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Sample records for friction processing determination

  1. Local reinforcement of magnesium components by friction processing. Determination of bonding mechanisms and assessment of joint properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, G.A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2008-07-01

    The development of new creep-resistant and cost effective die casting magnesium alloys, such as AE, MRI, MEZ, ACM, AXJ, AJ, WE, have emerged as an alternative, to fulfil the modern demands in structurally relevant applications, such as engine blocks, gears and converter boxes. However, in most cases, magnesium components are screwed with aluminium and steel bolts, which lead the screwed joints to lose the preload force, due to relaxation. This barrier thereby limits the broad use of magnesium within this segment and should somehow find an adequate solution to help overcome this limitation. Furthermore, together with alloy development and the addition of reinforcement (MMCs), local material engineering processes have been conceived and are considered a method to improve the properties and therefore expand the number of potential applications for magnesium alloys. In this context, Friction Welding (FW) and particularly Friction Hydro Pillar Processing (FHPP), which can be described as a drill and fill process, appear to be an alternative to make the use of magnesium more widespread. For this reason, FHPP is intended to be used, to locally reinforce the mechanically fastened magnesium components. With this approach, regions submitted to the stresses imposed by tightening forces can be compensated by the use of a material with superior properties. It is not required to fabricate the whole structure from an expensive material, thus saving costs and thereby satisfying the economic pressures of an increasingly competitive global market. In the present work, a preliminary experimental matrix was defined and used to determine the optimal welding conditions for each specific material combination selected. Further, elaborate experimental techniques are used to describe the process parameters-microstructure-properties relationships and the consequent mechanisms leading to bonding in FHPP welds in similar and dissimilar configurations. The welds were performed using a hydraulic

  2. Local reinforcement of magnesium components by friction processing. Determination of bonding mechanisms and assessment of joint properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, G.A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2008-07-01

    The development of new creep-resistant and cost effective die casting magnesium alloys, such as AE, MRI, MEZ, ACM, AXJ, AJ, WE, have emerged as an alternative, to fulfil the modern demands in structurally relevant applications, such as engine blocks, gears and converter boxes. However, in most cases, magnesium components are screwed with aluminium and steel bolts, which lead the screwed joints to lose the preload force, due to relaxation. This barrier thereby limits the broad use of magnesium within this segment and should somehow find an adequate solution to help overcome this limitation. Furthermore, together with alloy development and the addition of reinforcement (MMCs), local material engineering processes have been conceived and are considered a method to improve the properties and therefore expand the number of potential applications for magnesium alloys. In this context, Friction Welding (FW) and particularly Friction Hydro Pillar Processing (FHPP), which can be described as a drill and fill process, appear to be an alternative to make the use of magnesium more widespread. For this reason, FHPP is intended to be used, to locally reinforce the mechanically fastened magnesium components. With this approach, regions submitted to the stresses imposed by tightening forces can be compensated by the use of a material with superior properties. It is not required to fabricate the whole structure from an expensive material, thus saving costs and thereby satisfying the economic pressures of an increasingly competitive global market. In the present work, a preliminary experimental matrix was defined and used to determine the optimal welding conditions for each specific material combination selected. Further, elaborate experimental techniques are used to describe the process parameters-microstructure-properties relationships and the consequent mechanisms leading to bonding in FHPP welds in similar and dissimilar configurations. The welds were performed using a hydraulic

  3. Validation of measured friction by process tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Morten; Henningsen, Poul; Tan, Xincai;

    The objective of sub-task 3.3 is to evaluate under actual process conditions the friction formulations determined by simulative testing. As regards task 3.3 the following tests have been used according to the original project plan: 1. standard ring test and 2. double cup extrusion test. The task ...

  4. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  5. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  6. Applications of Friction Stir Processing during Engraving of Soft Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kočović

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing has extensive application in many technological operations. Application area of friction stir processing can be extended to the processing of non-metallic materials, such as wood. The paper examines the friction stir processing contact between a specially designed hard and temperature-resistant rotating tool and workpiece which is made of wood. Interval of speed slip and temperature level under which the combustion occurs and carbonization layer of soft material was determined. The results of the research can be applied in technological process of wood engraving operations which may have significant technological and aesthetic effects.

  7. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  8. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant

  9. Nano-Sized Grain Refinement Using Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure produced as a result of dynamic recrystallization. The friction stir ... Friction Stir Processing, Magnesium, Nano-size grains Abstract A key characteristic of a friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure...state process developed on the basis of the friction stir welding (FSW) technique invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991 [2]. During

  10. Thermo-Mechanical Processing in Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid-phase joining, or welding process that was invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute (TWI). The process is potentially capable of joining a wide variety of aluminum alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. The friction stir welding (FSW) process produces welds by moving a non-consumable rotating pin tool along a seam between work pieces that are firmly clamped to an anvil. At the start of the process, the rotating pin is plunged into the material to a pre-determined load. The required heat is produced by a combination of frictional and deformation heating. The shape of the tool shoulder and supporting anvil promotes a high hydrostatic pressure along the joint line as the tool shears and literally stirs the metal together. To produce a defect free weld, process variables (RPM, transverse speed, and downward force) and tool pin design must be chosen carefully. An accurate model of the material flow during the process is necessary to guide process variable selection. At MSFC a plastic slip line model of the process has been synthesized based on macroscopic images of the resulting weld material. Although this model appears to have captured the main features of the process, material specific interactions are not understood. The objective of the present research was to develop a basic understanding of the evolution of the microstructure to be able to relate it to the deformation process variables of strain, strain rate, and temperature.

  11. Friction stir processing on carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Sergei Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Melnikov, Alexander G., E-mail: melnikov-ag@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Rubtsov, Valery E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    Friction stir processing of medium carbon steel samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. Samples have been machined from 40 and 40X steels. The tools have been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm and 3×3×1.5 mm tetrahedrons. The microstructure of stirred zone has been obtained using the smaller tool and consists of fine recrystallized 2-3 μm grains, whereas the larger tool has produced the 'onion-like' structures comprising hard quenched 'white' 500-600 MPa layers with 300-350 MPa interlayers of bainite needles. The mean values of wear intensity obtained after measuring the wear scar width were 0.02 mm/m and 0.001 mm/m for non-processed and processed samples, respectively.

  12. Prediction and determination of both friction coefficient and forming force on sheet metal deep—drawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junxiang; YonglinKang; 等

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the criterion of no-wrinkle,the principle and method of prediction and determination of both friction coefficient and forming force on sheet metal deep-drawing are put forward,and proved it's expedience and practicability.They are suitable for as sessment of lubricant properties.Friction coefficient and forming force are a function of material parameter,design parameter and process parameter,especially relative prevent wrinkle blank-holder force.Product of both friction coefficient and prevent wrinkle blank-holder force is only function of process parameter η after determining material parameter and design parameter.

  13. Prediction and determination of both friction coefficient and forming force on sheet metal deep-drawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the criterion of no-wrinkle, the principle and method of prediction and determination of both friction coefficientand forming force on sheet metal deep-drawing are put forward, and proved it's expedience and practicability. They are suitable for assessment of lubricant properties. Friction coefficient and forming force are a function of material parameter, design parameter and process parameter, especially relative prevent wrinkle blank-holder force. Product of both friction coefficient and prevent wrinkle blank-holder force isonly function of process parameter after determining material parameter and design parameter.

  14. Magnetic Properties of Friction Stir Processed Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-07-01

    Of the many existing inspection or monitoring systems, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. These systems are usually comprised of semi-remote sensors that frequently cause difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites, so that embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and periodically can be interrogated by a reading device. The "reinforcement rich" processed areas can then be used to record properties such as strain, temperature, and stress state, to name a few, depending on the reinforcement material. Friction stir processing was used to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum matrix. The aim was to develop a composite that produces strain in response to a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. A simple and cost-effective setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and the processing route was modified to improve the magnetic response.

  15. Magnetic properties of friction stir processed composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-03-29

    There are many existing inspection systems each with their own advantages and drawbacks. These usually comprise of semi-remote sensors which frequently causes difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites. Through this route, embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and can be periodically interrogated by a reading device. The “reinforcement rich” processed areas can then be utilized to record properties like strain, temperature, stress state etc. depending on the reinforcement material. In this work, friction stir processing (FSP) was utilized to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum (Al) matrix. It targets to develop a composite that produces strain in a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were observed to be distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). A simple and cheap setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and ways to improve the magnetic properties discussed.

  16. Determination of basic friction angle using various laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bo-An

    2016-04-01

    The basic friction angle of rock is an important factor of joint shear strength and is included within most shear strength criteria. It can be measured by direct shear test, triaxial compression test and tilt test. Tilt test is mostly used because it is the simplest method. However, basic friction angles measured using tilt test for same rock type or for one sample are widely distributed and often do not show normal distribution. In this research, the basic friction angles for the Hangdeung granite form Korea and Berea sandstone from USA are measured accurately using direct shear test and triaxial compression test. Then basic friction angles are again measured using tilt tests with various conditions and are compared with those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test to determine the optimum condition of tilt test. Three types of sliding planes, such as planes cut by saw and planes polished by #100 and #600 grinding powders, are prepared. When planes are polished by #100 grinding powder, the basic friction angles measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test are very consistent and show narrow ranges. However, basic friction angles show wide ranges when planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder. The basic friction angle measured using tilt test are very close to those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test when plane is polished by #100 grinding powder. When planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder, basic friction angles measured using tilt test are slightly different. This indicates that tilt test with plane polished by #100 grinding powder can yield an accurate basic friction angle. In addition, the accurate values are obtained not only when planes are polished again after 10 times of tilt test, but values are averaged by more 30 times of tests.

  17. Friction Modelling In Connection With Cold Forming Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai

    soap or molybdenum disulphide. As processes testing friction sensitive flow, the ring-compression tests and the double cup extrusion tests are carried out. An absolute constant friction model has been proposed to separate the influence of strain hardening from friction. This model has been applied...... in the FEM analyses of the process tests. In the simulative testing, the compression-twist tests in open die and closed die are carried out to measure friction stress directly at varying normal pressure, surface expansion, sliding length and tool temperature etc. It is found that normal pressure...... differences in the results. New empirical friction models have therefore been developed, based on the results of the simulative tests. Applying these models in the FEM simulations shows that they are acceptable for direct applications. In direct process testing, the forward rod extrusion test is investigated...

  18. Process Model for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new process being applied for joining of metal alloys. The process was initially developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The FSW process is being investigated at NASA/MSEC as a repair/initial weld procedure for fabrication of the super-light-weight aluminum-lithium shuttle external tank. The FSW investigations at MSFC were conducted on a horizontal mill to produce butt welds of flat plate material. The weldment plates are butted together and fixed to a backing plate on the mill bed. A pin tool is placed into the tool holder of the mill spindle and rotated at approximately 400 rpm. The pin tool is then plunged into the plates such that the center of the probe lies at, one end of the line of contact, between the plates and the shoulder of the pin tool penetrates the top surface of the weldment. The weld is produced by traversing the tool along the line of contact between the plates. A lead angle allows the leading edge of the shoulder to remain above the top surface of the plate. The work presented here is the first attempt at modeling a complex phenomenon. The mechanical aspects of conducting the weld process are easily defined and the process itself is controlled by relatively few input parameters. However, in the region of the weld, plasticizing and forging of the parent material occurs. These are difficult processes to model. The model presented here addresses only variations in the radial dimension outward from the pin tool axis. Examinations of the grain structure of the weld reveal that a considerable amount of material deformation also occurs in the direction parallel to the pin tool axis of rotation, through the material thickness. In addition, measurements of the axial load on the pin tool demonstrate that the forging affect of the pin tool shoulder is an important process phenomenon. Therefore, the model needs to be expanded to account for the deformations through the material thickness and the

  19. Metal cutting analogy for establishing Friction Stir Welding process parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Sylvester Allen

    A friction stir weld (FSW) is a solid state joining operation whose processing parameters are currently determined by lengthy trial and error methods. To implement FSWing rapidly in various applications will require an approach for predicting process parameters based on the physics of the process. Based on hot working conditions for metals, a kinematic model has been proposed for calculating the shear strain and shear strain rates during the FSW process, validation of the proposed model with direct measuring is difficult however. Since the shear strain and shear strain rates predicted for the FSW process, are similar to those predicted in metal cutting, validation of the FSW algorithms with microstructural studies of metal chips may be possible leading to the ability to predict FSW processing parameters.

  20. Unraveling the Processing Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is translated along a weld seam, literally stirring the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path or paths is required. In this study, various markers are used to trace the flow paths of the metal. X-ray radiographs record the segmentation and position of the wire. Several variations in the trajectories can be differentiated within the weld zone.

  1. Measurement of Normal and Friction Forces in a Rolling Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Arentoft, Mogens; Wanheim, Tarras

    2004-01-01

    For the rolling process, knowledge about interface conditions is important since it directly influences the maximum reduction ratio and thereby the num-ber of steps required for a given reduction. The mechanical properties of the produced sheet and the surface quality of it are also influenced...... by the fric-tion conditions. To achieve this important informa-tion, measurements of the normal pressure and friction stresses in the deformation zone are re-quested. The direction of the friction stresses is changing during the rolling gap. At the entrance of the de-formation zone, the peripherical velocity...... of the roll is higher than for the incoming material, which causes frictional stresses at the material acting in the rolling direction. At the outlet of the rolling gap, the velocity of the deformed material exceeds the velocity of the roll, generating frictional stresses contrary to the direction of rolling...

  2. Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Formation and Corrosion of Friction Stir Processed Nickel Aluminum Bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    friction stir welding (FSW) but is used for the purpose of refining...mechanical properties [11]. C. FRICTION STIR WELDING AND PROCESSING Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is derived from Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which was...Temple-Smith, and C. Dawes, Friction - stir butt welding , GB Patent No. 9125978.8, International patent application No. PCT/GB92/02203, 1991. [4

  3. In-process discontinuity detection during friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amber

    The objective of this work is to develop a method for detecting the creation of discontinuities (e.g., voids) during friction stir welding. Friction stir welding is inherently cost-effective, however, the need for significant weld inspection can make the process cost-prohibitive. A new approach to weld inspection is required -- where an in-situ characterization of weld quality can be obtained, reducing the need for post-process inspection. Friction stir welds with discontinuity and without discontinuity were created. In this work, discontinuities are generated by reducing the friction stir tool rotation frequency and increasing the tool traverse speed in order to create "colder" welds. During the welds, forces are measured. Discontinuity sizes for welds are measured by computerized tomography. The relationship between the force transients and the discontinuity sizes indicate that the force measurement during friction stir welding can be effectively used for detecting discontinuities in friction stir welds. The normalized force transient data and normalized discontinuity size are correlated to develop a criterion for discontinuity detection. Additional welds are performed to validate the discontinuity detection method. The discontinuity sizes estimated by the force measurement based method are in good agreement with the discontinuity sizes measured by computerized tomography. These results show that the force measurement based discontinuity detection model method can be effectively used to detect discontinuities during friction stir welding.

  4. Friction Stir Processing of Particle Reinforced Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Solomon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to provide a review of friction stir processing (FSP technology and its application for microstructure modification of particle reinforced composite materials. The main focus of FSP was on aluminum based alloys and composites. Recently, many researchers have investigated this technology for treating other alloys and materials including stainless steels, magnesium, titanium, and copper. It is shown that FSP technology is very effective in microstructure modification of reinforced metal matrix composite materials. FSP has also been used in the processing and structure modification of polymeric composite materials. Compared with other manufacturing processes, friction stir processing has the advantage of reducing distortion and defects in materials. The layout of this paper is as follows. The friction stir processing technology will be presented first. Then, the application of this technology in manufacturing and structure modification of particle reinforced composite materials will be introduced. Future application of friction stir processing in energy field, for example, for vanadium alloy and composites will be discussed. Finally, the challenges for improving friction stir processing technology will be mentioned.

  5. Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters for Joining Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel%Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters for Joining Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Paventhan; P R Lakshminarayanan; V Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Friction weIding is a solid state joining process used extensively currently owing to its advantages such as low heat input, high production efficiency, ease of manufacture, and environment friendliness. Materials difficult to be welded by fusion welding processes can be successfully welded by friction welding. An attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the tensile strength of friction welded AISI 1040 grade medium carbon steel and AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel, incorporating the process parameters such as friction pressure, forging pressure, friction time and forging time, which have great influence on strength of the joints. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the friction welding process parameters to attain maximum tensile strength of the joint. The maximum tensile strength of 543 MPa could be obtained for the joints fabricated under the welding conditions of friction pressure of 90 MPa, forging pressure of 90 MPa, friction time of 6 s and forging time of 6 s.

  6. Localized Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Processed Sensitized 5456-H116 Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    stir welding (FSW) but it does not create a joint. Friction stir welding is a solid state joining process where the material is softened such that...small randomly distributed porosity. The volumetric defects are representative of those seen in friction stir processing and friction stir welding ...retreating side on the second pass, are typical defects seen in aluminum friction stir processing and friction stir welding

  7. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk A. Fraser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges, being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS. A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  8. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kirk A; St-Georges, Lyne; Kiss, Laszlo I

    2014-04-30

    Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges), being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS). A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed) is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  9. Process parameters optimization for friction stir welding of RDE-40 aluminium alloy using Taguchi technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K.LAKSHMINARAYANAN; V.BALASUBRAMANIAN

    2008-01-01

    Taguchi approach was applied to determine the most influential control factors which will yield better tensile strength of the joints of friction stir welded RDE-40 aluminium alloy. In order to evaluate the effect of process parameters such as tool rotational speed, traverse speed and axial force on tensile strength of friction stir welded RDE-40 aluminium alloy, Taguchi parametric design and optimization approach was used. Through the Taguchi parametric design approach, the optimum levels of process parameters were determined. The results indicate that the rotational speed, welding speed and axial force are the significant parameters in deciding the tensile strength of the joint. The predicted optimal value of tensile strength of friction stir welded RDE-40 aluminium alloy is 303 MPa. The results were confirmed by further experiments.

  10. Peak Stir Zone Temperatures during Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Oh-Ishi, Keiichiro; Zhilyaev, Alexander P.; Fuller, Christian B.; London, Blair; Mahoney, Murray W.; McNelley, Terry R.

    2010-03-01

    The stir zone (SZ) temperature cycle was measured during the friction stir processing (FSP) of NiAl bronze plates. The FSP was conducted using a tool design with a smooth concave shoulder and a 12.7-mm step-spiral pin. Temperature sensing was accomplished using sheathed thermocouples embedded in the tool path within the plates, while simultaneous optical pyrometry measurements of surface temperatures were also obtained. Peak SZ temperatures were 990 °C to 1015 °C (0.90 to 0.97 T Melt) and were not affected by preheating to 400 °C, although the dwell time above 900 °C was increased by the preheating. Thermocouple data suggested little variation in peak temperature across the SZ, although thermocouples initially located on the advancing sides and at the centerlines of the tool traverses were displaced to the retreating sides, precluding direct assessment of the temperature variation across the SZ. Microstructure-based estimates of local peak SZ temperatures have been made on these and on other similarly processed materials. Altogether, the peak-temperature determinations from these different measurement techniques are in close agreement.

  11. Processing Determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, William

    2015-01-01

    I propose that the course of development in first and second language acquisition is shaped by two types of processing pressures--internal efficiency-related factors relevant to easing the burden on working memory and external input-related factors such as frequency of occurrence. In an attempt to document the role of internal factors, I consider…

  12. Process optimization of friction stir welding based on thermal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to apply optimization methods to numerical models of a friction stir welding process. The work is intended as a proof-of-concept using different methods that are applicable to models of high complexity, possibly with high computational cost, and without the possibility...... information of the high-fidelity model. The optimization schemes are applied to stationary thermal models of differing complexity of the friction stir welding process. The optimization problems considered are based on optimizing the temperature field in the workpiece by finding optimal translational speed....... Also an optimization problem based on a microstructure model is solved, allowing the hardness distribution in the plate to be optimized. The use of purely thermal models represents a simplification of the real process; nonetheless, it shows the applicability of the optimization methods considered...

  13. Modeling of material flow in friction stir welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D numerical model to study the material flow in the friction stir welding process. Results indicate that the material in front of the pin moves upwards due to the extrusion of the pin, and then the upward material rotates with the pin. Behind the rotating tool, the material starts to move downwards and to deposit in the wake. This process is the real cause to make friction stir welding process continuing successfully. The tangent movement of the material takes the main contribution to the flow of the material in friction stir welding process. There exists a swirl on the advancing side and with the increase of the translational velocity the inverse flow of the material on the advancing side becomes faster. The shoulder can increase the velocity of material flow in both radial direction and tangent direction near the top surface. The variations of process parameters do have an effect on the velocity field near the pin, especially in the region in which the material flow is faster.

  14. Repair welding process of friction stir welding groove defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-jie; ZHANG Hui-jie

    2009-01-01

    The groove defect formed in the friction stir welding dramatically deteriorates weld appearances and mechanical properties of the joints owing to its larger size and penetration. Therefore, the friction stir repair welding was utilized to remove such a groove defect, and the focus was placed on the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the repair joints so as to obtain an optimum repair welding process. The experimental results indicate that the groove defect can be removed by friction stir repair welding, and the offset repair welding process is superior to the symmetrical repair welding process. In the symmetrical repair welding process, a large number of fine cavity defects and an obvious aggregation of hard-brittle phase Al2Cu occur, accordingly the mechanical properties of the repair joint are weakened, and the fracture feature of repair joint is partially brittle and partially plastic. A good-quality repair joint can be obtained by the offset repair welding process, and the repair joint is fractured near the interface between the weld nugget zone and thermal-mechanically affected zone.

  15. The Friction Force Determination of Large-Sized Composite Rods in Pultrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, S. N.; Krasnovskii, A. N.; Kazakov, I. A.

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, the simple pull-force models of pultrusion process are not suitable for large sized rods because they are not considered a chemical shrinkage and thermal expansion acting in cured material inside the die. But the pulling force of the resin-impregnated fibers as they travels through the heated die is essential factor in the pultrusion process. In order to minimize the number of trial-and-error experiments a new mathematical approach to determine the frictional force is presented. The governing equations of the model are stated in general terms and various simplifications are implemented in order to obtain solutions without extensive numerical efforts. The influence of different pultrusion parameters on the frictional force value is investigated. The results obtained by the model can establish a foundation by which process control parameters are selected to achieve an appropriate pull-force and can be used for optimization pultrusion process.

  16. Developing Friction Stir Welding Process Model for ICME Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    A framework for developing a product involving manufacturing processes was developed with integrated computational materials engineering approach. The key component in the framework is a process modeling tool which includes a thermal model, a microstructure model, a thermo-mechanical, and a property model. Using friction stir welding (FSW) process as an example, development of the process modeling tool was introduced in detail. The thermal model and the microstructure model of FSW of steels were validated with the experiment data. The model can predict reasonable temperature and hardness distributions as observed in the experiment. The model was applied to predict residual stress and joint strength of a pipe girth weld.

  17. Efficiency of the Inertia Friction Welding Process and Its Dependence on Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkov, O. N.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Tung, D. J.; Zhang, W.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2017-07-01

    It has been widely assumed, but never proven, that the efficiency of the inertia friction welding (IFW) process is independent of process parameters and is relatively high, i.e., 70 to 95 pct. In the present work, the effect of IFW parameters on process efficiency was established. For this purpose, a series of IFW trials was conducted for the solid-state joining of two dissimilar nickel-base superalloys (LSHR and Mar-M247) using various combinations of initial kinetic energy ( i.e., the total weld energy, E o), initial flywheel angular velocity ( ω o), flywheel moment of inertia ( I), and axial compression force ( P). The kinetics of the conversion of the welding energy to heating of the faying sample surfaces ( i.e., the sample energy) vs parasitic losses to the welding machine itself were determined by measuring the friction torque on the sample surfaces ( M S) and in the machine bearings ( M M). It was found that the rotating parts of the welding machine can consume a significant fraction of the total energy. Specifically, the parasitic losses ranged from 28 to 80 pct of the total weld energy. The losses increased (and the corresponding IFW process efficiency decreased) as P increased (at constant I and E o), I decreased (at constant P and E o), and E o (or ω o) increased (at constant P and I). The results of this work thus provide guidelines for selecting process parameters which minimize energy losses and increase process efficiency during IFW.

  18. Microscopic Evaluation of Friction Plug Welds- Correlation to a Processing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenberg, Ellen M.; Chen, Poshou; Gorti, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Recently an analysis of dynamic forge load data from the friction plug weld (FPW) process and the corresponding tensile test results showed that good plug welds fit well within an analytically determined processing parameter box. There were, however, some outliers that compromised the predictions. Here the microstructure of the plug weld material is presented in view of the load analysis with the intent of further understanding the FPW process and how it is affected by the grain structure and subsequent mechanical properties.

  19. Friction Stir Processing of ODS and FM Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young Bum; Noh, Sang Hoon; Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In ODS steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and martensite, and the oxide

  20. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  1. Influence of Processing Parameters on the Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J. A.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid phase welding process that unites thermal and mechanical aspects to produce a high quality joint. The process variables are rpm, translational weld speed, and downward plunge force. The strain-temperature history of a metal element at each point on the cross-section of the weld is determined by the individual flow path taken by the particular filament of metal flowing around the tool as influenced by the process variables. The resulting properties of the weld are determined by the strain-temperature history. Thus to control FSW properties, improved understanding of the processing parameters on the metal flow path is necessary.

  2. Tensile strength on friction stir processed AMg5 (5083) aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumaevsky, A. V.; Eliseev, A. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Tarasov, S. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The results of the tensile tests carried out both on AMg5 (5083) aluminum alloy samples base and those obtained using friction stir processing technique are reported. The tensile test samples have been prepared from the friction stir processed plates so that their tensile axis was parallel to the processing direction. The maximum tensile strength of the processed samples was 9% higher than of the base metal. The fractographic examination shows the presence of flat areas inherent of the brittle fracture in all three friction processed samples. The load-extension curves show that friction stir processing may suppress the serrated yielding.

  3. Measurement of Normal and Friction Forces in a Rolling Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Arentoft, Mogens; Wanheim, Tarras

    2004-01-01

    by the fric-tion conditions. To achieve this important informa-tion, measurements of the normal pressure and friction stresses in the deformation zone are re-quested. The direction of the friction stresses is changing during the rolling gap. At the entrance of the de-formation zone, the peripherical velocity...... of the roll is higher than for the incoming material, which causes frictional stresses at the material acting in the rolling direction. At the outlet of the rolling gap, the velocity of the deformed material exceeds the velocity of the roll, generating frictional stresses contrary to the direction of rolling...

  4. Determination of Actual Friction Factors in Metal Forming under Heavy Loaded Regimes Combining Experimental and Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Camacho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tribological conditions can change drastically during heavy loaded regimes as experienced in metal forming; this is especially critical when lubrication can only be applied at the early stage of the process because the homogeneous lubricant layer can break along the die-workpiece interface. In these cases, adopting a constant friction factor for the lubricant-surface pair may not be a valid assumption. This paper presents a procedure based on the use of dual friction factor maps to determine friction factors employed in heavy loaded regimes. A finite element (FE simulation is used to obtain the friction factor map for the alloy UNS A96082. Experiments were conducted using four lubricants (aluminum anti-size, MoS2 grease, silicone oil, and copper paste to determine the actual friction curves. The experimental procedure is based on the application of lubricant only at the beginning of the first stage of ring compression, and not at intermediate stages as is usual in typical ring compression tests (RCTs. The results show that for small reductions (rh < 20%, the conventional RCT can be applied because the tribological conditions remain similar. For large reductions (rh > 20%, it is recommended to obtain an average value of the friction factor for every lubricant-surface pair in the range of deformation considered.

  5. Physical Simulation of Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Nickel-Base Alloys Using Hot Torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, James R.; Lippold, John C.

    2013-08-01

    The Gleeble hot torsion test was utilized in an attempt to simulate the friction stir-processed microstructure of three Ni-base alloys: Hastelloy X, Alloy 625, and Alloy 718. The simulation temperatures were based on actual thermal cycles measured by embedded thermocouples during friction stir processing of these alloys. Peak process temperatures were determined to be approximately 1423 K (1150 °C) for Hastelloy X and Alloy 625 K and 1373 K (352 °C and 1100 °C) for Alloy 718. The peak temperature and cooling rates were programed into the Gleeble™ 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator to reproduce the stir zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) microstructures. The TMAZ was successfully simulated using this technique, but the stir zone microstructure could not be accurately reproduced, with hot torsion samples exhibiting larger grain size than actual friction stir processing trials. Shear stress and strain rates as a function of temperature were determined for each material using hot torsion simulation.

  6. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  7. Effect of Process Parameters of Friction Stir Welded Joint for Similar Aluminium Alloys H30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita S. Thete

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effect of process parameters of friction stir welded joint for similar aluminium alloys H30 was studied. Taper cylindrical with three flutes all made of High speed steel was used for the friction stir welding (FSW aluminium alloy H30 and the tensile test of the welded joint were tested by universal testing method. The optimization done using detailed mathematical model is simulated by Minitab17. In this investigation, an effective approach based on Taguchi method, has been developed to determine the optimum conditions leading to higher tensile strength. Experiments were conducted on varying rotational speed, transverse speed, and axial force using L9 orthogonal array of Taguchi method. The present study aims at optimizing process parameters to achieve high tensile strength.

  8. Analysis of wire drawing process with friction and thermal conditions obtained by inverse engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Sun; Kim, Nak Soo [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    In cold wire drawing process, which is performed at room temperature, heat is generated because of plastic work and friction at the workpiece die interface. Temperature distribution in both the workpiece and the die affects thermal expansion, deformation pattern, and elastic recovery. These effects produce the final dimension of the drawn products. We propose inverse engineering procedures to determine friction and thermal conditions by comparing simple measurements with the computational results of the drawing power and the temperature changes of the die. The conditions were then used to simulate numerically the deformation behavior of the wire and the temperature distribution in the die. The thermal effects on the quality of drawn products were investigated based on the prediction of the final dimensions of the products. Therefore, thermal effects should not be ignored even in cold wire-drawing process because reasonable numerical results were acquired in comparing the experiments.

  9. Thinning Behavior Simulations in Superplastic Forming of Friction Stir Processed Titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul D.; Sanders, Daniel G.; Ramulu, M.; Grant, Glenn; Trapp, Tim; Comley, Peter

    2010-06-01

    A study was undertaken to simulate the thinning behavior of titanium 6Al-4V alloy sheet during Superplastic Forming and to evaluate the feasibility of controlling thinning in areas of interest with Friction Stir Processing (FSP) of the material. The commercially available Finite Element Analysis software ABAQUS was used to execute these simulations. Material properties of the parent sheet and the Friction Stir Processed regions input into the models were determined experimentally by elevated temperature tensile testing. The results of these simulations were compared to experimental test results via Superplastically Forming representative aerospace parts and analytical computations for validation. It was found that numerical simulations can be used to predict the thin-out characteristics of superplastically formed titanium parts and the thin-out can be controlled in desired areas by FSP, locally, prior to forming.

  10. Friction stir welding (FSW process of copper alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miličić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes the structure of the weld joint of technically pure copper, which is realized using friction stir welding (FSW. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical processes of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Parameters of the FSW welding technology influencing the zone of the seam material and the mechanical properties of the resulting joint were analyzed. The physical joining consists of intense mixing the base material along the joint line in the “doughy” phase. Substantial plastic deformations immediately beneath the frontal surface of tool provide fine-grained structure and a good quality joint. The optimum shape of the tool and the optimum welding regime (pressure force, rotation speed and the traverse speed of the tool in the heat affected zone enable the achievement of the same mechanical properties as those of the basic material, which justifies its use in welding reliable structures.

  11. Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

  12. The Investigations of Friction under Die Surface Vibration in Cold Forging Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinming, Sha

    is undergoing vibration. In the experiments, die surface orientation, frequency and amplitude of vibration, vibrating wave form and the direction of vibration has been taken into account as the parameters which influence friction behaviour in forging process. The results reveal that friction could be reduced up......The objective of this thesis is to fundamentally study the influence of die surface vibration on friction under low frequency in metal forging processes. The research includes vibrating tool system design for metal forming, theoretical and experimental investigations, and finite element simulations...... on die surface vibration in forging process. After a general introduction to friction mechanisms and friction test techniques in metal forming, the application of ultrasonic vibration in metal forming, the influence of sliding velocity on friction is described. Some earlier investigations...

  13. Measurements of Normal and Friction Forces in a Rolling Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Arentoft, Mogens; Wanheim, Tarras

    2004-01-01

    To improve the quality of frictional data and to validate the simulations in rolling, a load transducer for measuring normal and friction stresses in the deformation zone has been developed. The transducer consists of a strain gauge equipped insert embedded in the surface of the roll. The length ...

  14. A lubrication approach to friction in thermoplastic composites forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thije, ten R.H.W.; Akkerman, R.; Ubbink, M.P.; Meer, van der L.

    2011-01-01

    Friction is an important phenomenon that can dominate the resulting product geometry of thermoplastic composites upon forming. A model was developed that predicts the friction between a thermoplastic laminate and a rigid tool. The model is based on the Reynolds equation for thin film lubrication and

  15. Effect of energetic dissipation processes on the friction unit tribological

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moving V. V.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In article presented temperature influence on reological and fric-tion unit coefficients cast iron elements. It has been found that surface layer formed in the temperature friction has good rub off resistance. The surface layer structural hardening and capacity stress relaxation make up.

  16. Measurements of normal and frictional forces in a rolling process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Arentoft, Mogens; Wanheim, Tarras

    2006-01-01

    To improve the quality of frictional data and to validate the simulations in rolling, a load transducer for measuring normal and frictional stresses in the deformation zone has been developed. The transducer consists of a strain-gauge-equipped insert embedded in the surface of the roll. The length...

  17. A lubrication approach to friction in thermoplastic composites forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Thije, R.H.W.; Akkerman, Remko; Ubbink, M.P.; van der Meer, L.

    2011-01-01

    Friction is an important phenomenon that can dominate the resulting product geometry of thermoplastic composites upon forming. A model was developed that predicts the friction between a thermoplastic laminate and a rigid tool. The model is based on the Reynolds equation for thin film lubrication and

  18. Simulation of Friction Stir Processing in 304L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A major dilemma facing the nuclear industry is repair or replacement of stainless steel reactor components that have been exposed to neutron irradiation. When conventional fusion welding is used for weld repair, the high temperatures and thermal stresses inherent in the process enhance the growth of helium bubbles, causing intergranular cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ. Friction stir processing (FSP has potential as a weld repair technique for irradiated stainless steel, because it operates at much lower temperatures than fusion welding, and is therefore less likely to cause cracking in the HAZ. Numerical simulation of the FSP process in 304L stainless steel was performed using an Eulerian finite element approach. Model input required flow stresses for the large range of strain rates and temperatures inherent in the FSP process. Temperature predictions in three locations adjacent to the stir zone were accurate to within 4% of experimentally measure values. Prediction of recrystallized grain size at a location about 6mm behind the tool center was less accurate, because the empirical model employed for the prediction did not account for grain growth that occurred after deformation in the experiment was halted.

  19. Determination of Friction Coefficient in Unconfined Compression of Brain Tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.05.001

    2013-01-01

    Unconfined compression tests are more convenient to perform on cylindrical samples of brain tissue than tensile tests in order to estimate mechanical properties of the brain tissue because they allow for homogeneous deformations. The reliability of these tests depends significantly on the amount of friction generated at the specimen/platen interface. Thus, there is a crucial need to find an approximate value of the friction coefficient in order to predict a possible overestimation of stresses during unconfined compression tests. In this study, a combined experimental-computational approach was adopted to estimate the dynamic friction coefficient mu of porcine brain matter against metal platens in compressive tests. Cylindrical samples of porcine brain tissue were tested up to 30% strain at variable strain rates, both under bonded and lubricated conditions in the same controlled environment. It was established that mu was equal to 0.09 +/- 0.03, 0.18 +/- 0.04, 0.18 +/- 0.04 and 0.20 +/- 0.02 at strain rates of...

  20. Standard guide for determining friction energy dissipation in reciprocating tribosystems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers and is intended for use in interpreting the friction forces recorded in reciprocating tribosystems. The guide applies to any reciprocating tribosystem, whether it is a wear or fretting test or an actual machine or device. 1.2 The energy dissipation guide was developed in analyzing friction results in the Test Method G133 reciprocating ball-on-flat test, but it applies to other ASTM or ISO reciprocating tests. This technique is frequently used to record the friction response in fretting tribosystems. 1.3 Specimen material may play some role in the results if the materials under test display viscoelastic behavior. This guide as written is for metals, plastics, and ceramics that do not display viscoelastic behavior. It also applies to lubricated and non-lubricated contacts. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, asso...

  1. Friction stir processing (FSP: refining microstructures and improving properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNelley, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available FSP is reviewed as an allied technology of friction stir welding (FSW and additional considerations such as processing pattern and step over distance are introduced. The application of FSP to continuously cast AA5083 material in the as-cast condition is described and the extent of grain refinement and homogenization of microstructure is documented. The FSP-induced superplastic response of this material is compared to the response of conventionally processed AA5083 and the improved ductility of the FSP material is related to grain refinement and microstructure homogenization.

    Se revisa el procesado por fricción batida (FSP como un aliado tecnológico de la soldadura por fricción batida (FSW y se introducen consideraciones adicionales tales como el patrón de procesado y el paso en función de la distancia. Se describe la aplicación de FSP al material AA5083 por colada continua en la condición de colada y se documenta el grado de afino de grano y homogeneización de la microestructura. La respuesta de superplasticidad inducida por FSP se compara con la respuesta de la aleación AA5083 procesada convencionalmente y la mejora de ductilidad del material FSP se relaciona con el afino de grano y la homogeneización de la microestructura.

  2. A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a CMP process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Chi; Guo Dongming; Jin Zhuji; Kang Renke, E-mail: xuchi_dut@163.com [Key Laboratory for Precision and Non-Traditional Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process is presented. The signal process method uses the wavelet threshold denoising method to reduce the noise contained in the measured original signal, extracts the Kalman filter innovation from the denoised signal as the feature signal, and judges the CMP endpoint based on the feature of the Kalman filter innovation sequence during the CMP process. Applying the signal processing method, the endpoint detection experiments of the Cu CMP process were carried out. The results show that the signal processing method can judge the endpoint of the Cu CMP process. (semiconductor technology)

  3. Experimental Determination of Temperature During Rotary Friction Welding of AA1050 Aluminum with AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Paduan Alves

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the temperature monitoring at bonding interface during the rotary friction welding process of dissimilar materials: AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel. As it is directly related to the mechanical strenght of the junction, its experimental determination in real time is of fundamental importance for understanding and characterizing the main process steps, and the definition and optimization of parameters. The temperature gradients were obtained using a system called Thermocouple Data-Logger, which allowed monitoring and recording data in real-time operation. In the graph temperature versus time obtained, the heating rates, cooling were analyzed, and the maximum temperature was determined that occurred during welding, and characterized every phases of the process. The efficiency of this system demonstrated by experimental tests and the knowledge of the temperature at the bonding interface open new lines of research to understand the process of friction welding.

  4. Process Optimization for Friction-Stir-Welded Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Kumar, K.; Mishra, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    Advanced high-strength M190 steel sheets were joined by friction-stir welding under different tool rotational and traversing speeds. The optical microstructure of the joints exhibited complete martensite and partial martensite at the weld nugget depending on the cooling rate during welding. The first heat-affected zone outside of the weld nugget revealed ferrite-pearlite phase aggregate, and the second heat-affected zone showed a tempered martensitic structure. The interplay of process variables in terms of peak temperature and cooling rate was studied to observe their effect on joint efficiency under shear testing. The peak hardness at weld nugget was close to the parent alloy at an intermediate cooling rate of 294 to 313 K/s. The lowest hardness was observed at the first heat-affected zone for all welded joints. Joint efficiency was dependent on relative quantity of ferrite-pearlite at first heat-affected zone. In that respect, the intermediate temperature to the tune of ~1193 K to 1273 K (~920 °C to 1000 °C) at the weld nugget was found to be beneficial for obtaining an adequate quantity of pearlite at the first heat-affected zone to provide joint efficiency of more than 50 pct of that of parent alloy.

  5. Formability of fiber-reinforced thermoplastics in hot press forming process based on friction properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, U.; Haanappel, S.P.; Rietman, A.D.; Thije, ten R.H.W.; Akkerman, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler m

  6. Optimizing Friction Stir Welding via Statistical Design of Tool Geometry and Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blignault, C.; Hattingh, D. G.; James, M. N.

    2012-06-01

    This article considers optimization procedures for friction stir welding (FSW) in 5083-H321 aluminum alloy, via control of weld process parameters and tool design modifications. It demonstrates the potential utility of the "force footprint" (FF) diagram in providing a real-time graphical user interface (GUI) for process optimization of FSW. Multiple force, torque, and temperature responses were recorded during FS welding using 24 different tool pin geometries, and these data were statistically analyzed to determine the relative influence of a number of combinations of important process and tool geometry parameters on tensile strength. Desirability profile charts are presented, which show the influence of seven key combinations of weld process variables on tensile strength. The model developed in this study allows the weld tensile strength to be predicted for other combinations of tool geometry and process parameters to fall within an average error of 13%. General guidelines for tool profile selection and the likelihood of influencing weld tensile strength are also provided.

  7. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOVACEVIC, Ilija; DJELOSEVIC, Mirko; TEPIC, Goran; MILISAVLJEVIC, Stevan

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW) technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established...

  8. Hybrid manufacturing processes for fusion welding and friction stir welding of aerospace grade aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegesky, Megan Alexandra

    Friction stir welding and processing can provide for joints in aerospace grade aluminum alloys that have preferable material properties as compared to fusion welding techniques. Aerospace grade aluminum alloys such as AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 are considered non-weldable by traditional fusion welding techniques. Improved mechanical properties over previously used techniques are usually preferable for aerospace applications. Therefore, by combining traditional fusion welding and friction stir processing techniques, it could be plausible to create more difficult geometries in manufactured parts instead of using traditional techniques. While this combination of fusion welding and friction stir processing is not a new technology, its introduction to aerospace grade aluminum alloys as well as non-weldable alloys, is new. This is brought about by a lowered required clamping force required by adding a fusion weld before a friction stir processing technique. The changes in properties associated with joining techniques include: microstructural changes, changes in hardness, tensile strength, and corrosion resistance. This thesis illustrates these changes for the non-weldable AA2024-T351 and AA7075-T651 as well as the weldable alloy AA5052-H32. The microhardness, tensile strength and corrosion resistance of the four processing states: base material, fusion welded material, friction stir welded material, and friction stir processed fusion welded material is studied. The plausibility of this hybrid process for the three different materials is characterized, as well as plausible applications for this joining technique.

  9. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Ying An; Francisco Piorino Neto; Eder Paduan Alves

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results we...

  10. Determination of friction in sheet metal forming by means of simulative tribo-tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Numerical modeling of complex sheet stamping operations is well developed and implemented in industry. The weakest link now seems to be appropriate modeling of friction and to some extent also material properties especially when it comes to new lubricants and materials. In modeling of 3-D stamping...... operations a coefficient of friction μ is often determined by calibration of the simulation results with experimental observations of material flow and/or measured load. In case of modeling of new stamping operations μ is typically selected based on former experience. These procedures are, however......, not appropriate when introducing new tribo-systems (lubricant, workpiece material, tool material or tool coating). In order to determine friction under the very varied conditions in sheet stamping simulative testing may be applied, e.g., Plane-Strip-Testing (PST), Draw-Bead-Testing (DBT) and Bending...

  11. Experimental studies of parameters affecting the heat generation in friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat generation is a complex process of transformation of a specific type of energy into heat. During friction stir welding, one part of mechanical energy delivered to the welding tool is consumed in the welding process, another is used for deformational processes etc., and the rest of the energy is transformed into heat. The analytical procedure for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding is very complex because it includes a significant number of variables and parameters, and many of them cannot be fully mathematically explained. Because of that, the analytical model for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding defines variables and parameters that dominantly affect heat generation. These parameters are numerous and some of them, e. g. loads, friction coefficient, torque, temperature, are estimated experimentally. Due to the complex geometry of the friction stir welding process and requirements of the measuring equipment, adequate measuring configurations and specific constructional solutions that provide adequate measuring positions are necessary. This paper gives an overview of the process of heat generation during friction stir welding, the most influencing parameters on heat generation, constructional solutions for the measuring equipment needed for these experimental researches and examples of measured values.

  12. Processing Parameters Influence on Wear Resistance Behaviour of Friction Stir Processed Al-TiC Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Akinlabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP being a novel process is employed for the improvement of the mechanical properties of a material and the production of surface layer composites. The vital role of the integrity of surface characteristics in the mechanical properties of materials has made the research studies into surface modification important in order to improve the performance in practical applications. This study investigates the effect of processing parameters on the wear resistance behavior of friction stir processed Al-TiC composites. This was achieved through microstructural characterization by using both the optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM, microhardness profiling, and tribological characterization by means of the wear. The microhardness profiling of the processed samples revealed an increased hardness value, which was a function of the TiC particles incorporated when compared to the parent material. The wear resistance property was also found to increase as a result of the TiC powder addition. The right combination of processing parameters was found to improve the wear resistance property of the composites produced.

  13. Retractable Pin Tools for the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Two companies have successfully commercialized a specialized welding tool developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Friction stir welding uses the high rotational speed of a tool and the resulting frictional heat created from contact to crush, 'stir' together, and forge a bond between two metal alloys. It has had a major drawback, reliance on a single-piece pin tool. The pin is slowly plunged into the joint between two materials to be welded and rotated as high speed. At the end of the weld, the single-piece pin tool is retracted and leaves a 'keyhole,' something which is unacceptable when welding cylindrical objects such as drums, pipes and storage tanks. Another drawback is the requirement for different-length pin tools when welding materials of varying thickness. An engineer at the MSFC helped design an automatic retractable pin tool that uses a computer-controlled motor to automatically retract the pin into the shoulder of the tool at the end of the weld, preventing keyholes. This design allows the pin angle and length to be adjusted for changes in material thickness and results in a smooth hole closure at the end of the weld. Benefits of friction stir welding, using the MSFC retractable pin tool technology, include the following: The ability to weld a wide range of alloys, including previously unweldable and composite materials; provision of twice the fatigue resistance of fusion welds and no keyholes; minimization of material distortion; no creation of hazards such as welding fumes, radiation, high voltage, liquid metals, or arcing; automatic retraction of the pin at the end of the weld; and maintaining full penetration of the pin.

  14. Nano-scale stick-slip friction model for the chatter scratch generated by chemical mechanical polishing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Jin; Yang, Ji Chul; Yoon, Bo Un; Lee, Hyeon-Deok; Kim, Taesung

    2012-07-01

    Although Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) process is a still promising technology for the fabrication of the next generation devices, CMP-induced defects tackle further development of CMP process. In particular, even nano-sized scratches generated by CMP process kill the device directly. However mechanism of scratch formation was not clearly understood yet. CMP-induced scratches are classified as razor, chatter mark and skipping scratch. Among them, chatter mark scratch (or chatter scratch) is the most critical defect for the device yield loss. Chatter scratch has a periodic pattern of scars, which is reminiscent of a stick-slip friction pattern. Based on that similarity, stick-slip model was proposed in this paper in order to explain how chatter scratch is formed. And controlling parameters for chatter scratch are defined. During stick period the friction force that exceeds the yield strength of wafer surface makes chatter scratch and the distance between chatter marks is determined by slip period.

  15. Friction Stir Spot Welding: A Review on Joint Macro- and Microstructure, Property, and Process Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. W. Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir spot welding (FSSW is a very useful variant of the conventional friction stir welding (FSW, which shows great potential to be a replacement of single-point joining processes like resistance spot welding and riveting. There have been many reports and some industrial applications about FSSW. Based on the open literatures, the process features and variants, macro- and microstructural characteristics, and mechanical properties of the resultant joints and numerical simulations of the FSSW process were summarized. In addition, some applications of FSSW in aerospace, aviation, and automobile industries were also reviewed. Finally, the current problems and issues that existed in FSSW were indicated.

  16. Dynamic rupture simulation with an experimentally-determined friction law leads to slip-pulse propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Reches, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the dynamic rupture along a vertical, strike-slip fault in an elastic half-space. The fault has frictional properties that were determined in high-velocity, rotary shear apparatus Sierra-White granite. The experimental fault was abruptly loaded by a massive flywheel, which is assumed to simulate the loading of a fault patch during an earthquake, and termed Earthquake-Like-Slip Event (ELSE) (Chang et al., 2012). The experiments revealed systematic alteration between slip-weakening and slip-strengthening (Fig. 1A), and were considered as proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of M = 4-8. We used the friction-distance relations of these experiments to form an empirical slip-dependent friction model, ELSE-model (Fig. 1B). For the dynamic rupture simulation, we used the program of Ampuero (2002) (2D spectral boundary integral elements) designed for anti-plane (mode III) shear fracturing. To compare with published works, the calculations used a crust with mechanical properties and stress state of Version 3 benchmark of SCEC (Harris et al., 2004). The calculations with a fault of ELSE-model friction revealed: (1) Rupture propagation in a slip-pulse style with slip cessation behind the pulse; (2) Systematic decrease of slip distance away from the nucleation zone; and (3) Spontaneous arrest of the dynamic rupture without a barrier. These features suggest a rupture of a self-healing slip-pulse mode (Fig. 1C), in contrast to rupturing of a fault with linear slip-weakening friction (Fig. 1B) (Rojas et al., 2008) in crack-like mode and no spontaneous arrest. We deduce that the slip-pulse in our simulation results from the fast recovery of shear strength as observed in ELSE experiments, and argue that incorporating this experimentally-based friction model to rupture modeling produces realistic propagation style of earthquake rupture. Figure 1 Fault patch behavior during an earthquake. (A) Experimental evolution of frictional stress, slip velocity, and

  17. Optimization of Blank Holding Force in Deep Drawing Process Using Friction Property of Steel Blank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad S. Pandhare

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Majority of automobile and appliances component are made by deep drawing sheet metal process. So these growing need demands a new design methodology based on metal forming simulation. With the help of metal forming simulation we can identify the problem areas and solutions can be validated in computers without any expensive shop floor operations prior to any tool construction. Metal forming simulation is also helpful at the product and tool design stage to decide various parameters. Problem and improvements in each area of the SDF technology and their interactions should be considered. In the product and process design phases in order to optimize Blank Holding Force which is one of the important parameters in Deep Drawing process. Sometimes accuracies of frictional values have more effect on the simulation results than most of the material properties. So that friction plays a major role during optimization of Blank Holding Force. In this paper, the friction is varied in six different values. CRDQ Steel is used as a material. For each value of friction and its corresponding B.H.F., Forming Limit Diagrams are drawn by using hyper mesh module of Hyper Form Solver software. Also the effect of these two parameters on occurrence of wrinkling during the process is studied. Thus, optimized range of coefficient of friction in which product is safe as well as having minimized wrinkles along with optimized B.H.F. is calculated.

  18. Optimization of process parameters of aluminum alloy AA 2014-T6 friction stir welds by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanjaneyulu Kadaganchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The heat treatable aluminum–copper alloy AA2014 finds wide application in the aerospace and defence industry due to its high strength-to-weight ratio and good ductility. Friction stir welding (FSW process, an emerging solid state joining process, is suitable for joining this alloy compared to fusion welding processes. This work presents the formulation of a mathematical model with process parameters and tool geometry to predict the responses of friction stir welds of AA 2014-T6 aluminum alloy, viz yield strength, tensile strength and ductility. The most influential process parameters considered are spindle speed, welding speed, tilt angle and tool pin profile. A four-factor, five-level central composite design was used and a response surface methodology (RSM was employed to develop the regression models to predict the responses. The mechanical properties, such as yield strength (YS, ultimate tensile strength (UTS and percentage elongation (%El, are considered as responses. Method of analysis of variance was used to determine the important process parameters that affect the responses. Validation trials were carried out to validate these results. These results indicate that the friction stir welds of AA 2014-T6 aluminum alloy welded with hexagonal tool pin profile have the highest tensile strength and elongation, whereas the joints fabricated with conical tool pin profile have the lowest tensile strength and elongation.

  19. Friction Melt Bonding: An innovative process for aluminium-steel lap joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simar Aude

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new process based on Friction Stir Welding has been developed to weld dissimilar metals, particularly steel and aluminum, in a lap-joint configuration. In this Friction Melt Bonding process, frictional heat generated by the rotating and translating tool brings about local and transient melting (Figure 1. Welding then occurs owing to controlled reactivity and solidification at the interface between the two plates. With an adequate choice of the welding parameters, low alloy steel and aluminium alloys have been successfully welded. Characterisation of the microstructure was systematically performed to highlight the influence of the process parameters, particularly the temperature cycle, on the steel-Al interface. The thickness of the intermetallic layer varies from a couple of micrometers to tens of micrometers depending on the advancing speed of the tool (Fig. 2. The lap shear properties of the joints were also investigated and analysed based on the morphology of the intermetallic layer.

  20. Determination of the Mechanical Properties of Friction Welded Tube Yoke and Tube Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Işık

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the friction welding of the tube yoke and the tube of the drive shaft used in light commercial vehicles. Tube yoke made from hot forged microalloyed steel and the tube made from cold drawn steel, with a ratio (thickness/outside diameter ratio of less than 0.1, were successfully welded by friction welding method. Hardness distributions on both sides of the welded joint across the welding interface were determined and the microstructure of the joint was investigated. Furthermore, joint strength was tested under tensile, static torsional, and torsional fatigue loadings. The tested data were analyzed by Weibull distribution. The maximum hardness value along the welded joint was detected as 553 Hv1. The lowest detected tensile strength of the joint was 13% less than the base materials’ tensile strength. The torsional load carrying capacity of the friction welded thin walled tubular joint without any damage was obtained as 4.252,5 Nm in 95% confidence interval. After conducting fully reversed torsional fatigue tests, the fatigue life of friction welded tubular joints was detected as 220.066,3 cycles.

  1. Process Development and Microstructural Characterization on Friction Plug Welded 2195 and 2219 Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z. X.; Cantrell, M. A.; Brown, R. J.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation about Friction Plug Welding (FPW). It reviews the process of FPW, showing pictures which review the process. It also reviews the microstructural characterization using Transmission Electron Microscopy. There are several charts which are included for further information.

  2. Hybrid Search for Faster Production and Safer Process Conditions in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate optimum process parameters and tool geometries in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) to minimize temperature difference between the leading edge of the tool probe and the work piece material in front of the tool shoulder, and simultaneously maximize traverse...... choices have been offered based on several process specific performance and cost related criteria....

  3. Multi-objective Optimization of Process Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    The objective of this paper is to investigate optimum process parameters in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) to minimize residual stresses in the work piece and maximize production efficiency meanwhile satisfying process specific constraints as well. More specifically, the choices of tool rotational...

  4. Friction surface cladding: An exploratory study of a new solid state cladding process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, S.J.; Bor, T.C.; Stelt, van der A.A.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.; Kwakernaak, C.; Kooijman, A.M.; Mol, J.M.C.; Akkerman, R.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Friction surface cladding is a newly developed solid state cladding process to manufacture thin metallic layers on a substrate. In this study the influence of process conditions on the clad layer appearance and the mechanical properties of both the clad layer and the substrate were investigated. Thi

  5. Effects of Applied Load on 6061-T6 Aluminum Joined Employing a Novel Friction Bonding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Hallinan, Neil P.; Shropshire, Karen L.; Wells, Peter B.

    2008-12-01

    Friction bonding is under consideration for use in mass production of plate-type nuclear fuels for research reactors. This article discusses the effects of applied load (the most important process parameter for fabrication of these fuels) on temperature distribution, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Friction bonding experiments showed that tool geometry caused temperature gradients across the tool surface. Temperatures at the joint interface suggested the advancing side of the tool produced a majority of the frictional heat, while the retreating side of the tool mainly forged the plasticized material while bonding increased with applied load. The microstructure across the tool surface was also altered and, as a function of applied load, affected the mechanical properties. The 6061 aluminum alloy had mechanical properties close to a T4 temper after processing. Results documented in this article will aid in continual enhancement of friction bonding for nuclear fuel plate fabrication, and will hopefully contribute to continued advancement of friction stir welding (FSW) state of the art.

  6. Friction and scale-dependent deformation processes of large experimental carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesei, Telemaco; Carpenter, Brett M.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Scuderi, Marco M.; Sagy, Amir; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Collettini, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    We studied the frictional behaviour and deformation products of large (20 cm × 20 cm bare surfaces) experimental limestone faults. We sheared samples in a direct shear configuration, with an imposed normal force of 40-200 kN and shear velocity of 10 μm/s. The steady-state shearing of these surfaces yielded a coefficient of friction 0.7hold-slide tests, is null (Δμ≤0 upon re-shear). Moreover, sliding of these surfaces is accompanied by dilatation and production of grooves, gouge striations and fault mirrors. These products are entirely analogous to slip surface phenomena found on natural limestone-bearing faults at both the macroscale and at the microscale. We infer that high friction, accompanied by dilatant deformation, and null frictional healing are the macroscopic effect of brittle damage on the sliding surface, constrained by the strength of the rock and by fast healing processes in the gouge. Simultaneously to brittle failure, plastic deformation occurs on the sliding surface and inside the intact rock via nanoparticle formation (mirrors) and twinning at the micron scale. Because of the similarity between experimental and natural structures, we suggest that sliding of carbonate-bearing faults in the uppermost crust could be characterized by high friction, fast healing and strongly dilatant deformation, which would help to explain shallow seismicity frequently documented in carbonatic terrains such as the Northern Apennines of Italy.

  7. Friction Consolidation Processing of n-Type Bismuth-Telluride Thermoelectric Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalen, Scott A.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Catalini, David; Overman, Nicole R.; Sharp, Jeffrey

    2016-04-13

    This work focused on the development of a new mechanical processing route, called Friction Consolidation Processing (FCP), for densifying bismuth-telluride (Bi2Te3) powders into bulk form. FCP is a solid-state process wherein a rotating tool was used to generate severe plastic deformation within the Bi2Te3 powder, resulting in a recrystallizing flow of material. Upon cooling, the non-equilibrium microstructure within the flow was locked into the material. FCP was demonstrated on -325 mesh (~44 micron) n-type Bi2Te3 feedstock powder to form pucks with 92% theoretical density having a diameter of 25.4mm and thickness of 4.2mm. FCP was shown to achieve highly textured bulk materials, with sub-micron grain size, directly from coarse particle feedstock powders in a single process. An average grain size of 0.8 microns was determined for one sample and a multiple of uniform distribution (MUD) value of 15.49 was calculated for the (0001) pole figure from another sample. These results indicate that FCP can yield highly refined grains and textural alignment of the (0001) basal planes in Bi2Te3. ZT=0.37 at 336K was achieved for undoped stoichiometric Bi2Te3, which is near the “text book” value of ZT=0.5.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical property of nano-SiCp reinforced high strength Mg bulk composites produced by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, K., E-mail: greatsunkai@sina.com [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shi, Q.Y.; Sun, Y.J.; Chen, G.Q. [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultimate tensile strength of the bulk composite improved significantly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles dispersed uniformly in the composites after friction stir process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strengthening mechanism of the composites has been studied. - Abstract: Friction stir processing has been applied to fabricate SiC-Mg bulk composites in this study. AZ63 magnesium alloy, a kind of commercial engineering materials, was selected as base metal. SiC nanoparticles with average size of 40 nm were selected as reinforced particles. After being ultrasonic dispersed in ethanol and friction stir processed with base metal, the SiC particles were uniformly dispersed. Friction stir processing without filling any particles was also applied to base metal as a comparison group. Microstructure evolution was observed by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Fine and uniform nugget zone were found both in comparison group and composite. The phases of the material were determined by X-ray diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy observation was conducted to study the condition of SiC nanoparticles. SiC particles were found both inside the grain and at the grain boundary. No micro-sized particle agglomeration was observed in the composite. Vicker hardness and tensile test were carried out to study the mechanical properties of the composite. The average Vicker hardness of the base metal, comparison group and composite were 80 Hv, 85 Hv and 109 Hv respectively. The ultimate tensile strength of the composite reached 312 MPa. Compared with 160 MPa of the as-casted Mg alloy, 263 MPa of the comparison group, the effect of nanoparticles on strength increase was significant.

  9. Friction stir processed Al - Metal oxide surface composites: Anodization and optical appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Canulescu, Stela

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to impregnate metal oxide (TiO2, Y2O3 and CeO2) particles into the surface of an Aluminium alloy. The surface composites were then anodized in a sulphuric acid electrolyte. The effect of anodizing parameters on the resulting optical...

  10. Friction surface cladding of AA1050 onto AA2024: parameter study and process window development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shaojie

    2016-01-01

    Friction surface cladding (FSC), a relatively new solid state surface modification technique, was developed to deposit thin metallic layers onto substrates to protect the substrates from chemical corrosion. The FSC process employs a specially designed rotating tool containing an opening as the suppl

  11. Experimental determination of heat transfer and friction in helically-finned tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdaniuk, Gregory J. [Ramboll Whitbybird Ltd., 60 Newman Street, London W1T 3DA (United Kingdom); Chamra, Louay M.; Mago, Pedro J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mississippi State University, 210 Carpenter Engineering Building, P.O. Box ME, Mississippi State, MS 39762-5925 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Heat transfer coefficients and friction factors were determined experimentally for eight helically-finned tubes and one smooth tube using liquid water at Reynolds numbers ranging from 12,000 to 60,000. The helically-finned tubes tested in this investigation have helix angles between 25 and 48 , number of fin starts between 10 and 45, and fin height-to-diameter ratios between 0.0199 and 0.0327. An uncertainty analysis was completed and plain-tube results were compared to the Blasius and Dittus-Boelter equations with satisfactory agreement. Power-law correlations for Fanning friction and Colburn j-factors were developed using a least-squares regression. The performance of the correlations was evaluated with data of other researchers with average prediction errors between 30% and 40%. (author)

  12. Measurement and Determination of Friction Characteristic of Air Flow through Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sintered metal porous media currently plays an important role in air bearing systems. When flowing through porous media, the flow properties are generally represented by incompressible Darcy-Forchheimer regime or Ergun regime. In this study, a modified Ergun equation, which includes air compressibility effects, is developed to describe friction characteristic. Experimental and theoretical investigations on friction characteristic are conducted with a series of metal-sintered porous media. Re = 10 is selected as the boundary for a viscous drag region and a form drag region. Experimental data are first used to determine the coefficient α in the viscous drag region, and then the coefficient β in the form drag region, rather than both simultaneously. Also, the theoretical mass flow rate in terms of the modified Ergun equation provides close approximations to the experimental data. Finally, it is also known that both the air compressibility and inertial effects can obviously enhance the pressure drop.

  13. Determination of coefficient of friction for self-expanding stent-grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vad, Siddharth; Eskinazi, Amanda; Corbett, Timothy; McGloughlin, Tim; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2010-12-01

    Migration of stent-grafts (SGs) after endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms is a serious complication that may require secondary intervention. Experimental, analytical, and computational studies have been carried out in the past to understand the factors responsible for migration. In an experimental setting, it can be very challenging to correctly capture and understand the interaction between a SG and an artery. Quantities such as coefficient of friction (COF) and contact pressures that characterize this interaction are difficult to measure using an experimental approach. This behavior can be investigated with good accuracy using finite element modeling. Although finite element models are able to incorporate frictional behavior of SGs, the absence of reliable values of coefficient of friction make these simulations unreliable. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate a method for determining the coefficients of friction of a self-expanding endovascular stent-graft. The methodology is demonstrated by considering three commercially available self-expanding SGs, labeled as A, B, and C. The SGs were compressed, expanded, and pulled out of polymeric cylinders of varying diameters and the pullout force was recorded in each case. The SG geometries were recreated using computer-aided design modeling and the entire experiment was simulated in ABAQUS 6.8/STANDARD. An optimization procedure was carried out for each SG oversize configuration to determine the COF that generated a frictional force corresponding to that measured in the experiment. The experimental pullout force and analytically determined COF for SGs A, B, and C were in the range of 6-9 N, 3-12 N, and 3-9 N and 0.08-0.16, 0.22-0.46, and 0.012-0.018, respectively. The computational model predicted COFs in the range of 0.00025-0.0055, 0.025-0.07, and 0.00025-0.006 for SGs A, B, and C, respectively. Our results suggest that for SGs A and B, which are exoskeleton based devices, the pullout forces

  14. Effect of Friction on the Drawing Process of Hot-Galvanized Sheet Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongying GONG; Wei ZHU; Zhiliang ZHANG; Zhenliang LOU

    2005-01-01

    A probe test method was employed to detect the friction condition of the interfaces between tools and blank. At the same time a self-developed measurement apparatus to realize the probe test method was also presented. Based on the analysis of force, a correlative friction model was also given. With the self-developed measurement apparatus,the effects of three kinds of lubricating oils which were in common use during the process of sheet steel drawing were studied. By probing the friction coefficient values of different lubricating oils during the drawing process of the hot-galvanized sheet steel (steel brand: ST07Zn), we can see that the friction caused by PK oil was the lowest, so the effect of PK oil was the best. Then PK oil was used as the base lubricating oil and some solid additive powers was added into it to make a new type lubrication (named as L oil).The result of test proved that the new lubricating oil had remarkable effect on the drawing process of hot-galvanized sheet steel.

  15. DETERMINATION OF FRICTION PERFORMANCE INFLUENCE IN THE SYSTEM "BODY–BOGIE" ON THE FREIGHT CAR DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The main requirements for the design of a new generation of cars, according to the Program of rolling stock renovation, are the requirements reducing the operating costs and increasing the cost-effectiveness of their use, taking into account the achievements of scientific and technical thought. Due to the urgency of this subject the paper is devoted to the study of the friction coefficient influence in the bearing connection «center plate – center bowl – bearers»of freight cars on their main dynamic parameters – coefficients of horizontal and vertical dynamics, body acceleration, frame strength, derailment stability factor. Methodology. The study was conducted by numerical integration and mathematical modeling of the freight car dynamic loading using the software package «Dynamics of Rail Vehicles» («DYNRAIL». Findings. Investigations have shown that the safety movement parameters are influenced by both the friction parameters in bearing connection «center plate – center bowl – bearers» of freight cars in empty and loaded state with bogies TSNII-X3 (model 18-100. Effect have other components of freight car dynamics, namely: radii of curved track sections, height of outer rail, etc. Originality. The author investigated the friction influence on the car dynamic loading using new approaches to solving the problem of predicting the rolling stock dynamics. Prediction was carried out on the basis of significantly updated theoretical material that covers all history of the friction theory and includes the results of recent experimental studies because of the speed on the straights and curves of small-and medium-range sections of the road.Practical value. The obtained results have practical orientation. During the research and after modeling with the improved method of accounting of friction processes dependencies of main dynamic parameters of a four-freight gondola on the value of the friction coefficient in the "body

  16. Optimized process parameters for fabricating metal particles reinforced 5083 Al composite by friction stir processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauri, Ranjit; Yadav, Devinder; Shyam Kumar, C N; Janaki Ram, G D

    2015-12-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) exhibit improved strength but suffer from low ductility. Metal particles reinforcement can be an alternative to retain the ductility in MMCs (Bauri and Yadav, 2010; Thakur and Gupta, 2007) [1,2]. However, processing such composites by conventional routes is difficult. The data presented here relates to friction stir processing (FSP) that was used to process metal particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites. The data is the processing parameters, rotation and traverse speeds, which were optimized to incorporate Ni particles. A wide range of parameters covering tool rotation speeds from 1000 rpm to 1800 rpm and a range of traverse speeds from 6 mm/min to 24 mm/min were explored in order to get a defect free stir zone and uniform distribution of particles. The right combination of rotation and traverse speed was found from these experiments. Both as-received coarse particles (70 μm) and ball-milled finer particles (10 μm) were incorporated in the Al matrix using the optimized parameters.

  17. Optimized process parameters for fabricating metal particles reinforced 5083 Al composite by friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Bauri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites (MMCs exhibit improved strength but suffer from low ductility. Metal particles reinforcement can be an alternative to retain the ductility in MMCs (Bauri and Yadav, 2010; Thakur and Gupta, 2007 [1,2]. However, processing such composites by conventional routes is difficult. The data presented here relates to friction stir processing (FSP that was used to process metal particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites. The data is the processing parameters, rotation and traverse speeds, which were optimized to incorporate Ni particles. A wide range of parameters covering tool rotation speeds from 1000 rpm to 1800 rpm and a range of traverse speeds from 6 mm/min to 24 mm/min were explored in order to get a defect free stir zone and uniform distribution of particles. The right combination of rotation and traverse speed was found from these experiments. Both as-received coarse particles (70 μm and ball-milled finer particles (10 μm were incorporated in the Al matrix using the optimized parameters.

  18. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzner, Nathan

    Friction welding, a solid-state joining method, is presented as a novel alternative process step for lining mild steel pipe and forged components internally with a corrosion resistant (CR) metal alloy for petrochemical applications. Currently, fusion welding is commonly used for stainless steel overlay cladding, but this method is costly, time-consuming, and can lead to disbonding in service due to a hard martensite layer that forms at the interface due to partial mixing at the interface between the stainless steel CR metal and the mild steel base. Firstly, the process parameter space was explored for inertia friction butt welding using AISI type 304L stainless steel and AISI 1018 steel to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties effects. A conceptual model for heat flux density versus radial location at the faying surface was developed with consideration for non-uniform pressure distribution due to frictional forces. An existing 1 D analytical model for longitudinal transient temperature distribution was modified for the dissimilar metals case and to account for material lost to the flash. Microstructural results from the experimental dissimilar friction welds of 304L stainless steel to 1018 steel were used to discuss model validity. Secondly, the microstructure and mechanical property implications were considered for replacing the current fusion weld cladding processes with friction welding. The nominal friction weld exhibited a smaller heat softened zone in the 1018 steel than the fusion cladding. As determined by longitudinal tensile tests across the bond line, the nominal friction weld had higher strength, but lower apparent ductility, than the fusion welds due to the geometric requirements for neck formation adjacent to a rigid interface. Martensite was identified at the dissimilar friction weld interface, but the thickness was smaller than that of the fusion welds, and the morphology was discontinuous due to formation by a mechanism of solid

  19. Numerical Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process Using Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, M.; Badulescu, C.; Iacomi, D.; Nitu, E.; Ciuca, C.

    2016-08-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process that relies on frictional heating and plastic deformation realized at the interaction between a non-consumable welding tool that rotates on the contact surfaces of the combined parts. The experiments are often time consuming and costly. To overcome these problems, numerical analysis has frequently been used in last years. Several simplified numerical models were designed to elucidate various aspects of the complex thermo-mechanical phenomena associated with FSW. This research investigates a thermo-mechanical finite element model based on Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method to simulate the friction stir welding of the AA 6082-T6 alloy. Abaqus/cae software is used in order to simulate the welding stage of the Friction Stir Welding process. This paper presents the steps of the numerical simulation using the finite elements method, in order to evaluate the boundary conditions of the model and the geometry of the tools by using the Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method.

  20. Optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding based on residual stress analysis: a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2010-01-01

    The present paper considers the optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding (FSW). More specifically, the choices of rotational speed and traverse welding speed have been investigated using genetic algorithms. The welding process is simulated in a transient, two-dimensional sequen......The present paper considers the optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding (FSW). More specifically, the choices of rotational speed and traverse welding speed have been investigated using genetic algorithms. The welding process is simulated in a transient, two......, and this is presented as a Pareto optimal front. Moreover, a higher welding speed for a fixed rotational speed results, in general, in slightly higher stress levels in the tension zone, whereas a higher rotational speed for a fixed welding speed yields somewhat lower peak residual stress, however, a wider tension zone...

  1. Effect of process control mode on weld quality of friction stir welded plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Sorour, Sherif; Alian, Ahmed R. [Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process which requires no filler material where the heat input is generated by frictional energy between the tool and workpiece. The objective of the present work is to conduct a fully coupled thermomechanical finite element analysis based on Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation for both 'Force-Controlled' and 'Displacement-Controlled' FSW process to provide more detailed insight of their effect on the resulting joint quality. The developed finite element models use Johnson- Cook material model and temperature dependent physical properties for the welded plates. Efforts on proper modeling of the underlying process physics are done focusing on the heat generation of the tool/workpiece interface to overcome the shortcomings of previous investigations. Finite elements results show that 'Force-Controlled' FSW process provides better joint quality especially at higher traveling speed of the tool which comes to an agreement with published experimental results.

  2. Friction and wear characteristics of Al-Cu/C composites synthesized using partial liquid phase casting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, W.B.; Gupta, M.; Lim, S.C. [Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore (Singapore)

    1997-10-01

    During the sliding of aluminium alloys dispersed with graphite particulates, a layer of graphite is usually present at the sliding interface. This tribo-layer significantly reduces the amount of direct metal-to-metal contact, giving rise to low friction and a low rate of wear, making these composites useful candidate materials for anti-friction applications. Such self-lubricating composites are commonly fabricated via the squeeze casting, slurry casting or powder metallurgy route. These processes are expensive while the less-expensive conventional casting route is limited by the agglomeration of graphite particles in the composites, giving rise to poor mechanical properties. In this work, graphite particulate-reinforced Al-4.5 wt.% Cu composites with two effective graphite contents (Al-4.5 Cu/4.2 wt.% C and Al-4.5 Cu/6.8 wt.% C) were synthesized through an innovative partial liquid phase casting (rheocasting) technique, which is a modification of the conventional casting process. Unlubricated (without the use of conventional liquid lubrication) friction and wear performance of these composites as well as the un-reinforced aluminium alloy was determined using a pin-on-disk tester. The results revealed that the graphite-reinforced composites have a higher wear rate than the un-reinforced matrix alloy while their frictional characteristics are very similar within the range of testing conditions. Combining these with the information gathered from worn-surface examinations and wear-debris analysis, it is suggested that there exists a certain threshold for the amount and size of graphite particulates in these composites to enable them to have improved tribological properties. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Infrared thermography for monitoring heat generation in a linear friction welding process of Ti6Al4V alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio, L.; Liberini, M.; Campanella, D.; Astarita, A.; Esposito, S.; Boccardi, S.; Meola, C.

    2017-03-01

    The increasing use of titanium alloys in a wider range of applications requires the development of new techniques and processes capable to decrease production costs and manufacturing times. In this regard welding and other joining techniques play an important role. Today, solid state friction joining processes, such as friction stir welding, friction spot welding, inertia friction welding, continuous-drive friction welding and linear friction welding (LFW), represent promising methods for part manufacturing. They allow for joining at temperature essentially below the melting point of the base materials being joined, without the addition of filler metal. However, the knowledge of temperature is essential to understand and model the phenomena involved in metal welding. A global measured value represents only a clue of the heat generation during the process; while, a deep understanding of welding thermal aspects requires temperature field measurement. This paper is focused on the use of infrared thermography applied to the linear friction welding process of Ti6Al4V alloy. The attention is concentrated on thermal field that develops on the outer wall of the two parts to be joined (i.e. heat generated in the friction zone), and on the maximum temperature that characterizes the process before and after the flash formation.

  4. Friction modeling on multiple scales for Deep drawing processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karupannasamy, Dinesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A deep drawing process is one of the widely used manufacturing techniques in the automotive industry because of its capability to produce complex shapes with sheet material, often performed using lubricants to ease the forming. Finite Element Methods (FEM) are popularly used at the desi

  5. Model to Study Resin Impregnation Process of Premix Made of Friction Spun Core Yarn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁辛; 吴学东

    2001-01-01

    A model was deveIoped to investigate impregnation behavior of thermoplastic resin into filament bundle based on Darcy's law. Consolidation processes of unidirectional laminate were performed to evaluate the validity of the model. Friction spun core yarns were used in the experiments with polypropylene fiber sheath and glass filament core. The processing conditions, such as temperature and pressure, and filament parameters were taken into consideration. A good agreement was found between theoretical prediction and experiment data.

  6. FEA ANALYSIS OF FRICTIONAL HEATING PROCESS (MAX. TEMPERATURE VS. ROTATIONAL SPEED)

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Sachchidanand J Nimankar *, Prof. Sachin K. Dahake

    2016-01-01

    Friction stir welding process is a promising welding technology from its existence as it is easy to use, low energy costs, being ecology friendly process and with no requirement of any type of filler material. This study of FSW gives analysis of the maximum temperature generated during operation. This is done by making three dimensional non-linear model. This model helps in trend for the relationship between translational velocity of tool, rotation speed of the tool, and the maximum temperatu...

  7. Friction Mapping as a Tool for Measuring the Elastohydrodynamic Contact Running-in Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Elastohydrodynamically...state friction coefficient and surface morphology , once the running-in process is complete, does not depend significantly on the ramp direction, nor... morphological changes may also be taking place.1–5 The running-in process has lasting consequences for the operation, efficiency, and failure conditions of the

  8. The effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior of investment cast titanium aluminum vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilchak, Adam L.

    The use of investment cast titanium components is becoming increasingly common in the aerospace industry due to the ability to produce large, one-piece components with complex geometries that were previously fabricated by mechanically fastening or welding multiple smaller parts together. However, the coarse, fully lamellar microstructure typical of investment cast alpha + beta titanium alloys results in relatively poor fatigue strength compared to forged titanium products. As a result, investment castings are not considered for use in fatigue limited structures. In recent years, friction stir processing has emerged as a solid state metalworking technique capable of substantial microstructure refinement in aluminum and nickel-aluminum-bronze alloys. The purpose of the present study is to determine the feasibility of friction stir processing and assess its effect on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the most widely used alpha + beta titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V. Depending on processing parameters, including tool travel speed, rotation rate and geometry, the peak temperature in the stir zone was either above or below the beta transus. The resulting microstructures consisted of either ˜1 mum equiaxed a grains, ˜25 mum prior beta grains containing a colony alpha + beta microstructure or a combination of 1 mum equiaxed alpha and fine, acicular alpha + beta. The changes in microstructure were characterized with scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The texture in the stir zone was nearly random for all processing conditions, however, several components of ideal simple shear textures were observed in both the hexagonal close packed alpha and the body centered cubic beta phases which provided insight into the operative grain refinement mechanisms. Due to the relatively small volume of material affected by friction stir processing, conventionally sized test specimens were unable to be machined from the stir zone

  9. Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhili [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan [Harriman, TN

    2010-07-27

    Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

  10. A portable wheel tester for tyre-road friction and rolling resistance determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytka, J.; Budzyński, P.; Tarkowski, P.; Piaskowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes theory of operation, design and construction as well as results from primarily experiments with a portable wheel tester that has been developed by the authors as a device for on-site determination of tyre-road braking/driving friction and rolling resistance. The paper includes schematics, drawings, descriptions as well as graphical results form early tests with the presented device. It is expected that the tester can be useful in road accident reconstruction applications as well as in vehicle dynamics research.

  11. Optimization of process parameters of aluminum alloy AA 2014-T6 friction stir welds by response surface methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanjaneyulu Kadaganchi; Madhusudhan Reddy Gankidi; Hina Gokhale

    2015-01-01

    The heat treatable aluminum–copper alloy AA2014 finds wide application in the aerospace and defence industry due to its high strength-to-weight ratio and good ductility. Friction stir welding (FSW) process, an emerging solid state joining process, is suitable for joining this alloy compared to fusion welding processes. This work presents the formulation of a mathematical model with process parameters and tool geometry to predict the responses of friction stir welds of AA 2014-T6 aluminum allo...

  12. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a CMP process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xu; Dongming, Guo; Zhuji, Jin; Renke, Kang

    2010-12-01

    A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process is presented. The signal process method uses the wavelet threshold denoising method to reduce the noise contained in the measured original signal, extracts the Kalman filter innovation from the denoised signal as the feature signal, and judges the CMP endpoint based on the feature of the Kalman filter innovation sequence during the CMP process. Applying the signal processing method, the endpoint detection experiments of the Cu CMP process were carried out. The results show that the signal processing method can judge the endpoint of the Cu CMP process.

  13. Friction Stir.Welding is an advance metal joining process: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umasankar Das,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The friction stir welding is recently developed solid state welding process which overcome the problem associated with fusion welding technology. The properties achieved by friction stir welding is better than that achieve by fusion welding technique It has been invented as a solid-state joining technique and initially applied to aluminum alloys. FSW is used to replace rivets joints in the aeronautical industry. Recently the aircraft and military industries widely have been using aluminum alloys particularly because of their fine strength to weight ratio. However in compare with steels they represent welding difficulties and also lower ductility. In last years it has been observed that Friction Stir Welding (FSW method represents better microstructure and mechanical properties than conventional methods in welding aluminum alloys. It has been widely investigated for mostly low melting materials, such as Al, Mg and Cu alloys. Aluminum is the most usable material in engineering application and a lot of improvement is needed in the area of its welding. The latest works on friction stir welding of aluminum have been directed towards improving the quality of weld, reducing defects and applying the process of FSW to aluminum for specific applications. This joining technique is energy efficient, environment friendly, and versatile. In particular, it can be used to join high-strength aerospace aluminum alloys and other metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. FSW is considered to be the most significant development in metal joining in a last decade. The FSW of Aluminums and its alloys has been commercialized; and recent interest is focused on joining dissimilar materials. However, in order to commercialize the process, research studies are required to characterize and establish proper process parameters for FSW. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of this welding processes in the field of welding. Future aspects of

  14. Friction Consolidation Processing of n-Type Bismuth-Telluride Thermoelectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Scott; Jana, Saumyadeep; Catalini, David; Overman, Nicole; Sharp, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    Refined grain sizes and texture alignment have been shown to improve transport properties in bismuth-telluride (Bi2Te3) based thermoelectric materials. In this work we demonstrate a new approach, called friction consolidation processing (FCP), for consolidating Bi2Te3 thermoelectric powders into bulk form with a high degree of grain refinement and texture alignment. FCP is a solid-state process wherein a rotating tool is used to generate severe plastic deformation within the Bi2Te3 powder, resulting in a recrystallizing flow of material. Upon cooling, the far-from-equilibrium microstructure within the flow can be retained in the material. FCP was demonstrated on n-type Bi2Te3 feedstock powder having a -325 mesh size to form pucks with a diameter of 25.4 mm and thickness of 4.2 mm. Microstructural analysis confirmed that FCP can achieve highly textured bulk materials, with sub-micrometer grain size, directly from coarse feedstock powders in a single process. An average grain size of 0.8 μm was determined for regions of one sample and a multiple of uniform distribution (MUD) value of 15.49 was calculated for the (0001) pole figure of another sample. These results indicate that FCP can yield ultra-fine grains and textural alignment of the (0001) basal planes in Bi2Te3. ZT = 0.37 at 336 K was achieved for undoped stoichiometric Bi2Te3, which approximates literature values of ZT = 0.4-0.5. These results point toward the ability to fabricate bulk thermoelectric materials with refined microstructure and desirable texture using far-from-equilibrium FCP solid-state processing.

  15. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiskumar, R., E-mail: sathiscit2011@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugan, N., E-mail: murugan@cit.edu.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, V V College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai, 627 657 Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph@karunya.edu [Centre for Research in Metallurgy (CRM), School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, 641 114 Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  16. Evaluation of Friction Stir Processing of HY-80 Steel Under Wet and Dry Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Garth William II

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the microstructural and mechanical property changes associated with Friction Stir Processing (FSP) of HY-80 steel under dry and underwater conditions. HY-80 is a low-carbon alloy steel that is used in a quenched and tempered condition and is highly susceptible to hydrogen assisted cracking associated with conventional fusion welding. FSW/P (400 RPM/ 2 IPM) was conducted using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool having a pin length of 6.35 mm. Two sets ...

  17. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW, which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results were analyzed by means of tensile tests, Vickers microhardness, metallographic tests and SEM-EDX. The strength of the joints varied with increasing friction time and the use of different pressure values. Joints were obtained with superior mechanical properties of the AA1050 aluminum, with fracture occurring in the aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analysis by EDX at the interface of the junction showed that interdiffusion occurs between the main chemical components of the materials involved. The RFW proves to be a great method for obtaining joints between dissimilar materials, which is not possible by fusion welding processes.

  18. Instability-Enhanced Collisional Friction Determines the Bohm Criterion in Multiple-Ion-Species Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, S. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D.

    2009-11-01

    Ion-ion streaming instabilities are excited in the presheath region of plasmas with multiple ion species if the ions are much colder than the electrons. Streaming instabilities onset when the relative fluid flow between ion species exceeds a critical speed, δVc, of order the ion thermal speeds. Using a generalized Lenard-Balescu theory that accounts for instability-enhanced collective responses [1], one is able to show the instabilities rapidly enhance the collisional friction between ion species far beyond the contribution from Coulomb collisions alone. This strong frictional force determines the relative fluid speed between species. When this condition is combined with the Bohm criterion generalized for multiple ion species, the fluid speed of each ion species is determined at the sheath edge. For each species, this speed differs from the common ``system'' sound speed by a factor that depends on the species concentrations, masses and δVc.[4pt] [1] S.D. Baalrud, J.D. Callen, and C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 15, 092111 (2008).

  19. Optimization of the Process Parameters for Controlling Residual Stress and Distortion in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    , is investigated. The welding process is simulated in 2-dimensions with a sequentially coupled transient thermo-mechanical model using ANSYS. The numerical optimization problem is implemented in modeFRONTIER and solved using the Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA-II). An engineering-wise evaluation or ranking......In the present paper, numerical optimization of the process parameters, i.e. tool rotation speed and traverse speed, aiming minimization of the two conflicting objectives, i.e. the residual stresses and welding time, subjected to process-specific thermal constraints in friction stir welding...

  20. A New Surface Modification Technique and Their Characterisation: Friction Stir Processing of Al-Zn-Mg Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Mandal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since aluminium alloy is a well-known light alloys to use in aerospace and automotive industries. Therefore, a new method, so far little known in metal forming industries, is the friction stir processing of surface layers. Friction stir processing (FSP is an emerging surface engineering solid-state technology which provides the ability to thermomechnically process selective locations on the materials surface and to enhance specific properties to some considerable depth. However, from a practical point of view it is important to determine the impact of FSP conditions, therefore, a tool rotation speed, travel rate, pressure force as well as the shape and type of tool on the moment acting to heat generated in the stirring area. The heat generated in the area being processed and the level of plastic strain are factors having a decisive effect on microstructural changes, and, consequently, on the mechanical and functional properties of newly formed areas. In this phenomena that the main FSP features have been investigated through OM (optical microscopy, SEM (scanning electron microscopy, FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy, TEM (transmission electron microscopy and mechanical properties. Moreover, aluminium alloy being an age-hardening response to evaluated through Vicker’s hardness measurement a typical characterisation at present task. The research of the FSP of surface layers, so far has been focused mainly on the metallurgical analysis of microstructural changes in modified aluminium alloys.

  1. Improvement the wear behavior of low carbon steels by friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekban, D. M.; Aktarer, S. M.; Yanar, H.; Alsaran, A.; Purcek, G.

    2017-02-01

    A low carbon structural steel was surface-hardened by friction stir processing (FSP) through 4 mm thickness from the surface. The hardness of the alloy increased from 140 Hv0.1 to about 240 Hv0.1 after single-pass FSP. This improvement came from the substantial microstructural refinement due to both severe plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization. Both yield and tensile strength of the alloy increased without a considerable decrease in ductility after FSP. Friction and wear behavior of the alloy before and after FSP was investigated by a pin-on-disk type tribometer according to ASTM-G133. The substantial increase in both hardness and yield strength resulted in a considerable improvement in wear resistance of the alloy depending on applied pressure. In this study, metallurgical and mechanical reasons for such improvement in wear behavior and any change in wear mechanisms after FSP were investigated.

  2. Numerical simulation of friction stir spot welding process for aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongun; Badarinarayan, Harsha; Ryu, Ill; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Chongmin; Okamoto, Kazutaka; Wagoner, R. H.; Chung, Kwansoo

    2010-04-01

    Thermo-mechanical simulations of the Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) processes were performed for AA5083-H18 and AA6022-T4, utilizing commercial Finite Element Method (FEM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM) codes, which are based on Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, respectively. The Lagrangian explicit dynamic FEM code, PAM-CRASH, and the Eulerian Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) FVM code, STAR-CD, were utilized to understand the effect of pin geometry on weld strength and material flow under the unsteady state condition. Using FVM code, material flow patterns near the tool boundary were analyzed to explain weld strength difference between welds by a cylindrical pin and welds by a triangular pin, whereas the frictional energy concept using the FEM code had a limited capacity to explain the weld strength difference.

  3. Process of friction-stir welding high-strength aluminum alloy and mechanical properties of joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王大勇; 冯吉才; 郭德伦; 孙成彬; 栾国红; 郭和平

    2004-01-01

    The process of friction-stir welding 2A12CZ alloy has been studied. And strength and elongation tests have been performed, which demonstrated that the opportunity existed to manipulate friction-stir welding parameters in order to improve a range of material properties. The results showed that the joint strength and elongation arrived at their parameters changing, joint tensile strength and elongation had similar development. Hardness measurement indicated that the weld was softened. However, there was considerable difference in softening degree for different joint zone. The weld top had lower hardness and wider softening zone than other zone of the weld. And softening zone at advancing side was wider than that at retreating side.

  4. EFFECT OF PROCESS PARAMETERS ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF FRICTION STIR WELDED DISSIMILAR ALUMINUM JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. PADMANABAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is one of the recent solid state joining processes that has drawn the attention of the metal joining community. In this work the effects of tool rotation speed (TRS and welding speed (WS on the tensile strength of dissimilar friction stir welded AA2024-AA7075 joints are investigated. Response surface methodology is used for developing a mathematical model for the tensile strength of the dissimilar aluminum alloy joints. The model is used to investigate the effect of TRS and WS on the tensile strength of the joints. It is seen that the tensile strength of the joint increases with the increase in TRS up to a limit of 1050 rpm and decreases thereafter. The tensile strength of the joints is also seen increasing with the WS up to 15 mm/min. Further increase in WS results in a reduction of the tensile strength of the joints.

  5. Effect of viscosity on material behavior in friction stir welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-wu; ZHANG Zhao; BIE Jun; ZHOU Lei; CHEN Jin-tao

    2006-01-01

    Temperature-dependent elastic viscoplastic material model was used for the numerical simulation of the friction stir welding process. The non-elastic response of the rate-dependent material in the large deformation problems was calculated by using the closest point algorithm. The numerical results show that the shape of the equivalent plastic strain looks like onion rings and the spacing of the rings is approximately equal to the forward movement of the tool in one rotation. The equivalent plastic strain is increased with the increase of viscosity coefficient due to the increase of friction stress in the pin-plate interface. The region which is influenced by the rotating tool is decreased with the decrease of viscosity coefficient. The radial and circumferential stresses in front of the pin are greater than the ones behind the pin. This difference can be reduced with the decrease of viscosity.

  6. Processing-Microstructure Relationships in Friction Stir Welding of MA956 Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bradford W.; Menon, E. Sarath K.; McNelley, Terry R.; Brewer, Luke N.; El-Dasher, Bassem; Farmer, Joseph C.; Torres, Sharon G.; Mahoney, Murray W.; Sanderson, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive set of processing-microstructure relationships is presented for friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened MA956 steel. Eight rotational speed/traverse speed combinations were used to produce friction stir welds on MA956 plates using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool. Weld conditions with high thermal input produced defect-free, full-penetration welds. Electron backscatter diffraction results showed a significant increase in grain size, a persistent body centered cubic torsional texture in the stir zone, and a sharp transition in grain size across the thermo-mechanically affected zone sensitive to weld parameters. Micro-indentation showed an asymmetric reduction in hardness across a transverse section of the weld. This gradient in hardness was greatly increased with higher heat inputs. The decrease in hardness after welding correlates directly with the increase in grain size and may be explained with a Hall-Petch type relationship.

  7. Structure and Hardness of 01570 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir Welds Processed Under Different Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'yasov, R. R.; Avtokratova, E. V.; Markushev, M. V.; Predko, P. Yu.; Konkevich, V. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Structure and hardness of the 01570 aluminum alloy joints processed by friction stir welding at various speeds are investigated. It is shown that increasing the traverse tool speed lowers the probability of macrodefect formation in the nugget zone; however, this can lead to anomalous grain growth in the zone of contact with the tool shoulder. Typical "onion-like" structure of the weld consisting of rings that differ by optical contrast is formed for all examined welding regimes. It is demonstrated that this contrast is caused by the difference in the grain sizes in the rings rather than by their chemical or phase composition. Mechanisms of transformation of the alloy structure during friction stir welding are discussed.

  8. Experimental Investigations on Formability of Aluminum Tailor Friction Stir Welded Blanks in Deep Drawing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesharwani, R. K.; Panda, S. K.; Pal, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, tailor friction stir welded blanks (TFSWBs) were fabricated successfully using 2.0-mm-thick AA5754-H22 and AA5052-H32 sheet metals with optimized tool design and process parameters. Taguchi L9 orthogonal array has been used to design the friction stir welding experiments, and the Grey relational analysis has been applied for the multi objective optimization in order to maximize the weld strength and total elongation reducing the surface roughness and energy consumption. The formability of the TFSWBs and parent materials was evaluated and compared in terms of limiting drawing ratio (LDR) using a conventional circular die. It was found that the formability of the TFSWBs was comparable with that of both the parent materials without failure in the weldment. A modified conical tractrix die (MCTD) was proposed to enhance the LDR of the TFSWBs. It was found that the formability was improved by 27% using the MCTD.

  9. 3D visualization of the material flow in friction stir welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yanhua; Lin Sanbao; Shen Jiajie; Wu Lin

    2005-01-01

    The material flow in friction stir welded 2014 Al alloy has been investigated using a marker insert technique (MIT). Results of the flow visualization show that the material flow is asymmetrical during the friction stir welding(FSW)process and there are also significant differences in the flow patterns observed on advancing side and retreating side. On advancing side, some material transport forward and some move backward, but on retreating side, material only transport backward. At the top surface of the weld, significant material traasport forward due to the action of the rotating tool shoulder.Combining the data from all the markers, a three-dimensional flow visualization, similar to the 3D image reconstruction technique, was obtained. The three-dimensional plot gives the tendency chart of material flow in friction stir welding process and from the plot it can be seen that there is a vertical, circular motion around the longitudinal axis of the weld. On the advancing side of the weld, the material is pushed downward but on the retreating side, the material is pushed toward the crown of the weld. The net result of the two relative motions in both side of the advancing and the retreating is that a circular motion comes into being. Comparatively, the material flow around the longitudinal axis is a secondary motion.

  10. DETERMINATION OF BALL COHESIVE AND FRICTIONAL FORCES WITH TOOL AT POLISHING BETWEEN ALIGNED RINGS AND DISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schetnikovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a design description of a tool used for polishing balls made of brittle materials between bottom driving disk and two rings. An external stationary ring has a ring turning of rectangular profile that helps the ring to be based directly on the balls which are to be polished and take self-aligned position in relation to tool rotation axis.  Forces acting on the balls in the points of contact with the tool with due account of friction against a separator and conditions of ball sliding along ring working surfaces are determined in the paper. Dependence for determination of stationary and driving ring load ratio when balls are sliding along two contact surfaces of the tool is ascertained in the paper. The paper contains recommendations on selection of modes for ball polishing at its initial and finishing stages.

  11. Simulation of the Thermal Hydraulic Processes in the Horizontal Steam Generator with the Use of the Different Interfacial Friction Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Melikhov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The horizontal steam generator (SG is one of specific features of Russian-type pressurized water reactors (VVERs. The main advantages of horizontal steam generator are connected with low steam loads on evaporation surface, simple separation scheme and high circulation ratio. The complex three-dimensional steam-water flows in the steam generator vessel influence significantly the processes of the steam separation, distribution, and deposition of the soluble and nonsoluble impurities and determine the efficiency and reliability of the steam generator operation. The 3D code for simulation of the three-dimensional steam-water flows in the steam generator could be effective tool for design and optimization of the horizontal steam generator. The results of the code calculations are determined mainly by the set of the correlations describing interaction of the steam-water mixture with the inner constructions of the SG and interfacial friction. The results obtained by 3D code STEG with the usage of the different interfacial friction correlations are presented and discussed in the paper. These results are compared with the experimental ones obtained at the experimental test facility PGV-1500 constructed for investigation of the processes in the horizontal steam generator.

  12. Linear friction weld process monitoring of fixture cassette deformations using empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, O. J.; Gibson, C.; Wilson, P.; Lohse, N.; Popov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Due to its inherent advantages, linear friction welding is a solid-state joining process of increasing importance to the aerospace, automotive, medical and power generation equipment industries. Tangential oscillations and forge stroke during the burn-off phase of the joining process introduce essential dynamic forces, which can also be detrimental to the welding process. Since burn-off is a critical phase in the manufacturing stage, process monitoring is fundamental for quality and stability control purposes. This study aims to improve workholding stability through the analysis of fixture cassette deformations. Methods and procedures for process monitoring are developed and implemented in a fail-or-pass assessment system for fixture cassette deformations during the burn-off phase. Additionally, the de-noised signals are compared to results from previous production runs. The observed deformations as a consequence of the forces acting on the fixture cassette are measured directly during the welding process. Data on the linear friction-welding machine are acquired and de-noised using empirical mode decomposition, before the burn-off phase is extracted. This approach enables a direct, objective comparison of the signal features with trends from previous successful welds. The capacity of the whole process monitoring system is validated and demonstrated through the analysis of a large number of signals obtained from welding experiments.

  13. The effect of surface morphology on the friction of electrogalvanized sheet steel in forming processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarpelos, P. N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1993-12-01

    The effect in the drawbead simulator test were evaluated for a set of commercially coated steels and a set of laboratory coated steels with underlying surfaces produced by laser textured, shot blast, and electro-discharge textured rolls. In general, surfaces with higher roughness (R{sub a} parameter) measured lower friction in the DBS tests. The requisite roughness amplitude necessary for low friction was moderated somewhat by having a more closely spaced roughness as described by the median wavelength, {lambda}m, of the power spectrum. This effect is due to interaction with the lubricant by the micro-roughness imparted by the galvanizing process. The lubricant tends to be retained better by the surfaces with the micro-roughness, thereby increasing the amount of elasto- and plasto-hydrodynamic support of the load. Other variables, such as large variations in thickness of the sheet can mask the effect of the surface by changing the actual distance of sliding contact during the DBS test. For tests where the amount of sliding is similar, the effect of roughness is significant. The friction measured for EG steels in the DBS test is dominated by deformation of the surface with plowing by the asperities of the tooling adding to that caused by the deformation. The size of the plow marks in the deformed surfaces corresponds to the roughness of the tooling and no significant evidence of wear particles was observed.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Friction Stir Welding Process by Using Rate-dependent Constitutive Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwu ZHANG; Zhao ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Rate-dependent constitutive model was used to simulate the friction stir welding process. The effect of the viscosity coefficient and the process parameters on the material behaviors and the stress distributions around the pin were studied. Results indicate that the stress in front of the pin is larger than that behind the pin. The difference between the radial/circumferential stress in front of the pin and that behind it becomes smaller when the material gets closer to the top surface. This difference increases with increasing the viscosity coefficient and becomes smaller when the welding speed decreases. The variation of the angular velocity does not significantly affect the difference.

  15. Microstructure and optical appearance of anodized friction stir processed Al - Metal oxide surface composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Bordo, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to impregnate Ti, Y and Ce oxide powders into the surface of an Aluminium alloy. The FSP processed surface composite was subsequently anodized with an aim to develop optical effects in the anodized layer owing to the presence of incorporated...... oxide particles which will influence the scattering of light. This paper presents the investigations on relation between microstructure of the FSP zone and optical appearance of the anodized layer due to incorporation of metal oxide particles and modification of the oxide particles due to the anodizing...

  16. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  17. EARTH’S ROTATIONAL DECELERATION: DETERMINATION OF TIDAL FRICTION INDEPENDENT OF TIMESCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deines, Steven D. [Donatech Corporation, Fairfield, IA 52556 (United States); Williams, Carol A., E-mail: steven.deines@gmail.com, E-mail: cw@math.usf.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Prof. emeritus), University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    This paper determines Earth's rotational deceleration without relying on atomic or ephemeris timescales. Earth's rotation defines the civil time standard called Universal Time (UT). Our previous paper did not examine tidal friction in depth when analyzing the timescale divergence between UT and International Atomic Time (TAI). We examine all available paleontological fossils and deposits for the direct measurements of Earth's past rotation rates, because that record includes all contributing effects. We examine paleontological reports that date Earth's rotation rate using corals, bivalves, brachiopods, rhythmites, and stromatolites. Contributions that vary Earth's moment of inertia, such as continental plate drifts, coastline changes, ice age formations, and viscous glacial rebounds, are superimposed with the secular deceleration. The average deceleration of Earth's rotation rate from all available fossil data is found to be (5.969 ± 1.762) × 10{sup −7} rad yr{sup −2}. Our value is 99.8% of the total rotational deceleration determined by Christodoulidis et al., who used artificial satellite data, and our value is 96.6% of the expected tidal friction value obtained by Stephenson and Morrison. Taking the derivative of conserved angular momentum, the predicted lunar orbital deceleration caused by the average rotational deceleration corresponds closely to lunar models. When evaluating the significant time gaps between UT and TAI, Earth's rotational deceleration is a minor contributing factor. Also, the secular deceleration rate is necessary to correctly date ancient astronomical events. We strongly encourage that more ocean paleontological evidence be found to supplement the record to separate the many periodic variations embedded in these data.

  18. An empirical model for friction in cold forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Eriksen, Morten; Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    With a system of simulative tribology tests for cold forging the friction stress for aluminum, steel and stainless steel provided with typical lubricants for cold forging has been determined for varying normal pressure, surface expansion, sliding length and tool/work piece interface temperature...... of normal pressure and tool/work piece interface temperature. The model is verified by process testing measuring friction at varying reductions in cold forward rod extrusion. KEY WORDS: empirical friction model, cold forging, simulative friction tests....

  19. Effect of the Metal Transport on the Mechanical Properties of Al-2Si Alloys Processed through Friction Stir Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailesh Rao, A.; Naik, Yuvaraja

    2017-03-01

    In this study, Al-2Si alloys were joined using friction stir welding with various process parameters. The process parameters considered here were rotational speeds from 600 to 1200 rpm, feed rate from 50 to 150 mm/min with three equal increments. In this study, the mushy state metal movements during the processes are discussed. The experimental observation and results indicate that the flaw formations, surface roughness of the weld, and hardness value depend on the metal movement and are explained in this study. The microstructure of the weld zone was studied finally.

  20. Microstructure evolution in hot rolled 7075 Al via friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei Ling; Tan, Ming Jen; Liu, Feng Chao; Song, Xu; Chua, Beng Wah

    2016-10-01

    Friction stir processed (FSP) hot rolled 7075 Al alloy with grain size of 5.2 μm was investigated in the temperature range 350 °C-500 °C and strain rates from 3x10-4 to 10-1 s-1. Maximum superplastic elongation of 776.4 % was achieved at 500 °C and strain rate 10-3 s-1. The microstructure evolution of FSP 7075 Al during superplastic deformation was studied by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Further analyses of superplastic results indicated the main deformation mechanism of FSP 7075 Al was grain boundary sliding (GBS).

  1. Texture Analyses of Ti/Al2O3 Nanocomposite Produced Using Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei-Zarghani, Aziz; Kashani-Bozorg, Seyed Farshid; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2016-11-01

    The texture evolution of Ti/Al2O3 nanocomposite fabricated using friction stir processing (FSP) was investigated at both macroscopic and microscopic levels employing X-ray diffraction and electron backscattering diffraction techniques. The developed textures were compared with ideal shear textures of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure, revealing that the fabricated nanocomposite is dominated by the P 1 hcp (fiber { 10bar{1}1} continuous dynamic recrystallization as well as increasing the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries within the developed microstructure.

  2. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Gharavi; Khamirul Amin Matori; Robiah Yunus; Norinsan Kamil Othman; Firouz Fadaeifard

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the par...

  3. Development and Optimization of Hybrid Friction Materials Consisting of Nanoclay and Carbon Nanotubes by using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP and Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS under Fuzzy Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tej SINGH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The tribo-performance of nanoclay and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT filled and graphite lubricated phenolic composites, reinforced with a combination of lapinus and kevlar fibers, have been evaluated on a Kraus friction testing machine. The combined fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP and fuzzy technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (FTOPSIS approach, taking into account performance defining attributes (PDAs such as friction performance, wear, friction-fade, friction-recovery, stability coefficient, variability coefficient, friction fluctuations and temperature rise of the disc, was used for the performance assessment of fabricated friction composite materials. The weight of different PDAs were evaluated by FAHP; μ-performance (0.144, 0.255, 0.435, wear (0.144, 0.255, 0.435, fade-% (0.073, 0.15, 0.307, recovery-% (0.063, 0.126, 0.268, stability coefficient (0.037, 0.075, 0.156, variability coefficient (0.032, 0.063, 0.136, frictional fluctuations (0.023, 0.037, 0.069, and DTR (0.023, 0.037, 0.069 respectively.  FTOPSIS was employed to determine the optimal ranking of the friction composite materials as NC-7>NC-8>NC-6>NC-5>NC-3>NC-4>NC-2>NC-1. The alternative with kevlar: lapinus, 2.5:27.5 wt-% and graphite: nanoclay: carbon nanotube, 2.25:2.75 wt-% exhibits the optimal properties.

  4. Process Parameters Optimization for Friction Stir Welding of Pure Aluminium to Brass (CuZn30 using Taguchi Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfar O. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the friction stir welding of dissimilar commercial pure aluminium and brass (CuZn30 plates was investigated and the process parameters were optimized using Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The considered process parameters were the rotational speed, traverse speed and pin offset. The optimum setting was determined with reference to ultimate tensile strength of the joint. The predicted optimum value of ultimate tensile strength was confirmed by experimental run using optimum parameters. Analysis of variance revealed that traverse speed is the most significant factor in controlling the joint tensile strength and pin offset also plays a significant role. In this investigation, the optimum tensile strength is 50% of aluminium base metal. Metallographic examination revealed that intermetallic compounds were formed in the interface of the optimum joint where the tensile failure was observed to take place.

  5. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajian, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei-Nejad, S.S.; Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadavi, S.M.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MA University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chung, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Engineering Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shokouhimehr, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3–6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  6. An investigation on SA 213-Tube to SA 387-Tube plate using friction welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, S. Pandia; Kumaraswamidhas, L. A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Jharkhand (India); Kumaran, S. Senthil [RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Tamil Nadu (India); Muthukumaran, S. [National Institute of Technology, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) is a relatively newer solid state welding process used for joining tube to tube plate of either similar or dissimilar materials with enhanced mechanical and metallurgical properties. In the present study, FWTPET has been used to weld SA 213 (Grade T12) tube with SA 387 (Grade 22) tube plate. The welded samples are found to have satisfactory joint strength and the Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that inter metallic compound is absent in the weld zone. The different weld joints have been identified and the phase composition is found using EDX and XRD. Microstructures have been analyzed using optical and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties such as hardness, compressive shear strength and peel test for different weld conditions are studied and the hardness survey revealed that there is increase in hardness at the weld interface due to grain refinement. The corrosion behavior for different weld conditions have been analyzed and the weld zone is found to have better corrosion resistance due to the influence of the grain refinement after FWTPET welding process. Hence, the present investigation is carried out to study the behavior of friction welded dissimilar joints of SA 213 tube and SA 387 tube plate joints and the results are presented. The present study confirms that a high quality tube to tube plate joint can be achieved using FWTPET process at 1120 rpm.

  7. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Mahmoud [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Behrouz [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keivani, Rasoul [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  8. Multi-objective Optimization of Continuous Drive Friction Welding Process Parameters Using Response Surface Methodology with Intelligent Optimization Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P M AJITH; T MAFSAL HUSAIN; P SATHIYA; S ARAVINDAN

    2015-01-01

    The optimum friction welding (FW) parameters of duplex stainless steel (DSS) UNS S32205 joint was determined. The experiment was carried out as the central composite array of 30 experiments. The selected input parameters were friction pressure (F), upset pressure (U), speed (S) and burn-off length (B), and responses were hardness and ultimate tensile strength. To achieve the quality of the welded joint, the ultimate tensile strength and hardness were maximized, and response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to create separate regression equations of tensile strength and hardness. Intelligent optimization technique such as genetic algorithm was used to predict the Pareto optimal solutions. Depending upon the application, preferred suitable welding parameters were selected. It was inferred that the changing hardness and tensile strength of the friction welded joint inlfuenced the upset pressure, friction pressure and speed of rotation.

  9. Theoretical studies on the role of transition in determining friction and heat transfer in smooth and rough passages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (USA). Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer Lab.); Rabas, T.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-04-01

    It has been established that transition determines the attainable friction and heat transfer in smooth and rough passages. According to the proposed law of corresponding states for friction, different types of roughness exhibit the same general behavior for friction at the same reduced conditions. This is also true of different types of smooth passages. It has been fully demonstrated that, in rough passages, the marked increases in friction factor are intimately associated with early transition and that, under reduced similarity conditions, the friction factors are considerably lower than those deduced from the familiar f vs. Re plots. For all smooth or rough passages, the simple rule for heat transfer amounts to this: the lower the critical Reynolds number for transition, the greater the value for the average heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, for a given Reynolds number based on the hydraulic diameter, triangular passages can be expected to give heat transfer coefficients that are significantly higher than for circular, rectangular or annular tubes. For smooth and enhanced passages of complex shapes, it appears that heat transfer coefficients can be calculated accurately from the smooth circular tube relations, provided the critical Reynolds number is known. 61 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  10. "Frictional processes" in carbonate-bearing rocks at seismic deformation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Toro, G.; Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Rempe, M.; Smith, S. A. F.; Nielsen, S. B.; Fondriest, M.; Plumper, O.

    2015-12-01

    Moderate to large earthquakes often rupture and propagate along faults in carbonate-bearing rocks (dolostones, limestones, marbles, etc.). Compared to silicate-bearing rocks, which melt, weaken and wear when sheared at seismic slip rates (ca. 1 m/s), carbonate-bearing rocks do not melt, the minimum friction coefficient can be much lower (down to 5% of static friction) and the wear rate is negligible at seismic slip rates. In cohesive carbonate-bearing rocks, experiments simulating seismic deformation conditions and stopped at slip initiation (solid lubricant) at asperity contacts. With progressive slip and bulk temperature increase, nanograins accommodate large strain rates (ca. 104 s-1) by grain boundary sliding as suggested by several authors. The presence of a microporous fabric boosts pore-controlled diffusive process propelled by CO2 gas exhaust due to decarbonation. Enhanced pore-controlled diffusive processes allow (1) efficient mass transfer during grain boundary sliding and (2) sintering of the nanograins into a foam-like slip surface at the end of the experiment.

  11. Morphology characterization and friction coefficient determination of sputtered V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluensner, T.; Shen, Q.; Hlawacek, G. [Institute of Physics, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Teichert, C., E-mail: teichert@unileoben.ac.a [Institute of Physics, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Fateh, N.; Fontalvo, G.A.; Mitterer, C. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2010-12-01

    The morphology of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} low-friction coatings on MgO (001) substrates synthesized by unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering was investigated using atomic force microscopy. Analyzing the height-height correlation function, the evolution of the surface roughness parameters root mean square roughness (rms), lateral correlation length, and the Hurst parameter were determined. Studying samples of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} grown at temperatures from 25 {sup o}C to 300 {sup o}C, a transition from amorphous to crystalline growth at 80 {sup o}C was observed. The rms roughness increased from 0.7 nm at 26 {sup o}C to 21 nm at 300 {sup o}C. Furthermore, a method to quantitatively determine friction coefficients via friction force microscopy was applied. The surface contact forces were calculated via the cantilever's spring constants determined using the Sader method. At scan speeds of 1.25 {mu}m/s and 3.13 {mu}m/s, friction coefficients of 0.60 {+-} 0.02 and 0.63 {+-} 0.01, respectively, have been obtained.

  12. Tribological Behavior of A356/Al2O3 Surface Nanocomposite Prepared by Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M. H.

    2014-04-01

    Surface A356 aluminum alloy matrix composites containing micro and nanosized Al2O3 are prepared by a new approach utilizing high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying and friction stir processing (FSP). Optical and scanning electron microscopy, microhardness, and wear tests were used to characterize the surface composites. Results indicated that, the presence of Al2O3 in matrix can improve the mechanical properties of specimens. The microhardness of surface composites containing micro and nanosized Al2O3 were 89.8 ± 2.6 HV and 109.7 ± 2.5 HV, respectively, which were higher than those for the as-received (79.6 ± 1.1 HV) and the FSPed A356-T6 with no alumina powder (66.8 ± 0.9 HV). Surface composites revealed low friction coefficients and wear rates, which were significantly lower than those obtained for substrate. The wear mass losses of the as-received, the FSPed, and surface micro and nanocomposite specimens after 500-m sliding distance were 50.5, 55.6, 31, and 17.2 mg, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy tests revealed different wear mechanisms on the surface of the wear test specimens.

  13. Fabrication of novel fiber reinforced aluminum composites by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, Seyyed Mohammad; Karimi, Saeed; Jahromi, Seyyed Ahmad Jenabali, E-mail: jahromi@shirazu.ac.ir; Javadpour, Sirus; Zebarjad, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2015-04-24

    In this study, chopped and attrition milled high strength carbon, E-glass, and S-glass fibers have been used as the reinforcing agents in an aluminum alloy (Al1100) considered as the matrix. The Surface Metal Matrix Composites (SMMCs) then are produced by Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Tensile and micro-hardness examinations represent a magnificent improvement in the hardness, strength, ductility and toughness for all of the processed samples. Scanning Electron Micrographs reveal a proper distribution of the reinforcements in the matrix and a change in the fracture behavior of the FSPed specimens. The synergetic effects of reinforcing by fibers and Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) lead to an extra ordinary improvement in the mechanical properties.

  14. Optimizing Powder Distribution in Production of Surface Nano-Composite via Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarian, Arash; Dehghani, Kamran; Slamkish, Taymor

    2014-06-01

    Notwithstanding the extensive interest in using friction stir processing (FSP) for producing metal matrix composite (MMC), more uniform powder distribution along the composite zone is still needed. In most studies, one groove is machined out of the specimen, filled with powder, and then processed by identical passes. In this investigation, an innovative technique was used that involved machining out of three gradient grooves with increasing depth from the advancing side to the retreating side instead of using a conventional sample with just a groove. Macro, optical, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and microhardness test were used to evaluate the powder distribution. The images indicated that the most uniform distribution of SiC particles in the whole composite zone was related to a three-gradient grooves sample. Microohardness measurement of a three-gradient grooves sample, carried out along the cross section and perpendicular to the traverse direction of FSP, experiences less fluctuation in hardness compared with other techniques.

  15. Low temperature enhanced ductility of friction stir processed 5083 aluminum alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ehab A El-Danaf; Magdy M El-Rayes; Mahmoud S Soliman

    2011-12-01

    Commercial 5083 Al rolled plates were subjected to friction stir processing (FSP) with two different processing parameters, having 430 and 850 rpm tool rotational speed with a single traverse feed rate of 90 mm/min. These FSP conditions resulted in two fine grained microstructures of 0.95 m (430 rpm) and 2.6 m (850 rpm). Tensile elongations were measured at a relatively low temperature of 250°C at three strain rates, and demonstrated that a decrease in grain size resulted in significantly enhanced ductility and lower forming loads. The occurrence of a relatively high value of strain rate sensitivity, of 0.45 for a grain size of 0.95 m, suggests the operation of superplastic deformation under these present experimental conditions.

  16. Micromachined strain gauges for the determination of liquid flow friction coefficients in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baviere, R.; Ayela, F.

    2004-02-01

    In this research program, we have performed and tested cupro-nickel (Cu-Ni) strain gauges micromachined on different sorts of silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes. The design of the gauges obeys an electrical Wheatstone bridge configuration. We have found a good agreement between the expected electromechanical response of the bridge and the experimental signals. The results have displayed sensitivity to static pressure ranging from 50 to 100 µV V-1 bar-1 as a function of the thickness and of the diameter of the membranes. This is part of a study devoted to determining liquid flow friction coefficients in silicon-Pyrex microchannels. Preliminary attempts (Reynolds number up to 300) made using global pressure measurements and with very simple local pressure probes are discussed. Further experiments using Cu-Ni strain gauges are described. Their micromachining, characterization and integration along silicon microchannels are presented. These sensors permitted us to perform the first local and reliable pressure drop measurements in a 7.5 µm deep microchannel. The results are in good agreement with the classical laminar theory for a Reynolds number ranging from 0.2 to 3.

  17. Effects of Annealing Process on the Formability of Friction Stir Welded Al-Li Alloy 2195 Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Bradford, Vann; Russell, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Large rocket cryogenic tank domes have typically been fabricated using Al-Cu based alloys like Al-Cu alloy 2219. The use of aluminum-lithium based alloys for rocket fuel tank domes can reduce weight because aluminum-lithium alloys have lower density and higher strength than Al-Cu alloy 2219. However, Al-Li alloys have rarely been used to fabricate rocket fuel tank domes because of the inherent low formability characteristic that make them susceptible to cracking during the forming operations. The ability to form metal by stretch forming or spin forming without excessive thinning or necking depends on the strain hardening exponent "n". The stain hardening exponent is a measure of how rapidly a metal becomes stronger and harder. A high strain hardening exponent is beneficial to a material's ability to uniformly distribute the imposed strain. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a novel annealing process that can achieve a work hardening exponent on the order of 0.27 to 0.29, which is approximately 50% higher than what is typically obtained for Al-Li alloys using the conventional method. The strain hardening exponent of the Al-Li alloy plates or blanks heat treated using the conventional method is typically on the order of 0.17 to 0.19. The effects of this novel annealing process on the formability of friction stir welded Al-Li alloy blanks are being studied at Marshall Space Flight Center. The formability ratings will be generated using the strain hardening exponent, strain rate sensitivity and forming range. The effects of forming temperature on the formability will also be studied. The objective of this work is to study the deformation behavior of the friction stir welded Al-Li alloy 2195 blank and determine the formability enhancement by the new annealing process.

  18. Friction stir processed Al–TiO{sub 2} surface composites: Anodising behaviour and optical appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy, E-mail: chakri_gvc@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Jensen, Flemming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Simar, Aude [iMMC, Université Catholique de Louvain, Place Sainte Barbe 2, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Shabadi, Rajashekhara [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, Université Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve-d’Ascq (France); Ambat, Rajan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructure of friction stir processed Al–TiO{sub 2} surface composites after anodising. • Effect of sulphuric acid anodising parameters on optical appearance of anodised layer. • Partial to complete amorphization of TiO{sub 2} particles with increasing anodising voltage. • Unoxidized metallic Al “shadow region” below TiO{sub 2} particles at low anodising voltage. • Presence of coloured Ti{sub n}O{sub 2n−1} and light absorbing unoxidized metallic Al cause darkening of anodised layer. - Abstract: Multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to impregnate TiO{sub 2} (rutile) particles into the surface of an aluminium alloy. The surface composites of Al–TiO{sub 2} were then anodised in a sulphuric acid electrolyte. The effect of anodising parameters on the resulting optical appearance was investigated. Microstructural and morphological characterization was performed using scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface appearance was analysed using an integrating sphere-spectrophotometer setup which measures the diffuse and total reflectance of light from the surface. Compared to samples without TiO{sub 2}, surface appearance after anodising of samples with TiO{sub 2} changed from dark to greyish white upon increasing the anodising voltage. This is attributed to the localized microstructural and morphological differences around the TiO{sub 2} powder particles incorporated into the anodic alumina matrix. The TiO{sub 2} powder particles in the FSP zone were partially or completely amorphized during the anodising process, and also electrochemically shadowed the anodising of underlying Al matrix.

  19. Impacts of friction stir processing on irradiation effects in vacuum-plasma-spray coated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kazumi, E-mail: ozawa.kazumi@jaea.go.jp [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi-Omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi-Omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    In order to examine the impacts of friction stir processing (FSP) on irradiation effects in vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) coated tungsten (W), nano indentation hardness was evaluated of three kinds of W materials after self-ion-irradiation to 5.0–5.4 dpa at 500 and 800 °C. The VPS-FSP clearly got grains refined and isotropic compared to bulk-W and the as-VPS-W. Nano indentation hardness remains unchanged for the as-VPS-W and VPS-FSP × 2-W irradiated to 5.4 dpa at 500 °C and it decreased from 1 dpa at 800 °C, while typical irradiation induced hardening was observed for the bulk-W irradiated at 500 °C.

  20. Using two-pass friction stir processing to produce nanocrystalline microstructure in AZ61 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Despite their interesting properties,nanostructured materials have found limited use as a result of the cost of preparation and the difficulty in scaling up.Herein,a two-pass friction stir processing(FSP)technique is employed to refine grain sizes to a nanoscale.Nanocrystalline AZ61 Mg alloy with an av-erage grain size of less than 100nm was successfully obtained using FSP.Corresponding to this,the highest microhardness of the nano-grained region reached triple times that of AZ61 substrate.In prin-ciple,by applying multiple overlapping passes,it should be possible to produce any desired size thin sheet of nanostructure using this technique.We expect that the FSP technique may pave a way to large-scale structural applications of nanostructured metals and alloys.

  1. Influence of the tool temperature increment on the coefficient of friction behavior on the deep drawing process of HSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, I.; Galdos, L.; Mugarra, E.; Mendiguren, J.; Saenz de Argandoña, E.

    2016-11-01

    The use of High Strength Steels (HSS) in the deep drawing processes has an impact on the temperature that is achieved on the die surfaces. Due to the heat that is created through the deformation of the material and the friction itself, the tools temperature increase considerably up to approximately 100°C. This temperature increment has an effect on both the wear of the surface and also the coefficient of friction (COF). In this work the influence of the tool temperature on the coefficient of friction is studied. For that, Strip Drawing Tests have been carried out at different tool temperatures with a DP780, High Strength Steel. Moreover, different contact pressures have been considered in the study to analyse the combined effect of the contact pressure with the temperature increment. It has been proved that the temperature increment has to be taken into account to predict accurately the behavior of the coefficient of friction between the sheet and the tool. This change in the coefficient of friction has a high impact on the prediction of the deep drawing process.

  2. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija KOVACEVIC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Presented are the basic analytical formulations for the definition of temperature fields. Analysis of influential parameters of welding FSW technology at the zone of the weld material and mechanical properties of the realized joint was performed. Influential welding parameters were defined based on tool geometry, technological parameters of processing and the axial load of tool. Specific problems with the FSW process are related to gaps (holes left behind by a tool at the end of the process and inflexibility of welding regarding the degree of variation of material thickness. Numerical simulation of process welding FSW proceeding was carried out on the example of Aluminum Alloy (AA 2219 using the ANSYS Mechanical ADPL (Transient Thermal software package. The defined was the temperature field in the welding process at specified time intervals.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10022

  3. Frictional transfer and the self-organization phenomenon in the friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, I. V.; Manturov, D. S.

    2017-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface structures formation in the process of metal-polymer frictional contact. IR spectroscopy methods have showed that the formation kinetics of a frictionally transferred film is determined by the adhesion of the composite components and the direction of the electric field at the contact.

  4. Severe plastic deformation using friction stir processing, and the characterization of microstructure and mechanical behavior using neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Wanchuck

    Friction-stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process, which utilizes a cylindrical rotating tool consisting of a concentric threaded tool pin and tool shoulder. The strong metallurgical bonding during the FSW is accomplished through: (1) the severe plastic deformation caused by the rotation of the tool pin that plunges into the material and travels along the joining line; and (2) the frictional heat generated mainly from the pressing tool shoulder. Recently, a number of variations of the FSW have been applied to modify the microstructure, for example, grain refinements and homogenization of precipitate particles, namely friction-stir processing (FSP). Applications of the FSP/FSW are widespread for the transportation industries. The microstructure and mechanical behavior of light-weight materials subjected to the FSW/FSP are being studied extensively. However, separating the effect of the frictional heat and severe plastic deformation on the residual stress and texture has been a standing problem for the fundamental understanding of FSW/FSP. The fundamental issues are: (i) the heat- and plastic-deformation-induced internal stresses that may be detrimental to the integrity and performance of components; (ii) the frictional heating that causes a microstructural softening due to the dissolution or growth of the precipitates in precipitation-hardenable Al alloys during the process; and (iii) the crystallographic texture can be significantly altered from the original texture, which could affect the physical and mechanical properties. The understanding of the influences of the de-convoluted sources (e.g. frictional heat, severe plastic deformation, or their combination) on the residual stress, microstructural softening, and texture variations during FSW can be used for a physicsvi based optimization of the processing parameters and new tool designs. Furthermore, the analyses and characterization of the natural aging behavior and the aging kinetics can be

  5. Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructural Evolution, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Processed Al 7075 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Atul; Sharma, Sandan Kumar; Pal, Kaushik; Mula, Suhrit

    2017-03-01

    Aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of process parameters on microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of an age-hardenable Al 7075 alloy. The alloy plates (6 mm thickness) were friction stir processed (FSPed) at various traverse speed, namely 25, 45, 65, 85, 100 and 150 mm/min at 2 different rpm of 508 and 720. The optimized result in terms of defect-free processed zone with refined microstructure was obtained only at a rotational speed of 720 rpm for a traverse speed of 25, 45, 65 and 85 mm/min. The microstructural evolution was investigated using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The grain size of the nugget zone was found to decrease with increase in the traverse speed from 25 to 85 mm/min at a constant rpm of 720. The mechanical properties were evaluated by Vickers hardness measurements, tensile and wear testing. Yield strength was found to be the maximum ( 366 MPa) for the FSPed sample processed at 85 mm/min. The hardness values also followed the similar increasing trend with increase in the traverse speed. The wear volume loss decreased by 38% for the sample processed at a traverse speed of 85 mm/min as compared to that of the sample processed at 25 mm/min. The friction coefficient was found to substantiate well with the wear track morphology. The improvement in mechanical properties is ascertained to the refinement of grain size at higher traverse speed (due to less heat input). The FSPed samples showed inferior corrosion resistance in contrast to that of the base metal. This is possibly due to the coarsening of precipitates and depletion of solutes in the matrix. The morphology of the corroded samples corroborated well with the corrosion behavior of the corresponding specimen.

  6. Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructural Evolution, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Processed Al 7075 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Atul; Sharma, Sandan Kumar; Pal, Kaushik; Mula, Suhrit

    2017-02-01

    Aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of process parameters on microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of an age-hardenable Al 7075 alloy. The alloy plates (6 mm thickness) were friction stir processed (FSPed) at various traverse speed, namely 25, 45, 65, 85, 100 and 150 mm/min at 2 different rpm of 508 and 720. The optimized result in terms of defect-free processed zone with refined microstructure was obtained only at a rotational speed of 720 rpm for a traverse speed of 25, 45, 65 and 85 mm/min. The microstructural evolution was investigated using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The grain size of the nugget zone was found to decrease with increase in the traverse speed from 25 to 85 mm/min at a constant rpm of 720. The mechanical properties were evaluated by Vickers hardness measurements, tensile and wear testing. Yield strength was found to be the maximum ( 366 MPa) for the FSPed sample processed at 85 mm/min. The hardness values also followed the similar increasing trend with increase in the traverse speed. The wear volume loss decreased by 38% for the sample processed at a traverse speed of 85 mm/min as compared to that of the sample processed at 25 mm/min. The friction coefficient was found to substantiate well with the wear track morphology. The improvement in mechanical properties is ascertained to the refinement of grain size at higher traverse speed (due to less heat input). The FSPed samples showed inferior corrosion resistance in contrast to that of the base metal. This is possibly due to the coarsening of precipitates and depletion of solutes in the matrix. The morphology of the corroded samples corroborated well with the corrosion behavior of the corresponding specimen.

  7. EFFECTS OF FRICTION STIR PROCESSING ON MICROSTRUCTURAL, HARDNESS AND DAMPING CHARACTERISTICS OF FERRITIC NODULAR CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDULSALAM Y.OBAID

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations had been done in this study to explore the effects of friction stir processing (FSP on the microstructure, hardness and damping capacity of fully ferrite nodular cast iron ASTM A536, grade 65-45-12. The main process parameters employed in this study were the rotational speed, translational speed and axial applied load which were varied within selected ranges. Their influence to be analysed and optimized for best process conditions compared with as cast material. Detailed investigations were carried out using optical microscopy, hardness test and impact test. Results showed that graphite grain refinements of 2-3 times the original size and phase transformations of a fully ferritic to bainite/martensite were achieved within the processed zone and across thickness. Matrix modifications caused improvement in hardness of 3.5 times compared to hardness of original cast iron. Increment in the damping capacity up to 14% was achieved. The stated improvements were related to the process parameters employed in the test.

  8. Determination of time-varying contact length, friction force, torque and forces at the bearings in a helical gear system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Chinmaya; Mohanty, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with determining various time-varying parameters that are instrumental in introducing noise and vibration in a helical gear system. The most important parameter is the contact line variation, which subsequently induces friction force variation, frictional torque variation and variation in the forces at the bearings. The contact line variation will also give rise to gear mesh stiffness and damping variations. All these parameters are simulated for a defect-free and two defective cases of a helical gear system. The defective cases include one tooth missing and two teeth missing in the helical gear. The algorithm formulated in this paper is found to be simple and effective in determining the time-varying parameters.

  9. Microstructure, Hardness and Impact Toughness of Heat-Treated Nanodispersed Surface and Friction Stir-Processed Aluminum Alloy AA7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, M.; Elashery, A.; Toschi, S.; Ahmed, M. M. Z.; Morri, A.; El-Mahallawi, I.; Ceschini, L.

    2016-11-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is a recent surface engineering processing technique that is gaining wide recognition for manufacturing nanodispersed surface composites, which are of high specific strength, hardness and resistance to wear and corrosion. Herein, four-pass FSP was applied on aluminum alloy 7075 (AA7075-O) with and without the addition of alumina nanoparticles (Al2O3) of average size 40 nm. All FSP parameters were constant at 40 mm/min transverse speed, 500 rpm and tilt angle of 3°. FSP rotation direction was reversed every other pass. The friction stir-processed materials were sectioned and solution treated at 515 °C for 1.5 h, followed by age hardening at 120 °C for 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 h. The effect of heat treatment regimes on microstructure, hardness and toughness was examined, as well as the fracture mode. The new friction stir-processed surfaces without and with nanodispersion showed enhancement in the hardness of the surface of the AA7075-O material (65 HV) to almost a double (100 and 140 HV) after four-pass FSP (before heat treatment) without and with incorporating nanoalumina particles, respectively. After 48-h aging at 120 °C, a significant enhancement in impact toughness was achieved for both the friction stir-processed without and with nanodispersion (181 and 134 J, respectively), compared to the reference material AA7075 in T6 condition (104 J).

  10. Effect Of Process Parameters On Mechanical Properties Of Friction Stir.Welded Joint Of Two Similar &Dissimilar Al-Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umasankar Das,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is an advance joining process for different similar and dissimilar materials. It is commonly used for joining of Aluminum alloys. However it is necessary to overcome some challenges for its wide-spread uses. Tool design and the selection of process parameters are critical issues in the usage of this process. This study focuses on the process parameters that is required for producing effective friction stir welding of two similar aluminum alloys (AA6101T6 to AA6101T6 and dissimilar Aluminum alloys (AA6101T6 alloy to AA6351T6 . Three different tool diameters such as 20 mm, 25 mm and 30 mm with three different tool rotational speeds such as 600 rpm, 800 rpm and 1200 rpm have been used to weld the joints. The welded samples were tested for mechanical properties as well as microstructure. It was observed that 30 mm tool gives better weld quality for friction stir welding of similar aluminum alloy but 25 mm tool with 1200 rpm rotational speed gave satisfactory weld quality for friction stir welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys. It is one of the important welding process that can adopted for welding of aluminum alloys with excellent mechanical properties. The results were confirmed by further experiments.

  11. Fabrication of Surface Level Cu/SiCp Nanocomposites by Friction Stir Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cartigueyen Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP technique has been successfully employed as low energy consumption route to prepare copper based surface level nanocomposites reinforced with nanosized silicon carbide particles (SiCp. The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed, and tool tilt angle on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. Single pass FSP was performed based on Box-Behnken design at three factors in three levels. A cluster of blind holes 2 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth was used as particulate deposition technique in order to reduce the agglomeration problem during composite fabrication. K-type thermocouples were used to measure temperature histories during FSP. The results suggest that the heat generation during FSP plays a significant role in deciding the microstructure and microhardness of the surface composites. Microstructural observations revealed a uniform dispersion of nanosized SiCp without any agglomeration problem and well bonded with copper matrix at different process parameter combinations. X-ray diffraction study shows that no intermetallic compound was produced after processing. The microhardness of nanocomposites was remarkably enhanced and about 95% more than that of copper matrix.

  12. Microstructural and Mechanical Evolution of a Low Carbon Steel by Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekban, Dursun Murat; Aktarer, Semih Mahmut; Zhang, Hao; Xue, Peng; Ma, Zongyi; Purcek, Gencaga

    2017-08-01

    A low carbon steel (Grade A) was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP), and the effect of FSP on the microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated systematically. It was found that two distinct zones called stir zone (SZ) and heat-effected zone (HAZ) were formed during FSP. The SZ and HAZ consist mainly of ferrite, widmanstatten ferrite, ferrite+cementite aggregates, and martensite. FSP considerably refined the microstructure of the steel by means of dynamic recrystallization mechanism and formed a volumetric defect-free basin-like processed region. The ferritic grain size of the steel decreased from 25 µm in the coarse-grained state to about 3 µm in the fine-grained state, and the grains formed were separated mostly by high angle of misorientation with low density of dislocations. This microstructural evolution brought about a considerable increase in both hardness and strength values without a considerable decrease in ductility. Ultrafine-grained microstructure formed around and just beneath the pin increased the hardness of the steel from 140 Hv0.3 to about 245 Hv0.3. However, no hardness uniformity was formed throughout the processed zone due to the changes in deformation- and temperature-induced microstructure. Both yield and tensile strength values of processed zone increased from 256 and 435 MPa to about 334 and 525 MPa, respectively.

  13. Fabrication of Al/Graphite/Al2O3 Surface Hybrid Nano Composite by Friction Stir Processing and Investigating The Wear and Microstructural Properties of The Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mostafapour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing was applied for fabricating an aluminum alloy based hybrid nano composite reinforced with nano sized Al2O3 and micro sized graphite particles. A mixture of Al2O3 and graphite particles was packed into a groove with 1 mm width and 4.5 mm depth, which had been cut in 5083 aluminum plate of 10 mm thick. Packed groove was subjected to friction stir processing in order to implement powder mixture into the aluminum alloy matrix. Microstructural properties were investigated by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was found that reinforcement particle mixture was distributed uniformly in nugget zone. Wear resistance of composite was measured by dry sliding wear test. As a result, hybrid composite revealed significant reduction in wear rate in comparison with Al/AL2O3 composite produced by friction stir processing. Worn surface of the wear test samples were examined by SEM in order to determine wear mechanism.

  14. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Process Parameters of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamjidy, Mehran; Baharudin, B. T. Hang Tuah; Paslar, Shahla; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Sulaiman, Shamsuddin; Fadaeifard, Firouz

    2017-01-01

    The development of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has provided an alternative approach for producing high-quality welds, in a fast and reliable manner. This study focuses on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotational speed, tool traverse speed, tilt angle, and tool offset influence the mechanical properties of the friction stir welded joints significantly. A mathematical regression model is developed to determine the empirical relationship between the FSW process parameters and mechanical properties, and the results are validated. In order to obtain the optimal values of process parameters that simultaneously optimize the ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and minimum hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ), a metaheuristic, multi objective algorithm based on biogeography based optimization is proposed. The Pareto optimal frontiers for triple and dual objective functions are obtained and the best optimal solution is selected through using two different decision making techniques, technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) and Shannon’s entropy. PMID:28772893

  15. Friction Stir Processing of Al with Mechanically Alloyed Al-TiO2-Graphite Powder: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygi, R.; Mehrizi, M. Zarezadeh; Eisaabadi B, G.

    2017-02-01

    Commercial pure aluminum was friction stir processed with Al-TiO2-graphite mixture pre-placed into a groove in Al. Two kinds of powders were used as starting particles for friction stir processing; as-mixed powder and 60-h ball-milled powder. Characterization by XRD, SEM and EDS analysis showed that with as-mixed powder an Al composite reinforced with Al3Ti and Al2O3 was produced. Graphite particles were remained in the matrix unchanged. Using 60-h ball-milled powder as starting particle in friction stir processing, resulted in an Al composite reinforced with TiC-Al2O3 nanoparticles dispersed uniformly into the matrix having the size of 100 nm on average. In this state, the microhardness values obtained in the stir zone were higher than those ones obtained using as-mixed powders. The mechanism of phases formation during friction stir processing with two different kinds of powders are elaborated and discussed in this study. Also the mechanical properties of samples were investigated.

  16. Tribology of o/w emulsions under mouth-like conditions: determinants of friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dresselhuis, D.M.; Klok, H.J.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Vries, de R.J.; Aken, van G.A.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Fat-perception is thought to be related to a complex interplay between fat-associated flavor release and mouth-feel. Friction sensed between the tongue and the palate seems to play a prominent role: in previous work, we have shown that emulsions that are more sensitive toward coalescence give rise

  17. Determining the friction factors for underground colliery bord and pillar workings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyer, CF

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available This project was mainly proposed to make available, to the coal mining industry a set of default friction values that could be used with more confidence in network simulation programs, during the project use was made of both underground...

  18. Tribology of o/w emulsions under mouth-like conditions: determinants of friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dresselhuis, D.M.; Klok, H.J.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Vries, de R.J.; Aken, van G.A.; Jongh, de H.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Fat-perception is thought to be related to a complex interplay between fat-associated flavor release and mouth-feel. Friction sensed between the tongue and the palate seems to play a prominent role: in previous work, we have shown that emulsions that are more sensitive toward coalescence give rise t

  19. A method for the determination of the coefficient of rolling friction using cycloidal pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciornei, M. C.; Alaci, S.; Ciornei, F. C.; Romanu, I. C.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a method for experimental finding of coefficient of rolling friction appropriate for biomedical applications based on the theory of cycloidal pendulum. When a mobile circle rolls over a fixed straight line, the points from the circle describe trajectories called normal cycloids. To materialize this model, it is sufficient that a small region from boundary surfaces of a moving rigid body is spherical. Assuming pure rolling motion, the equation of motion of the cycloidal pendulum is obtained - an ordinary nonlinear differential equation. The experimental device is composed by two interconnected balls rolling over the material to be studied. The inertial characteristics of the pendulum can be adjusted via weights placed on a rod. A laser spot oscillates together to the pendulum and provides the amplitude of oscillations. After finding the experimental parameters necessary in differential equation of motion, it can be integrated using the Runge-Kutta of fourth order method. The equation was integrated for several materials and found values of rolling friction coefficients. Two main conclusions are drawn: the coefficient of rolling friction influenced significantly the amplitude of oscillation but the effect upon the period of oscillation is practically imperceptible. A methodology is proposed for finding the rolling friction coefficient and the pure rolling condition is verified.

  20. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Yavari, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-06-01

    An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite-element analysis is combined with thermo-mechanical material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel to develop a linear friction welding (LFW) process model for this material. The main effort was directed toward developing reliable material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 and toward improving functional relations and parameterization of the workpiece/workpiece contact-interaction models. The LFW process model is then used to predict thermo-mechanical response of Carpenter Custom 465 during LFW. Specifically, temporal evolutions and spatial distribution of temperature within, and expulsion of the workpiece material from, the weld region are examined as a function of the basic LFW process parameters, i.e., (a) contact-pressure history, (b) reciprocation frequency, and (c) reciprocation amplitude. Examination of the results obtained clearly revealed the presence of three zones within the weld, i.e., (a) Contact-interface region, (b) Thermo-mechanically affected zone, and (c) heat-affected zone. While there are no publicly available reports related to Carpenter Custom 465 LFW behavior, to allow an experiment/computation comparison, these findings are consistent with the results of our ongoing companion experimental investigation.

  1. Functionally Graded Aluminum Foam Fabricated by Friction Powder Sintering Process with Traversing Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Morita, Tomoaki; Koyama, Shinji; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Functionally graded aluminum foam (FG Al foam) is a new class of Al foam in which the pore structure varies over the foam, resulting in corresponding variations in the mechanical properties of the foam. In this study, FG Al foam plates were fabricated by a friction powder sintering (FPS) process with a traversing tool that is based on a previously developed sintering and dissolution process. The variation of the mechanical properties was realized by setting the volume fraction φ of NaCl in the mixture to 60, 70, and 80%. Long FG Al foam plates were fabricated with a length equal to the tool traversing length with φ varying in the tool traversing direction. From x-ray computed tomography observation, it was shown that the density of the Al foam decreased with increasing φ. In contrast, almost uniform pore structures were obtained in each area. According to the results of compression tests on each area, the plateau stress and energy absorption tended to decrease with increasing φ. Therefore, it was shown that FG Al foam plates with varying mechanical properties can be fabricated by the FPS process with the traversing tool.

  2. X-ray Microtomography Analysis of the Aluminum Alloy Composite Reinforced by SiC After Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicka, Anna; Mroczka, Krzysztof; Kurtyka, Paweł; Binkowski, Marcin; Wróbel, Zygmunt

    2014-09-01

    Despite many years of using friction stir processing (FSP), there are many unexplained aspects concerning the processes which appear during FSP: determining the direction of flow and mixing of the materials and the degree of mixing and microstructure fragmentation in specific areas. This paper presents the impact of FSP on the micro- and macrostructure of the composite with hypo-eutectic Si matrix reinforced by SiC particles. The analysis of the structure of the processed area in FSP in the relation to the microstructure of the base material has been made using x-ray microtomography. The results of these studies have been juxtaposed with studies using microscopic methods (light microscopy and SEM). The microtomography images revealed an additional separation on the advancing side and the weld nugget, where on the basis of a 3D reconstruction a layer microstructure on the direction of linear movement of the tool has been demonstrated. The analyses have revealed a limited flow of the material above the weld nugget. The main advantages of the research method applied were the possibility to show the invisible or barely visible elements of the microstructure using standard test methods and the ability to analyze the microstructure changes uninterruptedly in different directions in the volume of the material.

  3. Development of quartz particulate reinforced AA6063 aluminum matrix composites via friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Joyson Abraham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP has been accepted as a potential method to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs without the drawbacks of liquid metallurgy methods. The present work focuses on the development of AMCs reinforced with quartz (SiO2 particles using FSP. Grooves with various dimensions were machined on AA6063 plates and compacted with quartz particles. A single pass FSP was carried out using a combination of optimized process parameters. The volume fraction of quartz particles in the AMCs was varied from 0 to 18 vol.% in steps of 6 vol.%. The developed AA6063/Quartz AMCs were characterized using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The quartz particles were distributed uniformly in the aluminum matrix irrespective of the location within the stir zone. The grains of the AA6063 were extensively refined by the combination of thermomechanical effect of FSP and the pinning effect of quartz particles. The dispersion of the quartz particles improved the microhardness and wear resistance of the AMCs. The role of quartz particles on the worn surface and wear debris is reported.

  4. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  5. Development of Fatigue Life Improvement Technology of Butt Joints Using Friction Stir Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ung Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Burr grinding, tungsten inert gas (TIG dressing, ultrasonic impact treatment, and peening are used to improve fatigue life in steel structures. These methods improve the fatigue life of weld joints by hardening the weld toe, improving the bead shape, or causing compressive residual stress. This study proposes a new postweld treatment method improving the weld bead shape and metal structure at the welding zone using friction stir processing (FSP to enhance fatigue life. For that, a pin-shaped tool and processing condition employing FSP has been established through experiment. Experimental results revealed that fatigue life improves by around 42% compared to as-welded fatigue specimens by reducing the stress concentration at the weld toe and generating a metal structure finer than that of flux-cored arc welding (FCAW. Hot-spot stress, structural stress, and simplified calculation methods cannot predict the accurate stress at the weld toe in case the weld toe has a smooth curvature as in the case of the FSP specimen. On the contrary, a finite element calculation could reasonably predict the stress concentration factor for the FSP specimen because it considers not only the bead profile but also the weld toe profile.

  6. Multi-Track Friction Stir Lap Welding of 2024 Aluminum Alloy: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengke Zou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir lap welding (FSLW raises the possibility of fabricating high-performance aluminum components at low cost and high efficiency. In this study, we mainly applied FSLW to fabricate multi-track 2024 aluminum alloy without using tool tilt angle, which is important for obtaining defect-free joint but significantly increases equipment cost. Firstly, systematic single-track FSLW experiments were conducted to attain appropriate processing parameters, and we found that defect-free single-track could also be obtained by the application of two-pass processing at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm and a traverse speed of 300 mm/min. Then, multi-track FSLW experiments were conducted and full density multi-track samples were fabricated at an overlapping rate of 20%. Finally, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the full density multi-track samples were investigated. The results indicated that ultrafine equiaxed grains with the grain diameter about 9.4 μm could be obtained in FSLW samples due to the dynamic recrystallization during FSLW, which leads to a yield strength of 117.2 MPa (17.55% higher than the rolled 2024-O alloy substrate and an elongation rate of 31.05% (113.84% higher than the substrate.

  7. Microstructure and microhardness of AA1050/TiC surface composite fabricated using friction stir processing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Thangarasu; N Murugan; I Dinaharan; S J Vijay

    2012-10-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) has been developed by several researchersto produce an upper surface modification of metallic materials. The fabrication of TiC particulate $(\\sim 2 \\mu m)$ reinforced aluminum matrix composite (AMC) using FSP is studied in this paper. The measured content of TiC powders were compacted into a groove of 0.5 mm × 5.5 mm. A single pass FSP was carried out using a tool rotational speed of 1600 rpm, processing speed of 60 mm/min and axial force of 10 kN. A tool made of HCHCr steel, oil hardened to 62 HRC, having a cylindrical profile was used in this study. The microstructure and microhardness of the fabricated AMC were analysed. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs revealed a uniform distribution of TiC particles which were well-bonded to the matrix alloy. The hardness of the AMC increased by 45% higher than that of the matrix alloy.

  8. Microstructural characteristics and effects of TC4 titanium alloy processed by using friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo LI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding technique is used for the processing of TC4 titanium alloy under protective atmosphere, and it results with good formability. The research focues on the evolution mechanisms of α+β dual phase microstructure in stirred zone and the effects of processing parameters on structures hardness. The results show that with optimized technological parameters, stir zone structure experiences the α/β transformation, and finally changes to the α+β duplex structure which is based on the β phase. After mixing head leaves and the structure cools, the precipitated lamellar α phase is among and/or within-regions. Grain refining of α+β dual phase is obvious. The shortened α/β lamellar spacing distance may improve the strengthening effect of the α+β duplex phase and enhance the hardness of the stir zone. The increasing of the tool rotation speed could coarsen β-regions, while the increasing of the travel speed could help reduce the α phase ratio and generate needle-type Martensites.

  9. Generated forces and heat during the critical stages of friction stir welding and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Sadiq Aziz; Tahir, Abd Salam Md; Izamshah, R. [University Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Malacca (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    The solid-state behavior of friction stir welding process results in violent mechanical forces that should be mitigated, if not eliminated. Plunging and dwell time are the two critical stages of this welding process in terms of the generated forces and the related heat. In this study, several combinations of pre-decided penetration speeds, rotational speeds, tool designs, and dwell time periods were used to investigate these two critical stages. Moreover, a coupled-field thermal-structural finite element model was developed to validate the experimental results and the induced stresses. The experimental results revealed the relatively large changes in force and temperature during the first two stages compared with those during the translational tool movement stage. An important procedure to mitigate the undesired forces was then suggested. The model prediction of temperature values and their distribution were in good agreement with the experimental prediction. Therefore, the thermal history of this non-uniform heat distribution was used to estimate the induced thermal stresses. Despite the 37% increase in these stresses when 40 s dwell time was used instead of 5 s, these stresses showed no effect on the axial force values because of the soft material incidence and stir effects.

  10. Friction stir welding of AZ31 magnesium alloys processed by equal channel angular pressing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bing; YUAN Shouqian; WANG Xunhong

    2008-01-01

    Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) is an effective thermo-mechanical process to make ultrafine grains.An investigation was carried out on the friction stir welding (FSW) of ECAPed AZ31 magnesium alloys with a thickness of 15 mm.For different process parameters,the optimum FSW conditions of ECAPed AZ31 magnesium alloys were examined.The basic characterization of weld formation and the mechanical properties of the joints were discussed.The results show that the effect of welding parameters on welding quality was evident and welding quality was sensitive to welding speed.Sound joints could be obtained when the welding speed was 37.5 mm/min and the rotation speed of the stir tool was 750 r/min.The maximum tensile strength (270 MPa) of FSW was 91% that of the base materials.The value of microhardness varied between advancing side and retreating side because of the speed field near the pin of the stir tool,which weakened the deformed stress field.The value of microhardness of the welding zone was lower than that of the base materials.The maximum value was located near the heat-affected zone (HAZ).Remarkable ductile character was observed from the fracture morphologies of welded joints.

  11. Microstructural modification of as-cast Al-Si-Mg alloy by friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z. Y.; Sharma, S. R.; Mishra, R. S.

    2006-11-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) has been applied to cast aluminum alloy A356 plates to enhance the mechanical properties through microstructural refinement and homogenization. The effect of tool geometry and FSP parameters on resultant microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated. The FSP broke up and dispersed the coarse acicular Si particles creating a uniform distribution of Si particles in the aluminum matrix with significant microstructural refinement. Further, FSP healed the casting porosity. These microstructural changes led to a significant improvement in both strength and ductility. Higher tool rotation rate was the most effective parameter to refine coarse Si particles, heal the casting porosity, and consequently increase strength. The effect of tool geometry was complicated and no systematic trend was observed. For a standard pin design, maximum strength was achieved at a tool rotation rate of 900 rpm and traverse speed of 203 mm/min. Post-FSP aging increased strength for materials processed at higher tool rotation rates of 700 to 1100 rpm, but exerted only a marginal effect on samples prepared at the lower rotation rate of 300 rpm. Two-pass FSP with 100 pct overlapping passes resulted in higher strength for both as-FSP and post-FSP aged conditions.

  12. Use of the quartz crystal microbalance to determine the monomeric friction coefficient of polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Mary M.

    1995-01-01

    When a thin film of polymer is coated on to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the QCM can be used to detect the rate of increase in weight of the polymer film as the volatile penetrant diffuses into the polymer. From this rate information the diffusion coefficient of the penetrant into the polymer can be computed. Calculations requiring this diffusion coefficient lead to values which approximate the monomeric friction coefficient of the polymer. This project has been concerned with the trial of crystal oscillating circuits suitable for driving polymer coated crystals in an atmosphere of penetrant. For these studies done at room temperature, natural rubber was used as an easily applied polymer that is readily penetrated by toluene vapors, qualities anticipated with polyimides when they are tested at T(g) in the presence of toluene. Three quartz crystal oscillator circuits were tested. The simplest circuit used +/- 5 volt dc and had a transistor to transistor logic (TTL) inverter chip that provides a 180 deg phase shift via a feed back loop. This oscillator circuit was stable but would not drive the crystal when the crystal was coated with polymer and subjected to toluene vapors. Removal of a variable resistor from this circuit increased stability but did not otherwise increase performance. Another driver circuit tested contained a two stage differential input, differential output, wide band video amplifier and also contain a feed back loop. The circuit voltage could not be varied and operated at +/- 5 volts dc; this circuit was also stable but failed to oscillate the polymer coated crystal in an atmosphere saturated with toluene vapors. The third oscillator circuit was of similar construction and relied on the same video amplifier but allowed operation with variable voltage. This circuit would drive the crystal when the crystal was submerged in liquid toluene and when the crystal was coated with polymer and immersed in toluene vapors. The frequency readings

  13. Optimization of process parameters for friction stir processing (FSP) of Al–TiC in situ composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjit Bauri

    2014-05-01

    Segregation of in situ formed particles at the grain boundaries is a major drawback of in situ composites. In this study, it has been demonstrated that friction stir processing (FSP) can be used as an effective tool to homogenize the particle distribution in Al based in situ composites and FSP processing parameters were optimized for this purpose. An Al-5 wt% TiC composite was processed in situ using K2TiF6 and graphite in Al melt and subjected to FSP. Processing parameters for FSP were optimized to get a defect free stir zone and homogenize the particle distribution. It was found that a rotation speed > 800 rpm is needed. A rotation speed of 1000 rpm and a traverse speed of 60 mm/min were found to be an optimum combination. The grain size was also refined in addition to homogenization of the as-cast microstructure. This resulted in significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the processed composite.

  14. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  15. Synthesize of AZ31/TiC magnesium matrix composites using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Balakrishnan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP is a novel solid state technique to synthesize metal matrix composites. In the present work, an attempt has been made to synthesize AZ31/TiC magnesium matrix composites using FSP and to analyze the microstructure using scanning electron microscopy. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick AZ31 magnesium alloy plates and compacted with TiC particles. The width of the groove was varied to result in four different volume fraction of TiC particles (0, 6, 12 and 18 vol.%. A single pass FSP was carried out using a tool rotational speed of 1200 rpm, traverse speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to study the microstructure of the synthesized composites. The results indicated that TiC particles were distributed uniformly in the magnesium matrix without the formation of clusters. There was no interfacial reaction between the magnesium matrix and the TiC particle. TiC particles were properly bonded to the magnesium matrix.

  16. Processing and Optimization of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding of AA 2219 and AA 7039 Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, D.; Nageswara rao, P.; Mahapatra, M. M.; Harsha, S. P.; Mandal, N. R.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper discusses the optimization of dissimilar friction stir welding of AA 2219 and AA 7039 alloys with respect to tool design issues including microstructural study of weld. The optimized ultimate tensile strength was ~280 MPa, and % elongation was ~11.5. It was observed that the extent of tool shoulder flat surface and tool rotational speed influenced the weld quality significantly. A mathematical model was also developed using response surface regression analysis to predict the effects of tool geometry and process variables on dissimilar AA 2219 and AA 7039 alloys welds. The microstructure evolution and mechanical properties were investigated by employing electron backscatter diffraction technique, Vickers microhardness, and tensile testing, respectively. The microstructural observations indicated that the grain size obtained at advancing side (AA 2219 alloy side) was much finer compared to the retreating side (AA 7039 alloy side). Hardness distribution in the stir zone was inhomogeneous, which might be due to inadequate mixing of weld zone material. The hardness values observed at the weld zone were lower than that in the base materials.

  17. Wear Behavior of Aluminum Matrix Hybrid Composites Fabricated through Friction Stir Welding Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Halil Ibrahim KURT; Murat ODUNCUOGLU; Ramazan ASMATULU

    2016-01-01

    Effects of friction stir processing (FSP)parameters and reinforcements on the wear behavior of 6061-T6 based hybrid composites were investigated.A mathematical formulation was derived to calculate the wear volume loss of the composites.The experimental results were contrasted with the results of the proposed model.The influ-ences of sliding distance,tool traverse and rotational speeds,as well as graphite (Gr)and titanium carbide (TiC) volume fractions on the wear volume loss of the composites were also investigated using the prepared formulation. The results demonstrated that the wear volume loss of the composites significantly increased with increasing sliding distance,tool traverse speed,and rotational speed;while the wear volume loss decreased with increasing volume fraction of the reinforcements.A minimum wear volume loss for the hybrid composites with complex reinforcements was specified at the inclusion ratio of 50% TiC+50% Al2 O3 because of improved lubricant ability,as well as resist-ance to brittleness and wear.New possibilities to develop wear-resistant aluminum-based composites for different in-dustrial applications were proposed.

  18. Temperature distribution study during the friction stir welding process of Al2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Y. H.; Hussain, A.; Lalwani, R. K.; Chan, H. K.; Hakimi, N.

    2013-08-01

    Heat flux characteristics are critical to good quality welding obtained in the important engineering alloy Al2024-T3 by the friction stir welding (FSW) process. In the present study, thermocouples in three different configurations were affixed on the welding samples to measure the temperatures: in the first configuration, four thermocouples were placed at equivalent positions along one side of the welding direction; the second configuration involved two equivalent thermocouple locations on either side of the welding path; while the third configuration had all the thermocouples on one side of the layout but with unequal gaps from the welding line. A three-dimensional, non-linear ANSYS computational model, based on an approach applied to Al2024-T3 for the first time, was used to simulate the welding temperature profiles obtained experimentally. The experimental thermal profiles on the whole were found to be in agreement with those calculated by the ANSYS model. The broad agreement between the two kinds of profiles validates the basis for derivation of the simulation model and provides an approach for the FSW simulation in Al2024-T3 and is potentially more useful than models derived previously.

  19. Application of laser ultrasonic method for on-line monitoring of friction stir spot welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua

    2015-09-01

    Application of a laser ultrasonic method is developed for on-line monitoring of the friction stir spot welding (FSSW) process. Based on the technology of FSSW, laser-generated ultrasonic waves in a good weld and nonweld area are simulated by a finite element method. The reflected and transmitted waves are analyzed to disclose the properties of the welded interface. The noncontact-laser ultrasonic-inspection system was established to verify the numerical results. The reflected waves in the good-weld and nonweld area can be distinguished by time-of-flight. The transmitted waves evidently attenuate in the nonweld area in contrast to signal amplitude in the good weld area because of interfacial impedance difference. Laser ultrasonic C-scan images can sufficiently evaluate the intrinsic character of the weld area in comparison with traditional water-immersion ultrasonic testing results. The research results confirm that laser ultrasonics would be an effective method to realize the characterization of FSSW defects.

  20. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  1. Physical Simulation of Deformation and Microstructure Evolution During Friction Stir Processing of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, S. S.; Livingston, J.; Lippold, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    The feasibility of using high-strain rate (1.475 to 3.942 s-1) hot-torsion testing with a Gleeble® thermomechanical simulator was demonstrated for simulating microstructures consistent with friction stir processing (FSP) of Ti-6Al-4V. The tests were performed on α/β-processed base material at temperatures both above and below the β-transus. Various phenomena including the refinement of α- and β-grains, deformation-induced heating, and deformation instabilities were observed. These tests reproduced the range of microstructures that are observed under FSP processing conditions. The testing methodology can be used for generating constitutive material property equations relevant to computational FSP/friction stir welding models.

  2. Effect of Nano-Particle Addition on Grain Structure Evolution of Friction Stir-Processed Al 6061 During Postweld Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junfeng; Lee, Bing Yang; Du, Zhenglin; Bi, Guijun; Tan, Ming Jen; Wei, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of nano-composites is challenging because uniform dispersion of nano-sized reinforcements in metallic substrate is difficult to achieve using powder metallurgy or liquid processing methods. In the present study, Al-based nano-composites reinforced with Al2O3 particles have been successfully fabricated using friction stir processing. The effects of nano-Al2O3 particle addition on grain structure evolution of friction stir-processed Al matrix during post-weld annealing were investigated. It was revealed that the pinning effect of Al2O3 particles retarded grain growth and completely prevented abnormal grain growth during postweld annealing at 470°C. However, abnormal grain growth can still occur when the composite material was annealed at 530°C. The mechanism involved in the grain structure evolution and the effect of nano-sized particle addition on the mechanical properties were discussed therein.

  3. A study of the friction stir welding process by experimental investigation and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tianzhong

    2005-12-01

    In this study, 2-D and 3-D models based on a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (FLUENT) and suitable user defined viscosity law are used to capture many of the trends observed in FSW. The fully thermo-mechanically coupled 2 D CFD model can run in a few hours on a PC based system. The low computational cost for 2-D model enables rapid assessment of the effects of various material properties and the criticality of inclusion or exclusion of some property details. The effects of varying material properties and process parameters, on the trends in x-axis forces and potential weld defect formation (via material flow pattern) are studied and compared with the experimental observations. It was found that the minimum x-force that occurs in the median RPM range is strongly influenced by the cutoff temperature in the viscosity law. The bifurcation of material flow in the weld path also occurs when the maximum temperature ahead of the pin surpasses the cutoff temperature. Aluminum alloys AA2219, AA5083, AA6061, and AA7050 were welded using constant welding speed and linearly increased RPM. The grain sizes in the welds were measured and the applied torque and x-force during friction stir welding process were recorded. The correlations of the grain size, the applied torque and x-force were studied using simulation and the experimental methods. The 2D and 3D CFD model simulation results compare well with experimental measurements. Based on the 2D model results, the material's simulated thermo-mechanical history was also studied. The model predicts that the material in the weld region experiences a high temperature after the deformation is complete. This thermo-mechanical history indicates that metallurgical transformations may continue after the end of deformation and that the grain size in the weld cannot be adequately described using a Zener-Holloman parameter approach or by invoking the continuous dynamic recrystallization process.

  4. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  5. Influence of Stored Strain on Fabricating of Al/SiC Nanocomposite by Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, M. Sarkari; Kazeminezhad, M.; Kokabi, A. H.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, 1050 aluminum (Al) sheets were annealed and severely deformed by 1, 2, and 3 passes of constrained groove pressing process to obtain the various initial stored strain values of 0, 1.16, 2.32, and 3.48, respectively. Friction stir processing (FSP) was then applied using SiC nanoparticles to fabricate Al/SiC nanocomposite with approximately 1.5 vol pct reinforced particles. Microstructural examinations revealed that an increase in the initial stored strain of the base metal led to the formation of finer grain structure after 1 pass of FSP. The finer grain structure occurred in the stir zone where a sufficient amount of nanoparticles with a relatively proper distribution existed. However, the initial stored strain value had a contrary influence in the regions with low volume fraction of nanoparticles. In fact, more stored strain in the base metal provided more driving force for both nucleation and grain growth of newly recrystallized grains at the stir zone. Pinning effect of well-distributed nanoparticles could effectively retard grain growth leading to the formation of very fine grain structure. Also it was observed that the initial stored strain values did not have impressive rule in the microstructural evolutions at the stir zone during the second and third FSP passes signifying that all of the stored energy in the base metal would be released after 1 pass of FSP. The results obtained with microhardness measurement at the stir zone were fairly in agreement with those achieved by the microstructure assessments.

  6. Hot deformation behavior of an aluminum-matrix hybrid nanocomposite fabricated by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Simchi, A., E-mail: simchi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-25

    A fine-grained aluminum-matrix hybrid nanocomposite reinforced with TiO{sub 2}, MgO and Al{sub 3}Ti nanoparticles was prepared via reactive friction stir processing (FSP) of an Al–Mg sheet with pre-placed TiO{sub 2} particles (50 nm; 3.1 vol%). The microstructure of the hybrid nanocomposite comprises high-angle grain boundaries (~90%) with an average size of 2 µm and hard inclusions with sizes in the range of 30–50 nm. Evaluation of the hot deformation behavior of the nanocomposite by uniaxial tensile testing at different temperatures (300–450 °C) and strain rates (0.001–0.1 s{sup −1}) shows that the deformation apparent activation energy of the nanocomposite is 137 kJ mol{sup −1} at ≤300 °C. The values of the activation energy for the Al–Mg alloy before and after FSP at this temperature range are about 105 and 135 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. This observation highlights the role of ultrafine hard particles and the structural changes induced by FSP on the deformation process. At the higher temperatures, the deformation activation energy for the aluminum alloy without and with the reinforcing particles is 303 and 456 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. Detailed microstructural analysis by electron back scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy suggests that dynamic recrystallization is responsible for the deformation behavior at the elevated temperatures. Meanwhile, the presence of the hard nanoparticles operates as a grain growth inhibitor improving the thermal stability of the fine-grained aluminum alloy.

  7. Artificial neural network modeling studies to predict the friction welding process parameters of Incoloy 800H joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Anand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on friction welding process parameter optimization using a hybrid technique of ANN and different optimization algorithms. This optimization techniques are not only for the effective process modelling, but also to illustrate the correlation between the input and output responses of the friction welding of Incoloy 800H. In addition the focus is also to obtain optimal strength and hardness of joints with minimum burn off length. ANN based approaches could model this welding process of INCOLOY 800H in both forward and reverse directions efficiently, which are required for the automation of the same. Five different training algorithms were used to train ANN for both forward and reverse mapping and ANN tuned force approach was used for optimization. The paper makes a robust comparison of the performances of the five algorithms employing standard statistical indices. The results showed that GANN with 4-9-3 for forward and 4-7-3 for reverse mapping arrangement could outperform the other four approaches in most of the cases but not in all. Experiments on tensile strength (TS, microhardness (H and burn off length (BOL of the joints were performed with optimised parameter. It is concluded that this ANN model with genetic algorithm may provide good ability to predict the friction welding process parameters to weld Incoloy 800H.

  8. Effect of Friction Stir Processing on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ91C Magnesium Cast Alloy Weld Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Behzad; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Enayati, Mohammad Hossein; Sabooni, Soheil; Vallant, Rudolf

    2016-07-01

    In this study, friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to the GTAW (TIG)-welded AZ91C cast alloy to refine the microstructure and optimize the mechanical properties of the weld zone. Microstructural investigation of the samples was performed by optical microscopy and the phases in the microstructure were determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructural evaluations showed that FSP destroys the coarse dendritic microstructure. Furthermore, it dissolves the secondary hard and brittle β-Mg17Al12 phase existing at grain boundaries of the TIG weld zone. The closure and decrease in amount of porosities along with the elimination of the cracks in the microstructure were observed. These changes were followed by a significant grain refinement to an average value of 11 µm. The results showed that the hardness values increased to the mean ones, respectively, for as-cast (63 Hv), TIG weld zone (67 Hv), and stir zone (79 Hv). The yield and ultimate strength were significantly enhanced after FSP. The fractography evaluations, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicated to a transition from brittle to ductile fracture surface after applying FSP to the TIG weld zone.

  9. Enhancement of wear and ballistic resistance of armour grade AA7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I. SUDHAKAR; V. MADHU; G. MADHUSUDHAN REDDY; K. SRINIVASA RAO

    2015-01-01

    Industrial applications of aluminium and its alloys are restricted because of their poor tribological properties. Thermal spraying, laser surfacing, electron beam welding are the most widely used techniques to alter the surface morphology of base metal. Preliminary studies reveal that the coating and layering of aluminium alloys with ceramic particles enhance the ballistic resistance. Furthermore, among aluminium alloys, 7075 aluminium alloy exhibits high strength which can be compared to that of steels and has profound applications in the designing of lightweight fortification structures and integrated protection systems. Having limitations such as poor bond integrity, formation of detrimental phases and interfacial reaction between reinforcement and substrate using fusion route to deposit hard particles paves the way to adopt friction stir processing for fabricating surface composites using different sizes of boron carbide particles as reinforcement on armour grade 7075 aluminium alloy as matrix in the present investigation. Wear and ballistic tests were carried out to assess the performance of friction stir processed AA7075 alloy. Significant improvement in wear resistance of friction stir processed surface composites is attributed to the change in wear mechanism from abrasion to adhesion. It has also been observed that the surface metal matrix composites have shown better ballistic resistance compared to the substrate AA7075 alloy. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 has reduced the depth of penetration of the projectile to half that of base metal AA7075 alloy. For the first time, the friction stir processing technique was successfully used to improve the wear and ballistic resistances of armour grade high strength AA7075 alloy.

  10. Enhancement of wear and ballistic resistance of armour grade AA7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sudhakar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial applications of aluminium and its alloys are restricted because of their poor tribological properties. Thermal spraying, laser surfacing, electron beam welding are the most widely used techniques to alter the surface morphology of base metal. Preliminary studies reveal that the coating and layering of aluminium alloys with ceramic particles enhance the ballistic resistance. Furthermore, among aluminium alloys, 7075 aluminium alloy exhibits high strength which can be compared to that of steels and has profound applications in the designing of lightweight fortification structures and integrated protection systems. Having limitations such as poor bond integrity, formation of detrimental phases and interfacial reaction between reinforcement and substrate using fusion route to deposit hard particles paves the way to adopt friction stir processing for fabricating surface composites using different sizes of boron carbide particles as reinforcement on armour grade 7075 aluminium alloy as matrix in the present investigation. Wear and ballistic tests were carried out to assess the performance of friction stir processed AA7075 alloy. Significant improvement in wear resistance of friction stir processed surface composites is attributed to the change in wear mechanism from abrasion to adhesion. It has also been observed that the surface metal matrix composites have shown better ballistic resistance compared to the substrate AA7075 alloy. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 has reduced the depth of penetration of the projectile to half that of base metal AA7075 alloy. For the first time, the friction stir processing technique was successfully used to improve the wear and ballistic resistances of armour grade high strength AA7075 alloy.

  11. Torsional friction damper optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shaochun; Williams, Keith A.

    2006-06-01

    A new approach for the analysis of friction dampers is presented in this work. The exact form of the steady-state solution for a friction damper implemented on a primary system is developed and numerical solutions are used to determine the optimum friction in a friction damper applied to a specific primary system. When compared to classical results presented by earlier authors, the new approach provides a more optimal solution. In addition, viscous damping in the primary system may be included with the new analysis approach. The ability to optimize a friction damper when viscous damping is included in the primary system is a significant improvement over earlier methods and shows potential for serving as a guide to realizing a more accurate estimate of the optimal damping for friction dampers.

  12. Fabrication of Al5083/B4C surface composite by friction stir processing and its tribological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Yuvaraj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Improved surface properties with the retainment of bulk properties are necessary for a component for enhanced wear characteristics. Friction stir processing (FSP is used to produce such surface composites. Fabrication of 5083 aluminum alloy with reinforced layers of boron carbide (B4C through FSP was carried out. Micro and nano sized B4C particles were used as reinforcements. The friction processed surface composite layer was analyzed through optical and scanning electron microscopical studies. The number of passes and the size of reinforcement play a vital role in the development of surface composites by FSP. Mechanical properties of the friction stir processed surface composites were evaluated through micro hardness and universal tensile tests. The results were compared with the properties of the base metal. The role of reinforcement and number of passes on properties were also evaluated. Tribological performance of the surface composites is tested through pin on disk test. The surface composite layer resulted in three passes with nano particle reinforcement exhibited better properties in hardness, tensile behavior and wear resistance compared to the behavior of the base metal.

  13. Insights on frictional processes in sheared clastic marine sediments using ultrasonic nondestructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; Marone, C.; Ikari, M.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate changes in the elastic properties of deforming core materials recovered from the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism along the IODP NanTroSEIZE transect. We shear clastic marine sediments while simultaneously making ultrasonic velocity measurements across the deforming layers. Examining the resulting changes in elastic moduli at the laboratory scale allows us to identify characteristic “fingerprints” of deformation style during direct-shear experiments, which may then be compared with measurements conducted at the field scale to infer how deformation is localized within the accretionary prism. Identifying relationships between hold time and attenuation may also shed light on fault healing mechanisms taking place immediately following a rupture. Together the effects of sliding rate and hold time on elastic moduli provide us with new ways of constraining the mechanical behavior of large plat-boundary settings throughout the seismic cycle. We tested intact core material, remolded layers, and disaggregated granular powders derived from a range of depths from IODP sites C0007 and C0004 penetrating the frontal thrust and a large out-of-sequence thrust in the outer prism, respectively. Samples were deformed in a double-direct shear configuration, varying first the strain rate and then subjecting the gouge layer to a series of slides and holds of increasing duration. Elastic wave propagation depends on micromechanical interactions and gouge layer strength, so as the shear zone evolves changes in elastic wavespeed provide a means to interrogate strain materials non-destructively, providing insight into frictional processes and mechanics as that deformation is taking place. Our results suggest that there are characteristic changes in P and S-wave velocity and attenuation for marine clastic to hemipelagic sediments as a function of sliding rate and hold time. Ultimately, examining variation in elastic moduli during a simulated seismic cycle may provide insight

  14. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  15. Collisonal Friction Enhanced by Two-Stream Instabilities Determines the Bohm Criterion in Plasmas With Multiple Ion Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, S. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Ion-ion streaming instabilities are excited in the presheath region of plasmas with multiple ion species if the ions are much colder than the electrons. Streaming instabilities onset when the relative fluid flow between ion species exceeds a critical speed, δVc, of order the ion thermal speeds. Using a generalized Lenard-Balescu theory that accounts for instability-enhanced collective responses [1], one is able to show the instabilities rapidly (within a few Debye lengths) enhance the collisional friction between ion species far beyond the contribution from Coulomb collisions alone. This strong frictional force determines the relative fluid speed between species. When this condition is combined with the Bohm criterion generalized for multiple ion species, the fluid speed of each ion species is determined at the sheath edge. For each species, this speed differs from the common ``system'' sound speed by a factor that depends on the species concentration and δVc.[4pt] [1] S.D. Baalrud, J.D. Callen, and C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 15, 092111 (2008).

  16. Features of the microstructure development under conditions, reproducing the process of friction stir welding. Molecular-dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikonov, Anton Yu., E-mail: anickonoff@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: dmitr@ispms.tsc.ru; Dmitriev, Andrey I., E-mail: anickonoff@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: dmitr@ispms.tsc.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050, Russia and Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Kolubaev, Evgeniy A., E-mail: eak@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rvy@ispms.tsc.ru; Rubtsov, Valeriy E., E-mail: eak@ispms.tsc.ru, E-mail: rvy@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    Friction stir welding is a recently developed technology which is used in various branches of modern engineering. The basis of this technology is the friction of the rotating cylindrical or specially shaped tool between two metal plates brought together either to meet their ends of one above another with the overlap. When applying the FSW process in various economical sectors, the important task is to study the mechanisms and identify the physical laws and factors leading to formation of structural inhomogeneities and discontinuities in the weld seam. This paper analyzes the basic mechanisms behind the structural state generation in the material subjected to severe plastic deformation and heating. To investigate the atomic mechanisms of structural changes in FSW, the modeling at atomic scale has been carried out. Results of work can be a basis for new knowledge about the microstructure evolution in FSW.

  17. EFFECT OF TOOL PIN PROFILES AND HEAT TREATMENT PROCESS IN THE FRICTION STIR WELDING OF AA 6061 ALUMINIUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir linear welding (FSLW uses a non consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as rotational speed, welding speed, axial force, tool tilt angle, etc., and tool pin profiles play a major role in deciding the joint properties. In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the effect of four different tool pin profiles on mechanical properties of AA 6061 aluminum alloy. Four different profiles have been used to fabricate the butt joints by keeping constant process parameters of tool rotational speed 1200RPM, welding speed 14mm/min and an axial force 7kN. Different heat treatment methods like annealing, normalizing and quenching have been applied on the joints and evaluation of the mechanical properties like tensile strength, percentage of elongation, hardness and microstructure in the friction stirring formation zone are evaluated. From this investigation, it is found that the hexagonal tool profile produces good tensile strength, percent of elongation in annealing and hardness in quenching process.

  18. Energy Balance of Friction and Friction Coefficient in Energetical Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Fedorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction energy model is proposed. In this model, generalized mechanism of transformation and dissipation of energy under friction the model of elastic-plastic deformation and fracture contact volumes is considered. Energy model of the process of plastic deformation and destruction of solid bodies is based on the concept of ergodynamic of deformable bodies. Equations of energy balance of friction within the structural and energetic interpretation of deformation are proposed. The energy interpretation of the coefficient of friction is showed. From this position the friction coefficient is the most informative characteristic of the process. Experimental friction curves have been generalized. As a result of the energy analysis of friction, the energy diagram of the structural evolution of the friction surfaces is suggested.

  19. Computational analysis of linear friction welding process and micromechanical modeling of deformation behavior for medium carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨夏炜; 李文亚; 马铁军

    2015-01-01

    Finite element simulation of linear friction welding (LFW) medium carbon steel was carried out using the ABAQUS software. A two-dimensional (2D) coupled thermo-mechanical model was established. First, the temperature fields of medium carbon steel during LFW process were investigated. And then, the Mises stress and the 1st, 2nd and 3rd principal stresses fields’ evolution of the steel during LFW process were studied. The deformation behavior of LFW carbon steel was analyzed by using micromechanics model based on ABAQUS with Python code. The Lode parameter was expressed using the Mohr stress circle and it was investigated in detail.

  20. Role of Friction in Cold Ring Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He YANG; Lianggang GUO; Mei ZHAN

    2005-01-01

    Cold ring rolling is an advanced but complex metal forming process under coupled effects with multi-factors, such as geometry sizes of rolls and ring blank, material, forming process parameters and friction, etc. Among these factors,friction between rolls and ring blank plays animportant role in keeping the stable forming of cold ring rolling. An analytical method was firstly presented for proximately determining the critical friction coefficient of stable forming and then a method was proposed to determine thecritical friction coefficient by combining analytical method with numerical simulation. And the influence of friction coefficient on the quality of end-plane and side spread of ring,rolling force, rolling moment and metal flow characteristic in the cold ring rolling process have been explored using the three dimensional (3D) numerical simulation based on the elastic-plastic dynamic finite element method (FEM)under the ABAQUS software environment, and the results show that increasing the friction on the contact surfaces between rolls and ring blank is useful not only for improving the stability of cold ring rolling but also for improving the geometry and dimension precision of deformed ring.

  1. Thermal Phenomena in the Friction Process of the TG15 - Hard Anodic Coating Couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Służałek G.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a one-dimensional model of heat conduction in a couple consisting of a cylinder made of a sliding plastic material, TG15, and a cuboid made of alloy AW 6061 coated with a hard anodic coating, where the couple is heated with the heat generated during friction. TG15 is a composite material based on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE with a 15% graphite filler, used for piston rings in oil-free air-compressors. Measurement of temperature in the friction zone is extremely important for the understanding and analysis of the phenomena occurring therein. It is practically impossible to introduce a temperature sensor in such a place. Therefore, the interaction taking place in such a couple was modelled using numerical methods. In order to simplify and accelerate the calculations, a one-dimensional model and constant thermophysical parameters of the materials participating in friction were adopted. To solve the proposed model, the finite difference method was used (FDM. The resultant system of equations was solved by means of an explicit scheme.

  2. Cryogenic friction-stir processing of ultrafine-grained Al–Mg–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Simchi, A., E-mail: simchi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-03

    Submerged friction-stir processing under cryogenic conditions was employed to fabricate ultrafine-grained nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical characteristics. Al–Mg alloy sheet with 3 vol% TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were processed under air (ambient temperature), a water-dry ice medium (∼−25 °C), and liquid nitrogen. It is shown that a homogenous distribution of reinforcement particles throughout the metal matrix is attained at a rotational speed of 1400 rpm and a traverse velocity of 50 mm/min after 4 passes. In situ formation of Al{sub 3}Ti and MgO nanophases during multi-pass processing is shown by transmission electron microscopy. Under the cryogenic cooling condition, ultrafine grains and cellular structures with sizes smaller than 1 μm and 200 nm are attained. It is shown that the formation of an ultrafine-grained structure is accompanied with significant improvement (150–200%) in the mechanical strength. The tensile yield strength of ∼170 MPa, elongation of ∼22% and Vickers hardness of ∼165 HV are attained. A change in the fracture mode from ductile-brittle to fully ductile is presented when the cryogenic processing is employed. A relationship between the grain size and the fracture features is demonstrated. Effects of cooling conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir processed Al-based nanocomposites are addressed.

  3. Basic investigation about a new joining process called HFDB (Hybrid Friction Diffusion Bonding); Grundlegende Untersuchung ueber ein neues Schweissverfahren namens HFDB (Hybrid Friction Diffusion Bonding)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Arne

    2010-07-01

    Scientific and technological objectives in the area of joining of materials for the transportation and energy industry have been the motivation for the development of a new joining method. For integral structures in aircraft a joining technology that is capable of joining metals which differ significantly in melting temperature and strength like titanium and aluminium is needed. In composite structures thin aluminium foils should be welded without degrading or destroying the intermediate polymers. Joining at low temperatures without mixing the joining partners is therefore desirable. Most of today's joining methods do not fulfil these requirements. In the course of this thesis a new joining technology named HFDB (Hybrid Friction Diffusion Bonding) has been developed. With this new joining technology the joining of similar and dissimilar materials of varying thicknesses (AA 2024; Al 7075; Al 99,5; 1.4301; Ti6Al4V; AZ31 in 0,1 mm up to 0,7 mm) as well as the manufacturing of a prototype for a heat-exchanger has been investigated. In addition a clamping set-up for the thin sheets has been developed and tested to avoid buckling during joining. Characterisation of the new bonding method has been established by means of metallographic procedures as well as mechanical testing (REM, {mu}CT, Nanoindenter, EDX, peel- and shear tensile tests, optical microscopy). Results of EDX as well as nano-indentation show a metallic joint in Aluminium /Aluminium as well as Aluminium / Titanium joints. A comparison of HFDB and DB results of the mechanical characterisation show comparable peel results at a significant lower heat input and processing time for HFDB. {mu}CT results show no vertical mixing of the materials across the bonding line. Only horizontal movement of the marker material can be observed. A micro structural investigation in combination with an analytical comparison shows a diffusion dominated joining mechanism. Furthermore the energy input and the bonding mechanism

  4. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution using finite difference equations and estimation of the grain size during friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, H.S. [School of Mechanical, Material and Energy Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, Punjab 140001 (India); Singh, H., E-mail: harpreetsingh@iitrpr.ac.in [School of Mechanical, Material and Energy Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, Punjab 140001 (India); Dhindaw, B.K. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, Nibong Tebal, Pulau Penang 14300 (Malaysia)

    2012-05-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnesium alloy AE42 was friction stir processed under different cooling conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat flow model was developed using finite difference heat equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generalized MATLAB code was developed for solving heat flow model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regression equation for estimation of grain size was developed. - Abstract: The present investigation is aimed at developing a heat flow model to simulate temperature history during friction stir processing (FSP). A new approach of developing implicit form of finite difference heat equations solved using MATLAB code was used. A magnesium based alloy AE42 was friction stir processed (FSPed) at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions. Temperature history was continuously recorded in the nugget zone during FSP using data acquisition system and k type thermocouples. The developed code was validated at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions during FSP experimentation. The temperature history at different locations in the nugget zone at different instants of time was further utilized for the estimation of grain growth rate and final average grain size of the FSPed specimen. A regression equation relating the final grain size, maximum temperature during FSP and the cooling rate was developed. The metallurgical characterization was done using optical microscopy, SEM, and FIB-SIM analysis. The simulated temperature profiles and final average grain size were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The presence of fine precipitate particles generated in situ in the investigated magnesium alloy also contributed in the evolution of fine grain structure through Zener pining effect at the grain boundaries.

  5. Role of friction stir processing parameters on microstructure and microhardness of boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sathiskumar; N Murugan; I Dinaharan; S J Vijay

    2013-12-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to fabricate boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforced copper surface composites. The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed and groove width on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. A groove was contrived on the 6mm thick copper plates and packed with B4C particles. FSP was carried out using five various tool rotational speeds, processing speeds and groove widths. Optical and scanning electron microscopies were employed to study the microstructure of the fabricated surface composites. The results indicated that the selected FSP parameters significantly influenced the area of surface composite, distribution of B4C particles and microhardness of the surface composites. Higher tool rotational speed and lower processing speed produced an excellent distribution of B4C particles and higher area of surface composite due to higher frictional heat, increased stirring and material tranportation. The B4C particles were bonded well to the copper matrix and refined the grains of copper due to the pinning effect of B4C particles. B4C particles retained the original size and morphology because of its small size and minimum sharp corners in the morphology.

  6. Multi-response optimization of process parameters in friction stir welded AM20 magnesium alloy by Taguchi grey relational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Kumar Sahu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to optimize the process parameter to get the better mechanical properties of friction stir welded AM20 magnesium alloy using Taguchi Grey relational analysis (GRA. The considered process parameters are welding speed, tool rotation speed, shoulder diameter and plunging depth. The experiments were carried out by using Taguchi's L18 factorial design of experiment. The processes parameters were optimized and ranked the parameters based on the GRA. The percentage influence of each process parameter on the weld quality was also quantified. A validation experimental run was conducted using optimal process condition, which was obtained from the analysis, to show the improvement in mechanical properties of the joint. This study also shows the feasibility of the GRA with Taguchi technique for improvement in welding quality of magnesium alloy.

  7. Improvement in grain refinement efficiency of Mg–Zr master alloy for magnesium alloy by friction stir processing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chengqi; Sun, Ming; Zheng, Feiyan; Peng, Liming; Ding, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have proved that the zirconium (Zr) alloying and grain refining performance of a Mg–Zr master alloy on Mg alloy is closely related to the distribution of Zr particle size, and a Mg–Zr master alloy with more Zr particles in size range of 1–5 μm exhibits a better refining efficiency. In this paper, friction stir processing (FSP) was used to modify the Zr particles size distribution of a commercially available Mg–30 wt.%Zr master alloy, and the subsequent grain refinement abilit...

  8. Microstructure analysis in friction welding of copper and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, A. G. Wahyu; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Friction welding is a welding method with utilizing heat generated due to friction. Surfaces of two materials to be joined, one rotates the other being idle, is contacted by a pressure force. Friction on the second contact surface is done continuously so that the heat generated by the continuous friction will continue to rise. With the heat and the pressure force on the second surface to the second meeting of the material reaches its melting temperature then there is the process of welding. This paper examines the influence of the pressure force, rotational speed and contact time on friction welding of Aluminum (Al) and Copper (Cu) to the quality of welded joints. Friction welding process is performed on a friction welding machine that is equipped with the loading mechanism. The parameters used are the pressure force, rotational speed and friction time. Determination of the quality of welding is done by testing the tensile strength, hardness, and micro structure on the weld joint areas. The results showed that the friction welding quality is very good, this is evidenced by the results of a tensile strength test where the fault occurs outside the weld joint and increased violence in the weld joint. On the results visually cuts the welding area did not reveal any porosity so that it can be concluded that each metal contacts have melted perfectly and produce a connection with good quality.

  9. Effects of nanometric inclusions on the microstructural characteristics and strengthening of a friction-stir processed aluminum–magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F., E-mail: farzadkhodabakhshi83@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Zand Boulevard, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simchi, A., E-mail: simchi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Švec, P. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Simančík, F. [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, Bratislava (Slovakia); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-08-26

    An aluminum–magnesium alloy was friction-stir processed in the presence of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles which were pre-placed in a groove on the surface to produce a composite. Field emission-scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies show that solid state chemical reactions occur between the Al–Mg matrix and the ceramic particles upon the severe plastic deformation process. The microstructure of the aluminum alloy consists of a coarse grain structure, large complex (Fe,Mn,Cr){sub 3}SiAl{sub 12} particles, and small Mg{sub 2}Si precipitates. After friction stir processing, a deformed grain structure containing rod-like Al–Fe–Mn–Si precipitates is attained, along with cuboidal (~100 nm) Cr{sub 2} precipitates and spherical (~100 and 5 nm) Mg{sub 2}Si particles. In the presence of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, magnesium oxide (MgO) and titanium aluminide (Al{sub 3}Ti) nanophases are formed. It is shown that these microstructural modifications lead to a significant enhancement in the hardness and tensile strength of the aluminum alloy. The relationship between the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties and the role of hard inclusions are presented and discussed. An analysis based on strengthening models indicates that the yield strength of the nanocomposite is mainly controlled by dislocations and grain boundaries rather than the nano-scale inclusions.

  10. Modification of vacuum plasma sprayed tungsten coating on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, Hiroyasu, E-mail: tanigawa.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Ozawa, Kazumi [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan); Noh, Sanghoon [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Nuclear Material Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied on vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W to improve its low thermal conductivity and weakness due to high porosity. • FSP can achieve significant improvement both in mechanical and thermal properties of VPS-W coating. • It was indicated that the double pass FSP at 600 rpm/50 mm/min/2 ton on VPS-W show the most dense microstructure and hardest mechanical property. • Hardness test over FSPed VPS-W layer revealed that the hardness of W becomes higher than that of bulk W. • The thermal conductivity of double pass FSPed VPS-W was about 80% of bulk W at 200 °C, and it becomes equivalent to that of bulk W over 800 °C. - Abstract: Tungsten (W) is the primary candidate material as a plasma facing material in fusion devices, as for its high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity and low sputtering rate, and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) technique is preferred as it is applicable for large area without brittle interlayer, but the thermal conductivity of W layer is very poor, and easy to detach, mainly caused by its porous structure. W Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied on VPS-W to improve these poor properties, and it was suggested that FSP can contribute to significant improvement in both mechanical and thermal properties of the VPS-W coating.

  11. Optimization of process parameters for friction stir lap welding of carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic composites by Taguchi method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, H.; Arab, N. B. Mostafa; Ghasemi, F. Ashenai [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Friction stir welding process parameters such as welding speed, rotational speed and tilt angle affect the strength of the weld joint. For maximizing the weld strength, these process parameters must therefore be properly selected and optimized. This study presents an application of Taguchi method to optimize process parameters like welding speed, rotational speed and tilt angle to maximize lap weld tensile-shear strength in 4 mm thick polypropylene composite sheets with 20 wt% carbon fiber. To this end, a L9 orthogonal array of Taguchi method using three factors at three levels was used. Analysis of variance and confirmation tests were conducted. The results indicated that welding speed, rotational speed and tilt angle are respectively the significant parameters affecting the lap weld strength. Optimization results also showed that tensile-shear strength of 6.06 MPa was obtained when welding speed, rotational speed and tilt angle were 25 mm/min, 1250 rpm and 1 degree, respectively.

  12. Effect of Multi-Pass Friction Stir Processing on Mechanical Properties for AA2024/Al2O3 Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Moustafa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an aluminum metal matrix reinforced with (Al2O3 nanoparticles was fabricated as a surface composite sheet using friction stir processing (FSP. The effects of processing parameters on mechanical properties, hardness, and microstructure grain were investigated. The results revealed that multi-pass FSP causes a homogeneous distribution and good dispersion of Al2O3 in the metal matrix, and consequently an increase in the hardness of the matrix composites. A finer grain is observed in the microstructure examination in specimens subjected to second and third passes of FSP. The improvement in the grain refinement is 80% compared to base metal. The processing parameters, particularly rotational tool speed and pass number in FSP, have a major effect on strength properties and surface hardness. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS and the average hardness are improved by 25% and 46%, respectively, due to presence of reinforcement Al2O3 nanoparticles.

  13. Parametric optimization of friction stir welding process of age hardenable aluminum alloys-ANFIS modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D Vijayan; V Seshagiri Rao

    2016-01-01

    A comparative approach was performed between the response surface method (RSM) and the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to enhance the tensile properties, including the ultimate tensile strength and the tensile elongation, of friction stir welded age hardenable AA6061 and AA2024 aluminum alloys. The effects of the welding parameters, namely the tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial load and pin profile, on the ultimate tensile strength and the tensile elongation were analyzed using a three-level, four-factor Box-Behnken experimental design. The developed design was utilized to train the ANFIS models. The predictive capabilities of RSM and ANFIS were compared based on the root mean square error, the mean absolute error, and the correlation coefficient based on the obtained data set. The results demonstrate that the developed ANFIS models are more effective than the RSM model.

  14. Financial Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Jensen, Mads

    frictions, a call option should never be exercised early, but only at expiration or just before the underlying stock pays a dividend. Chapter one of this thesis shows that suffciently severe frictions can make early exercise optimal. Short-sale costs especially represent an important driver of early...

  15. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  16. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  17. Quantitative Model of Price Diffusion and Market Friction Based on Trading as a Mechanistic Random Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Marcus G.; Farmer, J. Doyne; Gillemot, László; Iori, Giulia; Smith, Eric

    2003-03-01

    We model trading and price formation in a market under the assumption that order arrival and cancellations are Poisson random processes. This model makes testable predictions for the most basic properties of markets, such as the diffusion rate of prices (which is the standard measure of financial risk) and the spread and price impact functions (which are the main determinants of transaction cost). Guided by dimensional analysis, simulation, and mean-field theory, we find scaling relations in terms of order flow rates. We show that even under completely random order flow the need to store supply and demand to facilitate trading induces anomalous diffusion and temporal structure in prices.

  18. Processing and study of the wear and friction behaviour of discrete graded Cu hybrid composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Ram Prabhu

    2015-06-01

    Discrete functionally graded composites are the novel composites which have high potential in the brake friction material applications. In this paper, we have prepared discrete functional graded Cu/10%SiC/20%graphite(Gr)/10%boron nitride (h-BN) hybrid composites by the layer stacking compaction and pressure sintering techniques.We have considered two types of composites based on h-BN particle sizes. The size ranges of h-BN used were 140–180 and 3–25 m. The friction and wear properties of the composites were evaluated in a laboratory scale brake inertial dynamometer at low (5, 10 m s−1) and high sliding speeds (30, 35 m s−1) and, high braking load (2000 N) conditions. In addition, we have performed microstructure characterization, density, hardness and flexural strength measurements.Wear surface morphology studies were also carried out using stereoscope and scanning electron microscope. Our experiments lead to the following important results: (1) the large size h-BN particle improves the densification of the hybridized composite layer and provides higher wear resistance and better braking performance at all sliding speeds, (2) the wear loss (by mass) and the stopping distance/time increase with sliding speeds due to the increase in the braking energy, (3) at low sliding speeds (5, 10 m s−1), abrasive wear is the main wear mechanism, whereas many different wear mechanisms (delamination, oxidation, abrasive) are cooccuring at higher sliding speeds (30, 35 m s−1), (4) the mechanical properties (flexural strength and surface hardness) of composites are not affected by the h-BN particle size, (5) the incorporation of copper layer in the discrete layer structure deflects and arrests the crack at the copper/composite layer interface, thus improving the fracture resistance in addition to improving the bulk thermal conductivity.

  19. Effect of Process Variables on the Inertia Friction Welding of Superalloys LSHR and Mar-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, D. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Shivpuri, R.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of inertia friction welding process parameters on microstructure evolution, weld plane quality, and the tensile behavior of welds between dissimilar nickel-base superalloys was established. For this purpose, the fine-grain, powder metallurgy alloy LSHR was joined to coarse-grain cast Mar-M247 using a fixed level of initial kinetic energy, but different combinations of the flywheel moment of inertia and initial rotation speed. It was found that welds made with the largest moment of inertia resulted in a sound bond with the best microstructure and room-temperature tensile strength equal to or greater than that of the parent materials. A relationship between the moment of inertia and weld process efficiency was established. The post-weld tensile behavior was interpreted in the context of observed microstructure gradients and weld-line defects.

  20. Determine separations process strategy decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    This study provides a summary level comparative analysis of selected, top-level, waste treatment strategies. These strategies include No Separations, Separations (high-level/low-level separations), and Deferred Separations of the tank waste. These three strategies encompass the full range of viable processing alternatives based upon full retrieval of the tank wastes. The assumption of full retrieval of the tank wastes is a predecessor decision and will not be revisited in this study.

  1. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Inertia Friction Welding Process of Dissimilar Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hadek, Medhat A.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional axisymmetric finite element analyses have been performed to analyze the coupled thermo-mechanical oscillatory transient problem of friction welding of two dissimilar hollow cylinders. The analysis included the effect of conduction and convection heat transfer implementing three independent variables specifically the welding time, the rotational velocity, and the thrust pressure. Experimental evaluation of the non-linear copper and Aluminum 6061 stress-strain responses, the thermal conductivities, and the specific heat coefficients were conducted using an environmental-controlled compartment for at least four different temperatures. These results were incorporated in the finite element model calculating a real joint transient temperature distribution and a full field view of the residual stresses in weldment. Variables of angular rotational velocity of (200, 400, and 600 rpm), thrust pressure of (10E5, 10E6, and 10E7 Pa), and total welding time of (1, 2, and 4 seconds) were used in the model simulation. The optimum welding conditions were selected using Taguchi method. Finally, the deformation shape predicted by the finite element simulations was compared to the deformations obtained by the experimental results.

  3. Weldability of AISI 304 to copper by friction welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Balalan, Zulkuf [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2013-06-01

    Friction welding is a solid-state welding method, which can join different materials smoothly and is excessively used in manufacturing industry. Friction welding method is commonly used in welding applications of especially cylindrical components, pipes and materials with different properties, for which other welding methods remain incapable. AISI 304 stainless steel and a copper alloy of 99.6 % purity were used in this study. This couple was welded in the friction welding machine. After the welding process, samples were analyzed macroscopically and microscopically, and their microhardness was measured. Tensile test was used to determine the bond strength of materials that were joined using the friction welding method. At the end of the study, it was observed that AISI 304 stainless steel and copper could be welded smoothly using the friction welding method and the bond strength is close to the tensile strength of copper. (orig.)

  4. 金属成型过程中摩擦成因的分析%ANALYSIS OF FRICTION IN THE PROCESS OF METAL FORMING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许光明; 崔建忠

    2000-01-01

    In this article, the reason how the friction produces in the process of metal forming was analyzed, and the friction was thought to be mainly caused by the plastic flow of metal in the pits of tool surface. The work rate of the metal in pits was considered to be the frictional work rate, and when the work rate was great than the work rate to produce shear flow at the interface between the metal and tool ,the friction was thought to change into sticky friction from slide friction. According to some hypothesis about tool surface, the relationship among the friction, roughness and hydrostatic stress was derived, and the limited hydrostatic stress was got when the sticky friction takes place. The result of calculation showed that the frictional model was effective and closed to fact, and a new method was provided to calculate the friction in theory.%本文从微观入手对金属压力成型过程中摩擦的形成原因进行了分析,认为摩擦主要是由于被压入工具表面凹坑金属的塑性流动所引起的。摩擦功率等于此部分金属的变形功率,当它的变形功率大于在界面产生剪切流动的功率时,摩擦由滑动摩擦转变为粘着摩擦。同时,根据对工具表面的某些假设,推导了摩擦应力与粗糙度和静水压应力等之间的关系,并求出了发生粘着摩擦所需的静水压应力。计算结果表明,建立的摩擦模型是比较有效和合乎实际的,它为理论计算摩擦提供了方法。

  5. Formation of Al/B4C Surface Nano-composite Layers on 7075 Al Alloy Employing Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani-Bozorg, S. F.; Jazayeri, K.

    2009-06-01

    Al/B4C surface nano-composite layers was achieved on commercial 7075 Al substrate employing friction stir processing technique. Agglomeration of B4C particles was occurred after a single pass. The dispersion of B4C particles was found to be affected by the number of FSP passes. A distribution of nano-size B4C particle was achieved after four passes. Moreover, the increasing in number of FSP passes causes a decreasing in matrix grain size of the surface nano-composite layer. The micro hardness of the surface nano-composite layer improves by almost two times as compared to that of the as-received substrate; this is attributed to the finer matrix grains and dispersion of nano-sized B4C particles.

  6. Effect of Multipass Friction Stir Processing on Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of 2507 Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M. K.; Gunasekaran, G.; Rao, A. G.; Kashyap, B. P.; Prabhu, N.

    2016-12-01

    The microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of 2507 super duplex stainless steel after multipass friction stir processing (FSP) were examined. A significant refinement in grain size of both ferrite and austenite was observed in stir zone resulting in improved yield and tensile strength. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and anodic polarization studies in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution showed nobler corrosion characteristics with increasing number of FSP passes. This was evident from the decrease in corrosion current density, decrease in passive current density, and increase in polarization resistance. Also, the decrease in density of defects, based on Mott-Schottky analysis, further confirms the improvement in corrosion resistance of 2507 super duplex stainless steel after multipass FSP.

  7. Heat-Affected Zone Liquation Cracking Resistance of Friction Stir Processed Aluminum-Copper Alloy AA 2219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, G. M.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2016-12-01

    In the current work, the effect of friction stir processing on heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking resistance of aluminum-copper alloy AA 2219 was evaluated. In Gleeble hot-ductility tests and longitudinal Varestraint tests, the FSPed material, despite its very fine dynamically recrystallized equiaxed grain structure, showed considerably higher susceptibility to HAZ liquation cracking when compared to the base material. Detailed microstructural studies showed that the increased cracking susceptibility of the FSPed material is due to (i) increase in the amount of liquating θ phase (equilibrium Al2Cu) and (ii) increase in the population of grain boundary θ particles. An important learning from the current work is that, in certain materials like alloy 2219, the use of FSP as a pretreatment to fusion welding can be counterproductive.

  8. In-process tool force and rotation variation to control sheet thickness change in friction stir welding of magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, Gianluca; Fratini, Livan; Simoncini, Michela; Forcellese, Archimede

    2016-10-01

    Two different in-process control strategies, developed in order to produce sound joints in AZ31 magnesium alloy by Friction Stir Welding on sheet blanks with a non-uniform thickness, are presented and compared. To this purpose, sheets with dip or hump were machined and welded by either changing the rotational speed or the tool plunging in order to keep constant the vertical force occurring during welding. The mechanical strength of the joints was measured in the zones where the sheets before welding were characterised by different thicknesses. The sheets welded by the two different strategies are characterized by very similar ultimate tensile strength values. Finally, the results showed that the two approaches permit to successfully weld sheets with non-uniform thickness with a reduced loss in the mechanical strength.

  9. Effect of Process Parameters on Tensile Strength of Friction Stir Welded Cast LM6 Aluminium Alloy Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Jayaraman; R.Sivasubramanian; V. Balasubramanian

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the effect of friction stir welding (FSW) process parameters on tensile strength of cast LM6 aluminium alloy. Joints were made by using different combinations of tool rotation speed, welding speed and axial force each at four levels. The quality of weld zone was investigated using macrostructure and microstructure analysis. Tensile strength of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the weld zone hardness and microstructure. The joint fabricated using a rotational speed of 900 r/min, a welding speed of 75 mm/min and an axial force of 3 kN showed superior tensile strength compared with other joints. The tensile strength and microhardness of the welded joints for the optimum conditions were 166 MPa and 64.8 Hv respectively.

  10. Heat-Affected Zone Liquation Cracking Resistance of Friction Stir Processed Aluminum-Copper Alloy AA 2219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, G. M.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Kottada, Ravi Sankar

    2017-04-01

    In the current work, the effect of friction stir processing on heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking resistance of aluminum-copper alloy AA 2219 was evaluated. In Gleeble hot-ductility tests and longitudinal Varestraint tests, the FSPed material, despite its very fine dynamically recrystallized equiaxed grain structure, showed considerably higher susceptibility to HAZ liquation cracking when compared to the base material. Detailed microstructural studies showed that the increased cracking susceptibility of the FSPed material is due to (i) increase in the amount of liquating θ phase (equilibrium Al2Cu) and (ii) increase in the population of grain boundary θ particles. An important learning from the current work is that, in certain materials like alloy 2219, the use of FSP as a pretreatment to fusion welding can be counterproductive.

  11. On the Process-Related Rivet Microstructural Evolution, Material Flow and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V/GFRP Friction-Riveted Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Z. Borba

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the current work, process-related thermo-mechanical changes in the rivet microstructure, joint local and global mechanical properties, and their correlation with the rivet plastic deformation regime were investigated for Ti-6Al-4V (rivet and glass-fiber-reinforced polyester (GF-P friction-riveted joints of a single polymeric base plate. Joints displaying similar quasi-static mechanical performance to conventional bolted joints were selected for detailed characterization. The mechanical performance was assessed on lap shear specimens, whereby the friction-riveted joints were connected with AA2198 gussets. Two levels of energy input were used, resulting in process temperatures varying from 460 ± 130 °C to 758 ± 56 °C and fast cooling rates (178 ± 15 °C/s, 59 ± 15 °C/s. A complex final microstructure was identified in the rivet. Whereas equiaxial α-grains with β-phase precipitated in their grain boundaries were identified in the rivet heat-affected zone, refined α′ martensite, Widmanstätten structures and β-fleck domains were present in the plastically deformed rivet volume. The transition from equiaxed to acicular structures resulted in an increase of up to 24% in microhardness in comparison to the base material. A study on the rivet material flow through microtexture of the α-Ti phase and β-fleck orientation revealed a strong effect of shear stress and forging which induced simple shear deformation. By combining advanced microstructural analysis techniques with local mechanical testing and temperature measurement, the nature of the complex rivet plastic deformational regime could be determined.

  12. Characterization of Aluminum-Based-Surface Matrix Composites with Iron and Iron Oxide Fabricated by Friction Stir Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam R. I. Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface composite layers were successfully fabricated on an A 1050-H24 aluminum plate by dispersed iron (Fe and magnetite (Fe3O4 particles through friction stir processing (FSP. Fe and Fe3O4 powders were packed into a groove of 3 mm in width and 1.5 mm in depth, cut on the aluminum plate, and covered with an aluminum sheet that was 2-mm thick. A friction stir processing (FSP tool of square probe shape, rotated at a rate of 1000–2000 rpm, was plunged into the plate through the cover sheet and the groove, and moved along the groove at a travelling speed of 1.66 mm/s. Double and triple passes were applied. As a result, it is found that the Fe particles were homogenously distributed in the whole nugget zone at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm after triple FSP passes. Limited interfacial reactions occurred between the Fe particles and the aluminum matrix. On the other hand, the lower rotation speed (1000 rpm was not enough to form a sound nugget when the dispersed particles were changed to the larger Fe3O4. The Fe3O4 particles were dispersed homogenously in a sound nugget zone when the rotation speed was increased to 1500 rpm. No reaction products could be detected between the Fe3O4 particles and the aluminum matrix. The saturation magnetization (Ms of the Fe-dispersed nugget zone was higher than that of the Fe3O4-dispersed nugget zone. Moreover, there were good agreement between the obtained saturation magnetization values relative to that of pure Fe and Fe3O4 materials and the volume content of the dispersed particles in the nugget zone.

  13. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Heat Friction Contact Master Belt with the Gun Mount Barrel During the Process of High-Speed Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zezulinsky Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction in the gun mount barrel at sliding speeds of artillery projectile 500 - 700 m/s is not sufficiently studied. The main problem is to increase the efficiency of the master belt with a significant increase of the interaction parameters of the barrel with the projectile. To determine the effect of heating on the change of physical and mechanical properties of the surface layer and friction coefficient on the surface of the master belt were made mathematical modeling of heat transfer.

  15. The use of surface layer with boron in friction pairs lubricated by engine oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczypiński-Sala, W.; Lubas, J.

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present work is to determine the influence of surface layers with boron and engine oil on the processes of friction and wear in friction pairs. The ring samples with borided surface layer cooperated under test conditions with counterparts made with CuPb30 and AlSn20 bearing alloys. During the tests, the friction pairs were lubricated with 15W/40 Lotos mineral oil and 5W/40 Lotos synthetic oil. The lubrication of friction area with Lotos mineral oil causes the reduction of the friction force, the temperature in the friction area and the wear of the bearing alloys under study, whereas the lubrication with Lotos synthetic oil reduces the changes in the geometrical structure of the cooperating friction pair elements. Lubrication of the friction area in the start-up phase of the friction pair by mineral oil causes faster stabilization of the friction conditions in the contact area than in the cause of lubrication of the friction pair by synthetic oil. The intensity of wear of the AlSn20 bearing alloy cooperating with the borided surface layer is three times smaller than the intensity of use of the CuPb30 alloy bearing.

  16. Integrated Business Process Adaptation towards Friction-Free Business-to-Business Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    One key issue in process-aware E-commerce collaboration is the orchestration of business processes of multiple business partners throughout a supply chain network in an automated and seamless way. Since each partner has its own internal processes with different control flow structures and message interfaces, the real challenge lies in verifying…

  17. Integrated Business Process Adaptation towards Friction-Free Business-to-Business Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    One key issue in process-aware E-commerce collaboration is the orchestration of business processes of multiple business partners throughout a supply chain network in an automated and seamless way. Since each partner has its own internal processes with different control flow structures and message interfaces, the real challenge lies in verifying…

  18. Friction stir welding process and material microstructure evolution modeling in 2000 and 5000 series of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalavarthy, Harshavardhan

    Interactions between the rotating and advancing pin-shaped tool (terminated at one end with a circular-cylindrical shoulder) with the clamped welding-plates and the associated material and heat transport during a Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process are studied computationally using a fully-coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis. To surmount potential numerical problems associated with extensive mesh distortions/entanglement, an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation was used which enabled adaptive re-meshing (to ensure the continuing presence of a high-quality mesh) while allowing full tracking of the material free surfaces. To demonstrate the utility of the present computational approach, the analysis is applied to the cases of same-alloy FSW of two Aluminum-alloy grades: (a) AA5083 (a solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened/stabilized Al-Mg-Mn alloy); and (b) AA2139 (a precipitation hardened quaternary Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy). Both of these alloys are currently being used in military-vehicle hull structural and armor systems. In the case of non-age-hardenable AA5083, the dominant microstructure evolution processes taking place during FSW are extensive plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization of highly-deformed material subjected to elevated temperatures approaching the melting temperature. To account for the competition between plastic-deformation controlled strengthening and dynamic-recrystallization induced softening phenomena during the FSW process, the original Johnson-Cook strain- and strain-rate hardening and temperature-softening material strength model is modified in the present work using the available recrystallization-kinetics experimental data. In the case of AA2139, in addition to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, precipitates coarsening, over-aging, dissolution and re-precipitation had to be also considered. Limited data available in the open literature pertaining to the kinetics of the aforementioned

  19. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  20. Simulative testing of friction in warm/hot forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Lindegren, Maria

    The objective of sub-task 3.2 is to determine the friction values for different work piece materials, tool materials and lubricants as a function of the main process parameters under conditions reflecting those which are present in typical warm/hot forming operations i.e. surface expansion, work...... piece and tool temperature. Based on this experimental work establish mathematical formulations of friction as a function of the basic parameters....

  1. Friction laws for lubricated nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzio, R.; Boragno, C.; Valbusa, U.

    2006-09-01

    We have used friction force microscopy to probe friction laws for nanoasperities sliding on atomically flat substrates under controlled atmosphere and liquid environment, respectively. A power law relates friction force and normal load in dry air, whereas a linear relationship, i.e., Amontons' law, is observed for junctions fully immersed in model lubricants, namely, octamethylciclotetrasiloxane and squalane. Lubricated contacts display a remarkable friction reduction, with liquid and substrate specific friction coefficients. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulations suggests that load-bearing boundary layers at junction entrance cause the appearance of Amontons' law and impart atomic-scale character to the sliding process; continuum friction models are on the contrary of limited predictive power when applied to lubrication effects. An attempt is done to define general working conditions leading to the manifestation of nanoscale lubricity due to adsorbed boundary layers.

  2. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  3. Influence of ceramic particulate type on microstructure and tensile strength of aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP was applied to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. Aluminum alloy AA6082 was used as the matrix material. Various ceramic particles, such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC, were used as reinforcement particle. AA6082 AMCs were produced using a set of optimized process parameters. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy, filed emission scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diagram. The results indicated that the type of ceramic particle did not considerably vary the microstructure and ultimate tensile strength (UTS. Each type of ceramic particle provided a homogeneous dispersion in the stir zone irrespective of the location and good interfacial bonding. Nevertheless, AA6082/TiC AMC exhibited superior hardness and wear resistance compared to other AMCs produced in this work under the same set of experimental conditions. The strengthening mechanisms and the variation in the properties are correlated to the observed microstructure. The details of fracture mode are further presented.

  4. Experience-based learning on determining the frictional coefficients of thermoset polymers incorporated with silicon carbide whiskers and chopped carbon fibers at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Edward; Alamir, Mohammed; Alzahrani, Naif; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2017-04-01

    High temperature applications of materials have been increasing for various industrial applications, such as automobile brakes, clutches and thrust pads. The big portion of these materials are made out of the polymeric materials with various reinforcements. In the present study, high temperature polymeric materials were incorporated with SiC whiskers and chopped carbon fibers at 0, 5, 10 and 20wt.% and molded into desired size and shape prior to the curing process. These inclusions were selected because of their high mechanical strengths and thermal conductivity values to easily dissipate the frictional heat energy and sustain more external loads. The method of testing involves a metal ramp with an adjustable incline to find the coefficients of static and kinetic frictions by recording time and the angle of movement at various temperatures (e.g., -10°C and 50°C). The test results indicated that increasing the inclusions made drastic improvements on the coefficients of static and kinetic frictions. The undergraduate students were involved in the project and observed all the details of the process during the laboratory studies, as well as data collection, analysis and presentation. This study will be useful for the future trainings of the undergraduate engineering students on the composite, automobile and other manufacturing industries.

  5. Influence of process parameters on physical dimensions of AA6063 aluminium alloy coating on mild steel in friction surfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made in the present study to obtain the relationships among process parameters and physical dimensions of AA6063 aluminium alloy coating on IS2062 mild steel obtained through friction surfacing and their impact on strength and ductility of the coating. Factorial experimental design technique was used to investigate and select the parameter combination to achieve a coating with adequate strength and ductility. Spindle speed, axial force and table traverse speed were observed to be the most significant factors on physical dimensions. It was observed that the thickness of the coating decreased as the coating width increased. In addition, the width and thickness of the coatings are higher at low and high torques. At intermediate torque values, when the force is high, the width of the coating is high, and its thickness is thin; and when the force is low, the width and thickness are low. The interaction effect between axial force (F – table traverse speed (Vx and spindle speed (N – table traverse speed (Vx produced an increasing effect on coating width and thickness, but other interactions exhibited decreasing influence. It has also been observed that sound coatings could be obtained in a narrow set of parameter range as the substrate-coating materials are metallurgically incompatible and have a propensity to form brittle intermetallics.

  6. Improvement in grain refinement efficiency of Mg–Zr master alloy for magnesium alloy by friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqi Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have proved that the zirconium (Zr alloying and grain refining performance of a Mg–Zr master alloy on Mg alloy is closely related to the distribution of Zr particle size, and a Mg–Zr master alloy with more Zr particles in size range of 1–5 μm exhibits a better refining efficiency. In this paper, friction stir processing (FSP was used to modify the Zr particles size distribution of a commercially available Mg–30 wt.%Zr master alloy, and the subsequent grain refinement ability was studied by trials on a typical Mg–3Nd–0.2Zn–0.6Zr (wt.%, NZ30K alloy. It is found that plenty of large Zr particles in the as-received Mg–30%Zr master alloy are broken by FSP. Grain refinement tests reveal that the refining efficiency of Mg–30%Zr alloy is significantly improved by FSP, which is attributed to the better distribution of Zr particles. The refinement effect by adding 0.6% FSP-ed Mg–30%Zr is approximately equivalent to that by adding 1.0% as-received Mg–30%Zr. Due to the easy and convenient operation of FSP, this study provides a new method to develop a more efficient Mg–Zr refiner.

  7. Effect of Post Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Microhardness of Friction Stir Processed NiAl Bronze (NAB Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Lv

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NiAl bronze (NAB alloy is prepared by using friction stir processing (FSP technique at a tool rotation rate of 1200 rpm and a traverse speed of 150 mm/min. A post heat treatment is performed at the temperature of 675 °C. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and microhardness is studied. The results show that the microstructure of the FSP NAB alloy consists of high density dislocations, retained β phase (β′ phase and recrystallized grains. When annealed at 675 °C, discontinuous static recrystallization (DSRX takes place. The content of β′ phase gradually decreases and fine κ phase is precipitated. After annealing for 2 h, both the microhardness of the FSP sample in the stir zone (SZ and the difference in hardness between the SZ and base metal decrease due to the reduction of the dislocation density and β′ phase, accompanying recrystallized grain coarsening. With further increasing of the annealing time to 4 h, the aforementioned difference in hardness nearly disappears.

  8. Aging of medium strength aluminum alloy friction stir welds produced by different process parameter after tensile strain hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerri, Emanuela, E-mail: emanuela.cerri@unipr.it; Leo, Paola

    2014-10-15

    Effect of tool rotation rate and travel speed on aging of 6082T6 friction stir welds after tensile strain hardening were investigated using Vickers microhardness (HV) measurements and precipitation hardening concepts. Tensile tests were performed at constant strain rate up to natural fracture followed by aging at low and medium temperatures. The results showed that HV measured on strain hardened FSW joints was not very sensitive to travel speeds experienced during FSW process, at constant rotation rate; anyway, strain hardening was very effective on hardness and induce an average increase by 20–25% in the stirred zone (SZ). Strain hardening was also very effective on aging at 200 °C, while it was not at 300 °C. At this temperature, HV assumed uniform values along joint cross section. - Highlights: • FSW joints have been investigated after tensile deformation and aging. • Tensile strain hardening induces a 20–25% HV increment in the stirred zone. • Subsequent aging at 200 °C did not substantially modify hardness profiles. • After aging at 300 °C, HV values were uniform and lower than HV minimum.

  9. Design and development of fixture and force measuring system for friction stir welding process using strain gauges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parida, Biswajit; Vishwakarma, Shiv Dayal; Pal, Sukhomay [IIT Guwahati, Guwahati (India)

    2015-02-15

    We developed a clamping system and an instrumented setup for a vertical milling machine for friction stir welding (FSW) operations and measuring the process forces. Taking into account the gap formation (i.e., lateral movement) and transverse movement of the workpiece, a new type of adjustable fixture was designed to hold the workpiece being welded. For force measurement, a strain gauge based force dynamometer was designed, developed and fabricated. The strain gauges were fitted into the specially designed octagonal members to support the welding plates. When the welding force was applied onto the plates, the load was transferred to the octagonal members and strain was induced in the member. The strains of the strain gauges were measured in terms of voltages using a Wheatstone bridge. To acquire forces in FSW operations, a data acquisition system with the necessary hardware and software was devised and connected to the developed setup. The developed setup was tested in actual welding operations. It is found that the proposed setup can be used in milling machine to perform FSW operations.

  10. Dissimilar friction stir welds in AA5083-AA6082. Part I: Process parameter effects on thermal history and weld properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, M. J.; Steuwer, A.; Withers, P. J.; Dickerson, T.; Shi, Q.; Shercliff, H.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the so-called processing window, within which good-quality welds can be produced, for the friction stir welding of AA5083 to AA6082. To that end a systematic set of nine instrumented welds were made using rotation speeds of 280, 560, and 840 rpm and traverse speeds of 100, 200, and 300 mm/min with AA5083 on the advancing side and another nine with the materials reversed. For comparison a smaller series of AA5083-AA5083 and AA6082-AA6082 welds were also made. Thermocouple measurements, tool torque, extent of material mixing, and macrostructural observations all indicate that the temperature under the tool is more strongly dependent on the rotation than the traverse speed. It was found that in the current case, the power (energy/s) and heat input (energy/mm) do not correlate simply with the weld temperature. As a result, such metrics may not be suitable for characterizing the conditions under which welds are produced.

  11. The Role of Friction Stir Processing (FSP Parameters on TiC Reinforced Surface Al7075-T651 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe García-Vázquez

    Full Text Available Abstract: Aluminum alloys are very promising for structural applications in aerospace, military and transportation industries due to their light weight, high strength-to-weight ratio and excellent resistance to corrosion. In comparison to unreinforced aluminum alloys, aluminum/aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic phases exhibit higher strength and hardness, improved tribological characteristics. A novel surface modifying technique, friction stir processing (FSP, has been developed for fabrication of surface composite with an improved performance. The effect of FSP parameters such as number of passes, direction of each pass, sealed or unsealed groove on microstructure was investigated. In this work, nano-particles of TiC (2% in weight were added to aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 to produce a functional surface. Fixed parameters for this AA7075 alloy were used; rotation speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 300 mm/min and pin penetration of 2.8 mm. Optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM were employed to study the microstructure of the fabricated surface composites. The results indicated that the selected FSP parameters influenced the area of surface composite, distribution of TiC particles and micro-hardness of the surface composites. Finally, in order to evaluate rate wear the pin on disk test was carried out.

  12. A microtexture investigation of recrystallization during friction stir processing of as-cast NiAl bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh-Ishi, Keiichiro; Zhilyaev, Alexander P.; McNelley, Terry R.

    2006-07-01

    As-cast NiAl bronze (NAB) was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP). Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) methods were used to obtain microtexture data in the stir zone (SZ) and along its periphery. At selected SZ locations, orientation data were obtained by convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) methods in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Random α phase textures were apparent in the SZ. The α grains tended to be equiaxed, exhibited annealing twins, and were refined to 1 to 2 µm at the edge of the SZ. The population of subgrain boundaries in α phase grains was highest near the plate surface in contact with the tool and decreased with depth in the SZ, reflecting deformation by the tool shoulder after the passage of the tool pin. Distinct shear texture components were apparent in the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) outside of and along the periphery of the SZ. A texture gradient from the TMAZ into the SZ was apparent and was steeper on the advancing side and under the SZ center than on the retreating side. The apparent shear plane tended to align with the local interface between the SZ and TMAZ, while the shear direction tended to align with the FSP traversing direction. In this material, the SZ-TMAZ interface is a distinct boundary between recrystallized and deformed regions and the α-phase grain refinement reflects dynamic recrystallization and, in locations near the SZ-TMAZ interface, particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN) at undissolved Fe3Al particles.

  13. Evaluation of Friction Stir Processing of HY-80 Steel Under Wet and Dry Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    material on Littoral Combat Ships along with the surface treatment of nickel aluminum bronze propellers. In the last ten years, research on FSW/P...processing was polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) embedded in a tungsten -rhenium (W-Re) binder, Figure 4. The tool material is also designated as... bronze . The grains remain equi-axed and not elongated due to deformation. 42 2. Scanning Electron Microscopy a. Base Material Using the SEM, the

  14. Process Modeling of Ti-6Al-4V Linear Friction Welding (LFW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    temporal evolution of the axial shortening and the spatial distribution of various microstructural phases/ constituents and microhardness in the as...reciprocation frequency; (b) reciproca- tion amplitude; and (c) contact pressure levels in different phases of LFW. A test matrix showing the levels of these...the accompanying convective/radiation heat losses from the edge Table 2 LFW process parameter test matrix used in the present study Parameter FSW

  15. Welding of Al6061and Al6082-Cu composite by friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, R. B.; Dhabale, R. B.; Jatti, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    Present study aims at investigating the influence of process parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties such as tensile strength and hardness of the dissimilar metal without and with copper powder. Before conducting the copper powder experiments, optimum process parameters were obtained by conducting experiments without copper powder. Taguchi's experimental L9 orthogonal design layout was used to carry out the experiments without copper powder. Threaded pin tool geometry was used for conducting the experiments. Based on the experimental results and Taguchi's analysis it was found that maximum tensile strength of 66.06 MPa was obtained at 1400 rpm spindle speed and weld speed of 20 mm/min. Maximum micro hardness (92 HV) was obtained at 1400 rpm spindle speed and weld speed of 16 mm/min. At these optimal setting of process parameters aluminium alloys were welded with the copper powder. Experimental results demonstrated that the tensile strength (96.54 MPa) and micro hardness (105 HV) of FSW was notably affected by the addition of copper powder when compared with FSW joint without copper powder. Tensile failure specimen was analysed using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to study the failure mechanism.

  16. Influence of fibre distribution and grain size on the mechanical behaviour of friction stir processed Mg–C composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, A., E-mail: anne.mertens@ulg.ac.be [Université de Liège, Faculty of Applied Science, A& M Department, Metallic Materials Science Unit (Belgium); Simar, A. [Université catholique de Louvain, Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (Belgium); Adrien, J.; Maire, E. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon (INSA Lyon), MATEIS Laboratory (France); Montrieux, H.-M. [Université de Liège, Faculty of Applied Science, A& M Department, Metallic Materials Science Unit (Belgium); Delannay, F. [Université catholique de Louvain, Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (Belgium); Lecomte-Beckers, J. [Université de Liège, Faculty of Applied Science, A& M Department, Metallic Materials Science Unit (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    Short C fibres–Mg matrix composites have been produced by friction stir processing sandwiches made of a layer of C fabric stacked between two sheets of Mg alloy AZ31B or AZ91D. This novel processing technique can allow the easy production of large-scale metal matrix composites. The paper investigates the microstructure of FSPed C fibre–Mg composites in relation with the fragmentation of the C fibres during FSP and their influence on the tensile properties. 3D X-ray tomography reveals that the fibres orient like onion rings and are more or less fragmented depending on the local shear stress during the process. The fibre volume fraction can be increased from 2.3% to 7.1% by reducing the nugget volume, i.e. by using a higher advancing speed in AZ31B alloy or a stronger matrix alloy, like AZ91D alloy. A higher fibre volume fraction leads to a smaller grain size which brings about an increase of the composite yield strength by 15 to 25%. However, a higher fibre volume fraction also leads to a lower fracture strain. Fracture surface observations reveal that damage occurs by fibre/matrix decohesion along fibres oriented perpendicularly to the loading direction. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • C–Mg MMCs were produced by FSP sandwiches made of a C fabric between Mg sheets. • Fibre fragmentation and erosion is larger when the temperature reached during FSP is lower. • A lower advancing speed brings a lower fibre volume fraction and a lower grain size. • X-ray tomography reveals that fibres orient along the FSP material flow. • The fibres and grain size reduction increase the yield strength by 15 to 25%.

  17. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-11

    Cavin, W.D. Porter, and C.R. Hubbard, Effect of Iron Additions on Structure of Laves Phases in Nb-Cr-Fe Alloys, Mater. Sci. Eng., 1993, A160, p 37–48 19...ultimate adhesion/bonding. Detailed past investigations of LFW (Ref 1-3) established the presence of five distinct phases of this joining process: (a...initial phase , (b) transition phase , (c) equilibrium phase , (d) deceleration/ forging phase , and (e) stand phase . A simple schematic of the first four

  18. Rotary Engine Friction Test Rig Development Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    5  4.  Friction Rig Development 7  5.  AutoCAD ...Figure 4. Engine friction test rig AutoCAD model. ........................................................................8  Figure 5. Engine...top dead center. 8 5. AutoCAD Model Development A model of the rotary engine friction test rig was developed to determine the optimal

  19. Experimental Study on Friction Coefficient Between Concrete and the Top Surface of Rubble Mound Foundation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-bao; JIANG Xue-lian; GUO Hong-yi

    2005-01-01

    Experimental studies on the friction coefficient between concrete and the top surface of a rubble mound foundation in China are reviewed. Through comparison of different test results, the development of this research is comprehensively analyzed. An experiment is carried out in the condition similar to prototype. The process curve of friction coefficient with the test block sliding is analyzed and a standard for determination of the friction coefficient is defined. The variation features of the friction coefficient are analyzed on the basis of the present experimental results and other studies in China. It is shown that the friction coefficient between concrete and the top surface of a rubble mound foundation decreases with the increase of the foundation pressure, and the friction coefficient for a very fine leveling bed is smaller than that for a fine leveling bed.

  20. Using two-pass friction stir processing to produce nanocrystalline microstructure in AZ61 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU XingHao; WU BaoLin

    2009-01-01

    Despite their interesting properties, nanostructured materials have found limited use as a result of the cost of preparation and the difficulty in soaling up. Herein, a two-pass friotion stir processing (FSP) technique is employed to refine grain sizes to a nanoscale. Nanocrystalline AZ61 Mg alloy with an av-erage grain size of less than 100 nm was successfully obtained using FSP. Corresponding to this, the highest microhardness of the nano-grained region reached triple times that of AZ61 substrate. In prin-ciple, by applying multiple overlapping passes, it should be possible to produce any desired size thin sheet of nanostructure using this technique. We expect that the FSP technique may pave a way to large-scale structural applications of nanostruotured metals and alloys.

  1. Experimental investigation on the effect of process environment on the mechanical properties of AA5083/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite fabricated via friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashjari, M., E-mail: Mhd_Ashjari@yahoo.com; Mostafapour Asl, A.; Rouhi, S.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir processing, a lately devised grain refining and also microstructure homogenizing technique, has extensively been used on aluminum alloys. Significance of limiting the grain growth during the process, has made lots of researchers make endeavor to keep, as one of the ways of controlling grain growth, the process temperature low; one way of doing so, is performing the friction stir process under water, which keeps the peak temperature low and increases the cooling rate as well. In the present work, research has been done to make known the effects of doing submerged friction stir processing on mechanical properties of AA5083/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p} composite. The process was completed on each sample without changing the rotation and traverse speed of the tool. The pin of the tool was a threaded cylindrical one. Tensile and micro-hardness tests were used to evaluate the effect of the process on these properties of the samples. Also to study the microstructure of the samples, optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs were used. The results show that, underwater friction stir process is capable of producing defect-free AA5083/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p} nanocomposite. Analyzing the properties of the processed samples showed that, by significantly reducing the grain size, water environment has positive impact on the mechanical properties of the alloy; And that, Hall–Petch effect is more powerful than Orowan mechanism in enhancing the mechanical properties of the samples.

  2. Effect of heat treatment and number of passes on the microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir processed AZ91C magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadashpour, M.; Yeşildal, R. [University of Ataturk, Erzurum (Turkmenistan); Mostafapour, A.; Rezazade, V. [University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, the effect of heat treatment and number of passes on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir processed AZ91C magnesium alloy samples were investigated. From six samples of as-cast AZ91C magnesium alloy, three plates were pre-heated at temperature of 375°C for 3 hours, and then were treated at temperature of 415°C for 18 hours and finally were cooled down in air. Three plates were relinquished without heat treatment. 8 mm thick as-cast AZ91C magnesium alloy plates were friction stir processed at constant traverse speed of 40 mm/min and tool rotation speed of 1250 rpm. After process, microstructural characterization of samples was analyzed using optical microscopy and tensile and Vickers hardness tests were performed. It was found that heat treated samples had finer grains, higher hardness, improved tensile strength and elongation relative to non-heat treated ones. As the number of passes increased, higher UTS and TE were achieved due to finer grains and more dissolution of β phase (Mg17Al12). The micro-hardness characteristics and tensile improvement of the friction stir processed samples depend significantly on grain size, removal of voids and porosities and dissolution of β phase in the stir zone.

  3. Friction in surface micromachined microengines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; LaVigne, G.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding the frictional properties of advanced Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is essential in order to develop optimized designs and fabrication processes, as well as to qualify devices for commercial applications. We develop and demonstrate a method to experimentally measure the forces associated with sliding friction of devices rotating on a hub. The method is demonstrated on the rotating output gear of the microengine recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In-situ measurements of an engine running at 18300 rpm give a coefficient of friction of 0.5 for radial (normal) forces less than 4 {mu}N. For larger forces the effective coefficient of friction abruptly increases, suggesting a fundamental change in the basic nature of the interaction between the gear and hub. The experimental approach we have developed to measure the frictional forces associated with the microengine is generically applicable to other MEMS devices.

  4. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  5. Hybrid Al/steel-joints manufactured by ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW): Process comparison, nondestructive testing and microscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomä, M.; Wagner, G.; Straß, B.; Wolter, B.; Benfer, S.; Fürbeth, W.

    2017-03-01

    The process of friction stir welding (FSW) is an innovative joining technique, which proved its potential in joining dissimilar metals that are poorly fusion weldable. This ability opens a wide range for applications in industrial fields, where weight reduction by partial substitution of conventional materials through lightweight materials is a current central aim. As a consequence of this, the realization of aluminum / steel-joints is of great interest. For this material compound, several friction stir welds were carried out by different researchers for varying Al/steel-joints, whereas the definition of optimal process parameters as well as the increase of mechanical properties was in the focus of the studies. To achieve further improved properties for this dissimilar joint a newly developed hybrid process named “ultrasound enhanced friction stir welding (USE-FSW)” was applied. In this paper the resulting properties of Al/steel-joints using FSW and USE-FSW will be presented and compared. Furthermore, first results by using the nondestructive testing method “computer laminography” to analyze the developed joining area will be shown supplemented by detailed light-microscopic investigations, scanning electron microscopic analysis, and EDX.

  6. Effect of Microstructures on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Friction Stir Processed NiAl Bronze Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yuting; Ding, Yang; Han, Yuanfei; Wu, Laizhi; Wang, Liqiang; Lu, Weijie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Friction stir processed (FSPed) NAB alloy exhibits inhomogeneous microstructures that can be divided into three subregions from the top surface to the bottom according to α phase morphologies: Widmanstatten α subregion, banded α colonies, and stream-like α colonies. In this study, a constant stress intensity range (ΔK) was used for each sample to study the effect of microstructures on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) of FSPed NAB alloy. The results show that α phase in banded and stream-like α colonies experiences completely dynamic recrystallization and forms equiaxed α grains during FSP. The FCGR of FSPed NAB alloy continuously decreases from the top surface to the bottom. In the subregion with stream-like α colonies, the alloy containing a higher content of equiaxed α grains and fine κ iv phase, and less retained β (β') phase exhibits the best FCG resistance. The equiaxed α grains deflect the main crack and increase crack tortuosity effect, which make a main contribution to FCG resistance of FSPed NAB alloy, while martensite β' phase produced during FSP accelerates its fatigue crack growth. Compared to matrix alloy, FSPed NAB alloy exhibits better FCG resistance only at high ΔK levels. At low ΔK levels, the crack deflection effect caused by coarser κ phase in the matrix alloy obviously improves its FCG resistance. With the increasing ΔK, the aforementioned crack deflection effect gradually diminishes and fatigue crack prefers to propagate in a flat way, resulting in higher FCGR of matrix alloy.

  7. Effect of the Preheating Temperature on Process Time in Friction Stir Welding of Al 6061-T6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained and the deductions made from an analytical modeling involving friction stir welding of Al 6061-T6. A new database was developed to simulate the contact temperature between the tool and the workpiece. A second-order equation is proposed for simulating...

  8. Theoretical Analysis of Unit Friction Force Working on the Metal Contact Surface with the Roll Change during Feedstock with Non-Uniform Temperature Distribution Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sygut P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of theoretical studies influence of non-uniform temperature distribution along the feedstock length to the unit friction force working on the metal contact surface with the roll change during the round bars 70 mm in diameter continuous rolling process. This value is one of the major factors affecting the grooves wear during the rolling process. The studies were carried out based on the actual engineering data for 160 × 160 mm square cross-section feedstock of steel S355J0. Numerical modelling of the rolling process was performed using Forge2008®, a finite-element based computer program.

  9. Numerical optimisation of friction stir welding: review of future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, the combination of increasingly more advanced numerical simulation software with high computational power has resulted in models for friction stir welding (FSW), which have improved the understanding of the determining physical phenomena behind the process substantially....... This has made optimisation of certain process parameters possible and has in turn led to better performing friction stir welded products, thus contributing to a general increase in the popularity of the process and its applications. However, most of these optimisation studies do not go well beyond manual...

  10. SIMULACIÓN DE LA TEMPERATURA EN EL PROCESO "FRICTION STIT WELDING" (FSW DE ALUMINIO AA 1100-0 // SIMULATION OF THE TEMPERATURE IN THE PROCESS FRICTION STIR WELDING" (FSW OF AA 1100-0 ALUMINIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Valdivé Lunar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The work presented shows the simulated values of the temperatures experimentally un-dertaken in [1] and [11] during friction stir welding (FSW of AA 1100-0 aluminum plates. This is done using the finite element method (FEM. We studied the behavior of temperature by applying MEF to the heat transfer equation used by [9]. The methodology used allowed modeling the problem using the software ABAQUS /CAE v6.7-1 with elements hexahedral of eight nodes and tetrahedral of four nodes. The simulation of the AA 1100-0 aluminum FSW reported a temperature difference of 80.3 C compared to the maximum value obtained experimentally by [1]. The result shows that the process modeling allows to predict the thermal behavior of the weld. // RESUMEN: The work presented shows the simulated values of the temperatures experimentally un-dertaken in [1] and [11] during friction stir welding (FSW of AA 1100-0 aluminum plates. This is done using the finite element method (FEM. We studied the behavior of temperature by applying MEF to the heat transfer equation used by [9]. The methodology used allowed modeling the problem using the software ABAQUS /CAE v6.7-1 with elements hexahedral of eight nodes and tetrahedral of four nodes. The simulation of the AA 1100-0 aluminum FSW reported a temperature difference of 80.3 C compared to the maximum value obtained experimentally by [1]. The result shows that the process modeling allows to predict the thermal behavior of the weld.

  11. Characteristics of Nanophase WC and WC-3 wt% (Ni, Co, and Fe Alloys Using a Rapid Sintering Process for the Application of Friction Stir Processing Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeup Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstructures and mechanical characteristics of tungsten carbide- (WC- based alloys, that is, WC, WC-3 wt% Ni, WC-3 wt% Co, and WC-3 wt% Fe, fabricated using a spark plasma sintering (SPS method for the application of friction stir processing tools were evaluated. The sintered bodies with a diameter of 66 mm showed relative densities of up to 99% with an average particle size of 0.26~0.41 μm under a pressure condition of 60 MPa with an electric current for 35 min without noticeable grain growth during sintering. Even though no phase changes were observed after the ball milling process the phases of W2C and WC1-x appeared in all sintered samples after sintering. The Vickers hardness and fracture toughness of the WC, WC-3 wt% Ni, WC-3 wt% Co, and WC-3 wt% Fe samples ranged from 2,240 kg mm2 to 2,730 kg mm2 and from 6.3 MPa·m1/2 to 9.1 MPa·m1/2, respectively.

  12. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Espinosa Franco1, Marina Altagracia Martínez2, Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez1, Albert I Wertheimer31Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM, Mexico; 2Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Xochimilco, Mexico; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USABackground: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community.Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem.Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded.Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance.Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.Keywords: antibiotic drug resistance

  13. Evaluation of existing EPRI and INEL test data to determine the worm to worm gear coefficient of friction in Limitorque actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza, I.A.

    1996-12-01

    About the last sizing parameter for motor operated valves which has not been determined by utility or NRC sponsored testing is actuator efficiency. A by-product of EPRI testing for valve factors is the measurement of the actuator efficiencies. Motor sizing in this testing provides efficiency testing for motors running near synchronous speed. INEL testing, sponsored by the NRC, for stem factors and rate of loading provides complimentary data for motors loaded down to zero speed. This paper analyzes the data from these two test programs to determine the coefficient of friction for the worm to worm gear interface. This allowed the development of an algorithm for determining the efficiency of actuators which have not been tested. This paper compares the results of this algorithm to the test data to provide a measure of the accuracy of this method for calculating actuator efficiency.

  14. Two new methods to determine the adhesion by means of internal friction in materials covered with films; Dos nuevos metodos para determinar la adhesion mediante friccion interna en materiales recubiertos con peliculas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colorado, H. A.; Ghilarducci, A. A.; Salva, H. R.

    2006-07-01

    Two new models are proposed to determine the adhesion energy be means of the internal friction technique (IF) in thin films layered materials. for the first method is necessary to determine enthalpy by means of the IF technique, for which the adhesion work has been determined with experimental data. In the second method are necessary to perform IF tests at constant temperature. (Author)

  15. Optimization of process parameters for friction Stir welding of dissimilar Aluminum alloys (AA2024 -T6 and AA6351-T6 by using Taguchi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ramanaiah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the Taguchi experimental design technique of Friction Stir Welds of dissimilar aluminum alloys (AA2024-T6 and AA6351-T6 for tensile properties. Effect of process parameters, rotational speed, Traverse speed and axial force, on tensile strength was evaluated. Optimized welding conditions for maximize tensile strength were estimated in order to improve the productivity, weld quality. Non-linear regression mathematical model was developed to correlate the process parameters to tensile strength. The results were verified by conducting the confirmation tests at identified optimum conditions.

  16. Process monitoring to determine electrostatic risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, David E [Affinity Static Control Consulting, LLC 2609 Quanah Drive, Round Rock, TX 78681 (United States)], E-mail: deswenson@affinity-esd.com

    2008-12-01

    Designing a factory electrostatic discharge (ESD) control program requires an understanding of all the processes where unprotected ESD susceptible items are handled either manually or by machine. Human handling aspects are generally understood and control procedures where people are involved are commonly implemented with great care. Personnel grounding systems, monitors, and the like, are installed in order to make sure that personnel do not accumulate and transfer electrostatic charge that could damage sensitive parts during handling or assembly operations. However, the ability to determine what is occurring inside of process equipment has not been particularly easy up to now. Equipment is now available that allows the measurement and recording of electrical field information inside of many process tools. One of the goals of this work is to be able to characterize equipment as capable of handling parts susceptible to specific levels that may be related to component part sensitivity.

  17. Influence of the electrical sliding speed on friction and wear processes in an electrical contact copper stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoucha, A.; Chekroud, S.; Paulmier, D.

    2004-02-01

    Among the various parameters that influence the friction and wear behaviour of a copper-stainless steel couple crossed by an electrical current and in a dry contact is the sliding speed. The tests were carried out under ambient environment and the sliding speed was in the range of 0.2-8 ms -1. The electrical current intensity was varied from 0 to 40 A and held constant during each experiment. The normal load was maintained constant corresponding to an average Hertzian stress of 10 7 Pa. It appears that the friction coefficient and the wear rate increase at first with the speed, reach their maximums, then slowly decrease and tend to constant values. Over the entire range of sliding speeds two types of wear are observed. These latters are essentially mild wear as long as hard debris do not appear at the interface and severe wear when debris consisting of oxides or oxide metal mixture become big enough, they are removed from the surface and have abrasive effect. The results are discussed in terms of observations of wear debris size and composition, wear track study, metallographic study of worn surfaces and friction and electrical contact resistance records.

  18. Fabrication of aluminum-alumina metal matrix composites via cold gas dynamic spraying at low pressure followed by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodder, K.J.; Izadi, H. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, 7th Floor, Electrical and Computer Engineering Research Facility, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2V4 (Canada); McDonald, A.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, 4-9 Mechanical Engineering Building, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G8 (Canada); Gerlich, A.P., E-mail: agerlich@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2012-10-30

    Cold gas dynamic spraying at low pressure (1 MPa gage or 150 psig) was used to fabricate Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings onto 6061 Al alloy. The powder contained Al powder admixed with -10 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in fractions up to 90 wt.%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Vickers microhardness testing, and image analysis were conducted to determine the microstructure, properties, and volume fraction of reinforcing particles in the coatings. The coatings were then friction-stir processed (FSP) at tool rotation speeds of 894 or 1723 RPM using a flat cylindrical tool. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and hardness of the final MMC coatings increased with increasing fractions of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in the feedstock powder, resulting in a maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of 48 wt.% and a hardness of 85 HV of the as-sprayed coating when 90 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used in the feed powder blend. After FSP, the hardness of the MMC increased to a maximum of 137 HV. The as-sprayed coatings contained Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles that were segregated between the Al particles, and FSP was effective in dispersing these Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and decreasing their mean free path. It was suggested that this re-distribution and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle size refinement during FSP improved the hardness of the MMC coatings.

  19. Optimization of friction stir welding process to maximize tensile strength of AA6061/ZrB2 in-situ composite butt joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinaharan, I.; Murugan, N.

    2012-02-01

    A variety of ceramic particles is added to aluminum alloys to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Establishing the joining procedure for AMCs is an essential requirement prior to extending their applications. Friction stir welding (FSW) is an emerging solid state welding which eliminates all the defects associated with fusion welding of AMCs. An attempt has been made to friction stir weld AA6061/ ZrB2 in-situ composite. A four factor, five level central composite rotatable design has been used to minimize the number of experiments. The four factors considered are tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force and weight percentage of ZrB2. A mathematical model has been developed incorporating the FSW process parameters to predict the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and FS process is optimized using generalized reduced gradient method (GRG) to maximize the UTS. The effect of process parameters on UTS was analyzed. It was observed that the process parameters independently influence the UTS over the entire range studied in this work.

  20. Experimental comparison of the MIG, friction stir welding, cold metal transfer and hybrid laser-MIG processes for AA 6005-T6 aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Serafino; Sgambitterra, Emanuele; Rinaldi, Sergio; Gallone, Antonello; Viscido, Lucio; Filice, Luigino; Umbrello, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of welded joints of AA 6005-T6 aluminum alloy obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and cold metal transfer (CMT) welding were analyzed. The performance of hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welded joints were identified using tensile, bending, shear and fatigue life tests. Taking into account the process conditions and requirements, hybrid laser-MIG and CMT welding processes were compared with friction stir welding (FSW) and conventional metal inert gas (MIG) welding processes, shown in a previous work, to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the processes for welding applications of studied Al alloy. Better tensile, bending and shear strength and fatigue life behavior were obtained with hybrid laser-MIG and FSW welded joints compared with conventional MIG processes.

  1. Influence of Grain Coarsening on the Creep Parameters During the Superplastic Deformation of a Severely Friction Stir Processed Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Caballero, Alberto; Ruano, Oscar A.; Carreño, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    During grain boundary sliding in ultrafine-grain materials at intermediate temperatures and high strain rates ( 10-2 s-1), apparent creep parameters usually deviate from the theoretical values, due to microstructural coarsening. An analysis has been carried out in a severely friction stir processed (FSP) 7075 alloy with three different ultra-fine grain sizes ( L), obtaining explicit grain size dependence of the creep parameters n ap = n ap( L) and Q ap = Q ap( L), confirming the validity of the theoretical values of these parameters in the constitutive equation.

  2. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  3. Determination of optimum welding parameters in connecting high alloyed X53CrMnNiN219 and X45CrSi93 steels by friction welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Uzkut; Bekir Sadik Ünlü; Mustafa Akdağ

    2011-07-01

    In this study, different welding parameters were applied to two different steels with high alloys and mechanical and metallographical investigations are performed. Thus, the optimum welding parameters were determined for these materials and working conditions. 12.30 diameter steel bars made up of 1.4871 (X53CrMnNiN219) and 1.4718 (X45CrSi93) steel were used as experimental material. The material loss increased with increase in friction and rotating pressure. No fracture at the welding region was observed and the highest fracture energy was identified in B5 group. Based on micro hardness investigation; the hardness profile reached its minimum value at the welding region.

  4. Linearization of friction effects in vibration of two rotating blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of friction effects in blade shrouding which are realized by means of friction elements placed between blades. In order to develop a methodology of modelling, two blades with one friction element in between are considered only. Flexible blades fixed to a rotating disc are discretized by FEM using 1D Rayleigh beam elements derived in rotating space as well as the friction element modelled as a rigid body. The blades and the friction element are connected through two concurrent friction planes, where the friction forces arise on the basis of centrifugal force acting on the friction element. The linearization of friction is performed using the harmonic balance method to determine equivalent damping coefficients in dependence on the amplitudes of relative slip motion between the blades and the friction element. The methodology is applied to a model of two real blades and will be extended for the whole bladed disc with shrouding.

  5. Comparisons of friction models in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    A friction model is one of the key input boundary conditions in finite element simulations. It is said that the friction model plays an important role in controlling the accuracy of necessary output results predicted. Among the various friction models, which one is of higher accuracy is still...... unknown and controversial. In this paper, finite element analyses applying five different friction models to experiments of upsetting of AA 6082 lubricated with four lubricants are presented. Frictional parameter values are determined by fitness of data of friction area ratio from finite element analysis...... to experimental results. It is found that calibration curves of the friction area ratio for all of the five chosen friction models used in the finite element simulation do fit the experimental results. Usually, calbration curves of the friction area ratio are more sensitive to friction at the tool...

  6. Development of a Robust and Cost-Effective Friction Stir Welding Process for Use in Advanced Military Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    245influences the FSW joint profile as well as the weld material 246microstructure and properties. Initially, one-piece steel tools 247were used with both the pin...885Fracture Locations of Friction-Stir Welded Joints of 6061-T6 Alumin - 886ium Alloy, J. Mater. Sci. Lett., 2003, 22, p 1061–1063 8878. W.B. Lee, C.Y. Lee...Stir Welding of Stainless Steel , 915 Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 2005, 398, p 146–163 916 18. M. Grujicic, G. Arakere, C.-F.Yen, and B.A. Cheeseman, Computa- 917

  7. Acoustics of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  8. Temporarily alloying titanium to facilitate friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  9. Temporarily alloying titanium to facilitate friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  10. Noise and vibration in friction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sergienko, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The book analyzes the basic problems of oscillation processes and theoretical aspects of noise and vibration in friction systems. It presents generalized information available in literature data and results of the authors in vibroacoustics of friction joints, including car brakes and transmissions. The authors consider the main approaches to abatement of noise and vibration in non-stationary friction processes. Special attention is paid to materials science aspects, in particular to advanced composite materials used to improve the vibroacoustic characteristics of tribopairs The book is intended for researchers and technicians, students and post-graduates specializing in mechanical engineering, maintenance of machines and transport means, production certification, problems of friction and vibroacoustics.

  11. Research on measurement and modeling of the gastro intestine's frictional characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun Dong; Yan, Guo Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The frictional characteristics of an intestine are required basically for the development of a noninvasive endoscope for the human intestine. The frictional force is tested by measuring the current of the motor hauling the frictional coupons at an even speed. A multifunction data acquisition device with model NI-6008 USB is used and the data process is performed on the Labview software. Two kinds of materials with aluminum and copper are used. The surfaces are designed as triangle, rectangular, cylindrical and plane forms. The tested results indicate that the frictional resistance force includes the nominal frictional force and the visco-adhesive force. When the surface contour changes from the triangle to the rectangular, to the cylindrical and finally to the plane, the nominal frictional coefficients will decrease and the visco-adhesive force will increase. The nominal frictional force is related to the elastic restoring force, the real frictional force and the contact angle. The cohesive force is determined by the contact area and the contact angle. This research will provide some preliminary references to the design and the parameter selection of locomotion devices in the human gastro-intestine.

  12. Bending Under Tension Test with Direct Friction Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Olsson, David Dam; Chodnikiewicz, K.

    2006-01-01

    A special Bending-Under-Tension (BUT) transducer has been developed in which friction around the tool radius can be directly measured when drawing a plane sheet strip around a cylindrical tool-pin under constant back tension. The front tension, back tension and torque on the tool-pin are all...... measured directly, thus enabling accurate measurement of friction and direct determination of lubricant film breakdown for varying normal pressure, sliding speed, tool radius and tool preheat temperature. The transducer is applied in an experimental investigation focusing on limits of lubrication...... in drawing of stainless steel showing the influence of varying process conditions and the performance of different lubricants....

  13. Bending Under Tension Test with Direct Friction Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Olsson, David Dam; Chodnikiewicz, K.

    2004-01-01

    A special BUT-transducer has been developed in which friction around the tool radius can be directly measured when drawing a plane sheet strip around a cylindrical tool-pin under constant back tension. The front tension, back tension and torque on the tool-pin are all measured directly, thus...... enabling accurate measurement of friction and direct determination of lubricant film breakdown for varying normal pressure, sliding speed, tool radius and tool preheat temperature. The transducer is applied in an experimental investigation focusing on limits of lubrication in drawing of stainless steel...... showing the influence of varying process conditions and the performance of different lubricants....

  14. Study Friction Distribution during the Cold Rolling of Material by Matroll Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, H.; Dehghani, K.

    2007-04-01

    Rolling process is one of the most important ways of metal forming. Since the results of this process are almost finished product, therefore controlling the parameters affecting this process is very important in order to have cold rolling products with high quality. Among the parameters knowing the coefficient of friction within the roll gap is known as the most significant one. That is because other rolling parameters such as rolling force, pressure in the roll gap, forward slip, surface quality of sheet, and the life of work rolls are directly influenced by friction. On the other hand, in rolling calculation due to lake of a true amount for coefficient of friction a supposed value is considered for it. In this study, a new software (Matroll), is introduced which can determine the coefficient of friction (COF) and plot the friction hills for an industrial mill. Besides, based on rolling equations, it offers about 30 rolling parameters as outputs. Having the rolling characteristics as inputs, the software is able to calculate the coefficient of friction. Many rolling passes were performed on real industrial aluminum mill. The coefficient of friction was obtained for all passes. The results are in good agreement with the findings of the other researchers.

  15. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  16. Inertial Lévy Flight with Nonlinear Friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yan; BAO Jing-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Lévy Bight with nonlinear friction is studied. Due to the occurrence of extremely long jumps Levy flights often possess infinite variance and are physically problematic if describing the dynamics of a particle of finite mass. However, by introducing nonlinear friction, we show that the stochastic process subject to Levy noise exhibits finite variance, leading to a well-defined .kinetic energy. In the force-free fiIeld, normal diffusion behavior is observed and the diffusion coefficient decreases with Levy index μ. Furthermore, we find a kinetic resonance of the particle in the harmonic potential to the external oscillating field in the generally underdamped region and the value of the linear friction γo determines whether resonance occurs or not.%Lévy flight with nonlinear friction is studied.Due to the occurrence of extremely long jumps Lévy flights often possess infinite variance and are physically problematic if describing the dynamics of a particle of finite mass.However,by introducing nonlinear friction,we show that the stochastic process subject to Lévy noise exhibits finite variance,leading to a well-defined kinetic energy.In the force-free field,normal diffusion behavior is observed and the diffusion coefficient decreases with Lévy index μ.Furthermore,we find a kinetic resonance of the particle in the harmonic potential to the external oscillating field in the generally underdamped region and the value of the linear friction γ0 determines whether resonance occurs or not.The stable Lévy process,often called the Lévy flight,is used to model various phenomena such as self-diffusion in micelle systems,[1] special problems in reaction dynamics,[2] and even the flight of an albatross.

  17. Friction and Wear in Timing Belt Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Timing belt tooth goes into contact with a drive pulley, stretched to the maximum, because of the previous tension. When the contact begins the peak of the belt tooth makes the contact with the outer surface of the pulley teeth. The process of the teeth entering into the contact zone is accompanied with the relative sliding of their side surfaces and appropriate friction force. The normal force value is changing with the parabolic function, which also leads to the changes of the friction force. The biggest value of the normal force and of the friction force is at the tooth root. Hollow between teeth and the tip of the pulley teeth are also in contact. Occasionally, the face surface of the belt and the flange are also in contact. The friction occurs in those tribomechanical systems, also. Values of these friction forces are lower compared with the friction force, which occurs at the teeth root.

  18. Estudo de viabilidade da soldagem de termoplásticos por "Friction Spot Welding" (FSpW Feasibility study of the Friction Spot Welding (FSpW process in thermoplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Freiria de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Os plásticos apresentam boa processabilidade, oferecendo uma grande liberdade de design. Porém, a fabricação de peças cada vez maiores e mais complexas tem exigido a busca por melhorias e desenvolvimento dos atuais processos de união e soldagem de polímeros. Friction Spot Welding (FSpW é uma técnica de soldagem pontual por fricção inicialmente desenvolvida para ligas de alumínio, possibilitando soldas com excelentes propriedades mecânicas. Nesse trabalho a soldagem de termoplásticos através da técnica FSpW foi analisada. Para tal, utilizaram-se placas de polimetacrilato de metila (PMMA, um termoplástico amorfo com crescente importância na indústria automotiva e aeronáutica por seu bom balanço de propriedades, como baixa densidade, boa processabilidade, soldabilidade e resistência química e ao envelhecimento. As amostras soldadas foram analisadas por microscopia ótica, medições de microdureza Vickers e ensaio de resistência ao cisalhamento. Os resultados mostraram que a resistência mecânica ao cisalhamento alcançada (cerca de 9,5 MPa é igual ou maior que a resistência de juntas sobrepostas de PMMA obtidas por outras técnicas convencionais como soldagem por ultra-som, por microondas e thermal bonding. O presente trabalho comprovou, dessa forma, a potencialidade da técnica FSpW para soldar termoplásticos.The modern thermoplastics show a wide range of engineering applications, mainly due to its good processability and properties, such as stress-to-weight ratio and toughness. However, the manufacturing of larger products with complex geometries require advanced polymer welding techniques. Friction Spot Welding (FSpW is a joining technique allowing the fabrication of joint with good mechanical properties. In this work, the feasibility of the FSpW of thermoplastics was investigated in polymethyl-methacrilate (PMMA, an amorphous thermoplastic with increasing importance in the airspace and automotive industry due to its

  19. Development of empirical relationships for prediction of mechanical and wear properties of AA6082 aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Processing (FSP has been established as a potential solid state production method to prepare aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. FSP was effectively applied to produce AA6082 AMCs reinforced with various ceramic particles such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC in this work. Empirical relationships were estimated to predict the influence of FSP process parameters on the properties such as area of stir zone, microhardness and wear rate of AMCs. FSP experiments were executed using a central composite rotatable design consisting of four factors and five levels. The FSP parameters analyzed were tool rotational speed, traverse speed, groove width and type of ceramic particle. The effect of those parameters on the properties of AMCs was deduced using the developed empirical relationships. The predicted trends were explained with the aid of observed macro and microstructures.

  20. How to teach friction: Experiments and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Borghi, Lidia; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    Students generally have difficulty understanding friction and its associated phenomena. High school and introductory college-level physics courses usually do not give the topic the attention it deserves. We have designed a sequence for teaching about friction between solids based on a didactic reconstruction of the relevant physics, as well as research findings about student conceptions. The sequence begins with demonstrations that illustrate different types of friction. Experiments are subsequently performed to motivate students to obtain quantitative relations in the form of phenomenological laws. To help students understand the mechanisms producing friction, models illustrating the processes taking place on the surface of bodies in contact are proposed.

  1. Design and manufacture of intelligent Cu-based wet friction materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁华东; 韩文政; 傅苏黎; 杜建华; 遇元宏

    2004-01-01

    The friction sheets working process was analyzed. It is found that its characteristic is microregion instantaneous high temperature and the current cooling method, making the sheets cooled by the lubricating oil flowing through the friction surface, is not very efficient. Then, intelligent materials concept was introduced, the component and microstructure of intelligent Cu-based friction materials were designed, and the intelligent Cu-based wet friction materials as well as sheets were manufactured. And the intelligent friction materials working principle, i.e. the materials cooling the friction microregion in real time or the friction sheets cutting the peak value of microregion instantaneous high temperature during friction process, was given depending on the characteristics of the materials' and friction sheets' working process. Finally, it is indicated that the intelligent friction sheets excell the currently used friction sheets in properties, including anti-heating property, anti-wearing property as well as friction characteristic.

  2. Friction measurement and modelling in forward rod extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai; Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2003-01-01

    Forward extrusion is one of the important processes in bulk metal forming. Friction stress can be estimated from the slope of the load±displacement curve at the steady state after the maximum load in a forward extrusion test. In this paper, forward rod extrusion tests are carried out to determine...... experimentally friction stress at various normal pressures, reductions in area, billet heights and lubrications. Tested materials include aluminium alloy, low carbon steel and stainless steel. Two lubrication methods are applied, conversion coating followed by either alkaline soap or molybdenum disulphide...... as the lubricant. Friction stresses are obtained from measurements of slopes of extrusion pressure±punch travel curves at the steady state stage. Normal pressures are evaluated by using Mohr’s circle, in which shear ¯ow stresses are estimated at the maximum elastic deformation points from the same extrusion...

  3. Effects of friction stir processing on the microstructure and superplasticity of in situ nano-ZrB2/2024Al composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutao Zhao; Xizhou Kai; Gang Chen; Weili Lin; Chunmei Wang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, in situ nano-ZrB2/2024Al composites fabricated from 2024Al–K2ZrF6–KBF4 system were processed by friction stir processing (FSP) to achieve superplasticity of the composites. And the effects of particle contents (1 wt%, 3 wt%, 5 wt%), matrix grain size (micron or sub-micron), strain rates (5 × 10¯3 s¯1, 1 × 10¯2 s¯1, 2 × 10¯2 s¯1) and deformation temperatures (400 K, 480 K, 600 K, 700 K, 750 K) on the superplasticity of the composites were investigated. After the friction stir processing, the coarse grains of the cast composites with matrix grain size of about 80–100 μm and nano-ZrB2 reinforcement size of 30–100 nm were crushed into small grains about 1 μm in size, and the uniformity of the nano-ZrB2 reinforcements was also improved. And under the same superplastic tensile testing condition at the temperature of 750 K and strain rate of 5 × 10¯3 s¯1, the FSP nano 3 wt%ZrB2/2024Al composite exhibited an superplastic elongation of 292.5%, while the elongation of the corresponding cast composite was only less than 100%. Meanwhile, the m values of the FSP composites were always higher than the cast composites, especially the FSP composites with 3 wt% particles has the m value of 0.5321 i.e., the FSP composites should had better superplastic properties than cast ones. Furthermore, the FSP composites had higher apparent deformation activation energy (Q) than that of the lattice diffusion of pure aluminium, indicating that the deformation mechanisms of the FSP composites should be grain boundary sliding mechanisms.

  4. Effects of tempering on internal friction of carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyos, J.J., E-mail: jjhoyos@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Ciencia y Tecnologia de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellin, Carrera 80 Numero 65-223, Medellin (Colombia); Ghilarducci, A.A., E-mail: friccion@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Instituto Balseiro-Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche RN (Argentina); Salva, H.R., E-mail: salva@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Instituto Balseiro-Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche RN (Argentina); Chaves, C.A., E-mail: cachaves@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Ciencia y Tecnologia de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellin, Carrera 80 Numero 65-223, Medellin (Colombia); Velez, J.M., E-mail: jmvelez@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Ciencia y Tecnologia de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellin, Carrera 80 Numero 65-223, Medellin (Colombia)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Time tempering dependent microstructure of two steels is studied by internal friction. {yields} Internal friction indicates the interactions of dislocations with carbon and carbides. {yields} Internal friction detects the first stage of tempering. {yields} Precipitation hardening is detected by the decrease in the background. - Abstract: Two steels containing 0.626 and 0.71 wt.% carbon have been studied to determine the effects of tempering on the microstructure and the internal friction. The steels were annealed at 1093 K, quenched into water and tempered for 60 min at 423 K, 573 K and 723 K. The increase of the tempering time diminishes the martensite tetragonality due to the redistribution of carbon atoms from octahedrical interstitial sites to dislocations. Internal friction spectrum is decomposed into five peaks and an exponential background, which are attributed to the carbide precipitation and the dislocation relaxation process. Simultaneous presence of peaks P1 and P2 indicates the interaction of dislocations with the segregated carbon and carbide precipitate.

  5. FRICTION MODELING OF Al-Mg ALLOY SHEETS BASED ON MULTIPLE REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirpa G. Lemu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reports a proposed approach to a frictional resistance description in sheet metal forming processes that enables determination of the friction coefficient value under a wide range of friction conditions without performing time-consuming experiments. The motivation for this proposal is the fact that there exists a considerable amount of factors affect the friction coefficient value and as a result building analytical friction model for specified process conditions is practically impossible. In this proposed approach, a mathematical model of friction behaviour is created using multiple regression analysis and artificial neural networks. The regression analysis was performed using a subroutine in MATLAB programming code and STATISTICA Neural Networks was utilized to build an artificial neural networks model. The effect of different training strategies on the quality of neural networks was studied. As input variables for regression model and training of radial basis function networks, generalized regression neural networks and multilayer networks the results of strip drawing friction test were utilized. Four kinds of Al-Mg alloy sheets were used as a test material.

  6. Benchmarking of direct and indirect friction tests in micro forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rasmus Solmer; Calaon, Matteo; Arentoft, M.

    2012-01-01

    The sizeable increase in metal forming friction at micro scale, due to the existence of size effects, constitutes a barrier to the realization of industrial micro forming processes. In the quest for improved frictional conditions in micro scale forming operations, friction tests are applied...... to qualify the tribological performance of the particular forming scenario. In this work the application of a simulative sliding friction test at micro scale is studied. The test setup makes it possible to measure the coefficient of friction as a function of the sliding motion. The results confirm a sizeable...... increase in the coefficient of friction when the work piece size is scaled down. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications....

  7. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  8. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  9. Friction of tungsten carbide-cobalt coatings obtained by means of plasma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, M. (Hydromecanique et Frottement, Centre de Recherches, 42 - Andreziux-Boutheon (France)); McDonnell, L.; Cashell, E.M. (CRTC, Cork (Ireland))

    1991-11-29

    A study of the frictional properties of WC-Co-type coatings obtained by plasma spraying was carried out, the influence of the majority of the parameters involved in atmospheric spraying being analysed. This study of the correlations between the tribological behaviour and the compositionl of the coatings shows that friction is mainly determined by the method and degree of decomposition of the carbides. These in turn are linked to the effects of heat and/or oxidation, factors which can change considerably, not only as a function of the method used (plasma power, nature and flow rate of the plasma gases etc.) but also as a function of the coating process and the composition of the original powders. It has been possible to correlate the improvement in the frictional properties (resistance to seizure, reduction in the coefficient of friction) with the presence of free carbon in the coatings, associated with the carbide decomposition process. (orig.).

  10. Effect of Multi-pass Friction Stir Processing on the Electrochemical and Corrosion Behavior of Pure Titanium in Strongly Acidic Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Attarzadeh, Farid Reza; Vakili-Azghandi, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of multi-pass friction stir processed (FSP) pure titanium was studied in 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. Microstructures of treated and untreated samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the grain size decreased with increasing the number of applied passes of FSP. Electrochemical tests including potentiodynamic polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that three passes of FSP treatments resulted in a Ti sample which exhibited the best passive behavior and had the highest corrosion resistance among all samples in strongly acidic solutions of 0.5 M H2SO4. These improvements can be attributed to the emergence of diverse structural defects and grain refinement induced by FSP treatments. Moreover, Mott-Schottky analysis was performed to investigate the semiconducting properties of passive films. It was found that the semiconducting behavior remained the same after FSP treatments but it reduced donor densities and surprisingly introduced an additional donor level.

  11. Influence of Al2O3 particles on the microstructure and mechanical properties of copper surface composites fabricated by friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Suvarna Raju

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of three factors, such as volume percentage of reinforcement particles (i.e. Al2O3, tool tilt angle and concave angle of shoulder, on the mechanical properties of Cu–Al2O3 surface composites fabricated via friction stir processing was studied. Taguchi method was used to optimize these factors for maximizing the mechanical properties of surface composites. The fabricated surface composites were examined by optical microscope for dispersion of reinforcement particles. It was found that Al2O3 particles are uniformly dispersed in the stir zone. The tensile properties of the surface composites increased with the increase in the volume percentage of the Al2O3 reinforcement particles. This is due to the addition of the reinforcement particles which increases the temperature of recrystallization by pinning the grain boundaries of the copper matrix and blocking the movement of the dislocations. The observed mechanical properties are correlated with microstructure and fracture features.

  12. Influence of Al2O3 particles on the microstructure and mechanical properties of copper surface composites fabricated by friction stir processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.SUVARNA RAJU; A.KUMAR

    2014-01-01

    The influence of three factors, such as volume percentage of reinforcement particles (i.e. Al2O3), tool tilt angle and concave angle of shoulder, on the mechanical properties of CueAl2O3 surface composites fabricated via friction stir processing was studied. Taguchi method was used to optimize these factors for maximizing the mechanical properties of surface composites. The fabricated surface composites were examined by optical microscope for dispersion of reinforcement particles. It was found that Al2O3 particles are uniformly dispersed in the stir zone. The tensile properties of the surface composites increased with the increase in the volume percentage of the Al2O3 reinforcement particles. This is due to the addition of the reinforcement particles which increases the temperature of recrystallization by pinning the grain boundaries of the copper matrix and blocking the movement of the dislocations. The observed mechanical properties are correlated with microstructure and fracture features.

  13. Volatility Determination in an Ambit Process Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Graversen, Svend-Erik

    The probability limit behaviour of normalised quadratic variation is studied for a simple tempo-spatial ambit process, with particular regard to the question of volatility memorylessness.......The probability limit behaviour of normalised quadratic variation is studied for a simple tempo-spatial ambit process, with particular regard to the question of volatility memorylessness....

  14. Measuring Search Frictions Using Japanese Microdata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, Masaru; Kohara, Miki; Machikita, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    This paper estimates individual-level matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labour market and presents the determinants of search duration. We employ administrative microdata that track the job search process of job seekers who left or lost their job in August 2005...... and subsequently registered at their local public employment service. Our finding is that the matching function exhibits decreasing rather than constant returns-to-scale for job seekers and vacancies. We also find that after controlling for the benefits period, job seekers who lost their job involuntarily were...

  15. Measuring Search Frictions Using Japanese Microdata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, Masaru; Kohara, Miki; Machikita, Tomohiro

    This paper estimates matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labor market and presents determinants of search duration to explain the effect of unemployment benefits on a job seeker’s behavior. We employ administrative micro data that track the job search process...... unemployment benefits lengthen (shorten) the duration of job search for job seekers who voluntarily (involuntarily) leave employment....... of individuals who left or lost their job in August 2005 and subsequently registered at their local public employment service. Our finding is that the matching function would exhibit decreasing returns-to-scale for job seekers and vacancies, rather than constant return-to-scale. We also find that generous...

  16. Financial Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Jensen, Mads

    at a pre-specified price, no later than a pre-specified date. For example, an option can grant the right to buy 100 General Electric shares for USD 31 each no later than October 21, 2016. An interesting issue is determining when an option is optimally exercised. Merton (1973) shows that in a world without...

  17. Frictional heating of tribological contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Johannes

    1995-01-01

    Wherever friction occurs, mechanical energy is transformed into heat. The tem­ perature rise associated with this heating can have an important influence on the tribological behaviour of the contacting components. Apart from determining per­ formance, thermal phenomena affect reliability and may cau

  18. Friction Sensitivity of Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan none tetrazene 407913 tetrazene 7902454 The mixes which were tested are: NOL 130 (basic lead styphnate , barium nitrate, lead...azide, tetrazene, and antimony sulfide); PA 100 (normal lead styphnate , barium nitrate, tetrazene, lead dioxide, calcium silicide, and antimony...styuhnate, basic lead styphnate , potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan, and tetrazene were tested to determine the- 10% and 50% probability of friction

  19. Industrial Specialization: Determinants, Processes and Consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis examines the causes, processes and consequences of industrial specialization. Specifically, three sets of questions are addressed. First, how do trade and financial openness affect industrial specialization across countries? Second, how does trade openness affect industrial composition

  20. FEM simulation of friction testing method based on combined forward rod-backward can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakamura, T; Bay, Niels; Zhang, Z. L

    1997-01-01

    A new friction testing method by combined forward rod-backward can extrusion is proposed in order to evaluate frictional characteristics of lubricants in forging processes. By this method the friction coefficient mu and the friction factor m can be estimated along the container wall and the conic...... in a mechanical press with aluminium alloy A6061 as the workpiece material and different kinds of lubricants. They confirm the analysis resulting in reasonable values for the friction coefficient and the friction factor....

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir processed IF steel%搅拌摩擦加工IF钢的组织性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵凯; 王快社; 郝亚鑫; 王文; 徐瑞琦

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir processing was applied to cool-rolled DC04 IF steel plates with a thickness of 3 mm, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the processed zone were investigated. A defect-free specimen with a shiny and smooth surface is fabrica-ted at a tool rotation rate of 950 r·min-1 and a travel speed of 60 mm·min-1 using additional forced cooling technology after processing. A fine equiaxed grain structure can be obtained in the processed zone, which causes a higher hardness of HV 135. 6, 1. 4 times as large as the base metal at the center of the processed zone, and the highest hardness of HV 312. 8 in the surface. The ultimate tensile strength of processed samples with and without the surface fine-grained layer increases by 50. 9% and 47. 6% compared to that of the base material, respectively. The both fracture surfaces of samples before and after friction stir processing exhibit dimple ductile fracture characterization. Grain refinement is considered to be the main reason for improving the ultimate tensile strength.%对3 mm厚的DC04冷轧IF钢板进行搅拌摩擦加工,研究加工区域的微观组织与力学性能. 在旋转速度为950 r· min-1 ,加工速度为60 mm·min-1时,采用加工后强制冷却技术可获得光滑平整且没有缺陷的加工表面. 搅拌摩擦加工后组织显著细化,加工中心的平均显微硬度约为HV 135. 6,是母材硬度的1. 4倍,表面细晶层硬度最高可达到HV 312. 8,细晶层和过渡层的抗拉强度分别比母材的抗拉强度提高50. 9%和47. 6%,加工前后试样的拉伸断口均呈微孔聚合韧性断裂特征. 细晶强化对材料抗拉强度的提高起主要作用.

  2. Micromechanisms of friction and wear introduction to relativistic tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Lyubimov, Dmitrij; Pinchuk, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    The modern vision of the micromechanism of friction and wear is explored, from the examination of ideal and real crystal structure and adhesion properties to the dynamics of solid frictional interaction. The fundamental quantum-mechanical and relativity principles of particle interaction are considered as basis of friction micro-process examination. The changes in solid structure originated from the influence of different kinds of force fields are considered. The principal possibility of relativity effect manifestation by friction is explained. The critical state of friction – triboplasma – was studied. Structural peculiarities of triboplasma, the kinetics of its transformation during frictional interaction as well as the influence of plasma and postplasma processes on tribojunction friction characteristics and complex formation by friction were examined. The book addresses to tribology researchers.

  3. Temperature dependent effective friction coefficient estimation in friction stir welding with the bobbin tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction coefficient in many friction stir welding researches is generally used as an effective, constant value without concern on the adaptable and changeable nature of the friction during welding sequence. This is understandable because the main problem in analyzing friction in friction stir welding are complex nature of the friction processes, case-dependent and time dependent contact between the bodies, influence of the temperature, sliding velocity, etc. This paper is presenting a complex experimental-numerical-analytical model for estimating the effective friction coefficient on contact of the bobbin tool and welding plates during welding, considering the temperature at the contact as the most influencing parameter on friction. The estimation criterion is the correspondence of the experimental temperature and temperature from the numerical model. The estimation procedure is iterative and parametric - the heat transport parameters and friction coefficient are adapted during the estimation procedure in a realistic manner to achieve relative difference between experimental and model’s temperature lower than 3%. The results show that friction coefficient varies from 0.01 to 0.21 for steel-aluminium alloy contact and temperature range from 406°C to 22°C.

  4. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa, Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco1, Marina Altagracia Martínez2, Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez1, Albert I Wertheimer31Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM), Mexico; 2Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Xochimilco, Mexico; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USABackground: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a se...

  5. Forming of aluminium alloy friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating, through analytical models, numerical models and experiments, the effect of the warm deformation phase, realised with an in temperature upsetting, on the weld previously performed by friction stir lap welding on aluminium alloy blanks. The investigation allows to show the deformation zones after upsetting that determine the homogenisation of the weld section. The analytical model allows to relate the friction factor with the upsetting load. The presence on the weld of not elevated friction factor values determines the deformation and localisation levels very useful for the weld. Such methodology allows to improve the weld itself with the forming phase.

  6. An empirically based steady state friction law and implications for fault stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, E.; Nielsen, S.; Violay, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2016-04-01

    Empirically based rate-and-state friction laws (RSFLs) have been proposed to model the dependence of friction forces with slip and time. The relevance of the RSFL for earthquake mechanics is that few constitutive parameters define critical conditions for fault stability (i.e., critical stiffness and frictional fault behavior). However, the RSFLs were determined from experiments conducted at subseismic slip rates (V 0.1 m/s) remains questionable on the basis of the experimental evidence of (1) large dynamic weakening and (2) activation of particular fault lubrication processes at seismic slip rates. Here we propose a modified RSFL (MFL) based on the review of a large published and unpublished data set of rock friction experiments performed with different testing machines. The MFL, valid at steady state conditions from subseismic to seismic slip rates (0.1 µm/s arrest.

  7. Fatigue crack paths and properties in A356-T6 aluminum alloy microstructurally modified by friction stir processing under different conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tajiri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A356-T6 cast aluminum alloy is a light weight structural material, but fatigue crack initiates and propagates from a casting defect leading to final fracture. Thus it is important to eliminate casting defects. In this study, friction stir processing (FSP was applied to A356-T6, in which rotating tool with probe and shoulder was plunged into the material and travels along the longitudinal direction to induce severe plastic deformation, resulting in the modification of microstructure. Two different processing conditions with low and high tool rotational speeds were tried and subsequently fully reversed fatigue tests were performed to investigate the effect of processing conditions on the crack initiation and propagation behavior. The fatigue strengths were successfully improved by both conditions due to the elimination of casting defects. But the lower tool rotational speed could further improve fatigue strength than the higher speed. EBSD analyses revealed that the higher tool rotational speed resulted in the severer texture having detrimental effects on fatigue crack initiation and propagation resistances.

  8. Effect of Welding Parameters and Aging Process on the Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir-Welded 6063-T4 Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toktaş, Alaaddin; Toktaş, Gülcan

    2012-06-01

    6063-T4 Al alloy was friction stir welded at various tool rotations (800, 1120, and 1600 rpm) and welding speeds (200 and 315 mm/min) using a specially manufactured tool with a height-adjustable and right-hand-threaded pin. The postweld aging process (at 185 °C for 7 h) was applied to a group of the welded plates. In this study, the effects of the welding parameters and the postweld aging treatment on the microstructural and mechanical properties of 6063-T4 Al alloy were studied. The maximum weld temperatures during the welding process were recorded, and the fracture surfaces of tensile specimens were examined using a scanning electron microscope. The homogeneous hardness profiles were obtained for all the weldings with no trace of softening regions. It was observed that the ultimate tensile strengths (UTS) increased slightly (on average by approx. 8%) and the percent elongations decreased (on average by approx. 33%) by the postweld aging treatment. The maximum bending forces ( F max) of all the welds were less than that of the base metal. It was observed that the F max values increased after the postweld aging process at the welding speed of 315 mm/min and decreased at the welding speed of 200 mm/min.

  9. Measurement of friction coefficient in aluminum sheet warm forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zheng-hua; LI Zhi-gang; HUANG Chong-jiu; DONG Xiang-huai

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheets are used more and more to manufacture auto panels. Because the friction behavior is very complicated, it is necessary to study the friction during the aluminum sheet warm forming process. The author has designed a new probe sensor based on an online tribotest method which directly measures friction coefficient in the forming process. Experiments of cup drawing have been conducted and the friction coefficients under different forming conditions have been measured. The results indicate that the forming parameters, such as forming temperature, blankholding force and lubrication status have great effect upon the friction coefficient.

  10. Effects of friction stir processing on the microstructure and superplasticity of in situ nano-ZrB2/2024Al composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutao Zhao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, in situ nano-ZrB2/2024Al composites fabricated from 2024Al–K2ZrF6–KBF4 system were processed by friction stir processing (FSP to achieve superplasticity of the composites. And the effects of particle contents (1 wt%, 3 wt%, 5 wt%, matrix grain size (micron or sub-micron, strain rates (5×10−3 s−1, 1×10−2 s−1, 2×10−2 s−1 and deformation temperatures (400 K, 480 K, 600 K, 700 K, 750 K on the superplasticity of the composites were investigated. After the friction stir processing, the coarse grains of the cast composites with matrix grain size of about 80–100 μm and nano-ZrB2 reinforcement size of 30–100 nm were crushed into small grains about 1 μm in size, and the uniformity of the nano-ZrB2 reinforcements was also improved. And under the same superplastic tensile testing condition at the temperature of 750 K and strain rate of 5×10−3 s−1, the FSP nano 3 wt%ZrB2/2024Al composite exhibited an superplastic elongation of 292.5%, while the elongation of the corresponding cast composite was only less than 100%. Meanwhile, the m values of the FSP composites were always higher than the cast composites, especially the FSP composites with 3 wt% particles has the m value of 0.5321 i.e., the FSP composites should had better superplastic properties than cast ones. Furthermore, the FSP composites had higher apparent deformation activation energy (Q than that of the lattice diffusion of pure aluminium, indicating that the deformation mechanisms of the FSP composites should be grain boundary sliding mechanisms.

  11. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  12. THE DYNAMIC FRICTION TERM IN THE SPRING-BLOCK MODELS FOR EARTHQUAKES: A CONSTRAINT FROM SEISMIC MOMENT AND ENERGY CATALOGUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴忠良

    2001-01-01

    In the spring-block models of earthquakes, one of the key factors is the dynamic friction term which determines the complexity of the faulting process. Generally, two kinds of friction, namely velocity-dependent friction and slipdependent friction, are used in the modelling. But until now there has still been a lack of information on which kind of friction term is more suitable for modelling the phenomenology of earthquakes. Based on the numerical studies of Shaw (1998 Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 88 1457), we have examined the ratio of the broadband radiated energy and the scalar seismic moment of shallow earthquakes worldwide from 1987 to 1998. The result shows that for earthquakes with strike-slip mechanisms, velocity-dependent friction seems to be predominant, while for thrust and normal events,slip-dependent friction seems predominant. This suggests that in the spring-block models for earthquakes, the type of focal mechanism has to be accounted for, and different types of earthquakes require different dynamic friction terms in the corresponding spring-block model.

  13. A new smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for friction stir welding: Process modeling and simulation of microstructure evolution in a magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Dongsheng; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ahzi, Said; Khraisheh, Marwan; Khaleel, Moe

    2013-09-01

    We present a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for friction stir welding (FSW). FSW has broad commercial application in the marine, aerospace, rail, and automotive industries. However, development of the FSW process for each new application has remained largely empirical. Few established numerical modeling techniques have been developed that can explain and predict important features of the process physics involved in FSW. This is particularly true in the areas of material flow and mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we present a novel modeling approach to simulate FSW that may have significant advantages over current finite element or finite difference based methods. Unlike traditional grid-based methods, Lagrangian particle methods such as SPH can simulate the dynamics of interfaces, large material deformations, and the material’s strain and temperature history without employing complex tracking schemes. Three-dimensional simulations of FSW on AZ31 Mg alloy are performed. The temperature history and distribution, grain size, microhardness as well as the texture evolution are presented. Numerical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Friction Welding of Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys with Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ambroziak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our actual knowledge and experience in joining dissimilar materials with the use of friction welding method. The joints of aluminium and aluminium alloys with the different types of steel were studied. The structural effects occurring during the welding process were described. The mechanical properties using, for example, (i microhardness measurements, (ii tensile tests, (iii bending tests, and (iv shearing tests were determined. In order to obtain high-quality joints the influence of different configurations of the process such as (i changing the geometry of bonding surface, (ii using the interlayer, or (iii heat treatment was analyzed. Finally, the issues related to the selection of optimal parameters of friction welding process were also investigated.

  15. A friction model for cold forging of aluminum, steel and stainless steel provided with conversion coating and solid film lubricant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Eriksen, Morten; Tan, Xincai

    2011-01-01

    Adopting a simulative tribology test system for cold forging the friction stress for aluminum, steel and stainless steel provided with typical lubricants for cold forging has been determined for varying normal pressure, surface expansion, sliding length and tool/work piece interface temperature...... of normal pressure and tool/work piece interface temperature. The model is verified by process testing measuring friction at varying reduction in cold forward rod extrusion....

  16. Study on the Friction Coefficient in Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The friction between the abrasive grains and workpi ec e is a crutial factor determining the main grinding output. Few studies have bee n carried out investigating the values of the friction coefficient in grinding, due to the difficulty of direct measurement. In this paper, a mathematical model of the friction coefficient in grinding has been established with the aid of a new grinding parameter C ge, which has close relations to wheel wear rate Z s, metal removal rate Z w, specific energy u and gr...

  17. Metallographic structure, mechanical properties, and process parameter optimization of 5A06 joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted refill friction stir spot welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-bo; Qiao, Feng-bin; Guo, Li-jie; Qiu, Xiong-er

    2017-02-01

    Novel hybrid refill friction stir spot welding (RFSSW) assisted with ultrasonic oscillation was introduced to 5A06 aluminum alloy joints. The metallographic structure and mechanical properties of 5A06 aluminum alloy RFSSW joints formed without ultrasonic assistance and with lateral and longitudinal ultrasonic assistance were compared, and the ultrasonic-assisted RFSSW process parameters were optimized. The results show that compared with lateral ultrasonic oscillation, longitudinal ultrasonic oscillation strengthens the horizontal bonding ligament in the joint and has a stronger effect on the joint's shear strength. By contrast, lateral ultrasonic oscillation strengthens the vertical bonding ligament and is more effective in increasing the joint's tensile strength. The maximum shear strength of ultrasonic-assisted RFSSW 5A06 aluminum alloy joints is as high as 8761 N, and the maximum tensile strength is 3679 N when the joints are formed at a tool rotating speed of 2000 r/min, a welding time of 3.5 s, a penetration depth of 0.2 mm, and an axial pressure of 11 kN.

  18. Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat BMSCs on a novel Ti/SiC metal matrix nanocomposite modified by friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenyuan; Lv, Yuting; Qian, Chao; Qian, Haixin; Jiao, Ting; Wang, Liqiang; Zhang, Fuqiang

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study were to fabricate a novel titanium/silicon carbide (Ti/SiC) metal matrix nanocomposite (MMNC) by friction stir processing (FSP) and to investigate its microstructure and mechanical properties. In addition, the adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on the nanocomposite surface were investigated. The MMNC microstructure was observed by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were characterized by nanoindentation and Vickers hardness testing. Integrin β1 immunofluorescence, cell adhesion, and MTT assays were used to evaluate the effects of the nanocomposite on cell adhesion and proliferation. Osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation were evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, ALP activity, PCR and osteocalcin immunofluorescence. The observed microstructures and mechanical properties clearly indicated that FSP is a very effective technique for modifying Ti/SiC MMNC to contain uniformly distributed nanoparticles. In the interiors of recrystallized grains, characteristics including twins, fine recrystallized grains, and dislocations formed concurrently. Adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of rat BMSCs were all enhanced on the novel Ti/SiC MMNC surface. In conclusion, nanocomposites modified using FSP technology not only have superior mechanical properties under stress-bearing conditions but also provide improved surface and physicochemical properties for cell attachment and osseointegration.

  19. Effect of Multiple-Pass Friction Stir Processing Overlapping on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of As-Cast NiAl Bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, D. R.; Xue, P.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2011-08-01

    As-cast Cu-9Al-4.5Ni-4Fe NiAl bronze alloy (NAB) was subjected to multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) with a 50 pct overlap. After FSP, the coarse microstructure of the base metal (BM) was transformed to defect-free material with fine microstructure. While the torchlike patterns in the stir zone (SZ) and the uplifted grains in the transitional zones (TZs) between two passes were observed in the multiple-pass FSP region, no grain coarsening was found in the remnant zone of the previous SZ after subsequent FSP pass. The hardness value of the FSP materials was higher than that of the BM and was homogeneously distributed throughout the entire multiple-pass FSP region. The FSP materials showed greatly improved tensile properties compared to the BM, and the TZs showed similar tensile strength and ductility to the single-pass FSP materials. The BM broke in a mixture mode of brittle cleavage and microvoid coalescence fracture, whereas the FSP and TZ samples failed in the latter fracture mode. The results showed that the multiple-pass overlapping (MPO) FSP was feasible to modify the microstructure of large-sized plate of the NAB.

  20. Methods and Devices used to Measure Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, Jack; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2004-01-01

    The physical condition at the work-piece/die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals, yet it remains the least understood. Hence the need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms....... To gain a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure friction-stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods, which have...

  1. Friction in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  2. Redistribution Mechanisms and Quantification of Homogeneity in Friction Stir Welding and Processing of an Aluminum Silicon Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    processing on the microstructure of cast A356 aluminum ,” Materials Science and Engineering: A, Vol. 433, pp. 269–78, 2006. [37] Y. Zha and T. Moan...and S. M. Fatemi-Varzaneh, “The effects of thermo-mechanical parameters on the microstructure of thixocast A356 aluminum alloy,” Materials Science and...E. Fine, “The effect of microscopic inclusion locations and silicon segregation on fatigue lifetimes of aluminum alloy A356 castings,” Materials

  3. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%–78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  4. Friction Compensation in the Upsetting of Cylindrical Test Specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Martins, P. A. F.; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript presents a combined numerical andexperimental methodology for determining the stress-straincurve of metallic materials from the measurements of forceand displacement obtained in the axial compression of cylindrical test specimens with friction between the specimens and the platens...... model or combined friction models are utilized .Experimental results obtained from cylindrical and Rastegaev test specimens with different lubricants combined with the experimental determination of friction by means of ring compression tests allows compensating the effect of friction...... Appendix is provided for those readers interested in utilizing the associated numerical algorithm for determining the stress straincurves of metallic materials....

  5. Determinants of Successful Internationalisation Processes in Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Henry; Guzmán, Alexander; Trujillo, María-Andrea

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the internationalisation process in business schools as a response to the globalisation phenomena and argue that environmental pressures, isomorphic forces, the pool of internal resources and the alignment of the process with the institution's general strategic plan are the main determinants of a successful internationalisation process.…

  6. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  7. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  8. Permeability equipment for porous friction surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standiford, D. L.; Graul, R. A.; Lenke, L. R.

    1985-04-01

    Hydroplaning is the loss of traction between tires and pavement due to the presence of a layer of water. This loss of traction can result in loss of vehicle control. A porous friction surface (PFS) applied over an existing pavement permits the water to drain laterally and vertically away from the tire path, effectively lowering hydroplaning potential. Equipment used to measure pavement drainage (permeability) is discussed with respect to usage on porous friction surface. Background information on hydroplaning, flow theory, and PFS field performance as they are affected by permeability are also presented. Two dynamic test devices and four static devices are considered for measuring PFS permeability. Permeability tests are recommended to measure PFS permeability for maintenance purposes and construction control. Dynamic devices cited could possibly estimate hydroplaning potential; further research must be done to determine this. Permeability devices cannot be used to accurately estimate friction of a pavement surface, however, decreased permeability of a pavement infers a decrease in friction.

  9. Transient effects in friction fractal asperity creep

    CERN Document Server

    Goedecke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Transient friction effects determine the behavior of a wide class of mechatronic systems. Classic examples are squealing brakes, stiction in robotic arms, or stick-slip in linear drives. To properly design and understand mechatronic systems of this type, good quantitative models of transient friction effects are of primary interest. The theory developed in this book approaches this problem bottom-up, by deriving the behavior of macroscopic friction surfaces from the microscopic surface physics. The model is based on two assumptions: First, rough surfaces are inherently fractal, exhibiting roughness on a wide range of scales. Second, transient friction effects are caused by creep enlargement of the real area of contact between two bodies. This work demonstrates the results of extensive Finite Element analyses of the creep behavior of surface asperities, and proposes a generalized multi-scale area iteration for calculating the time-dependent real contact between two bodies. The toolset is then demonstrated both...

  10. Microstructure of AA 2024 fixed joints formed by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welded butt joints on 2024T3 alloy have been obtained using different process parameters. The microstructures of all the weld joint zones have been examined and such structural parameters as grain size, particle size and volume content of particles have been determined in order to find correlations with the microhardness of the corresponding zones of the weld.

  11. Dry friction characterisation of carbon fibre tow and satin weave fabric for composite applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo; Sachs, Ulrich; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2014-01-01

    Composites forming processes such as resin transfer moulding (RTM) typically involve a preforming step in which dry fabric material is deformed. Frictional forces in tool–fabric and fabric–fabric contacts determine the fabric deformation behaviour to a large extent. Previous investigations of the fr

  12. Research of optimization method for friction coefficient model in cold rolling process%冷轧轧制过程摩擦系数模型优化方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高雷; 郭立伟; 李书昌; 陈丹; 何绪铃

    2014-01-01

    The friction coefficient model in cold rolling process is a nonlinear polynomial. In order to get the parameters of friction coefficient model which can better reflect the real rolling condition,we perform regression analysis on the parameters through optimized method by making full use of the ac-tual process data. The practical application proves that it can improve the calculation precision of the friction coefficient model in cold rolling process and provide a basis for high accuracy rolling.%冷轧轧制过程摩擦系数模型为非线性多项式,为了获得更能反应实际轧制工况的摩擦系数模型参数,充分利用实际工艺数据,通过优化的方法对模型参数进行回归分析。实际应用证明,该方法可以提高轧制过程摩擦系数模型设定精度,为高精度轧制提供基础。

  13. The Correlation of Stir Zone Texture Development with Base Metal Texture and Tool-Induced Deformation in Friction Stir Processing of Severely Deformed Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkari Khorrami, M.; Kazeminezhad, Mohsen; Miyashita, Y.; Kokabi, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    The texture development during friction stir processing (FSP) of 1050 aluminum severely deformed at the strain magnitude of 2.32 was comprehensively discussed. It was observed that the component bar{B} of the ideal shear texture along with the cube texture was developed in the severely deformed base metal. The effects of base metal texture on the texture development of stir zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone, and heat-affected zone during FSP were examined. Also, the developed texture components in the vicinity of the FSP tool and the stir zone were correlated to the deformation induced by the rotating tool which consisted of pin and shoulder. The observed texture components in the longitudinal section of the stir zone were found coincided with the ideal shear ones, but different from those observed in the severely deformed base metal. It could be responsible for the fact that the material beneath the FSP tool is predominantly deformed and stirred by the shoulder rather than the pin. The independency of texture development in the stir zone from pin-induced deformation was also consistent with the observation associated with the stir zone geometry which was independent of the pin geometry. Microstructural evolutions in the regions located ahead of the FSP tool manifested the incident of static recovery and recrystallization as a result of the stored strain in the severely deformed base metal. These led to the development of almost random texture and the deterioration of base metal texture in this region. This suggested the independency of texture development in the stir zone from the texture of severely deformed base metal.

  14. Strengthening analyses and mechanical assessment of Ti/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-composites produced by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafiei-Zarghani, Aziz, E-mail: ashafiei@ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence for Surface Engineering and Corrosion Protection of Industries, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kashani-Bozorg, Seyed Farshid, E-mail: fkashani@ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence for Surface Engineering and Corrosion Protection of Industries, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gerlich, Adrian P., E-mail: adrian.gerlich@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2015-04-17

    The present work investigates strengthening mechanisms and mechanical assessment of Ti/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-composites produced by friction stir processing of commercially pure titanium using nano-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with different volume fractions and particle sizes. Microstructural analyses were conducted to characterize the grain size of matrix, size and dispersion of reinforcing particles. The mean grain size of the composites ranged from ~0.7 to 1.1 μm that is much lower than 28 μm of the as-received material. Reduction of grain size was found to be in agreement with Rios approach (based on energy dissipated during the motion of an interface through particle dispersion), and showed deviation from Zener pinning model. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies revealed a near uniform dispersion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-particles, with only a small fraction of widely spaced clusters. The maximum compression yield strength of the fabricated nano-composite (Ti/3.9%vol of 20 nm-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was found to be ~494 MPa that is ~1.5 times higher than that of the as-received material. Strengthening analyses based on grain refining (Hall–Petch approach), load transfer from matrix to reinforcements, Orowan looping, and enhanced dislocation density due to thermal mismatch effects were carried out considering Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reinforcement with different volume fractions and sizes. However, Hall–Petch approach was found to be the dominant mechanism for the enhancement of yield strength.

  15. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  16. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  17. Charts Adapted from Van Driest's Turbulent Flat-plate Theory for Determining Values of Turbulent Aerodynamic Friction and Heat-transfer Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dorothy B; Faget, Maxime A

    1956-01-01

    A modified method of Van Driest's flat-plate theory for turbulent boundary layer has been found to simplify the calculation of local skin-friction coefficients which, in turn, have made it possible to obtain through Reynolds analogy theoretical turbulent heat-transfer coefficients in the form of Stanton number. A general formula is given and charts are presented from which the modified method can be solved for Mach numbers 1.0 to 12.0, temperature ratios 0.2 to 6.0, and Reynolds numbers 0.2 times 10 to the 6th power to 200 times 10 to the 6th power.

  18. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on defect formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is a perspective method for manufacturing automotive parts, aviation and space technology. One of the major problems is the formation of welding defects and weld around the welding zone. The formation of defect is the main reason failure of the joint. A possible way to obtain defect-free welded joints is the selection of the correct welding parameters. Experimental results describing the effect of friction stir welding process parameters on the defects of welded joints on aluminum alloy AMg5M have been shown. The weld joint defects have been characterized using the non-destructive radioscopic and ultrasound phase array methods. It was shown how the type and size of defects determine the welded joint strength.

  19. SHADOW PROCESSES INSTATE BUDGET: CURRENT CONDITION AND DETERMINING FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Varnalii

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The most significant factors that move state budget into the shadow are determined. Current condition of shadow processes in state budget is highlighted. The paper also provides an analysis of relationship between political processes and shadow economy in public sector of Ukraine.

  20. Determining effectiveness of the system monitoring initial processing of petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakan, G.M.; Goryachev, V.M.; Nenyesyuk, A.A.; Tarnovskiy, Yu.P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses methodology for determining effectivess of the processing subsystem that stabilizes qualitative factors of initially processed petroleum products. This methodology differs in the approach to the problem to evaluating effectiveness due to variability of light oil products in the raw material.

  1. Friction laws from dimensional-analysis point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Hatano, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Friction laws, which are a key to the understanding of the diversity of earthquakes, are considered theoretically. Using dimensional analysis, the logarithmic dependence of the friction coefficient on the slip velocity and the state variable is derived without any knowledge of the underlying physical processes on the frictional surface. This is based on a simple assumption that the friction coefficient is expressed as the difference from a reference state. Therefore, the functional form of the rate and state dependent friction law itself does not necessarily mean that thermal activation processes dominate friction. It is also shown that, if there are two (or more) state variables having the same dimension, we need not assume the logarithmic dependence on the state variables.

  2. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  3. Friction Stir Welding Technology: Adapting NASA's Retractable Pin Tool

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    In late 1991, The Welding Institute (TWI), a British research and technology organization, invented and patented a welding process named Friction Stir Welding (FSW). Friction Stir Welding is a highly significant advancement in aluminum welding technology that can produce stronger, lighter, and more efficient welds than any previous process.

  4. Network-Configurations of Dynamic Friction Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2012-01-01

    The complex configurations of dynamic friction patterns-regarding real time contact areas- are transformed into appropriate networks. With this transformation of a system to network space, many properties can be inferred about the structure and dynamics of the system. Here, we analyze the dynamics of static friction, i.e. nucleation processes, with respect to "friction networks". We show that networks can successfully capture the crack-like shear ruptures and possible corresponding acoustic features. We found that the fraction of triangles remarkably scales with the detachment fronts. There is a universal power law between nodes' degree and motifs frequency (for triangles, it reads T(k)\\proptok{\\beta} ({\\beta} \\approx2\\pm0.4)). We confirmed the obtained universality in aperture-based friction networks. Based on the achieved results, we extracted a possible friction law in terms of network parameters and compared it with the rate and state friction laws. In particular, the evolutions of loops are scaled with p...

  5. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  6. Friction stir processing of an aluminum-magnesium alloy with pre-placing elemental titanium powder: In-situ formation of an Al{sub 3}Ti-reinforced nanocomposite and materials characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F., E-mail: farzadkhodabakhshi83@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Zand Boulevard, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simchi, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    A fine-grained Al–Mg/Al{sub 3}Ti nanocomposite was fabricated by friction stir processing (FSP) of an aluminum-magnesium (AA5052) alloy with pre-placed titanium powder in the stirred zone. Microstructural evolutions and formation of intermetallic phases were analyzed by optical and electron microscopic techniques across the thickness section of the processed sheets. The microstructure of the nanocomposite consisted of a fine-grained aluminum matrix (1.5 µm), un-reacted titanium particles (<40 µm) and reinforcement particles of Al{sub 3}Ti (<100 nm) and Mg{sub 2}Si (<100 nm). Detailed microstructural analysis indicated solid-state interfacial reactions between the aluminum matrix and micro-sized titanium particles to form Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallic phase. The hard inclusions were then fractured and re-distributed in the metal matrix by the severe thermo-mechanical conditions imposed by FSP. Evaluation of mechanical properties by hardness measurement and uniaxial tensile test determined significant enhancement in the mechanical strength (by 2.5 order of magnetite) with a high ductility (~22%). Based on a dislocation-based model analysis, it was suggested that the strength enhancement was governed by grain refinement and the presence of hard inclusions (4 vol%) in the metal matrix. Fractographic studies also showed a ductile-brittle fracture mode for the nanocomposite compared with fully ductile rupture of the annealed alloy as well as the FSPed specimen without pre-placing titanium particles. - Highlights: • FSP was employed to fabricate in situ nanocomposite. • The AA5052 Al alloy with pre-placed micro-sized Ti particles were utilized. • The structural analysis was revealed that the in situ formation of Al{sub 3}Ti nanophase. • The SZ grain structure was refined by PSN and ZHP mechanisms during DRX. • Hardness and tensile strength were improved up to ~2.5 times with a good ductility.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Residual Stresses in Linear Friction Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nikiforov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A thermo-mechanical model of linear friction welding has been developed. The temperature distribution during the heating process was determined using a one-dimensional model. The distribution of temperature and stress field during the forging phase was determined by solving the coupled problem in ANSYS. The model allows to predict the effect of welding parameters on the stress field, whereas modeling data are consistent with the residual stresses in welded joints of the Ti6Al4V alloy obtained during the experiment.

  8. Determination of SATI Instrument Filter Parameters by Processing Interference Images

    CERN Document Server

    Atanassov, Atanas Marinov

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method for determination of interference filter parameters such as the effective refraction index and the maximal transmittance wavelength on the basis of image processing of a spectrogram produced by Spectrometer Airglow Temperature Imager instrument by means of data processing. The method employs the radial sections for determination of points from the crests and valleys in the spectrograms. These points are involved in the least square method for determination of the centres and radii of the crests and valleys. The use of the image radial sections allows to determine the maximal number of crests and valleys in the spectrogram. The application of the least square fitting leads to determination of the image centers and radii of the crests and valleys with precision higher than one pixel. The nocturnal course of the filter parameters produced by this method is presented and compared with that of the known ones. The values of the filter parameters thus obtained are closer to the laborator...

  9. Simulative Testing of Friction and Lubrication in Cold Forging of Steel and Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno; Bay, Niels; Aida, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    A new, simulative test of friction and lubrication in cold forging is developed by the authors. The test is based on a backward can extrusion process in which the workpiece rotates relatively to the conical punch. An analytical model is presented determining the friction stress from the measured ...... coating plus MoS2 and single bathe lubrication with PULS and aluminum provided with 6 different lubricant systems. The new test is so severe, that it is possible to break down the best lubrication systems for cold forging of steel and aluminum....

  10. Numerical Analysis of Frictional Heat-Stress Coupled Field at Dynamic Contact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张一兵; 刘佐民

    2004-01-01

    A new analysis method was developed to simulate the dynamic process of a frictional heat-stress coupled field.The relationship between the frictional heat and the thermal stress was investigated for concave cylinder contact conditions.The results show that, as a nonlinear contact problem, the frictional heat at the contact areas changes with moving velocity in both value and distribution, and that the transient frictional heat at the dynamic condition has a peak within a cycle.The dynamic process of friction heat and thermal stresses affects diffusion of the frictional effects.The result can be helpful for dynamic simulation of diffusion lubrication of elements at elevated temperatures.

  11. Unconventional Behavior of Friction at the Nanoscale beyond Amontons' Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingrun; Gao, Wang

    2017-08-05

    By means of a many-body van der Waals (vdW)-corrected density functional theory approach, the atomic-scale friction of a prototypical tip-substrate system consisting of an Si tip and a graphene substrate is studied. In a loading-sliding process, the tip-substrate distance is found to be essential for nanofrictional behavior, through determining the competition between vdW contributions and electronic contributions. As the tip approaches the substrate, this competition results in a smooth transition of normal forces from attraction to repulsion, and the friction coefficient in turn undergoes a sign change from negative to positive with possible giant magnitude and strong anisotropy. The loading-sliding process does not introduce any chemical modification of the underlying system. These findings reveal the boundary of validity of Amontons' law, unify negative and giant friction coefficients, rationalize the experimentally observed anisotropy of nanofriction, and are universal when vdW interactions are crucial, all of which are helpful to establish a comprehensive picture of nanofriction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Friction Compensation in the Upsetting of Cylindrical Test Specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Martins, P. A. F.; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript presents a combined numerical andexperimental methodology for determining the stress-straincurve of metallic materials from the measurements of forceand displacement obtained in the axial compression of cylindrical test specimens with friction between the specimens and the platens...... model or combined friction models are utilized .Experimental results obtained from cylindrical and Rastegaev test specimens with different lubricants combined with the experimental determination of friction by means of ring compression tests allows compensating the effect of friction...... in the determination of the material flow curve. Comparison with the flow curves determined without friction compensation shows the viability of the proposed methodology. The proposed methodology is a simple and effective alternative to other solutions available in the literature and the pseudo-code supplied inthe...

  13. PREFACE: The International Conference on Science of Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kouji; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    The first international conference on the science of friction in Japan was held at Irago, Aichi on 9-13 September 2007. The conference focused on the elementary process of friction phenomena from the atomic and molecular scale view. Topics covered in the conference are shown below.: Superlubricity and friction Electronic and phononic contributions to friction Friction on the atomic and molecular scales van der Waals friction and Casimir force Molecular motor and friction Friction and adhesion in soft matter systems Wear and crack on the nanoscale Theoretical studies on the atomic scale friction and energy dissipation Friction and chaos Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts Friction of powder The number of participants in the conference was approximately 100, registered from 11 countries. 48 oral and 29 poster talks were presented at the conference. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 23 papers devoted to the above topics of friction. The successful organization of the conference was made possible by the contribution of the members of the Organizing Committee and International Advisory Committee. The conference was made possible thanks to the financial support from Aichi University of Education and the Taihokogyo Tribology Research Foundation (TTRF), and moreover thanks to the approval societies of The Physical Society of Japan, The Surface Science Society of Japan, The Japanese Society of Tribologists and Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute. The details of the conference are available at http://www.science-of-friction.com . Finally we want to thank the speakers for the high quality of their talks and all participants for coming to Irago, Japan and actively contributing to the conference. Kouji Miura and Hiroshi Matsukawa Editors

  14. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veijgen, N K; Masen, M A; van der Heide, E

    2013-12-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the human skin, subject characteristics and environmental conditions on skin friction. The data are obtained on 50 subjects (34 males and 16 females). Friction measurements represent the friction between in vivo human skin and an aluminium sample, assessed on three anatomical locations. The coefficient of friction increased significantly (pskin and the height of the subject. Other outcome variables in this study were the hydration of the skin and the skin temperature.

  15. A HYBRID TECHNIQUE FOR FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION OF SERVO SYSTEM WITH FRICTION FORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAIK.RAFI KIRAN,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The system identification process in servo system with frictional force seems to be a complex task becauseof its non-linear nature. For such non-linear systems, a good choice is system identification in frequencydomain. However, most of the techniques are manual and are inappropriate for determination of systemparameters. This makes system identification ineffective for servo systems with frictional force. Toovercome this issue, a hybrid technique is proposed in this paper. The proposed technique exploits neuralnetwork and genetic algorithm to determine the system parameters of servo systems with friction. In theproposed technique, the target parameters are determined from the transfer function derived for thesystem. Subsequently, the system parameters are identified by a process formed by blending the neuralnetwork and genetic algorithm techniques. Prior to performing the identification procedure, backpropagation training is given to the neural network using a pre-examined dataset. Then with thecombined operation of neural network and genetic algorithm, the system parameters that are closer tothe target parameters for the servo system with frictional force are determined. The technique isimplemented and compared with the existing frequency domain identification technique. From thecomparative results, it is evident that the proposed technique outperforms the existing technique.

  16. Friction Properties of Inkjet and Flexographic Prints on Different Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Grigaliūnienė

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction between different papers, inkjet and flexographic prints has been experimentally investigated. Flexographic prints have been made using an anilox roller, and inkjet prints have been produced covering paper with one and four toner layers. Static (SCOF and kinetic (KCOF friction coefficients between paper and paper, paper and prints, prints and prints have been determined. Friction properties have been discovered to be different in flexographic and laser prints. The dependence of SCOF and KCOF on pressure (both decrease together with roughness measurements enables to conclude that the friction of prints is mainly governed by adhesion forces.

  17. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  18. Anomalous friction of graphene nanoribbons on waved graphenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Friction plays a critical role in the function and maintenance of small-scale structures, where the conventional Coulomb friction law often fails. To probe the friction at small scales, here we present a molecular dynamics study on the process of dragging graphene nanoribbons on waved graphene substrates. The simulation shows that the induced friction on graphene with zero waviness is ultra-low and closely related to the surface energy barrier. On waved graphenes, the friction generally increases with the amplitude of the wave at a fixed period, but anomalously increases and then decreases with the period at a fixed amplitude. These findings provide insights into the ultra-low friction at small scales, as well as some guidelines into the fabrication of graphene-based nano-composites with high performance.

  19. Friction related size-effect in microforming – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chunju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a thorough literature review of the size effects of friction in microforming. During miniaturization, the size effects of friction occur clearly. The paper first introduces experimental research progress on size effects of friction in both micro bulk and sheet forming. The effects of several parameters are discussed. Based on the experimental results, several approaches have been performed to develop a model or functions to analyse the mechanism of size effects of friction, and simulate the micro deep drawing process by integrating them into an FE program. Following this, surface modification, e.g. a DLC film and a micro structure/textured surface, as a method to reduce friction are presented. Finally, the outlook for the size effect of friction in the future is assessed, based on the understanding of the current research progress.

  20. Methods and devices used to measure friction in rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, J.; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    Friction at the workpiece-die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals; yet it remains the least understood. Hence there is a need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms. To gain...... a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure frictional stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods that have been used...

  1. Progress and development in thermodynamic theory of friction and wear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Tribology theory lags well behind engineering needs because of those complex and multi-dimensional characteristics associated with friction and wear. The mechanism of friction is reviewed and discussed from a static thermodynamics perspective; research methods on the process of friction and wear and thermodynamic studies within the field of tribology are also reviewed. We propose that entropy can be a critical parameter in describing the evolution of friction and wear, and the entropy balance equation could be considered as a fundamental cornerstone for a systematic tribology theory. Applications of irreversible thermodynamic theory of tribology to various fields are reviewed.

  2. Progress and development in thermodynamic theory of friction and wear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI ZhenDong; XUE QunJi

    2009-01-01

    Tribology theory lags well behind engineering needs because of those complex and multi-dimensional characteristics associated with friction and wear. The mechanism of friction is reviewed end discussed from a static thermodynamics perspective; research methods on the process of friction and wear and thermodynamic studies within the field of tribology are also reviewed. We propose that entropy can be a critical parameter in describing the evolution of friction and wear, and the entropy balance equation could be considered as a fundamental cornerstone for a systematic tribology theory. Applications of irreversible thermodynamic theory of tribology to various fields are reviewed.

  3. Wet Friction-Elements Boundary Friction Mechanism and Friction Coefficient Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yanzhong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The friction mechanism for the boundary friction course of friction elements engagement was explicitly expressed. The boundary friction model was built up by the surface topography. The model contained the effect of boundary film, adhesion, plough and lubrication. Based on the model, a coefficient for weakening plough for the lubrication was proposed. The modified model could fit for the working condition of wet friction elements. The friction coefficient as a function curve of rotating speed could be finally obtained by the data k and s/sm. The method provides a well interpretation of friction condition and friction coefficient prediction and the agreement between theoretical and experimental friction coefficients is reasonably good.

  4. Scanning-electron-microscope used in real-time study of friction and wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Small friction and wear apparatus built directly into scanning-electron-microscope provides both dynamic observation and microscopic view of wear process. Friction and wear tests conducted using this system have indicated that considerable information can readily be gained.

  5. Estudo da microestrutura formada no processo de soldagem por atrito em aço C-Mn com pino consumível Microstructural evaluation of a C-Mn steel welded by the friction hidro-pillar process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Rodrigo de Lima Lessa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A soldagem por arco elétrico é a técnica mais empregada para reparar estruturas de grande porte, mas apresenta desvantagens associadas à solidificação do metal de solda. Então a utilização de processos de solda por atrito, especificamente o processo FHPP (Friction Hydro Pillar Processing que consiste na utilização de pinos para reparo por atrito, apresenta vantagens por ser um processo realizado no estado sólido. Menores temperaturas estão envolvidas e não existe influência do ambiente externo, minimizando os problemas nos reparos estruturais. Este trabalho teve como objetivo observar a variação dos parâmetros do processo e os efeitos desses na microestrutura e qualidade do reparo. O estudo comparou diferentes forças axiais nos reparos com aço C-Mn através de metalografias e perfis de microdureza. Uma força axial maior resultou em um menor tempo de processo, em uma microestrutura mais homogênea e evitou os defeitos "falta de adesão" na zona de ligação e "cisalhamento a quente" do pino.The arc welding it is the most used technique to repair large structures, however, has disadvantages that result from the solidification of the weld metal. So the use of friction welding, specifically the FHPP (friction hydro pillar processing process that consists on using plugs for friction repair, presents advantages because it is a process that is carried out on the solid state. Lower temperatures are involved and do not have the influence of the external environment, minimizing the problems on structure repairs. This work has the objective of observe the process parameters variation and their effects on microstructure and on the quality of the repair. The study compared different axial forces on repairs whit C-Mn steel through of metallographic and microhardness profiles. A higher axial force results in less time of process, in a more homogeneous microstructure, and avoided the defects "noncompliance" in the bounding zone and "hot

  6. Classical shear cracks drive the onset of dry frictional motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Fineberg, Jay

    2014-05-08

    Frictional processes entail the rupture of the ensemble of discrete contacts defining a frictional interface. There are a variety of views on how best to describe the onset of dry frictional motion. These range from modelling friction with a single degree of freedom, a 'friction coefficient', to theoretical treatments using dynamic fracture to account for spatial and temporal dynamics along the interface. We investigated the onset of dry frictional motion by performing simultaneous high-speed measurements of the real contact area and the strain fields in the region surrounding propagating rupture tips within the dry (nominally flat) rough interfaces formed by brittle polymer blocks. Here we show that the transition from 'static' to 'dynamic' friction is quantitatively described by classical singular solutions for the motion of a rapid shear crack. We find that these singular solutions, originally derived to describe brittle fracture, are in excellent agreement with the experiments for slow propagation, whereas some significant discrepancies arise as the rupture velocity approaches the Rayleigh wave speed. In addition, the energy dissipated in the fracture of the contacts remains nearly constant throughout the entire range in which the rupture velocity is less than the Rayleigh wave speed, whereas the size of the dissipative zone undergoes a Lorentz-like contraction as the rupture velocity approaches the Rayleigh wave speed. This coupling between friction and fracture is critical to our fundamental understanding of frictional motion and related processes, such as earthquake dynamics.

  7. CAM/LIFTER forces and friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbey, D. J.; Lee, J.; Patterson, D. J.

    1992-02-01

    This report details the procedures used to measure the cam/lifter forces and friction. The present effort employed a Cummins LTA-10, and focuses on measurements and dynamic modeling of the injector train. The program was sponsored by the US Department of Energy in support of advanced diesel engine technology. The injector train was instrumented to record the instantaneous roller speed, roller pin friction torque, pushrod force, injector link force, and cam speed. These measurements, together with lift profiles for pushrod and injector link displacement, enabled the friction work loss in the injector train to be determined. Other significant design criteria such as camshaft roller follower slippage and maximum loads on components were also determined. Future efforts will concentrate on the dynamic model, with tests run as required for correlation.

  8. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  9. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching.

  10. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, van der E.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on t

  11. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, E. van der

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables.This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the

  12. Optimizing snake locomotion in the plane. II. Large transverse friction

    CERN Document Server

    Alben, Silas

    2013-01-01

    We determine analytically the form of optimal snake locomotion when the coefficient of transverse friction is large, the typical regime for biological and robotic snakes. We find that the optimal snake motion is a retrograde traveling wave, with a wave amplitude that decays as the -1/4 power of the coefficient of transverse friction. This result agrees well with our numerical computations.

  13. Optimizing friction stir welding parameters to maximize tensile strength of AA2219 aluminum alloy joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, S.; Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balasubramanian, M.

    2009-04-01

    AA2219 aluminium alloy (Al-Cu-Mn alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of lightweight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. In contrast to the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force etc., and the tool pin profile play a major role in determining the joint strength. An attempt has been made here to develop a mathematical model to predict the tensile strength of friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. A central composite design with four factors and five levels has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The response surface method (RSM) has been used to develop the model. The developed mathematical model has been optimized using the Hooke and Jeeves search technique to maximize the tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy joints.

  14. A senior manufacturing laboratory for determining injection molding process capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Jerry L.; Plocinski, David

    1992-01-01

    The following is a laboratory experiment designed to further understanding of materials science. This subject material is directed at an upper level undergraduate/graduate student in an Engineering or Engineering Technology program. It is assumed that the student has a thorough understanding of the process and quality control. The format of this laboratory does not follow that which is normally recommended because of the nature of process capability and that of the injection molding equipment and tooling. This laboratory is instead developed to be used as a point of departure for determining process capability for any process in either a quality control laboratory or a manufacturing environment where control charts, process capability, and experimental or product design are considered important topics.

  15. Green tea flavour determinants and their changes over manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhuo-Xiao; Rana, Mohammad M; Liu, Guo-Feng; Gao, Ming-Jun; Li, Da-Xiang; Wu, Fu-Guang; Li, Xin-Bao; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Wei, Shu

    2016-12-01

    Flavour determinants in tea infusions and their changes during manufacturing processes were studied using Camellia sinensis cultivars 'Bai-Sang Cha' ('BAS') possessing significant floral scents and 'Fuding-Dabai Cha' ('FUD') with common green tea odour. Metabolite profiling based on odour activity threshold revealed that 'BAS' contained higher levels of the active odorants β-ionone, linalool and its two oxides, geraniol, epoxylinalool, decanal and taste determinant catechins than 'FUD' (pmanufacturing processes, the levels of linalool and geraniol decreased whereas those of β-ionone, linalool oxides, indole and cis-jasmone increased. Compared with pan-fire treatment, steam treatment reduced the levels of catechins and proportion of geraniol, linalool and its derivatives, consequently, reducing catechin-related astringency and monoterpenol-related floral scent. Our study suggests that flavour determinant targeted modulation could be made through genotype and manufacturing improvements.

  16. Process to determine light elements content of steel and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintella, Cristina M.A.L.T.M.H.; Castro, Martha T.P.O. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (IQ/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. LabLaser; Mac-Culloch, Joao N.L.M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present work reports a process to determine qualitatively and quantitatively elements of molar mass inferior to 23 within materials, by X rays spectra associated with multivariate data analysis, or chemometric analysis. The spectra is acquired between 5 keV and 22 keV when the materials are exposed to X radiation. Here is reported the direct determination of carbon content in steel and metallic alloys. The process is more effective when using spectral regions which are not usually used. From the analysis of these spectral regions which were not considered before, it was possible to detect light elements with molar mass lower than 23, which have low capacity of absorbing and emitting radiation, but have high capacity of scattering radiation. The process here reported has the advantage that X-Ray spectra obtained are calibrated multivariately, showing high potential for development in order to be used in a portable field equipment. (author)

  17. Optimization of friction stir welding parameters for improved corrosion resistance of AA2219 aluminum alloy joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rambabu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aluminium alloy AA2219 (Al–Cu–Mg alloy is widely used in the fabrication of lightweight structures with high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. Welding is main fabrication method of AA2219 alloy for manufacturing various engineering components. Friction stir welding (FSW is a recently developed solid state welding process to overcome the problems encountered in fusion welding. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat on the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters, such as tool pin profile, rotational speed, welding speed and axial force, play major role in determining the microstructure and corrosion resistance of welded joint. The main objective of this work is to develop a mathematical model to predict the corrosion resistance of friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. In this work a central composite design with four factors and five levels has been used to minimize the experimental conditions. Dynamic polarization testing was carried out to determine critical pitting potential in millivolt, which is a criteria for measuring corrosion resistance and the data was used in model. Further the response surface method (RSM was used to develop the model. The developed mathematical model was optimized using the simulated annealing algorithm optimizing technique to maximize the corrosion resistance of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy joints.

  18. Cladding of Advanced Al Alloys Employing Friction Stir Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, van der A.A.; Bor, T.C.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.; Akkerman, R.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler m

  19. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  20. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der E.; Zeng, X.; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is fre

  1. Gravitomagnetic dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Cashen, Benjamin; Kesden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A supermassive black hole moving through a field of stars will gravitationally scatter the stars, inducing a backreaction force on the black hole known as dynamical friction. In Newtonian gravity, the axisymmetry of the system about the black hole's velocity $\\mathbf{v}$ implies that the dynamical friction must be anti-parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$. However, in general relativity the black hole's spin $\\mathbf{S}$ need not be parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$, breaking the axisymmetry of the system and generating a new component of dynamical friction similar to the Lorentz force $\\mathbf{F} = q\\mathbf{v} \\times \\mathbf{B}$ experienced by a particle with charge $q$ moving in a magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$. We call this new force gravitomagnetic dynamical friction and calculate its magnitude for a spinning black hole moving through a field of stars with Maxwellian velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, assuming that both $v$ and $\\sigma$ are much less than the speed of light $c$. We use post-Newtonian equations of motion accurate to $...

  2. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Sabina Luisa Campanelli; Giuseppe Casalino; Caterina Casavola; Vincenzo Moramarco

    2013-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the we...

  3. Tool For Friction Stir Tack Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerald W.; Dingler, Johnny W.; Loftus, Zachary

    2003-01-01

    A small friction-stir-welding tool has been developed for use in tack welding of aluminum-alloy workpieces. It is necessary to tack-weld the workpieces in order to hold them together during friction stir welding because (1) in operation, a full-size friction-stir-welding tool exerts a large force that tends to separate the workpieces and (2) clamping the workpieces is not sufficient to resist this force. It is possible to tack the pieces together by gas tungsten arc welding, but the process can be awkward and time-consuming and can cause sufficient damage to necessitate rework. Friction stir tack welding does not entail these disadvantages. In addition, friction stir tack welding can be accomplished by use of the same automated equipment (except for the welding tool) used in subsequent full friction stir welding. The tool for friction stir tack welding resembles the tool for full friction stir welding, but has a narrower shoulder and a shorter pin. The shorter pin generates a smaller workpiece-separating force so that clamping suffices to keep the workpieces together. This tool produces a continuous or intermittent partial-penetration tack weld. The tack weld is subsequently consumed by action of the larger tool used in full friction stir welding tool.

  4. Experimental determination of the segregation process using computer tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Beckmann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modelling methods such as DEM and CFD are increasingly used for developing high efficient combine cleaning systems. For this purpose it is necessary to verify the complex segregation and separation processes in the combine cleaning system. One way is to determine the segregation and separation function using 3D computer tomography (CT. This method makes it possible to visualize and analyse the movement behaviour of the components of the mixture during the segregation and separation process as well as the derivation of descriptive process parameters. A mechanically excited miniature test rig was designed and built at the company CLAAS Selbstfahrende Erntemaschinen GmbH to achieve this aim. The investigations were carried out at the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS. Through the evaluation of the recorded images the segregation process is described visually. A more detailed analysis enabled the development of segregation and separation function based on the different densities of grain and material other than grain.

  5. Experimental determination of the segregation process using computer tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Beckmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Modelling methods such as DEM and CFD are increasingly used for developing high efficient combine cleaning systems. For this purpose it is necessary to verify the complex segregation and separation processes in the combine cleaning system. One way is to determine the segregation and separation function using 3D computer tomography (CT. This method makes it possible to visualize and analyse the movement behaviour of the components of the mixture during the segregation and separation process as well as the derivation of descriptive process parameters. A mechanically excited miniature test rig was designed and built at the company CLAAS Selbstfahrende Erntemaschinen GmbH to achieve this aim. The investigations were carried out at the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS. Through the evaluation of the recorded images the segregation process is described visually. A more detailed analysis enabled the development of segregation and separation function based on the different densities of grain and material other than grain.

  6. Investigation of the Effect of Friction Stir Spot Welding of BH Galvanized Steel Plates on Process Parameters and Weld Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sheikhhasani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the effect of Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW pin shape on overlapping galvanized BH plates. FSSW is done at 4, 6 and 9 seconds dwell time at two rotational speeds (1500 and 1800 rpm by tools with 10 and 14 mm shoulder diameter. Microstructural properties (OM and SEM, Vickers micro hardness and tension are tested on the welded spots. By increasing shoulder diameter from 10 to 14 mm to joint two plates, microstructural grain size decreases by 23% in SZ and 15% in TMAZ. Maximum fracture increases as shoulder diameter increases to 32%.

  7. Impact Damage Evaluation Method of Friction Disc Based on High-Speed Photography and Tooth-Root Stress Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L.; Shao, Y. M.; Liu, J.; Zheng, H. L.

    2015-07-01

    The stability of friction disc could be seriously affected by the tooth surface damage due to poor working conditions of the wet multi-disc brake in heavy trucks. There are few current works focused on the damage of the friction disc caused by torsion-vibration impacts. Hence, it is necessary to investigate its damage mechanisms and evaluation methods. In this paper, a damage mechanism description and evaluation method of a friction disc based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling is proposed. According to the HighSpeed Photography, the collision process between the friction disc and hub is recorded, which can be used to determine the contact position and deformation. Combined with the strain-stress data obtained by the strain gauge at the place of the tooth-root, the impact force and property are studied. In order to obtain the evaluation method, the damage surface morphology data of the friction disc extracted by 3D Super Depth Digital Microscope (VH-Z100R) is compared with the impact force and property. The quantitative relationships between the amount of deformation and collision number are obtained using a fitting analysis method. The experimental results show that the damage of the friction disc can be evaluated by the proposed impact damage evaluation method based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling.

  8. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyáš, Robert; Šelešovský, Jakub; Musil, Tomáš

    2012-04-30

    The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monomeric Friction Coefficient of Metalnanodispersible Polymeric Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Kolupayev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of a nanodispersible metal excipient in number of 0    5,0 vol.% Cu for the size of a monomeric friction coefficient of polyvinylchloride (PVC systems in temperature range 298  Т  (Tg + 10 K is investigated. It is shown that various types of coordination movements of building blocks are described by a friction coefficient which serves as a measure of influence of external fields and ingredients on viscoelastic behavior of a composite. The analysis of processes of a relaxation on the basis of the theory of flexible chains taking into account power and entropic factors is carried out.

  10. The use KPI's to determine the waste in production process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsos, G.; Iacob, C. C.; Calefariu, G.

    2016-11-01

    In theory and practice of management is well-known Lean approach about forms of waste from production processes (Muda) and the method VSM (Value Stream Map), one of the most effective methods for determining the activities generating value within industrial companies. It is also obvious concern of the specialists for performance measurement regardless of purview of the organizations. The literature review has shown that the link between performance indicators and the objectives of the companies is researched in detail. However, the correlation between indicators and the forms of waste that generate deviations from the setpoints is rather nature practical and it depends on the talent and managerial skills of those directing production processes. The paper presents the results of a applied study, performed by the authors, through which it was has sought to will create a system of performance indicators specific to manufacturing activity that to be a useful tool to quantify the losses and to determining ways to improve default losses.

  11. Process Approach to Determining Quality Inspection Deployment Product Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Manual Inspection covers10-20% of parts not covered by the machine Example ICT via Flying Probe U.S. SPACE PROGRAM MISSION ASSURANCE IMPROVEMENT...Identified part types and applications where ICT not able to capture all issues ROI • Performed study for purchasing unit vs. outsourcing • Identified...Bold – co-leads SME Team Approved Electronically by: AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR-2015-02542 Process Approach to Determining Quality Inspection Deployment

  12. 基于统计的润滑剂摩擦因数测试方法研究%Study on the Test Method for the Determination of the Friction Coefficient of Lubricants Based on Statistical Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林福严; 杨建华; 张志华; 李静敏

    2011-01-01

    润滑剂摩擦因数测试具有很大的误差,ASTM D5183-05和SH/T0762-05标准的数据重复性和再现性误差都分别为20%和49%.根据数学理论导出在一定置信度下的试验数据误差估算式;通过多次抽样测试认为四球摩擦因数测试的重复性误差可以控制在1%~5%以内;提出根据试验数据方差来预计试验次数的计算公式,并指出为保证试验结果的可靠性除了保证必要的测试次数外还要确保实际测试精度.%The test error in the determination of the friction coefficient of lubricants is rather large.The data repeatability and reproducibility of ASTM D5183-05 and SH/T0762-05 are 20% and 49% respectively.An expression for the test error estimation with given confidence level was deduced from statistical theory.With duplicate tests, the repeatability for the determination of the friction coefficient of lubricants using four-ball wear test machine can be reduced to 1% ~ 5%.A formula for estimating the number of duplicate tests by the variance of test data was proposed.To ensure the reliability of test result,the number of duplicate tests and the calculated precision of tests must be ensured.

  13. Antigen Processing by Autoreactive B Cells Promotes Determinant Spreading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang D.Dai; George Carayanniotis; Eli Sercarz

    2005-01-01

    Acute primary immune responses tend to focus on few immunodominant determinants using a very limited number of T cell clones for expansion, whereas chronic inflammatory responses generally recruit a large number of different T cell clones to attack a broader range of determinants of the invading pathogens or the inflamed tissues.In T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune disease, a transition from the acute to the chronic phase contributes to pathogenesis, and the broadening process is called determinant spreading. The cellular components catalyzing the spreading reaction are not identified. It has been suggested that autoreactive B cells may play a central role in diversifying autoreactive T cell responses, possibly through affecting antigen processing and presentation. The clonal identity and diversity of the B cells and antibodies seem critical in regulating T cell activity and subsequent tissue damage or repair. Here, we use two autoimmune animal models, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT)and type 1 diabetes (T1D), to discuss how autoreactive B cells or antibodies alter the processing and presentation of autoantigens to regulate specific T cell response.

  14. High fidelity frictional models for MEMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpick, Robert W. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Bitsie, Fernando; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corwin, Alex David; Ashurst, William Robert (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Jones, Reese E.; Subhash, Ghatu S. (Michigan Technological Institute, Houghton, MI); Street, Mark D. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Sumali, Anton Hartono; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Starr, Michael James; Redmond, James Michael; Flater, Erin E. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

    2004-10-01

    The primary goals of the present study are to: (1) determine how and why MEMS-scale friction differs from friction on the macro-scale, and (2) to begin to develop a capability to perform finite element simulations of MEMS materials and components that accurately predicts response in the presence of adhesion and friction. Regarding the first goal, a newly developed nanotractor actuator was used to measure friction between molecular monolayer-coated, polysilicon surfaces. Amontons law does indeed apply over a wide range of forces. However, at low loads, which are of relevance to MEMS, there is an important adhesive contribution to the normal load that cannot be neglected. More importantly, we found that at short sliding distances, the concept of a coefficient of friction is not relevant; rather, one must invoke the notion of 'pre-sliding tangential deflections' (PSTD). Results of a simple 2-D model suggests that PSTD is a cascade of small-scale slips with a roughly constant number of contacts equilibrating the applied normal load. Regarding the second goal, an Adhesion Model and a Junction Model have been implemented in PRESTO, Sandia's transient dynamics, finite element code to enable asperity-level simulations. The Junction Model includes a tangential shear traction that opposes the relative tangential motion of contacting surfaces. An atomic force microscope (AFM)-based method was used to measure nano-scale, single asperity friction forces as a function of normal force. This data is used to determine Junction Model parameters. An illustrative simulation demonstrates the use of the Junction Model in conjunction with a mesh generated directly from an atomic force microscope (AFM) image to directly predict frictional response of a sliding asperity. Also with regards to the second goal, grid-level, homogenized models were studied. One would like to perform a finite element analysis of a MEMS component assuming nominally flat surfaces and to include the

  15. Modelling and Testing of Friction in Forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge about friction is still limited in forging. The theoretical models applied presently for process analysis are not satisfactory compared to the advanced and detailed studies possible to carry out by plastic FEM analyses and more refined models have to be based on experimental testing...

  16. Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhi-hong; HE Di-qiu; WANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    Friction stir welding(FSW), a new solid-state welding technology invited in the early 1990s,enables us weld aluminum alloys and titanium alloys etc. The processing of FSW, the microstructure in FSW alloysand the factors influencing weld quality are introduced. The complex factors affecting the properties are researched.

  17. Determination of Properties of Selected Fresh and Processed Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley G. Cabrera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the chemical properties, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity and toxicity level of fresh and processed medicinal plants such as corn (Zea mays silk, pancitpancitan (Peperomiapellucida leaves, pandan (Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves, and commercially available tea. The toxicity level of the samples was measured using the Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay (BSLA. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. Results showed that in terms of chemical properties there is significant difference between fresh and processed corn silk except in crude fiber content was noted. Based on proximate analyses of fresh and processed medicinal plants specifically in terms of % moisture, %crude protein and % total carbohydrates were also observed. In addition, there is also significant difference on bioactive compound contents such as total flavonoids and total phenolics between fresh and processed corn silk except in total vitamin E (TVE content. Pandan and pancit-pancitan showed significant difference in all bioactive compounds except in total antioxidant content (TAC. Fresh pancit-pancitan has the highest total phenolics content (TPC and TAC, while the fresh and processed corn silk has the lowest TAC and TVE content, respectively. Furthermore, results of BSLA for the three medicinal plants and commercially available tea extract showed after 24 hours exposure significant difference in toxicity level was observed. The percentage mortality increased with an increase in exposure time of the three medicinal plants and tea extract. The results of the study can served as baseline data for further processing and commercialization of these medicinal plants.

  18. 基于FLUENT的7022铝合金搅拌摩擦焊接过程数值模拟与分析%Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Friction Stir Welding Process for Aluminiurn Alloy 7022 Based on FLUENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董学伟; 黎向锋; 左敦稳; 汪洪峰; 王吉胜; 董春林; 李光

    2011-01-01

    During the friction stir welding process of aluminium alloy,the plastic metal flow in the weld is a kind of single-phase flow. In this paper,aiming at numerical simulation and analysis of this single-phase flow,computational fluid dynamics (CFD) commercial software FLUENT is applied and a 3-D flow filed is obtained. According to the related results of flow field, the flow patterns and tracks of the plastic metal flow are observed visually. This can give a reference to the study and discovery of the metal flow mechanism in the weld of friction stir welding process.%铝合金搅拌摩擦焊接焊缝区域金属流是单相流.针对这种单相流搅拌摩擦焊接过程应用大型计算流体动力学(CFD)软件FLUENT进行了数值模拟与分析,得到其三维流场.根据流场得到的相关结果可以观察焊缝区塑性金属流动形态与轨迹,为探究与揭示搅拌摩擦焊接过程中焊缝区塑性金属流变机理提供参考.

  19. Prolegomena to the Study of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The literature contains many approaches toward modeling of the friction stir welding (FSW) process with varying treatments of the weld metal properties. It is worthwhile to consider certain fundamental features of the process before attempting to interpret FSW phenomena: Because of the unique character of metal deformation (as opposed to, say, viscous deformation) a velocity "discontinuity" or shear surface occurs in FSW and determines much of the character of the welding mechanism. A shear surface may not always produce a sound bond. Balancing mechanical power input against conduction and convection heat losses yields a relation, a "temperature index", between spindle speed and travel speed to maintain constant weld temperature. But many process features are only weakly dependent upon temperature. Thus, unlike modeling of metal forming processes, it may be that modeling the FSW process independently of the material conditions has some merit.

  20. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  1. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  2. Friction in rail guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of friction is included in the present equations describing the performance of an inductively driven rail gun. These equations, which have their basis in an empirical formulation, are applied to results from two different experiments. Only an approximate physical description of the problem is attempted, in view of the complexity of details in the interaction among forces of this magnitude over time periods of the order of milisecs.

  3. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  4. Influence of shear velocity on frictional characteristics of rock surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T N Singh; A K Verma; Tanmay Kumar; Avi Dutt

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the fundamental issues related with the effect of shear velocity on frictional characteristics at the interface of rock surfaces is an important issue. In this paper, strain-rate dependence on friction is investigated in relation to sliding behaviour under normal load. The phenomenon of stick-slip of granite and shaly sandstone with a tribometer at constant rate of strain under normal loads was observed. Friction at the interface of the rock samples was developed by increasing shear strain at a constant rate by applying constant velocity using the tribometer. For shaly sandstone, state parameters ( and ) played a major role in determining the friction values and roughness of the contact surfaces as well. Higher values of for shaly sandstone may be attributed to the fact that its surface had a greater number of pronounced asperities. Rubbing between the surfaces does not mean that surface becomes smoother. This is because of variation of friction between surfaces.

  5. The influence of surface topography on the forming friction of automotive aluminum sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Pamela Ann [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1998-05-01

    Interest in utilizing aluminum alloys in automobiles has increased in recent years as a result of the desire to lower automobile weight and, consequently, increase fuel economy. While aluminum alloy use in cast parts has increased, outer body panel applications are still being investigated. The industry is interested in improving the formability of these sheet alloys by a combination of alloy design and processing. A different avenue of improving the formability of these alloys may be through patterning of the sheet surface. Surface patterns hold the lubricant during the forming process, with a resulting decrease in the sheet-die surface contact. While it has been speculated that an optimum surface pattern would consist of discrete cavities, detailed investigation into the reduction of forming friction by utilizing discrete patterns is lacking. A series of discrete patterns were investigated to determine the dependence of the forming friction of automotive aluminum alloys on pattern lubricant carrying capacity and on material strength. Automotive aluminum alloys used in outer body panel applications were rolled on experimental rolls that had been prepared with a variety of discrete patterns. All patterns for each alloy were characterized before and after testing both optically and, to determine pattern lubricant capacity, using three dimensional laser profilometry. A draw bead simulation (DBS) friction tester was designed and fabricated to determine the forming friction of the patterned sheets. Tensile testing and frictionless DBS testing were performed to ascertain the material properties of each sheet. The most striking result of this work was the inversely linear dependence of forming friction on the lubricant carrying capacity of the discrete patterns.

  6. Frictional behavior of carbon fiber tows: a contact mechanics model of tow–tow friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo; Rooij, de Matthijn B.; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2014-01-01

    Composite-forming processes involve mechanical interactions at the ply, tow, and filament level. The deformations that occur during forming processes are governed by friction between the contacting tows on the mesoscopic level and consequently between filaments on the microscopic level. A thorough u

  7. Universal Aging Mechanism for Static and Sliding Friction of Metallic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Tekiel, Antoni; Topple, Jessica; Grütter, Peter; Schirmeisen, André

    2016-07-01

    The term "contact aging" refers to the temporal evolution of the interface between a slider and a substrate usually resulting in increasing friction with time. Current phenomenological models for multiasperity contacts anticipate that such aging is not only the driving force behind the transition from static to sliding friction, but at the same time influences the general dynamics of the sliding friction process. To correlate static and sliding friction on the nanoscale, we show experimental evidence of stick-slip friction for nanoparticles sliding on graphite over a wide dynamic range. We can assign defined periods of aging to the stick phases of the particles, which agree with simulations explicitly including contact aging. Additional slide-hold-slide experiments for the same system allow linking the sliding friction results to static friction measurements, where both friction mechanisms can be universally described by a common aging formalism.

  8. High Speed Friction Microscopy and Nanoscale Friction Coefficient Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, James L.; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for Friction Coefficient Mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true...

  9. Frictional properties of single crystals HMX, RDX and PETN explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y Q; Huang, F L

    2010-11-15

    The frictional properties of single crystals of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) secondary explosives are examined using a sensitive friction machine. The explosive crystals used for the measurements are at least 3.5 mm wide. The friction coefficients between crystals of the same explosive (i.e., HMX on HMX, etc.), crystals of different explosives (i.e., HMX on RDX, etc.), and each explosive and a well-polished gauge steel surface are determined. The frictional surfaces are also studied under an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) to analyze surface microstructural changes under increasing loading forces. The friction coefficients vary considerably with increasing normal loading forces and are particularly sensitive to slider shapes, crystal roughness and the mechanical properties of both the slider and the sample. With increasing loading forces, most friction experiments show surface damage, consisting of grooves, debris, and nano-particles, on both the slider and sample. In some cases, a strong evidence of a localized molten state is found in the central region of the friction track. Possible mechanisms that affect the friction coefficient are discussed based on microscopic observations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Friction and wear behavior of carbon fiber reinforced brake materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du-qing CHENG; Xue-tao WANG; Jian ZHU; Dong-bua QIU; Xiu-wei CHENG; Qing-feng GUAN

    2009-01-01

    A new composite brake material was fabri-cated with metallic powders, barium sulphate and modified phenolic resin as the matrix and carbon fiber as the reinforced material. The friction, wear and fade character-istics of this composite were determined using a D-MS friction material testing machine. The surface structure of carbon fiber reinforced friction materials was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Glass fiber-reinforced and asbestos fiber-reinforced composites with the same matrix were also fabricated for comparison. The carbon fiber-reinforced friction materials (CFRFM) shows lower wear rate than those of glass fiber- and asbestos fiber-reinforced composites in the temperature range of 100℃-300℃. It is interesting that the frictional coefficient of the carbon fiber-reinforced friction materials increases as frictional temperature increases from 100℃ to 300℃, while the frictional coefficients of the other two composites decrease during the increasing temperatures. Based on the SEM observation, the wear mechanism of CFRFM at low temperatures included fiber thinning and pull-out. At high temperature, the phenolic matrix was degraded and more pull-out enhanced fiber was demonstrated. The properties of carbon fiber may be the main reason that the CFRFM possess excellent tribological performances.

  11. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert, E-mail: robert.matyas@upce.cz [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Pardubice 532 10 (Czech Republic); Selesovsky, Jakub; Musil, Tomas [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Pardubice 532 10 (Czech Republic)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The friction sensitivity of 14 samples of primary explosives was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The same apparatus (small scale BAM) and the same method (probit analysis) was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal shapes and sizes were documented with microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost all samples are less sensitive than lead azide, which is commercially used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The organic peroxides (TATP, DADP, HMTD) are not as sensitive as often reported. - Abstract: The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature.

  12. Factors determining the viability of radiation processing in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, H.J. van der; Basson, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    In the fifteen years since the introduction of radiation processing to South Africa, four commercial irradiation facilities have been established. These are involved in the processing of a large variety of products, from syringes and prostheses to strawberries and sugar yeast. Three of the facilities are devoted mainly to food irradiation and several thousand tonnes are now processed annually. During this period it was repeatedly experienced that the successful introduction of radiation processing in general, and food radurization in particular, on a commercial scale was critically dependent on the following factors: acceptance by the producer, industry and consumer;initial capital expenditure;running costs and overheads in general;and continuous throughput. All of these factors contribute to the processing cost which is the ultimate factor in determining the value/price ratio for the potential entrepreneur and customer of this new technology. After a market survey had identified the need for a new food irradiation facility to cope with the growing interest in commercial food radurization in the Western Cape, the above-mentioned factors were of cardinal importance in the design and manufacture of a new irradiator. The resulting batch-pallet facility which was commissioned in August 1986, is rather inefficient as far as energy utilization is concerned but this shortcoming is compensated for by its low cost, versatility and low hold-up. Although the facility has limitations as far as the processing of really large volumes of produce is concerned, it is particularly suitable not only for developing countries, but for developed countries in the introductory phase of commercial food radurization.

  13. The Friction Acoustic Emission Signal Characteristics During the Plastic Forming Process of Metal%金属塑性成型过程中摩擦声发射信号特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾园; 张守茁; 席镇; 高宏; 魏盛春

    2009-01-01

    In the plastic forming process of metal, at the great pressure, the friction was produced between the deformation metal and the mold, which could made energy waste, and also so the non-uniform deformation of the metal blank. Using acoustic emission testing technique, the plastic deformation acoustic emission signals of friction were detected during the simulated metal slider and skateboards on three uniform speed and three contact pressure.Testing results showed that under certain conditions, as the pressure was increased, the counts and amplitude of acoustic emission signals would reduce.%在金属塑性成型的过程中,在较大的正压力作用下,变形金属与模具之间存在着摩擦力,导致除了浪费能源以外,还会使金属坯料的变形不均匀.采用声发射技术,检测了模拟金属滑块和滑板在三种匀速运动及三种正压力的情况下,产生的塑性变形摩擦声发射信号的变化.试验结果表明,在特定条件下,随着正压力的增加,声发射信号的计数和幅度减少.

  14. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process developed and patented by The Welding Institute in Cambridge, England. Friction stir welding has been implemented in the aerospace industry in the fabrication of longitudinal welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks. As the industry looks to implement friction stir welding in circumferential welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks, techniques to close out the termination hole associated with retracting the pin tool are being evaluated. Friction pull plug welding is under development as a one means of closing out the termination hole. A friction pull plug weld placed in a friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite, plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size in the test or service environments. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in two aluminum alloy friction plug weld configurations is presented.

  15. Evaluation of interfacial bonding in dissimilar materials of YSZ-alumina composites to 6061 aluminium alloy using friction welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uday, M.B., E-mail: ummb2008@gmail.com [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Ahmad Fauzi, M.N., E-mail: afauzi@eng.usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Zuhailawati, H.; Ismail, A.B. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Friction-welding process. {yields} Joining between ceramic composite and metal alloy. {yields} Slip casting of the yttria stabilized zirconia/alumina composite samples. - Abstract: The interfacial microstructures characteristics of alumina ceramic body reinforced with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was evaluated after friction welding to 6061 aluminum alloy using optical and electron microscopy. Alumina rods containing 25 and 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia were fabricated by slip casting in plaster of Paris (POP) molds and subsequently sintered at 1600 deg. C. On the other hand, aluminum rods were machine down to the required dimension using a lathe machine. The diameter of the ceramic and the metal rods was 16 mm. Rotational speeds for the friction welding were varied between 900 and 1800 rpm. The friction pressure was maintained at 7 MPa for a friction time of 30 s. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the microstructure of the resultant joints, particularly at the interface. The joints were also examined with EDX line (energy dispersive X-ray) in order to determine the phases formed during the welding. The mechanical properties of the friction welded YSZ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite to 6061 alloy were determined with a four-point bend test and Vickers microhardness. The experimental results showed the degree of deformation varied significantly for the 6061 Al alloy than the ceramic composite part. The mechanical strength of friction-welded ceramic composite/6061 Al alloy components were obviously affected by joining rotational speed selected which decreases in strength with increasing rotational speed.

  16. Solid friction between soft filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  17. Effect of friction time on the properties of friction welded YSZ‐alumina composite and 6061 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday M. Basheer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of alumina 0, 25, 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ composite and 6061 aluminium alloy joints formed by friction welding. The alumina-YSZ composites were prepared through slip casting in plaster of Paris molds (POP and subsequently sintered at 1600°C, while the aluminium rods were machined down using a lathe machine to the dimension required. The welding process was carried out under different rotational speeds and friction times, while friction force (0.5 ton-force was kept constant. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the interface of the joints structure. The experimental results showed that the friction time has a significant effect on joint structure and mechanical properties.

  18. Fluorescence determination of acrylamide in heat-processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Congcong; Luo, Feng; Chen, Dongmei; Qiu, Bin; Tang, Xinhua; Ke, Huixian; Chen, Xi

    2014-06-01

    A simple and rapid fluorescence method has been developed for the determination of acrylamide in heat-processed food samples. In the determination, acrylamide is degraded through Hofmann reaction to generate vinyl amine, and pyrrolinone is produced when the vinyl amine reacts with fluorescamine, resulting in a strong fluorescence emission at 480 nm. Hofmann reaction is a key step for the fluorescence determination of acrylaminde, and the reaction conditions are investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the fluorescence intensity increases with the increase of acrylamide concentrations. The linear range between the fluorescence intensity and the square-root of acrylamide concentrations is from 0.05 μg mL(-1) to 20 μg mL(-1) with the correlation coefficient R(2)=0.9935. The detection limit is 0.015 μg mL(-1) and the recovery for food samples is from 66.0% to 110.6%. In comparison with Specification of Entry&Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of The People׳s Republic of China (SN/T 2281-2009), the method showed comparable results and demonstrated the accuracy of the method.

  19. Effect of ZrSiO4 on the Friction Performance of Automotive Brake Friction Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Friction-wear properties of the ZrSiO4 reinforced samples were measured and compared with those of plain bronze based ones. For this purpose, density, hardness, friction coefficient wear behaviour of the samples were tested. Microstructures of samples before and after sintering and worn surfaces were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the wear types were determined. The optimum friction-wear behaviour was obtained in the sample compacted at 500 MPa and sintered at 820℃. Density of the final samples decreased with increasing the amount of reinforcing elements (ZrSiO4) before pre-sintering. However after sintering, there is no change in density of the samples including reinforcing elements (ZrSiO4). With increasing friction surface temperature, a reduction in the friction coefficient of the samples was observed.However, the highest reductions in the friction coefficients were observed in the as-received samples containing 0,5% reinforced ZrSiO4. The SEM images of the sample indicated that while bronze-based break lining material without ZrSiO4 showed abrasive wear behaviour, increasing the amount of ZrSiO4 resulted a change in abrasive to adhesive wear mechanism. All samples exhibited friction-wear values, which were within the values shown in SAE-J661 standard. With increasing the amount of reinforcing ZrSiO4, wear resistance of the samples was increased. However samples reinforced with 5% and 6% ZrSiO4 showed the best results.

  20. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Rothenburg, L.; Gutkowski, Witold; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle fri

  1. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  2. Mapping Instabilities in Polymer Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Charles; Crosby, Alfred

    2005-03-01

    Schallamach waves are instabilities that occur as interfaces between a soft elastomer and rigid surface slide past each other.(1) The presence of Schallamach waves can lead to drastic changes in frictional properties. Although the occurrence of Schallamach waves has been studied for the past several decades, a general map relating fundamental material properties, geometry, and operating conditions (i.e. speed and temperature) has not been established. Using a combinatorial approach, we illustrate the role of modulus, testing velocity and surface energetics of crosslinked poly(dimethyl siloxane) on the generation Schallamach waves. This knowledge will be used with polymer patterning processes to fabricate responsive coatings for applications such as anti-fouling coatings. (1)Schallamach, A.;Wear 1971,17, 301-312.

  3. Frictional melting processes and the generation of shock veins in terrestrial impact structures: Evidence from the Steen River impact structure, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Erin L.; Sharp, Thomas G.; Hu, Jinping

    2016-05-01

    Shock-produced melt within crystalline basement rocks of the Steen River impact structure (SRIS) are observed as thin (1-510 μm wide), interlocking networks of dark veins which cut across and displace host rock minerals. Solid-state phase transformations, such as ferro-pargasite to an almandine-andradite-majorite garnet and amorphization of quartz and feldspar, are observed in zones adjacent to comparatively wider (50-500 μm) sections of the shock veins. Shock pressure estimates based on the coupled substitution of Na+, Ti4+ and Si4+ for divalent cations, Al3+ and Cr3+ in garnet (14-19 GPa) and the pressure required for plagioclase (Ab62-83) amorphization at elevated temperature (14-20 GPa) are not appreciably different from those recorded by deformation effects observed in non-veined regions of the bulk rock (14-20 GPa). This spatial distribution is the result of an elevated temperature gradient experienced by host rock minerals in contact with larger volumes of impact-generated melt and large deviatoric stresses experienced by minerals along vein margins. Micrometer-size equant crystals of almandine-pyrope-majorite garnet define the shock vein matrix, consistent with rapid quench (100-200 ms) at 7.5-10 GPa. Crystallization of the vein occurred during a 0.1-0.15 s shock pressure pulse. Majoritic garnet, formed during shock compression by solid state transformation of pargasite along shock vein margins, is observed in TEM bright field images as nanometer-size gouge particles produced at strain rates in the supersonic field (106-108). These crystals are embedded in vesiculated glass, and this texture is interpreted as continued movement and heating along slip planes during pressure release. The deformation of high-pressure minerals formed during shock compression may be the first evidence of oscillatory slip in natural shock veins, which accounts for the production of friction melt via shear when little or no appreciable displacement is observed. Our observations

  4. Effects of lubricant's friction coefficient on warm compaction powder metallurgy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-yuan; NGAI Tungwai Leo; WANG Shng-lin; ZHU Min; CHEN Wei-ping

    2005-01-01

    The correct use of lubricant is the key of warm compaction powder metallurgy.Different lubricants produce different lubrication effects and their optimal application temperature will be different.Three different lubricants were used to study the effects of friction coefficient on warm compaction process.Friction coefficients of these lubricants were measured at temperatures ranging from ambient temperature to 200 ℃.Iron-base samples were prepared using different processing temperatures and their green compact densities were studied.

  5. Friction or Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundahl, Mikela

    2014-01-01

    . The anthropologist Anna Tsing has developed the concept-metaphor friction as a way to discuss the energy created when various actors narrate “the same” event(s) in different ways, and see the other participants’ accounts as fantasies or even fabrications. I will use my position as researcher and my relations...... is Stone Town in Zanzibar and the de-velopment and dissolution going on under the shadow of the UNESCO World Heritage flag; a growing tourism; a global and local increase in islamisation; and the political tension within the Tanzanian union. My main focus is narratives of the identity of Zanzibar since...

  6. Static and kinetic friction characteristics of nanowire on different substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Joon; Nguyen, Gia Hau; Ky, Dinh Le Cao; Tran, Da Khoa; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Friction characteristics of nanowires (NWs), which may be used as building blocks for nano-devices, are crucial, especially for cases where contact sliding occurs during the device operation. In this work, the static and kinetic friction characteristics of oxidized Si NWs deposited on thermally grown SiO2 and chemical vapor-deposited single layer graphene were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Kinetic friction between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was directly measured by the AFM. Static friction was also obtained from the most bent state of the NWs using the individually determined elastic moduli of the NWs from kinetic friction experiments based on elastic beam theory. Furthermore, the shear stress between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was estimated based on adhesive contact theory. It was found that both static and kinetic friction increased as the radius of the NWs increased. The friction of the oxidized Si NWs on the graphene substrate was found to be smaller than that on the SiO2 substrate, which suggests that chemical vapor-deposited graphene can be used as a lubricant or as a protective layer in nano-devices to reduce friction. The shear stress estimated from the kinetic friction data between the oxidized Si NWs and the SiO2 substrate ranged from 7.5 to 12.3 MPa while that between the oxidized Si NWs and the graphene substrate ranged from 4.7 to 7.0 MPa. The result also indicated that the dependence of shear stress on the radius of the NWs was not significant. These findings may provide insight into the friction characteristics of NWs.

  7. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  8. FRICTION ANALYSIS OF KINETIC SCHEMES - THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOLKEMA, JS

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  9. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  10. Effects of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir lap linear welded 6061 aluminum alloy to NZ30K magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Tan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir lap linear welded as-extruded 6061 Al alloy to as-cast Mg–3.0Nd–0.2Zn–0.7Zr (wt.% (NZ30K alloy joints were examined. Various tool rotation and travel speeds were adopted to prepare the joints. The analysis of temperature field indicates that the peak temperature for each sample can reach 450 °C, which exceeds the eutectic reaction temperatures of 437 °C and 450 °C according to the binary phase diagram of Al–Mg system. The fierce intermixing can be found at the interface between Al and Mg alloys, forming the intermetallic of Al3Mg2. Welds with the rotation speed of 900 rpm and travel speed of 120 mm/min display the highest tensile shear failure load of about 2.24 kN. The value was increased by 13% after the sample was heat treated at 400 °C for 0.5 h.

  11. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface.

  12. Development of a Constitutive Friction Law based on the Frictional Interaction of Rough Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Beyer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction has a considerable impact in metal forming. This is in particular true for sheet-bulk metal-forming (SBMF in which local highly varying contact loads occur. A constitutive friction law suited to the needs of SBMF is necessary, if numerical investigations in SBMF are performed. The identification of the friction due to adhesion and ploughing is carried out with an elasto-plastic half-space model. The normal contact is verified for a broad range of normal loads. In addition, the model is used for the characterization of the occurring shear stress. Ploughing is determined by the work which is necessary to plastically deform the surface asperities of the new area that gets into contact during sliding. Furthermore, the surface patches of common half-space models are aligned orthogonally to the direction in which the surfaces approach when normal contact occurs. For a better reflection of the original surfaces, the element patches become inclined. This leads to a geometric share of lateral forces which also contribute to friction. Based on these effects, a friction law is derived which is able to predict the contact conditions especially for SBMF.

  13. Static and kinetic friction characteristics of nanowire on different substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Joon [Department of Precision Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Sangju 37224 (Korea, Republic of); Nguyen, Gia Hau; Ky, Dinh Le Cao; Tran, Da Khoa [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 44610 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ki-Joon [Department of Environmental Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 22212 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Koo-Hyun, E-mail: khchung@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 44610 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Direct measurement of kinetic friction of oxidized Si NW using AFM. • Determination of static friction of oxidized Si NW from most bent state. • Friction characteristics of oxidized Si NW on SiO{sub 2} and graphene. • Estimation of shear stress between cylindrical NW and flat substrate. • No significant dependence of shear stress on NW radius. - Abstract: Friction characteristics of nanowires (NWs), which may be used as building blocks for nano-devices, are crucial, especially for cases where contact sliding occurs during the device operation. In this work, the static and kinetic friction characteristics of oxidized Si NWs deposited on thermally grown SiO{sub 2} and chemical vapor-deposited single layer graphene were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Kinetic friction between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was directly measured by the AFM. Static friction was also obtained from the most bent state of the NWs using the individually determined elastic moduli of the NWs from kinetic friction experiments based on elastic beam theory. Furthermore, the shear stress between the oxidized Si NWs and the substrates was estimated based on adhesive contact theory. It was found that both static and kinetic friction increased as the radius of the NWs increased. The friction of the oxidized Si NWs on the graphene substrate was found to be smaller than that on the SiO{sub 2} substrate, which suggests that chemical vapor-deposited graphene can be used as a lubricant or as a protective layer in nano-devices to reduce friction. The shear stress estimated from the kinetic friction data between the oxidized Si NWs and the SiO{sub 2} substrate ranged from 7.5 to 12.3 MPa while that between the oxidized Si NWs and the graphene substrate ranged from 4.7 to 7.0 MPa. The result also indicated that the dependence of shear stress on the radius of the NWs was not significant. These findings may provide insight into the friction characteristics

  14. Modelling of friction anisotropy of deepdrawing sheet in ABAQUS/EXPLICIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stachowicz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental and numerical results of rectangular cup drawing of steel sheets. The aim of the experimental study was to analyze material behavior under deformation. The received results were further used to verify the results from numerical simulation by taking friction and material anisotropy into consideration. A 3D parametric finite element (FE model was built using the FE-package ABAQUS/Standard. ABAQUS allows analyzing physical models of real processes putting special emphasis on geometrical non-linearities caused by large deformations, material non-linearities and complex friction conditions. Frictional properties of the deep drawing quality steel sheet were determined by using the pin-on-disc tribometer. It shows that the friction coefficient value depends on the measured angle from the rolling direction and corresponds to the surface topography. A quadratic Hill anisotropic yield criterion was compared with Huber-Mises yield criterion having isotropic hardening. Plastic anisotropy is the result of the distortion of the yield surface shape due to the material microstructural state. The sensitivity of constitutive laws to the initial data characterizing material behavior isalso presented. It is found that plastic anisotropy of the matrix in ductile sheet metal has influence on deformation behavior of the material. If the material and friction anisotropy are taken into account in the finite element analysis, this approach undoubtedly gives the most approximate numerical results to real processes. This paper is the first part of the study of numerical investigation using ABAQUS and mainly deals with the most influencing parameters in a forming process to simulate the sheet metal forming of rectangular cup.

  15. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  16. Simulation on friction taper plug welding of AA6063-20Gr metal matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Nithin, Abeyram M.

    2016-05-01

    Friction taper plug welding a variant of friction welding is useful in welding of similar and dissimilar materials. It could be used for joining of composites to metals in sophisticated aerospace applications. In the present work numerical simulation of friction taper plug welding process is carried out using finite element based software. Graphite reinforced AA6063 is modelled using the software ANSYS 15.0 and temperature distribution is predicted. Effect of friction time on temperature distribution is numerically investigated. When the friction time is increased to 30 seconds, the tapered part of plug gets detached and fills the hole in the AA6063 plate perfectly.

  17. The Application of Vibration Accelerations in the Assessment of Average Friction Coefficient of a Railway Brake Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawczuk, Wojciech

    2017-06-01

    Due to their wide range of friction characteristics resulting from the application of different friction materials and good heat dissipation conditions, railway disc brakes have long replaced block brakes in many rail vehicles. A block brake still remains in use, however, in low speed cargo trains. The paper presents the assessment of the braking process through the analysis of vibrations generated by the components of the brake system during braking. It presents a possibility of a wider application of vibroacoustic diagnostics (VA), which aside from the assessment of technical conditions (wear of brake pads) also enables the determination of the changes of the average friction coefficient as a function of the braking onset speed. Vibration signals of XYZ were measured and analyzed. The analysis of the results has shown that there is a relation between the values of the point measures and the wear of the brake pads.

  18. A study on the effect of flat plate friction resistance on speed performance prediction of full scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flat plate friction lines hare been used in the process to estimate speed performance of full-scale ships in model tests. The results of the previous studies showed considerable differences in determining form factors depending on changes in plate friction lines and Reynolds numbers. These differences had a great influence on estimation of speed performance of full-scale ships. This study- was conducted in two parts. In the first part, the scale effect of the form factor depending on change in the Reynolds number was studied based on CFD, in connection with three kinds of friction resistance curves: the ITTC-1957, the curve proposed by Grigson (1993; 1996, and the curve developed by Katsui et al (2005. In the second part, change in the form factor by three kinds of

  19. On the nature of the static friction, kinetic friction and creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.; Mancosu, F.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the nature of the static and kinetic friction, and of (thermally activated) creep.We focus on boundary lubrication at high confining pressure (∼1GPa), as is typical for hard solids, where one or at most two layers of confined molecules separates the sliding surfaces. We...... may depend linearly on ln (v/v0), as usually observed experimentally, rather than non-linearly [−ln (v/v0)]2/3 as predicted by a simple theory of activated processes. We also discuss the role of elasticity at stop and start. We show that for "simple" rubber (at low start velocity), the static friction...

  20. Ferrous friction stir weld physical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Seth Jason

    2006-04-01

    Traditional fusion welding processes have several drawbacks associated with the melting and solidification of metal. Weld defects associated with the solidification of molten metal may act as initiation sites for cracks. Segregation of alloying elements during solidification may cause local changes in resistance to corrosion. The high amount of heat required to produce the molten metal in the weld can produce distortion from the intended position on cooling. The heat from the electric arc commonly used to melt metal in fusion welds may also produce metal fumes which are a potential health hazard. Friction stir welding is one application which has the potential to make full thickness welds in a single pass, while eliminating fume, reducing distortion, and eliminating solidification defects. Currently the friction stir welding process is used in the aerospace industry on aluminum alloys. Interest in the process by industries which rely on iron and its alloys for structural material is increasing. While friction stir welding has been shown to be feasible with iron alloys, the understanding of friction stir welding process effects on these materials is in its infancy. This project was aimed to better that understanding by developing a procedure for physical simulation of friction stir welding. Friction stir weld material tracer experiments utilizing stainless steel markers were conducted with plates of ingot iron and HSLA-65. Markers of 0.0625" diameter 308 stainless steel worked well for tracing the end position of material moved by the friction stir welding tool. The markers did not produce measurable increases in the loading of the tool in the direction of travel. Markers composed of 0.25" diameter 304 stainless steel did not perform as well as the smaller markers and produced increased loads on the friction stir welding tool. The smaller markers showed that material is moved in a curved path around the tool and deposited behind the tool. Material near the surface

  1. Elastic model of dry friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E., E-mail: dekl2@cam.ac.uk [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  2. Fully Coupled Thermomechanical Finite Element Analysis of Material Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-03

    Sharma, S. R., and Mishra, R. S. Effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure of cast A356 aluminum . Mater. Sci. Engng A, 2006, 433, 269...J. and Thomas, W. M. Friction stir process welds aluminum alloys. Welding J., 1996, 75, 41–52. 3 Thomas, W. M. and Dolby, R. E. Friction stir welding...273. 8 Su, J. Q., Nelson, T. W., Mishra, R., and Mahoney, M. Microstructural investigation of friction stir welded 7050-T651 aluminum . Acta Mater., 2003

  3. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yalin

    Nanotribology is a research field to study friction, adhesion, wear and lubrication occurred between two sliding interfaces at nano scale. This study is motivated by the demanding need of miniaturization mechanical components in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), improvement of durability in magnetic storage system, and other industrial applications. Overcoming tribological failure and finding ways to control friction at small scale have become keys to commercialize MEMS with sliding components as well as to stimulate the technological innovation associated with the development of MEMS. In addition to the industrial applications, such research is also scientifically fascinating because it opens a door to understand macroscopic friction from the most bottom atomic level, and therefore serves as a bridge between science and engineering. This thesis focuses on solid/solid atomic friction and its associated energy dissipation through theoretical analysis, atomistic simulation, transition state theory, and close collaboration with experimentalists. Reduced-order models have many advantages for its simplification and capacity to simulating long-time event. We will apply Prandtl-Tomlinson models and their extensions to interpret dry atomic-scale friction. We begin with the fundamental equations and build on them step-by-step from the simple quasistatic one-spring, one-mass model for predicting transitions between friction regimes to the two-dimensional and multi-atom models for describing the effect of contact area. Theoretical analysis, numerical implementation, and predicted physical phenomena are all discussed. In the process, we demonstrate the significant potential for this approach to yield new fundamental understanding of atomic-scale friction. Atomistic modeling can never be overemphasized in the investigation of atomic friction, in which each single atom could play a significant role, but is hard to be captured experimentally. In atomic friction, the

  4. Friction of viscoelastic elastomers with rough surfaces under torsional contact conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo, Miguel; Fretigny, Christian; Chateauminois, Antoine

    2013-11-01

    Frictional properties of contacts between a smooth viscoelastic rubber and rigid surfaces are investigated using a torsional contact configuration where a glass lens is continuously rotated on the rubber surface. From the inversion of the displacement field measured at the surface of the rubber, spatially resolved values of the steady state frictional shear stress are determined within the nonhomogeneous pressure and velocity fields of the contact. For contacts with a smooth lens, a velocity-dependent but pressure-independent local shear stress is retrieved from the inversion. On the other hand, the local shear stress is found to depend on both velocity and applied contact pressure when a randomly rough (sand-blasted) glass lens is rubbed against the rubber surface. As a result of changes in the density of microasperity contacts, the amount of light transmitted by the transparent multicontact interface is observed to vary locally as a function of both contact pressure and sliding velocity. Under the assumption that the intensity of light transmitted by the rough interface is proportional to the proportion of area into contact, it is found that the local frictional stress can be expressed experimentally as the product of a purely velocity-dependent term, k(v), by a term representing the pressure and velocity dependence of the actual contact area, A/A0. A comparison between k(v) and the frictional shear stress of smooth contacts suggests that nanometer scale dissipative processes occurring at the interface predominate over viscoelastic dissipation at microasperity scale.

  5. Measuring Coefficients of Friction for Materials Commonly Used in Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Robert; Martell, Eric

    2008-04-01

    While designing a stage setup for a theatrical presentation, designers must consider equipment, materials, cost and manpower, and we can use physics to simplify and enhance the process. Unfortunately, there is a lack of information about the properties of materials commonly used in theatre. The objective of this research was to determine the coefficients of static and kinetic friction for several materials commonly used in theatrical scene construction and the coefficients of rolling friction for a series of commonly used casters. Materials of known coefficients were tested to confirm the accuracy of the experimental process. Data was collected using a sled style apparatus and LabVIEW software. Data was analyzed in mass volumes using Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and macros. This research was performed as a part of the Physics of Theatre project, a joint collaboration between Millikin University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and was supported in part by Millikin, UIUC, and the United States Institute for Theatre Technology.

  6. Pitting corrosion resistance and bond strength of stainless steel overlay by friction surfacing on high strength low alloy steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Singh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification is essential for improving the service properties of components. Cladding is one of the most widely employed methods of surface modification. Friction surfacing is a candidate process for depositing the corrosion resistant coatings. Being a solid state process, it offers several advantages over conventional fusion based surfacing process. The aim of this work is to identify the relationship between the input variables and the process response and develop the predictive models that can be used in the design of new friction surfacing applications. In the current work, austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 was friction surfaced on high strength low alloy steel substrate. Friction surfacing parameters, such as mechtrode rotational speed, feed rate of substrate and axial force on mechtrode, play a major role in determining the pitting corrosion resistance and bond strength of friction surfaced coatings. Friction surfaced coating and base metal were tested for pitting corrosion by potentio-dynamic polarization technique. Coating microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Coatings in the as deposited condition exhibited strain-induced martensite in austenitic matrix. Pitting resistance of surfaced coatings was found to be much lower than that of mechtrode material and superior to that of substrate. A central composite design with three factors (mechtrode rotational speed, substrate traverse speed, axial load on mechtrode and five levels was chosen to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Response surface methodology was used to develop the model. In the present work, an attempt has been made to develop a mathematical model to predict the pitting corrosion resistance and bond strength by incorporating the friction surfacing process parameters.

  7. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Friction factor of CP aluminium and aluminium–zinc alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Vidhya Sagar; K S Anand; A C Mithun; K Srinivasan

    2006-12-01

    Friction factor has been determined for CP aluminium and aluminium–zinc alloys using ring compression test at different temperatures from 303 K to 773 K. It is found that CP aluminium exhibits sticking whereas Al–Zn alloys do not exhibit sticking at elevated temperatures. Hot working of Al–Zn alloy is easier than that of CP aluminium at 773 K. As zinc content increases up to 10 wt% the friction factor decreases up to 0.02.

  9. The Mechanical Behavior of Friction-Stir Spot Welded Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Hande

    2014-10-01

    Aluminum and alloys are widely used in the automotive industry due to the light weight, good formability, and malleability. Spot welding is the most commonly used joining method of these materials, but the high current requirements and the inconsistent quality of the final welds make this process unsuitable. An alternative welding technique, the friction-stir spot welding process, can also be successfully used in joining of aluminum and alloys. In this study, 1-mm-thick AA5754 Al-alloy plates in the H-111 temper conditions were joined by friction-stir spot welding using two different weld parameters such as tool rotational speed and dwell time. Mechanical properties of the joints were obtained with extensive hardness measurements and tensile shear tests. The effect of these parameters on the failure modes of welded joints was also determined.

  10. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  11. Student figures in friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

      This thesis analyses how ‘the student', as a contested figure, is negotiated and enacted in a period of extensive university reform in Denmark. Through a combination of historical and anthropological research, it focuses on students' changing participation in the shaping of Danish society......, students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures......, the university and their own education. Detailed studies explore, first, politically active students' various attempts to influence national educational policies; second, student participation in the development of the university, especially regarding debates over consumer conduct versus co-ownership; and third...

  12. Processes determining the marine alkalinity and carbonate saturation distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Carter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a composite tracer, Alk*, that has a global distribution primarily determined by CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution. Alk* also highlights riverine alkalinity plumes that are due to dissolved calcium carbonate from land. We estimate the Arctic receives approximately twice the riverine alkalinity per unit area as the Atlantic, and 8 times that of the other oceans. Riverine inputs broadly elevate Alk* in the Arctic surface and particularly near river mouths. Strong net carbonate precipitation lowers basin mean Indian and Atlantic Alk*, while upwelling of dissolved CaCO3 rich deep waters elevates Northern Pacific and Southern Ocean Alk*. We use the Alk* distribution to estimate the carbonate saturation variability resulting from CaCO3 cycling and other processes. We show regional variations in surface carbonate saturation are due to temperature changes driving CO2 fluxes and, to a lesser extent, freshwater cycling. Calcium carbonate cycling plays a tertiary role. Monitoring the Alk* distribution would allow us to isolate the impact of acidification on biological calcification and remineralization.

  13. Frictional properties of lubrication greases with the addition of nickel nanoparticles in pneumatic cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho; Lan, Chou-Wei; Guo, Jia-Bin

    2011-12-01

    This paper studies the influence of addition of 100 nm diameter nickel nano-particles on the friction properties of synthetic grease (Li base, VG100) in pneumatic cylinder. The friction force test of pneumatic cylinder equipment measures the frictional force between seal and cylinder bore in pneumatic cylinders. The lubricants with addition of nickel nano-particles were used for lubricating the contact interface between seal and cylinder bore. The friction force test equipment employ a load cell force sensor to measure the friction force between seals and cylinder bores. Results obtained from experimental tests are compared to determine the friction force between seals and cylinder bore in pneumatic cylinders. The study leads to the conclusion that the addition of nickel nano-particles to synthetic grease results in a decrease in friction force between seals and cylinder bores in pneumatic cylinder. This tribological behavior is closely related to the deposition of nano-particles on the rubbing surfaces

  14. Integrated Data Collection and Analysis Project: Friction Correlation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    and to maintain the utility of historical data while transitioning from mortar and pestle to steel pinch point friction sensitivity. This project...formulations and to maintain the utility of historical data while transitioning from mortar and pestle (such as the BAM) to steel pinch point (such as the ABL...friction sensitivity method mimics the antiquated mortar and pestle environment which is no longer utilized in the formulation and processing of

  15. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  16. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was

  17. Step towards optimizing friction, wear and oil control in piston ring/cylinder systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, H.H.

    1986-04-01

    In a reciprocating-piston engine, cylinder liner temperature has the greatest influence on friction and lubricating film thickness. With rising liner temperature, hydrodynamic friction forces and thus friction losses decrease. At the same time, the lubricating film thicknesses on the rings drop and the mixed friction forces at TDC and BDC rise. Wear increases. With increasing speed and constant liner temperature, hydrodynamic friction and thus friction losses increase. Lubricating films become thicker, mixed friction decreases and so does wear. Under increasing pressure loads at the same liner temperature, lubricating film thicknesses decrease, especially during the expansion stroke. Mixed friction increases and so does wear. Among the various running surface profiles examined for the first compression ring, there is one optimal profile as regards friction, wear and oil control: the results confirm that the profile used on modern rings in standard production today is already optimal for today's engines, having been developed purposefully over the years. The correlations found between friction and lubricating film thickness, between mixed friction forces and ring and liner wear rates, and between lubricating thickness and oil consumption show that it is possible to determine accurately the physical correlations involved by using such a test rig, and that the results can also be applied to a fired production engine. (orig.).

  18. Rubber friction: comparison of theory with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J; Dieluweit, S; Tada, T

    2011-12-01

    We have measured the friction force acting on a rubber block slid on a concrete surface. We used both unfilled and filled (with carbon black) styrene butadiene (SB) rubber and have varied the temperature from -10 °C to 100 °C and the sliding velocity from 1 μm/s to 1000 μm/s. We find that the experimental data at different temperatures can be shifted into a smooth master-curve, using the temperature-frequency shifting factors obtained from measurements of the bulk viscoelastic modulus. The experimental data has been analyzed using a theory which takes into account the contributions to the friction from both the substrate asperity-induced viscoelastic deformations of the rubber, and from shearing the area of real contact. For filled SB rubber the frictional shear stress σ(f) in the area of real contact results mainly from the energy dissipation at the opening crack on the exit side of the rubber-asperity contact regions. For unfilled rubber we instead attribute σ(f) to shearing of a thin rubber smear film, which is deposited on the concrete surface during run in. We observe very different rubber wear processes for filled and unfilled SB rubber, which is consistent with the different frictional processes. Thus, the wear of filled SB rubber results in micrometer-sized rubber particles which accumulate as dry dust, which is easily removed by blowing air on the concrete surface. This wear process seams to occur at a steady rate. For unfilled rubber a smear film forms on the concrete surface, which cannot be removed even using a high-pressure air stream. In this case the wear rate appears to slow down after some run in time period.

  19. Numerical simulation of coupled thermo-mechanical process of friction stir welding in quasi-steady-state%搅拌摩擦焊准稳态热力耦合过程数值模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷鹏飞; 张蓉; 熊江涛; 李京龙

    2013-01-01

    搅拌摩擦焊接过程中的材料塑性变形流场与温度场对焊接接头的组织演化及最终的力学性能有着十分重要的影响,许多学者对此进行了大量的研究.近年来的研究结果表明,该过程是一个极其复杂的热力耦合过程,温度场与材料塑性变形流场之间具有相互耦合效应.运用流体力学和传热学原理对准稳态热力耦合过程进行了数值模拟研究,通过计算得到了焊件材料的流场和温度场分布,并设计了相关实验对温度场进行了验证,结果表明该计算结果可以较准确地描述搅拌摩擦焊准稳态热力耦合状态.%The flow field of plastic deformation and the temperature field during the process of friction stir welding can directly affect the structure evolution of the welded joint, and also have a great influence on mechanical properties of the final joint. In this respect, therfore, a lot of researches have been carried out. The recent research results show that this process is an extremely complex coupled thermal-mechanical process, the temperature field couples together with the flow field of plastic deformation of the material. In this paper, the coupled process is simulated based on hydromechanics and heat transfer theory; the flow field of plastic deformation and the temperature field are calculated; an experiment is designed to measure the temperature field, which indicates that the computed results can exactly describe the coupled thermal-mechanical condition of the friction stir welding in quasi-steady-state.

  20. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston