  6. Determination of oral mucosal Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction from in-vivo contact pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junning; Suenaga, Hanako; Hogg, Michael; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Despite their considerable importance to biomechanics, there are no existing methods available to directly measure apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient of oral mucosa. This study aimed to develop an inverse procedure to determine these two biomechanical parameters by utilizing in vivo experiment of contact pressure between partial denture and beneath mucosa through nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis and surrogate response surface (RS) modelling technique. First, the in vivo denture-mucosa contact pressure was measured by a tactile electronic sensing sheet. Second, a 3D FE model was constructed based on the patient CT images. Third, a range of apparent Poisson's ratios and the coefficients of friction from literature was considered as the design variables in a series of FE runs for constructing a RS surrogate model. Finally, the discrepancy between computed in silico and measured in vivo results was minimized to identify the best matching Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction. The established non-invasive methodology was demonstrated effective to identify such biomechanical parameters of oral mucosa and can be potentially used for determining the biomaterial properties of other soft biological tissues.

  7. Existence of solutions for the dynamic frictional contact problem of isotropic viscoelastic bodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eck, C.; Jarušek, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2003), s. 157-181 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1075005; GA AV ČR IAA1075707 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905; CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : dynamic contact problem * parabolic equation * Coulomb law of friction Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.354, year: 2003

  8. Shape Optimization in Three-Dimensional Contact Problems with Coulomb Friction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beremlijski, P.; Haslinger, J.; Kočvara, Michal; Kučera, R.; Outrata, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2009), s. 416-444 ISSN 1052-6234 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802; GA AV ČR IAA1075402 Grant - others:European Commision(XE) FP6 - 30717; GA ČR(CZ) GA201/07/0294 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : shape optimization * contact problems * Coulomb friction Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.429, year: 2009

  9. Reliable Solution of a Unilateral Contact Problem with Friction and Uncertain Data in Thermo-Elasticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Ivan; Nedoma, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 67, - (2005), s. 559-580 ISSN 0378-4754 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/01/1200; GA MŠk OK 407 Grant - others:COPERNICUS-HIPERGEOS II(XE) KIT 977006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : unilateral contact * steady-state heat flow * Coulomb friction * finite element analysis * radioactive waste repositories Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.554, year: 2005

  10. Comparison of the Friction-Loss Coefficient for the Gap of Two Contact Surfaces and a Crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ho Yun; Choi, Byoung Hae; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Young Bum

    2011-01-01

    A leak-detection method has been developed by measuring the pressure variation between the inner and outer heat transfer tubes of a double-wall tube steam generator. An experiment was carried out to measure the leak rate in the gap between two surfaces pressed with a hydraulic press in order to simulate the phenomena, and a correlation was determined for the leak rate in a micro gap. However, in the correlation, the gap width and friction coefficient were coupled with the surface roughness, which affects the two parameters. The two parameters were separated using a surface-contact model to develop a correlation for the friction coefficient. The correlation was compared with the existing correlations used for crack analysis. Although the applied ranges of Reynolds numbers were different, the developed correlation for Reynolds numbers of 0.1.0.35 showed similar tendencies to existing correlations used for higher Reynolds numbers

  11. Rate and State Friction Relation for Nanoscale Contacts: Thermally Activated Prandtl-Tomlinson Model with Chemical Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaiwen; Goldsby, David L.; Carpick, Robert W.

    2018-05-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are widely used empirical relationships that describe macroscale to microscale frictional behavior. They entail a linear combination of the direct effect (the increase of friction with sliding velocity due to the reduced influence of thermal excitations) and the evolution effect (the change in friction with changes in contact "state," such as the real contact area or the degree of interfacial chemical bonds). Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments and simulations found that nanoscale single-asperity amorphous silica-silica contacts exhibit logarithmic aging (increasing friction with time) over several decades of contact time, due to the formation of interfacial chemical bonds. Here we establish a physically based RSF relation for such contacts by combining the thermally activated Prandtl-Tomlinson (PTT) model with an evolution effect based on the physics of chemical aging. This thermally activated Prandtl-Tomlinson model with chemical aging (PTTCA), like the PTT model, uses the loading point velocity for describing the direct effect, not the tip velocity (as in conventional RSF laws). Also, in the PTTCA model, the combination of the evolution and direct effects may be nonlinear. We present AFM data consistent with the PTTCA model whereby in aging tests, for a given hold time, static friction increases with the logarithm of the loading point velocity. Kinetic friction also increases with the logarithm of the loading point velocity at sufficiently high velocities, but at a different increasing rate. The discrepancy between the rates of increase of static and kinetic friction with velocity arises from the fact that appreciable aging during static contact changes the energy landscape. Our approach extends the PTT model, originally used for crystalline substrates, to amorphous materials. It also establishes how conventional RSF laws can be modified for nanoscale single-asperity contacts to provide a physically based friction

  12. The influence of friction coefficient and wheel/rail profiles on energy dissipation in the wheel/rail contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idarraga Alarcon, G.A.; Burgelman, N.D.M.; Meza Meza, J.; Toro, A.; Li, Z.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the energy dissipation in a wheel/rail system through friction work modeling. In order to identify the effect of the friction coefficient on the energy dissipation in the wheel/rail contact, several simulations were performed using a 3D multibody model of a railway vehicle

  13. FASTSIM2: a second-order accurate frictional rolling contact algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollebregt, E. A. H.; Wilders, P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider the frictional (tangential) steady rolling contact problem. We confine ourselves to the simplified theory, instead of using full elastostatic theory, in order to be able to compute results fast, as needed for on-line application in vehicle system dynamics simulation packages. The FASTSIM algorithm is the leading technology in this field and is employed in all dominant railway vehicle system dynamics packages (VSD) in the world. The main contribution of this paper is a new version "FASTSIM2" of the FASTSIM algorithm, which is second-order accurate. This is relevant for VSD, because with the new algorithm 16 times less grid points are required for sufficiently accurate computations of the contact forces. The approach is based on new insights in the characteristics of the rolling contact problem when using the simplified theory, and on taking precise care of the contact conditions in the numerical integration scheme employed.

  14. The effect of ligation method on friction in sliding mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Max; Dhopatkar, Ashish; Rock, Peter

    2003-04-01

    During orthodontic tooth movement with the preadjusted edgewise system, friction generated at the bracket/archwire interface tends to impede the desired movement. The method of ligation is an important contributor to this frictional force. This in vitro study investigated the effect of ligation method on friction and evaluated the efficacy of the new slick elastomeric modules from TP Orthodontics (La Porte, Ind), which are claimed to reduce friction at the module/wire interface. Slick modules were compared with regular nonslick modules, stainless steel ligatures, and the SPEED self-ligating bracket system (Strite Industries, Cambridge, Ontario, Canada). The effect of using slick modules with metal-reinforced ceramic (Clarity, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and miniature brackets (Minitwin, 3M Unitek) was also examined. Results showed that, when considering tooth movement along a 0.019 x 0.025-in stainless steel archwire, saliva-lubricated slick modules can reduce static friction at the module/archwire interface by up to 60%, regardless of the bracket system. The SPEED brackets produced the lowest friction compared with the 3 other tested bracket systems when regular modules were used. The use of slick modules, however, with all of the ligated bracket types tested significantly reduced friction to below the values recorded in the SPEED groups. Loosely tied stainless steel ligatures were found to generate the least friction.

  15. Friction and wear behaviour of 18 polymers in contact with steel in environments of air and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, J.W.M.; de Gee, A.W.J.

    1991-01-01

    18 polymers were characterized with respect to their friction and wear behaviour in contact with steel in environments of air and water. These were six unfilled materials, i.e. polyamide 66 (PA 66), polyoxymethylene (POM), polyethyleneterephthalate (PETP), polyetheretherketone (PEEK),

  16. Effect of barrier height on friction behavior of the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted for the semiconductors silicon and gallium arsenide in contact with pure metals. Polycrystalline titanium, tantalum, nickel, palladium, and platinum were made to contact a single crystal silicon (111) surface. Indium, nickel, copper, and silver were made to contact a single crystal gallium arsenide (100) surface. Sliding was conducted both in room air and in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 9th power torr. The friction of semiconductors in contact with metals depended on a Schottky barrier height formed at the metal semiconductor interface. Metals with a higher barrier height on semiconductors gave lower friction. The effect of the barrier height on friction behavior for argon sputtered cleaned surfaces in vacuum was more specific than that for the surfaces containing films in room air. With a silicon surface sliding on titanium, many silicon particles back transferred. In contrast, a large quantity of indium transferred to the gallium arsenide surface.

  17. Comparison of the Contact stress and friction behavior of SiC and ZrO2 materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, L.J.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were performed to further elucidate the friction and contact- stress characteristics of structural ceramic materials. New data for fully stabilized and partially stabilized zirconia ceramics are compared with prior test results for sintered SiC. The comparison provides further evidence that the high temperature friction characteristics of sinstered SiC are strongly influenced by the presence of a viscous surface layer. The results also show that a ceramic material with lower coefficient of friction and higher fracture toughness has increased resistance to strength-reducing surface damage due to contact stress

  18. Direct Laser Interference Patterning: Tailoring of Contact Area for Frictional and Antibacterial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rosenkranz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface functionalization by topographic micro- and nano-structures in order to achieve unique properties, like super-hydrophobicity or ultrahigh light absorption, is a common strategy in nature. In this paper, direct laser interference patterning (DLIP is presented as a promising tool allowing for the generation of such surface patterns on technical surfaces in order to mimic these biological surfaces and effects. Friction optimization and antibacterial effects by DLIP are exemplarily described. Topographic surface patterns on the micro- and nano-scale demonstrated a significant reduction in the coefficient of friction and bacterial adhesion. It was shown that in both cases, the control of the contact area between surfaces or between surface and bacteria is of utmost importance.

  19. A frictional contact problem with wear involving elastic-viscoplastic materials with damage and thermal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoumene Djabi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider a mathematical problem for quasistatic contact between a thermo-elastic-viscoplastic body with damage and an obstacle. The contact is frictional and bilateral with a moving rigid foundation which results in the wear of the contacting surface. We employ the thermo-elasticviscoplastic with damage constitutive law for the material. The damage of the material caused by elastic deformations. The evolution of the damage is described by an inclusion of parabolic type. The problem is formulated as a coupled system of an elliptic variational inequality for the displacement, a parabolic variational inequality for the damage and the heat equation for the temperature. We establish a variational formulation for the model and we prove the existence of a unique weak solution to the problem. The proof is based on a classical existence and uniqueness result on parabolic inequalities, differential equations and fixed point arguments.

  20. Steady sliding frictional contact problem for a 2d elastic half-space with a discontinuous friction coefficient and related stress singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    The steady sliding frictional contact problem between a moving rigid indentor of arbitrary shape and an isotropic homogeneous elastic half-space in plane strain is extensively analysed. The case where the friction coefficient is a step function (with respect to the space variable), that is, where there are jumps in the friction coefficient, is considered. The problem is put under the form of a variational inequality which is proved to always have a solution which, in addition, is unique in some cases. The solutions exhibit different kinds of universal singularities that are explicitly given. In particular, it is shown that the nature of the universal stress singularity at a jump of the friction coefficient is different depending on the sign of the jump.

  1. Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Clarke, Daryl D.; Ozeki, Shinichi

    Friction materials such as disk pads, brake linings, and clutch facings are widely used for automotive applications. Friction materials function during braking due to frictional resistance that transforms kinetic energy into thermal energy. There has been a rudimentary evolution, from materials like leather or wood to asbestos fabric or asbestos fabric saturated with various resins such as asphalt or resin combined with pitch. These efforts were further developed by the use of woven asbestos material saturated by either rubber solution or liquid resin binder and functioned as an internal expanding brake, similar to brake lining system. The role of asbestos continued through the use of chopped asbestos saturated by rubber, but none was entirely successful due to the poor rubber heat resistance required for increased speeds and heavy gearing demands of the automobile industry. The use of phenolic resins as binder for asbestos friction materials provided the necessary thermal resistance and performance characteristics. Thus, the utility of asbestos as the main friction component, for over 100 years, has been significantly reduced in friction materials due to asbestos identity as a carcinogen. Steel and other fibrous components have displaced asbestos in disk pads. Currently, non-asbestos organics are the predominate friction material. Phenolic resins continue to be the preferred binder, and increased amounts are necessary to meet the requirements of highly functional asbestos-free disk pads for the automotive industry. With annual automobile production exceeding 70 million vehicles and additional automobile production occurring in developing countries worldwide and increasing yearly, the amount of phenolic resin for friction material is also increasing (Fig. 14.1). Fig. 14.1 Worldwide commercial vehicle production In recent years, increased fuel efficiency of passenger car is required due to the CO2 emission issue. One of the solutions to improve fuel efficiency is to

  2. A dynamic elastic-visco-plastic unilateral contact problem with normal damped response and Coulomb friction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eck, Ch.; Jarušek, Jiří; Sofonea, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2010), s. 229-251 ISSN 0956-7925 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : elastic-vosco plastic material * dynamic contact problem * normal damped response * unilateral constraint * Coulomb friction * weak solution * penalitazion * smoothing Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.480, year: 2010 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7675484&fileId=S0956792510000045

  3. Static and kinetic friction force and surface roughness of different archwire-bracket sliding contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion-Vilches, Francisco J; Bermudez, María-Dolores; Fructuoso, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the static and kinetic friction forces of the contact bracket-archwire with different dental material compositions in order to select those materials with lower resistance to sliding. We carried out sliding friction tests by means of a universal testing machine following an experimental procedure as described in ASTM D1894 standard. We determined the static and kinetic friction forces under dry and lubricating conditions using an artificial saliva solution at 36.5ºC. The bracket-archwire pairs studied were: stainless steel-stainless steel; stainless steel-glass fiber composite; stainless steel-Nitinol 60; sapphire-stainless steel; sapphire-glass fiber composite; and sapphire-Nitinol 60. The best performance is obtained for Nitinol 60 archwire sliding against a stainless steel bracket, both under dry and lubricated conditions. These results are in agreement with the low surface roughness of Nitinol 60 with respect to the glass fiber composite archwire. The results described here contribute to establishing selection criteria for materials for dental archwire-brackets.

  4. The role of frictional contact of constituent blocks on the stability of masonry domes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatini, Valentina; Royer-Carfagni, Gianni; Tasora, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    The observation of old construction works confirms that masonry domes can withstand tensile hoop stresses, at least up to a certain level. Here, such tensile resistance, rather than a priori assumed as a property of the bulk material, is attributed to the contact forces that are developed at the interfaces between interlocked blocks under normal pressure, specified by Coulomb's friction law. According to this rationale, the aspect ratio of the blocks, as well as the bond pattern, becomes of fundamental importance. To investigate the complex assembly of blocks, supposed rigid, we present a non-smooth contact dynamic analysis, implemented in a custom software based on the Project Chrono C++ framework and complemented with parametric-design interfaces for pre- and post-processing complex geometries. Through this advanced tool, we investigate the role of frictional forces resisting hoop stresses in the stability of domes, either circular or oval, under static and dynamic loading, focusing, in particular, on the structural role played by the underlying drum and the surmounting tiburium .

  5. THE CONTROL VARIATIONAL METHOD FOR ELASTIC CONTACT PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Sofonea

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a multivalued equation of the form Ay + F(y = fin a real Hilbert space, where A is a linear operator and F represents the (Clarke subdifferential of some function. We prove existence and uniqueness results of the solution by using the control variational method. The main idea in this method is to minimize the energy functional associated to the nonlinear equation by arguments of optimal control theory. Then we consider a general mathematical model describing the contact between a linearly elastic body and an obstacle which leads to a variational formulation as above, for the displacement field. We apply the abstract existence and uniqueness results to prove the unique weak solvability of the corresponding contact problem. Finally, we present examples of contact and friction laws for which our results work.

  6. Anti-friction performance of FeS nanoparticle synthesized by biological method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lu Hai, E-mail: lhzhou@t.shu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Wei, Xi Cheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Ma, Zi Jian [Pipe and Bar Division of Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd., Shanghai 200941 (China); Mei, Bin [Shanghai Medical Instrumentation College, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • FeS nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a biological method. • The anti-friction performance of prepared nanoparticle under oil lubricating and dry condition were analyzed. • The anti-friction mechanism of FeS nanoparticle was discussed. - Abstract: FeS nanoparticle is prepared by a biological method. The size, morphology and structure of the FeS nanoparticle are characterized by the means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The anti-friction behavior of the FeS nanoparticle as a lubricating oil additive is evaluated in the engine oil by using a face-to-face contact mode. The worn surface is characterized by using the scanning electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy in order to find the reasons resulting in the reduction of friction coefficient due to the addition of the FeS nanoparticle. The anti-friction mechanism of the FeS nanoparticle is elucidated based on the experimental results.

  7. The Analysis of Three-Body Contact Temperature under the Different Third Particle Size, Density, and Value of Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horng-Wen Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, many studies have investigated the friction, wear, and temperature characteristics of the interface between two relative movements. Such analyses often set the coefficient of friction as a fixed value and are analyzed in cases of two-body contact; however, the interface is often a three-body contact and the coefficient of friction varies depending on the operating conditions. This is a significant error in the analysis of contact characteristics, therefore, in this study, the actual interface and the change of the coefficient of friction were analyzed based on three-body micro-contact theory where the contact temperature was also analyzed and the difference between the generally assumed values were compared. The results showed that under three-body contact, the coefficient of total friction increased with an increase in particle size; and at a different particle size and area density of particles, the surface contact temperature increased with the plasticity index and load increases, and the particle contact temperature increased with the increasing particle size. The surface temperature rise was mainly affected by the ratio of the average temperature between surface 1 and surface 2 to the multiplication between the 100th root of the area density of particles and the square root of the equivalent surface roughness (Ts1s2_ave*/ηa0.01σ0.5 and the ratio of the 10th root of the mean particle diameter to the 100th root of the equivalent surface roughness (xa0.1/σ0.001. Particle temperature was mainly affected by the ratio of the 10th root of the mean particle diameter to the 100th root of the equivalent surface roughness (xa0.1/σ0.001 and the area density of particles ηa. Our study indicated that when the contact of surface with surface and the contact of the particles with the surface, the resulting heat balance was assigned to the particles and the surface in a three-body contact situation. Under this contact behavior, it could avoid

  8. The friction coefficient and its relation to the contact fatigue characteristics of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    The process of friction has been treated within the framework of an ergodynamic concept of deformable bodies. Equations of the friction energy balance are derived and a structure-energy interpretation of the friction process proposed. The friction parameter ranges within the domain of compatibility have been computed for tribosystems. The friction coefficient is shown to be a characteristic of the fatigue, wear resistance, and order (disorder) parameter of a tribosystem. Equations of state of a tribosystem and universal friction constants have been proposed. 31 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  9. Intelligent tires for identifying coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces using three-axis accelerometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Kamai, Kazuto; Seki, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent tires equipped with sensors as well as the monitoring of the tire/road contact conditions are in demand for improving vehicle control and safety. With the aim of identifying the coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces during driving, including during cornering, we develop an identification scheme for the coefficient of friction that involves estimation of the slip angle and applied force by using a single lightweight three-axis accelerometer attached on the inner surface of the tire. To validate the developed scheme, we conduct tire-rolling tests using an accelerometer-equipped tire with various slip angles on various types of road surfaces, including dry and wet surfaces. The results of these tests confirm that the estimated slip angle and applied force are reasonable. Furthermore, the identified coefficient of friction by the developed scheme agreed with that measured by standardized tests. (paper)

  10. On a solvability of hydro-mechanical problem based on contact problem with visco-plastic friction in Bingham rheology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedoma, Jiří; Tomášek, Luboš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 218, č. 1 (2008), s. 116-124 ISSN 0377-0427 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : visco-plasticity * Bingham rheology * contact problems with friction * variational inequalities * FEM * geomechanics * hydromechanics Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.048, year: 2008

  11. On a Solvability of Contact Problems with Visco-Plastic Friction in the Thermo-Visco-Plastic Bingham Rheology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedoma, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2006), s. 484-499 ISSN 0167-739X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : unilateral contact problem * local visco- plastic friction * thermo-visco- plastic Bingham rheology * FEM Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.722, year: 2006

  12. Comparison of different methods to extract the required coefficient of friction for level walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Chang, Chien-Chi; Matz, Simon

    2012-01-01

    The required coefficient of friction (RCOF) is an important predictor for slip incidents. Despite the wide use of the RCOF there is no standardised method for identifying the RCOF from ground reaction forces. This article presents a comparison of the outcomes from seven different methods, derived from those reported in the literature, for identifying the RCOF from the same data. While commonly used methods are based on a normal force threshold, percentage of stance phase or time from heel contact, a newly introduced hybrid method is based on a combination of normal force, time and direction of increase in coefficient of friction. Although no major differences were found with these methods in more than half the strikes, significant differences were found in a significant portion of strikes. Potential problems with some of these methods were identified and discussed and they appear to be overcome by the hybrid method. No standard method exists for determining the required coefficient of friction (RCOF), an important predictor for slipping. In this study, RCOF values from a single data set, using various methods from the literature, differed considerably for a significant portion of strikes. A hybrid method may yield improved results.

  13. Effect of Friction Model and Tire Maneuvering on Tire-Pavement Contact Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Haichao Zhou; Guolin Wang; Yangmin Ding; Jian Yang; Chen Liang; Jing Fu

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to simulate the effects of different friction models on tire braking. A truck radial tire (295/80R22.5) was modeled and the model was validated with tire deflection. An exponential decay friction model that considers the effect of sliding velocity on friction coefficients was adopted for analyzing braking performance. The result shows that the exponential decay friction model used for evaluating braking ability meets design requirements of antilock braking system (ABS). The ti...

  14. Computation of the flash-temperature at the wheel-rail contact using a 3D finite element model and its comparison with analytical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeimi, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.; Wu, J.; Petrov, R.H.; Sietsma, J.

    2015-01-01

    The coupled mechanical–thermal behaviour of wheel and rail materials under rolling contact is studied to determine the temperature rise due to the frictional heat. The wheel–rail frictional rolling contact problem is solved using the three–dimensional finite element (FE) method. The FE model

  15. Analytical and experimental investigation of the static friction regime for rubber-rigid ball contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, E.L.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; de Vries, Erik G.; de Vries, Erik G.; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2006-01-01

    The static friction regime is of great importance for systems requiring accurate positioning. The parameters of the static friction regime in terms of static friction force and limiting displacement before gross sliding are investigated for a rubber ball/metal flat configuration. Single-asperity

  16. The effect of load in a contact with boundary lubrication. [reduction of coefficient of friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, J. M.; Lamy, B.; Daronnat, M.; Moro, S.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the transition load on the wear in a contact with boundary lubrication was investigated. An experimental method was developed for this purpose, and parameters affecting the boundary lubrication under industrial operating conditions were identified. These parameters are the adsorbed boundary film, the contact microgeometry (surface roughness), macrogeometry, and hardness of materials used. It was found that the curve of the tops of the surface protrustion affect the transition load, and thus the boundary lubrication. The transition load also depends on the chemical nature of the contact and its geometrical and mechanical aspects.

  17. Properties of Friction Welding of Dissimilar Metals WCu-Cu Weld for Electrical Contact Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Y. H.; Yoon, G. G. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (Korea); Min, T. K. [Chungnam National University (Korea); Han, B. S. [Chonbuk National University (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    A copper-tungsten sintered alloy(WCu) has been friction-welded to a tough pitch copper (Cu) in order to investigate friction weldability. The maximum tensile strength of the WCu-Cu friction welded joints had up to 96% of those of the Cu base metal under the condition of friction time 0.6sec, friction pressure 45MPa, upset pressure 125MPa and upset time 5.0sec. And it is confirmed that the tensile strength of friction welded joints are influenced highly by upset pressure rather than friction time. And it is considered that mixed layer was formed in the Cu adjacent side to the weld interface, W particles included in mixed layer induced fracture in the Cu adjacent side to the weld interface and also, thickness of mixed layer was reduced as upset pressure increase. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  18. Friction and Wear of Nanoadditive-Based Biolubricants in Steel-Steel Sliding Contacts: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev Nayan; Harsha, A. P.

    2018-02-01

    The present work deals with the study of tribo-pair interaction in lubricated sliding contacts. By considering the environmental issues, the sunflower oil was extracted from the sunflower seeds and used as a base lubricant. The two types of the nanoadditives, i.e., CuO and CeO2, varying concentrations from 0.10 to 0.50% w/v were used to formulate the nanolubricants. The compatibility/synergism of the nanoadditives was examined from antifriction and antiwear behavior study with four-ball tester. Also, sunflower oil was modified by the chemical method to improve its fatty acid structure. A comparative tribological and compatibility study was also done in modified oil at similar concentration levels with both types of nanoparticles. The tribological test result exhibits 0.10% w/v concentration of the nanoadditive as optimum due to lowest wear scar and coefficient of friction. Higher concentration of the nanoparticles impaired the base oil performance. Different analytical tools were used to characterize the oil modification and worn surfaces. Moreover, the role of subsurface of the contacting material with the tribological performance has been reported.

  19. Impact Damage Evaluation Method of Friction Disc Based on High-Speed Photography and Tooth-Root Stress Coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L; Shao, Y M; Liu, J; Zheng, H L

    2015-01-01

    The stability of friction disc could be seriously affected by the tooth surface damage due to poor working conditions of the wet multi-disc brake in heavy trucks. There are few current works focused on the damage of the friction disc caused by torsion-vibration impacts. Hence, it is necessary to investigate its damage mechanisms and evaluation methods. In this paper, a damage mechanism description and evaluation method of a friction disc based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling is proposed. According to the HighSpeed Photography, the collision process between the friction disc and hub is recorded, which can be used to determine the contact position and deformation. Combined with the strain-stress data obtained by the strain gauge at the place of the tooth-root, the impact force and property are studied. In order to obtain the evaluation method, the damage surface morphology data of the friction disc extracted by 3D Super Depth Digital Microscope (VH-Z100R) is compared with the impact force and property. The quantitative relationships between the amount of deformation and collision number are obtained using a fitting analysis method. The experimental results show that the damage of the friction disc can be evaluated by the proposed impact damage evaluation method based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling. (paper)

  20. Simple and Reliable Method to Estimate the Fingertip Static Coefficient of Friction in Precision Grip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrea, Allan; Bulens, David Cordova; Lefevre, Philippe; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    The static coefficient of friction (µ static ) plays an important role in dexterous object manipulation. Minimal normal force (i.e., grip force) needed to avoid dropping an object is determined by the tangential force at the fingertip-object contact and the frictional properties of the skin-object contact. Although frequently assumed to be constant for all levels of normal force (NF, the force normal to the contact), µ static actually varies nonlinearly with NF and increases at low NF levels. No method is currently available to measure the relationship between µ static and NF easily. Therefore, we propose a new method allowing the simple and reliable measurement of the fingertip µ static at different NF levels, as well as an algorithm for determining µ static from measured forces and torques. Our method is based on active, back-and-forth movements of a subject's finger on the surface of a fixed six-axis force and torque sensor. µ static is computed as the ratio of the tangential to the normal force at slip onset. A negative power law captures the relationship between µ static and NF. Our method allows the continuous estimation of µ static as a function of NF during dexterous manipulation, based on the relationship between µ static and NF measured before manipulation.

  1. Unilateral contact problems variational methods and existence theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Eck, Christof; Krbec, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    The mathematical analysis of contact problems, with or without friction, is an area where progress depends heavily on the integration of pure and applied mathematics. This book presents the state of the art in the mathematical analysis of unilateral contact problems with friction, along with a major part of the analysis of dynamic contact problems without friction. Much of this monograph emerged from the authors'' research activities over the past 10 years and deals with an approach proven fruitful in many situations. Starting from thin estimates of possible solutions, this approach is based on an approximation of the problem and the proof of a moderate partial regularity of the solution to the approximate problem. This in turn makes use of the shift (or translation) technique - an important yet often overlooked tool for contact problems and other nonlinear problems with limited regularity. The authors pay careful attention to quantification and precise results to get optimal bounds in sufficient conditions f...

  2. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D.H.

    1978-04-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active metal is, and the greater resistance to shear it has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide

  3. Friction and wear behavior of nitrogen-doped ZnO thin films deposited via MOCVD under dry contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.S. Mbamara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most researches on doped ZnO thin films are tilted toward their applications in optoelectronics and semiconductor devices. Research on their tribological properties is still unfolding. In this work, nitrogen-doped ZnO thin films were deposited on 304 L stainless steel substrate from a combination of zinc acetate and ammonium acetate precursor by MOCVD technique. Compositional and structural studies of the films were done using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS and X-ray Diffraction (XRD. The frictional behavior of the thin film coatings was evaluated using a ball-on-flat configuration in reciprocating sliding under dry contact condition. After friction test, the flat and ball counter-face surfaces were examined to assess the wear dimension and failure mechanism. Both friction behavior and wear (in the ball counter-face were observed to be dependent on the crystallinity and thickness of the thin film coatings.

  4. 3D-characterization method and morphological filtering for the assessment and the design of friction optimized surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeger, S; Dietzsch, M; Burkhardt, T

    2011-01-01

    For a specific manipulation of friction surfaces it is important to measure and calculate geometrical parameters to derive the tribological behavior. The new functional approach presented in this paper is the calculation of the characteristic lateral extension of the real contact surface as well as the representative contact radius by applying morphological filters to a 3D-set of data. All surface characteristics, including form, waviness, roughness as well as defined microstructures, are extracted holistically with a 3D Coordinate Measuring Instrument or a Form Measuring Instrument, but with the smallest available tip radius. The paper presents the benefit of this holistic extraction method and the application of morphological filtering for the description of the contact form (plateau or sphere), the real contact surface, number of contacts, the typical contact radius and the typical lateral extension of the micro contact plateaus.

  5. Transducer for measuring normal and friction stress in contact zone during rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Wanheim, Tarras; Arentoft, Mogens

    2004-01-01

    , generating frictional stresses contrary to the direction of rolling. In a narrow area in the deformation zone, the velocity of the deformed material is equal to the velocity of the rolls. This area or line is named “neutral line”[2]. The position of the neutral line depends on friction, reduction ratio...

  6. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber-glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuononen, Ari J

    2016-06-13

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons' law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements.

  7. A method for evaluating dynamical friction in linear ball bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yusaku; Maru, Koichi; Jin, Tao; Yupapin, Preecha P; Mitatha, Somsak

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for evaluating the dynamical friction of linear bearings, whose motion is not perfectly linear due to some play in its internal mechanism. In this method, the moving part of a linear bearing is made to move freely, and the force acting on the moving part is measured as the inertial force given by the product of its mass and the acceleration of its centre of gravity. To evaluate the acceleration of its centre of gravity, the acceleration of two different points on it is measured using a dual-axis optical interferometer.

  8. Modeling coupled bending, axial, and torsional vibrations of a CANDU fuel rod subjected to multiple frictional contact constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadaee, M.; Yu, S.D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a finite element based dynamic model is presented for bending, axial, and torsional vibrations of an outer CANDU fuel element subjected to multiple unilateral frictional contact (MUFC) constraints. The Bozzak-Newmark relaxation-integration scheme is used to discretize the equations of motion in the time domain. At a time step, equations of state of the fuel element with MUFC constraints reduce to a linear complementarity problem (LCP). Results are compared with those available in the literature. Good agreement is achieved. The 2D sliding and stiction motion of a fuel element at points of contact is obtained for harmonic excitations. (author)

  9. Dynamic induced softening in frictional granular materials investigated by discrete-element-method simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemrich, Laure; Carmeliet, Jan; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Jia, Xiaoping

    2017-12-01

    A granular system composed of frictional glass beads is simulated using the discrete element method. The intergrain forces are based on the Hertz contact law in the normal direction with frictional tangential force. The damping due to collision is also accounted for. Systems are loaded at various stresses and their quasistatic elastic moduli are characterized. Each system is subjected to an extensive dynamic testing protocol by measuring the resonant response to a broad range of ac drive amplitudes and frequencies via a set of diagnostic strains. The system, linear at small ac drive amplitudes, has resonance frequencies that shift downward (i.e., modulus softening) with increased ac drive amplitude. Detailed testing shows that the slipping contact ratio does not contribute significantly to this dynamic modulus softening, but the coordination number is strongly correlated to this reduction. This suggests that the softening arises from the extended structural change via break and remake of contacts during the rearrangement of bead positions driven by the ac amplitude.

  10. METHOD OF THE DRIVE POWER DETERMINATION OF THE MECHANISMS OF THE BRIDGE CRANE MOVEMENT CONSIDERING THE ROLLING FRICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Bohomaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The value of drive resistance to its movement is the main parameter at calculating the drive power of bridge crane. The value of the wheel rolling friction on the rails is one of the important parts of the resistance to movement. It is necessary to determine the dependence of static (dynamic quantities of resistance to the bridge crane movement on a straight section of the track from the position of the bogie in the span, and explore the influence of the wheel flanges resistance for wear. Methodology. Using the analytical dependences for determining the rolling friction coefficient, that depends on the size of the half-width of the contact between the wheel and rail, the improved method for calculating the required drive power of the crane was proposed. Findings. With the proposed method of power calculation the characteristic curve of the crane wheel loads, the coefficient of rolling friction of the wheels and the crane resistance to movement from the position of the bogie on span were built. In the result of graphs analysis it was found that the engine power, obtained by the proposed method is higher than the recommended by the existing standards. The more precise formula for determining the total coefficient of sliding friction that takes into account the friction of wheel flanges on the rail is given. The characteristic curves of such coefficient of friction and the total resistance to movement of the position of the crane bogie were built. Originality. The scientists proposed an improved method of determining the required engine power of bridge crane, which takes into account the effect of rolling friction of the wheels on the rails and the bogie in the span. The improved formula for determining the coefficient of friction that takes into account the friction wheel flanges of the rail was given. The characteristic curve of this coefficient of friction and the total resistance movement of crane from the position of the crane bogie

  11. Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

  12. Evaluation of Contact Friction in Fracture of Rotationally Bent Nitinol Endodontic Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimed, Tariq Abu

    2011-12-01

    The high flexibility of rotary Nitinol (Ni-Ti) files has helped clinicians perform root canal treatments with fewer technical errors than seen with stainless steel files. However, intracanal file fracture can occur, compromising the outcome of the treatment. Ni-Ti file fracture incidence is roughly around 4% amongst specialists and higher amongst general practitioners. Therefore, eliminating or reducing this problem should improve patient care. The aim of this project was to isolate and examine the role of friction between files and the canal walls of the glass tube model, and bending-related maximum strain amplitudes, on Ni-Ti file lifetimes-tofracture in the presence of different irrigant solutions and file coatings. A specifically designed device was used to test over 300 electropolished EndoSequenceRTM Ni-Ti files for number of cycles to failure (NCF) in smooth, bent glass tube models at 45 and 60 degrees during dry, coated and liquid-lubricated rotation at 600rpm. Fractured files were examined under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) afterwards. Four different file sizes 25.04, 25.06, 35.04, 35.06 (diameter in mm/taper %) and six surface modification conditions were used independently. These conditions included, three solutions; (1) a surfactant-based solution, Surface-Active-Displacement-Solution (SADS), (2) a mouth wash proven to remove biofilms, Delmopinol 1%(DEL), and (3) Bleach 6% (vol.%), the most common antibacterial endodontic irrigant solution. The conditions also included two low-friction silane-based coating groups, 3-Hepta-fluoroisopropyl-propoxymethyl-dichlorosilane (3-HEPT) and Octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODS), in addition to an as-received file control group (Dry). The coefficient of friction (CF) between the file and the canal walls for each condition was measured as well as the surface tension of the irrigant solutions and the critical surface tension of the coated and uncoated files by contact angle measurements. The radius of curvature and

  13. Estimation of coefficient of rolling friction by the evolvent pendulum method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaci, S.; Ciornei, F. C.; Ciogole, A.; Ciornei, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents a method for finding the coefficient of rolling friction using an evolvent pendulum. The pendulum consists in a fixed cylindrical body and a mobile body presenting a plane surface in contact with a cylindrical surface. The mobile body is placed over the fixed one in an equilibrium state; after applying a small impulse, the mobile body oscillates. The motion of the body is video recorded and afterwards the movie is analyzed by frames and the decrease with time of angular amplitude of the pendulum is found. The equation of motion is established for oscillations of the mobile body. The equation of motion, differential nonlinear, is integrated by Runge-Kutta method. Imposing the same damping both to model’s solution and to theoretical model, the value of coefficient of rolling friction is obtained. The last part of the paper presents results for actual pairs of materials. The main advantage of the method is the fact that the dimensions of contact regions are small, of order a few millimeters, and thus is substantially reduced the possibility of variation of mechanical characteristic for the two surfaces.

  14. Effect of Nano and Micro Friction Modifier Based Lubricants on Wear behavior between Steel-Steel Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bhaumik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The wear and surface morphology between steel (EN24, 22-24Rc-steel (EN 31, 58-60Rc contacts was investigated in presence of friction modifiers based (micro-graphite/nano particles- multi wall carbon nano tubes and zinc oxide mineral oil. Though a decrease in wear was observed (upto a certain concentration of nano friction modifiers but a weight-gain in pins after the tests was observed for all tests with ZnO nanoparticles while weight loss was observed in tests with multi wall carbon nano tubes and graphite particles based oil samples. Surface characterization of the worn surfaces showed more surface deteriorations in case of mineral oil (no friction modifiers and mineral oil with graphite as compared with nano particles/tubes based lubricants. The occurrence of a tribo film due to the deposition of nano particle and the formation of a modified layer on the pin surfaces are likely to be responsible for the reduction of coefficient of friction and better surface roughness. Apart from investigating the wear behaviour between two steel surfaces under micro and nano particles based lubricant and analysing the surfaces of the samples a part of the work was also focussed on the weight gain after tribo tests with ZnO nano particle additions.

  15. Force-free magnetic fields - The magneto-frictional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W. H.; Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    The problem under discussion is that of calculating magnetic field configurations in which the Lorentz force j x B is everywhere zero, subject to specified boundary conditions. We choose to represent the magnetic field in terms of Clebsch variables in the form B = grad alpha x grad beta. These variables are constant on any field line so that each field line is labeled by the corresponding values of alpha and beta. When the field is described in this way, the most appropriate choice of boundary conditions is to specify the values of alpha and beta on the bounding surface. We show that such field configurations may be calculated by a magneto-frictional method. We imagine that the field lines move through a stationary medium, and that each element of magnetic field is subject to a frictional force parallel to and opposing the velocity of the field line. This concept leads to an iteration procedure for modifying the variables alpha and beta, that tends asymptotically towards the force-free state. We apply the method first to a simple problem in two rectangular dimensions, and then to a problem of cylindrical symmetry that was previously discussed by Barnes and Sturrock (1972). In one important respect, our new results differ from the earlier results of Barnes and Sturrock, and we conclude that the earlier article was in error.

  16. Quantitative assessment of contact and non-contact lateral force calibration methods for atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Chung, Koo-Hyun, E-mail: khchung@ulsan.ac.kr

    2016-02-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been widely used for measuring friction force at the nano-scale. However, one of the key challenges faced by AFM researchers is to calibrate an AFM system to interpret a lateral force signal as a quantifiable force. In this study, five rectangular cantilevers were used to quantitatively compare three different lateral force calibration methods to demonstrate the legitimacy and to establish confidence in the quantitative integrity of the proposed methods. The Flat-Wedge method is based on a variation of the lateral output on a surface with flat and changing slopes, the Multi-Load Pivot method is based on taking pivot measurements at several locations along the cantilever length, and the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method is based on determining the optical lever sensitivity from the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode with a known torsional spring constant from the Sader method. The results of the calibration using the Flat-Wedge and Multi-Load Pivot methods were found to be consistent within experimental uncertainties, and the experimental uncertainties of the two methods were found to be less than 15%. However, the lateral force sensitivity determined by the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method was found to be 8–29% smaller than those obtained from the other two methods. This discrepancy decreased to 3–19% when the torsional mode correction factor for an ideal cantilever was used, which suggests that the torsional mode correction should be taken into account to establish confidence in Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method. - Highlights: • Quantitative assessment of three lateral force calibration methods for AFM. • Advantages and disadvantages of three different lateral force calibration method. • Implementation of Multi-Load Pivot method as non-contact calibration technique. • The torsional mode correction for Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method.

  17. Quantitative assessment of contact and non-contact lateral force calibration methods for atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been widely used for measuring friction force at the nano-scale. However, one of the key challenges faced by AFM researchers is to calibrate an AFM system to interpret a lateral force signal as a quantifiable force. In this study, five rectangular cantilevers were used to quantitatively compare three different lateral force calibration methods to demonstrate the legitimacy and to establish confidence in the quantitative integrity of the proposed methods. The Flat-Wedge method is based on a variation of the lateral output on a surface with flat and changing slopes, the Multi-Load Pivot method is based on taking pivot measurements at several locations along the cantilever length, and the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method is based on determining the optical lever sensitivity from the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode with a known torsional spring constant from the Sader method. The results of the calibration using the Flat-Wedge and Multi-Load Pivot methods were found to be consistent within experimental uncertainties, and the experimental uncertainties of the two methods were found to be less than 15%. However, the lateral force sensitivity determined by the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method was found to be 8–29% smaller than those obtained from the other two methods. This discrepancy decreased to 3–19% when the torsional mode correction factor for an ideal cantilever was used, which suggests that the torsional mode correction should be taken into account to establish confidence in Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method. - Highlights: • Quantitative assessment of three lateral force calibration methods for AFM. • Advantages and disadvantages of three different lateral force calibration method. • Implementation of Multi-Load Pivot method as non-contact calibration technique. • The torsional mode correction for Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method.

  18. FEM simulation of friction testing method based on combined forward rod-backward can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakamura, T; Bay, Niels; Zhang, Z. L

    1997-01-01

    A new friction testing method by combined forward rod-backward can extrusion is proposed in order to evaluate frictional characteristics of lubricants in forging processes. By this method the friction coefficient mu and the friction factor m can be estimated along the container wall and the conical...... curves are obtained by rigid-plastic FEM simulations in a combined forward rod-backward can extrusion process for a reduction in area R-b = 25, 50 and 70 percent in the backward can extrusion. It is confirmed that the friction factor m(p) on the punch nose in the backward cart extrusion has almost...... in a mechanical press with aluminium alloy A6061 as the workpiece material and different kinds of lubricants. They confirm the analysis resulting in reasonable values for the friction coefficient and the friction factor....

  19. Rolling Friction Torque in Ball-Race Contacts Operating in Mixed Lubrication Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Rodica D. Bălan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on a theoretical model and an experimental methodology for defining the friction torque for lubricated conditions in a modified thrust ball bearing having only three balls, the authors experimentally investigated the influence of the lubricant parameter Λ on friction torque for mixed IVR (isoviscous rigid and EHL (elastohydrodynamic lubrication conditions. The experiments were conducted using ball diameters of 3 mm, 3.97 mm and 6.35 mm loaded at 0.125 N, 0.400 N and 0.633 N. Two oils of viscosity 0.08 Pa·s and 0.05 Pa·s were used and rotational speed was varied in the range 60–210 rpm to obtain a lubricant parameter Λ varying between 0.3 and 3.2. The experiments confirmed that the measured friction torque can be explained using hydrodynamic rolling force relationships respecting the transition from an IVR to an EHL lubrication regime.

  20. Deformation and friction of MoS2 particles in liquid suspensions used to lubricate sliding contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Rashmi R.; Biswas, Sanjay K.

    2010-01-01

    Tribology of a well known solid lubricant molybdenum disulphide is studied here in water and oil medium, over a large range of contact dimensions. Lateral force microscopy is used to identify the deformation modes; intra-crystalline slip, plastic grooving, fragmentation and fracture, of single particles. The medium and agglomeration were found to dictate the deformation mode. Steel on steel tribology lubricated by suspensions of these particles in liquid media was conducted over a range of contact pressure and sliding velocity. A scrutiny of the frictional data with the aid of Raman spectroscopy to identify the transfer film, suggested that the particle size, as it is at contact, is an important tribological parameter. Ultrasonication of the suspension and dispersion of the particle by surfactants were used to control the apriori particle size fed into the suspension. Correspondence of friction data of the gently sonicated suspension with that of the ultrasonicated suspension with dispersants indicated the importance of liquid ingestion by these particles as it controls their mode of deformation and consequent tribology.

  1. Enhanced Locomotion Efficiency of a Bio-inspired Walking Robot using Contact Surfaces with Frictional Anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Petersen, Dennis; Kovalev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    stability. It shows high frictional anisotropy due to an array of sloped denticles. The orientation of the denticles to the underlying collagenous material also strongly influences their mechanical interlocking with the substrate. This study not only opens up a new way of achieving energy-efficient legged...

  2. Tow mechanics: a contact mechanics approach of friction in fibrous tows during forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo; Rietman, Bert; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Akkerman, Remko

    2012-01-01

    Composites forming processes involve mechanical interactions on the ply, tow, and filament level. The deformations that occur during forming processes are governed by friction between tows and tooling material on the mesoscopic level and consequently between filaments within the tows on the

  3. FE Modeling of Blade Couple with Friction Contacts Under Dynamic Loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pešek, Luděk; Půst, Ladislav; Vaněk, František; Veselý, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2014), s. 229-238 ISSN 2321-3558 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1166 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : turbine blades * dry friction * damping Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.tvi-in.com/Journals/journaldetail.aspx?Id=201406251115146464844edeb39be66

  4. WEAR OF THE FRICTION SURFACES PARTS IN THE PRESENSE OF SOLID PARTICLES CONTACTING ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Musaibov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of intensity of wear of details of the cars working in the oil polluted by abrasive particles, depending on mechanical properties of material of details and abrasive particles, their sizes, a form and concentration, loading, temperature of a surface of friction, speed of sliding, quality of lubricant are considered. 

  5. New insights into the short pitch corrugation development enigma based on 3D-FE dynamic vehicle-track coupled modelling in frictional rolling contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, S.; Li, Z.; Nunez Vicencio, Alfredo; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.

    2017-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) dynamic frictional rolling contact model is presented for the study of short pitch corrugation that considers direct and instantaneous coupling between the contact mechanics and the structural dynamics in a vehicle-track system. In this study, we examine

  6. A substitute model of two-dimensional dry friction exposed to dither generated by rolling contact of wheel and rail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    Dither generated by rolling contact of wheel and rail smoothes dry friction damping provided by the primary suspension dampers of freight wagons and it should be taken into account in numerical simulations. But numerically the problem is non-smooth and this leads to long execution time during simulation, especially when the vehicle with friction dampers is modelled in the environment of an multi-body system simulation program, whose solver has to cope with many strong non-linearities. The other difficulty is the necessity of handling within the code a number of big volume files of recorded dither sampled with high frequency. To avoid these difficulties, a substitute model of two-dimensional dry friction exposed to dither is proposed that does not need application of dither during simulation, but it behaves as if dither were applied. Due to this property of the model, the excitation of the vehicle model by track irregularities may be supplied as low-frequency input, which allows fast execution and, the necessity of handling high-volume files of recorded dither is avoided. The substitute model is numerically effective. To identify parameters of the substitute model, a pre-processing employing a sample of the realistic dither is carried-out on a simple two-degrees-of-freedom system. The substitute model is anisotropic, describing anisotropic properties of the two-dimensional friction arising in the presence of one-dimensional dither. The model may be applied in other branches of engineering, for example, in mechatronics and robotics, where application of dither may improve the accuracy of positioning devices.

  7. Lifetime limitations of ohmic, contacting RF MEMS switches with Au, Pt and Ir contact materials due to accumulation of ‘friction polymer’ on the contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplewski, David A; Nordquist, Christopher D; Dyck, Christopher W; Patrizi, Gary A; Kraus, Garth M; Cowan, William D

    2012-01-01

    We present lifetime limitations and failure analysis of many packaged RF MEMS ohmic contacting switches with Au–Au, Au–Ir, and Au–Pt contact materials operating with 100 µN of contact force per contact in hermetically sealed glass wall packages. All metals were tested using the same switch design in a controlled environment to provide a comparison between the performance of the different materials and their corresponding failure mechanisms. The switch lifetimes of the different contact materials varied from several hundred cycles to 200 million cycles with different mechanisms causing failures for different contact materials. Switches with Au–Au contacts failed due to adhesion when thoroughly cleaned while switches with dissimilar metal contacts (Au–Ir and Au–Pt) operated without adhesion failures but failed due to carbon accumulation on the contacts even in a clean, packaged environment as a result of the catalytic behavior of the contact materials. Switch lifetimes correlated inversely with catalytic behavior of the contact metals. The data suggests the path to increase switch lifetime is to use favorable catalytic materials as contacts, design switches with higher contact forces to break through any residual contamination, and use cleaner, probably smaller, packages. (paper)

  8. Low friction slip-rolling contacts. Influences of alternative steels, high performance thin film coatings and lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Due to the growing environmental awareness worldwide, containment provisions for CO{sub 2} emissions in mobility systems and increasing performance requirements the demands on mechanical systems and their materials continuously rise. These high demands require the implementation of new technical approaches, for example of light-weight strategies in automotive powertrains, and directly raise questions about the suitability of the most promising technical solution. Two basic parameters, the surface hardness of the tooth flanks and the core fatigue strength of the tooth root, illustrate exemplarily increasing demands on material grades used for gear wheels in automotive powertrains. In addition to light-weight strategies, a reduction in friction and an increase of the fatigue lifetime are two other major development directions to strive the mentioned targets. It is clear that any kind of solution must show an equal application profile, preferably an improvement, compared to the state-of-the-art solutions. For tribological systems, the following paths may offer lower friction and higher load carrying capabilities: 1. Alternative base oils and additives (such as esters, polyglycols), 2. Thin film coatings (e.g. DLC) and/or 3. Novel steel metallurgies. In previous investigations on the slip-rolling resistance of thin film coatings (a-C, ta-C, Zr(C,N)) the substrates were mainly made of the bearing steels 100Cr6H and Cronidur 30. Applying contact pressures of up to P{sub 0max} = 2.9 GPa (F{sub N} = 2,000 N), the samples were tested up to 10 million load cycles in endurance tests. The aim of the present work is to broaden the research by varying the input parameters. Newly developed engine oil mixtures, high performance thin film coatings and alternative steel solutions are intensively investigated in highly stressed slip-rolling contacts at lubricant temperatures of 120 C. Specifically, in using new steel metallurgies, i.e. the high toughness and high strength steels V300

  9. Meniscus formation in a capillary and the role of contact line friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrukh, Taras; Monaenkova, Daria; Rubin, Binyamin; Lee, Wah-Keat; Kornev, Konstantin G

    2014-01-28

    We studied spontaneous formation of an internal meniscus by dipping glass capillaries of 25 μm to 350 μm radii into low volatile hexadecane and tributyl phosphate. X-ray phase contrast and high speed optical microscopy imaging were employed. We showed that the meniscus completes its formation when the liquid column is still shorter than the capillary radius. After that, the meniscus travels about ten capillary radii at a constant velocity. We demonstrated that the experimental observations can be explained by introducing a friction force linearly proportional to the meniscus velocity with a friction coefficient depending on the air/liquid/solid triplet. It was demonstrated that the friction coefficient does not depend on the capillary radius. Numerical solution of the force balance equation revealed four different uptake regimes that can be specified in a phase portrait. This phase portrait was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results and can be used as a guide for the design of thin porous absorbers.

  10. Development of friction welding method by electric servo motors; Dendo servo shiki masatsu assetsuho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H; Onuma, M; Hasegawa, T; Sakamoto, T [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The standard friction welding has two methods; the brake method and the inertia method. We have developed a new friction welding method with the electric servo motor system. The forming of plastic fluidity layers of interface is evaluated quantitatively with the feedback control characteristics. The new method has enabled to reduce the heat effect and the burr of friction welding. In the method, we could reduce the getting heat energy, from one-third to half less than the previous methods. 6 refs., 16 figs.

  11. The extended wedge method: atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, H S; Burris, D L

    2013-05-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS2 to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS2 had friction coefficients of μ = 0.20 ± 0.04 and μ = 0.006 ± 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS2 had a friction coefficient of μ = 0.005 ± 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  12. Real-time deflection and friction force imaging by bimorph-based resonance-type high-speed scanning force microscopy in the contact mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei; Fan, Haiyun; Zhao, Jianyong; Shang, Guangyi

    2014-01-01

    We report herein an alternative high-speed scanning force microscopy method in the contact mode based on a resonance-type piezoelectric bimorph scanner. The experimental setup, the modified optical beam deflection scheme suitable for smaller cantilevers, and a high-speed control program for simultaneous data capture are described in detail. The feature of the method is that the deflection and friction force images of the sample surface can be obtained simultaneously in real time. Images of various samples (e.g., a test grating, a thin gold film, and fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass slides) are acquired successfully. The imaging rate is 25 frames per second, and the average scan speed reaches a value of approximately 2.5 cm/s. The method combines the advantages of both observing the dynamic processes of the sample surface and monitoring the frictional properties on the nanometer scale. 07.79.Lh; 07.79.Sp; 68.37.Ps.

  13. What Governs Friction of Silicon Oxide in Humid Environment: Contact Area between Solids, Water Meniscus around the Contact, or Water Layer Structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Xiao, Chen; Yu, Bingjun; Kim, Seong H; Qian, Linmao

    2017-09-26

    In order to understand the interfacial parameters governing the friction force (F t ) between silicon oxide surfaces in humid environment, the sliding speed (v) and relative humidity (RH) dependences of F t were measured for a silica sphere (1 μm radius) sliding on a silicon oxide (SiO x ) surface, using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and analyzed with a mathematical model describing interfacial contacts under a dynamic condition. Generally, F t decreases logarithmically with increasing v to a cutoff value below which its dependence on interfacial chemistry and sliding condition is relatively weak. Above the cutoff value, the logarithmic v dependence could be divided into two regimes: (i) when RH is lower than 50%, F t is a function of both v and RH; (ii) in contrast, at RH ≥ 50%, F t is a function of v only, but not RH. These complicated v and RH dependences were hypothesized to originate from the structure of the water layer adsorbed on the surface and the water meniscus around the annulus of the contact area. This hypothesis was tested by analyzing F t as a function of the water meniscus area (A m ) and volume (V m ) estimated from a thermally activated water-bridge formation model. Surprisingly, it was found that F t varies linearly with V m and correlates poorly with A m at RH contact under ambient conditions.

  14. On the Frictional Heating in Single Summit Contacts: Towards Failure at Asperity Level in Lubricated Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Emile; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of surface roughness and thermal conductivity on seizure in lubricated contacts is described in this work by quantifying the action of individual asperities in relation to local surface temperature rise. Application of the model to a contact situation in metal forming of stainless

  15. Structural characterization and frictional properties of carbon nanotube/alumina composites prepared by precursor method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Go [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-707 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: gyamamoto@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.jp; Omori, Mamoru; Yokomizo, Kenji; Hashida, Toshiyuki [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-707 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Adachi, Koshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites with MWCNTs content up to 10 mass% were prepared by precursor method. XRD analysis revealed that MWCNT/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were successfully synthesized by the dehydration of aluminum hydroxide-MWCNTs mixture at 1500 deg. C in vacuum. The steady-state friction coefficient ({mu}) of the composites decreased with increasing up to 4 mass% MWCNT and stayed constant ({mu} = 0.33) with further addition of MWCNT, which value was substantially lower than that of MWCNT-free monolithic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ({mu} = 0.57). Microstructural observations showed that resultant friction behavior may be related to the smearing of transferred film over the contact area, which was expected to permit easy shear and then help to achieve a lubricating effect during sliding. However, fracture property tests have shown that no improvement of the fracture strength and fracture toughness of the composites was achieved by addition of MWCNTs. It may be mainly due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs and the weak interface between MWCNTs and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix.

  16. Structural characterization and frictional properties of carbon nanotube/alumina composites prepared by precursor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Go; Omori, Mamoru; Yokomizo, Kenji; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Adachi, Koshi

    2008-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Al 2 O 3 composites with MWCNTs content up to 10 mass% were prepared by precursor method. XRD analysis revealed that MWCNT/Al 2 O 3 composites were successfully synthesized by the dehydration of aluminum hydroxide-MWCNTs mixture at 1500 deg. C in vacuum. The steady-state friction coefficient (μ) of the composites decreased with increasing up to 4 mass% MWCNT and stayed constant (μ = 0.33) with further addition of MWCNT, which value was substantially lower than that of MWCNT-free monolithic Al 2 O 3 (μ = 0.57). Microstructural observations showed that resultant friction behavior may be related to the smearing of transferred film over the contact area, which was expected to permit easy shear and then help to achieve a lubricating effect during sliding. However, fracture property tests have shown that no improvement of the fracture strength and fracture toughness of the composites was achieved by addition of MWCNTs. It may be mainly due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs and the weak interface between MWCNTs and the Al 2 O 3 matrix

  17. Method for Friction Force Estimation on the Flank of Cutting Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Huerta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction forces are present in any machining process. These forces could play an important role in the dynamics of the system. In the cutting process, friction is mainly present in the rake face and the flank of the tool. Although the one that acts on the rake face has a major influence, the other one can become also important and could take part in the stability of the system. In this work, experimental identification of the friction on the flank is presented. The experimental determination was carried out by machining aluminum samples in a CNC lathe. As a result, two friction functions were obtained as a function of the cutting speed and the relative motion of the contact elements. Experiments using a worn and a new insert were carried out. Force and acceleration were recorded simultaneously and, from these results, different friction levels were observed depending on the cutting parameters, such as cutting speed, feed rate, and tool condition. Finally, a friction model for the flank friction is presented.

  18. Separation of contact in a sliding system with frictionally excited thermoelastic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voldřich J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The first phase of the thermoelastic instability, which is characterized by a full contact regime, can be modelled using Fourier decomposition and application of an analytical description. However, in case of further increase of instability, a separation of the contact occurs which is more difficult to cover by mathematical means. The contribution deals with numerical simulations of the separation. The problems are topical in connection with the disk brakes design, should we give an example.

  19. Method of contacting solids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-08-06

    A continuous method is described for contacting solids and gases. The process involves passing a confined stream of gases through an extended path including a treating zone and imposing a pressure on the stream of gases at least sufficient to overcome the resistence of said path to the flow of said gases. A solid in finely divided form is then introduced into said stream of gases, maintaining a vertical column of finely divided solid in fluidized state of a height which will produce a pressure at the column bottom at least equal to the gas pressure at the point of entry of the solids into the stream. The solids then pass from the bottom of the column into the stream.

  20. Two-Polarisation Physical Model of Bowed Strings with Nonlinear Contact and Friction Forces, and Application to Gesture-Based Sound Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Desvages

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent bowed string sound synthesis has relied on physical modelling techniques; the achievable realism and flexibility of gestural control are appealing, and the heavier computational cost becomes less significant as technology improves. A bowed string sound synthesis algorithm is designed, by simulating two-polarisation string motion, discretising the partial differential equations governing the string’s behaviour with the finite difference method. A globally energy balanced scheme is used, as a guarantee of numerical stability under highly nonlinear conditions. In one polarisation, a nonlinear contact model is used for the normal forces exerted by the dynamic bow hair, left hand fingers, and fingerboard. In the other polarisation, a force-velocity friction curve is used for the resulting tangential forces. The scheme update requires the solution of two nonlinear vector equations. The dynamic input parameters allow for simulating a wide range of gestures; some typical bow and left hand gestures are presented, along with synthetic sound and video demonstrations.

  1. Tribological Properties of Silicone Rubber-Based Ceramizable Composites Destined for Wire Covers. Part II. Studies of Ball-on-Plate, Plate-on-Plate and Ring-on-Plate Friction Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Anyszka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tribological properties of commercially available silicone-based ceramizable composites were studied. Friction forces of three different types of ceramizable composites were measured against three different-shape steel samples. Each friction pair contact was loaded with 15, 30, 45 or 60 N. Conducted studies reveal that tribological behavior of the composites vary considerably depending on the composite type and friction contact. However, friction force was increasing with an increase of the load, which mean that the composites behave accordingly to the classic friction theory.

  2. Method for Predicting Void Ratio and Triaxial Friction Angle from Laboratory CPT at Shallow Depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim André; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    In this report an investigation of the relationship between the tip resistance, qc of a laboratory CPT-probe versus the relative density, Dr and friction angle, ∏ of Aalborg University Sand No. 0 is carried out. A method for estimating the relative density and the triaxial friction angle from...... the cone resistance of the laboratory probe is proposed. The suggested method deals with the fact that the friction angle is depended of the stress level especially at low stresses. The method includes a calibration of the cone resistance from the laboratory CPT at shallow depths i.e. low values of d...

  3. Dealing with friction in a reusable 6 degrees of freedom adjustment mechanism with sliding contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinkhamer, J.F.F.

    2003-01-01

    Although the possibility of a 6 degrees of freedom adjustment based on a single body pulled onto on six adjustable supports follows directly from the kinematic theory, such mechanisms are seldom used in actual products. Two major drawbacks for the use of this solution are: Due to the sliding contact

  4. Dynamic Head-Disk Interface Instabilities With Friction for Light Contact (Surfing) Recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vakis, Antonis I.; Lee, Sung-Chang; Polycarpou, Andreas A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in hard-disk drive technology involve the use of a thermal fly-height control (TFC) pole tip protrusion to bring the read/write recording elements of the slider closer to the disk surface and thus achieve Terabit per square inch recording densities. A dynamic, contact mechanics-based

  5. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Frederick, David Alan

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  6. A two-dimensional finite element method for analysis of solid body contact problems in fuel rod mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissen, K.L.

    1988-06-01

    Two computer codes for the analysis of fuel rod behavior have been developed. Fuel rod mechanics is treated by a two-dimensional, axisymmetric finite element method. The program KONTAKT is used for detailed examinations on fuel rod sections, whereas the second program METHOD2D allows instationary calculations of whole fuel rods. The mechanical contact of fuel and cladding during heating of the fuel rod is very important for it's integrity. Both computer codes use a Newton-Raphson iteration for the solution of the nonlinear solid body contact problem. A constitutive equation is applied for the dependency of contact pressure on normal approach of the surfaces which are assumed to be rough. If friction is present on the contacting surfaces, Coulomb's friction law is used. Code validation is done by comparison with known analytical solutions for special problems. Results of the contact algorithm for an elastic ball pressing against a rigid surface are confronted with Hertzian theory. Influences of fuel-pellet geometry as well as influences of discretisation of displacements and stresses of a single fuel pellet are studied. Contact of fuel and cladding is calculated for a fuel rod section with two fuel pellets. The influence of friction forces between fuel and cladding on their axial expansion is demonstrated. By calculation of deformations and temperatures during an instationary fuel rod experiment of the CABRI-series the feasibility of two-dimensional finite element analysis of whole fuel rods is shown. (orig.) [de

  7. Frictional contact behaviour of the tyre: the effect of tread slip on the in-plane structural deformation and stress field development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotras, Achillefs; Mavros, George

    2010-08-01

    The analysis of the in-plane deformation of the tyre in relation to the frictional contact between the road and the tread is a crucial first step in the understanding of its contribution to the longitudinal dynamics of a vehicle. In this work, the physical mechanism of the generation of the two-dimensional contact pressure distribution for a non-rolling tyre is studied. Towards this aim, a physical tyre model is constructed, consisting of an analytical ring under pretension, a non-linear sidewall foundation, and a discretised foundation of viscoelastic elements representing the tread. Tread behaviour is examined first, with focus on the development of shear micro-slip. The tread simulation is enhanced with the combination of radial and tangential tread elements and the benefits of such an approach are identified. Subsequently, the contact of the complete model is examined by implementing an algorithm for transient simulations in the time domain. The effects of the imposed vertical load and sidewall non-linearity on the contact stress and strain fields are identified. The modelling approach is validated by comparison with published experimental results. The physical mechanism that couples the torsional and horizontal/vertical deformations of the carcass with the frictional forces at the tread is identified and discussed in detail. The proposed modelling approach is found appropriate for the description of the development of the two-dimensional contact pressure field as a function of the frictional potential of the contact.

  8. Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic Method of Friction Stir Weld Assessment, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the project is demonstration of the feasibility of Friction Stir Weld (FSW) assessment by novel Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) method. Time...

  9. Novel friction law for the static friction force based on local precursor slipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Yu; Nakano, Ken; Otsuki, Michio; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2014-09-10

    The sliding of a solid object on a solid substrate requires a shear force that is larger than the maximum static friction force. It is commonly believed that the maximum static friction force is proportional to the loading force and does not depend on the apparent contact area. The ratio of the maximum static friction force to the loading force is called the static friction coefficient µM, which is considered to be a constant. Here, we conduct experiments demonstrating that the static friction force of a slider on a substrate follows a novel friction law under certain conditions. The magnitude of µM decreases as the loading force increases or as the apparent contact area decreases. This behavior is caused by the slip of local precursors before the onset of bulk sliding and is consistent with recent theory. The results of this study will develop novel methods for static friction control.

  10. General predictive model of friction behavior regimes for metal contacts based on the formation stability and evolution of nanocrystalline surface films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argibay, Nicolas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Cheng, Shengfeng [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Sawyer, W. G. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Michael, Joseph R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandross, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The prediction of macro-scale friction and wear behavior based on first principles and material properties has remained an elusive but highly desirable target for tribologists and material scientists alike. Stochastic processes (e.g. wear), statistically described parameters (e.g. surface topography) and their evolution tend to defeat attempts to establish practical general correlations between fundamental nanoscale processes and macro-scale behaviors. We present a model based on microstructural stability and evolution for the prediction of metal friction regimes, founded on recently established microstructural deformation mechanisms of nanocrystalline metals, that relies exclusively on material properties and contact stress models. We show through complementary experimental and simulation results that this model overcomes longstanding practical challenges and successfully makes accurate and consistent predictions of friction transitions for a wide range of contact conditions. This framework not only challenges the assumptions of conventional causal relationships between hardness and friction, and between friction and wear, but also suggests a pathway for the design of higher performance metal alloys.

  11. Development of a New Method to Investigate the Dynamic Friction Behavior of Interfaces Using a Kolsky Tension Bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanborn, B.; Song, B.; Nishida, E.

    2017-01-01

    In order to understand interfacial interaction of a bi-material during an impact loading event, the dynamic friction coefficient is one of the key parameters that must be characterized and quantified. In this study, a new experimental method to determine the dynamic friction coefficient between two metals was developed by using a Kolsky tension bar and a custom-designed friction fixture. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) force sensors were used to measure the normal force applied to the friction tribo pairs and the friction force was measured with conventional Kolsky tension bar method. To evaluate the technique, the dynamic friction coefficient between 4340 steel and 7075-T6 aluminum was investigated at an impact speed of approximately 8 m/s. Additionally, the dynamic friction coefficient of the tribo pairs with varied surface roughness was also investigated. The data suggest that higher surface roughness leads to higher friction coefficients at the same speed of 8 m/s.

  12. Estimation method for first excursion probability of secondary system with impact and friction using maximum response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeru Aoki

    2005-01-01

    The secondary system such as pipings, tanks and other mechanical equipment is installed in the primary system such as building. The important secondary systems should be designed to maintain their function even if they are subjected to destructive earthquake excitations. The secondary system has many nonlinear characteristics. Impact and friction characteristic, which are observed in mechanical supports and joints, are common nonlinear characteristics. As impact damper and friction damper, impact and friction characteristic are used for reduction of seismic response. In this paper, analytical methods of the first excursion probability of the secondary system with impact and friction, subjected to earthquake excitation are proposed. By using the methods, the effects of impact force, gap size and friction force on the first excursion probability are examined. When the tolerance level is normalized by the maximum response of the secondary system without impact or friction characteristics, variation of the first excursion probability is very small for various values of the natural period. In order to examine the effectiveness of the proposed method, the obtained results are compared with those obtained by the simulation method. Some estimation methods for the maximum response of the secondary system with nonlinear characteristics have been developed. (author)

  13. A measurement method for distinguishing the real contact area of rough surfaces of transparent solids using improved Otsu technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Bao-Jiang; Yan Shao-Ze; Xiang Wu-Wei-Kai

    2015-01-01

    An experimental method of measuring the real contact area of transparent blocks based on the principle of total internal reflection is presented, intending to support the investigation of friction characteristics, heat conduction, and energy dissipation at the contact interface. A laser sheet illuminates the contact interface, and the transmitted laser sheet is projected onto a screen. Then the contact information is acquired from the screen by a camera. An improved Otsu method is proposed to process the data of experimental images. It can compute the threshold of the overall image and filter out all the pixels one by one. Through analyzing the experimental results, we describe the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure during a continuous loading process, at different loading rates, with the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) material. A hysteresis phenomenon in the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure is found and explained. (paper)

  14. Stick–slip boundary friction mode as a second-order phase transition with an inhomogeneous distribution of elastic stress in the contact area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iakov A. Lyashenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an investigation of the dynamical contact between two atomically flat surfaces separated by an ultrathin lubricant film. Using a thermodynamic approach we describe the second-order phase transition between two structural states of the lubricant which leads to the stick–slip mode of boundary friction. An analytical description and numerical simulation with radial distributions of the order parameter, stress and strain were performed to investigate the spatial inhomogeneity. It is shown that in the case when the driving device is connected to the upper part of the friction block through an elastic spring, the frequency of the melting/solidification phase transitions increases with time.

  15. Granular contact dynamics using mathematical programming methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhoft, K.; Lyamin, A. V.; Huang, J.

    2012-01-01

    granular contact dynamics formulation uses an implicit time discretization, thus allowing for large time steps. Moreover, in the limit of an infinite time step, the general dynamic formulation reduces to a static formulation that is useful in simulating common quasi-static problems such as triaxial tests...... is developed and it is concluded that the associated sliding rule, in the context of granular contact dynamics, may be viewed as an artifact of the time discretization and that the use of an associated flow rule at the particle scale level generally is physically acceptable. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  16. Contact Stress Analysis for Gears of Different Helix Angle Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Santosh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The gear contact stress problem has been a great point of interest for many years, but still an extensive research is required to understand the various parameters affecting this stress. Among such parameters, helix angle is one which has played a crucial role in variation of contact stress. Numerous studies have been carried out on spur gear for contact stress variation. Hence, the present work is an attempt to study the contact stresses among the helical gear pairs, under static conditions, by using a 3D finite element method. The helical gear pairs on which the analysis is carried are 0, 5, 15, 25 degree helical gear sets. The Lagrange multiplier algorithm has been used between the contacting pairs to determine the stresses. The helical gear contact stress is evaluated using FE model and results have also been found at different coefficient of friction, varying from 0.0 to 0.3. The FE results have been further compared with the analytical calculations. The analytical calculations are based upon Hertz and AGMA equations, which are modified to include helix angle. The commercial finite element software was used in the study and it was shown that this approach can be applied to gear design efficiently. The contact stress results have shown a decreasing trend, with increase in helix angle.

  17. Study on friction behaviour of brake shoe materials for mining hoist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungureanu, M.; Ungureanu, N. S.; Crăciun, I.

    2017-02-01

    The friction coefficient in the brake linkages has an important influence on the braking efficiency and safety of machines. The paper presents a method for the study of the friction coefficient of the friction couple brake shoe-drum for mining hoist. In this context, it is interesting to define the friction coefficient, not just according to the materials in contact, but according to the entire ensemble of tribological factors of the friction couple.

  18. MEMS-based contact stress field measurements at a rough elastomeric layer: local test of Amontons’ friction law in static and steady sliding regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debrégeas G.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of recent friction experiments in which a MEMS-based sensing device is used to measure both the normal and tangential stress fields at the base of a rough elastomer film in frictional contact with smooth, rigid, glass indentors. We consider successively multicontacts under (i static normal loading by a spherical indentor and (ii frictional steady sliding conditions against a cylindrical indentor, for an increasing normal load. In both cases, the measured fields are compared to elastic calculations assuming (i a smooth interface and (ii Amontons’ friction law. In the static case, significant deviations are observed which decrease with increasing load and which vanish when a lubricant is used. In the steady sliding case, Amontons’ law reproduces rather satisfactorily the experiments provided that the normal/tangential coupling at the contact interface is taken into account. We discuss the origin of the difference between the Amontons fields and the measured ones, in particular the effect of the finite normal and tangential compliances of the multicontact interface.

  19. FEM simulation of a friction testing method based on combined forward conical can-backward straight can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakamura, T; Bay, Niels

    1998-01-01

    A new friction testing method based on combined forward conical can-backward straight can extrusion is proposed in order to evaluate friction characteristics in severe metal forming operations. By this method the friction coefficient along the conical punch surface is determined knowing...... the friction coefficient along the die wall. The latter is determined by a combined forward and backward can extrusion of straight cans. Calibration curves determining the relationship between punch travel, can heights, and friction coefficient for the two rests are calculated based on a rigid-plastic FEM...... analysis. Experimental friction tests are carried out in a mechanical press with aluminium alloy A6061 as the workpiece material and different kinds of lubricants. They confirm that the theoretical analysis results irt reasonable values for the friction coefficient....

  20. Energy conversion device and method of reducing friction therein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyeva, Lyudmila Mikhaylovna; Jansson, Kyle S; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim; Zhu, Dong; Milner, Robert; Daughterty, Early Eugene; Higdon, Clifton Baxter; Elagamy, Kamel Abdel-Khalik; Hicks, Aaron Michael

    2013-10-08

    A device configured for converting energy includes a first surface, a second surface configured for moving with respect to the first surface during operation of the device, and a coating disposed on at least one of the first surface and the second surface. The coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy represented by the general formula AlMgB.sub.14--X, wherein X is present in an amount of from 0 to 70 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of the ceramic alloy and is a doping agent selected from the group of Group IV elements and borides and nitrides thereof, and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon in a gradient concentration. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12.

  1. Corrosion behaviour of stainless steels by internal friction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postnikov, V.S.; Kovalevskij, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion of austenite chromium-nickel stainless steels 12 Kh18N9, 12Kh18N9T, 12Kh18N10 and 12Kh18N10T is investigated. Wire samples 0.7...0.8 mm in diameter before tests were subjected to quenching in water from the temperature of 1050...1100 deg C and part of them - to tempering at 650 deg C for 2 h. Pitting corrosion was brought about by different concentration of iron chloride solutions (C FeCl 3 ). Total corrosion has a slight effect on the character of IF (internal friction) variation that increases without the whole test period up to the moment when mechanical strength of the sample

  2. Effect of the Contact Pressure on the Friction Loss Coefficient in a Micro Gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ho Yun; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Yong Bum

    2010-01-01

    As one way to improve the reliability of a steam generator for a sodium-cooled fast reactor, a double-wall tube steam generator is being developed. The current development of the DWTSG focuses on the improvement of heat transfer capability for a double-wall tube and the development of a proper leak detection method for the double-wall tube during the operation of a reactor. In the conventional double wall tubes(DWT), the inner tube and the outer tube are made of the same material. When the temperature difference between the inner tube and the outer tube increases, the heat transfer efficiency decreases. To improve the heat transfer capability of a double wall tube, the inner tube is made of a material with a thermal expansion coefficient which is about 10 to 15% greater than that of the outer tube . For the on-line and real-time detection of whether the heat transfer tube is damaged or not, a detection method was developed by combining the heat transfer tube gaps and the detection holes meeting with a one-to-one correspondence in the lower tubesheet. In the pre-stressed DWT, there is a very small space due to the surface roughness of the inner wall and outer wall. Thus, if the outer wall is broken, the helium gas (2MPa) in the very narrow space is ejected into the sodium (0.1MPa), and if the inner wall is broken, the superheated gas (16.5MPa) is ejected into the space filled with helium gas. If the four grooves with 0.2-04mm depths are dug in the inner surface of the outer wall in order for the helium gas to flow easily, we can detect the leakage by checking the change of gas volume in the online groove

  3. Indentation of an Elastic Half-space by a Rigid Flat Punch as a Model Problem for Analysing Contact Problems with Coulomb Friction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ballard, P.; Jarušek, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 1 (2011), s. 15-52 ISSN 0374-3535 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : elasticity * contact * friction * uniqueness * singularity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.110, year: 2011 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10659-010-9270-9

  4. An experimental study on joining of severe plastic deformed aluminium materials with friction welding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Mumin [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)], E-mail: mumins@trakya.edu.tr; Erol Akata, H.; Ozel, Kaan [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, 5083 aluminium alloys, which were exposed to severe plastic deformation, were joined with friction welding method and the variation in mechanical properties of the joints was experimentally investigated. Severe plastic deformation methods can be classified as equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) (in other words, equal cross section lateral extrusion - ECSLE) and cyclic extrusion-compression. Aluminium alloy as test material 5083 and square cross-sectional equal channel angular pressing die for severe plastic deformation were used in the study. Firstly 5083 alloys, as purchased, were joined with friction welding method. The optimum parameters for friction time, upset time, friction pressure and upset pressure, which are necessary for welding, were obtained. Afterwards, 5083 aluminium materials as purchased were prepared as square cross-section and then 1-pass severe plastic deformation was applied to specimen by equal channel angular pressing die. The obtained parts as square form were prepared as cylindrical form by machining and then the parts were joined by continuous drive friction welding equipment that was designed and produced in laboratory conditions before. Later, the tensile strengths of the parts, obtained at optimum conditions, were compared with those of the joined parts as purchased form. Then, hardness variations and microstructures of joints were examined. Finally, the obtained results were commented on.

  5. METHODS TO MEASURE, PREDICT AND RELATE FRICTION, WEAR AND FUEL ECONOMY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravante, Steve [Ricardo, Inc.; Fenske, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Demas, Nicholas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Erck, Robert [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2018-03-19

    High-fidelity measurements of the coefficient of friction and the parasitic friction power of the power cylinder components have been made for the Isuzu 5.2L 4H on-highway engine. In particular, measurements of the asperity friction coefficient were made with test coupons using Argonne National Lab’s (ANL) reciprocating test rig for the ring-on-liner and skirt-on-liner component pairs. These measurements correlated well with independent measurements made by Electro-Mechanical Associates (EMA). In addition, surface roughness measurements of the Isuzu components were made using white light interferometer (WLI). The asperity friction and surface characterization are key inputs to advanced CAE simulation tools such as RINGPAK and PISDYN which are used to predict the friction power and wear rates of power cylinder components. Finally, motored friction tests were successfully performed to quantify the friction mean effective pressure (FMEP) of the power cylinder components for various oils (High viscosity 15W40, low viscosity 5W20 with friction modifier (FM) and specially blended oil containing consisting of PAO/ZDDP/MoDTC) at 25, 50, and 110 °C. Ricardo's objective is to use this data along with advanced CAE methods to develop empirical characterizations of friction and wear mechanisms in internal combustion engines such that the impact of such mechanisms of engine fuel consumption and/or vehicle fuel economy can be estimated. The value of such predictive schemes is that if one knows how a particular friction reduction technology changes oil viscosity and/or the friction coefficient then the fuel consumption or fuel economy impacts can be estimated without the excessive cost of motored or fired engine tests by utilizing cost effective lab scale tests and in combination with advanced analytical methods. One accomplishment made during this work was the development and validation of a novel technique for quantifying wear using data from WLI through the use of

  6. Underwater sediment-contact radiation survey method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.R.; St. Aubin, M.; Welch, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors are striving to produce a practical system for mapping lateral distributions in gamma activity on submerged sediments. This is in response to the need for quality control and interpretation of data obtainable by sediment sampling and analyses near nuclear utilities. A prototype gamma probe has been constructed and tested. The prototype is essentially a background survey meter packaged in a 53-cm-long x 5.4-cm-diam waterproof vehicle. This usage-shaped vehicle is connected to a cable for towing in contact with bottom sediments of lakes, rivers, and coastal waters. This vehicle, or sediment probe as it is called, was initially developed for measuring sediment electrical conductances, a parameter that can be used to locate underwater areas of groundwater and contaminant upwelling. During towing, the probe does not roll or twist around its longitudinal axis by more than 10 deg, so that sensors, which have been fixed within the vehicle, can be oriented to look up, down, or sideways. In over 450 lin-km of underwater survey, only a single sediment probe has been irretrievably snagged on sunken rocks or other debris. Work in the Ottawa River near the Chalk River Laboratories has shown good agreement among point measurements of river sediment with continuous measurements using the moving probe

  7. Standard test method for measurement of web/roller friction characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the simulation of a roller/web transport tribosystem and the measurement of the static and kinetic coefficient of friction of the web/roller couple when sliding occurs between the two. The objective of this test method is to provide users with web/roller friction information that can be used for process control, design calculations, and for any other function where web/roller friction needs to be known. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Study of Dimple Effect on the Friction Characteristics of a Journal Bearing using Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, A. Amar; Raghunandana, Dr.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of producing dimples using chemically etched techniques or by machining process on the surface of a journal bearing bushing to reduce the friction using Taguchi method is investigated. The data used in the present analysis is based on the results obtained by the series of experiments conducted to study the dimples effect on the Stribeck curve. It is statistically proved that producing dimples on the bushing surface of a journal bearing has significant effect on the friction coefficient when used with light oils. Also it is seen that there is an interaction effect between speeds-load and load-dimples. Hence the interaction effect, which are usually neglected should be considered during actual experiments that significantly contributes in reducing the friction in mixed lubrication regime. The experiments, if were conducted after Taguchi method, then the number of experiments would have been reduced to half of the actual set of experiments that were essentially conducted.

  9. A new theory for the static contact between rough, unmated surfaces in non-elastically deforming rock and its implications for rock friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stesky, R. M.; Hannan, S. S.

    The closure behavior of fractures in marble and alabaster is markedly different from that in quartzite. The aperture decreases considerably more under normal stress and remains permanently reduced, for the same ratio of normal stress to unconfined compressive strength. Also, a larger permanent relative contact area develops between the surfaces of marble and alabaster than it does between surfaces of quartzite. The permanent contact area increases at an increasing rate with normal stress in marble and alabaster, unlike the nearly linear increase in quartzite. The failure of surface asperities of calcite and gypsum during closure accounts for these differences. We modeled this process by considering the surfaces to consist of paraboloids lying on a flat plane and having a range of initial heights. Closure occurs by pressing a plane rigid surface against the 'hills', flattening their peaks, keeping the base area of the hills constant. To allow for a changing resistance to deformation, the contact stress is assumed to vary linearly with the shortening strain, to a first approximation. This model was tested against measurements of fracture closure and contact area of rough surfaces of calcite marble with a known initial height distribution of surface peaks. The fit to the data is quite good. In all cases, the model shows that closure is accompanied by a decrease in contact strength of deforming asperities, suggested also by the cataclastic deformation observed petrographically. The number of contact spots and the total length of contact seen in profile are also reasonably well modeled. These results have important implications for our understanding of frictional strength of fractures. The overall resistance to shear along rough surfaces depends upon the product of the shear strength and true area of the contacts, both of which are affected by normal stress. Application of this model approach shows that the initial frictional resistance of some fractures in ductile

  10. Visual method for detecting critical damage in railway contact strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judek, S.; Skibicki, J.

    2018-05-01

    Ensuring an uninterrupted supply of power in the electric traction is vital for the safety of this important transport system. For this purpose, monitoring and diagnostics of the technical condition of the vehicle’s power supply elements are becoming increasingly common. This paper presents a new visual method for detecting contact strip damage, based on measurement and analysis of the movement of the overhead contact line (OCL) wire. A measurement system configuration with a 2D camera was proposed. The experimental method has shown that contact strips damage can be detected by transverse displacement signal analysis. It has been proven that the velocity signal numerically established on that basis has a comparable level in the case of identical damage, regardless of its location on the surface of the contact strip. The proposed method belongs to the group of contact-less measurements, so it does not require interference with the structure of the catenary network nor the mounting of sensors in its vicinity. Measurement of displacements of the contact wire in 2D space makes it possible to combine the functions of existing diagnostic stands assessing the correctness of the mean contact force control adjustment of the current collector with the elements of the contact strip diagnostics, which involves detecting their damage which may result in overhead contact line rupture.

  11. Numerical analysis for the stick-slip vibration of a transversely moving beam in contact with a frictional wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hong-In; Chung, Jintai

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical analysis for the stick-slip vibration of a transversely moving beam, considering both stick-slip transition and friction force discontinuity. The dynamic state of the beam was separated into the stick state and the slip state, and boundary conditions were defined for both. By applying the finite element method, two matrix-vector equations were derived: one for stick state and the other for slip state. However, the equations have different degrees of freedom depending on whether the end of a beam sticks or slips, so we encountered difficulties in time integration. To overcome the difficulties, we proposed a new numerical technique to alternatively use the matrix-vector equations with different matrix sizes. In addition, to eliminate spurious high-frequency responses, we applied the generalized-α time integration method with appropriate value of high-frequency numerical dissipation. Finally, the dynamic responses of stick-slip vibration were analyzed in time and frequency domains: the dynamic behavior of the beam was explained to facilitate understanding of the stick-slip motion, and frequency characteristics of the stick-slip vibration were investigated in relation to the natural frequencies of the beam. The effects of the axial load and the moving speed upon the dynamic response were also examined.

  12. An asymptotic preserving multidimensional ALE method for a system of two compressible flows coupled with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino, S.; Labourasse, E.; Morel, G.

    2018-06-01

    We present a multidimensional asymptotic preserving scheme for the approximation of a mixture of compressible flows. Fluids are modelled by two Euler systems of equations coupled with a friction term. The asymptotic preserving property is mandatory for this kind of model, to derive a scheme that behaves well in all regimes (i.e. whatever the friction parameter value is). The method we propose is defined in ALE coordinates, using a Lagrange plus remap approach. This imposes a multidimensional definition and analysis of the scheme.

  13. A NEW METHOD OF CHANNEL FRICTION INVERSION BASED ON KALMAN FILTER WITH UNKNOWN PARAMETER VECTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wei-ping; MAO Gen-hai; LIU Guo-hua

    2005-01-01

    Channel friction is an important parameter in hydraulic analysis.A channel friction parameter inversion method based on Kalman Filter with unknown parameter vector is proposed.Numerical simulations indicate that when the number of monitoring stations exceeds a critical value, the solution is hardly affected.In addition, Kalman Filter with unknown parameter vector is effective only at unsteady state.For the nonlinear equations, computations of sensitivity matrices are time-costly.Two simplified measures can reduce computing time, but not influence the results.One is to reduce sensitivity matrix analysis time, the other is to substitute for sensitivity matrix.

  14. Effect of fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayer films on sidewall adhesion and friction of surface micromachines with impacting and sliding contact interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, H.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2013-01-01

    A self-assembled monolayer film consisting of fluoro-octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) was vapor-phase deposited on Si(100) substrates and polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) surface micromachines. The hydrophobic behavior and structural composition of the FOTS film deposited on Si(100) were investigated by goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effects of contact pressure, relative humidity, temperature, and impact/sliding cycles on the adhesive and friction behavior of uncoated and FOTS-coated polysilicon micromachines (referred to as the Si and FOTS/Si micromachines, respectively) were investigated under controlled loading and environmental conditions. FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated much lower and stable adhesion than Si micromachines due to the highly hydrophobic and conformal FOTS film. Contrary to Si micromachines, sidewall adhesion of FOTS/Si micromachines demonstrated a weak dependence on relative humidity, temperature, and impact cycles. In addition, FOTS/Si micromachines showed low and stable adhesion and low static friction for significantly more sliding cycles than Si micromachines. The adhesive and static friction characteristics of Si and FOTS/Si micromachines are interpreted in the context of physicochemical surface changes, resulting in the increase of the real area of contact and a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition of the surface chemical characteristics caused by nanoscale surface smoothening and the removal of the organic residue (Si micromachines) or the FOTS film (FOTS/Si micromachines) during repetitive impact and oscillatory sliding of the sidewall surfaces.

  15. The mechanism and universal scaling law of the contact line friction for the Cassie-state droplets on nanostructured ultrahydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2018-04-05

    Besides the Wenzel state, liquid droplets on micro/nanostructured surfaces can stay in the Cassie state and consequently exhibit intriguing characteristics such as a large contact angle, small contact angle hysteresis and exceptional mobility. Here we report molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the wetting dynamics of Cassie-state water droplets on nanostructured ultrahydrophobic surfaces with an emphasis on the genesis of the contact line friction (CLF). From an ab initio perspective, CLF can be ascribed to the collective effect of solid-liquid retarding and viscous damping. Solid-liquid retarding is related to the work of adhesion, whereas viscous damping arises from the viscous force exerted on the liquid molecules within the three-phase (liquid/vapor/solid) contact zone. In this work, a universal scaling law is derived to generalize the CLF on nanostructured ultrahydrophobic surfaces. With the decreasing fraction of solid-liquid contact (i.e., the solid fraction), CLF for a Cassie-state droplet gets enhanced due to the fact that viscous damping is counter-intuitively intensified while solid-liquid retarding remains unchanged. Nevertheless, the overall friction between a Cassie-state droplet and the structured surface is indeed reduced since the air cushion formed in the interstices of the surface roughness underneath the Cassie-state droplet applies negligible resistance to the contact line. Our results have revealed the genesis of CLF from an ab initio perspective, demonstrated the effects of surface structures on a moving contact line and justified the critical role of CLF in the analysis of wetting-related situations.

  16. An analytical method for computing atomic contact areas in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-15

    We propose a new analytical method for detecting and computing contacts between atoms in biomolecules. It is based on the alpha shape theory and proceeds in three steps. First, we compute the weighted Delaunay triangulation of the union of spheres representing the molecule. In the second step, the Delaunay complex is filtered to derive the dual complex. Finally, contacts between spheres are collected. In this approach, two atoms i and j are defined to be in contact if their centers are connected by an edge in the dual complex. The contact areas between atom i and its neighbors are computed based on the caps formed by these neighbors on the surface of i; the total area of all these caps is partitioned according to their spherical Laguerre Voronoi diagram on the surface of i. This method is analytical and its implementation in a new program BallContact is fast and robust. We have used BallContact to study contacts in a database of 1551 high resolution protein structures. We show that with this new definition of atomic contacts, we generate realistic representations of the environments of atoms and residues within a protein. In particular, we establish the importance of nonpolar contact areas that complement the information represented by the accessible surface areas. This new method bears similarity to the tessellation methods used to quantify atomic volumes and contacts, with the advantage that it does not require the presence of explicit solvent molecules if the surface of the protein is to be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Standard test method for conducting friction tests of piston ring and cylinder liner materials under lubricated conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for conducting laboratory bench-scale friction tests of materials, coatings, and surface treatments intended for use in piston rings and cylinder liners in diesel or spark-ignition engines. The goal of this procedure is to provide a means for preliminary, cost-effective screening or evaluation of candidate ring and liner materials. A reciprocating sliding arrangement is used to simulate the contact that occurs between a piston ring and its mating liner near the top-dead-center position in the cylinder where liquid lubrication is least effective, and most wear is known to occur. Special attention is paid to specimen alignment, running-in, and lubricant condition. 1.2 This test method does not purport to simulate all aspects of a fired engine’s operating environment, but is intended to serve as a means for preliminary screening for assessing the frictional characteristics of candidate piston ring and liner material combinations in the presence of fluids that behave as u...

  18. Linear least-squares method for global luminescent oil film skin friction field analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekjin; Nonomura, Taku; Asai, Keisuke; Liu, Tianshu

    2018-06-01

    A data analysis method based on the linear least-squares (LLS) method was developed for the extraction of high-resolution skin friction fields from global luminescent oil film (GLOF) visualization images of a surface in an aerodynamic flow. In this method, the oil film thickness distribution and its spatiotemporal development are measured by detecting the luminescence intensity of the thin oil film. From the resulting set of GLOF images, the thin oil film equation is solved to obtain an ensemble-averaged (steady) skin friction field as an inverse problem. In this paper, the formulation of a discrete linear system of equations for the LLS method is described, and an error analysis is given to identify the main error sources and the relevant parameters. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the accuracy of the LLS method and the effects of the image patterns, image noise, and sample numbers on the results in comparison with the previous snapshot-solution-averaging (SSA) method. An experimental case is shown to enable the comparison of the results obtained using conventional oil flow visualization and those obtained using both the LLS and SSA methods. The overall results show that the LLS method is more reliable than the SSA method and the LLS method can yield a more detailed skin friction topology in an objective way.

  19. Some adjustments to the human capital and the friction cost methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targoutzidis, Antonis

    2018-03-21

    The cost of lost output is a major component of the total cost of illness estimates, especially those for the cost of workplace accidents and diseases. The two main methods for estimating this output, namely the human capital and the friction cost method, lead to very different results, particularly for cases of long-term absence, which makes the choice of method a critical dilemma. Two hidden assumptions, one for each method, are identified in this paper: for human capital method, the assumption that had the accident not happened the individual would remain alive, healthy and employed until retirement, and for friction cost method, the assumption that any created vacancy is covered by an unemployed person. Relevant adjustments to compensate for their impact are proposed: (a) to depreciate the estimates of the human capital method for the risks of premature death, disability or unemployment and (b) to multiply the estimates of the friction cost method with the expected number of job shifts that will be caused by a disability. The impact of these adjustments on the final estimates is very important in terms of magnitude and can lead to better results for each method.

  20. Acoustics of friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  1. Review of modern methods for continuous friction measurement on airfield pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowski, Paweł; Blacha, Krzysztof; Wesołowski, Mariusz

    2018-05-01

    The safety of traffic, including both road and air traffic on a ground manoeuvre area, depends on many factors. These mainly include the anti-slip properties of a road or airfield pavement on which the traffic takes place. The basic pavement parameter that determines its characteristics in terms of anti-slip properties is the skid resistance, which constitutes the ratio of the wheel downforce and the friction on the contact surface. There are currently many devices for continuous measurement of the skid resistance (Continuous Friction-Measuring Equipment - CFME) around the world. Most of them, in principle, do not vary much from one another. Most of the devices measure the measuring wheel’s downforce on the pavement and the friction on the wheel-pavement contact surface. The skid resistance is the result of this measurement. The devices vary in many aspects, such as the type and size of the used measuring tyre, pavement-wheel slip or tyre pressure. This does not mean that the results obtained from various devices mbe directly compared. On the other hand, each device allows determining the pavement’s anti-slip conditions in terms of the requirements specified for the given type of devices, thereby enabling pavement classification in these terms. The classification allows for comparing the results obtained from various measuring devices. The paper presents an overview of equipment used in Poland and around the world to measure the skid resistance on airfield pavements. The authors draw attention to the requirements for pavements in terms of their roughness, with division into road and airfield pavements.

  2. Theoretical Analysis of Unit Friction Force Working on the Metal Contact Surface with the Roll Change during Feedstock with Non-Uniform Temperature Distribution Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sygut P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of theoretical studies influence of non-uniform temperature distribution along the feedstock length to the unit friction force working on the metal contact surface with the roll change during the round bars 70 mm in diameter continuous rolling process. This value is one of the major factors affecting the grooves wear during the rolling process. The studies were carried out based on the actual engineering data for 160 × 160 mm square cross-section feedstock of steel S355J0. Numerical modelling of the rolling process was performed using Forge2008®, a finite-element based computer program.

  3. An overview of the formulation, existence and uniqueness issues for the initial value problem raised by the dynamics of discrete systems with unilateral contact and dry friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Patrick; Charles, Alexandre

    2018-03-01

    In the end of the seventies, Schatzman and Moreau undertook to revisit the venerable dynamics of rigid bodies with contact and dry friction in the light of more recent mathematics. One claimed objective was to reach, for the first time, a mathematically consistent formulation of an initial value problem associated with the dynamics. The purpose of this article is to make a review of the today state-of-art concerning not only the formulation, but also the issues of existence and uniqueness of solution. xml:lang="fr"

  4. Experimental Methods for Implementing Graphene Contacts to Finite Bandgap Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob

    Present Ph.D. thesis describes my work on implanting graphene as electrical contact to finite bandgap semiconductors. Different transistor architectures, types of graphene and finite bandgap semiconductors have been employed. The device planned from the beginning of my Ph.D. fellowship...... contacts to semiconductor nanowires, more specifically, epitaxially grown InAs nanowires. First, we tried a top down method where CVD graphene was deposited on substrate supported InAs nanowires followed by selective graphene ashing to define graphene electrodes. While electrical contact between...

  5. Application of a non-dynamometric method to the measurement of the coefficient of static friction in cold and hot water between stainless steel and two alloys of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agraives, B.C.; Toornvliet, J.

    1977-01-01

    A method is proposed to perform comparative measurements of the coefficient of friction, either in cold water (25 0 C) or in hot pressurized water (240 0 C). For the purpose, a pin-on-disc tribometer, working with no force transducer, in which the coefficient of friction μ is measured through an angle 0, and given by μ=K sin 0 is used. The method is presently applied to the determination of the incipient friction along a distance of few millimetres. At low speed (1 mm/s) and with light contacts loads (from 50 to 150 g), two different friction mechanisms are observed for the following couples of materials; Zircalloy 2/304L stainless steel, Zirconium Niobium 2.5/304L stainless steel, 304L stainless steel/304L stainless steel. The first mechanism, which is observed essentially in cold conditions, is characterized by a regular sliding since friction starts, whereas the second appears mostly in hot conditions and shows peaks of friction with irregular and scattered values of μ. These two mechanisms seem to be related to intermetallic affinity of the mating materials, and also to the existence of preoxydized surface layers, and, to a large extent, to the change in the water viscosity. In such conditions, it appears that it is not possible to replace friction experiments in hot water by easier experiments in cold water

  6. A study on the determination of diffusion coefficient of carbon in 304 austenitic stainless steels by internal friction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.S.; Kim, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Internal friction peaks associated with the presence of carbon in 18-8 type 304 stainless steel have been observed from measurements with a torsion pendulum. The temperature for maximum internal friction lies between 250degC and 300degC with a frequency of vibration. The height of the peak rises and the position of the peak shifts to a lower temperature with an increase of the carbon content. And a comparison of the activation energy and the diffusion coefficient determined by internal friction methods with those measured in conventional macro-diffusion experiments reveals that the diffusion data measured by internal friction method and the diffusion data measured by conventional method exist in the same line. It follows from the above fact that observed internal friction peak is associated with the stress-induced diffusion of carbon in face-centered cubic alloys. (Author)

  7. Method and apparatus for high-efficiency direct contact condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathan, Desikan; Parent, Yves; Hassani, A. Vahab

    1999-01-01

    A direct contact condenser having a downward vapor flow chamber and an upward vapor flow chamber, wherein each of the vapor flow chambers includes a plurality of cooling liquid supplying pipes and a vapor-liquid contact medium disposed thereunder to facilitate contact and direct heat exchange between the vapor and cooling liquid. The contact medium includes a plurality of sheets arranged to form vertical interleaved channels or passageways for the vapor and cooling liquid streams. The upward vapor flow chamber also includes a second set of cooling liquid supplying pipes disposed beneath the vapor-liquid contact medium which operate intermittently in response to a pressure differential within the upward vapor flow chamber. The condenser further includes separate wells for collecting condensate and cooling liquid from each of the vapor flow chambers. In alternate embodiments, the condenser includes a cross-current flow chamber and an upward flow chamber, a plurality of upward flow chambers, or a single upward flow chamber. The method of use of the direct contact condenser of this invention includes passing a vapor stream sequentially through the downward and upward vapor flow chambers, where the vapor is condensed as a result of heat exchange with the cooling liquid in the contact medium. The concentration of noncondensable gases in the resulting condensate-liquid mixtures can be minimized by controlling the partial pressure of the vapor, which depends in part upon the geometry of the vapor-liquid contact medium. In another aspect of this invention, the physical and chemical performance of a direct contact condenser can be predicted based on the vapor and coolant compositions, the condensation conditions. and the geometric properties of the contact medium.

  8. Contact mechanics of polyolefins: effect of pre-stretch on the frictional response and the onset of wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijmans, S.F.S.P.; Anderson, P.D.; van Breemen, L.C.A.; Crosby, A.J.; Govaert, L.E.

    2018-01-01

    As a result of processing history, polymer products are, more often than not, anisotropic. In this work, single-asperity sliding friction experiments are used to characterize the tribology of semi-crystalline polymer films. We show the improved scratch resistance of oriented isotactic polypropylene

  9. Numerical methods for two-phase flow with contact lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Clauido

    2012-07-01

    This thesis focuses on numerical methods for two-phase flows, and especially flows with a moving contact line. Moving contact lines occur where the interface between two fluids is in contact with a solid wall. At the location where both fluids and the wall meet, the common continuum descriptions for fluids are not longer valid, since the dynamics around such a contact line are governed by interactions at the molecular level. Therefore the standard numerical continuum models have to be adjusted to handle moving contact lines. In the main part of the thesis a method to manipulate the position and the velocity of a contact line in a two-phase solver, is described. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using an explicit finite difference method on a staggered grid. The position of the interface is tracked with the level set method and the discontinuities at the interface are treated in a sharp manner with the ghost fluid method. The contact line is tracked explicitly and its dynamics can be described by an arbitrary function. The key part of the procedure is to enforce a coupling between the contact line and the Navier-Stokes equations as well as the level set method. Results for different contact line models are presented and it is demonstrated that they are in agreement with analytical solutions or results reported in the literature.The presented Navier-Stokes solver is applied as a part in a multiscale method to simulate capillary driven flows. A relation between the contact angle and the contact line velocity is computed by a phase field model resolving the micro scale dynamics in the region around the contact line. The relation of the microscale model is then used to prescribe the dynamics of the contact line in the macro scale solver. This approach allows to exploit the scale separation between the contact line dynamics and the bulk flow. Therefore coarser meshes can be applied for the macro scale flow solver compared to global phase field simulations

  10. FRICTION TORQUE IN THE SLIDE BEARINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONDARENKO L. N.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Problem statement. Until now slide bearings are used widely in engineering. But the calculation is made on obsolete method that is based on undetermined parameters such as wear of the bearing shell. It is accepted in the literature that if the shaft and liner material are homogeneous, the workpiece surface are cylindrical as they wear and contact between them occurs at all points contact arc. Research objective. The purpose of this study is determine a friction torque in the slide bearings of power-basis parameters. Conclusions. Since the friction is primarily responsible for wear of cinematic pairs “pin – liner” and “pivot – liner” slide bearings. It is shown that the friction torquesof angles wrap, that are obtained by the formulas and given in literature, are not only qualitatively but also quantitatively, namely, the calculation by literature to the formulas the friction torques are proportional to the angle wrap and the calculation by improved formulas the friction torques are inversely proportional to the angle wrap due to the reduction the normal pressure. Underreporting friction torque at large angle wrap is between 40 and 15 %. The difference in the magnitude of friction torque in the run-in and run-out cinematic pairs with real method of machining is 2...3 %, which it is possible to declare of reducing the finish of contacting surface of slide bearings.

  11. Comparison of ALE finite element method and adaptive smoothed finite element method for the numerical simulation of friction stir welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stelt, A.A.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Quak, W.; Akkerman, Remko; Huetink, Han; Menary, G

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the material flow around the pin during friction stir welding (FSW) is simulated using a 2D plane strain model. A pin rotates without translation in a disc with elasto-viscoplastic material properties and the outer boundary of the disc is clamped. Two numerical methods are used to

  12. Isogeometric frictionless contact analysis with the third medium method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, R.; Nguyen-Thanh, N.; Wriggers, P.; De Lorenzis, L.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an isogeometric formulation for frictionless contact between deformable bodies, based on the recently proposed concept of the third medium. This concept relies on continuum formulations not only for the contacting bodies but also for a fictitious intermediate medium in which the bodies can move and interact. Key to the formulation is a suitable definition of the constitutive behavior of the third medium. In this work, based on a number of numerical tests, the role of the material parameters of the third medium is systematically assessed. We also assess the rate of spatial convergence for higher-order discretizations, stemming from the regularization of the non-smooth contact problem inherent to the third medium approach. Finally, problems with self contact are considered and turn out to be an attractive application of the method.

  13. Suggested Research Method for Testing Selected Tribological Properties of Friction Components in Vehicle Braking Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borawski Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The braking system is one of the most important systems in any vehicle. Its proper functioning may determine the health and life the people inside the vehicle as well as other road users. Therefore, it is important that the parameters which characterise the functioning of brakes changed as little as possible throughout their lifespan. Multiple instances of heating and cooling of the working components of the brake system as well as the environment they work in may impact their tribological properties. This article describes a method of evaluating the coefficient of friction and the wear speed of abrasive wear of friction working components of brakes. The methodology was developed on the basis of Taguchi’s method of process optimization.

  14. A new solution method for wheel/rail rolling contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Song, Hua; Fu, Lihua; Wang, Meng; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problem of wheel/rail rolling contact of nonlinear steady-state curving, a three-dimensional transient finite element (FE) model is developed by the explicit software ANSYS/LS-DYNA. To improve the solving speed and efficiency, an explicit-explicit order solution method is put forward based on analysis of the features of implicit and explicit algorithm. The solution method was first applied to calculate the pre-loading of wheel/rail rolling contact with explicit algorithm, and then the results became the initial conditions in solving the dynamic process of wheel/rail rolling contact with explicit algorithm as well. Simultaneously, the common implicit-explicit order solution method is used to solve the FE model. Results show that the explicit-explicit order solution method has faster operation speed and higher efficiency than the implicit-explicit order solution method while the solution accuracy is almost the same. Hence, the explicit-explicit order solution method is more suitable for the wheel/rail rolling contact model with large scale and high nonlinearity.

  15. Relationship between the real contact area and contact force in pre-sliding regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Baojiang; Yan Shaoze

    2017-01-01

    The pre-sliding regime is typically neglected in the dynamic modelling of mechanical systems. However, the change in contact state caused by static friction may decrease positional accuracy and control precision. To investigate the relationship between contact status and contact force in pre-sliding friction, an optical experimental method is presented in this paper. With this method, the real contact state at the interface of a transparent material can be observed based on the total reflection principle of light by using an image processing technique. A novel setup, which includes a pair of rectangular trapezoidal blocks, is proposed to solve the challenging issue of accurately applying different tangential and normal forces to the contact interface. The improved Otsu’s method is used for measurement. Through an experimental study performed on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), the quantity of contact asperities is proven to be the dominant factor that affects the real contact area. The relationship between the real contact area and the contact force in the pre-sliding regime is studied, and the distribution of static friction at the contact interface is qualitatively discussed. New phenomena in which the real contact area expands along with increasing static friction are identified. The aforementioned relationship is approximately linear at the contact interface under a constant normal pressure, and the distribution of friction stress decreases from the leading edge to the trailing edge. (paper)

  16. Computational Methods for Nonlinear Dynamics Problems in Solid and Structural Mechanics: Models of Dynamic Frictional Phenomena in Metallic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-31

    Martins, J.A.C. and Campos , L.T. [1986], "Existence and Local Uniqueness of Solutions to Contact Problems in Elasticity with Nonlinear Friction...noisy and ttoubl esome vibt.t4ons. If the sound generated by the friction-induced oscillations of Rviolin strings may be the delight of all music lovers...formulation. See 0den and Martins - [1985] and Rabier, Martins, Oden and Campos [1986]. - It is now simple to show, in a 6o’uman manner, that, for

  17. Effects of Material Combinations on Friction and Wear of PEEK/Steel Pairs under Oil-Lubricated Sliding Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagaki, T.; Nakamura, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Kawabata, M.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of material combinations on the friction and wear of PEEK/steel pairs are studied using blocks on a ring wear tester under oil-lubricated conditions. The rings are made of forged steel (SF540A) and a PEEK composite filled with 30 wt% carbon fibre. The surface roughness is 0.15 and 0.32 μm Ra, respectively. The blocks are also made of the same materials as the rings: the forged steel and the PEEK composite. Finished with an emery paper of #600, the surface roughness is 0.06 and 0.23 μm Ra, respectively. Sliding tests for 4 combinations of two materials are conducted. The load is increased up to 1177 N at 1 N s-1. The sliding velocity is varied in the range of 10 to 19 m s-1. In some cases, the ring temperature is measured with a thermocouple with a diameter of 0.5 mm, located 1 mm below the frictional surface. Results indicate that the forged steel’s ring and the PEEK composite’s block is the best combination among 4 combinations, because seizure does not occur under the increasing load up to 1177 N at the sliding velocity of 10-19 m s-1. In contrast, seizure occurs at 15 and 19 m s-1 in the other three combinations. However, the PEEK composite’s ring shows a lower friction coefficient as compared to the forged steel’s ring, when seizure does not occur. Wear scars are observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The seizure mechanisms are then discussed.

  18. Theoretical prediction of hysteretic rubber friction in ball on plate configuration by finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper has investigated theoretically the influence of sliding speed and temperature on the hysteretic friction in case of a smooth, reciprocating steel ball sliding on smooth rubber plate by finite element method (FEM. Generalized Maxwell-models combined with Mooney-Rivlin model have been used to describe the material behaviour of the ethylenepropylene-diene-monomer (EPDM rubber studied. Additionally, the effect of the technique applied at the parameter identification of the material model and the number of Maxwell elements on the coefficient of friction (COF was also investigated. Finally, the open parameter of the Greenwood-Tabor analytical model has been determined from a fit to the FE results. By fitting, as usual, the Maxwell-model to the storage modulus master curve the predicted COF, in a broad frequency range, will be underestimated even in case of 40-term Maxwell-model. To obtain more accurate numerical prediction or to provide an upper limit for the hysteretic friction, in the interesting frequency range, the Maxwell parameters should be determined, as proposed, from a fit to the measured loss factor master curve. This conclusion can be generalized for all the FE simulations where the hysteresis plays an important role.

  19. Literature survey on microscopic friction modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand contact and friction conditions, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed in order to take microscopic dependencies into account. Friction is developed on microscopic level by adhesion between contacting asperities, the ploughing effect between asperities and the

  20. Nondestructive online testing method for friction stir welding using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levikhina, Anastasiya

    2017-12-01

    The paper reviews the possibility of applying the method of acoustic emission for online monitoring of the friction stir welding process. It is shown that acoustic emission allows the detection of weld defects and their location in real time. The energy of an acoustic signal and the median frequency are suggested to be used as informative parameters. The method of calculating the median frequency with the use of a short time Fourier transform is applied for the identification of correlations between the defective weld structure and properties of the acoustic emission signals received during welding.

  1. Chemical origins of frictional aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2012-11-02

    Although the basic laws of friction are simple enough to be taught in elementary physics classes and although friction has been widely studied for centuries, in the current state of knowledge it is still not possible to predict a friction force from fundamental principles. One of the highly debated topics in this field is the origin of static friction. For most macroscopic contacts between two solids, static friction will increase logarithmically with time, a phenomenon that is referred to as aging of the interface. One known reason for the logarithmic growth of static friction is the deformation creep in plastic contacts. However, this mechanism cannot explain frictional aging observed in the absence of roughness and plasticity. Here, we discover molecular mechanisms that can lead to a logarithmic increase of friction based purely on interfacial chemistry. Predictions of our model are consistent with published experimental data on the friction of silica.

  2. A hybrid filtering method based on a novel empirical mode decomposition for friction signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chengwei; Zhan, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    During a measurement, the measured signal usually contains noise. To remove the noise and preserve the important feature of the signal, we introduce a hybrid filtering method that uses a new intrinsic mode function (NIMF) and a modified Hausdorff distance. The NIMF is defined as the difference between the noisy signal and each intrinsic mode function (IMF), which is obtained by empirical mode decomposition (EMD), ensemble EMD, complementary ensemble EMD, or complete ensemble EMD with adaptive noise (CEEMDAN). The relevant mode selecting is based on the similarity between the first NIMF and the rest of the NIMFs. With this filtering method, the EMD and improved versions are used to filter the simulation and friction signals. The friction signal between an airplane tire and the runaway is recorded during a simulated airplane touchdown and features spikes of various amplitudes and noise. The filtering effectiveness of the four hybrid filtering methods are compared and discussed. The results show that the filtering method based on CEEMDAN outperforms other signal filtering methods. (paper)

  3. The friction influence on stress in micro extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piwnik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of metallic parts by forming methods is industrially widespread due to high production rate, high accuracy, dimension’s and shape’s repeatability and good surface quality. The application of metal extrusion methods for the production of micro parts is possible, but there are some technological problems caused by small dimensions. Size effect is appearing. One of size effect symptom in micro extrusion, is a significant influence of rough contact between workpiece and tool while processing. In the case of rough contact without friction, material flows in the vicinity of the die surface. In order to explain more accurately a friction distribution in this area, the plastic wave friction model is proposed. This paper analyses specifications of a metal extrusion in micro scale. Using the friction model, a substitute friction shear factor mz and its influence on extrusion loading curves is determined in relationship to size of asperities.

  4. Method of reducing tungsten selectivity to a contact sidewall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.C.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method for forming a contact plug on a surface of a semiconductor body. It comprises: forming a dielectric layer over the surface of the semiconductor body, the dielectric layer having an aperture therethrough with sidewalls comprising silicon nitride; depositing a metal into the aperture in such a manner that the metal deposits upon the silicon nitride of the sidewalls of the aperture at a substantially greater rate than upon the surface of the dielectric layer

  5. Method for producing ceramic composition having low friction coefficient at high operating temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, Jr., James

    1988-01-01

    A method for producing a stable ceramic composition having a surface with a low friction coefficient and high wear resistance at high operating temperatures. A first deposition of a thin film of a metal ion is made upon the surface of the ceramic composition and then a first ion implantation of at least a portion of the metal ion is made into the near surface region of the composition. The implantation mixes the metal ion and the ceramic composition to form a near surface composite. The near surface composite is then oxidized sufficiently at high oxidizing temperatures to form an oxide gradient layer in the surface of the ceramic composition.

  6. Comparison of the surface friction model with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froebrich, P.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison is made between the classical phenomenological surface friction model and a time-dependent Hartree-Fock study by Dhar for the system 208 Pb+ 74 Ge at E/sub lab/(Pb) = 1600 MeV. The general trends for energy loss, mean values for charge and mass, interaction times and energy-angle correlations turn out to be fairly similar in both methods. However, contrary to Dhar, the events close to capture are interpreted as normal deep-inelastic, i.e., not as fast fission processes

  7. Characterization of the dynamic friction of woven fabrics: Experimental methods and benchmark results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, Ulrich; Akkerman, Remko; Fetfatsidis, K.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Schumacher, J.; Ziegmann, G.; Allaoui, S.; Hivet, G.; Maron, B.; Vanclooster, K.; Lomov, S.V.

    2014-01-01

    A benchmark exercise was conducted to compare various friction test set-ups with respect to the measured coefficients of friction. The friction was determined between Twintex®PP, a fabric of commingled yarns of glass and polypropylene filaments, and a metal surface. The same material was supplied to

  8. The Effect of Various Ligation Methods on Friction in Sliding Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Slide modules produce least friction followed by loose SS ligation, slick modules, regular modules, tight SS ligation and highest friction was produced by regular modules tied in a ′figure of 8′ pattern. Width of bracket had no influence on friction produced.

  9. Effect of ecological surface treatment method on friction strength properties of nettle (urtica dioica) fibre yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şansal, S.; Mıstık, S. I.; Fettahov, R.; Ovalı, S.; Duman, M.

    2017-10-01

    Over the last few decades, more attention is given to lignocellulose based fibres as reinforcement material in the polymer composites owing to the environmental pollution caused by the extensive usage of synthetic and inorganic fibres. Developing new natural fibre reinforced composites is the focus of many researches nowadays. They are made from renewable resources and they have less environmental effect in comparison to inorganic fibre reinforced composites. The interest of consumers in eco-friendly natural fibres and textiles has increased in recent years. Unlike inorganic fibres, natural fibres present light weight, high strength/density ratio and are readily available, environmentally friendly and biodegradable. Many different types of natural fibres are exploited for the production of biodegradable polymer composites. The nettle (Urtica dioica L.) is a well-known plant growing on rural sites of Europe, Asia, and North America. Nettle plant contains fibre similar to hemp and flax. However, similar to other natural fibres, nettle fibres are poorly compatible with the thermoplastic matrix of composites, due to their hydrophilic character which reduces mechanical properties of nettle fibre reinforced thermoplastics. In order to improve the fibrematrix adhesion of the natural fibre reinforced composites, surface treatment processes are applied to the lignocellulose fibres. In this study nettle (urtica dioica) fibre yarns were treated with NaOH by using conventional, ultrasonic and microwave energy methods. After treatment processes tensile strength, elongation, friction strength and SEM observations of the nettle fibre yarns were investigated. All treatment processes were improved the tensile strength, elongation and friction strength properties of the nettle fibre yarns. Also higher tensile strength, elongation and friction strength properties were obtained from treated nettle fibre yarns which treated by using microwave energy method.

  10. Quasistatic normal-compliance contact problem of visco-elastic bodies with Coulomb friction implemented by QP and SGBEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vodička, R.; Mantič, V.; Roubíček, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 315, May (2017), s. 249-272 ISSN 0377-0427 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : contact mechanics * evolution variational inequalities * numerical approximation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.357, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037704271630499X

  11. [Stress analysis of femoral stems in cementless total hip arthroplasty by two-dimensional finite element method using boundary friction layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomori, H; Imura, S; Gesso, H

    1992-04-01

    To develop stem design achieving primary fixation of stems and effective load transfer to the femur, we studied stress analysis of stems in cementless total hip arthroplasty by two-dimensional finite element method using boundary friction layer in stem-bone interface. The results of analyses of stem-bone interface stresses and von Mises stresses at the cortical bones indicated that ideal stem design features would be as follows: 1) Sufficient length, with the distal end extending beyond the isthmus region. 2) Maximum possible width, to contact the cortical bones in the isthmus region. 3) No collars but a lateral shoulder at the proximal portion. 4) A distal tip, to contact the cortical bones at the distal portion.

  12. Uniaxial orientation of P3HT film prepared by soft friction transfer method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanishi, Masayoshi; Kajiya, Daisuke; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Saitow, Ken-Ichi

    2017-07-11

    The realization of room-temperature processes is an important factor in the development of flexible electronic devices composed of organic materials. In addition, a simple and cost-effective process is essential to produce stable working devices and to enhance the performance of a smart material for flexible, wearable, or stretchable-skin devices. Here, we present a soft friction transfer method for producing aligned polymer films; a glass substrate was mechanically brushed with a velvet fabric and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) solution was then spin-coated on the substrate. A P3HT film with a uniaxial orientation was obtained in air at room temperature. The orientation factor was 17 times higher than that of a film prepared using a conventional friction transfer technique at a high temperature of 120 °C. In addition, an oriented film with a thickness of 40 nm was easily picked up and transferred to another substrate. The mechanism for orientation of the film was investigated using six experimental methods and theoretical calculation, and was thereby attributed to a chemical process, i.e., cellulose molecules attach to the substrate and act as a template for molecular alignment.

  13. Celtic Stone Dynamics Revisited Using Dry Friction and Rolling Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Awrejcewicz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The integral model of dry friction components is built with assumption of classical Coulomb friction law and with specially developed model of normal stress distribution coupled with rolling resistance for elliptic contact shape. In order to avoid a necessity of numerical integration over the contact area at each the numerical simulation step, few versions of approximate model are developed and then tested numerically. In the numerical experiments the simulation results of the Celtic stone with the friction forces modelled by the use of approximants of different complexity (from no coupling between friction force and torque to the second order Padé approximation are compared to results obtained from model with friction approximated in the form of piecewise polynomial functions (based on the Taylor series with hertzian stress distribution. The coefficients of the corresponding approximate models are found by the use of optimization methods, like as in identification process using the real experiment data.

  14. Measurement of Internal Friction for Tungsten by the Curve Vibrating Method with Variation of Voltage and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Yusibani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of a curved vibrating wire method (CVM to measure gas viscosity has been widely used. A fine Tungsten wire with 50 mm of diameter is bent into a semi-circular shape and arranged symmetrically in a magnetic field of about 0.2 T. The frequency domain is used for calculating the viscosity as a response for forced oscillation of the wire. Internal friction is one of the parameter in the CVM which is has to be measured beforeahead. Internal friction coefficien for the wire material which is the inverse of the quality factor has to be measured in a vacuum condition. The term involving internal friction actually represents the effective resistance of motion due to all non-viscous damping phenomena including internal friction and magnetic damping. The testing of internal friction measurement shows that at different induced voltage and elevated temperature at a vacuum condition, it gives the value of internal friction for Tungsten is around 1 to 4 10-4.

  15. Two-Level Iteration Penalty Methods for the Navier-Stokes Equations with Friction Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two-level iteration penalty finite element methods to approximate the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with friction boundary conditions. The basic idea is to solve the Navier-Stokes type variational inequality problem on a coarse mesh with mesh size H in combining with solving a Stokes, Oseen, or linearized Navier-Stokes type variational inequality problem for Stokes, Oseen, or Newton iteration on a fine mesh with mesh size h. The error estimate obtained in this paper shows that if H, h, and ε can be chosen appropriately, then these two-level iteration penalty methods are of the same convergence orders as the usual one-level iteration penalty method.

  16. 3D simulation of friction stir welding based on movable cellular automaton method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Galina M.

    2017-12-01

    The paper is devoted to a 3D computer simulation of the peculiarities of material flow taking place in friction stir welding (FSW). The simulation was performed by the movable cellular automaton (MCA) method, which is a representative of particle methods in mechanics. Commonly, the flow of material in FSW is simulated based on computational fluid mechanics, assuming the material as continuum and ignoring its structure. The MCA method considers a material as an ensemble of bonded particles. The rupture of interparticle bonds and the formation of new bonds enable simulations of crack nucleation and healing as well as mas mixing and microwelding. The simulation results showed that using pins of simple shape (cylinder, cone, and pyramid) without a shoulder results in small displacements of plasticized material in workpiece thickness directions. Nevertheless, the optimal ratio of longitudinal velocity to rotational speed makes it possible to transport the welded material around the pin several times and to produce a joint of good quality.

  17. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nicolaas P.; Gutkowski, Witold; Rothenburg, L.; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle

  18. Research on friction coefficient of nuclear Reactor Vessel Internals Hold Down Spring: Stress coefficient test analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linjun, Xie; Guohong, Xue; Ming, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    friction coefficient f of the K1000 HDS are further calculated to be 0.336 by stress coefficient k f . It is very important that the research method of friction coefficient put forward by this paper for the first time. The method can provide an exact basis for HDS design and structure selection and can provide a guarantee for the safe operation of the reactor.

  19. Research on friction coefficient of nuclear Reactor Vessel Internals Hold Down Spring: Stress coefficient test analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linjun, Xie, E-mail: linjunx@zjut.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Guohong, Xue; Ming, Zhang [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research & Design Institute, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2016-08-01

    friction coefficient f of the K1000 HDS are further calculated to be 0.336 by stress coefficient k{sub f}. It is very important that the research method of friction coefficient put forward by this paper for the first time. The method can provide an exact basis for HDS design and structure selection and can provide a guarantee for the safe operation of the reactor.

  20. Review of friction modeling in metal forming processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C.V.; Bay, N.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In metal forming processes, friction between tool and workpiece is an important parameter influencing the material flow, surface quality and tool life. Theoretical models of friction in metal forming are based on analysis of the real contact area in tool-workpiece interfaces. Several...... research groups have studied and modeled the asperity flattening of workpiece material against tool surface in dry contact or in contact interfaces with only thin layers of lubrication with the aim to improve understanding of friction in metal forming. This paper aims at giving a review of the most...... conditions, normal pressure, sliding length and speed, temperature changes, friction on the flattened plateaus and deformation of the underlying material. The review illustrates the development in the understanding of asperity flattening and the methods of analysis....

  1. Friction stir welding - an alternative method for sealing nuclear waste storage canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.E. [TWI Ltd, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    When welding 50 mm thick copper a very high heat input is required to combat the high thermal diffusivity and only the Electron Beam Welding (EBW) process had this capability when this copper canister concept was conceived. Despite the encouraging results achieved using EBW with thick section copper, SKB felt that it would be prudent to assess other joining methods. This assessment concluded that friction welding, could also provide very high quality welds to satisfy the service life requirements of the SKB canister design. A friction welding variant called Friction Stir Welding (FSW) was shown to have the capability of welding 3 mm thick copper sheet with excellent integrity and reproducibility. This later provided sufficient encouragement for SKB to consider the potential of FSW as a method for joining thick section copper, using relatively simple machine tool based technology. It was thought that FSW might provide an alternative or complementary method for welding lids, or bases to canisters. In 1997 an FSW development programme started at TWI, focussed on the feasibility of welding 10 mm thick copper plate. Once this task was successfully completed, work continued to demonstrate that progressively thicker plate, up to 50 mm thick, could be joined. At this stage, with process viability established, a full size experimental FSW canister machine was designed and built. Work with this machine finished in January 2003, when it had been shown that FSW could definitely be used to weld lids to full size canisters. This report summarises the TWI development of FSW for SKB from 1997 to January 2003. It also highlights the important aspects of the process and the project milestones that will help to ensure that SKB has a welding technology that can be used with confidence for production fabrication of copper waste storage canisters in the future. The overall conclusion to this FSW development is that there is no doubt that the FSW process could be used to produce full

  2. Friction stir welding - an alternative method for sealing nuclear waste storage canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.E.

    2004-12-01

    When welding 50 mm thick copper a very high heat input is required to combat the high thermal diffusivity and only the Electron Beam Welding (EBW) process had this capability when this copper canister concept was conceived. Despite the encouraging results achieved using EBW with thick section copper, SKB felt that it would be prudent to assess other joining methods. This assessment concluded that friction welding, could also provide very high quality welds to satisfy the service life requirements of the SKB canister design. A friction welding variant called Friction Stir Welding (FSW) was shown to have the capability of welding 3 mm thick copper sheet with excellent integrity and reproducibility. This later provided sufficient encouragement for SKB to consider the potential of FSW as a method for joining thick section copper, using relatively simple machine tool based technology. It was thought that FSW might provide an alternative or complementary method for welding lids, or bases to canisters. In 1997 an FSW development programme started at TWI, focussed on the feasibility of welding 10 mm thick copper plate. Once this task was successfully completed, work continued to demonstrate that progressively thicker plate, up to 50 mm thick, could be joined. At this stage, with process viability established, a full size experimental FSW canister machine was designed and built. Work with this machine finished in January 2003, when it had been shown that FSW could definitely be used to weld lids to full size canisters. This report summarises the TWI development of FSW for SKB from 1997 to January 2003. It also highlights the important aspects of the process and the project milestones that will help to ensure that SKB has a welding technology that can be used with confidence for production fabrication of copper waste storage canisters in the future. The overall conclusion to this FSW development is that there is no doubt that the FSW process could be used to produce full

  3. Friction laws at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yifei; Turner, Kevin T; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2009-02-26

    Macroscopic laws of friction do not generally apply to nanoscale contacts. Although continuum mechanics models have been predicted to break down at the nanoscale, they continue to be applied for lack of a better theory. An understanding of how friction force depends on applied load and contact area at these scales is essential for the design of miniaturized devices with optimal mechanical performance. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with realistic force fields to establish friction laws in dry nanoscale contacts. We show that friction force depends linearly on the number of atoms that chemically interact across the contact. By defining the contact area as being proportional to this number of interacting atoms, we show that the macroscopically observed linear relationship between friction force and contact area can be extended to the nanoscale. Our model predicts that as the adhesion between the contacting surfaces is reduced, a transition takes place from nonlinear to linear dependence of friction force on load. This transition is consistent with the results of several nanoscale friction experiments. We demonstrate that the breakdown of continuum mechanics can be understood as a result of the rough (multi-asperity) nature of the contact, and show that roughness theories of friction can be applied at the nanoscale.

  4. Two new methods to determine the adhesion by means of internal friction in materials covered with films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorado, H. A.; Ghilarducci, A. A.; Salva, H. R.

    2006-01-01

    Two new models are proposed to determine the adhesion energy be means of the internal friction technique (IF) in thin films layered materials. for the first method is necessary to determine enthalpy by means of the IF technique, for which the adhesion work has been determined with experimental data. In the second method are necessary to perform IF tests at constant temperature. (Author)

  5. Dynamic Friction Parameter Identification Method with LuGre Model for Direct-Drive Rotary Torque Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Attainment of high-performance motion/velocity control objectives for the Direct-Drive Rotary (DDR torque motor should fully consider practical nonlinearities in controller design, such as dynamic friction. The LuGre model has been widely utilized to describe nonlinear friction behavior; however, parameter identification for the LuGre model remains a challenge. A new dynamic friction parameter identification method for LuGre model is proposed in this study. Static parameters are identified through a series of constant velocity experiments, while dynamic parameters are obtained through a presliding process. Novel evolutionary algorithm (NEA is utilized to increase identification accuracy. Experimental results gathered from the identification experiments conducted in the study for a practical DDR torque motor control system validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Effects of Si3+ and H+ Irradiation on Tungsten Evaluated by Internal Friction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jing; Wang Xianping; Fang Qianfeng; Liu Changsong; Zhang Yanwen; Zhao Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    Effects of Si 3+ and H + irradiation on tungsten were investigated by internal friction (IF) technique. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis revealed that sequential dual Si+H irradiation resulted in more serious damage than single Si irradiation. After irradiation, the IF background was significantly enhanced. Besides, two obvious IF peaks were initially found in temperature range of 70∼330 K in the sequential Si+H irradiated tungsten sample. The mechanism of increased IF background for the irradiated samples was suggested to originate from the high density dislocations induced by ion irradiation. On the other hand, the relaxation peak P L and non-relaxation peak P H in the Si+H irradiated sample were ascribed to the interaction process of hydrogen atoms with mobile dislocations and transient processes of hydrogen redistribution, respectively. The obtained experimental results verified the high sensitivity of IF method on the irradiation damage behaviors in nuclear materials

  7. Assessment of semi-active friction dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Braga; Coelho, Humberto Tronconi; Lepore Neto, Francisco Paulo; Mafhoud, Jarir

    2017-09-01

    The use of friction dampers has been widely proposed for a variety of mechanical systems for which applying viscoelastic materials, fluid based dampers or other viscous dampers is impossible. An important example is the application of friction dampers in aircraft engines to reduce the blades' vibration amplitudes. In most cases, friction dampers have been studied in a passive manner, but significant improvements can be achieved by controlling the normal force in the contact region. The aim of this paper is to present and study five control strategies for friction dampers based on three different hysteresis cycles by using the Harmonic Balance Method (HBM), a numerical and experimental analysis. The first control strategy uses the friction force as a resistance when the system is deviating from its equilibrium position. The second control strategy maximizes the energy removal in each harmonic oscillation cycle by calculating the optimal normal force based on the last displacement peak. The third control strategy combines the first strategy with the homogenous modulation of the friction force. Finally, the last two strategies attempt to predict the system's movement based on its velocity and acceleration and our knowledge of its physical properties. Numerical and experimental studies are performed with these five strategies, which define the performance metrics. The experimental testing rig is fully identified and its parameters are used for numerical simulations. The obtained results show the satisfactory performance of the friction damper and selected strategy and the suitable agreement between the numerical and experimental results.

  8. A friction test between steel and a brittle material at high contact pressures and high sliding velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picart D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to characterize the interface behaviour between an aggregate material and steel. This work focuses on contact pressures and sliding velocities reaching 100 MPa and 10 m/s. The set-up consists in a cylindrical sample of the aggregate material which slips into a steel tube. The tube is both a confinement vessel and a sliding surface. Thanks to confinement, the material can be tested under high stresses without failure. The interface pressure is generated by an axial compression. The sample is pressed on a spring, so it can be simultaneously compressed and rubbed on the tube. The set-up has been tested in the case of a quasi-static loading and the 100 MPa pressure has been reached. Then the set-up was mounted on a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar device in order to reach higher velocities. Numerical simulations have been realized to check the feasibility and the relevance of this dynamic test. These results are analysed and compared to the experimental ones.

  9. AFM and SFG studies of pHEMA-based hydrogel contact lens surfaces in saline solution: adhesion, friction, and the presence of non-crosslinked polymer chains at the surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Han; Opdahl, Aric; Marmo, Chris; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2002-04-01

    The surfaces of two types of soft contact lenses neutral and ionic hydrogels--were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and sum-frequency-generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. AFM measurements in saline solution showed that the presence of ionic functional groups at the surface lowered the friction and adhesion to a hydrophobic polystyrene tip. This was attributed to the specific interactions of water and the molecular orientation of hydrogel chains at the surface. Friction and adhesion behavior also revealed the presence of domains of non-crosslinked polymer chains at the lens surface. SFG showed that the lens surface became partially dehydrated upon exposure to air. On this partially dehydrated lens surface, the non-crosslinked domains exhibited low friction and adhesion in AFM. Fully hydrated in saline solution, the non-crosslinked domains extended more than tens of nanometers into solution and were mobile.

  10. Effects of Mistuning on the Forced Response of Bladed Discs with Friction Dampers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrov, E. P; Ewins, D. J

    2005-01-01

    A method recently developed by the authors allows efficient calculation of the periodic forced response to be performed for bladed discs with arbitrary nonlinearities, including friction contacts and gaps...

  11. Mixed Lubricated Line Contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faraon, I.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present work deals with friction in mixed lubricated line contacts. Components in systems are becoming smaller and due to, for instance power transmitted, partial contact may occur. In industrial applications, friction between the moving contacting surfaces cannot be avoided, therefore it is

  12. Comparison of three different methods for assessing in situ friction velocity: A case study from Loch Etive, Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inoue, Tetsunori; Glud, Ronnie N.; Stahl, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Three approaches, Eddy Correlation (EC), Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE), and Inertial Dissipation (ID) methods, were compared to evaluate their potential for estimation of friction velocity in a Scottish sea loch. As an independent assessment parameter, we used simultaneous O2 recordings of the d...

  13. Numeric simulation model for long-term orthodontic tooth movement with contact boundary conditions using the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ryo; Yamaoka, Satoshi; Anh, Tuan Nguyen; Tominaga, Jun-Ya; Koga, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2017-11-01

    Although many attempts have been made to simulate orthodontic tooth movement using the finite element method, most were limited to analyses of the initial displacement in the periodontal ligament and were insufficient to evaluate the effect of orthodontic appliances on long-term tooth movement. Numeric simulation of long-term tooth movement was performed in some studies; however, neither the play between the brackets and archwire nor the interproximal contact forces were considered. The objectives of this study were to simulate long-term orthodontic tooth movement with the edgewise appliance by incorporating those contact conditions into the finite element model and to determine the force system when the space is closed with sliding mechanics. We constructed a 3-dimensional model of maxillary dentition with 0.022-in brackets and 0.019 × 0.025-in archwire. Forces of 100 cN simulating sliding mechanics were applied. The simulation was accomplished on the assumption that bone remodeling correlates with the initial tooth displacement. This method could successfully represent the changes in the moment-to-force ratio: the tooth movement pattern during space closure. We developed a novel method that could simulate the long-term orthodontic tooth movement and accurately determine the force system in the course of time by incorporating contact boundary conditions into finite element analysis. It was also suggested that friction is progressively increased during space closure in sliding mechanics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Friction, adhesion and wear properties of PDMS films on silicon sidewalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penskiy, I; Gerratt, A P; Bergbreiter, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the first tests of friction, adhesion and wear properties of thin poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) films on the sidewalls of silicon-on-insulator structures. The test devices were individually calibrated using a simple method that included optical and electrical measurements. The static coefficient of friction versus normal pressure curves were obtained for PDMS–PDMS, PDMS–silicon and silicon–silicon sidewall interfaces. The effects of aging on friction and adhesion properties of PDMS were also evaluated. The results of friction tests showed that the static coefficient of friction follows the JKR contact model, which means that the friction force depends on the apparent area of contact. The wear tests showed high resistance of PDMS to abrasion over millions of cycles.

  15. Application of laser ultrasonic method for on-line monitoring of friction stir spot welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua

    2015-09-01

    Application of a laser ultrasonic method is developed for on-line monitoring of the friction stir spot welding (FSSW) process. Based on the technology of FSSW, laser-generated ultrasonic waves in a good weld and nonweld area are simulated by a finite element method. The reflected and transmitted waves are analyzed to disclose the properties of the welded interface. The noncontact-laser ultrasonic-inspection system was established to verify the numerical results. The reflected waves in the good-weld and nonweld area can be distinguished by time-of-flight. The transmitted waves evidently attenuate in the nonweld area in contrast to signal amplitude in the good weld area because of interfacial impedance difference. Laser ultrasonic C-scan images can sufficiently evaluate the intrinsic character of the weld area in comparison with traditional water-immersion ultrasonic testing results. The research results confirm that laser ultrasonics would be an effective method to realize the characterization of FSSW defects.

  16. Automatic mesh refinement and local multigrid methods for contact problems: application to the Pellet-Cladding mechanical Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This Ph.D. work takes place within the framework of studies on Pellet-Cladding mechanical Interaction (PCI) which occurs in the fuel rods of pressurized water reactor. This manuscript focuses on automatic mesh refinement to simulate more accurately this phenomena while maintaining acceptable computational time and memory space for industrial calculations. An automatic mesh refinement strategy based on the combination of the Local Defect Correction multigrid method (LDC) with the Zienkiewicz and Zhu a posteriori error estimator is proposed. The estimated error is used to detect the zones to be refined, where the local sub-grids of the LDC method are generated. Several stopping criteria are studied to end the refinement process when the solution is accurate enough or when the refinement does not improve the global solution accuracy anymore. Numerical results for elastic 2D test cases with pressure discontinuity show the efficiency of the proposed strategy. The automatic mesh refinement in case of unilateral contact problems is then considered. The strategy previously introduced can be easily adapted to the multi-body refinement by estimating solution error on each body separately. Post-processing is often necessary to ensure the conformity of the refined areas regarding the contact boundaries. A variety of numerical experiments with elastic contact (with or without friction, with or without an initial gap) confirms the efficiency and adaptability of the proposed strategy. (author) [fr

  17. Development of method for experimental determination of wheel–rail contact forces and contact point position by using instrumented wheelset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bižić, Milan B; Petrović, Dragan Z; Tomić, Miloš C; Djinović, Zoran V

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a unique method for experimental determination of wheel–rail contact forces and contact point position by using the instrumented wheelset (IWS). Solutions of key problems in the development of IWS are proposed, such as the determination of optimal locations, layout, number and way of connecting strain gauges as well as the development of an inverse identification algorithm (IIA). The base for the solution of these problems is the wheel model and results of FEM calculations, while IIA is based on the method of blind source separation using independent component analysis. In the first phase, the developed method was tested on a wheel model and a high accuracy was obtained (deviations of parameters obtained with IIA and really applied parameters in the model are less than 2%). In the second phase, experimental tests on the real object or IWS were carried out. The signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the main influential parameter on the measurement accuracy. Тhе obtained results have shown that the developed method enables measurement of vertical and lateral wheel–rail contact forces Q and Y and their ratio Y / Q with estimated errors of less than 10%, while the estimated measurement error of contact point position is less than 15%. At flange contact and higher values of ratio Y / Q or Y force, the measurement errors are reduced, which is extremely important for the reliability and quality of experimental tests of safety against derailment of railway vehicles according to the standards UIC 518 and EN 14363. The obtained results have shown that the proposed method can be successfully applied in solving the problem of high accuracy measurement of wheel–rail contact forces and contact point position using IWS. (paper)

  18. Identify methods to reduce the risk of explosions and fires caused by frictional ignition hazards.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phillips, HR

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes outcome of a literature review of the extensive research conducted worldwide into the phenomenon of frictional ignition, a review of whether machines currently used in South Africa comply with known principles for reducing...

  19. Domain decomposition method for dynamic faulting under slip-dependent friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, Lori; Ionescu, Ioan R.; Wolf, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    The anti-plane shearing problem on a system of finite faults under a slip-dependent friction in a linear elastic domain is considered. Using a Newmark method for the time discretization of the problem, we have obtained an elliptic variational inequality at each time step. An upper bound for the time step size, which is not a CFL condition, is deduced from the solution uniqueness criterion using the first eigenvalue of the tangent problem. Finite element form of the variational inequality is solved by a Schwarz method assuming that the inner nodes of the domain lie in one subdomain and the nodes on the fault lie in other subdomains. Two decompositions of the domain are analyzed, one made up of two subdomains and another one with three subdomains. Numerical experiments are performed to illustrate convergence for a single time step (convergence of the Schwarz algorithm, influence of the mesh size, influence of the time step), convergence in time (instability capturing, energy dissipation, optimal time step) and an application to a relevant physical problem (interacting parallel fault segments)

  20. Novel Plasmid Transformation Method Mediated by Chrysotile, Sliding Friction, and Elastic Body Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Yoshida

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli as a plasmid recipient cell was dispersed in a chrysotile colloidal solution, containing chrysotile adsorbed to plasmid DNA (chrysotile-plasmid cell mixture. Following this, the chrysotile-plasmid cell mixture was dropped onto the surface of an elastic body, such as agarose, and treated physically by sliding a polystyrene streak bar over the elastic body to create friction. Plasmid DNA was easily incorporated into E. coli, and antibiotic resistance was conferred by transformation. The transformation efficiency of E. coli cultured in solid medium was greater than that of E. coli cultured in broth. To obtain greater transformation efficiency, we attempted to determine optimal transformation conditions. The following conditions resulted in the greatest transformation efficiency: the recipient cell concentration within the chrysotileplasmid cell mixture had an optical density greater than or equal to 2 at 550 nm, the vertical reaction force applied to the streak bar was greater than or equal to 40 g, and the rotation speed of the elastic body was greater than or equal to 34 rpm. Under these conditions, we observed a transformation efficiency of 107 per μg plasmid DNA. The advantage of achieving bacterial transformation using the elastic body exposure method is that competent cell preparation of the recipient cell is not required. In addition to E. coli, other Gram negative bacteria are able to acquire plasmid DNA using the elastic body exposure method.

  1. Optimization of wheel-rail interface friction using top-of-rail friction modifiers: State of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Roshan; Dasaka, Satyanarayana Murty

    2018-05-01

    High Speed Railways and Dedicated Freight Corridors are the need of the day for fast and efficient transportation of the ever growing population and freight across long distances of travel. With the increase in speeds and axle loads carried by these trains, wearing out of rails and train wheel sections are a common issue, which is due to the increase in friction at the wheel-rail interfaces. For the cases where the wheel-rail interface friction is less than optimum, as in case of high speed trains with very low axle loads, wheel-slips are imminent and loss of traction occurs when the trains accelerate rapidly or brake all of a sudden. These vast variety of traction problems around the wheel-rail interface friction need to be mitigated carefully, so that the contact interface friction neither ascents too high to cause material wear and need for added locomotive power, nor be on the lower side to cause wheel-slips and loss of traction at high speeds. Top-of-rail friction modifiers are engineered surface coatings applied on top of rails, to maintain an optimum frictional contact between the train wheels and the rails. Extensive research works in the area of wheel-rail tribology have revealed that the optimum frictional coefficients at wheel-rail interfaces lie at a value of around 0.35. Application of top-of-rail (TOR) friction modifiers on rail surfaces add an extra layer of material coating on top of the rails, with a surface frictional coefficient of the desired range. This study reviews the common types of rail friction modifiers, the methods for their application, issues related with the application of friction modifiers, and a guideline on selection of the right class of coating material based on site specific requirements of the railway networks.

  2. Comparison of a Material Point Method and a Galerkin Meshfree Method for the Simulation of Cohesive-Frictional Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Iaconeta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of large deformation problems, involving complex history-dependent constitutive laws, is of paramount importance in several engineering fields. Particular attention has to be paid to the choice of a suitable numerical technique such that reliable results can be obtained. In this paper, a Material Point Method (MPM and a Galerkin Meshfree Method (GMM are presented and verified against classical benchmarks in solid mechanics. The aim is to demonstrate the good behavior of the methods in the simulation of cohesive-frictional materials, both in static and dynamic regimes and in problems dealing with large deformations. The vast majority of MPM techniques in the literatrue are based on some sort of explicit time integration. The techniques proposed in the current work, on the contrary, are based on implicit approaches, which can also be easily adapted to the simulation of static cases. The two methods are presented so as to highlight the similarities to rather than the differences from “standard” Updated Lagrangian (UL approaches commonly employed by the Finite Elements (FE community. Although both methods are able to give a good prediction, it is observed that, under very large deformation of the medium, GMM lacks robustness due to its meshfree natrue, which makes the definition of the meshless shape functions more difficult and expensive than in MPM. On the other hand, the mesh-based MPM is demonstrated to be more robust and reliable for extremely large deformation cases.

  3. Investigation of subsurface fatigue crack in PEEK shaft under one-point rolling contact by using 2.5D layer observation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOIKE Hitonobu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface fatigue cracks under rolling contact area of the PEEK shaft against an alumina bearing’s ball were investigated for application of frictional part in mechanical element in special situations such as chemical environments. In order to explore the flaking process of the PEEK shaft, the rolling contact fatigue tests were carried out by using a one-point radial loading rolling contact machine. The flaking occurred on the rolling track of the PEEK shaft at approximate 4⨉105 fatigue cycles. The subsurface fatigue crack propagation was investigated by using 2.5-Dimension layer observation method. The flaking was caused by the propagations of surface cracks and subsurface shear cracks, and the flaking shape was half-ellipse. Moreover, beach marks as fatigue crack propagation in the flaking were observed.

  4. Labour market frictions and migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The 4th contribution to the series INT-AR papers is dedicated to the methods of assessing labour market frictions. The paper provides a (brief) international comparison of the role of labour migration in solving these frictions.

  5. Nonsmooth Newton method for Fischer function reformulation of contact force problems for interactive rigid body simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz, Morten; Niebe, Sarah Maria; Erleben, Kenny

    2009-01-01

    contact response. In this paper, we present a new approach to contact force determination. We reformulate the contact force problem as a nonlinear root search problem, using a Fischer function. We solve this problem using a generalized Newton method. Our new Fischer - Newton method shows improved...... qualities for specific configurations where the most widespread alternative, the Projected Gauss-Seidel method, fails. Experiments show superior convergence properties of the exact Fischer - Newton method....

  6. A friction stress method for the cyclic inelastic behavior of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhansale, H.R.

    1975-01-01

    Inelastic deformation and fatigue analyses require that computational models of inelastic material behavior be capable of simulating the various plastic stress-strain phenomena such as the memory of prior history and cycle dependent transient hardening, softening, relaxation and creep associated with cyclic loads. This paper presents such a formulation in which the transient phenomena are uniquely described in terms of a friction stress parameter and the memory phenomenon is simulated by the characteristics of a mechanical model comprising of 'Hookean Spring-Friction Slider' elements connected in series, the spring and slider within each element being connected in parallel. The formulation is ideally suited for programming on a digital computer. (Auth.)

  7. Analysis of deep learning methods for blind protein contact prediction in CASP12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Sun, Siqi; Xu, Jinbo

    2018-03-01

    Here we present the results of protein contact prediction achieved in CASP12 by our RaptorX-Contact server, which is an early implementation of our deep learning method for contact prediction. On a set of 38 free-modeling target domains with a median family size of around 58 effective sequences, our server obtained an average top L/5 long- and medium-range contact accuracy of 47% and 44%, respectively (L = length). A complete implementation has an average accuracy of 59% and 57%, respectively. Our deep learning method formulates contact prediction as a pixel-level image labeling problem and simultaneously predicts all residue pairs of a protein using a combination of two deep residual neural networks, taking as input the residue conservation information, predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility, contact potential, and coevolution information. Our approach differs from existing methods mainly in (1) formulating contact prediction as a pixel-level image labeling problem instead of an image-level classification problem; (2) simultaneously predicting all contacts of an individual protein to make effective use of contact occurrence patterns; and (3) integrating both one-dimensional and two-dimensional deep convolutional neural networks to effectively learn complex sequence-structure relationship including high-order residue correlation. This paper discusses the RaptorX-Contact pipeline, both contact prediction and contact-based folding results, and finally the strength and weakness of our method. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Blades Couple Dry Friction Connection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Pešek, Luděk; Radolfová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2015), s. 31-40 ISSN 1802-680X Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : stick-slip dry friction * 3D friction characteristic * tangential contact stiffness * hysterezis loop * response curves Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  9. Wildlife contact analysis: Emerging methods, questions, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Creech, Tyler G.; Ebinger, Michael R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Creel, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Recent technological advances, such as proximity loggers, allow researchers to collect complete interaction histories, day and night, among sampled individuals over several months to years. Social network analyses are an obvious approach to analyzing interaction data because of their flexibility for fitting many different social structures as well as the ability to assess both direct contacts and indirect associations via intermediaries. For many network properties, however, it is not clear whether estimates based upon a sample of the network are reflective of the entire network. In wildlife applications, networks may be poorly sampled and boundary effects will be common. We present an alternative approach that utilizes a hierarchical modeling framework to assess the individual, dyadic, and environmental factors contributing to variation in the interaction rates and allows us to estimate the underlying process variation in each. In a disease control context, this approach will allow managers to focus efforts on those types of individuals and environments that contribute the most toward super-spreading events. We account for the sampling distribution of proximity loggers and the non-independence of contacts among groups by only using contact data within a group during days when the group membership of proximity loggers was known. This allows us to separate the two mechanisms responsible for a pair not contacting one another: they were not in the same group or they were in the same group but did not come within the specified contact distance. We illustrate our approach with an example dataset of female elk from northwestern Wyoming and conclude with a number of important future research directions.

  10. A method for the statistical interpretation of friction ridge skin impression evidence: Method development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swofford, H J; Koertner, A J; Zemp, F; Ausdemore, M; Liu, A; Salyards, M J

    2018-04-03

    The forensic fingerprint community has faced increasing amounts of criticism by scientific and legal commentators, challenging the validity and reliability of fingerprint evidence due to the lack of an empirically demonstrable basis to evaluate and report the strength of the evidence in a given case. This paper presents a method, developed as a stand-alone software application, FRStat, which provides a statistical assessment of the strength of fingerprint evidence. The performance was evaluated using a variety of mated and non-mated datasets. The results show strong performance characteristics, often with values supporting specificity rates greater than 99%. This method provides fingerprint experts the capability to demonstrate the validity and reliability of fingerprint evidence in a given case and report the findings in a more transparent and standardized fashion with clearly defined criteria for conclusions and known error rate information thereby responding to concerns raised by the scientific and legal communities. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. A method to measure internal contact angle in opaque systems by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiqin; Tian, Ye; Gao, Xuefeng; Jiang, Lei

    2013-07-23

    Internal contact angle is an important parameter for internal wettability characterization. However, due to the limitation of optical imaging, methods available for contact angle measurement are only suitable for transparent or open systems. For most of the practical situations that require contact angle measurement in opaque or enclosed systems, the traditional methods are not effective. Based upon the requirement, a method suitable for contact angle measurement in nontransparent systems is developed by employing MRI technology. In the Article, the method is demonstrated by measuring internal contact angles in opaque cylindrical tubes. It proves that the method also shows great feasibility in transparent situations and opaque capillary systems. By using the method, contact angle in opaque systems could be measured successfully, which is significant in understanding the wetting behaviors in nontransparent systems and calculating interfacial parameters in enclosed systems.

  12. In situ observation of a hydrogel-glass interface during sliding friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsurou; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Ahmed, Jamil; Kamita, Gen; Yashima, Shintaro; Furukawa, Yuichiro; Ota, Yuko; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Gong, Jian Ping

    2014-08-14

    Direct observation of hydrogel contact with a solid surface in water is indispensable for understanding the friction, lubrication, and adhesion of hydrogels under water. However, this is a difficult task since the refractive index of hydrogels is very close to that of water. In this paper, we present a novel method to in situ observe the macroscopic contact of hydrogels with a solid surface based on the principle of critical refraction. This method was applied to investigate the sliding friction of a polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel with glass by using a strain-controlled parallel-plate rheometer. The study revealed that when the compressive pressure is not very high, the hydrogel forms a heterogeneous contact with the glass, and a macro-scale water drop is trapped at the soft interface. The pre-trapped water spreads over the interface to decrease the contact area with the increase in sliding velocity, which dramatically reduces the friction of the hydrogel. The study also revealed that this heterogeneous contact is the reason for the poor reproducibility of hydrogel friction that has been often observed in previous studies. Under the condition of homogeneous full contact, the molecular origin of hydrogel friction in water is discussed. This study highlights the importance of direct interfacial observation to reveal the friction mechanism of hydrogels.

  13. Block Copolymer Adhesion Measured by Contact Mechanics Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsafi, A.; Bates, S.; Tirrell, M.; Pocius, A. V.

    1997-03-01

    Adhesion measurements for a series of polyolefin diblocks and triblocks are presented. These materials have poly(ethylene-propylene) or poly(ethyl-ethylene) rubbery block, and semicrystalline polyethylene block as physical crosslinker. The experiments consist of compression and decompression profiles of contact area between the samples as a function of normal load, analyzed by the JKR Theory. The samples are prepared either by formation of caps from the bulk material in melting and subsequent cooling, and/or coating them in thin films on surface modified elastic foundations of polydimethylsiloxane caps. The latter minimizes the viscoelastic losses which are dominant in the bulk of material. The effect of molecular architecture and microstructure on adhesion energy and dynamics of separation, obtained from decompression experiments, is discussed in view of their influence on molecular arrangements at the contacting surfaces.

  14. The behaviour of molybdenum dialkyldithiocarbamate friction modifier additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Jocelyn Claire Herries

    2001-01-01

    In recent years there has been growing concern to produce energy-efficient lubricated components and modem engine oil specifications require lubricants to demonstrate fuel efficiency in standardised engine tests. One important method of producing low friction and thus fuel-efficient lubricants is to use oil-soluble, molybdenum-containing, friction modifier additives. In optimal conditions these additives are able to produce very low friction coefficients, in the range 0.045 to 0.075 in boundary lubrication conditions. Very little is known about the chemical and physical mechanisms by which oil soluble molybdenum additives form low friction films in tribological contacts. Information about their activity could lead to optimal use of these additives in lubricants and, therefore, more efficient engine running. The work outlined in this thesis investigated the behaviour of oil-soluble molybdenum additives and showed that these additives were able to effectively reduce friction in the absence of other additives such as ZnDTP. Their activity was shown to be highly concentration and temperature dependent and was also found to be sensitive to the roughness of the contacting surfaces. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the chemical nature of molybdenum-containing reaction films and found that friction reduction indubitably arises from the local formation of platelets (diameter 30-50 nm) of MoS 2 . The formation of MoS 2 -rich films was found to occur only during direct asperity-asperity rubbing of the contacting surfaces (this type of contact being especially prevalent in pure sliding contacts). At elevated temperatures and in the presence of oxidising gases the consumption of MoDTC was monitored. MoDTC concentration dropped until the total value fell below a critical level to reduce friction. The study showed that decay rate of molybdenum-containing species was reduced by the addition of peroxide-decomposing antioxidants. (author)

  15. Study on phase transformations in superconducting Ti-50%Nb alloy using temperature-dependent internal friction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapoval, B.I.; Tikhinskij, G.F.; Somov, A.I.; Chernyj, O.V.; Rudycheva, T.Yu.; Andrievskaya, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    The internal friction method is used to study phase transformations in the Ti-50%Nb alloy parallel with other methods. The effect of annealing temperature and time, as well as the content of interstitial impurities in the alloy and its thermomechanical treatment (TMT) is studied. In the 250-300 deg C temperature range the complex maximum of internal friction caused by extraction of secondary phases is observed. The latter is confirmed by the measurement data of mechanical properties and electron microscopic analysis. The maximum consists of three overlapping peaks that reflects stepped form of the decomposition process of the metastable solid solution. The preliminary thermo-mechanical alloy treatment consisting of equidirectional plastic deformation with the following recrystallization annealing leads to peak increase. This fact testifies to the stimulating effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on the degree of solid solution decomposition and reveals in the increase of the critical current density of a wire made of the ingot. The increase of the interstitial impurity content in the alloy has the analogous effect. The reduction of the internal friction level during isothermal stand-up at temperatures higher than the third peak temperature proceeds in two stages [ru

  16. Analysis of the material's expenditure of electric contacts by means of the isotopic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkash, K.

    1979-01-01

    To investigate lifetime of the weak-current and heavy-current contacts different radioisotopic methods have been developed. Advantages of the radioisotopic methods as compared with other methods of testing consists of the fact that due to their sensitivity they permit to determine low expense of material; permit to determine quantitatively expense of each element separately from the elements, composing the contacts alloy; by means of these methods it is possible to evaluate quantitatively topological distribution of the matter separated from the contacts into the environment; it is possible to determine morphological characteristics of the matter separated from the contact. During investigation of the lifetime of contacts there were determined: value of the expense of the material of contacts; composition of the expense of the material of contacts; composition of the matter separated from the contact; distribution of the separated matter depending on the electrical parameters and number of the closings of contact in the case of different compositions of contacts and in different conditions. Strength of the contacts' alloys related to the electrical load was investigated at the special stand [ru

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Heat Friction Contact Master Belt with the Gun Mount Barrel During the Process of High-Speed Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zezulinsky Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction in the gun mount barrel at sliding speeds of artillery projectile 500 - 700 m/s is not sufficiently studied. The main problem is to increase the efficiency of the master belt with a significant increase of the interaction parameters of the barrel with the projectile. To determine the effect of heating on the change of physical and mechanical properties of the surface layer and friction coefficient on the surface of the master belt were made mathematical modeling of heat transfer.

  18. Practical method transfer from high performance liquid chromatography to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography: the importance of frictional heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Lucie; Veuthey, Jean Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2011-11-04

    In theory, with identical stationary phase chemistry, the transfer of an HPLC method to UHPLC conditions is straightforward and necessitates the calculation of new conditions based on column and instrument geometries. Occasionally, undesirable changes in selectivity, retention or efficiency have been reported and have been attributed to a frictional heating phenomenon that is due to the elevated generated pressure drop. In the present study, the frictional heating in a UHPLC system was evaluated experimentally under gradient elution conditions (acetonitrile/buffer at pH 3 and 9) with generated pressure drops in the range of 100-1000 bar on both 1.0mm and 2.1mm I.D. columns using a mixture of 10 representative basic, acidic and neutral pharmaceutical compounds. Under adiabatic conditions (i.e., still-air oven), the longitudinal temperature gradient was estimated at +4 °C, +8 °C and +16 °C at 300, 600 and 1000 bar, respectively, on a 2.1mm I.D. column using an empirical measurement procedure. With the 1.0mm I.D. column, these values were reduced to +3 °C, +6 °C and +12 °C, respectively. Finally, various approaches to eliminate or at least to reduce the effect of frictional heating are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Ophthalmic Medications: Relevant Allergens and Alternative Testing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Katherine R; Warshaw, Erin M

    Allergic contact dermatitis is an important cause of periorbital dermatitis. Topical ophthalmic agents are relevant sensitizers. Contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications can be challenging to diagnose and manage given the numerous possible offending agents, including both active and inactive ingredients. Furthermore, a substantial body of literature reports false-negative patch test results to ophthalmic agents. Subsequently, numerous alternative testing methods have been described. This review outlines the periorbital manifestations, causative agents, and alternative testing methods of allergic contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications.

  20. Systematic Breakdown of Amontons' Law of Friction for an Elastic Object Locally Obeying Amontons' Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Michio; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In many sliding systems consisting of solid object on a solid substrate under dry condition, the friction force does not depend on the apparent contact area and is proportional to the loading force. This behaviour is called Amontons' law and indicates that the friction coefficient, or the ratio of the friction force to the loading force, is constant. Here, however, using numerical and analytical methods, we show that Amontons' law breaks down systematically under certain conditions for an elastic object experiencing a friction force that locally obeys Amontons' law. The macroscopic static friction coefficient, which corresponds to the onset of bulk sliding of the object, decreases as pressure or system length increases. This decrease results from precursor slips before the onset of bulk sliding, and is consistent with the results of certain previous experiments. The mechanisms for these behaviours are clarified. These results will provide new insight into controlling friction. PMID:23545778

  1. Systematic breakdown of Amontons' law of friction for an elastic object locally obeying Amontons' law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Michio; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In many sliding systems consisting of solid object on a solid substrate under dry condition, the friction force does not depend on the apparent contact area and is proportional to the loading force. This behaviour is called Amontons' law and indicates that the friction coefficient, or the ratio of the friction force to the loading force, is constant. Here, however, using numerical and analytical methods, we show that Amontons' law breaks down systematically under certain conditions for an elastic object experiencing a friction force that locally obeys Amontons' law. The macroscopic static friction coefficient, which corresponds to the onset of bulk sliding of the object, decreases as pressure or system length increases. This decrease results from precursor slips before the onset of bulk sliding, and is consistent with the results of certain previous experiments. The mechanisms for these behaviours are clarified. These results will provide new insight into controlling friction.

  2. Experimental Method for Analyzing Friction Phenomenon Related to Drum Brake Squeal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. GLIŠOVIĆ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Automobile brakes have been intensively developed during past few decades, but the maximum motor’s power, that should amortized in vehicle brakes, has been significantly increased also. Most of the kinetic energy of the moving vehicles is transforming into heat through friction. But the small part of kinetic energy transforms into sound pressure and makes noise. Low frequency squeal of drum brakes is very intense and can lead to customers’ complain. The interaction between the brake system and the vehicle framework and suspension is often very substantial during occurrence of brake noise. Unfortunately, to solve this type of squeal problem is also difficult because of the large number of components involved. The other cause is attributed to self-excited vibration that is induced when the friction material has a negative slope in relation to the relative velocity. This paper illustrates an approach to experimental studies of drum brakes in road conditions in order to monitor changes in the coefficient of friction that can generate drum brake squeal at low frequencies.

  3. A field theoretic model for static friction

    OpenAIRE

    Mahyaeh, I.; Rouhani, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a field theoretic model for friction, where the friction coefficient between two surfaces may be calculated based on elastic properties of the surfaces. We assume that the geometry of contact surface is not unusual. We verify Amonton's laws to hold that friction force is proportional to the normal load.This model gives the opportunity to calculate the static coefficient of friction for a few cases, and show that it is in agreement with observed values. Furthermore we show that the ...

  4. [Study on friction and wear properties of dental zirconia ceramics processed by microwave and conventional sintering methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoxin, Hu; Ying, Yang; Yuemei, Jiang; Wenjing, Xia

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the wear of an antagonist and friction and wear properties of dental zirconia ceramic that was subjected to microwave and conventional sintering methods. Ten specimens were fabricated from Lava brand zirconia and randomly assigned to microwave and conventional sintering groups. A profile tester for surface roughness was used to measure roughness of the specimens. Wear test was performed, and steatite ceramic was used as antagonist. Friction coefficient curves were recorded, and wear volume were calculated. Finally, optical microscope was used to observe the surface morphology of zirconia and steatite ceramics. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the microstructure of zirconia. Wear volumes of microwave and conventionally sintered zirconia were (6.940±1.382)×10⁻², (7.952±1.815) ×10⁻² mm³, respectively. Moreover, wear volumes of antagonist after sintering by the considered methods were (14.189±4.745)×10⁻², (15.813±3.481)×10⁻² mm³, correspondingly. Statistically significant difference was not observed in the wear resistance of zirconia and wear volume of steatite ceramic upon exposure to two kinds of sintering methods. Optical microscopy showed that ploughed surfaces were apparent in zirconia. The wear surface of steatite ceramic against had craze, accompanied by plough. Scanning electron microscopy showed that zirconia was sintered compactly when subjected to both conventional sintering and microwave methods, whereas grains of zirconia sintered by microwave alone were smaller and more uniform. Two kinds of sintering methods are successfully used to produce dental zirconia ceramics with similar friction and wear properties.
.

  5. Fuel cell electrode interconnect contact material encapsulation and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derose, Anthony J.; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Gudyka, Russell A.; Bonadies, Joseph V.; Silvis, Thomas W.

    2016-05-31

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of fuel cell cassettes each including a fuel cell with an anode and a cathode. Each fuel cell cassette also includes an electrode interconnect adjacent to the anode or the cathode for providing electrical communication between an adjacent fuel cell cassette and the anode or the cathode. The interconnect includes a plurality of electrode interconnect protrusions defining a flow passage along the anode or the cathode for communicating oxidant or fuel to the anode or the cathode. An electrically conductive material is disposed between at least one of the electrode interconnect protrusions and the anode or the cathode in order to provide a stable electrical contact between the electrode interconnect and the anode or cathode. An encapsulating arrangement segregates the electrically conductive material from the flow passage thereby, preventing volatilization of the electrically conductive material in use of the fuel cell stack.

  6. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  7. Method for making low-resistivity contacts to high T/sub c/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekin, J.W.; Panson, A.J.; Blankenship, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    A method for making low-resistivity contacts to high T/sub c/ superconductors has been developed, which has achieved contact surface resistivities less than 10 μΩ cm 2 at 76 K and does not require sample heating above ∼150 0 C. This is an upper limit for the contact resistivity obtained at high current densities up to 10 2 --10 3 A/cm 2 across the contact interface. At lower measuring current densities the contact resistivities were lower and the voltage-current curve was nonlinear, having a superconducting transition character. On cooling from 295 to 76 K, the contact resistivity decreased several times, in contrast to indium solder contacts where the resistivity increased on cooling. The contacts showed consistently low resistivity and little degradation when exposed to dry air over a four-month period and when repeatedly cycled between room temperature and 76 K. The contacts are formed by sputter depositing a layer of a noble metal-silver and gold were used-on a clean superconductor surface to protect the surface and serve as a contact pad. External connections to the contact pads have been made using both solder and wire-bonding techniques

  8. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogliati, Joshua J.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2010-01-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  9. Effect of the coefficient of friction and tightening speed on the preload induced at the dental implant complex with the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaqi, Haddad Arabi; Mousavi Mashhadi, Mahmoud; Geramipanah, Farideh; Safari, Hamed; Paknejad, Mojgan

    2015-05-01

    To prevent screw loosening, a clear understanding of the factors influencing secure preload is necessary. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of coefficient of friction and tightening speed on screw tightening based on energy distribution method with exact geometric modeling and finite element analysis. To simulate the proper boundary conditions of the screw tightening process, the supporting bone of an implant was considered. The exact geometry of the implant complex, including the Straumann dental implant, direct crown attachment, and abutment screw were modeled with Solidworks software. Abutment screw/implant and implant/bone interfaces were designed as spiral thread helixes. The screw-tightening process was simulated with Abaqus software, and to achieve the target torque, an angular displacement was applied to the abutment screw head at different coefficients of friction and tightening speeds. The values of torque, preload, energy distribution, elastic energy, and efficiency were obtained at the target torque of 35 Ncm. Additionally, the torque distribution ratio and preload simulated values were compared to theoretically predicted values. Upon reducing the coefficient of friction and enhancing the tightening speed, the angle of turn increased at the target torque. As the angle of turn increased, the elastic energy and preload also increased. Additionally, by increasing the coefficient of friction, the frictional dissipation energy increased but the efficiency decreased, whereas the increase in tightening speed insignificantly affected efficiency. The results of this study indicate that the coefficient of friction is the most influential factor on efficiency. Increasing the tightening speed lowered the response rate to the frictional resistance, thus diminishing the coefficient of friction and slightly increasing the preload. Increasing the tightening speed has the same result as reducing the coefficient of friction. Copyright © 2015

  10. Analysis of effect of different construction methods of piles on the end effect on skin friction of piles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hongbo; CHEN Zhuchang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the comparative analysis of end effect on skin friction of displacement-pile (driven pile),the end effect on skin friction of bored pile is studied.The end effect on skin friction between driven pile and bored pile is different and the end effect on skin friction of bored pile is reduce of skin friction in the soil layer adjacent to the pile end.The degradation degree of skin friction is deduced with the increase of the distance from pile end.The concept of additional mud cake formed by the effect of cushion at the bottom of borehole during pouring concrete is introduced to explain the mechanism of end effect on skin friction of the bored pile.The test results of post-grouting piles indicate that the post-grouting technique is an effective way to improve the end effect on skin friction of bored pile.

  11. Standard test method for measuring rolling friction characteristics of a spherical shape on a flat horizontal plane

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the use of an angled launch ramp to initiate rolling of a sphere or nearly spherical shape on a flat horizontal surface to determine the rolling friction characteristics of a given spherical shape on a given surface. 1.1.1 Steel balls on a surface plate were used in interlaboratory tests (see Appendix X1). Golf balls on a green, soccer and lacrosse balls on playing surfaces, bowling balls on an a lane, basketballs on hardwood, and marbles on composite surface were tested in the development of this test method, but the test applies to any sphere rolling on any flat horizontal surface. 1.1.2 The rolling friction of spheres on horizontal surfaces is affected by the spherical shape’s stiffness, radius of curvature, surface texture, films on the surface, the nature of the counterface surface; there are many factors to consider. This test method takes all of these factors into consideration. The spherical shape of interest is rolled on the surface of interest using a standard ramp to...

  12. An evaluation of prediction methods for frictional pressure drop of Two-phase flow in mini-channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Licheng; Yan Changqi; Sun Zhongning

    2010-01-01

    2092 pieces of data for frictional pressure drop of two-phase flow were collected from 18 published papers of which the working fluids include R123, R134a, R22, R236ea, R245fa, R404a, R407C, R410a, R507, CO2, water and air. The hydraulic diameter ranges from 0.506 to 12 mm; Re l from 10 to 37000, and Re g from 3 to 4 x 10 5 . 11 correlations and models for calculating the frictional pressure drop of two-phase flow were evaluated based on these data. The results show that the accuracy of the Lockhart-Martinelli method, Mishima and Hibiki correlation, Zhang and Mishima correlation and Lee and Mudawar correlation in the laminar region is very close to each other, while the Muller-Steinhagen and Heck correlation is the best among the evaluated correlations in the turbulent region. New correlation based on Chishom method was proposed, which is better than other methods in both laminar region and turbulent region. (authors)

  13. Contact dermatitis is an unrecognized problem in the construction industry : Comparison of four different assessment methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Johan G; Heederik, Dick; Spee, Ton; van Rooy, Frits G; Krop, Esmeralda J M; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Smit, Lidwien A M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A high contact dermatitis symptoms prevalence has been observed in Dutch construction workers. METHODS: Contact dermatitis was diagnosed by an expert panel using questionnaire data and photographs of 751 subjects' hands. A subset was evaluated by two occupational physicians. Their

  14. The study on defects in aluminum 2219-T6 thick butt friction stir welds with the application of multiple non-destructive testing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bo; Shen, Yifu; Hu, Weiye

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Friction stir weld-defect forming mechanisms of thick butt-joints. → Relationship between weld-defects and friction stir welding process parameters. → Multiple non-destructive testing methods applied to friction stir welds. → Empirical criterion basing on mass-conservation for inner material-loss defects. → Nonlinear correlation between weld strengths and root-flaw lengths. -- Abstract: The present study focused on the relationship between primary friction stir welding process parameters and varied types of weld-defect discovered in aluminum 2219-T6 friction stir butt-welds of thick plates, meanwhile, the weld-defect forming mechanisms were investigated. Besides a series of optical metallographic examinations for friction stir butt welds, multiple non-destructive testing methods including X-ray detection, ultrasonic C-scan testing, ultrasonic phased array inspection and fluorescent penetrating fluid inspection were successfully used aiming to examine the shapes and existence locations of different weld-defects. In addition, precipitated Al 2 Cu phase coarsening particles were found around a 'kissing-bond' defect within the weld stirred nugget zone by means of scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. On the basis of volume conservation law in material plastic deformation, a simple empirical criterion for estimating the existence of inner material-loss defects was proposed. Defect-free butt joints were obtained after process optimization of friction stir welding for aluminum 2219-T6 plates in 17-20 mm thickness. Process experiments proved that besides of tool rotation speed and travel speed, more other appropriate process parameter variables played important roles at the formation of high-quality friction stir welds, such as tool-shoulder target depth, spindle tilt angle, and fixture clamping conditions on the work-pieces. Furthermore, the nonlinear correlation between weld tensile strengths and weld crack

  15. Contact Thermal Analysis and Wear Simulation of a Brake Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nándor Békési

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes an experimental test and a coupled contact-thermal-wear analysis of a railway wheel/brake block system through the braking process. During the test, the friction, the generated heat, and the wear were evaluated. It was found that the contact between the brake block and the wheel occurs in relatively small and slowly moving hot spots, caused by the wear and the thermal effects. A coupled simulation method was developed including numerical frictional contact, transient thermal and incremental wear calculations. In the 3D simulation, the effects of the friction, the thermal expansion, the wear, and the temperature-dependent material properties were also considered. A good agreement was found between the results of the test and the calculations, both for the thermal and wear results. The proposed method is suitable for modelling the slowly oscillating wear caused by the thermal expansions in the contact area.

  16. Dynamic Multi-Rigid-Body Systems with Concurrent Distributed Contacts: Theory and Examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRINKLE, JEFFREY C.; TZITZOURIS, J.A.; PANG, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Consider a system of rigid bodies with multiple concurrent contacts. The multi-rigid-body contact problem is to predict the accelerations of the bodies and the normal friction loads acting at the contacts. This paper presents theoretical results for the multi-rigid-body contact problem under the assumptions that one or more contacts occur over locally planar, finite regions and that friction forces are consistent with the maximum work inequality. Existence and uniqueness results are presented for this problem under mild assumptions on the system inputs. In addition, the performance of two different time-stepping methods for integrating the dynamics are compared on two simple multi-body systems

  17. Friction of elastomer-on-glass system and direct observation of its frictional interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Sugiura, Jun-ichi; Hirano, Motohisa; Nitta, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    We performed a study on the static friction of PDMS elastomers with well-defined surface topography sliding over glass. An experimental setup for simultaneous measurements of friction force and direct observations of frictional interface has been developed. The static friction force was nearly proportional to normal load. The static friction force was independent of stick time. The simultaneous measurements revealed that the static friction force was proportional to the total area of contact. The coefficient was nearly independent of the surface topography of PDMS elastomers

  18. Rough Surface Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the contact of general rough curved surfaces having nearly identical geometries, assuming the contact at each differential area obeys the model proposed by Greenwood and Williamson. In order to account for the most general gross geometry, principles of differential geometry of surface are applied. This method while requires more rigorous mathematical manipulations, the fact that it preserves the original surface geometries thus makes the modeling procedure much more intuitive. For subsequent use, differential geometry of axis-symmetric surface is considered instead of general surface (although this “general case” can be done as well in Chapter 3.1. The final formulas for contact area, load, and frictional torque are derived in Chapter 3.2.

  19. Monitoring Ion Implantation Energy Using Non-contact Characterization Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallian, M.; Pap, A.; Mocsar, K.; Somogyi, A.; Nadudvari, Gy.; Kosztka, D.; Pavelka, T.

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art ultra-shallow junctions are produced using extremely low ion implant energies, down to the range of 1-3 keV. This can be achieved by a variety of production techniques; however there is a significant risk that the actual implantation energy differs from the desired value. To detect this, sensitive measurement methods need to be utilized. Experiments show that both Photomodulated Reflection measurements before anneal and Junction Photovoltage-based sheet resistance measurements after anneal are suitable for this purpose.

  20. Seismic analysis of equipment system with non-linearities such as gap and friction using equivalent linearization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, H.; Hirai, T.; Nakata, M.; Kobori, T.; Mizukoshi, K.; Takenaka, Y.; Miyagawa, N.

    1989-01-01

    Many of the equipment systems of nuclear power plants contain a number of non-linearities, such as gap and friction, due to their mechanical functions. It is desirable to take such non-linearities into account appropriately for the evaluation of the aseismic soundness. However, in usual design works, linear analysis method with rough assumptions is applied from engineering point of view. An equivalent linearization method is considered to be one of the effective analytical techniques to evaluate non-linear responses, provided that errors to a certain extent are tolerated, because it has greater simplicity in analysis and economization in computing time than non-linear analysis. The objective of this paper is to investigate the applicability of the equivalent linearization method to evaluate the maximum earthquake response of equipment systems such as the CANDU Fuelling Machine which has multiple non- linearities

  1. The formulation of dynamical contact problems with friction in the case of systems of rigid bodies and general discrete mechanical systems—Painlevé and Kane paradoxes revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Alexandre; Ballard, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of mechanical systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom (discrete mechanical systems) is governed by the Lagrange equation which is a second-order differential equation on a Riemannian manifold (the configuration manifold). The handling of perfect (frictionless) unilateral constraints in this framework (that of Lagrange's analytical dynamics) was undertaken by Schatzman and Moreau at the beginning of the 1980s. A mathematically sound and consistent evolution problem was obtained, paving the road for many subsequent theoretical investigations. In this general evolution problem, the only reaction force which is involved is a generalized reaction force, consistently with the virtual power philosophy of Lagrange. Surprisingly, such a general formulation was never derived in the case of frictional unilateral multibody dynamics. Instead, the paradigm of the Coulomb law applying to reaction forces in the real world is generally invoked. So far, this paradigm has only enabled to obtain a consistent evolution problem in only some very few specific examples and to suggest numerical algorithms to produce computational examples (numerical modeling). In particular, it is not clear what is the evolution problem underlying the computational examples. Moreover, some of the few specific cases in which this paradigm enables to write down a precise evolution problem are known to show paradoxes: the Painlevé paradox (indeterminacy) and the Kane paradox (increase in kinetic energy due to friction). In this paper, we follow Lagrange's philosophy and formulate the frictional unilateral multibody dynamics in terms of the generalized reaction force and not in terms of the real-world reaction force. A general evolution problem that governs the dynamics is obtained for the first time. We prove that all the solutions are dissipative; that is, this new formulation is free of Kane paradox. We also prove that some indeterminacy of the Painlevé paradox is fixed in this

  2. Investigation of the Dynamic Contact Angle Using a Direct Numerical Simulation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangpu; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hai; Li, Aifen; Shams, Bilal

    2016-11-15

    A large amount of residual oil, which exists as isolated oil slugs, remains trapped in reservoirs after water flooding. Numerous numerical studies are performed to investigate the fundamental flow mechanism of oil slugs to improve flooding efficiency. Dynamic contact angle models are usually introduced to simulate an accurate contact angle and meniscus displacement of oil slugs under a high capillary number. Nevertheless, in the oil slug flow simulation process, it is unnecessary to introduce the dynamic contact angle model because of a negligible change in the meniscus displacement after using the dynamic contact angle model when the capillary number is small. Therefore, a critical capillary number should be introduced to judge whether the dynamic contact model should be incorporated into simulations. In this study, a direct numerical simulation method is employed to simulate the oil slug flow in a capillary tube at the pore scale. The position of the interface between water and the oil slug is determined using the phase-field method. The capacity and accuracy of the model are validated using a classical benchmark: a dynamic capillary filling process. Then, different dynamic contact angle models and the factors that affect the dynamic contact angle are analyzed. The meniscus displacements of oil slugs with a dynamic contact angle and a static contact angle (SCA) are obtained during simulations, and the relative error between them is calculated automatically. The relative error limit has been defined to be 5%, beyond which the dynamic contact angle model needs to be incorporated into the simulation to approach the realistic displacement. Thus, the desired critical capillary number can be determined. A three-dimensional universal chart of critical capillary number, which functions as static contact angle and viscosity ratio, is given to provide a guideline for oil slug simulation. Also, a fitting formula is presented for ease of use.

  3. Assessment on the methods of measuring the tyre-road contact patch stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelache, G.; Moisescu, A.-R.; Buretea, D.

    2017-08-01

    The paper reviews established and modern methods for investigating tri-axial stress distributions in the tyre-road contact patch. The authors used three methods of measuring stress distributions: strain gauge method; force sensing technique; acceleration measurements. Four prototypes of instrumented pins transducers involving mentioned measuring methods were developed. Data acquisitions of the contact patch stresses distributions were performed using each transducer with instrumented pin. The results are analysed and compared, underlining the advantages and drawbacks of each method. The experimental results indicate that the three methods are valuable.

  4. Size scaling of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, O M; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-22

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as f(m)+Δf/A(γ) for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of f(m), controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  5. A method to investigate the biomechanical alterations in Perthes’ disease by hip joint contact modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmingo, Remel A.; Skytte, Tina Lercke; Traberg, Marie Sand

    2017-01-01

    for the preoperative planning to obtain stress relief for the highly stressed areas in the malformed hip. This single-patient study demonstrated that the biomechanical alterations in Perthes’ disease can be evaluated individually by patient-specific finite element contact modeling using MRI. A multi-patient study...... was to develop a method to investigate the biomechanical alterations in Perthes’ disease by finite element (FE ) contact modeling using MRI. The MRI data of a unilateral Perthes’ case was obtained to develop the three-dimensional FE model of the hip joint. The stress and contact pressure patterns...... in the unaffected hip were well distrib uted. Elevated concentrations of stress and contact pressure were found in the Perthes’ hip. The highest femoral cartilagev on Mises stress 3.9 MPa and contact pressure 5.3 M P a were found in the Perthes’ hip, whereas 2.4 M P a and 4.9 MP a in the healthy hip, respectively...

  6. Friction and Shear Strength at the Nanowire–Substrate Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW–substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09–0.12 and 0.10–0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134–139 MPa and 78.9–95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW–substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  7. Friction and shear strength at the nanowire-substrate interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Qin, Qingquan; Gu, Yi; Wang, Zhonglin

    2009-11-28

    The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW)-substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09-0.12 and 0.10-0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134-139 MPa and 78.9-95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW-substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  8. Preferences for partner notification method: variation in responses between respondents as index patients and contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apoola, A; Radcliffe, K W; Das, S; Robshaw, V; Gilleran, G; Kumari, B S; Boothby, M; Rajakumar, R

    2007-07-01

    There have been very few studies focusing on what form of communication patients would find acceptable from a clinic. This study looks at the differences in preferences for various partner notification methods when the respondents were index patients compared with when they had to be contacted because a partner had a sexually transmitted infection (STI). There were 2544 respondents. When the clinic had to notify partners, respondents were more likely to report the method as good when a partner had an STI and they were being contacted compared with when the respondents had an infection and the partner was being contacted. The opposite was true for patient referral partner notification. Therefore, there are variations in the preferences of respondents for partner notification method, which depend on whether they see themselves as index patients or contacts.

  9. Three Three-Axis IEPE Accelerometers on the Inner Liner of a Tire for Finding the Tire-Road Friction Potential Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Arto; Tuononen, Ari J

    2015-08-05

    Direct tire-road contact friction estimation is essential for future autonomous cars and active safety systems. Friction estimation methods have been proposed earlier for driving conditions in the presence of a slip angle or slip ratio. However, the estimation of the friction from a freely-rolling tire is still an unsolved topic. Knowing the existing friction potential would be beneficial since vehicle control systems could be adjusted before any remarkable tire force has been produced. Since accelerometers are well-known and robust, and thus a promising sensor type for intelligent tires, this study uses three three-axis IEPE accelerometers on the inner liner of a tire to detect friction potential indicators on two equally smooth surfaces with different friction levels. The equal roughness was chosen for both surfaces in order to study the friction phenomena by neglecting the effect of surface texture on vibrations. The acceleration data before the contact is used to differentiate the two friction levels between the tire and the road. In addition, the contact lengths from the three accelerometers are used to validate the acceleration data. A method to differentiate the friction levels on the basis of the acceleration signal is also introduced.

  10. Three Three-Axis IEPE Accelerometers on the Inner Liner of a Tire for Finding the Tire-Road Friction Potential Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arto Niskanen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Direct tire-road contact friction estimation is essential for future autonomous cars and active safety systems. Friction estimation methods have been proposed earlier for driving conditions in the presence of a slip angle or slip ratio. However, the estimation of the friction from a freely-rolling tire is still an unsolved topic. Knowing the existing friction potential would be beneficial since vehicle control systems could be adjusted before any remarkable tire force has been produced. Since accelerometers are well-known and robust, and thus a promising sensor type for intelligent tires, this study uses three three-axis IEPE accelerometers on the inner liner of a tire to detect friction potential indicators on two equally smooth surfaces with different friction levels. The equal roughness was chosen for both surfaces in order to study the friction phenomena by neglecting the effect of surface texture on vibrations. The acceleration data before the contact is used to differentiate the two friction levels between the tire and the road. In addition, the contact lengths from the three accelerometers are used to validate the acceleration data. A method to differentiate the friction levels on the basis of the acceleration signal is also introduced.

  11. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly

  12. An adaptive EFG-FE coupling method for elasto-plastic contact of rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lan; Liu Geng; Tong Ruiting; Jin Saiying

    2010-01-01

    Differing from Finite Element Method, the meshless method does not need any mesh information and can arrange nodes freely which is perfectly suitable for adaptive analysis. In order to simulate the contact condition factually and improve computational efficiency, an adaptive procedure for Element-free Galerkin-Finite Element (EFG-FE) coupling contact model is established and developed to investigate the elastoplastic contact performance for engineering rough surfaces. The local adaptive refinement strategy combined with the strain energy gradient-based error estimation model is employed. The schemes, including principle explanation, arithmetic analysis and programming realization, are introduced and discussed. Furthermore, some related parameters on adaptive convergence criterion are researched emphatically, including adaptation-stop criterion, refinement or coarsening criterion which are guided by the relative error in total strain energy with two adjacent stages. Based on pioneering works of the EFG-FE coupling method for contact problems, an adaptive EFG-FE model for asperity contact is studied. Compared with the solutions obtained from the uniform refinement model, the adaptation results indicate that the adaptive method presented in this paper is capable of solving asperity contact problems with excellent calculation accuracy and computational efficiency.

  13. Tribological Properties of Silicone Rubber-Based Ceramizable Composites Destined for Wire Covers. Part I. Studies of Block-On-Ring Friction Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Anyszka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceramizable composites of silicone rubber matrix become more and more popular materials destined for wire covers, what can enhance fire safety of building increasing operation time of important equipment or devices (eg fire sprinklers, elevators, alarms etc. Aim of the research was to examine tribological properties and wear of commercially available silicone rubber-based ceramizable composites against steel, in configuration – steel block on composite ring, under various load (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 N. Changes to friction force in time were monitored by a tribotester, whereas wear of the composite surfaces were determined using an optical microscope. Performed studies demonstrate, that tribological characteristics and wear of the composites depend significantly on the origin of material.

  14. Oriented thin films of mixture of a low-bandgap polymer and a fullerene derivative prepared by friction-transfer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, Nobutaka; Mizokuro, Toshiko; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Shibata, Yousei; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki

    2018-02-01

    We have been studying oriented thin films of polymers fabricated by the friction-transfer method, which allows the alignment of a variety of conjugated polymers into highly oriented films. In this study, we prepared oriented blend films of a mixture of a low-bandgap polymer, poly{4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b‧]dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophene-4,6-diyl} (PTB7), and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM), which is a promising combination for application in organic solar cells. We obtained oriented blend films of PTB7 and PC71BM by the friction-transfer method from a solid block. Polarized UV-visible spectra show that the PTB7 chains were aligned parallel to the friction direction in the blend films. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) studies with synchrotron radiation suggested that the preferred orientation of PTB7 crystallites was face-on in the blend films. The GIXD results also showed the high uniaxial orientation of PTB7 chains in blend films. Photovoltaic devices were fabricated using the friction-transferred blend films of the PTB7 and PC71BM. These bulk heterojunction devices showed better performance than planar heterojunction devices fabricated using pure friction-transferred PTB7 films.

  15. General Retarded Contact Self-energies in and beyond the Non-equilibrium Green's Functions Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Tillmann; He, Yu; Andrawis, Robert; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    Retarded contact self-energies in the framework of nonequilibrium Green's functions allow to model the impact of lead structures on the device without explicitly including the leads in the actual device calculation. Most of the contact self-energy algorithms are limited to homogeneous or periodic, semi-infinite lead structures. In this work, the complex absorbing potential method is extended to solve retarded contact self-energies for arbitrary lead structures, including irregular and randomly disordered leads. This method is verified for regular leads against common approaches and on physically equivalent, but numerically different irregular leads. Transmission results on randomly alloyed In0.5Ga0.5As structures show the importance of disorder in the leads. The concept of retarded contact self-energies is expanded to model passivation of atomically resolved surfaces without explicitly increasing the device's Hamiltonian.

  16. The radial flow method: constraints from laboratory experiments on the evolution of hydraulic properties of fractures during frictional sliding experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kewel, M.; Renner, J.

    2017-12-01

    The variation of hydraulic properties during sliding events is of importance for source mechanics and analyses of the evolution in effective stresses. We conducted laboratory experiments on samples of Padang granite to elucidate the interrelation between shear displacement on faults and their hydraulic properties. The cylindrical samples of 30 mm diameter and 75 mm length were prepared with a ground sawcut, inclined 35° to the cylindrical axis and accessed by a central bore of 3 mm diameter. The conventional triaxial compression experiments were conducted at effective pressures of 30, 50, and 70 MPa at slip rates of 2×10-4 and 8×10-4 mm s-1. The nominally constant fluid pressure of 30 MPa was modulated by oscillations with an amplitude of up to 0.5 MPa. Permeability and specific storage capacity of the fault were determined using the oscillatory radial-flow method that rests on an analysis of amplitude ratio and phase shift between the oscillatory fluid pressure and the oscillatory fluid flow from and into the fault plane. This method allowed us to continuously monitor the hydraulic evolution during elastic loading and frictional sliding. The chosen oscillation period of 60 s guaranteed a resolution of hydraulic properties for slip increments as small as 20 μm. The determined hydraulic properties show a fairly uniform dependence on normal stress at hydrostatic conditions and initial elastic loading. The samples exhibited stable frictional sliding with modest strengthening with increasing strain. Since not all phase-shift values fell inside the theoretical range for purely radial pressure diffusion during frictional sliding, the records of equivalent hydraulic properties exhibit some gaps. In the phases with evaluable phase-shift values, permeability fluctuates by almost one order of magnitude over slip intervals of as little as 100 μm. We suppose that the observed fluctuations are related to comminution and reconfiguration of asperities on the fault planes

  17. A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Jian; Shi, Pan; Zhu, Lin; Ding, Jianfu; Chen, Qingmin; Wang, Qingjun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angle is proposed. • We have designed a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental. • The modified method overcomes the deviation of the bubble in the traditional captive bubble method. • The modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. - Abstract: In this work, a modification to the captive bubble method was proposed to test the advancing and receding contact angle. This modification is done by adding a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental system equipped with an optical angle mater equipped with a high speed CCD camera, a temperature control system and a computer. A series of samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared. The advancing and receding contact angles of these samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic surfaces through the new methods was comparable to the result tested by the traditional sessile drop method. It is proved that this method overcomes the limitation of the traditional captive bubble method and the modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. However, due to the nature of the captive bubble technique, this method is also only suitable for testing the surface with advancing or receding contact angle below 130°

  18. A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jian; Shi, Pan; Zhu, Lin [Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology (Nanjing University), Ministry of Eduction, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ding, Jianfu [Security and Disruptive Technologies, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, K1A 0R6, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Qingmin [Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology (Nanjing University), Ministry of Eduction, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, Qingjun, E-mail: njuwqj@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology (Nanjing University), Ministry of Eduction, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angle is proposed. • We have designed a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental. • The modified method overcomes the deviation of the bubble in the traditional captive bubble method. • The modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. - Abstract: In this work, a modification to the captive bubble method was proposed to test the advancing and receding contact angle. This modification is done by adding a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental system equipped with an optical angle mater equipped with a high speed CCD camera, a temperature control system and a computer. A series of samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared. The advancing and receding contact angles of these samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic surfaces through the new methods was comparable to the result tested by the traditional sessile drop method. It is proved that this method overcomes the limitation of the traditional captive bubble method and the modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. However, due to the nature of the captive bubble technique, this method is also only suitable for testing the surface with advancing or receding contact angle below 130°.

  19. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding of Aluminium Alloy Using Grey Relation Analysis with Entropy Measurement Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAURABH KUMAR GUPTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research focus on optimization of Friction Stir Welding (FSW process parameters for joining of AA6061 aluminium alloy using hybrid approach. The FSW process parameters considered are tool rotational speed, welding speed and axial force. The quality characteristics considered are tensile strength (TS and percentage of tensile elongation (TE. Taguchi based experimental design L9 orthogonal array is used for determining the experimental results. The value of weights corresponding to each quality characteristic is determined by using the entropy measurement method so that their importance can be properly explained. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA is used to determine the contribution of FSW process parameters. The confirmation tests also have been done for verifying the results.

  20. A multivariable model for predicting the frictional behaviour and hydration of the human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veijgen, N K; van der Heide, E; Masen, M A

    2013-08-01

    The frictional characteristics of skin-object interactions are important when handling objects, in the assessment of perception and comfort of products and materials and in the origins and prevention of skin injuries. In this study, based on statistical methods, a quantitative model is developed that describes the friction behaviour of human skin as a function of the subject characteristics, contact conditions, the properties of the counter material as well as environmental conditions. Although the frictional behaviour of human skin is a multivariable problem, in literature the variables that are associated with skin friction have been studied using univariable methods. In this work, multivariable models for the static and dynamic coefficients of friction as well as for the hydration of the skin are presented. A total of 634 skin-friction measurements were performed using a recently developed tribometer. Using a statistical analysis, previously defined potential influential variables were linked to the static and dynamic coefficient of friction and to the hydration of the skin, resulting in three predictive quantitative models that descibe the friction behaviour and the hydration of human skin respectively. Increased dynamic coefficients of friction were obtained from older subjects, on the index finger, with materials with a higher surface energy at higher room temperatures, whereas lower dynamic coefficients of friction were obtained at lower skin temperatures, on the temple with rougher contact materials. The static coefficient of friction increased with higher skin hydration, increasing age, on the index finger, with materials with a higher surface energy and at higher ambient temperatures. The hydration of the skin was associated with the skin temperature, anatomical location, presence of hair on the skin and the relative air humidity. Predictive models have been derived for the static and dynamic coefficient of friction using a multivariable approach. These

  1. Micromechanical simulation of frictional behaviour in metal forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Hodgson, P.D.; Cardew-Hall, M.J.; Kalyanasundaram, S.

    2000-01-01

    Friction is a critical factor for Sheet Metal Forming (SMF). The Coulomb friction model is usually used in most Finite Element (FE) simulation for SMF. However, friction is a function of the local contact deformation conditions, such as local pressure, roughness and relative velocity. This paper will present a micromechanical model that accounts for the local frictional behaviour through finite element simulations performed at the micromechanical level. Frictional behaviour between contact surfaces can be based on three cases: boundary, hydrodynamic and mixed lubrication. In our microscopic friction model based on FEM, the case of boundary lubrication contact between sheet and tool has been considered. In the view of microscopic geometry, roughness depends upon amplitude and wavelength of surface asperities of sheet and tool. The mean pressure applied on the surface differs from the pressure over the actual contact area. The effect of roughness (microscopic geometric condition) and relative speed of contact surfaces on friction coefficient was examined in the FE model for the microscopic friction behaviour. The analysis was performed using an explicit finite element formulation. In this study, it was found that the roughness of deformable sheet decreases during sliding and the coefficient of friction increases with increasing roughness of contact surfaces. The coefficient of friction increases with the increase of relative velocity and adhesive friction coefficient between contact surfaces. (author)

  2. Electrical properties of aluminum contacts deposited by DC sputtering method for photovoltaic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczak Ewelina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of aluminum contacts is common in the process of silicon solar cells production because of low contact resistivity. It has also a great importance in thin film technology for photovoltaics, especially in copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS devices. The final stage of CIGS cell production is the top contact deposition of high conductivity layer for lateral current collection. Such material has to be highly optically transparent as well. In order to make a contact, metal is deposited onto TCO layer with minimum shadowing to allow as much light as possible into device. The metal grid contact is being made by deposition of few microns of aluminum. The resistivity of the deposited material as well as resistance between the metal grid and TCO layer plays a great role in high quality solar cell production. This paper presents the results of four point probe conductivity analysis of Al thin films deposited by direct current (DC magnetron sputtering method. Influence of technological parameters of the Al deposition process on sheet resistance of deposited layers has been showed. In order to obtain the lowest resistivity of the thin contact layer, optimal set of sputtering parameters, i.e. power applied, deposition time and deposition pressure was found. The resistivity of the contact between two adjacent Al metal fingers deposited onto transparent conductive Al-doped zinc oxide film has been also examined.

  3. Contact dermatitis is an unrecognized problem in the construction industry: Comparison of four different assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Johan G; Heederik, Dick; Spee, Ton; van Rooy, Frits G; Krop, Esmeralda J M; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Smit, Lidwien A M

    2017-10-01

    A high contact dermatitis symptoms prevalence has been observed in Dutch construction workers. Contact dermatitis was diagnosed by an expert panel using questionnaire data and photographs of 751 subjects' hands. A subset was evaluated by two occupational physicians. Their diagnoses were compared to those of the expert panel. In addition, two self-reported questionnaire-based assessment methods were compared to the expert panel evaluation. Associations between contact dermatitis and determinants were assessed using log-binomial regression analysis. Contact dermatitis prevalence was high: 61.4% (expert panel's diagnosis) and 32.9% (self-reported). Agreement between occupational physicians and the expert panel was low but increased after training. Washing hands with solvents and performing job-related tasks at home were related to contact dermatitis. Contact dermatitis prevalence among construction workers is high. Recognition of contact dermatitis by occupational physicians is poor but can be improved by training. Awareness of skin disorders should be raised. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Electrical properties of aluminum contacts deposited by DC sputtering method for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczak, Ewelina; Gułkowski, Sławomir

    2017-10-01

    The use of aluminum contacts is common in the process of silicon solar cells production because of low contact resistivity. It has also a great importance in thin film technology for photovoltaics, especially in copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) devices. The final stage of CIGS cell production is the top contact deposition of high conductivity layer for lateral current collection. Such material has to be highly optically transparent as well. In order to make a contact, metal is deposited onto TCO layer with minimum shadowing to allow as much light as possible into device. The metal grid contact is being made by deposition of few microns of aluminum. The resistivity of the deposited material as well as resistance between the metal grid and TCO layer plays a great role in high quality solar cell production. This paper presents the results of four point probe conductivity analysis of Al thin films deposited by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering method. Influence of technological parameters of the Al deposition process on sheet resistance of deposited layers has been showed. In order to obtain the lowest resistivity of the thin contact layer, optimal set of sputtering parameters, i.e. power applied, deposition time and deposition pressure was found. The resistivity of the contact between two adjacent Al metal fingers deposited onto transparent conductive Al-doped zinc oxide film has been also examined.

  5. In Vitro Urethra Model to Characterize The Frictional Properties of Urinary Catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn, Troels; Lee, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    conformal sliding contacts with the catheter and high relevance to clinical catherization. With the proposed urethra model assembled in texture analyzer, the lubricity of catheters lubricated in different modes was tested. In comparison with conventional pin-on-disk tribometry, the coefficients of friction......, frictional properties of tubular devices such as catheters, endoscopes, and angioplasty balloons are particularly challenging to characterize because of non-standard shape and contact configuration. In this study, we propose that fabrication of in vitro urethra model with castable elastomers can provide...... of sliding contacts with the urethra model with unlubricated and lubricated catheters were determined. Impact of the improved bio-relevance of friction testing methods on the evaluation of various catheter materials and surface modification methods is discussed in detail....

  6. In-Vivo Human Skin to Textiles Friction Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfarr, Lukas; Zagar, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    We report on a measurement system to determine highly reliable and accurate friction properties of textiles as needed for example as input to garment simulation software. Our investigations led to a set-up that allows to characterize not just textile to textile but also textile to in-vivo human skin tribological properties and thus to fundamental knowledge about genuine wearer interaction in garments. The method of test conveyed in this paper is measuring concurrently and in a highly time resolved manner the normal force as well as the resulting shear force caused by a friction subject intending to slide out of the static friction regime and into the dynamic regime on a test bench. Deeper analysis of various influences is enabled by extending the simple model following Coulomb's law for rigid body friction to include further essential parameters such as contact force, predominance in the yarn's orientation and also skin hydration. This easy-to-use system enables to measure reliably and reproducibly both static and dynamic friction for a variety of friction partners including human skin with all its variability there might be.

  7. Friction Anisotropy with Respect to Topographic Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties. PMID:23248751

  8. Frictional ageing from interfacial bonding and the origins of rate and state friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qunyang; Tullis, Terry E; Goldsby, David; Carpick, Robert W

    2011-11-30

    Earthquakes have long been recognized as being the result of stick-slip frictional instabilities. Over the past few decades, laboratory studies of rock friction have elucidated many aspects of tectonic fault zone processes and earthquake phenomena. Typically, the static friction of rocks grows logarithmically with time when they are held in stationary contact, but the mechanism responsible for this strengthening is not understood. This time-dependent increase of frictional strength, or frictional ageing, is one manifestation of the 'evolution effect' in rate and state friction theory. A prevailing view is that the time dependence of rock friction results from increases in contact area caused by creep of contacting asperities. Here we present the results of atomic force microscopy experiments that instead show that frictional ageing arises from the formation of interfacial chemical bonds, and the large magnitude of ageing at the nanometre scale is quantitatively consistent with what is required to explain observations in macroscopic rock friction experiments. The relative magnitude of the evolution effect compared with that of the 'direct effect'--the dependence of friction on instantaneous changes in slip velocity--determine whether unstable slip, leading to earthquakes, is possible. Understanding the mechanism underlying the evolution effect would enable us to formulate physically based frictional constitutive laws, rather than the current empirically based 'laws', allowing more confident extrapolation to natural faults.

  9. Development of a novel non-contact inspection technique to detect micro cracks under the surface of a glass substrate by thermal stress-induced light scattering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Yoshitaro; Terasaki, Nao; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2017-05-01

    Fine polishing techniques, such as a chemical mechanical polishing treatment, are important techniques in glass substrate manufacturing. However, these techniques may cause micro cracks under the surface of glass substrates because they used mechanical friction. A stress-induced light scattering method (SILSM), which was combined with light scattering method and mechanical stress effects, was proposed for inspecting surfaces to detect polishing-induced micro cracks. However, in the conventional SILSM, samples need to be loaded with physical contact, and the loading point is invisible in transparent materials. Here, we introduced a novel non-contact SILSM using a heating device. A glass substrate was heated first, and then the light scattering intensity of micro cracks was detected by a cooled charge-couple device camera during the natural cooling process. Results clearly showed during the decreasing surface temperature of a glass substrate, appropriate thermal stress is generated for detecting micro cracks by using the SILSM and light scattering intensity from micro cracks changes. We confirmed that non-contact thermal SILSM (T-SILSM) can detect micro cracks under the surface of transparent materials.

  10. A simple criterion for determining the static friction force between nanowires and flat substrates using the most-bent-state method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lizhen; Wang, Shiliang; Huang, Han

    2015-04-24

    A simple criterion was developed to assess the appropriateness of the currently available models that estimate the static friction force between nanowires and substrates using the 'most-bent-state' method. Our experimental testing of the static friction force between Al2O3 nanowires and Si substrate verified our theoretical analysis, as well as the establishment of the criterion. It was found that the models are valid only for the bent nanowires with the ratio of wire length over the minimum curvature radius [Formula: see text] no greater than 1. For the cases with [Formula: see text] greater than 1, the static friction force was overestimated as it neglected the effect of its tangential component.

  11. A Physics-Based Rock Friction Constitutive Law: Steady State Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonov, Einat; Scholz, Christopher H.

    2018-02-01

    Experiments measuring friction over a wide range of sliding velocities find that the value of the friction coefficient varies widely: friction is high and behaves according to the rate and state constitutive law during slow sliding, yet markedly weakens as the sliding velocity approaches seismic slip speeds. We introduce a physics-based theory to explain this behavior. Using conventional microphysics of creep, we calculate the velocity and temperature dependence of contact stresses during sliding, including the thermal effects of shear heating. Contacts are assumed to reach a coupled thermal and mechanical steady state, and friction is calculated for steady sliding. Results from theory provide good quantitative agreement with reported experimental results for quartz and granite friction over 11 orders of magnitude in velocity. The new model elucidates the physics of friction and predicts the connection between friction laws to independently determined material parameters. It predicts four frictional regimes as function of slip rate: at slow velocity friction is either velocity strengthening or weakening, depending on material parameters, and follows the rate and state friction law. Differences between surface and volume activation energies are the main control on velocity dependence. At intermediate velocity, for some material parameters, a distinct velocity strengthening regime emerges. At fast sliding, shear heating produces thermal softening of friction. At the fastest sliding, melting causes further weakening. This theory, with its four frictional regimes, fits well previously published experimental results under low temperature and normal stress.

  12. Method of separate determination of high-ohmic sample resistance and contact resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim A. Golubiatnikov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A method of separate determination of two-pole sample volume resistance and contact resistance is suggested. The method is applicable to high-ohmic semiconductor samples: semi-insulating gallium arsenide, detector cadmium-zinc telluride (CZT, etc. The method is based on near-contact region illumination by monochromatic radiation of variable intensity from light emitting diodes with quantum energies exceeding the band gap of the material. It is necessary to obtain sample photo-current dependence upon light emitting diode current and to find the linear portion of this dependence. Extrapolation of this linear portion to the Y-axis gives the cut-off current. As the bias voltage is known, it is easy to calculate sample volume resistance. Then, using dark current value, one can determine the total contact resistance. The method was tested for n-type semi-insulating GaAs. The contact resistance value was shown to be approximately equal to the sample volume resistance. Thus, the influence of contacts must be taken into account when electrophysical data are analyzed.

  13. Frictional properties of jointed welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teufel, L.W.

    1981-07-01

    The results of the experiments on simulated joints in welded tuff from the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff warrant the following conclusions: (1) The coefficient of friction of the joints is independent of normal stress at a given sliding velocity. (2) The coefficient of friction increases with both increasing time of stationary contact and decreasing sliding velocity. (3) Time and velocity dependence of friction is due to an increase in the real area of contact on the sliding surface, caused by asperity creep. (4) Joints in water-saturated tuff show a greater time and velocity dependence of friction than those in dehydrated tuff. (5) The enhanced time and velocity dependence of friction with water saturation is a result of increased creep at asperity contacts, which is in turn due to a reduction in the surface indentation hardness by hydrolytic weakening and/or stress corrosion cracking

  14. Investigation of squeal noise under positive friction characteristics condition provided by friction modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaogang; Meehan, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Field application of friction modifiers on the top of rail has been shown to effectively curb squeal and reduce lateral forces, but performance can be variable, according to other relevant research. Up to now, most investigations of friction modifiers were conducted in the field, where it is difficult to control or measure important parameters such as angle of attack, rolling speed, adhesion ratio etc. In the present investigation, the effect of different friction modifiers on the occurrence of squeal was investigated on a rolling contact two disk test rig. In particular, friction-creep curves and squeal sound pressure levels were measured under different rolling speeds and friction modifiers. The results show friction modifiers can eliminate or reduce the negative slope of friction-creep curves, but squeal noise still exists. Theoretical modelling of instantaneous creep behaviours reveals a possible reason why wheel squeal still exists after the application of friction modifiers.

  15. Contact effects analyzed by a parameter extraction method based on a single bottom-gate/top-contact organic thin-film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Shunsuke; Yamada, Hirofumi; Noda, Kei

    2018-03-01

    Contact effects in organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) were examined by using our previously proposed parameter extraction method from the electrical characteristics of a single staggered-type device. Gate-voltage-dependent contact resistance and channel mobility in the linear regime were evaluated for bottom-gate/top-contact (BGTC) pentacene TFTs with active layers of different thicknesses, and for pentacene TFTs with contact-doped layers prepared by coevaporation of pentacene and tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ). The extracted parameters suggested that the influence of the contact resistance becomes more prominent with the larger active-layer thickness, and that contact-doping experiments give rise to a drastic decrease in the contact resistance and a concurrent considerable improvement in the channel mobility. Additionally, the estimated energy distributions of trap density in the transistor channel probably reflect the trap filling with charge carriers injected into the channel regions. The analysis results in this study confirm the effectiveness of our proposed method, with which we can investigate contact effects and circumvent the influences of characteristic variations in OTFT fabrication.

  16. Physico-chemical behaviour of a metal/polymer contact subject to a low amplitude friction in a chlorinated medium. Effect of ionitriding and ion implantation surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbe, L.M.

    1993-10-01

    The fretting-corrosion behaviour of two tribological couples (TA6V/PMMA and 316L/PMMA) had been studied in order to better understand the degradation mechanisms observed on pivot prosthesis sealed in bones. Pressure appears to have a major role; at high contact pressure, the PMMA wear is the main degradation mechanism with PMMA debris acting as a metal surface protecting agent; at low contact pressure, both material deterioration is involved, and titanium has a corrosion-dominated degradation. An optimal resistance to fretting is achieved when TA6V is coated with Ti N (ion implantation) and Ti N, Ti 2 N (ionitriding). When nitriding, processing temperature appears as a critical factor to ensure thickness and homogeneity of the nitride coatings. 181 p., 106 figs., 110 refs

  17. A novel method for the determination of migration of contaminants from food contact materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.; Parry, S.J.; Benzing, R.

    1996-01-01

    A neutron activation method has been developed for the analysis of high density polyethylene, low density polyethylene, polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate and polystyrene food contact plastics. The method provides determination of over 50 elements at concentrations below 1 mg kg -1 . This technique has now been extended to study migration from food contact materials into standard food simulants (olive oil, acetic acid, ethanol and water). Samples of plastic are irradiated in a thermal neutron flux to procedure radionuclides of the elements present in the plastic. (author). 5 refs., 7 tabs

  18. Kinetic Friction of Sport Fabrics on Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Nachbauer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available After falls, skiers or snowboarders often slide on the slope and may collide with obstacles. Thus, the skier’s friction on snow is an important factor to reduce incidence and severity of impact injuries. The purpose of this study was to measure snow friction of different fabrics of ski garments with respect to roughness, speed, and contact pressure. Three types of fabrics were investigated: a commercially available ski overall, a smooth downhill racing suit, and a dimpled downhill racing suit. Friction was measured for fabrics taped on a short ski using a linear tribometer. The fabrics’ roughness was determined by focus variation microscopy. Friction coefficients were between 0.19 and 0.48. Roughness, friction coefficient, and friction force were highest for the dimpled race suit. The friction force of the fabrics was higher for the higher contact pressure than for the lower one at all speeds. It was concluded that the main friction mechanism for the fabrics was dry friction. Only the fabric with the roughest surface showed friction coefficients, which were high enough to sufficiently decelerate a sliding skier on beginner and intermediate slopes.

  19. Nano-friction behavior of phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lichun; Liu, Bo; Srikanth, Narasimalu; Tian, Yu; Zhou, Kun

    2017-09-01

    Nano-friction of phosphorene plays a significant role in affecting the controllability and efficiency of applying strain engineering to tune its properties. So far, the friction behavior of phosphorene has not been studied. This work studies the friction of single-layer and bilayer phosphorene on an amorphous silicon substrate by sliding a rigid tip. For the single-layer phosphorene, it is found that its friction is highly anisotropic, i.e. the friction is larger along the armchair direction than that along the zigzag direction. Moreover, pre-strain of the phosphorene also exhibits anisotropic effects. The friction increases with the pre-strain along the zigzag direction, but decreases with that along the armchair direction. Furthermore, the strong adhesion between the phosphorene and its substrate increases the friction between the phosphorene and the tip. For bilayer phosphorene, its friction highly depends on its stacking mode, which determines the contact interface with a commensurate or incommensurate pattern. This friction behavior is quite unique and greatly differs from that of graphene and molybdenum disulfide. Detailed analysis reveals that this behavior results from the combination effect of the friction contact area, the potential-energy profile of phosphorene, and its unique elongation.

  20. Low-friction nanojoint prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassov, Sergei; Oras, Sven; Antsov, Mikk; Butikova, Jelena; Lõhmus, Rünno; Polyakov, Boris

    2018-05-01

    High surface energy of individual nanostructures leads to high adhesion and static friction that can completely hinder the operation of nanoscale systems with movable parts. For instance, silver or gold nanowires cannot be moved on silicon substrate without plastic deformation. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate an operational prototype of a low-friction nanojoint. The movable part of the prototype is made either from a gold or silver nano-pin produced by laser-induced partial melting of silver and gold nanowires resulting in the formation of rounded bulbs on their ends. The nano-pin is then manipulated into the inverted pyramid (i-pyramids) specially etched in a Si wafer. Due to the small contact area, the nano-pin can be repeatedly tilted inside an i-pyramid as a rigid object without noticeable deformation. At the same time in the absence of external force the nanojoint is stable and preserves its position and tilt angle. Experiments are performed inside a scanning electron microscope and are supported by finite element method simulations.

  1. New Method Developed to Measure Contact Angles of a Sessile Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2002-01-01

    The spreading of an evaporating liquid on a solid surface occurs in many practical processes and is of importance in a number of practical situations such as painting, textile dyeing, coating, gluing, and thermal engineering. Typical processes involving heat transfer where the contact angle plays an important role are film cooling, boiling, and the heat transfer through heat pipes. The biological phenomenon of cell spreading also is analogous to a drop spreading (ref. 1). In the study of spreading, the dynamic contact angle describes the interfacial properties on solid substrates and, therefore, has been studied by physicists and fluid mechanics investigators. The dynamic contact angle of a spreading nonvolatile liquid drop provides a simple tool in the study of the free-boundary problem, but the study of the spreading of a volatile liquid drop is of more practical interest because the evaporation of common liquids is inevitable in practical processes. The most common method to measure the contact angle, the contact radius, and the height of a sessile drop on a solid surface is to view the drop from its edge through an optical microscope. However, this method gives only local information in the view direction. Zhang and Yang (ref. 2) developed a laser shadowgraphy method to investigate the evaporation of sessile drop on a glass plate. As described here, Zhang and Chao (refs. 3 and 4) improved the method and suggested a new optical arrangement to measure the dynamic contact angle and the instant evaporation rate of a sessile drop with much higher accuracy (less than 1 percent). With this method, any fluid motion in the evaporating drop can be visualized through shadowgraphy without using a tracer, which often affects the field under investigation.

  2. Advanced friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Meinders, Vincent T.

    2012-01-01

    The Coulomb friction model is frequently used for sheet metal forming simulations. This model incorporates a constant coefficient of friction and does not take the influence of important parameters such as contact pressure or deformation of the sheet material into account. This article presents a

  3. Advanced friction modeling in sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Huetink, Han

    2011-01-01

    The Coulomb friction model is frequently used for sheet metal forming simulations. This model incorporates a constant coefficient of friction and does not take the influence of important parameters such as contact pressure or deformation of the sheet material into account. This article presents a

  4. A new method of making ohmic contacts to p-GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández-Gutierrez, C.A., E-mail: chernandez@fis.cinvestav.mx [DNyN, Cinvestav-IPN, México, DF, 07360 (Mexico); Kudriavtsev, Yu. [Departamento Ingeniería Eléctrica – SEES, Cinvestav-IPN, México, DF, 07360 (Mexico); Mota, Esteban [ESIME, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF, 07738 (Mexico); Hernández, A.G.; Escobosa-Echavarría, A.; Sánchez-Resendiz, V. [Departamento Ingeniería Eléctrica – SEES, Cinvestav-IPN, México, DF, 07360 (Mexico); Casallas-Moreno, Y.L.; López-López, M. [Departamento Física, Cinvestav-IPN, México, DF, 07360 (Mexico)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Low resistance Ohmic contacts preparation is based on low energy high dose In{sup +} ion implantation into Metal/p-GaN to achieve a thin layer of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N just at the interface. • The specific ohmic contact was reduced from 10{sup −2} Ωcm{sup 2} to 2.5 × 10{sup −4} Ωcm{sup 2}. - Abstract: The structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics of In{sup +} ion-implanted Au/Ni, Au/Nb and Au/W ohmic contacts to p-GaN were investigated. After the preparation of Ni, Nb and W electrode on the surface of p-GaN, the metal/p-GaN contact interface was implanted by 30 keV In{sup +} ions with an implantation dose of 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature to form a thin layer of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N located at the metal-semiconductor interface, achieved to reduce the specific contact resistance due to the improving quantum tunneling transport trough to the structure. The characterization was carried out by high-resolution X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry to investigate the formation of ternary alloy, re-crystallization by rapid thermal annealing process after In{sup +} implantation, and the redistribution of elements. The specific contact resistance was extracted by current-voltage (I-V) curves using transmission line method; the lowest specific contact resistance of 2.5 × 10{sup −4} Ωcm{sup 2} was achieved for Au/Ni/p-In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/p-GaN ohmic contacts.

  5. Studying the Transient Thermal Contact Conductance Between the Exhaust Valve and Its Seat Using the Inverse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhad, Mohsen Motahari; Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hassan; Shahraki, Saeid

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the experiments aimed at analyzing thermally the exhaust valve in an air-cooled internal combustion engine and estimating the thermal contact conductance in fixed and periodic contacts. Due to the nature of internal combustion engines, the duration of contact between the valve and its seat is too short, and much time is needed to reach the quasi-steady state in the periodic contact between the exhaust valve and its seat. Using the methods of linear extrapolation and the inverse solution, the surface contact temperatures and the fixed and periodic thermal contact conductance were calculated. The results of linear extrapolation and inverse methods have similar trends, and based on the error analysis, they are accurate enough to estimate the thermal contact conductance. Moreover, due to the error analysis, a linear extrapolation method using inverse ratio is preferred. The effects of pressure, contact frequency, heat flux, and cooling air speed on thermal contact conductance have been investigated. The results show that by increasing the contact pressure the thermal contact conductance increases substantially. In addition, by increasing the engine speed the thermal contact conductance decreases. On the other hand, by boosting the air speed the thermal contact conductance increases, and by raising the heat flux the thermal contact conductance reduces. The average calculated error equals to 12.9 %.

  6. Residual stress analysis in linear friction welded in-service Inconel 718 superalloy via neutron diffraction and contour method approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M. [University of British Columbia – Okanagan, School of Engineering, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, Canada V1V 1V7 (Canada); Levesque, J.-B. [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Québec (IREQ), 1800 Lionel-Boulet Blvd., Varennes, Canada J3X 1S1 (Canada); Bichler, L., E-mail: lukas.bichler@ubc.ca [University of British Columbia – Okanagan, School of Engineering, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, Canada V1V 1V7 (Canada); Sediako, D. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Building 459, Station 18, Chalk River, Canada K0J 1J0 (Canada); Gholipour, J.; Wanjara, P. [National Research Council of Canada, Aerospace 5145 Decelles Ave., Montreal, Canada H3T 2B2 (Canada)

    2017-04-13

    In this study, an analysis of elastic residual stress in Inconel{sup ®} 718 (IN 718) linear friction welds (LFWs) was carried out. In particular, the suitability of LFW for manufacturing and repair of aero engine components was emulated by joining virgin and in-service (extracted from a turbine disk) materials. The evolution in the residual strains and stresses in the heat-affected zone (HAZ), thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) and dynamically recrystallized zone (DRX) of the weld was characterized using the neutron diffraction and contour methods. The results provided insight into diverse challenges in quantitative analysis of residual stresses in welded IN 718 using diffraction techniques. Specifically, judicious selection of the beam width, height and stress-free lattice spacing were seen to be crucial to minimize measurement error and increase accuracy. Further, the contour method – a destructive technique relying on capturing the stress relaxation after electrical discharge machining – was used to characterize the residual stress distribution on two-dimensional plane sections of the welds. Both techniques suggested an increasing magnitude of residual stress originating from the base metal that reached a peak at the weld interface. Both methods indicated that the peak magnitude of residual stresses were below the yield stress of IN 718.

  7. Argo packing friction research update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanTassell, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper focuses on the issue of valve packing friction and its affect on the operability of motor- and air-operated valves (MOVs and AOVs). At this time, most nuclear power plants are required to perform postmaintenance testing following a packing adjustment or replacement. In many cases, the friction generated by the packing does not impact the operability window of a valve. However, to date there has not been a concerted effort to substantiate this claim. To quantify the effects of packing friction, it has become necessary to develop a formula to predict the friction effects accurately. This formula provides a much more accurate method of predicting packing friction than previously used factors based strictly on stem diameter. Over the past 5 years, Argo Packing Company has been developing and testing improved graphite packing systems at research facilities, such as AECL Chalk River and Wyle Laboratories. Much of this testing has centered around reducing and predicting friction that is related to packing. In addition, diagnostic testing for Generic Letter 89-10 MOVs and AOVs has created a significant data base. In July 1992 Argo asked several utilities to provide running load data that could be used to quantify packing friction repeatability and predictability. This technical paper provides the basis to predict packing friction, which will improve calculations for thrust requirements for Generic Leter 89-10 and future AOV programs. In addition, having an accurate packing friction formula will improve packing performance when low running loads are identified that would indicate insufficient sealing force

  8. Reliability of Semiautomated Computational Methods for Estimating Tibiofemoral Contact Stress in the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald D. Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that contact stress is a potent predictor of subsequent symptomatic osteoarthritis development in the knee. However, much larger numbers of knees (likely on the order of hundreds, if not thousands need to be reliably analyzed to achieve the statistical power necessary to clarify this relationship. This study assessed the reliability of new semiautomated computational methods for estimating contact stress in knees from large population-based cohorts. Ten knees of subjects from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study were included. Bone surfaces were manually segmented from sequential 1.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging slices by three individuals on two nonconsecutive days. Four individuals then registered the resulting bone surfaces to corresponding bone edges on weight-bearing radiographs, using a semi-automated algorithm. Discrete element analysis methods were used to estimate contact stress distributions for each knee. Segmentation and registration reliabilities (day-to-day and interrater for peak and mean medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact stress were assessed with Shrout-Fleiss intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs. The segmentation and registration steps of the modeling approach were found to have excellent day-to-day (ICC 0.93–0.99 and good inter-rater reliability (0.84–0.97. This approach for estimating compartment-specific tibiofemoral contact stress appears to be sufficiently reliable for use in large population-based cohorts.

  9. A Procedure for Determining Tire-Road Friction Characteristics Using a Modification of the Magic Formula Based on Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Javier; Velasco, Juan M.; Guerra, Antonio J.; Hernández, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of tire-road friction characteristics is essential for the proper performance of most relevant vehicle active safety systems. Therefore, its determination is necessary to improve the effectiveness of these systems and to avoid or reduce the consequences of traffic accidents. For this reason, there is a great deal of literature concerning methods and devices for measuring and modeling tire-road friction. Most of these methods have focused on determining the road friction resistance, taking only road composition and making measurements in wet conditions into account. However, friction forces are also dependent on the tire type, since the contact is established between the tire and the road in real driving conditions. Thus, the type and characteristics of the tire have to be considered in the study of the interaction between the vehicle and the road. The aim of this work is to unify the study of the friction coefficient, taking into consideration the two existing bodies involved in the contact, i.e., the tire and road and the main factors that influence the forces in the contact. To this end, a modification of the Pacejka Magic Formula is proposed to include the effects of the main parameters that influence the contact, such as road composition and its state, tire type, vehicle speed, and slip between the tire and the road. To do so, real tests have been conducted on several roads and with different operating conditions. As a result, a more accurate tire-road friction model has been obtained. PMID:29562623

  10. A Procedure for Determining Tire-Road Friction Characteristics Using a Modification of the Magic Formula Based on Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Cabrera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of tire-road friction characteristics is essential for the proper performance of most relevant vehicle active safety systems. Therefore, its determination is necessary to improve the effectiveness of these systems and to avoid or reduce the consequences of traffic accidents. For this reason, there is a great deal of literature concerning methods and devices for measuring and modeling tire-road friction. Most of these methods have focused on determining the road friction resistance, taking only road composition and making measurements in wet conditions into account. However, friction forces are also dependent on the tire type, since the contact is established between the tire and the road in real driving conditions. Thus, the type and characteristics of the tire have to be considered in the study of the interaction between the vehicle and the road. The aim of this work is to unify the study of the friction coefficient, taking into consideration the two existing bodies involved in the contact, i.e., the tire and road and the main factors that influence the forces in the contact. To this end, a modification of the Pacejka Magic Formula is proposed to include the effects of the main parameters that influence the contact, such as road composition and its state, tire type, vehicle speed, and slip between the tire and the road. To do so, real tests have been conducted on several roads and with different operating conditions. As a result, a more accurate tire-road friction model has been obtained.

  11. A Procedure for Determining Tire-Road Friction Characteristics Using a Modification of the Magic Formula Based on Experimental Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Juan A; Castillo, Juan J; Pérez, Javier; Velasco, Juan M; Guerra, Antonio J; Hernández, Pedro

    2018-03-17

    Knowledge of tire-road friction characteristics is essential for the proper performance of most relevant vehicle active safety systems. Therefore, its determination is necessary to improve the effectiveness of these systems and to avoid or reduce the consequences of traffic accidents. For this reason, there is a great deal of literature concerning methods and devices for measuring and modeling tire-road friction. Most of these methods have focused on determining the road friction resistance, taking only road composition and making measurements in wet conditions into account. However, friction forces are also dependent on the tire type, since the contact is established between the tire and the road in real driving conditions. Thus, the type and characteristics of the tire have to be considered in the study of the interaction between the vehicle and the road. The aim of this work is to unify the study of the friction coefficient, taking into consideration the two existing bodies involved in the contact, i.e., the tire and road and the main factors that influence the forces in the contact. To this end, a modification of the Pacejka Magic Formula is proposed to include the effects of the main parameters that influence the contact, such as road composition and its state, tire type, vehicle speed, and slip between the tire and the road. To do so, real tests have been conducted on several roads and with different operating conditions. As a result, a more accurate tire-road friction model has been obtained.

  12. Extension of One-Dimensional Models for Hyperelastic String Structures under Coulomb Friction with Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Shiryaev

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A stretching behavior of knitted and woven textiles is modeled. In our work, the yarns are modeled as one-dimensional hyperelastic strings with frictional contact. Capstan law known for Coulomb’s friction of yarns is extended to an additional adhesion due to gluing of filaments on the yarn surface or some chemical reaction. Two-step Newton’s method is applied for the solution of the large stretching with sliding evolution in the contact nodes. The approach is illustrated on a hysteresis of knitted textile and on the force-strain curve for a woven pattern and both compared with experimental effective curves.

  13. Spur gears: Optimal geometry, methods for generation and Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, Jiao

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this report include the following: (1) development of optimal geometry for crowned spur gears; (2) methods for their generation; and (3) tooth contact analysis (TCA) computer programs for the analysis of meshing and bearing contact on the crowned spur gears. The method developed for synthesis is used for the determination of the optimal geometry for crowned pinion surface and is directed to reduce the sensitivity of the gears to misalignment, localize the bearing contact, and guarantee the favorable shape and low level of the transmission errors. A new method for the generation of the crowned pinion surface has been proposed. This method is based on application of the tool with a surface of revolution that slightly deviates from a regular cone surface. The tool can be used as a grinding wheel or as a shaver. The crowned pinion surface can also be generated by a generating plane whose motion is provided by an automatic grinding machine controlled by a computer. The TCA program simulates the meshing and bearing contact of the misaligned gears. The transmission errors are also determined.

  14. Nickel contact sensitivity in the guinea pig. An efficient open application test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G D; Rohold, A E; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1992-01-01

    Nickel contact sensitivity was successfully induced in guinea pigs using an open epicutaneous application method. Immediately after pretreatment with 1% aqueous sodium lauryl sulfate, upper back skin was treated daily for 4 weeks with 0.3%-3% nickel sulfate in either a 1% lanolin cream (Vaseline, p...

  15. A contact method of determination of thermophysical properties of rocks from core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavril'ev, R.I.

    1995-01-01

    The zone of the action of thermal disturbances around a circular heat source on the surface of a semi-infinite body is estimated with the aim of using contact methods of determination of thermophysical properties of materials from core samples

  16. In situ observation of a hydrogel-glass interface during sliding friction

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Tetsurou; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Ahmed, Jamil; Kamita, Gen; Yashima, Shintaro; Furukawa, Yuichiro; Ota, Yuko; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Gong, Jian Ping

    2014-01-01

    Direct observation of hydrogel contact with a solid surface in water is indispensable for understanding the friction, lubrication, and adhesion of hydrogels under water. However, this is a difficult task since the refractive index of hydrogels is very close to that of water. In this paper, we present a novel method to in situ observe the macroscopic contact of hydrogels with a solid surface based on the principle of critical refraction. This method was applied to investigate the sliding frict...

  17. A study of friction mechanisms between a surrogate skin (Lorica soft) and nonwoven fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottenden, David J; Cottenden, Alan M

    2013-12-01

    Hygiene products such as incontinence pads bring nonwoven fabrics into contact with users' skin, which can cause damage in various ways, including the nonwoven abrading the skin by friction. The aim of the work described here was to develop and use methods for understanding the origin of friction between nonwoven fabrics and skin by relating measured normal and friction forces to the nature and area of the contact (fibre footprint) between them. The method development work reported here used a skin surrogate (Lorica Soft) in place of skin for reproducibility. The work was primarily experimental in nature, and involved two separate approaches. In the first, a microscope with a shallow depth of field was used to determine the length of nonwoven fibre in contact with a facing surface as a function of pressure, from which the contact area could be inferred; and, in the second, friction between chosen nonwoven fabrics and Lorica Soft was measured at a variety of anatomically relevant pressures (0.25-32.1kPa) and speeds (0.05-5mms(-1)). Both techniques were extensively validated, and showed reproducibility of about 5% in length and force, respectively. Straightforward inspection of the data for Lorica Soft against the nonwovens showed that Amontons' law (with respect to load) was obeyed to high precision (R(2)>0.999 in all cases), though there was the suggestion of sub-linearity at low loads. More detailed consideration of the friction traces suggested that two different friction mechanisms are important, and comparison with the contact data suggests tentatively that they may correspond to adhesion between two different populations of contacts, one "rough" and one "smooth". This additional insight is a good illustration of how these techniques may prove valuable in studying other, similar interfaces. In particular, they could be used to investigate interfaces between nonwovens and skin, which was the primary motivation for developing them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd

  18. Influence of ligation method on friction resistance of lingual brackets with different second-order angulations: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Graziane Olímpio; Gimenez, Carla Maria Melleiro; Prieto, Lucas; Prieto, Marcos Gabriel do Lago; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate stainless steel archwire static friction in active and passive self-ligating lingual and conventional brackets with second-order angulations. Two conventional lingual brackets for canines (STb light/Ormco; PSWb/Tecnident), and two self-ligating brackets, one active (In-Ovation L/GAC) and the other passive (3D/ Forestadent), were evaluated. A stainless steel archwire was used at 0°, 3° and 5° angulations. Metal ligatures, conventional elastic ligatures, and low friction elastic ligatures were also tested. A universal testing machine applied friction between brackets and wires, simulating sliding mechanics, to produce 2-mm sliding at 3 mm/minute speed. Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between brackets and angulations (p frictional resistance values were observed at 5° angulation for In-Ovation L, PSWb bracket with non conventional ligature, and STb bracket with metal ligature. As for 3D, PSWb with conventional or metal ligatures, and STb brackets with non conventional ligature, showed significantly lower static frictional resistance with 0° angulation. At 0° angulation, STb brackets with metal ties, In-Ovation L brackets and 3D brackets had the lowest frictional resistance. As the angulation increased from 0° to 3°, static friction resistance increased. When angulation increased from 3° to 5°, static friction resistance increased or remained the same. Self-ligating 3D and In-Ovation L brackets, as well as conventional STb brackets, seem to be the best option when sliding mechanics is used to perform lingual orthodontic treatment.

  19. Friction dependence of shallow granular flows from discrete particle simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, Anthony Richard; Weinhart, Thomas; Luding, Stefan; Bokhove, Onno

    2011-01-01

    A shallow-layer model for granular flows is completed with a closure relation for the macroscopic bed friction or basal roughness obtained from micro-scale discrete particle simulations of steady flows. We systematically vary the bed friction by changing the contact friction coefficient between

  20. Obtaining macroscopic quantities for the contact line problem from Density Functional Theory using asymptotic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, David; Nold, Andreas; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT), a statistical mechanics of fluids approach, captures microscopic details of the fluid density structure in the vicinity of contact lines, as seen in computations in our recent study. Contact lines describe the location where interfaces between two fluids meet solid substrates, and have stimulated a wealth of research due to both their ubiquity in nature and technological applications and also due to their rich multiscale behaviour. Whilst progress can be made computationally to capture the microscopic to mesoscopic structure from DFT, complete analytical results to fully bridge to the macroscale are lacking. In this work, we describe our efforts to bring asymptotic methods to DFT to obtain results for contact angles and other macroscopic quantities in various parameter regimes. We acknowledge financial support from European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  1. Determination of uranium element in rocks by using contact mold method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadanus, Soeprapto

    1982-01-01

    A contact mold method is used to accurately detect the presence of uranium in rocks. Ore microscopy and petrography are applied to assist the application of the method. The instruments used are stone cutter and grinding machine. The chemicals used are nitric acid HNO 3 15-10%, potassium ferrocyanides K 4 Fe(CN) 6 , and potassium hydroxides KOH 2.5r. The method is also called Hiller method. It is found that the blue colour on the contact mold indicates the presence of iron element. The brown colour indicates the presence of uranium element. The intensity of the colour depends on the solution level of the element and the element concentration in the rockas. (RUW)

  2. Friction dampers, the positive side of friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Arteaga, I.; Nijmeijer, H.; Busturia, J.M.; Sas, P.; Munck, de M.

    2004-01-01

    Friction is frequently seen as an unwanted phenomenon whose influence has to be either minimised or controlled. In this work one of the positive sides of friction is investigated: friction damping. Friction dampers can be a cheap and efficient way to reduce the vibration levels of a wide range of

  3. Implicit Geometry Meshing for the simulation of Rotary Friction Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmicker, D.; Persson, P.-O.; Strackeljan, J.

    2014-08-01

    The simulation of Rotary Friction Welding (RFW) is a challenging task, since it states a coupled problem of phenomena like large plastic deformations, heat flux, contact and friction. In particular the mesh generation and its restoration when using a Lagrangian description of motion is of significant severity. In this regard Implicit Geometry Meshing (IGM) algorithms are promising alternatives to the more conventional explicit methods. Because of the implicit description of the geometry during remeshing, the IGM procedure turns out to be highly robust and generates spatial discretizations of high quality regardless of the complexity of the flash shape and its inclusions. A model for efficient RFW simulation is presented, which is based on a Carreau fluid law, an Augmented Lagrange approach in mapping the incompressible deformations, a penalty contact approach, a fully regularized Coulomb-/fluid friction law and a hybrid time integration strategy. The implementation of the IGM algorithm using 6-node triangular finite elements is described in detail. The techniques are demonstrated on a fairly complex friction welding problem, demonstrating the performance and the potentials of the proposed method. The techniques are general and straight-forward to implement, and offer the potential of successful adoption to a wide range of other engineering problems.

  4. Robust and general method for determining surface fluid flow boundary conditions in articular cartilage contact mechanics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawaskar, Sainath Shrikant; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-01

    Contact detection in cartilage contact mechanics is an important feature of any analytical or computational modeling investigation when the biphasic nature of cartilage and the corresponding tribology are taken into account. The fluid flow boundary conditions will change based on whether the surface is in contact or not, which will affect the interstitial fluid pressurization. This in turn will increase or decrease the load sustained by the fluid phase, with a direct effect on friction, wear, and lubrication. In laboratory experiments or clinical hemiarthroplasty, when a rigid indenter or metallic prosthesis is used to apply load to the cartilage, there will not be any fluid flow normal to the surface in the contact region due to the impermeable nature of the indenter/prosthesis. In the natural joint, on the other hand, where two cartilage surfaces interact, flow will depend on the pressure difference across the interface. Furthermore, in both these cases, the fluid would flow freely in non-contacting regions. However, it should be pointed out that the contact area is generally unknown in advance in both cases and can only be determined as part of the solution. In the present finite element study, a general and robust algorithm was proposed to decide nodes in contact on the cartilage surface and, accordingly, impose the fluid flow boundary conditions. The algorithm was first tested for a rigid indenter against cartilage model. The algorithm worked well for two-dimensional four-noded and eight-noded axisymmetric element models as well as three-dimensional models. It was then extended to include two cartilages in contact. The results were in excellent agreement with the previous studies reported in the literature.

  5. Calculation of Friction Coefficient and Analysis of Fluid Flow in a Stepped Micro-Channel for Wide Range of Knudsen Number Using Lattice Boltzmann (MRT Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bakhshan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro scale gas flows has attracted significant research interest in the last two decades. In this research, the fluid flow of gases in the stepped micro-channel at a wide range of Knudsen number has been analyzed with using the Lattice Boltzmann (MRT method. In the model, a modified second-order slip boundary condition and a Bosanquet-type effective viscosity are used to consider the velocity slip at the boundaries and to cover the slip and transition regimes of flow and to gain an accurate simulation of rarefied gases. It includes the slip and transition regimes of flow. The flow specifications such as pressure loss, velocity profile, streamline and friction coefficient at different conditions have been presented. The results show good agreement with available experimental data. The calculation shows that the friction coefficient decreases with increasing the Knudsen number and stepping the micro-channel has an inverse effect on the friction coefficient. Furthermore, a new correlation is suggested for calculation of the friction coefficient in the stepped micro-channel as below: C_f Re  = 3.113+2.915/(1 +2 Kn+ 0.641 exp⁡(3.203/(1 + 2 Kn

  6. A molecular dynamics (MD simulation on tire-aggregate friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyan Sun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The friction between tire and road surface is fundamentally depending on the molecular forces. In this paper, the nanoscale 3D contact model is employed to investigate the tire-aggregate friction mechanism. The tire and aggregate micro-structure are both constructed to evaluate the microscopic performance of tire-aggregate friction influence. Simulation results show for a high velocity, the energy dissipation of sliding on crystal structure is small, which results in a small friction coefficient; temperature will have influences on the friction coefficient, and with the increasing of velocity, the effect will gradually reduce. Keywords: Tire, Aggregate, Friction coefficient, Microscopic mechanism, MD simulation

  7. A non-Hertzian method for solving wheel-rail normal contact problem taking into account the effect of yaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Binbin; Bruni, Stefano; Vollebregt, Edwin

    2016-09-01

    A novel approach is proposed in this paper to deal with non-Hertzian normal contact in wheel-rail interface, extending the widely used Kik-Piotrowski method. The new approach is able to consider the effect of the yaw angle of the wheelset against the rail on the shape of the contact patch and on pressure distribution. Furthermore, the method considers the variation of profile curvature across the contact patch, enhancing the correspondence to CONTACT for highly non-Hertzian contact conditions. The simulation results show that the proposed method can provide more accurate estimation than the original algorithm compared to Kalker's CONTACT, and that the influence of yaw on the contact results is significant under certain circumstances.

  8. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers. PMID:23934227

  9. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  10. Frictional forces between cohesive powder particles studied by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Robert; Pollock, Hubert M; Geldart, Derek; Verlinden-Luts, Ann

    2004-01-01

    A range of commercially important powders (hydrated alumina, limestone, titania and zeolite) and glass ballotini were attached to atomic force microscope cantilevers, and inter-particle friction forces studied in air using lateral force microscopy (LFM). The in situ calibration procedure for friction forces is described. LF images, line profiles, LF histograms, surface roughness, pull-off forces, and the load dependence of friction in the range 0-25 nN were studied for both particle-particle and particle-wall (steel) contacts. The single-particle friction results are discussed in terms of contact mechanics theory. Particle-particle contacts showed load-dependent friction, involving single asperity contacts (non-linear behaviour) or multi-asperity contacts (linear behaviour). Particle-wall contacts usually showed little load dependence and were more adhesive. The results are also related to shear stress-normal stress data (yield loci) for the same materials from bulk shear testers

  11. Measuring contact area in a sliding human finger-pad contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Carré, M J; Zhang, Q; Lu, Z; Matcher, S J; Lewis, R

    2018-02-01

    The work outlined in this paper was aimed at achieving further understanding of skin frictional behaviour by investigating the contact area between human finger-pads and flat surfaces. Both the static and the dynamic contact areas (in macro- and micro-scales) were measured using various techniques, including ink printing, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In the studies of the static measurements using ink printing, the experimental results showed that the apparent and the real contact area increased with load following a piecewise linear correlation function for a finger-pad in contact with paper sheets. Comparisons indicated that the OCT method is a reliable and effective method to investigate the real contact area of a finger-pad and allow micro-scale analysis. The apparent contact area (from the DIC measurements) was found to reduce with time in the transition from the static phase to the dynamic phase while the real area of contact (from OCT) increased. The results from this study enable the interaction between finger-pads and contact object surface to be better analysed, and hence improve the understanding of skin friction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Technical Note: Validation of two methods to determine contact area between breast and compression paddle in mammography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan; de Groot, Jerry E.; van Lier, Monique G. J. T. B.; Highnam, Ralph P.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of two methods of determining the contact area between the compression paddle and the breast in mammography. An accurate method to determine the contact area is essential to accurately calculate the average compression pressure applied by the paddle. Methods: For a

  13. The effect of friction in coulombian damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahad, H. S.; Tudor, A.; Vlase, M.; Cerbu, N.; Subhi, K. A.

    2017-02-01

    The study aimed to analyze the damping phenomenon in a system with variable friction, Stribeck type. Shock absorbers with limit and dry friction, is called coulombian shock-absorbers. The physical damping vibration phenomenon, in equipment, is based on friction between the cushioning gasket and the output regulator of the shock-absorber. Friction between them can be dry, limit, mixture or fluid. The friction is depending on the contact pressure and lubricant presence. It is defined dimensionless form for the Striebeck curve (µ friction coefficient - sliding speed v). The friction may damp a vibratory movement or can maintain it (self-vibration), depending on the µ with v (it can increase / decrease or it can be relative constant). The solutions of differential equation of movement are obtained for some work condition of one damper for automatic washing machine. The friction force can transfer partial or total energy or generates excitation energy in damper. The damping efficiency is defined and is determined analytical for the constant friction coefficient and for the parabolic friction coefficient.

  14. On the sliding friction at the interface between a fluid and a solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minetti-Mezzetti, E.

    1976-01-01

    A method is reported to investigate the possible existence and the numerical value of the sliding friction coefficient β at the contact interface between a fluid and a solid. Some preliminary experimental results at the interface glycerol-aluminium give 1/β -4 . (author)

  15. Acoustic emission evolution during sliding friction of Hadfield steel single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Novitskaya, O. S.; Kolubaev, A. V.; Sizova, O. V.

    2017-12-01

    Friction is a complex dynamic process. Direct observation of processes occurring in the friction zone is impossible due to a small size of a real contact area and, as a consequence, requires various additional methods applicable to monitor a tribological contact state. One of such methods consists in the analysis of acoustic emission data of a tribological contact. The use of acoustic emission entails the problem of interpreting physical sources of signals. In this paper, we analyze the evolution of acoustic emission signal frames in friction of Hadfield steel single crystals. The chosen crystallographic orientation of single crystals enables to identify four stages related to friction development as well as acoustic emission signals inherent in these stages. Acoustic emission signal parameters are studied in more detail by the short-time Fourier transform used to determine the time variation of the median frequency and its power spectrum. The results obtained will facilitate the development of a more precise method to monitor the tribological contact based on the acoustic emission method.

  16. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-11-14

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This "open-shielded" device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities.

  17. Efficient numerical methods for the large-scale, parallel solution of elastoplastic contact problems

    KAUST Repository

    Frohne, Jörg

    2015-08-06

    © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Quasi-static elastoplastic contact problems are ubiquitous in many industrial processes and other contexts, and their numerical simulation is consequently of great interest in accurately describing and optimizing production processes. The key component in these simulations is the solution of a single load step of a time iteration. From a mathematical perspective, the problems to be solved in each time step are characterized by the difficulties of variational inequalities for both the plastic behavior and the contact problem. Computationally, they also often lead to very large problems. In this paper, we present and evaluate a complete set of methods that are (1) designed to work well together and (2) allow for the efficient solution of such problems. In particular, we use adaptive finite element meshes with linear and quadratic elements, a Newton linearization of the plasticity, active set methods for the contact problem, and multigrid-preconditioned linear solvers. Through a sequence of numerical experiments, we show the performance of these methods. This includes highly accurate solutions of a three-dimensional benchmark problem and scaling our methods in parallel to 1024 cores and more than a billion unknowns.

  18. Efficient numerical methods for the large-scale, parallel solution of elastoplastic contact problems

    KAUST Repository

    Frohne, Jö rg; Heister, Timo; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Quasi-static elastoplastic contact problems are ubiquitous in many industrial processes and other contexts, and their numerical simulation is consequently of great interest in accurately describing and optimizing production processes. The key component in these simulations is the solution of a single load step of a time iteration. From a mathematical perspective, the problems to be solved in each time step are characterized by the difficulties of variational inequalities for both the plastic behavior and the contact problem. Computationally, they also often lead to very large problems. In this paper, we present and evaluate a complete set of methods that are (1) designed to work well together and (2) allow for the efficient solution of such problems. In particular, we use adaptive finite element meshes with linear and quadratic elements, a Newton linearization of the plasticity, active set methods for the contact problem, and multigrid-preconditioned linear solvers. Through a sequence of numerical experiments, we show the performance of these methods. This includes highly accurate solutions of a three-dimensional benchmark problem and scaling our methods in parallel to 1024 cores and more than a billion unknowns.

  19. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. General Friction Model Extended by the Effect of Strain Hardening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris V.; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Bay, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An extension to the general friction model proposed by Wanheim and Bay [1] to include the effect of strain hardening is proposed. The friction model relates the friction stress to the fraction of real contact area by a friction factor under steady state sliding. The original model for the real...... contact area as function of the normalized contact pressure is based on slip-line analysis and hence on the assumption of rigid-ideally plastic material behavior. In the present work, a general finite element model is established to, firstly, reproduce the original model under the assumption of rigid...

  1. Hydrogen extraction from liquid lithium-lead alloy by gas-liquid contact method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Bo; Weng Kuiping; Hou Jianping; Yang Guangling; Zeng Jun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen extraction experiment from liquid lithium-lead alloy by gas-liquid contact method has been carried out in own liquid lithium-lead bubbler (LLLB). Experimental results show that, He is more suitable than Ar as carrier gas in the filler tower. The higher temperature the tower is, the greater hydrogen content the tower exports. Influence of carrier gas flow rate on the hydrogen content in the export is jagged, no obvious rule. Although the difference between experimental results and literature data, but it is feasible that hydrogen isotopes extraction experiment from liquid lithium-lead by gas-liquid contact method, and the higher extraction efficiency increases with the growth of the residence time of the alloy in tower. (authors)

  2. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Ying; Lu, Qingyou, E-mail: qxl@ustc.edu.cn [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hou, Yubin [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-05-15

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is <10% of the total static friction force, which can help increase output force greatly. The piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope.

  3. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Ying; Lu, Qingyou; Hou, Yubin

    2014-01-01

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is <10% of the total static friction force, which can help increase output force greatly. The piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope

  4. Studies of non-contact methods for roughness measurements on wood surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, I.A.S.; Porankiewicz, B.

    1995-01-01

    The quality of wood surfaces after different kinds of machining processes is a property of great importance for the wood processing industries. Present work is a study, whose objective was to evaluate different non-contact methods, for measurement of the quality of the wood surfaces by correlating them with stylus tracing. A number of Scots Pine samples were prepared by different kinds of wood machining processing. Surface roughness measurements were performed, utilizing two optical noncontact methods. The results indicate that the laser scan method can measure surface roughness on sawn wood with a sufficient degree of accuracy. (author) [de

  5. A comparative study to evaluate the effects of ligation methods on friction in sliding mechanics using 0.022" slot brackets in dry state: An In-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, K; Venkatesh, M J; Nayak, Rabindra S; Pasha, Azam; Rajesh, M; Kumar, Pradeep

    2014-04-01

    Friction between archwires and brackets is assuming greater importance for finishing with increased use of sliding mechanics in orthodontics as friction impedes the desired tooth movement. The following study is conducted to compare and evaluate the effect of ligation on friction in sliding mechanics using 0.022" slot bracket in dry condition. In the study 48 combinations of brackets, archwires and different ligation techniques were tested in order to provide best combination that offers less friction during sliding mechanics. Instron- 4467 machine was used to evaluate static and kinetic friction force values and the results were subjected to Statistical Analysis and Anova test. The results of the study showed that 0.022" metal brackets, Stainless steel wires and Slick modules provided the optimum frictional resistance to sliding mechanics. It is observed that frictional forces of 0.019" x 0.025" were higher when compared with 0.016" x 0.022" Stainless steel archwire due to the increase in dimension. Self-ligating brackets offered least friction followed by mini twin, variable force, regular stainless steel, ceramic with metal insert bracket and ceramic brackets. The stainless steel ligature offered less resistance than slick and grey modules, and TMA wires recorded maximum friction. The stainless steel archwire of 0.019" x 0.025" dimension are preferred during sliding mechanics, these archwires with variable force brackets ligated with Slick Modules offer decreased friction and is cost effective combination which can be utilized during sliding mechanics. How to cite the article: Vinay K, Venkatesh MJ, Nayak RS, Pasha A, Rajesh M, Kumar P. A comparative study to evaluate the effects of ligation methods on friction in sliding mechanics using 0.022" slot brackets in dry state: An In-vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):76-83.

  6. Stochastic modeling of friction force and vibration analysis of a mechanical system using the model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Won Seok; Choi, Chan Kyu; Yoo, Hong Hee

    2015-01-01

    The squeal noise generated from a disk brake or chatter occurred in a machine tool primarily results from friction-induced vibration. Since friction-induced vibration is usually accompanied by abrasion and lifespan reduction of mechanical parts, it is necessary to develop a reliable analysis model by which friction-induced vibration phenomena can be accurately analyzed. The original Coulomb's friction model or the modified Coulomb friction model employed in most commercial programs employs deterministic friction coefficients. However, observing friction phenomena between two contact surfaces, one may observe that friction coefficients keep changing due to the unevenness of contact surface, temperature, lubrication and humidity. Therefore, in this study, friction coefficients are modeled as random parameters that keep changing during the motion of a mechanical system undergoing friction force. The integrity of the proposed stochastic friction model was validated by comparing the analysis results obtained by the proposed model with experimental results.

  7. Vacuum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Sonnleitner, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    We know that in empty space there is no preferred state of rest. This is true both in special relativity but also in Newtonian mechanics with its associated Galilean relativity. It comes as something of a surprise, therefore, to discover the existence a friction force associated with spontaneous emission. The resolution of this paradox relies on a central idea from special relativity even though our derivation of it is non-relativistic. We examine the possibility that the physics underlying this effect might be explored in an ion trap, via the observation of a superposition of different mass states.

  8. A systems based experimental approach to tactile friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masen, Marc Arthur

    2011-01-01

    This work focuses on the friction in contacts where the human finger pad is one of the interacting surfaces. This ‘tactile friction’ requires a full understanding of the contact mechanics and the behaviour of human skin. The coefficient of friction cannot be considered as a property of the skin

  9. Rôle des additifs anti-usure des huiles lubrifiantes dans un teste de frottement simulant le contact segment-chemise Role of Antiwear Additives for Lube Oils in a Friction Test Simulating Ring-Liner Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Nous avons mis en oeuvre un test de frottement dans lequel les conditions tribologiques sont voisines de celles existant au niveau segment-chemise des moteurs à explosion. Nous avons éprouvé différentes huiles commerciales ainsi que des additifs purs. Ayant choisi la température comme paramètre variable au cours de ce test nous pouvons déterminer pour chaque lubrifiant une plage de température correspondant à une zone d'efficacité maximale de l'additif anti-usure qu'il contient. La température correspondant à la limite inférieure de cette plage est liée à la nature chimique de l'additif. De plus lorsqu'un gradient de température existe entre les deux pièces en frottement, on observe, dans la zone d'efficacité maximale du lubrifiant, un phénomène de pulsations verticales de la goutte d'huile placée dans le contact. Des éléments d'interprétation, expliquant ces deux phénomènes, sont proposés et conduisent à relier l'efficacité anti-usure d'un additif à ses propriétés d'adsorption à la surface des pièces frottantes. The tribological conditions in the test used were similar to these existing in the ringliner area. of explosion engines. Different commercial cils were tested along with pure additives. Since temperature was chosen as a variable parameter during these tests, it was possible to determine a temperature range for each lubricant, corresponding to the maximum efficiency zone for the antiwear additive it contained. The temperature corresponding to the lower limit of this range is linked to the chemical nature of the additive. Likewise, when a temperature gradient exists between two rubbing parts, a vertical pulsation phenomenon of the drop of cil n the contact area occurs in the maximum efficiency zone of the lubricant. Interpretation elements explaining these two phenomena are proposed and lead to linking the antiwear efficiency of an additive to its adsorption properties on the surface of rubbing parts.

  10. A set-valued force law for spatial Coulomb-Contensou friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leine, R.I.; Glocker, C.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a set-valued contact law for combined spatial Coulomb-Contensou friction, taking into account a normal friction torque (drilling friction) and spin. The set-valued Coulomb-Contensou friction law is derived from a non-smooth velocity pseudo potential. A

  11. Effect of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Method on Patellofemoral Contact Pressures and Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Joanna M; Kittl, Christoph; Williams, Andy; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Fink, Christian; Amis, Andrew A

    2016-05-01

    There remains a lack of evidence regarding the optimal method when reconstructing the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and whether some graft constructs can be more forgiving to surgical errors, such as overtensioning or tunnel malpositioning, than others. The null hypothesis was that there would not be a significant difference between reconstruction methods (eg, graft type and fixation) in the adverse biomechanical effects (eg, patellar maltracking or elevated articular contact pressure) resulting from surgical errors such as tunnel malpositioning or graft overtensioning. Controlled laboratory study. Nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were placed on a customized testing rig, where the femur was fixed but the tibia could be moved freely from 0° to 90° of flexion. Individual quadriceps heads and the iliotibial tract were separated and loaded to 205 N of tension using a weighted pulley system. Patellofemoral contact pressures and patellar tracking were measured at 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion using pressure-sensitive film inserted between the patella and trochlea, in conjunction with an optical tracking system. The MPFL was transected and then reconstructed in a randomized order using a (1) double-strand gracilis tendon, (2) quadriceps tendon, and (3) tensor fasciae latae allograft. Pressure maps and tracking measurements were recorded for each reconstruction method in 2 N and 10 N of tension and with the graft positioned in the anatomic, proximal, and distal femoral tunnel positions. Statistical analysis was undertaken using repeated-measures analyses of variance, Bonferroni post hoc analyses, and paired t tests. Anatomically placed grafts during MPFL reconstruction tensioned to 2 N resulted in the restoration of intact medial joint contact pressures and patellar tracking for all 3 graft types investigated (P > .050). However, femoral tunnels positioned proximal or distal to the anatomic origin resulted in significant increases in the mean

  12. Frictional Heating with Time-Dependent Specific Power of Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topczewska Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper analytical solutions of the thermal problems of friction were received. The appropriate boundary-value problems of heat conduction were formulated and solved for a homogeneous semi–space (a brake disc heated on its free surface by frictional heat fluxes with different and time-dependent intensities. Solutions were obtained in dimensionless form using Duhamel's theorem. Based on received solutions, evolution and spatial distribution of the dimensionless temperature were analyzed using numerical methods. The numerical results allowed to determine influence of the time distribution of friction power on the spatio-temporal temperature distribution in brake disc.

  13. Slipforming - Materials effect on friction

    OpenAIRE

    Busterud, Jørgen Thomasgaard

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Structural engineering Slipforming is a construction method for concrete and it is especially suited for tall constructions with simple geometry. This method have occasionally caused lifting cracks and other surface damages, due to the friction between the slipform panel and the concrete has become to high. The thesis will look at how the choice of material composition in concrete mixes in the combination of a given slipform rate would affect the friction between the ...

  14. Non-Contact Plant Growth Measurement Method and System Based on Ubiquitous Sensor Network Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intae Ryoo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a non-contact plant growth measurement system using infrared sensors based on the ubiquitous sensor network (USN technology. The proposed system measures plant growth parameters such as the stem radius of plants using real-time non-contact methods, and generates diameter, cross-sectional area and thickening form of plant stems using this measured data. Non-contact sensors have been used not to cause any damage to plants during measurement of the growth parameters. Once the growth parameters are measured, they are transmitted to a remote server using the sensor network technology and analyzed in the application program server. The analyzed data are then provided for administrators and a group of interested users. The proposed plant growth measurement system has been designed and implemented using fixed-type and rotary-type infrared sensor based measurement methods and devices. Finally, the system performance is compared and verified with the measurement data that have been obtained by practical field experiments.

  15. Modular correction method of bending elastic modulus based on sliding behavior of contact point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Qixun; Liu, Changyi

    2015-01-01

    During the three-point bending test, the sliding behavior of the contact point between the specimen and supports was observed, the sliding behavior was verified to affect the measurements of both deflection and span length, which directly affect the calculation of the bending elastic modulus. Based on the Hertz formula to calculate the elastic contact deformation and the theoretical calculation of the sliding behavior of the contact point, a theoretical model to precisely describe the deflection and span length as a function of bending load was established. Moreover, a modular correction method of bending elastic modulus was proposed, via the comparison between the corrected elastic modulus of three materials (H63 copper–zinc alloy, AZ31B magnesium alloy and 2026 aluminum alloy) and the standard modulus obtained from standard uniaxial tensile tests, the universal feasibility of the proposed correction method was verified. Also, the ratio of corrected to raw elastic modulus presented a monotonically decreasing tendency as the raw elastic modulus of materials increased. (technical note)

  16. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  17. Nanolithography based contacting method for electrical measurements on single template synthesized nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusil, S.; Piraux, L.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    A reliable method enabling electrical measurements on single nanowires prepared by electrodeposition in an alumina template is described. This technique is based on electrically controlled nanoindentation of a thin insulating resist deposited on the top face of the template filled by the nanowires....... We show that this method is very flexible, allowing us to electrically address single nanowires of controlled length down to 100 nm and of desired composition. Using this approach, current densities as large as 10 A cm were successfully injected through a point contact on a single magnetic...

  18. Non-linear friction in reciprocating hydraulic rod seals: Simulation and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, A K; Tilley, D G; Johnston, D N; Bowen, C R; Keogh, P S

    2009-01-01

    Non-linear seal friction can impede the performance of hydraulic actuation systems designed for high precision positioning with favourable dynamic response. Methods for predicting seal friction are required to help develop sealing systems for this type of application. Recent simulation techniques have claimed progress, although have yet to be validated experimentally. A conventional reciprocating rod seal is analysed using established elastohydrodynamic theory and the mixed lubrication Greenwood-Williamson-average Reynolds model. A test rig was used to assess the accuracy of the simulation results for both instroke and outstroke. Inverse hydrodynamic theory is shown to predict a U 0.5 power law between rod speed and friction. Comparison with experimental data shows the theory to be qualitatively inaccurate and to predict friction levels an order of magnitude lower than those measured. It was not possible to model the regions very close to the inlet and outlet due to the high pressure gradients at the edges of the contact. The mixed lubrication model produces friction levels within the correct order of magnitude, although incorrectly predicts higher friction during instroke than outstroke. Previous experiments have reported higher friction during instroke than outstroke for rectangular seals, suggesting that the mixed lubrication model used could possibly be suitable for symmetric seals, although not for seal tribology in general.

  19. A finite element method with contact for tensile analysis in fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanajura, C.A.S.; Galeao, A.C.N.R.

    1987-01-01

    Elements for mechanical analysis of fuel rod of a PWR type reactor, are presented. The rod, consists basically in a cylindrical coating of zircalloy which contains pilling of UO 2 pellets, is submitted to strong internal and external pressures, intense temperature gradients and neutron flux. These conditions lead several phenomena in the pellet (swelling, fracture, densification, creep) and in the cladding (embrittlement, corrosion, creep) which undergo deformations leading them to contact the restriction for the interpenetration is included in the problem without restriction by Lagrange multipliers. Considering a non-linear problem, due to the surface of contact to be not known a priori, the numerical solutions were obtained using the finite element method. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Measurement of contact angle of copper-bearing shales using the captive bubble method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Szyszka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the measurement of contact angle of the natural surface of copper-bearing shales immersed in solutions of selected reagents of various concentrations using captive bubble method. It demonstrates that the copper-bearing shales coming from Legnicko-Głogwski Copper Region develop natural hydrophobic properties in surfactant (frother solutions and its hydrophobicity decreases from 82⁰ contact angle in distilled water, 78⁰ in C4E1 solutions, 76⁰ in C4E2 solutions, to 75⁰ in dodecylphenol solutions. These data show that the addition of frother causes a decrease of shale hydrophobicity but it can reduce stability of the thin film between the grain and air bubble. It means that flotation of copperbearing shales in the presence of frother will only be possible provided specific concentrations.

  1. Surface Friction of Polyacrylamide Hydrogel Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccia, Nicholas; Burton, Justin

    Polyacrylamide hydrogel particles have recently become a popular system for modeling low-friction, granular materials near the jamming transition. Because a gel consists of a polymer network filled with solvent, its frictional behavior is often explained using a combination of hydrodynamic lubrication and polymer-surface interactions. As a result, the frictional coefficient can vary between 0.001 and 0.03 depending on several factors such as contact area, sliding velocity, normal force, and the gel surface chemistry. Most tribological measurements of hydrogels utilize two flat surfaces, where the contact area is not well-defined. We have built a custom, low-force tribometer to measure the single-contact frictional properties of spherical hydrogel particles on flat hydrogel surfaces under a variety of measurement conditions. At high velocities (> 1 cm/s), the friction coefficient depends linearly on velocity, but does not tend to zero at zero velocity. We also compare our measurements to solid particles (steel, glass, etc.) on hydrogel surfaces, which exhibit larger frictional forces, and show less dependence on velocity. A physical model for the friction which includes the lubrication layer between the deformed surfaces will be discussed. National Science Foundation Grant No. 1506446.

  2. Predicting residue contacts using pragmatic correlated mutations method: reducing the false positives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexov Emil G

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting residues' contacts using primary amino acid sequence alone is an important task that can guide 3D structure modeling and can verify the quality of the predicted 3D structures. The correlated mutations (CM method serves as the most promising approach and it has been used to predict amino acids pairs that are distant in the primary sequence but form contacts in the native 3D structure of homologous proteins. Results Here we report a new implementation of the CM method with an added set of selection rules (filters. The parameters of the algorithm were optimized against fifteen high resolution crystal structures with optimization criterion that maximized the confidentiality of the predictions. The optimization resulted in a true positive ratio (TPR of 0.08 for the CM without filters and a TPR of 0.14 for the CM with filters. The protocol was further benchmarked against 65 high resolution structures that were not included in the optimization test. The benchmarking resulted in a TPR of 0.07 for the CM without filters and to a TPR of 0.09 for the CM with filters. Conclusion Thus, the inclusion of selection rules resulted to an overall improvement of 30%. In addition, the pair-wise comparison of TPR for each protein without and with filters resulted in an average improvement of 1.7. The methodology was implemented into a web server http://www.ces.clemson.edu/compbio/recon that is freely available to the public. The purpose of this implementation is to provide the 3D structure predictors with a tool that can help with ranking alternative models by satisfying the largest number of predicted contacts, as well as it can provide a confidence score for contacts in cases where structure is known.

  3. Effect of surface pattern on the adhesive friction of elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Bavouzet, Fanny; Cayer-Barrioz, Juliette; Le Bot, Alain; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise; Buguin, Axel

    2010-09-01

    We present experimental results for the friction of a flat surface against a hexagonally patterned surface, both being made of PolyDiMethylSiloxane. We simultaneously measure forces of range 10 mN and observe the contact under sliding velocities of about 100 μm/s. We observe adhesive friction on three different pattern heights (80, 310, and 2100 nm). Two kinds of contacts have been observed: the flat surface is in close contact with the patterned one (called intimate contact, observed for 80 nm) or only suspended on the tops on the asperities (called laid contact, observed for 2100 nm). In the range of velocities used, the contact during friction is similar to the static one. Furthermore, our experimental system presents a contact transition during friction for h=310 nm.

  4. Analytical Expressions of the Efficiency of Standard and High Contact Ratio Involute Spur Gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Pleguezuelos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple, traditional methods for computation of the efficiency of spur gears are based on the hypotheses of constant friction coefficient and uniform load sharing along the path of contact. However, none of them is accurate. The friction coefficient is variable along the path of contact, though average values can be often considered for preliminary calculations. Nevertheless, the nonuniform load sharing produced by the changing rigidity of the pair of teeth has significant influence on the friction losses, due to the different relative sliding at any contact point. In previous works, the authors obtained a nonuniform model of load distribution based on the minimum elastic potential criterion, which was applied to compute the efficiency of standard gears. In this work, this model of load sharing is applied to study the efficiency of both standard and high contact ratio involute spur gears (with contact ratio between 1 and 2 and greater than 2, resp.. Approximate expressions for the friction power losses and for the efficiency are presented assuming the friction coefficient to be constant along the path of contact. A study of the influence of some transmission parameters (as the gear ratio, pressure angle, etc. on the efficiency is also presented.

  5. An elastography method based on the scanning contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ji; Li, Faxin, E-mail: lifaxin@pku.edu.cn [State Key Lab for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China and HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technologies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Most tissues may become significantly stiffer than their normal states when there are lesions inside. The tissue's modulus can then act as an identification parameter for clinic diagnosis of tumors or fibrosis, which leads to elastography. This study introduces a novel elastography method that can be used for modulus imaging of superficial organs. Methods: This method is based on the scanning contact-resonance of a unimorph piezoelectric cantilever. The cantilever vibrates in its bending mode with the tip pressed tightly on the sample. The contact resonance frequency of the cantilever-sample system is tracked at each scanning point, from which the sample's modulus can be derived based on a beam dynamic model and a contact mechanics model. Scanning is performed by a three-dimensional motorized stage and the whole system is controlled by a homemade software program based on LabVIEW. Results: Testing onin vitro beef tissues indicates that the fat and the muscle can be easily distinguished using this system, and the accuracy of the modulus measurement can be comparable with that of nanoindentation. Imaging on homemade gelatin phantoms shows that the depth information of the abnormalities can be qualitatively obtained by varying the pressing force. The detection limit of this elastography method is specially examined both experimentally and numerically. Results show that it can detect the typical lesions in superficial organs with the depth of several centimeters. The lateral resolution of this elastography method/system is better than 0.5 mm, and could be further enhanced by using more scanning points. Conclusions: The proposed elastography system can be regarded as a sensitive palpation robot, which may be very promising in early diagnosis of tumors in superficial organs such as breast and thyroid.

  6. Novel Friction Law for the Static Friction Force based on Local Precursor Slipping

    OpenAIRE

    Katano, Yu; Nakano, Ken; Otsuki, Michio; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The sliding of a solid object on a solid substrate requires a shear force that is larger than the maximum static friction force. It is commonly believed that the maximum static friction force is proportional to the loading force and does not depend on the apparent contact area. The ratio of the maximum static friction force to the loading force is called the static friction coefficient µ M, which is considered to be a constant. Here, we conduct experiments demonstrating that the static fricti...

  7. A hierarchical estimator development for estimation of tire-road friction coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Göhlich, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    The effect of vehicle active safety systems is subject to the friction force arising from the contact of tires and the road surface. Therefore, an adequate knowledge of the tire-road friction coefficient is of great importance to achieve a good performance of these control systems. This paper presents a tire-road friction coefficient estimation method for an advanced vehicle configuration, four-motorized-wheel electric vehicles, in which the longitudinal tire force is easily obtained. A hierarchical structure is adopted for the proposed estimation design. An upper estimator is developed based on unscented Kalman filter to estimate vehicle state information, while a hybrid estimation method is applied as the lower estimator to identify the tire-road friction coefficient using general regression neural network (GRNN) and Bayes' theorem. GRNN aims at detecting road friction coefficient under small excitations, which are the most common situations in daily driving. GRNN is able to accurately create a mapping from input parameters to the friction coefficient, avoiding storing an entire complex tire model. As for large excitations, the estimation algorithm is based on Bayes' theorem and a simplified "magic formula" tire model. The integrated estimation method is established by the combination of the above-mentioned estimators. Finally, the simulations based on a high-fidelity CarSim vehicle model are carried out on different road surfaces and driving maneuvers to verify the effectiveness of the proposed estimation method.

  8. A hierarchical estimator development for estimation of tire-road friction coefficient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Zhang

    Full Text Available The effect of vehicle active safety systems is subject to the friction force arising from the contact of tires and the road surface. Therefore, an adequate knowledge of the tire-road friction coefficient is of great importance to achieve a good performance of these control systems. This paper presents a tire-road friction coefficient estimation method for an advanced vehicle configuration, four-motorized-wheel electric vehicles, in which the longitudinal tire force is easily obtained. A hierarchical structure is adopted for the proposed estimation design. An upper estimator is developed based on unscented Kalman filter to estimate vehicle state information, while a hybrid estimation method is applied as the lower estimator to identify the tire-road friction coefficient using general regression neural network (GRNN and Bayes' theorem. GRNN aims at detecting road friction coefficient under small excitations, which are the most common situations in daily driving. GRNN is able to accurately create a mapping from input parameters to the friction coefficient, avoiding storing an entire complex tire model. As for large excitations, the estimation algorithm is based on Bayes' theorem and a simplified "magic formula" tire model. The integrated estimation method is established by the combination of the above-mentioned estimators. Finally, the simulations based on a high-fidelity CarSim vehicle model are carried out on different road surfaces and driving maneuvers to verify the effectiveness of the proposed estimation method.

  9. Effects of heat production on the temperature pattern and stresses on frictional hardening of cylindrical components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovich, V.M.; Kratyuk, P.B.; Babei, Yu.I.; Maksimishin, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Metal heating occurs during pulse hardening which influences the structure, state of strain, and physicomechanical properties, which in turn affects the viability. Difficulties exists in measuring the resulting temperature distributions because of the lag in existing methods. More accurate estimates of temperature distributions may often be obtained using theoretical methods, which involve solving coupled problems in the theory of elasticity and thermal conductivity. In this work, a planar contact case in thermoelasticity is considered for frictional hardening, in which the friction disk and the workpiece are represented as an elastic plunger and the body.It is assumed that the contact normal and tangential stresses are related by Coulomb's law. Also given is a method of solving which enables the definition of the thermoelastic state with a given accuracy in the contact region for high disk speeds. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied....... Kinetic friction is observed to be caused by atomic-scale Stick and slip which occurs by nucleation and subsequent motion of dislocations preferably between close-packed {111} planes. Stick and slip seems ro occur in different situations. For single crystalline contacts without grain boundaries...... pinning of atoms near the boundary of the interface and is therefore more easily observed for smaller contacts. Depending on crystal orientation and load, frictional wear can also be seen in the simulations. In particular, for the annealed interface-necks which model contacts created by scanning tunneling...

  11. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different composite nanolubricant concentrations on Aluminium 2024 plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, N. N. M.; Azmi, W. H.; Redhwan, A. A. M.; Sharif, M. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Wear of sliding parts and operational machine consistency enhancement can be avoided with good lubrication. Lubrication reduce wear between two contacting and sliding surfaces and decrease the frictional power losses in compressor. The coefficient of friction and wear rate effects study were carried out to measure the friction and anti-wear abilities of Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants a new type of compressor lubricant to enhanced the compressor performances. The tribology test rig employing reciprocating test conditions to replicate a piston ring contact in the compressor was used to measure the coefficient of friction and wear rate. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different Al2O3-SiO2/PAG composite nanolubricants of Aluminium 2024 plate for 10-kg load at different speed were investigated. Al2O3 and SiO2 nanoparticles were dispersed in the Polyalkylene Glycol (PAG 46) lubricant using two-steps method of preparation. The result shows that the coefficient friction and wear rate of composite nanolubricants decreased compared to pure lubricant. The maximum reduction achievement for friction of coefficient and wear rate by Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants by 4.78% and 12.96% with 0.06% volume concentration. Therefore, 0.06% volume concentration is selected as the most enhanced composite nanolubricants with effective coefficient of friction and wear rate reduction compared to other volume concentrations. Thus, it is recommended to be used as the compressor lubrication to enhanced compressor performances.

  12. An elastography method based on the scanning contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ji; Li, Faxin

    2013-12-01

    Most tissues may become significantly stiffer than their normal states when there are lesions inside. The tissue's modulus can then act as an identification parameter for clinic diagnosis of tumors or fibrosis, which leads to elastography. This study introduces a novel elastography method that can be used for modulus imaging of superficial organs. This method is based on the scanning contact-resonance of a unimorph piezoelectric cantilever. The cantilever vibrates in its bending mode with the tip pressed tightly on the sample. The contact resonance frequency of the cantilever-sample system is tracked at each scanning point, from which the sample's modulus can be derived based on a beam dynamic model and a contact mechanics model. Scanning is performed by a three-dimensional motorized stage and the whole system is controlled by a homemade software program based on LabVIEW. Testing on in vitro beef tissues indicates that the fat and the muscle can be easily distinguished using this system, and the accuracy of the modulus measurement can be comparable with that of nanoindentation. Imaging on homemade gelatin phantoms shows that the depth information of the abnormalities can be qualitatively obtained by varying the pressing force. The detection limit of this elastography method is specially examined both experimentally and numerically. Results show that it can detect the typical lesions in superficial organs with the depth of several centimeters. The lateral resolution of this elastography method∕system is better than 0.5 mm, and could be further enhanced by using more scanning points. The proposed elastography system can be regarded as a sensitive palpation robot, which may be very promising in early diagnosis of tumors in superficial organs such as breast and thyroid.

  13. Influence of friction on the residual morphology, the penetration load and the residual stress distribution of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, friction between the Cube-Corner indenter and the sample surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG was analyzed and discussed by the experimental method, the theoretical method and the finite element simulation. Linear residua are observed on the surface of the indenter for the first time, which gives the direct evidence that strong interaction processes exist between the indenter surface and the sample surface because of strong friction and local high contact press. A simplified model was developed to correct the penetration load with the consideration of friction. Effects of friction on the penetration load-depth curves, plastic flow, surface deformation and residual stress distribution of the sample with different friction coefficients were investigated by the finite element simulation.

  14. Contact statuses between functionally graded brake disk and pure pad disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzamanian, M.M.; Sahari, B.B.; Bayat, M.; Mustapha, F.; Ismarrubie, Z.N.; Shahrjerdi, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The contact statuses between functionally graded (FG) brake disks and pure pad disk are investigated by using finite element method (FEM). Two types of variation is considered for FG brake disk, the variation of materials are considered change in radial and thickness direction of disk. The material properties of these two types of FG brake disks are assumed to be represented by power-law distributions in the radius and thickness direction. The results are obtained and then compared. For the radial FG brake disk, the inner and outer surfaces are considered metal and ceramic respectively, and friction coefficient between metal surface and ceramic surface of FG brake dick with pad are considered 1.4 and 0.75 respectively. For the thickness FG brake disk the contact surface with pure pad brake disk is ceramic and the free surface is metal and friction coefficient between ceramic (contact) surface and pure pad brake disk is considered 0.75. In both types of FG brake disks the Coulomb contact friction is applied. Mechanical response of FG brake disks are compared and verified with the known results in the literatures. Three types of contact statuses are introduced as Sticking, Contact and Near Contact. The contact status between pad and disk for different values for pad thickness, grading index,n , and percentage of friction coefficient (λ) is shown. It can be seen that for all values of percentage of friction coefficient,λ , and grading indices, n, by increasing the thickness of pad cause the contact status changes from sticking to contact and then to near contact. (author)

  15. Fingerprints are unlikely to increase the friction of primate fingerpads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warman, Peter H; Ennos, A Roland

    2009-07-01

    It is generally assumed that fingerprints improve the grip of primates, but the efficiency of their ridging will depend on the type of frictional behaviour the skin exhibits. Ridges would be effective at increasing friction for hard materials, but in a rubbery material they would reduce friction because they would reduce contact area. In this study we investigated the frictional performance of human fingertips on dry acrylic glass using a modified universal mechanical testing machine, measuring friction at a range of normal loads while also measuring the contact area. Tests were carried out on different fingers, fingers at different angles and against different widths of acrylic sheet to separate the effects of normal force and contact area. The results showed that fingertips behaved more like rubbers than hard solids; their coefficients of friction fell at higher normal forces and friction was higher when fingers were held flatter against wider sheets and hence when contact area was greater. The shear stress was greater at higher pressures, suggesting the presence of a biofilm between the skin and the surface. Fingerprints reduced contact area by a factor of one-third compared with flat skin, however, which would have reduced the friction; this casts severe doubt on their supposed frictional function.

  16. Tuning the Friction of Silicon Surfaces Using Nanopatterns at the Nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction and wear become significant at small scale lengths, particularly in MEMS/NEMS. Nanopatterns are regarded as a potential approach to solve these problems. In this paper, we investigated the friction behavior of nanopatterned silicon surfaces with a periodical rectangular groove array in dry and wear-less single-asperity contact at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics simulations. The synchronous and periodic oscillations of the normal load and friction force with the sliding distance were determined at frequencies defined by the nanopattern period. The linear load dependence of the friction force is always observed for the nanopatterned surface and is independent of the nanopattern geometry. We show that the linear friction law is a formal Amontons’ friction law, while the significant linear dependence of the friction force-versus-real contact area and real contact area-versus-normal load captures the general features of the nanoscale friction for the nanopatterned surface. Interestingly, the nanopattern increases the friction force at the nanoscale, and the desired friction reduction is also observed. The enlargement and reduction of the friction critically depended on the nanopattern period rather than the area ratio. Our simulation results reveal that the nanopattern can modulate the friction behavior at the nanoscale from the friction signal to the friction law and to the value of the friction force. Thus, elaborate nanopatterning is an effective strategy for tuning the friction behavior at the nanoscale.

  17. A method of non-contact reading code based on computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunsen; Zong, Xiaoyu; Guo, Bingxuan

    2018-03-01

    With the purpose of guarantee the computer information exchange security between internal and external network (trusted network and un-trusted network), A non-contact Reading code method based on machine vision has been proposed. Which is different from the existing network physical isolation method. By using the computer monitors, camera and other equipment. Deal with the information which will be on exchanged, Include image coding ,Generate the standard image , Display and get the actual image , Calculate homography matrix, Image distort correction and decoding in calibration, To achieve the computer information security, Non-contact, One-way transmission between the internal and external network , The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by experiments on real computer text data, The speed of data transfer can be achieved 24kb/s. The experiment shows that this algorithm has the characteristics of high security, fast velocity and less loss of information. Which can meet the daily needs of the confidentiality department to update the data effectively and reliably, Solved the difficulty of computer information exchange between Secret network and non-secret network, With distinctive originality, practicability, and practical research value.

  18. Note: A rigid piezo motor with large output force and an effective method to reduce sliding friction force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-05-01

    We present a completely practical TunaDrive piezo motor. It consists of a central piezo stack sandwiched by two arm piezo stacks and two leg piezo stacks, respectively, which is then sandwiched and spring-clamped by a pair of parallel polished sapphire rods. It works by alternatively fast expanding and contracting the arm/leg stacks while slowly expanding/contracting the central stack simultaneously. The key point is that sufficiently fast expanding and contracting a limb stack can make its two sliding friction forces well cancel, resulting in the total sliding friction force is piezo motor's high compactness, precision, and output force make it perfect in building a high-quality harsh-condition (vibration resistant) atomic resolution scanning probe microscope.

  19. On the geometric phenomenology of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shankar; Merin, A P; Nitsure, Nitin

    2017-09-06

    In this note we introduce a hierarchy of phase spaces for static friction, which give a graphical way to systematically quantify the directional dependence in static friction via subregions of the phase spaces. We experimentally plot these subregions to obtain phenomenological descriptions for static friction in various examples where the macroscopic shape of the object affects the frictional response. The phase spaces have the universal property that for any experiment in which a given object is put on a substrate fashioned from a chosen material with a specified nature of contact, the frictional behaviour can be read off from a uniquely determined classifying map on the control space of the experiment which takes values in the appropriate phase space.

  20. The method of contact angle measurements and estimation of work of adhesion in bioleaching of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matlakowska Renata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present our method for the measurement of contact angles on the surface of minerals during the bioleaching process because the standard deviation obtained in our measurements achieved unexpectedly low error. Construction of a goniometer connected with a specially prepared computer program allowed us to repeat measurements several times over a short time course, yielding excellent results. After defining points on the outline of the image of a drop and its baseline as well of the first approximation of the outline of the drop, an iterative process is initiated that is aimed at fitting the model of the drop and baseline. In turn, after defining the medium for which measurements were made, the work of adhesion is determined according to Young-Dupré equation. Calculations were made with the use of two methods named the L-M and L-Q methods.

  1. Transient effects in friction fractal asperity creep

    CERN Document Server

    Goedecke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Transient friction effects determine the behavior of a wide class of mechatronic systems. Classic examples are squealing brakes, stiction in robotic arms, or stick-slip in linear drives. To properly design and understand mechatronic systems of this type, good quantitative models of transient friction effects are of primary interest. The theory developed in this book approaches this problem bottom-up, by deriving the behavior of macroscopic friction surfaces from the microscopic surface physics. The model is based on two assumptions: First, rough surfaces are inherently fractal, exhibiting roughness on a wide range of scales. Second, transient friction effects are caused by creep enlargement of the real area of contact between two bodies. This work demonstrates the results of extensive Finite Element analyses of the creep behavior of surface asperities, and proposes a generalized multi-scale area iteration for calculating the time-dependent real contact between two bodies. The toolset is then demonstrated both...

  2. Adhesion and friction in single asperity contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaqoob, Muhammad Adeel

    2012-01-01

    In the modern era, many mechanical systems require more stringent requirements in terms of performance and reliability. The applications of these systems can be found in medical instrumentation, electron microscopes, lithography systems, as well as in aviation and space applications. Instruments

  3. Child contact management in high tuberculosis burden countries: A mixed-methods systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Plessis, Lienki; Du Preez, Karen; Carr, Catherine; Mandalakas, Anna M.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Considering the World Health Organization recommendation to implement child contact management (CCM) for TB, we conducted a mixed-methods systematic review to summarize CCM implementation, challenges, predictors, and recommendations. We searched the electronic databases of PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science for studies published between 1996–2017 that reported CCM data from high TB-burden countries. Protocol details for this systematic review were registered on PROSPERO: International prospective register of systematic reviews (#CRD42016038105). We formulated a search strategy to identify all available studies, published in English that specifically targeted a) population: child contacts (studied and compared in HBCs, and d) outcomes: monitoring and evaluation of CCM outcomes reported in the literature for each CCM cascade step. We included any quantitative, qualitative, mixed-methods study design except for randomized-controlled trials, editorials or commentaries. Thirty-seven studies were reviewed. Child contact losses varied greatly for screening, isoniazid preventive therapy initiation, and completion. CCM challenges included: infrastructure, knowledge, attitudes, stigma, access, competing priorities, and treatment. CCM recommendations included: health system strengthening, health education, and improved preventive therapy. Identified predictors included: index case and clinic characteristics, perceptions of barriers and risk, costs, and treatment characteristics. CCM lacks standardization resulting in common challenges and losses throughout the CCM cascade. Prioritization of a CCM-friendly healthcare environment with improved CCM processes and tools; health education; and active, evidence-based strategies can decrease barriers. A focused approach toward every aspect of the CCM cascade will likely diminish losses throughout the CCM cascade and ultimately decrease TB

  4. Collisions of Constrained Rigid Body Systems with Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Shen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach is developed for the general collision problem of two rigid body systems with constraints (e.g., articulated systems, such as massy linkages in which the relative tangential velocity at the point of contact and the associated friction force can change direction during the collision. This is beyond the framework of conventional methods, which can give significant and very obvious errors for this problem, and both extends and consolidates recent work. A new parameterization and theory characterize if, when and how the relative tangential velocity changes direction during contact. Elastic and dissipative phenomena and different values for static and kinetic friction coefficients are included. The method is based on the explicitly physical analysis of events at the point of contact. Using this method, Example 1 resolves (and corrects a paradox (in the literature of the collision of a double pendulum with the ground. The method fundamentally subsumes other recent models and the collision of rigid bodies; it yields the same results as conventional methods when they would apply (Example 2. The new method reformulates and extends recent approaches in a completely physical context.

  5. Non-contact method of search and analysis of pulsating vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtomonov, Yuri N.; Tsoy, Maria O.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2018-04-01

    Despite the variety of existing methods of recording the human pulse and a solid history of their development, there is still considerable interest in this topic. The development of new non-contact methods, based on advanced image processing, caused a new wave of interest in this issue. We present a simple but quite effective method for analyzing the mechanical pulsations of blood vessels lying close to the surface of the skin. Our technique is a modification of imaging (or remote) photoplethysmography (i-PPG). We supplemented this method with the addition of a laser light source, which made it possible to use other methods of searching for the proposed pulsation zone. During the testing of the method, several series of experiments were carried out with both artificial oscillating objects as well as with the target signal source (human wrist). The obtained results show that our method allows correct interpretation of complex data. To summarize, we proposed and tested an alternative method for the search and analysis of pulsating vessels.

  6. Friction of ice measured using lateral force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Inoue, Takahito; Salmeron, Miquel

    2000-01-01

    The friction of nanometer thin ice films grown on mica substrates is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Friction was found to be of similar magnitude as the static friction of ice reported in macroscopic experiments. The possible existence of a lubricating film of water due to pressure melting, frictional heating, and surface premelting is discussed based on the experimental results using noncontact, contact, and lateral force microscopy. We conclude that AFM measures the dry friction of ice due to the low scan speed and the squeezing out of the water layer between the sharp AFM tip and the ice surface. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  7. The estimation of dynamic contact angle of ultra-hydrophobic surfaces using inclined surface and impinging droplet methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasikova, Darina; Kotek, Michal

    2014-03-01

    The development of industrial technology also brings with optimized surface quality, particularly where there is contact with food. Application ultra-hydrophobic surface significantly reduces the growth of bacteria and facilitates cleaning processes. Testing and evaluation of surface quality are used two methods: impinging droplet and inclined surface method optimized with high speed shadowgraphy, which give information about dynamic contact angle. This article presents the results of research into new methods of measuring ultra-hydrophobic patented technology.

  8. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  9. Comparing numerically exact and modelled static friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krengel Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there exists no mechanically consistent “numerically exact” implementation of static and dynamic Coulomb friction for general soft particle simulations with arbitrary contact situations in two or three dimension, but only along one dimension. We outline a differential-algebraic equation approach for a “numerically exact” computation of friction in two dimensions and compare its application to the Cundall-Strack model in some test cases.

  10. Anisotropy in cohesive, frictional granular media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luding, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    The modelling of cohesive, frictional granular materials with a discrete particle molecular dynamics is reviewed. From the structure of the quasi-static granular solid, the fabric, stress, and stiffness tensors are determined, including both normal and tangential forces. The influence of the material properties on the flow behaviour is also reported, including relations between the microscopic attractive force and the macroscopic cohesion as well as the dependence of the macroscopic friction on the microscopic contact friction coefficient. Related to the dynamics, the anisotropy of both structure and stress are exponentially approaching the maximum

  11. DOE assay methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, F.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Caldwell, J.T. (Pajarito Scientific Corp., Los Alamos, NM (United States))

    1991-08-01

    US Department of Energy methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste prior to shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described and listed by contractor site. The methods described are part of the certification process. All CH-TRU waste must be assayed for determination of fissile material content and decay heat values prior to shipment and prior to storage on-site. Both nondestructive assay (NDA) and destructive assay methods are discussed, and new NDA developments such as passive-action neutron (PAN) crate counter improvements and neutron imaging are detailed. Specifically addressed are assay method physics; applicability to CH-TRU wastes; calibration standards and implementation; operator training requirements and practices; assay procedures; assay precision, bias, and limit of detection; and assay limitation. While PAN is a new technique and does not yet have established American Society for Testing and Materials. American National Standards Institute, or Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidelines or methods describing proper calibration procedures, equipment setup, etc., comparisons of PAN data with the more established assay methods (e.g., segmented gamma scanning) have demonstrated its reliability and accuracy. Assay methods employed by DOE have been shown to reliable and accurate in determining fissile, radionuclide, alpha-curie content, and decay heat values of CH-TRU wastes. These parameters are therefore used to characterize packaged waste for use in certification programs such as that used in shipment of CH-TRU waste to the WIPP. 36 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. DOE assay methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    US Department of Energy methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste prior to shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described and listed by contractor site. The methods described are part of the certification process. All CH-TRU waste must be assayed for determination of fissile material content and decay heat values prior to shipment and prior to storage on-site. Both nondestructive assay (NDA) and destructive assay methods are discussed, and new NDA developments such as passive-action neutron (PAN) crate counter improvements and neutron imaging are detailed. Specifically addressed are assay method physics; applicability to CH-TRU wastes; calibration standards and implementation; operator training requirements and practices; assay procedures; assay precision, bias, and limit of detection; and assay limitation. While PAN is a new technique and does not yet have established American Society for Testing and Materials. American National Standards Institute, or Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidelines or methods describing proper calibration procedures, equipment setup, etc., comparisons of PAN data with the more established assay methods (e.g., segmented gamma scanning) have demonstrated its reliability and accuracy. Assay methods employed by DOE have been shown to reliable and accurate in determining fissile, radionuclide, alpha-curie content, and decay heat values of CH-TRU wastes. These parameters are therefore used to characterize packaged waste for use in certification programs such as that used in shipment of CH-TRU waste to the WIPP. 36 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Influence of various base oils on friction and power loss in gears; Einfluss verschiedener Grundoele auf Reibung und Verlustleistung in Zahnradgetrieben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doleschel, A.; Michaelis, K.; Hoehn, B.R.

    2001-03-01

    The frictional behaviour of synthetic lubricants was systematically investigated in a twin disc test rig and a back-to-back gear test rig. For 22 lubricants (mineral oil, polyalfaolefin (PAO), polyglycol (PG), ester and mixtures) the coefficient of friction was measured in the twin disc test rig, dependant on pressure, oil temperature, rolling and sliding velocity. In the gear test rig pressure and velocity was varied for 9 lubricants. The mineral oil shows an estimated coefficient of friction of about {mu} >> 0.045, the synthetic lubricants have a lower coefficient of friction. In the twin disc test rig the lowest coefficient of friction with PG as low as 20% of the coefficient of mineral oil was measured, depending on the mixture of EO:PO. In the gear test rig such low coefficients of friction were not measured, but still values of 60% compared to mineral oil were obtained. Esters show in the twin disc test rig a coefficient of friction in the range of 30% to 100% of the coefficient of friction of mineral oil, in the gear test rig in the range of 60% to 100%. From these investigations a calculation method for the coefficient of friction in disc and gear contacts was derived. With these equations the power loss and efficiency of transmissions in practice, lubricated with synthetic gear oils can be evaluated. (orig.)

  14. Non-contact micro mass evaluation method using an X-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jiseok; Sun, Gwang Min; Baek, Ha Ni; Hoang, Sy Minh Tuan; Park, Sun Ae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    For the mass inspection of attached foils such as printed electrodes, mass should be measured by a non-contact method with the capacity to measure a small mass of micrograms. In this study, the masses of 1 mg to 10 mg electrodes were evaluated using an X-ray microscope. The results were compared with the masses determined by using a digital scale with a 0.005 mg error. The average of the relative error between the mass measurements using the X-ray microscope and those using the digital scale was less than 2.51%. The results show that X-ray mass evaluation method can be used for mass measurement of micro objects by replacing a digital scale.

  15. The hands in metabolic skeletal diseases 1. A method of high-detailed contact radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shotemor, Sh.Sh.; Tret'yakov, A.E.

    1982-01-01

    A method of high-detailed contact radiography of the hands consists in the the screenless x-ray on the fine grained technical film employing microfocus with consecutive optical enlargement of the appearance. Various specimens of home-made tecinical film have been tried, the best results were obtained with the PT-5 film type (an opportunity of 7-fold optical magnification without interfering effect of the emulsion granularity). The method provides for a significant diagnostic advantage, affording to reveal minimal manifestations of subperiosteal, intracortical, and enosteal bone tissue resorption, as well as tiny calcinates in soft tissues. Pathological bone disorders were discovered in 63 out of 142 examined patients, suspected of metabolic diseases of the skeleton [ru

  16. Two dimensional modeling of elastic wave propagation in solids containing cracks with rough surfaces and friction - Part II: Numerical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, Steven; Aleshin, Vladislav; Truyaert, Kevin; Bou Matar, Olivier; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2018-01-01

    Our study aims at the creation of a numerical toolbox that describes wave propagation in samples containing internal contacts (e.g. cracks, delaminations, debondings, imperfect intergranular joints) of known geometry with postulated contact interaction laws including friction. The code consists of two entities: the contact model and the solid mechanics module. Part I of the paper concerns an in-depth description of a constitutive model for realistic contacts or cracks that takes into account the roughness of the contact faces and the associated effects of friction and hysteresis. In the crack model, three different contact states can be recognized: contact loss, total sliding and partial slip. Normal (clapping) interactions between the crack faces are implemented using a quadratic stress-displacement relation, whereas tangential (friction) interactions were introduced using the Coulomb friction law for the total sliding case, and the Method of Memory Diagrams (MMD) in case of partial slip. In the present part of the paper, we integrate the developed crack model into finite element software in order to simulate elastic wave propagation in a solid material containing internal contacts or cracks. We therefore implemented the comprehensive crack model in MATLAB® and introduced it in the Structural Mechanics Module of COMSOL Multiphysics®. The potential of the approach for ultrasound based inspection of solids with cracks showing acoustic nonlinearity is demonstrated by means of an example of shear wave propagation in an aluminum sample containing a single crack with rough surfaces and friction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanov, A; Fontaine, J; Martin, J-M; Mogne, T L; Nevshupa, R

    2008-01-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H 2 and CH 4 . During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it

  18. Modern contact investigation methods for enhancing tuberculosis control in Aboriginal communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J. Cook

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Aboriginal communities in Canada are challenged by a disproportionate burden of TB infection and disease. Contact investigation (CI guidelines exist but these strategies do not take into account the unique social structure of different populations. Because of the limitations of traditional CI, new approaches are under investigation and include the use of social network analysis, geographic information systems and genomics, in addition to the widespread use of genotyping to better understand TB transmission. Guidelines for the routine use of network methods and other novel methodologies for TB CI and outbreak investigation do not exist despite the gathering evidence that these approaches can positively impact TB control efforts, even in Aboriginal communities. The feasibility and efficacy of these novel approaches to CI in Aboriginal communities requires further investigation. The successful integration of these novel methodologies will require community involvement, capacity building and ongoing support at every level. The outcome will not only be the systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of CI data in high-burden communities to assess transmission but the prioritization of contacts who are candidates for treatment of LTBI which will break the cycle of transmission. Ultimately, the measure of success will be a clear and sustained decline in TB incidence in Aboriginal communities.

  19. Standard test method for damage to contacting solid surfaces under fretting conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the studying or ranking the susceptibility of candidate materials to fretting corrosion or fretting wear for the purposes of material selection for applications where fretting corrosion or fretting wear can limit serviceability. 1.2 This test method uses a tribological bench test apparatus with a mechanism or device that will produce the necessary relative motion between a contacting hemispherical rider and a flat counterface. The rider is pressed against the flat counterface with a loading mass. The test method is intended for use in room temperature air, but future editions could include fretting in the presence of lubricants or other environments. 1.3 The purpose of this test method is to rub two solid surfaces together under controlled fretting conditions and to quantify the damage to both surfaces in units of volume loss for the test method. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5...

  20. Determination of the coefficient of dynamic friction between coatings of alumina and metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A.; Córdoba, E.; Ramírez, Z.; Sierra, C.; Ortega, Y.

    2017-12-01

    This project aims to determine the coefficient of dynamic friction between micrometric size coatings of alumina and metallic materials (Steel and aluminium); the methodology used to achieve the proposed objective consisted of 4 phases, in the first one was developed a procedure that allowed, from a Pin on Disk machine built based on the specifications given by the ASTM G99-05 standard (Standard test method for wear tests with a Pin on Disk machine), to determine the coefficient of dynamic friction between two materials in contact; subsequently the methodology was verified through tests between steel-steel and steel-aluminium, due to these values are widely reported in the literature; as a third step, deposits of alumina particles of micrometric size were made on a steel substrate through thermal spraying by flame; finally, the tests were carried out between pins of steel of aluminium and alumina coating to determine the coefficients of dynamic friction between these two surfaces. The results of the project allowed to verify that the developed methodology is valid to obtain coefficients of dynamic friction between surfaces in contact since the percentages of error were of 3.5% and 2.1% for steel-steel and aluminium-steel, respectively; additionally, it was found that the coefficient of friction between steel-alumina coatings is 0.36 and aluminium-alumina coating is 0.25.

  1. A real-time non-contact monitoring method of subsea pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Dalei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To monitoring the subsea pipeline in real-time, a special potentiometric sensor array and a potential prediction model are presented in this paper. Firstly, to measure the potential of seawater, a special potentiometric sensor array with Ag/AgCl all-solid-state reference electrodes is first developed in this paper. Secondly, according to the obtained distribution law of electric field intensities a prediction model of the pipeline potentials is developed. Finally, the potentiometric sensor array is applied in sink experiment and the prediction model is validated by the sink measurements. The maximum error for pipeline potential prediction model is 1.1 mV. The proposed non-contact monitoring method for subsea pipeline can predict the potential of sea pipeline in real-time, thus providing important information for further subsea pipeline maintenance.

  2. Detection of needle to nerve contact based on electric bioimpedance and machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvoy, Havard; Tronstad, Christian; Ullensvang, Kyrre; Steinfeldt, Thorsten; Sauter, Axel R

    2017-07-01

    In an ongoing project for electrical impedance-based needle guidance we have previously showed in an animal model that intraneural needle positions can be detected with bioimpedance measurement. To enhance the power of this method we in this study have investigated whether an early detection of the needle only touching the nerve also is feasible. Measurement of complex impedance during needle to nerve contact was compared with needle positions in surrounding tissues in a volunteer study on 32 subjects. Classification analysis using Support-Vector Machines demonstrated that discrimination is possible, but that the sensitivity and specificity for the nerve touch algorithm not is at the same level of performance as for intra-neuralintraneural detection.

  3. Effect of electrostatic field on dynamic friction coefficient of pistachio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H Aghkhani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Separation and grading of agricultural products from the production to supply, has notable importance. The separation can be done based on physical, electrical, magnetic, optical properties and etc. It is necessary for any development of new systems to study enough on the properties and behavior of agricultural products. Some characteristics for separation are size (length, width and thickness, hardness, shape, density, surface roughness, color, speed limit, aerodynamic properties, electrical conductivity, elasticity and coefficient of static friction point. So far, the friction properties of agricultural products used in the separating process, but the effect of electrostatic charging on static and dynamic coefficients of friction for separation had little attention. The aim of this study was to find out the interactions between electrostatic and friction properties to find a way to separate products that separation is not possible with conventional methods or not sufficiently accurate. In this paper, the separation of close and smiley pistachios by electrostatic charging was investigated. Materials and Methods: Kallehghoochi pistachio cultivar has the top rank in production in Iran. Therefore, it was used as a sample. The experimental design that used in this study, had moisture content at three levels (24.2, 14.5 and 8.1 percent, electric field intensity at three levels (zero, 4000 and 7000 V, speed of movement on the surface at three levels (1300, 2500 and 3300 mm per minute, friction surface (galvanized sheet iron, aluminum and flat rubber and pistachio type at two levels (filled splits and closed that was measured and analyzed in completely randomized factorial design. A friction measuring device (built in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad used to measure the friction force. It has a removable table that can move in two directions with adjustable speed. The test sample put into the vessel with internal dimensions of 300 × 150

  4. A Mathematical Method to Calculate Tumor Contact Surface Area: An Effective Parameter to Predict Renal Function after Partial Nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Wang, Yu-De; Huang, Chi-Ping; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Yang, Che-Rei; Chen, Guang-Heng; Chang, Chao-Hsiang

    2016-07-01

    We proposed a mathematical formula to calculate contact surface area between a tumor and renal parenchyma. We examined the applicability of using contact surface area to predict renal function after partial nephrectomy. We performed this retrospective study in patients who underwent partial nephrectomy between January 2012 and December 2014. Based on abdominopelvic computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, we calculated the contact surface area using the formula (2*π*radius*depth) developed by integral calculus. We then evaluated the correlation between contact surface area and perioperative parameters, and compared contact surface area and R.E.N.A.L. (Radius/Exophytic/endophytic/Nearness to collecting system/Anterior/Location) score in predicting a reduction in renal function. Overall 35, 26 and 45 patients underwent partial nephrectomy with open, laparoscopic and robotic approaches, respectively. Mean ± SD contact surface area was 30.7±26.1 cm(2) and median (IQR) R.E.N.A.L. score was 7 (2.25). Spearman correlation analysis showed that contact surface area was significantly associated with estimated blood loss (p=0.04), operative time (p=0.04) and percent change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (p contact surface area and R.E.N.A.L. score independently affected percent change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (p contact surface area was a better independent predictor of a greater than 10% change in estimated glomerular filtration rate compared to R.E.N.A.L. score (AUC 0.86 vs 0.69). Using this simple mathematical method, contact surface area was associated with surgical outcomes. Compared to R.E.N.A.L. score, contact surface area was a better predictor of functional change after partial nephrectomy. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Viscosity, granular-temperature, and stress calculations for shearing assemblies of inelastic, frictional disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Employing nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics methods the effects of two energy loss mechanisms on viscosity, stress, and granular-temperature in assemblies of nearly rigid, inelastic frictional disks undergoing steady-state shearing are calculated. Energy introduced into the system through forced shearing is dissipated by inelastic normal forces or through frictional sliding during collisions resulting in a natural steady-state kinetic energy density (granular-temperature) that depends on the density and shear rate of the assembly and on the friction and inelasticity properties of the disks. The calculations show that both the mean deviatoric particle velocity and the effective viscosity of a system of particles with fixed friction and restitution coefficients increase almost linearly with strain rate. Particles with a velocity-dependent coefficient of restitution show a less rapid increase in both deviatoric velocity and viscosity as strain rate increases. Particles with highly dissipative interactions result in anisotropic pressure and velocity distributions in the assembly, particularly at low densities. At very high densities the pressure also becomes anisotropic due to high contact forces perpendicular to the shearing direction. The mean rotational velocity of the frictional disks is nearly equal to one-half the shear rate. The calculated ratio of shear stress to normal stress varies significantly with density while the ratio of shear stress to total pressure shows much less variation. The inclusion of surface friction (and thus particle rotation) decreases shear stress at low density but increases shear stress under steady shearing at higher densities

  6. Modeling Friction Performance of Drill String Torsional Oscillation Using Dynamic Friction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingming Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drill string torsional and longitudinal oscillation can significantly reduce axial drag in horizontal drilling. An improved theoretical model for the analysis of the frictional force was proposed based on microscopic contact deformation theory and a bristle model. The established model, an improved dynamic friction model established for drill strings in a wellbore, was used to determine the relationship of friction force changes and the drill string torsional vibration. The model results were in good agreement with the experimental data, verifying the accuracy of the established model. The analysis of the influence of drilling mud properties indicated that there is an approximately linear relationship between the axial friction force and dynamic shear and viscosity. The influence of drill string torsional oscillation on the axial friction force is discussed. The results indicated that the drill string transverse velocity is a prerequisite for reducing axial friction. In addition, low amplitude of torsional vibration speed can significantly reduce axial friction. Then, increasing the amplitude of transverse vibration speed, the effect of axial reduction is not significant. In addition, by involving general field drilling parameters, this model can accurately describe the friction behavior and quantitatively predict the frictional resistance in horizontal drilling.

  7. Modeling for Friction of Four Stroke Four Cylinder In-Line Petrol Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Mishra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A four stroke four cylinder in-line petrol engine is modeled to estimate various performance parameters. The solution is based on tribology and dynamics principle. The detailed parameters relating to engine friction and lubrication are computed numerically for the engine firing order 1-3-4-2. The numerical method is based on finite difference method that solves coupled Reynolds Equation and Energy Equation. Output includes the movie thickness, friction force, friction power loss and temperature rise in the ring liner conjunction in all four cylinders. Transient regime of ring liner lubrication isaddressed while the same changes from hydrodynamic to mixed in an engine cycle. Momentary cessation near the top and bottom dead center that causes boundary interaction is analyzed through asperity contact. The non - Newtonian behavior of lubricant film due to pressure and temperature is addresses using viscosity -pressure- temperature inter relationship.

  8. Universal Aging Mechanism for Static and Sliding Friction of Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Tekiel, Antoni; Topple, Jessica; Grütter, Peter; Schirmeisen, André

    2016-07-08

    The term "contact aging" refers to the temporal evolution of the interface between a slider and a substrate usually resulting in increasing friction with time. Current phenomenological models for multiasperity contacts anticipate that such aging is not only the driving force behind the transition from static to sliding friction, but at the same time influences the general dynamics of the sliding friction process. To correlate static and sliding friction on the nanoscale, we show experimental evidence of stick-slip friction for nanoparticles sliding on graphite over a wide dynamic range. We can assign defined periods of aging to the stick phases of the particles, which agree with simulations explicitly including contact aging. Additional slide-hold-slide experiments for the same system allow linking the sliding friction results to static friction measurements, where both friction mechanisms can be universally described by a common aging formalism.

  9. Dry friction of microstructured polymer surfaces inspired by snake skin

    OpenAIRE

    Martina J. Baum; Lars Heepe; Elena Fadeeva; Stanislav N. Gorb

    2014-01-01

    Summary The microstructure investigated in this study was inspired by the anisotropic microornamentation of scales from the ventral body side of the California King Snake (Lampropeltis getula californiae). Frictional properties of snake-inspired microstructured polymer surface (SIMPS) made of epoxy resin were characterised in contact with a smooth glass ball by a microtribometer in two perpendicular directions. The SIMPS exhibited a considerable frictional anisotropy: Frictional coefficients ...

  10. Wet etch methods for InAs nanowire patterning and self-aligned electrical contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fülöp, G.; d'Hollosy, S.; Hofstetter, L.; Baumgartner, A.; Nygård, J.; Schönenberger, C.; Csonka, S.

    2016-05-01

    Advanced synthesis of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) enables their application in diverse fields, notably in chemical and electrical sensing, photovoltaics, or quantum electronic devices. In particular, indium arsenide (InAs) NWs are an ideal platform for quantum devices, e.g. they may host topological Majorana states. While the synthesis has been continously perfected, only a few techniques have been developed to tailor individual NWs after growth. Here we present three wet chemical etch methods for the post-growth morphological engineering of InAs NWs on the sub-100 nm scale. The first two methods allow the formation of self-aligned electrical contacts to etched NWs, while the third method results in conical shaped NW profiles ideal for creating smooth electrical potential gradients and shallow barriers. Low temperature experiments show that NWs with etched segments have stable transport characteristics and can serve as building blocks of quantum electronic devices. As an example we report the formation of a single electrically stable quantum dot between two etched NW segments.

  11. Effect of contact stiffness on wedge calibration of lateral force in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fei; Zhao Xuezeng

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative friction measurement of nanomaterials in atomic force microscope requires accurate calibration method for lateral force. The effect of contact stiffness on lateral force calibration of atomic force microscope is discussed in detail and an improved calibration method is presented. The calibration factor derived from the original method increased with the applied normal load, which indicates that separate calibration should be required for every given applied normal load to keep the accuracy of friction measurement. We improve the original method by introducing the contact factor, which is derived from the contact stiffness between the tip and the sample, to the calculation of calibration factors. The improved method makes the calculation of calibration factors under different applied normal loads possible without repeating the calibration procedure. Comparative experiments on a silicon wafer have been done by both the two methods to validate the method in this article

  12. Clinical evaluation of a computerized topography software method for fitting rigid gas permeable contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotka, L B; Capretta, D M; Lass, J H

    1994-10-01

    Computerized videokeratoscope software programs now have the ability to assist in the design of rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lenses and simulate fluorescein patterns. We evaluated the performance of Computed Anatomy's Topographic Modeling System (TMS-1) and its Contact Lens Fitting Program (version 1.41) in fitting RGP lenses in 31 subjects. Computerized topographic analysis, balanced manifest refraction, slit lamp examination, and keratometry were performed. Initial lens parameters were ordered according to manufacturer's programmed recommendations for base curve, power, lens diameter, optic zone diameter, and edge lift. Final lens parameters were based on clinical performance. Lenses were recorded for base curve changes of 0.1 mm or more, power alterations of +/- 0.50 D or more, or for any alteration in diameter/optic zone. Twenty-seven patients were analyzed for all five recommended parameters. Thirteen of 27 patients (48%) required no parameter changes. Nine of 27 patients (33%) required one parameter change, four of 27 patients (15%) required two parameter changes, and one patient (4%) needed three parameters altered. The most prevalent change was a power alteration, required in nine of 27 patients (33%); however, comparisons of all initial to final parameters showed no statistically significant differences. Comparison of initial base curves to that which would have been chosen via standard keratometry also showed no significant difference. This study found the TMS-1 default lens recommendations to be clinically unacceptable. This system, however, could be an alternative method of initial lens selection if used to titrate a fit or if software enhancements are incorporated to account for lens movement and flexure.

  13. Application of contact mechanics for fretting damage of fuel rod: part 1 influence functions and numerical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. K.; Yoon, K. H.; Kang, H. S.; Song, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    For the analysis of the fretting problem of the fuel rods, present paper(Part I) shows the numerical method developed for evaluating the stresses on the contact surfaces between the fuel rods and the spacer grids. Theory of Contact Mechanics was incorporated. Contact area was regarded as a plane strain condition, so plane problem was taken into consideration. Normal stress profile on the contact surface was assumed to be Hertzian. As for the direction of the shear load, a closed load path, e.g. load increase in transverse increase in axial decrease in transverse decrease in axial increase in transverse increase in axial direction was considered for simulating the rod vibration in a reactor core. Partial slip problem was consulted. As for the numerical method, a triangular traction element was utilized and the corresponding influence functions were evaluated. Numerical program has been implemented for the present analysis, of which the validity was verified by comparing the Mindlin-Cattaneo solution

  14. General Retarded Contact Self-energies in and beyond the Non-equilibrium Green's Functions Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, Tillmann; He, Yu; Andrawis, Robert; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Retarded contact self-energies in the framework of nonequilibrium Green's functions allow to model the impact of lead structures on the device without explicitly including the leads in the actual device calculation. Most of the contact self-energy algorithms are limited to homogeneous or periodic, semi-infinite lead structures. In this work, the complex absorbing potential method is extended to solve retarded contact self-energies for arbitrary lead structures, including irregular and randomly disordered leads. This method is verified for regular leads against common approaches and on physically equivalent, but numerically different irregular leads. Transmission results on randomly alloyed In 0.5 Ga 0.5 As structures show the importance of disorder in the leads. The concept of retarded contact self-energies is expanded to model passivation of atomically resolved surfaces without explicitly increasing the device's Hamiltonian. (paper)

  15. Boundary element method for normal non-adhesive and adhesive contacts of power-law graded elastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Popov, Valentin L.

    2018-03-01

    Recently proposed formulation of the boundary element method for adhesive contacts has been generalized for contacts of power-law graded materials with and without adhesion. Proceeding from the fundamental solution for single force acting on the surface of an elastic half space, first the influence matrix is obtained for a rectangular grid. The inverse problem for the calculation of required stress in the contact area from a known surface displacement is solved using the conjugate-gradient technique. For the transformation between the stresses and displacements, the Fast Fourier Transformation is used. For the adhesive contact of graded material, the detachment criterion based on the energy balance is proposed. The method is validated by comparison with known exact analytical solutions as well as by proving the independence of the mesh size and the grid orientation.

  16. Discrete element analysis is a valid method for computing joint contact stress in the hip before and after acetabular fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Kevin C; Thomas-Aitken, Holly D; Rudert, M James; Kern, Andrew M; Willey, Michael C; Anderson, Donald D; Goetz, Jessica E

    2018-01-23

    Evaluation of abnormalities in joint contact stress that develop after inaccurate reduction of an acetabular fracture may provide a potential means for predicting the risk of developing post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a computational technique for calculating intra-articular contact stress distributions in a fraction of the time required to obtain the same information using the more commonly employed finite element analysis technique. The goal of this work was to validate the accuracy of DEA-computed contact stress against physical measurements of contact stress made in cadaveric hips using Tekscan sensors. Four static loading tests in a variety of poses from heel-strike to toe-off were performed in two different cadaveric hip specimens with the acetabulum intact and again with an intentionally malreduced posterior wall acetabular fracture. DEA-computed contact stress was compared on a point-by-point basis to stress measured from the physical experiments. There was good agreement between computed and measured contact stress over the entire contact area (correlation coefficients ranged from 0.88 to 0.99). DEA-computed peak contact stress was within an average of 0.5 MPa (range 0.2-0.8 MPa) of the Tekscan peak stress for intact hips, and within an average of 0.6 MPa (range 0-1.6 MPa) for fractured cases. DEA-computed contact areas were within an average of 33% of the Tekscan-measured areas (range: 1.4-60%). These results indicate that the DEA methodology is a valid method for accurately estimating contact stress in both intact and fractured hips. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of friction on the slide guide in an elevator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X-g; Li, H-g; Meng, G [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: xingang.zhang@gmail.com

    2008-02-15

    The slide guide in an elevator moves in contact against the guide rail. This kind of surface contact exhibits a highly non-linear hysteretic friction behaviour which hampers greatly the riding quality of the elevator system. This paper presents an experimental investigation on this type of phenomenon through measuring the contact friction force between the interface of the slide guide and the rail under different combination of input parameters. The experiment shows frictional behaviours including pre-sliding/gross-sliding regimes, transition behaviour between them, time lag, and velocity (weakening and strengthening) dependence. In addition, it is found that different materials in contact, lubrications and friction duration have strong impacts on evaluation of the friction characteristics. The observations in the test provide an insight into relationships between different friction behaviours and can be used to validate the appropriate theoretical friction models.

  18. Development of a Constitutive Friction Law based on the Frictional Interaction of Rough Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Beyer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction has a considerable impact in metal forming. This is in particular true for sheet-bulk metal-forming (SBMF in which local highly varying contact loads occur. A constitutive friction law suited to the needs of SBMF is necessary, if numerical investigations in SBMF are performed. The identification of the friction due to adhesion and ploughing is carried out with an elasto-plastic half-space model. The normal contact is verified for a broad range of normal loads. In addition, the model is used for the characterization of the occurring shear stress. Ploughing is determined by the work which is necessary to plastically deform the surface asperities of the new area that gets into contact during sliding. Furthermore, the surface patches of common half-space models are aligned orthogonally to the direction in which the surfaces approach when normal contact occurs. For a better reflection of the original surfaces, the element patches become inclined. This leads to a geometric share of lateral forces which also contribute to friction. Based on these effects, a friction law is derived which is able to predict the contact conditions especially for SBMF.

  19. Effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanic properties of friction welded AISI 1040/Duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İhsan Kırık

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on the characteristic microstructure and mechanic properties of friction time on the couple steels AISI 1040/AISI 2205 stainless steel joining with friction welding method was experimentally investigated. Friction welding experiment were carried out in privately prepared PLC controlled continuous friction welding machine by us. Joints were carried out under 1700 rpm rotation speed, with 30MPa process friction pressure, 60MPa forging pressure, 4 second forging pressure and under 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 second friction time, respectively. After friction welding, the bonding interface microstructures of the specimens were examined by SEM microscopy and EDS analysis. After weld microhardness and tensile strength of specimens were carried out. The result of applied tests and observations pointed out that the properties of microstructure were changed with friction time increased. The excellent tensile strength of joint observed on 1700 rpm rotation speed and 3 second friction time sample.

  20. A Simple Measurement of the Sliding Friction Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Luigi M.; Defrancesco, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple computer-aided experiment for investigating Coulomb's law of sliding friction in a classroom. It provides a way of testing the possible dependence of the friction coefficient on various parameters, such as types of materials, normal force, apparent area of contact and sliding velocity.

  1. Isotropic compression of cohesive-frictional particles with rolling resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luding, Stefan; Benz, Thomas; Nordal, Steinar

    2010-01-01

    Cohesive-frictional and rough powders are the subject of this study. The behavior under isotropic compression is examined for different material properties involving Coulomb friction, rolling-resistance and contact-adhesion. Under isotropic compression, the density continuously increases according

  2. A new model for friction under shock conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dambakizi F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed at the developpement of a new model for friction under shock conditions. Thanks to a subgrid model and a specific Coulomb friction law, it takes into account the interface temperature and deformation but also the influence of asperities when the contact pressure is relatively low (≤ 3 GPa.

  3. Enhanced nanoscale friction on fluorinated graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sangku; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Jeong Young

    2012-12-12

    Atomically thin graphene is an ideal model system for studying nanoscale friction due to its intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy. Furthermore, modulating its tribological properties could be an important milestone for graphene-based micro- and nanomechanical devices. Here, we report unexpectedly enhanced nanoscale friction on chemically modified graphene and a relevant theoretical analysis associated with flexural phonons. Ultrahigh vacuum friction force microscopy measurements show that nanoscale friction on the graphene surface increases by a factor of 6 after fluorination of the surface, while the adhesion force is slightly reduced. Density functional theory calculations show that the out-of-plane bending stiffness of graphene increases up to 4-fold after fluorination. Thus, the less compliant F-graphene exhibits more friction. This indicates that the mechanics of tip-to-graphene nanoscale friction would be characteristically different from that of conventional solid-on-solid contact and would be dominated by the out-of-plane bending stiffness of the chemically modified graphene. We propose that damping via flexural phonons could be a main source for frictional energy dissipation in 2D systems such as graphene.

  4. Fatigue life prediction method for contact wire using maximum local stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Seok; Haochuang, Li; Seok, Chang Sung; Koo, Jae Mean [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won; Kwon, Sam Young; Cho, Yong Hyeon [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Railway contact wires supplying electricity to trains are exposed to repeated mechanical strain and stress caused by their own weight and discontinuous contact with a pantograph during train operation. Since the speed of railway transportation has increased continuously, railway industries have recently reported a number of contact wire failures caused by mechanical fatigue fractures instead of normal wear, which has been a more common failure mechanism. To secure the safety and durability of contact wires in environments with increased train speeds, a bending fatigue test on contact wire has been performed. The test equipment is too complicated to evaluate the fatigue characteristics of contact wire. Thus, the axial tension fatigue test was performed for a standard specimen, and the bending fatigue life for the contact wire structure was then predicted using the maximum local stress occurring at the top of the contact wire. Lastly, the tested bending fatigue life of the structure was compared with the fatigue life predicted by the axial tension fatigue test for verification.

  5. Fatigue life prediction method for contact wire using maximum local stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Seok; Haochuang, Li; Seok, Chang Sung; Koo, Jae Mean; Lee, Ki Won; Kwon, Sam Young; Cho, Yong Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    Railway contact wires supplying electricity to trains are exposed to repeated mechanical strain and stress caused by their own weight and discontinuous contact with a pantograph during train operation. Since the speed of railway transportation has increased continuously, railway industries have recently reported a number of contact wire failures caused by mechanical fatigue fractures instead of normal wear, which has been a more common failure mechanism. To secure the safety and durability of contact wires in environments with increased train speeds, a bending fatigue test on contact wire has been performed. The test equipment is too complicated to evaluate the fatigue characteristics of contact wire. Thus, the axial tension fatigue test was performed for a standard specimen, and the bending fatigue life for the contact wire structure was then predicted using the maximum local stress occurring at the top of the contact wire. Lastly, the tested bending fatigue life of the structure was compared with the fatigue life predicted by the axial tension fatigue test for verification.

  6. Friction Pull Plug and Material Configuration for Anti-Chatter Friction Pull Plug Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin Anderson (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A friction pull plug is provided for use in forming a plug weld in a hole in a material. The friction pull plug includes a shank and a series of three frustoconical sections. The relative sizes of the sections assure that a central one of the sections defines the initial contact point between the hole's sides. The angle defined by the central one of the sections reduces or eliminates chatter as the plug is pulled into the hole.

  7. Origins of Rolling Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2017-01-01

    When a hard object rolls on a soft surface, or vice versa, rolling friction arises from deformation of the soft object or the soft surface. The friction force can be described in terms of an offset in the normal reaction force or in terms of energy loss arising from the deformation. The origin of the friction force itself is not entirely clear. It…

  8. Friction and wear in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.J.; Droher, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    In the design of a safe and reliable sodium-cooled reactor one of the more important problem areas is that of friction and wear of components immersed in liquid sodium or exposed to sodium vapor. Sodium coolant at elevated temperatures may severely affect most oxide-bearing surface layers which provide corrosion resistance and, to some extent, lubrication and surface hardness. Consequently, accelerated deterioration may be experienced on engaged-motion contact surfaces, which could result in unexpected reactor shutdown from component malfunction or failure due to galling and seizure. An overall view of the friction and wear phenomena encountered during oscillatory rubbing of surfaces in high-temperature, liquid-sodium environments is presented. Specific data generated at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) on this subject is also presented. (U.S.)

  9. Friction measurement in a hip wear simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikko, Vesa

    2016-05-01

    A torque measurement system was added to a widely used hip wear simulator, the biaxial rocking motion device. With the rotary transducer, the frictional torque about the drive axis of the biaxial rocking motion mechanism was measured. The principle of measuring the torque about the vertical axis above the prosthetic joint, used earlier in commercial biaxial rocking motion simulators, was shown to sense only a minor part of the total frictional torque. With the present method, the total frictional torque of the prosthetic hip was measured. This was shown to consist of the torques about the vertical axis above the joint and about the leaning axis. Femoral heads made from different materials were run against conventional and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups in serum lubrication. Regarding the femoral head material and the type of polyethylene, there were no categorical differences in frictional torque with the exception of zirconia heads, with which the lowest values were obtained. Diamond-like carbon coating of the CoCr femoral head did not reduce friction. The friction factor was found to always decrease with increasing load. High wear could increase the frictional torque by 75%. With the present system, friction can be continuously recorded during long wear tests, so the effect of wear on friction with different prosthetic hips can be evaluated. © IMechE 2016.

  10. Partial digitization method of wave processes in rail lines on the discrete basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyurekhodzhaev, A.N.; Ibraev, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Analytical solution of the problem about longitudinal vibration of the rail which lies on the ties taking into account contact dry friction between wheel and rail is provided by the method of partial digitization and Laplace dual integral transformation. (author)

  11. Effects of antimony trisulfide (Sb2S3) on sliding friction of automotive brake friction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan Kyu; Rhee, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyun Seong; Jang, Ho

    2013-09-01

    The effect of antimony trisulfide (Sb2S3) on the tribological properties of automotive brake friction materials was investigated using a Krauss type tribometer and a 1/5 scale dynamometer with a rigid caliper. Results showed that Sb2S3 improved fade resistance by developing transfer films on the disc surface at elevated temperatures. On the other hand, the rubbing surfaces of the friction material exhibited contact plateaus with a broader height distribution when it contained Sb2S3, indicating fewer contact junctions compared to the friction material with graphite. The friction material with Sb2S3 also exhibited a lower stick-slip propensity than the friction material with graphite. The improved fade resistance with Sb2S3 is attributed to its lubricating capability sustained at high temperatures, while the lower stick-slip propensity of the friction material with Sb2S3 is associated with the slight difference between its static and kinetic coefficients of friction and high normal stiffness.

  12. Model development for mechanical properties and weld quality class of friction stir welding using multi-objective Taguchi method and response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Ackiel; Manurung, Yupiter HP; Berhan, Mohamed Nor

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the effect of the governing parameters in friction stir welding (FSW) on the mechanical properties and weld quality of a 6mm thick 6061 T651 Aluminum alloy butt joint. The main FSW parameters, the rotational and traverse speed were optimized based on multiple mechanical properties and quality features, which focus on the tensile strength, hardness and the weld quality class using the multi-objective Taguchi method (MTM). Multi signal to noise ratio (MSNR) was employed to determine the optimum welding parameters for MTM while further analysis concerning the significant level determination was accomplished via the well-established analysis of variance (ANOVA). Furthermore, the first order model for predicting the mechanical properties and weld quality class is derived by applying response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the experimental confirmation test, the proposed method can effectively estimate the mechanical properties and weld quality class which can be used to enhance the welding performance in FSW or other applications.

  13. Model development for mechanical properties and weld quality class of friction stir welding using multi-objective Taguchi method and response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Mohamed Ackiel [University Kuala Lumpur Malaysia France Institute, Bandar Baru Bangi (Malaysia); Manurung, Yupiter HP; Berhan, Mohamed Nor [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia)

    2015-06-15

    This study presents the effect of the governing parameters in friction stir welding (FSW) on the mechanical properties and weld quality of a 6mm thick 6061 T651 Aluminum alloy butt joint. The main FSW parameters, the rotational and traverse speed were optimized based on multiple mechanical properties and quality features, which focus on the tensile strength, hardness and the weld quality class using the multi-objective Taguchi method (MTM). Multi signal to noise ratio (MSNR) was employed to determine the optimum welding parameters for MTM while further analysis concerning the significant level determination was accomplished via the well-established analysis of variance (ANOVA). Furthermore, the first order model for predicting the mechanical properties and weld quality class is derived by applying response surface methodology (RSM). Based on the experimental confirmation test, the proposed method can effectively estimate the mechanical properties and weld quality class which can be used to enhance the welding performance in FSW or other applications.

  14. Surface topography and contact mechanics of dry and wet human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Kovalev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface topography of the human wrist skin is studied by using optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM methods. By using these techniques the surface roughness power spectrum is obtained. The Persson contact mechanics theory is used to calculate the contact area for different magnifications, for the dry and wet skin. The measured friction coefficient between a glass ball and dry and wet skin can be explained assuming that a frictional shear stress σf ≈ 13 MPa and σf ≈ 5 MPa, respectively, act in the area of real contact during sliding. These frictional shear stresses are typical for sliding on surfaces of elastic bodies. The big increase in friction, which has been observed for glass sliding on wet skin as the skin dries up, can be explained as result of the increase in the contact area arising from the attraction of capillary bridges. Finally, we demonstrated that the real contact area can be properly defined only when a combination of both AFM and optical methods is used for power spectrum calculation.

  15. Frictional Heating During Sliding of two Semi-Spaces with Arbitrary Thermal Nonlinearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Och Ewa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical and numerical solution for transient thermal problems of friction were presented for semi limited bodies made from thermosensitive materials in which coefficient of thermal conductivity and specific heat arbitrarily depend on the temperature (materials with arbitrary non-linearity. With the constant power of friction assumption and imperfect thermal contact linearization of nonlinear problems formulated initial-boundary thermal conductivity, using Kirchhoff transformation is partial. In order to complete linearization, method of successive approximations was used. On the basis of obtained solutions a numerical analysis of two friction systems in which one element is constant (cermet FMC-845 and another is variable (grey iron ChNMKh or aluminum-based composite alloy AL MMC was conducted

  16. Overview of friction modelling in metal forming processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    In metal forming processes, friction between tool and workpiece is an important parameter influencing the material flow, surface quality and tool life. Theoretical models of friction in metal forming are based on analysis of the real contact area in tool-workpiece interfaces. Several research...... groups have studied and modelled the asperity flattening of workpiece material against tool surface in dry contact or in contact interfaces with only thin layers of lubrication with the aim to improve understanding of friction in metal forming. This paper aims at giving a review of the most important...... future work in order to advance further in modelling of real contact area in relation to implementation of frictional conditions existing finite element codes for simulation of metal forming processes. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd....

  17. Friction characteristics of hardfacing materials in high temperature sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizobuchi, Syotaro; Kano, Shigeki; Nakayama, Kohichi; Atsumo, Hideo

    1980-01-01

    Friction and self-welding test were conducted on several materials used for the contacting and sliding components of a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. In the present study, the friction and self-welding characteristics of each material were evaluated through measuring the kinetic and breakaway friction coefficients. The influence of oscillating rotation and vertical reciprocating motion on the friction mode was also investigated. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Colmonoy No.6, the nickel base hardfacing alloy, indicated the lowest kinetic friction coefficient of all the materials in the present study. Also, Cr 3 C 2 /Ni-Cr material prepared by a detonation gun showed the most stable friction behavior. (2) The breakaway friction coefficient of each material was dependent upon dwelling time in a sodium environment. (3) The friction behavior of Cr 3 C 2 /Ni-Cr material was obviously related with the finishing roughness of the friction surface. It was anticipated that nichrome material as the binder of the chrome carbide diffused and exuded to the friction surface by sliding in sodium. (4) The friction coefficient in sliding mode of vertical reciprocating was lower than that of oscillating rotation. (author)

  18. Nonlinear friction dynamics on polymer surface under accelerated movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuki Aita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear phenomena on the soft material surface are one of the most exciting topics of chemical physics. However, only a few reports exist on the friction phenomena under accelerated movement, because friction between two solid surfaces is considered a linear phenomenon in many cases. We aim to investigate how nonlinear accelerated motion affects friction on solid surfaces. In the present study, we evaluate the frictional forces between two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE resins using an advanced friction evaluation system. On PTFE surfaces, the normalized delay time δ, which is the time lag in the response of the friction force to the accelerated movement, is observed in the pre-sliding friction process. Under high-velocity conditions, kinetic friction increases with velocity. Based on these experimental results, we propose a two-phase nonlinear model including a pre-sliding process (from the beginning of sliding of a contact probe to the establishment of static friction and a kinetic friction process. The present model consists of several factors including velocity, acceleration, stiffness, viscosity, and vertical force. The findings reflecting the viscoelastic properties of soft material is useful for various fields such as in the fabrication of clothes, cosmetics, automotive materials, and virtual reality systems as well as for understanding friction phenomena on soft material surfaces.

  19. A 3D model for rubber tyres contact, based on Kalker's methods through the STRIPES model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    A project on the pavement-rutting evolution under the effect of a tram on tyre, led the author to make a link between road and railway approaches to the problem of rolling contact. A simplified model is proposed with a fine description of the contact patch between a tyre and the road, and a more realistic pressure and shear stresses distribution than that available from basic models previously available. Experimental measurements are used to identify some characteristics of the force description, while the geometric shape of the tyre-road section are used, like in the traditional rail-wheel contact models, to build the 3D model. The last part validates a plausible contact pressure shape from self-aligning torque measurements and from Kalker's contact stresses gradient applied to the real tyre used in the project. The final result is a brush model extended from the wheel-rail STRIPES one, applicable to dynamics or contact studies of real tyres, with a physical coupling between longitudinal, lateral and spin effects, and a relatively fine description of the contact stresses along each strip of each tyre of the vehicle on an uneven road.

  20. Use of non-contacting electromagnetic inductive method for estimating soil moisture across a landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakural, B.R.; Robert, P.C.; Hugins, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    There is a growing interest in real-time estimation of soil moisture for site-specific crop management. Non-contacting electromagnetic inductive (EMI) methods have potentials to provide real-time estimate of soil profile water contents. Soil profile water contents were monitored with a neutron probe at selected sites. A Geonics LTD EM-38 terrain meter was used to record bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC(A)) readings across a soil-landscape in West central Minnesota with variable moisture regimes. The relationships among EC(A), selected soil and landscape properties were examined. Bulk soil electrical conductivity (0-1.0 and 0-0.5 m) was negatively correlated with relative elevation. It was positively correlated with soil profile (1.0 m) clay content and negatively correlated with soil profile coarse fragments (2 mm) and sand content. There was significant linear relationship between ECA (0-1.0 and 0-0.5) and soil profile water storage. Soil water storage estimated from ECA reflected changes in landscape and soil characteristics