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Sample records for friction processing determination

  1. Effect of Process Parameters on Friction Model in Computer Simulation of Linear Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yamileva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The friction model is important part of a numerical model of linear friction welding. Its selection determines the accuracy of the results. Existing models employ the classical law of Amonton-Coulomb where the friction coefficient is either constant or linearly dependent on a single parameter. Determination of the coefficient of friction is a time consuming process that requires a lot of experiments. So the feasibility of determinating the complex dependence should be assessing by analysis of effect of approximating law for friction model on simulation results.

  2. Local reinforcement of magnesium components by friction processing. Determination of bonding mechanisms and assessment of joint properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, G.A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2008-07-01

    The development of new creep-resistant and cost effective die casting magnesium alloys, such as AE, MRI, MEZ, ACM, AXJ, AJ, WE, have emerged as an alternative, to fulfil the modern demands in structurally relevant applications, such as engine blocks, gears and converter boxes. However, in most cases, magnesium components are screwed with aluminium and steel bolts, which lead the screwed joints to lose the preload force, due to relaxation. This barrier thereby limits the broad use of magnesium within this segment and should somehow find an adequate solution to help overcome this limitation. Furthermore, together with alloy development and the addition of reinforcement (MMCs), local material engineering processes have been conceived and are considered a method to improve the properties and therefore expand the number of potential applications for magnesium alloys. In this context, Friction Welding (FW) and particularly Friction Hydro Pillar Processing (FHPP), which can be described as a drill and fill process, appear to be an alternative to make the use of magnesium more widespread. For this reason, FHPP is intended to be used, to locally reinforce the mechanically fastened magnesium components. With this approach, regions submitted to the stresses imposed by tightening forces can be compensated by the use of a material with superior properties. It is not required to fabricate the whole structure from an expensive material, thus saving costs and thereby satisfying the economic pressures of an increasingly competitive global market. In the present work, a preliminary experimental matrix was defined and used to determine the optimal welding conditions for each specific material combination selected. Further, elaborate experimental techniques are used to describe the process parameters-microstructure-properties relationships and the consequent mechanisms leading to bonding in FHPP welds in similar and dissimilar configurations. The welds were performed using a hydraulic

  3. Validation of measured friction by process tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Morten; Henningsen, Poul; Tan, Xincai

    The objective of sub-task 3.3 is to evaluate under actual process conditions the friction formulations determined by simulative testing. As regards task 3.3 the following tests have been used according to the original project plan: 1. standard ring test and 2. double cup extrusion test. The task...... has, however, been extended to include a number of new developed process tests: 3. forward rod extrusion test, 4. special ring test at low normal pressure, 5. spike test (especially developed for warm and hot forging). Validation of the measured friction values in cold forming from sub-task 3.1 has...... been made with forward rod extrusion, and very good agreement was obtained between the measured friction values in simulative testing and process testing....

  4. Determining Spacecraft Reaction Wheel Friction Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarani, Siamak

    2009-01-01

    Software was developed to characterize the drag in each of the Cassini spacecraft's Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWAs) to determine the RWA friction parameters. This tool measures the drag torque of RWAs for not only the high spin rates (greater than 250 RPM), but also the low spin rates (less than 250 RPM) where there is a lack of an elastohydrodynamic boundary layer in the bearings. RWA rate and drag torque profiles as functions of time are collected via telemetry once every 4 seconds and once every 8 seconds, respectively. Intermediate processing steps single-out the coast-down regions. A nonlinear model for the drag torque as a function of RWA spin rate is incorporated in order to characterize the low spin rate regime. The tool then uses a nonlinear parameter optimization algorithm based on the Nelder-Mead simplex method to determine the viscous coefficient, the Dahl friction, and the two parameters that account for the low spin-rate behavior.

  5. Automatic Gap Detection in Friction Stir Welding Processes (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Yu; Kalya, Prabhanjana; Landers, Robert G; Krishnamurthy, K

    2006-01-01

    .... This paper develops a monitoring algorithm to detect gaps in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processes. Experimental studies are conducted to determine how the process parameters and the gap width affect the welding process...

  6. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  7. Applications of Friction Stir Processing during Engraving of Soft Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kočović

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing has extensive application in many technological operations. Application area of friction stir processing can be extended to the processing of non-metallic materials, such as wood. The paper examines the friction stir processing contact between a specially designed hard and temperature-resistant rotating tool and workpiece which is made of wood. Interval of speed slip and temperature level under which the combustion occurs and carbonization layer of soft material was determined. The results of the research can be applied in technological process of wood engraving operations which may have significant technological and aesthetic effects.

  8. Friction Stir Welding Process: A Green Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Esther T. Akinlabi; Stephen A. Akinlabi

    2012-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented and patented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in the United Kingdom in 1991 for butt and lap welding of metals and plastics. This paper highlights the benefits of friction stir welding process as an energy efficient and a green technology process in the field of welding. Compared to the other conventional welding processes, its benefits, typical applications and its use in joining similar and dissimilar materia...

  9. Friction Coefficient Determination by Electrical Resistance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunyagi, A.; Kandrai, K.; Fülöp, Z.; Kapusi, Z.; Simon, A.

    2018-01-01

    A simple and low-cost, DIY-type, Arduino-driven experiment is presented for the study of friction and measurement of the friction coefficient, using a conductive rubber cord as a force sensor. It is proposed for high-school or college/university-level students. We strongly believe that it is worthwhile planning, designing and performing Arduino…

  10. New Materials Design Through Friction Stir Processing Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.; Shivpuri, R.

    2007-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has reached a large interest in the scientific community and in the last years also in the industrial environment, due to the advantages of such solid state welding process with respect to the classic ones. The complex material flow occurring during the process plays a fundamental role in such solid state welding process, since it determines dramatic changes in the material microstructure of the so called weld nugget, which affects the effectiveness of the joints. What is more, Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is mainly being considered for producing high-strain-rate-superplastic (HSRS) microstructure in commercial aluminum alloys. The aim of the present research is the development of a locally composite material through the Friction Stir Processing (FSP) of two AA7075-T6 blanks and a different material insert. The results of a preliminary experimental campaign, carried out at the varying of the additional material placed at the sheets interface under different conditions, are presented. Micro and macro observation of the such obtained joints permitted to investigate the effects of such process on the overall joint performance

  11. Friction coefficient determination by electrical resistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunyagi, A.; Kandrai, K.; Fülöp, Z.; Kapusi, Z.; Simon, A.

    2018-05-01

    A simple and low-cost, DIY-type, Arduino-driven experiment is presented for the study of friction and measurement of the friction coefficient, using a conductive rubber cord as a force sensor. It is proposed for high-school or college/university-level students. We strongly believe that it is worthwhile planning, designing and performing Arduino and compatible sensor-based experiments in physics class in order to ensure a better understanding of phenomena, develop theoretical knowledge and multiple experimental skills.

  12. Simulation of friction stir drilling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayabaskar, P.; Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss

    2018-05-01

    The project is the study of the thermal drilling process. The process is a hole forming process in the sheet metals using the heat generated by means of friction. The main advantage of the process over the conventional drilling process is that the holes formed using this process does not need any backing arrangements such as weld nuts, rivet nuts etc. Because the extruded bush itself acts as a supporting structure for the fasteners. This eliminates the need for the access to the backside of the work material for fastening operations. The major factors contributing the thermal drilling operation are the spindle speed and the thrust force required for forming a hole. The process of finding out the suitable thrust force and the speed for drilling a particular material with particular thickness is a tedious process. The process can be simplified by forming a mathematical model by combining the empirical formulae from the literature. These formulae were derived in the literature from the experimental trials by following certain assumptions. In this paper a suitable mathematical model is formed by replicating the experiments and tried to be validated by the results from numerical analysis. The numerical analysis of the model is done using the ANSYS software.

  13. Engineered Alloy Structures by Friction Stir Reaction Processing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative surface modification technology incorporating friction stir reaction processing for producing...

  14. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  15. Process Model for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new process being applied for joining of metal alloys. The process was initially developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The FSW process is being investigated at NASA/MSEC as a repair/initial weld procedure for fabrication of the super-light-weight aluminum-lithium shuttle external tank. The FSW investigations at MSFC were conducted on a horizontal mill to produce butt welds of flat plate material. The weldment plates are butted together and fixed to a backing plate on the mill bed. A pin tool is placed into the tool holder of the mill spindle and rotated at approximately 400 rpm. The pin tool is then plunged into the plates such that the center of the probe lies at, one end of the line of contact, between the plates and the shoulder of the pin tool penetrates the top surface of the weldment. The weld is produced by traversing the tool along the line of contact between the plates. A lead angle allows the leading edge of the shoulder to remain above the top surface of the plate. The work presented here is the first attempt at modeling a complex phenomenon. The mechanical aspects of conducting the weld process are easily defined and the process itself is controlled by relatively few input parameters. However, in the region of the weld, plasticizing and forging of the parent material occurs. These are difficult processes to model. The model presented here addresses only variations in the radial dimension outward from the pin tool axis. Examinations of the grain structure of the weld reveal that a considerable amount of material deformation also occurs in the direction parallel to the pin tool axis of rotation, through the material thickness. In addition, measurements of the axial load on the pin tool demonstrate that the forging affect of the pin tool shoulder is an important process phenomenon. Therefore, the model needs to be expanded to account for the deformations through the material thickness and the

  16. Unraveling the Processing Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is translated along a weld seam, literally stirring the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path or paths is required. In this study, various markers are used to trace the flow paths of the metal. X-ray radiographs record the segmentation and position of the wire. Several variations in the trajectories can be differentiated within the weld zone.

  17. Determining friction and effective loading for sled sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Matt R; Tinwala, Farhan; Lenetsky, Seth; Samozino, Pierre; Brughelli, Matt; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the impact of friction in sled sprinting allows the quantification of kinetic outputs and the effective loading experienced by the athlete. This study assessed changes in the coefficient of friction (µ k ) of a sled sprint-training device with changing mass and speed to provide a means of quantifying effective loading for athletes. A common sled equipped with a load cell was towed across an athletics track using a motorised winch under variable sled mass (33.1-99.6 kg) with constant speeds (0.1 and 0.3 m · s -1 ), and with constant sled mass (55.6 kg) and varying speeds (0.1-6.0 m · s -1 ). Mean force data were analysed, with five trials performed for each condition to assess the reliability of measures. Variables were determined as reliable (ICC > 0.99, CV friction-force and speed/coefficient of friction relationships well fitted with linear (R 2  = 0.994-0.995) and quadratic regressions (R 2  = 0.999), respectively (P friction values determined at two speeds, and the range in values from the quadratic fit (µ k  = 0.35-0.47) suggested µ k and effective loading were dependent on instantaneous speed on athletics track surfaces. This research provides a proof-of-concept for the assessment of friction characteristics during sled towing, with a practical example of its application in determining effective loading and sled-sprinting kinetics. The results clarify effects of friction during sled sprinting and improve the accuracy of loading applications in practice and transparency of reporting in research.

  18. Dislocation Processes and Frictional Stability of Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, V. G.; Mitchell, T. M.; Druiventak, A.

    2011-12-01

    The rate dependence of frictional processes in faults in quartzofeldspathic crust is proposed to change at c. 300°C, because above this temperature asperity deformation can be accommodated by crystal plastic processes. As a consequence, the real fault contact area increases and the fault velocity strengthens. Conversely, faults at lower temperatures are velocity weakening and therefore prone to earthquake slip. We have investigated whether dislocation processes are important around faults in quartzites on seismic timescales, by inducing fault slip on a saw cut surface in novaculite blocks. Deformation was carried out at 450°C and 600°C in a Griggs apparatus. Slip rates of 8.3 x 10-7s-1 allowed total slip, u, of 0.5mm to be achieved in c. 10 minutes. Failure occurred at peak differential stresses of ~1.7 GPa and 1.4 GPa respectively, followed by significant weakening. Structures of the novaculite within and surrounding the fault surface were examined using EBSD, FIB-SEM and TEM to elucidate changes to their dislocation substructure. In the sample deformed at 450°C, a ~50μm thick layer of amorphous / non-crystalline silica was developed on the saw-cut surface during deformation. Rare clasts of the wall rock are preserved within this material. The surrounding sample is mostly composed of equant quartz grains of 5-10μm diameter that lack a preferred orientation, contain very few intercrystalline dislocations, and are divided by organised high angle grain boundaries. After deformation, most quartz grains within the sample retain their starting microstructure. However, within ~10μm of the sliding surface, dislocations are more common, and these are arranged into elongated, tangled zones (subgrain boundaries?). Microfractures are also observed. These microstructures are characteristic of deformation accommodated by low temperature plasticity. Our preliminary observations suggest that dislocation processes may be able to accommodate some deformation around fault

  19. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  20. Friction Modelling In Connection With Cold Forming Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai

    is first coated with aluminate conversion coatings and then lubricated by alkaline soap, molybdenum disulphide (MoS2), alkaline soap followed by molykote grease paste, or kerosene respectively. Steel and stainless steel are first coated with zinc phosphate coatings and then lubricated by either alkaline...... soap or molybdenum disulphide. As processes testing friction sensitive flow, the ring-compression tests and the double cup extrusion tests are carried out. An absolute constant friction model has been proposed to separate the influence of strain hardening from friction. This model has been applied...

  1. Determination of the Static Friction Coefficient from Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a physics laboratory exercise for determining the coefficient of static friction between two surfaces. The circular motion of a coin placed on the surface of a rotating turntable has been studied. For this purpose, the motion is recorded with a high-speed digital video camera recording at 240 frames s[superscript-1], and the…

  2. Frictional heating processes during laboratory earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, J.; Passelegue, F. X.; Deldicque, D.; Lahfid, A.; Girault, F.; Pinquier, Y.; Escartin, J.; Schubnel, A.

    2017-12-01

    Frictional heating during seismic slip plays a crucial role in the dynamic of earthquakes because it controls fault weakening. This study proposes (i) to image frictional heating combining an in-situ carbon thermometer and Raman microspectrometric mapping, (ii) to combine these observations with fault surface roughness and heat production, (iii) to estimate the mechanical energy dissipated during laboratory earthquakes. Laboratory earthquakes were performed in a triaxial oil loading press, at 45, 90 and 180 MPa of confining pressure by using saw-cut samples of Westerly granite. Initial topography of the fault surface was +/- 30 microns. We use a carbon layer as a local temperature tracer on the fault plane and a type K thermocouple to measure temperature approximately 6mm away from the fault surface. The thermocouple measures the bulk temperature of the fault plane while the in-situ carbon thermometer images the temperature production heterogeneity at the micro-scale. Raman microspectrometry on amorphous carbon patch allowed mapping the temperature heterogeneities on the fault surface after sliding overlaid over a few micrometers to the final fault roughness. The maximum temperature achieved during laboratory earthquakes remains high for all experiments but generally increases with the confining pressure. In addition, the melted surface of fault during seismic slip increases drastically with confining pressure. While melting is systematically observed, the strength drop increases with confining pressure. These results suggest that the dynamic friction coefficient is a function of the area of the fault melted during stick-slip. Using the thermocouple, we inverted the heat dissipated during each event. We show that for rough faults under low confining pressure, less than 20% of the total mechanical work is dissipated into heat. The ratio of frictional heating vs. total mechanical work decreases with cumulated slip (i.e. number of events), and decreases with

  3. Overview of friction modelling in metal forming processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    In metal forming processes, friction between tool and workpiece is an important parameter influencing the material flow, surface quality and tool life. Theoretical models of friction in metal forming are based on analysis of the real contact area in tool-workpiece interfaces. Several research...... groups have studied and modelled the asperity flattening of workpiece material against tool surface in dry contact or in contact interfaces with only thin layers of lubrication with the aim to improve understanding of friction in metal forming. This paper aims at giving a review of the most important...... future work in order to advance further in modelling of real contact area in relation to implementation of frictional conditions existing finite element codes for simulation of metal forming processes. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd....

  4. Review of friction modeling in metal forming processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C.V.; Bay, N.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In metal forming processes, friction between tool and workpiece is an important parameter influencing the material flow, surface quality and tool life. Theoretical models of friction in metal forming are based on analysis of the real contact area in tool-workpiece interfaces. Several...... research groups have studied and modeled the asperity flattening of workpiece material against tool surface in dry contact or in contact interfaces with only thin layers of lubrication with the aim to improve understanding of friction in metal forming. This paper aims at giving a review of the most...... conditions, normal pressure, sliding length and speed, temperature changes, friction on the flattened plateaus and deformation of the underlying material. The review illustrates the development in the understanding of asperity flattening and the methods of analysis....

  5. Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Clarke, Daryl D.; Ozeki, Shinichi

    Friction materials such as disk pads, brake linings, and clutch facings are widely used for automotive applications. Friction materials function during braking due to frictional resistance that transforms kinetic energy into thermal energy. There has been a rudimentary evolution, from materials like leather or wood to asbestos fabric or asbestos fabric saturated with various resins such as asphalt or resin combined with pitch. These efforts were further developed by the use of woven asbestos material saturated by either rubber solution or liquid resin binder and functioned as an internal expanding brake, similar to brake lining system. The role of asbestos continued through the use of chopped asbestos saturated by rubber, but none was entirely successful due to the poor rubber heat resistance required for increased speeds and heavy gearing demands of the automobile industry. The use of phenolic resins as binder for asbestos friction materials provided the necessary thermal resistance and performance characteristics. Thus, the utility of asbestos as the main friction component, for over 100 years, has been significantly reduced in friction materials due to asbestos identity as a carcinogen. Steel and other fibrous components have displaced asbestos in disk pads. Currently, non-asbestos organics are the predominate friction material. Phenolic resins continue to be the preferred binder, and increased amounts are necessary to meet the requirements of highly functional asbestos-free disk pads for the automotive industry. With annual automobile production exceeding 70 million vehicles and additional automobile production occurring in developing countries worldwide and increasing yearly, the amount of phenolic resin for friction material is also increasing (Fig. 14.1). Fig. 14.1 Worldwide commercial vehicle production In recent years, increased fuel efficiency of passenger car is required due to the CO2 emission issue. One of the solutions to improve fuel efficiency is to

  6. Frictional processes of bimaterial interfaces at seismic slip rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passelegue, F. X.; Fabbri, O.; Leclère, H.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.

    2017-12-01

    Large subduction earthquakes ruptures propagate from crustal rock toward the sea floor along frictional interfaces of different lythologies. Up to now, frictional processes of rocks were mainly investigated along single material experimental faults. Here, we present the results of high velocity friction experiments coupled with high frequency acoustic monitoring system on biomaterial interfaces including gabbro, pyroxenite and serpentinized peridotite (>95%), following a recent field investigation highlighting bimaterial contacts in the Corsica ophiolitic nappe. We first studied the frictional processes of single materials which result in a mechanical behaviour comparable to previous studies. Both gabbro and pyroxenite exhibit two weakening stages. The first one corresponds to flash heating and the second stage occurs concomitantly with complete melting of the interface. In the case of serpentinite, only one weakening stage is observed, after a weakening slip distance of only few centimeters. We then conducted bimaterial experiments. The two couples tested were gabbro/pyroxenite and gabbro/serpentinite, as observed along natural fault zones (Corsica, France). In the case of gabbro/serpentinite, we observe that frictional processes are controlled by serpentinite. Mechanical curves replicate the behaviour of single serpentinite friction experiments. We observe that few melting occurs, and that the product of experiments consists in fine grained cataclasite, as observed in the field. The case of gabbro/pyroxenite is more complicated. The first weakening is controlled by the lithology of the sample installed on the static part of the rotary apparatus. However, the second weakening is controlled by the gabbro and mechanical curves are identical than those obtained in the case of single gabbro experiments. Supported by microstructural analysis and acoustic activity, our results suggest that frictional processes of bimaterial interfaces are controlled by the material

  7. Friction stir welding process to repair voids in aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Charles D. (Inventor); Litwinski, Edward (Inventor); Valdez, Juan M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an in-process method to repair voids in an aluminum alloy, particularly a friction stir weld in an aluminum alloy. For repairing a circular void or an in-process exit hole in a weld, the method includes the steps of fabricating filler material of the same composition or compatible with the parent material into a plug form to be fitted into the void, positioning the plug in the void, and friction stir welding over and through the plug. For repairing a longitudinal void (30), the method includes machining the void area to provide a trough (34) that subsumes the void, fabricating filler metal into a strip form (36) to be fitted into the trough, positioning the strip in the trough, and rewelding the void area by traversing a friction stir welding tool longitudinally through the strip. The method is also applicable for repairing welds made by a fusing welding process or voids in aluminum alloy workpieces themselves.

  8. NORMAL PRESSURE AND FRICTION STRESS MEASUREMENT IN ROLLING PROCESSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Arentoft, Mogens; Lagergren, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    the output from the transducer, the friction stress and normal pressure in the contact zone can be determined. The new concept differs from existing pin designs by a lower disturbance of lubricant film and material flow and limited penetration of material between transducer and roll. Aluminum, cupper...

  9. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kirk A; St-Georges, Lyne; Kiss, Laszlo I

    2014-04-30

    Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges), being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS). A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed) is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  10. Investigation of cold extrusion process using coupled thermo-mechanical FEM analysis and adaptive friction modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görtan, Mehmet Okan

    2017-10-01

    Cold extrusion processes are known for their excellent material usage as well as high efficiency in the production of large batches. Although the process starts at room temperature, workpiece temperatures may rise above 200°C. Moreover, contact normal stresses can exceed 2500 MPa, whereas surface enlargement values can reach up to 30. These changes affects friction coefficients in cold extrusion processes. In the current study, friction coefficients between a plain carbon steel C4C (1.0303) and a tool steel (1.2379) are determined dependent on temperature and contact pressure using the sliding compression test (SCT). In order to represent contact normal stress and temperature effects on friction coefficients, an empirical adaptive friction model has been proposed. The validity of the model has been tested with experiments and finite element simulations for a cold forward extrusion process. By using the proposed adaptive friction model together with thermo-mechanical analysis, the deviation in the process loads between numerical simulations and model experiments could be reduced from 18.6% to 3.3%.

  11. Processing Determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, William

    2015-01-01

    I propose that the course of development in first and second language acquisition is shaped by two types of processing pressures--internal efficiency-related factors relevant to easing the burden on working memory and external input-related factors such as frequency of occurrence. In an attempt to document the role of internal factors, I consider…

  12. Process optimization of friction stir welding based on thermal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to apply optimization methods to numerical models of a friction stir welding process. The work is intended as a proof-of-concept using different methods that are applicable to models of high complexity, possibly with high computational cost, and without the possibility...... information of the high-fidelity model. The optimization schemes are applied to stationary thermal models of differing complexity of the friction stir welding process. The optimization problems considered are based on optimizing the temperature field in the workpiece by finding optimal translational speed....... Also an optimization problem based on a microstructure model is solved, allowing the hardness distribution in the plate to be optimized. The use of purely thermal models represents a simplification of the real process; nonetheless, it shows the applicability of the optimization methods considered...

  13. Sustainability of Welding Process through Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sued, M. K.; Samsuri, S. S. M.; Kassim, M. K. A. M.; Nasir, S. N. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    Welding process is in high demand, which required a competitive technology to be adopted. This is important for sustaining the needs of the joining industries without ignoring the impact of the process to the environment. Friction stir welding (FSW) is stated to be benefitting the environment through low energy consumption, which cannot be achieved through traditional arc welding. However, this is not well documented, especially for bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW). Therefore, an investigation is conducted by measuring current consumption of the machine during the BFSW process. From the measurement, different phases of BFSW welding process and its electrical demand are presented. It is found that in general total energy in BFSW is about 130kW inclusive of all identified process phases. The phase that utilise for joint formation is in weld phase that used the highest total energy of 120kWs. The recorded total energy is still far below the traditional welding technology and the conventional friction stir welding (CFSW) energy demand. This indicates that BFSW technology with its vast benefit able to sustain the joining technology in near future.

  14. Determination of the Frictional Behavior at Compaction of Powder Materials Consisting of Spray-Dried Granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staf, Hjalmar; Olsson, Erik; Lindskog, Per; Larsson, Per-Lennart

    2018-03-01

    The frictional behavior during powder compaction and ejection is studied using an instrumented die with eight radial sensors. The average friction over the total powder pillar is used to determine a local friction coefficient at each sensor. By comparing forces at compaction with forces at ejection, it can be shown that the Coulomb's friction coefficient can be described as a function of normal pressure. Also stick phenomena has been investigated in order to assess its influence on the determination of the local friction coefficient.

  15. Multi-objective Optimization of Friction Welding Process Parameters using Grey Relational Analysis for Joining Aluminium Metal Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasan KONGANAPURAM SUNDARARAJAN

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium metal matrix composites has gained importance in recent time because of its improved mechanical and metallurgical properties. The welding of aluminium metal matrix composites using conventional welding process has got many demerits so in order to overcome them a solid state welding process is to be employed. To achieve a good strength weld in the aluminium metal matrix composite bars an efficient and most preferred technique is friction welding. In this work the aluminium metal matrix composite AA7075 + 10 % vol SiC-T6 is selected and friction welded. The combination of friction welding process parameters such as spindle speed, friction pressure, upset pressure and burn-off- length for joining the AA7075 + 10 % vol SiCP-T6 metal matrix composite bars are selected by Taguchi’s design of experiment. The optimum friction welding parameters were determined for achieving improved ultimate tensile strength and the hardness using grey relational analysis. A combined grey relational grade is found from the determined grey relational coefficient of the output responses and the optimum friction welding process parameters were obtained as spindle speed – 1200 rpm, friction pressure – 100 MPa, upset pressure – 250 MPa, Burn-off-Length – 2 mm. Analysis of variance (ANOVA performed shows that the friction pressure is the most significant friction welding parameter that influences the both the ultimate tensile strength and hardness of friction welded AA7075 + 10 % volSiCP-T6 joints. The fractured surface under microstructure study also revealed good compliance with the grey relational grade result. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.24.2.17725

  16. Determination of friction in sheet metal forming by means of simulative tribo-tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    operations a coefficient of friction μ is often determined by calibration of the simulation results with experimental observations of material flow and/or measured load. In case of modeling of new stamping operations μ is typically selected based on former experience. These procedures are, however......, not appropriate when introducing new tribo-systems (lubricant, workpiece material, tool material or tool coating). In order to determine friction under the very varied conditions in sheet stamping simulative testing may be applied, e.g., Plane-Strip-Testing (PST), Draw-Bead-Testing (DBT) and Bending......-Under- Tension testing (BUT) but these tests should be analyzed and carefully tuned with the production process in question to ensure useful results. The present paper illustrates how the BUT test combined with classical analytical modeling may lead to very large errors in estimation of the coefficient...

  17. Friction Stir Processing of ODS and FM Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young Bum; Noh, Sang Hoon; Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In ODS steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and martensite, and the oxide

  18. Friction Stir Processing of ODS and FM Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young Bum; Noh, Sang Hoon; Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2013-01-01

    In ODS steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and martensite, and the oxide

  19. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  20. Friction stir processing on high carbon steel U12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, S. Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru; Rubtsov, V. E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Melnikov, A. G., E-mail: melnikov-ag@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Friction stir processing (FSP) of high carbon steel (U12) samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. The FSP tool has been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm. The microstructural characterization of obtained stir zone and heat affected zone has been carried out. Microhardness at the level of 700 MPa has been obtained in the stir zone with microstructure consisting of large grains and cementitte network. This high-level of microhardness is explained by bainitic reaction developing from decarburization of austenitic grains during cementite network formation.

  1. Influence of Processing Parameters on the Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J. A.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid phase welding process that unites thermal and mechanical aspects to produce a high quality joint. The process variables are rpm, translational weld speed, and downward plunge force. The strain-temperature history of a metal element at each point on the cross-section of the weld is determined by the individual flow path taken by the particular filament of metal flowing around the tool as influenced by the process variables. The resulting properties of the weld are determined by the strain-temperature history. Thus to control FSW properties, improved understanding of the processing parameters on the metal flow path is necessary.

  2. Determination of Actual Friction Factors in Metal Forming under Heavy Loaded Regimes Combining Experimental and Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Ana María; Veganzones, Mariano; Claver, Juan; Martín, Francisco; Sevilla, Lorenzo; Sebastián, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Tribological conditions can change drastically during heavy loaded regimes as experienced in metal forming; this is especially critical when lubrication can only be applied at the early stage of the process because the homogeneous lubricant layer can break along the die-workpiece interface. In these cases, adopting a constant friction factor for the lubricant-surface pair may not be a valid assumption. This paper presents a procedure based on the use of dual friction factor maps to determine friction factors employed in heavy loaded regimes. A finite element (FE) simulation is used to obtain the friction factor map for the alloy UNS A96082. Experiments were conducted using four lubricants (aluminum anti-size, MoS2 grease, silicone oil, and copper paste) to determine the actual friction curves. The experimental procedure is based on the application of lubricant only at the beginning of the first stage of ring compression, and not at intermediate stages as is usual in typical ring compression tests (RCTs). The results show that for small reductions (rh 20%), it is recommended to obtain an average value of the friction factor for every lubricant-surface pair in the range of deformation considered. PMID:28773868

  3. Determination of Actual Friction Factors in Metal Forming under Heavy Loaded Regimes Combining Experimental and Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Camacho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tribological conditions can change drastically during heavy loaded regimes as experienced in metal forming; this is especially critical when lubrication can only be applied at the early stage of the process because the homogeneous lubricant layer can break along the die-workpiece interface. In these cases, adopting a constant friction factor for the lubricant-surface pair may not be a valid assumption. This paper presents a procedure based on the use of dual friction factor maps to determine friction factors employed in heavy loaded regimes. A finite element (FE simulation is used to obtain the friction factor map for the alloy UNS A96082. Experiments were conducted using four lubricants (aluminum anti-size, MoS2 grease, silicone oil, and copper paste to determine the actual friction curves. The experimental procedure is based on the application of lubricant only at the beginning of the first stage of ring compression, and not at intermediate stages as is usual in typical ring compression tests (RCTs. The results show that for small reductions (rh < 20%, the conventional RCT can be applied because the tribological conditions remain similar. For large reductions (rh > 20%, it is recommended to obtain an average value of the friction factor for every lubricant-surface pair in the range of deformation considered.

  4. Determination and Application of Comprehensive Specific Frictional Resistance in Heating Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Tian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyze the deficiencies of specific frictional resistance in heating engineering. Based on economic specific frictional resistance, we put forward the concept of comprehensive specific frictional resistance, which considers the multiple factors of technology, economy, regulation modes, pipe segment differences, and medium pressure. Then, we establish a mathematical model of a heating network across its lifespan in order to develop a method for determining the comprehensive specific frictional resistance. Relevant conclusions can be drawn from the results. As an application, we have planned the heating engineering for Yangyuan County in China, which demonstrates the feasibility and superiority of the method.

  5. Model analysis and experimental investigation of the friction torque during the CMP process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Dongming; Xu Chi; Kang Renke; Jin Zhuji

    2011-01-01

    A model for calculating friction torque during the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process is presented, and the friction force and torque detection experiments during the CMP process are carried out to verify the model. The results show that the model can well describe the feature of friction torque during CMP processing. The research results provide a theoretical foundation for the CMP endpoint detection method based on the change of the torque of the polishing head rotational spindle. (semiconductor technology)

  6. Characteristics of Friction Stir Processed UHMW Polyethylene Based Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, G.; Khan, I.

    2018-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) based composites are widely used in biomedical and food industries because of their biocompatibility and enhanced properties. The aim of this study was to fabricate UHMWPE / nHA composite through heat assisted Friction Stir Processing. The rotational speed (ω), feed rate (f), volume fraction of nHA (v) and shoulder temperature (T) were selected as the process parameters. Macroscopic and microscopic analysis revealed that these parameters have significant effects on the distribution of reinforcing material, defects formation and material mixing. Defects were observed especially at low levels of (ω, T) and high levels of (f, v). Low level of v with medium levels of other parameters resulted in better mixing and minimum defects. A 10% increase in strength with only 1% reduction in Percent Elongation was observed at the above set of conditions. Moreover, the resulted hardness of the composite was higher than that of the parent material.

  7. Waste canister closure welding using the inertia friction welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.F.; Siemens, D.H.; Kuruzar, D.L.

    1986-02-01

    Liquid radioactive waste presently stored in underground tanks is to undergo a vitrifying process which will immobilize it in a solid form. This solid waste will be contained in a stainless steel canister. The canister opening requires a positive seal weld, the properties and thickness of which are at least equal to those of the canister material. This paper describes the inertia friction welding process and a proposed equipment design concept that will provide a positive, reliable, inspectable, and full thickness seal weld while providing easily maintainable equipment, even though the weld is made in a highly contaminated hot cell. All studies and tests performed have shown the concept to be highly feasible. 2 refs., 6 figs

  8. Influence of pulsed plasma streams processing on wear behavior of steels in different friction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandura, A.N.; Byrka, O.V.; Tereshin, V.I.; Bovda, A.M.; Tortika, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed plasma streams processing was applied for surface modification of industrial steel samples. Different types of wear tests (pin-on-disk,flat-on-flat, abrasive,cavitation) were carried out for samples irradiated by pulsed nitrogen plasma streams. There was achieved essential decrease of wear and tear of processed surfaces of all kinds of steels including previously thermally quenched ones. Obtained results are of importance for both determination of optimal regimes of plasma streams processing and the most resulting use of pulsed plasma streams for technology purpose, i.e. for identification of wear modes and optimal friction conditions for steels processed by plasma streams

  9. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  10. Grain refinement of Aluminium alloys using friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khraisheh, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is a new advanced material processing technique used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of sheet metals. FSP is a solid state processing technique that uses a rapidly rotating non-consumable high strength tool steel pin that extends from a cylindrical shoulder. The rotating pin is forced with a predetermined load into the work piece and moved along with the work pieces, while the rotating pin deforms and stirs the locally heated material. It is a hot working process in which a large amount of deformation is imparted to the sheet. FS processed zone is characterized by dynamic recrystallization which results in grain refinement . this promising emerging process needs further investigations to develop optimum process parameters to produce the desired microstructure. In this work, we present preliminary results on the effects of rotational and translational speeds on grain refinement of AA5052. Under certain processing conditions, sub-micron grain structure was produced using this technique

  11. Measurement of Normal and Friction Forces in a Rolling Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Arentoft, Mogens; Wanheim, Tarras

    2004-01-01

    by the fric-tion conditions. To achieve this important informa-tion, measurements of the normal pressure and friction stresses in the deformation zone are re-quested. The direction of the friction stresses is changing during the rolling gap. At the entrance of the de-formation zone, the peripherical velocity...... of the roll is higher than for the incoming material, which causes frictional stresses at the material acting in the rolling direction. At the outlet of the rolling gap, the velocity of the deformed material exceeds the velocity of the roll, generating frictional stresses contrary to the direction of rolling....... In a narrow area in the deformation zone, the velocity of the de-formed material is equal to the velocity of the rolls. This area or line is named “neutral line”. The posi-tion of the neutral line depends on friction, reduc-tion ratio, diameter of the rolls, and width of the sheet....

  12. Friction stir welding (FSW process of copper alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miličić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes the structure of the weld joint of technically pure copper, which is realized using friction stir welding (FSW. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical processes of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Parameters of the FSW welding technology influencing the zone of the seam material and the mechanical properties of the resulting joint were analyzed. The physical joining consists of intense mixing the base material along the joint line in the “doughy” phase. Substantial plastic deformations immediately beneath the frontal surface of tool provide fine-grained structure and a good quality joint. The optimum shape of the tool and the optimum welding regime (pressure force, rotation speed and the traverse speed of the tool in the heat affected zone enable the achievement of the same mechanical properties as those of the basic material, which justifies its use in welding reliable structures.

  13. Effect of energetic dissipation processes on the friction unit tribological

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moving V. V.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In article presented temperature influence on reological and fric-tion unit coefficients cast iron elements. It has been found that surface layer formed in the temperature friction has good rub off resistance. The surface layer structural hardening and capacity stress relaxation make up.

  14. Surface modification of hydroturbine steel using friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, H. S.; Arora, H. S.; Singh, H.; Agrawal, A.

    2013-03-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) has proved to be a viable tool for enhancing the mechanical properties of materials, however, the major focus has been upon improving the bulk properties of light metals and their alloys. Hydroturbines are susceptible to damage owing to slurry and cavitation erosion. In this study, FSP of a commonly employed hydroturbine steel, 13Cr4Ni was undertaken. Microstructural characterization of the processed steel was conducted using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. Mechanical characterization of the steel was undertaken in terms of microhardness and resistance to cavitation erosion (CE). FSP resulted in the refinement of the microstructure with reduction in grain size by a factor of 10. EBSD results confirmed the existence of submicron and ultrafine grained microstructure. The microhardness of the steel was found to enhance by 2.6 times after processing. The processed steel also showed 2.4 times higher resistance against cavitation erosion in comparison to unprocessed steel. The primary erosion mechanism for both the steels was identical in nature, with plastic deformation responsible for the loss of material.

  15. Simulation of Friction Stir Processing in 304L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A major dilemma facing the nuclear industry is repair or replacement of stainless steel reactor components that have been exposed to neutron irradiation. When conventional fusion welding is used for weld repair, the high temperatures and thermal stresses inherent in the process enhance the growth of helium bubbles, causing intergranular cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ. Friction stir processing (FSP has potential as a weld repair technique for irradiated stainless steel, because it operates at much lower temperatures than fusion welding, and is therefore less likely to cause cracking in the HAZ. Numerical simulation of the FSP process in 304L stainless steel was performed using an Eulerian finite element approach. Model input required flow stresses for the large range of strain rates and temperatures inherent in the FSP process. Temperature predictions in three locations adjacent to the stir zone were accurate to within 4% of experimentally measure values. Prediction of recrystallized grain size at a location about 6mm behind the tool center was less accurate, because the empirical model employed for the prediction did not account for grain growth that occurred after deformation in the experiment was halted.

  16. Friction Mapping as a Tool for Measuring the Elastohydrodynamic Contact Running-in Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    ARL-TR-7501 ● OCT 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Friction Mapping as a Tool for Measuring the Elastohydrodynamic Contact...Research Laboratory Friction Mapping as a Tool for Measuring the Elastohydrodynamic Contact Running-in Process by Stephen Berkebile Vehicle...YYYY) October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 January–30 June 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Friction Mapping as a Tool for

  17. Optimization of process parameters for friction stir processing (FSP ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    al 2005; Yadav and Bauri 2011) as the thermo- mechanical aspect of the process provides enough driving force for occurrence of dynamic recovery (DRV) that precedes DRX leading to an equi-axed fine grain struc- ture. The microstructure evolution is further discussed below with the aid of transmission electron microscopy.

  18. [Determination of a Friction Coefficient for THA Bearing Couples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbka, M; Nečas, D; Bartošík, J; Hartl, M; Křupka, I; Galandáková, A; Gallo, J

    2015-01-01

    The wear of articular surfaces is considered one of the most important factors limiting the life of total hip arthroplasty (THA). It is assumed that the particles released from the surface of a softer material induce a complex inflammatory response, which will eventually result in osteolysis and aseptic loosening. Implant wear is related to a friction coefficient which depends on combination of the materials used, roughness of the articulating surfaces, internal clearance, and dimensions of the prosthesis. The selected parameters of the bearing couples tested were studied using an experimental device based on the principle of a pendulum. Bovine serum was used as a lubricant and the load corresponded to a human body mass of 75 kg. The friction coefficient was derived from a curve of slowdown of pendulum oscillations. Roughness was measured with a device working on the principle of interferometry. Clearance was assessed by measuring diameters of the acetabular and femoral heads with a 3D optical scanner. The specimens tested included unused metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene, ceramic-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene and ceramic-on-ceramic bearing couples with the diameters of 28 mm and 36 mm. For each measured parameter, an arithmetic mean was calculated from 10 measurements. 1) The roughness of polyethylene surfaces was higher by about one order of magnitude than the roughness of metal and ceramic components. The Protasul metal head had the least rough surface (0.003 μm). 2) The ceramic-on-ceramic couples had the lowest clearance. Bearing couples with polyethylene acetabular liners had markedly higher clearances ranging from 150 μm to 545 μm. A clearance increased with large femoral heads (up to 4-fold in one of the couple tested). 3) The friction coefficient was related to the combination of materials; it was lowest in ceramic-on-ceramic surfaces (0.11 to 0.12) and then in ceramic-on-polyethylene implants (0.13 to 0.14). The friction coefficient is

  19. Determination of friction coefficient in unconfined compression of brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Badar; Destrade, Michel; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2012-10-01

    Unconfined compression tests are more convenient to perform on cylindrical samples of brain tissue than tensile tests in order to estimate mechanical properties of the brain tissue because they allow homogeneous deformations. The reliability of these tests depends significantly on the amount of friction generated at the specimen/platen interface. Thus, there is a crucial need to find an approximate value of the friction coefficient in order to predict a possible overestimation of stresses during unconfined compression tests. In this study, a combined experimental-computational approach was adopted to estimate the dynamic friction coefficient μ of porcine brain matter against metal platens in compressive tests. Cylindrical samples of porcine brain tissue were tested up to 30% strain at variable strain rates, both under bonded and lubricated conditions in the same controlled environment. It was established that μ was equal to 0.09±0.03, 0.18±0.04, 0.18±0.04 and 0.20±0.02 at strain rates of 1, 30, 60 and 90/s, respectively. Additional tests were also performed to analyze brain tissue under lubricated and bonded conditions, with and without initial contact of the top platen with the brain tissue, with different specimen aspect ratios and with different lubricants (Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and Silicone). The test conditions (lubricant used, biological tissue, loading velocity) adopted in this study were similar to the studies conducted by other research groups. This study will help to understand the amount of friction generated during unconfined compression of brain tissue for strain rates of up to 90/s. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface hardening of two cast irons by friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hidetoshi; Kikuchi, Toshifumi; Nogi, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Yasufumi; Kiguchi, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    The Friction Stir Processing (FSP) was applied to the surface hardening of cast irons. Flake graphite cast iron (FC300) and nodular graphite cast iron (FCD700) were used to investigate the validity of this method. The matrices of the FC300 and FC700 cast irons are pearlite. The rotary tool is a 25mm diameter cylindrical tool, and the travelling speed was varied between 50 and 150mm/min in order to control the heat input at the constant rotation speed of 900rpm. As a result, it has been clarified that a Vickers hardness of about 700HV is obtained for both cast irons. It is considered that a very fine martensite structure is formed because the FSP generates the heat very locally, and a very high cooling rate is constantly obtained. When a tool without an umbo (probe) is used, the domain in which graphite is crushed and striated is minimized. This leads to obtaining a much harder sample. The hardness change depends on the size of the martensite, which can be controlled by the process conditions, such as the tool traveling speed and the load. Based on these results, it was clarified that the FSP has many advantages for cast irons, such as a higher hardness and lower distortion. As a result, no post surface heat treatment and no post machining are required to obtain the required hardness, while these processes are generally required when using the traditional methods.

  1. Friction stir processing (FSP: refining microstructures and improving properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNelley, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available FSP is reviewed as an allied technology of friction stir welding (FSW and additional considerations such as processing pattern and step over distance are introduced. The application of FSP to continuously cast AA5083 material in the as-cast condition is described and the extent of grain refinement and homogenization of microstructure is documented. The FSP-induced superplastic response of this material is compared to the response of conventionally processed AA5083 and the improved ductility of the FSP material is related to grain refinement and microstructure homogenization.

    Se revisa el procesado por fricción batida (FSP como un aliado tecnológico de la soldadura por fricción batida (FSW y se introducen consideraciones adicionales tales como el patrón de procesado y el paso en función de la distancia. Se describe la aplicación de FSP al material AA5083 por colada continua en la condición de colada y se documenta el grado de afino de grano y homogeneización de la microestructura. La respuesta de superplasticidad inducida por FSP se compara con la respuesta de la aleación AA5083 procesada convencionalmente y la mejora de ductilidad del material FSP se relaciona con el afino de grano y la homogeneización de la microestructura.

  2. Experimental Determination of Temperature During Rotary Friction Welding of AA1050 Aluminum with AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Paduan Alves

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the temperature monitoring at bonding interface during the rotary friction welding process of dissimilar materials: AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel. As it is directly related to the mechanical strenght of the junction, its experimental determination in real time is of fundamental importance for understanding and characterizing the main process steps, and the definition and optimization of parameters. The temperature gradients were obtained using a system called Thermocouple Data-Logger, which allowed monitoring and recording data in real-time operation. In the graph temperature versus time obtained, the heating rates, cooling were analyzed, and the maximum temperature was determined that occurred during welding, and characterized every phases of the process. The efficiency of this system demonstrated by experimental tests and the knowledge of the temperature at the bonding interface open new lines of research to understand the process of friction welding.

  3. Formability of fiber-reinforced thermoplastics in hot press forming process based on friction properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, Ulrich; Haanappel, Sebastiaan; Rietman, Bert; ten Thije, R.H.W.; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler

  4. Experimental Determination of Temperature During Rotary Friction Welding of AA1050 Aluminum with AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying; Silva, Euclides Castorino da

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was the temperature monitoring at bonding interface during the rotary friction welding process of dissimilar materiais: AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel. As it is directly related to the mechanical strenght of the junction, its experimental determination in real time is of fundamental importance for understanding and characterizing the main process steps, and the definition and optimization of parameters. The temperature gradients were obtained...

  5. Temperature processes at two sliding surfaces subjected to dry friction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Pešek, Luděk; Cibulka, Jan; Bula, Vítězslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 63, 5/6 (2012), s. 277-292 ISSN 0039-2472 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1166 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : dry friction * vibration damping * experimental set * increase of temperature * lost energy Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  6. Role of friction stir processing parameters on microstructure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The life of compo- nents depends on surface properties in many applications. ... The modified surface layer is called as surface composite (Attia. 2001). Friction stir .... The optical photomicrograph of as received copper plate is shown in figure 1a. ... It is essential to obtain a smooth crown appearance owing to the fact that ...

  7. Characterization of Microstructure and Microtexture in Longitudinal Sections from Friction Stir Processed Nickel-Aluminum Bronze

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faires, Kenneth B

    2003-01-01

    .... Friction stir processing (FSP) represents a new technology for surface hardening of as-cast NAB by means of severe plastic deformation induced by a rotating tool that is traversed across the surface of a material...

  8. Determination of the coefficient of dynamic friction between coatings of alumina and metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A.; Córdoba, E.; Ramírez, Z.; Sierra, C.; Ortega, Y.

    2017-12-01

    This project aims to determine the coefficient of dynamic friction between micrometric size coatings of alumina and metallic materials (Steel and aluminium); the methodology used to achieve the proposed objective consisted of 4 phases, in the first one was developed a procedure that allowed, from a Pin on Disk machine built based on the specifications given by the ASTM G99-05 standard (Standard test method for wear tests with a Pin on Disk machine), to determine the coefficient of dynamic friction between two materials in contact; subsequently the methodology was verified through tests between steel-steel and steel-aluminium, due to these values are widely reported in the literature; as a third step, deposits of alumina particles of micrometric size were made on a steel substrate through thermal spraying by flame; finally, the tests were carried out between pins of steel of aluminium and alumina coating to determine the coefficients of dynamic friction between these two surfaces. The results of the project allowed to verify that the developed methodology is valid to obtain coefficients of dynamic friction between surfaces in contact since the percentages of error were of 3.5% and 2.1% for steel-steel and aluminium-steel, respectively; additionally, it was found that the coefficient of friction between steel-alumina coatings is 0.36 and aluminium-alumina coating is 0.25.

  9. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The ...

  10. Experimental studies of parameters affecting the heat generation in friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat generation is a complex process of transformation of a specific type of energy into heat. During friction stir welding, one part of mechanical energy delivered to the welding tool is consumed in the welding process, another is used for deformational processes etc., and the rest of the energy is transformed into heat. The analytical procedure for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding is very complex because it includes a significant number of variables and parameters, and many of them cannot be fully mathematically explained. Because of that, the analytical model for the estimation of heat generated during friction stir welding defines variables and parameters that dominantly affect heat generation. These parameters are numerous and some of them, e. g. loads, friction coefficient, torque, temperature, are estimated experimentally. Due to the complex geometry of the friction stir welding process and requirements of the measuring equipment, adequate measuring configurations and specific constructional solutions that provide adequate measuring positions are necessary. This paper gives an overview of the process of heat generation during friction stir welding, the most influencing parameters on heat generation, constructional solutions for the measuring equipment needed for these experimental researches and examples of measured values.

  11. Superplastic forming of 7475 Al sheet after friction stir processing (FSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, M.; Bingel, W.H.; Fuller, C. [Rockwell Scientific Co., Thousand Oaks, CA (United States); Barnes, A.J. [Superform USA, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Since the invention of friction stir welding (FSW) in 1991, an increasing number of successful applications have been found for this unique solid-state welding technique. More recently, attention has been given to utilizing the mechanics of friction stirring to thermo-mechanically modify the microstructure of aluminum alloys to create or enhance superplasticity. Until now, superplasticity induced by friction stir processing (FSP) has only been demonstrated in small samples and evaluated by hot tensile elongation testing. The present work describes what we believe to be the first biaxial testing and full size component superplastic forming of friction stir processed aluminum sheet. The remarkable formability demonstrated in these 'first time' trials is described in detail. (orig.)

  12. Effect of process parameters on the residual stresses in AA5083-H321 friction stir welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombard, H. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Hattingh, D.G. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Steuwer, A. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); FaME38 at the ILL-ESRF, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steuwer@ill.fr; James, M.N. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    This paper investigates the effect of varying welding parameters on the residual stress profiles in friction stir welds of aluminium alloy AA5083-H321, which were created on a fully instrumented friction welding machine. The residual stresses were determined non-destructively using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The width and maximum of the residual stress profile show clear correlation with the heat input, and in particular feed rate, which was found to be the dominant parameter.

  13. Importance of material and friction characterisation for FE-aided process design of hybrid bevel gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bouguecha, A.; Bonk, C.; Matthias, T.

    2017-10-01

    Solid-forming components are often used in areas where they are subjected to very high loads. For most solid components locally divergent and sometimes contradictory requirements exist. Despite these contradictory requirements, almost exclusively monomaterials are nowadays used for the production of solid components. These components often reach their material-specific limits because of increasing demands on the products. Thus a significant increase in product quality and profitability would result from combining different materials in order to create tailored properties. In the Collaborative Research Center (CRC) 1153 "Tailored Forming" at the Leibniz Universität Hannover, this topic is investigated. The primary objective of the CRC 1153 is to develop and investigate new tailored manufacturing processes to produce reliable hybrid solid semi-finished components. In contrast to existing production processes of hybrid solid components, semi-finished workpieces in the CRC 1153 are joined before the forming phase. Thus, it will be possible to produce complex and highly stressable solid components made of different metals, which cannot be produced yet with the current used technologies. In this work the material and friction characteristics are investigated and the forming tool for the production of hybrid bevel gears made of different steel alloys (C22 and 41Cr4) is designed by numerical simulations. For this purpose, flow curves of both materials are determined by means of upsetting tests at process-related forming temperatures and strain rates. The temperature range for the forming process of the semi-finished product is determined by comparing the respective flow curves regarding similar flow stresses. Furthermore, the friction between the tool and the joining materials is investigated by means of ring upsetting tests at a process-relevant temperature. Finally, a stress analysis of the forming tools is carried out.

  14. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Computing Technique for Determining Turbulent Flow Friction Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Givehchi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of the friction coefficient in pipes is very important in many water and wastewater engineering issues, such as distribution of velocity and shear stress, erosion, sediment transport and head loss. In analyzing these problems, knowing the friction coefficient, can obtain estimates that are more accurate. In this study in order to estimate the friction coefficient in pipes, using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS, grid partition method was used. For training and testing of neuro-fuzzy model, the data derived from the Colebrook’s equation was used. In the neuro-fuzzy approach, pipe relative roughness and Reynolds number are considered as input variables and friction coefficient as output variable is considered. Performance of the proposed approach was evaluated by using of the data obtained from the Colebrook’s equation and based on statistical indicators such as coefficient determination (R2, root mean squared error (RMSE and mean absolute error (MAE. The results showed that the adaptive nerou-fuzzy inference system with grid partition method and gauss model as an input membership function and linear as an output function could estimate friction coefficient more accurately than other conditions. The new proposed approach in this paper has capability of application in the practical design issues and can be combined with mathematical and numerical models of sediment transfer or real-time updating of these models.

  15. A research on determining the friction losses formed in the small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fastest way is to make use of the values given in the tables or diagrams determined by the equation of Hazen-Williams. However, no data related to floppy polythene (PE) pipes with small diameter is available in the tables and diagrams mentioned. In this study, values relating to friction losses and pressures formed in 10, 20, ...

  16. Determination of crystal oscillatory spectra by internal friction data spectroscopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaykin, Yu.A.

    1998-01-01

    Technique for relaxation spectra determination on the basis of internal friction averaging over relaxation frequencies is developed. It is shown that mathematically the problem is reduced to solution of the first type Fredholm integral equation. Impurity oscillatory spectra in alpha-iron, molybdenum and Fe-Cr-Ni alloy are obtained. (author)

  17. Retractable Pin Tools for the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Two companies have successfully commercialized a specialized welding tool developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Friction stir welding uses the high rotational speed of a tool and the resulting frictional heat created from contact to crush, 'stir' together, and forge a bond between two metal alloys. It has had a major drawback, reliance on a single-piece pin tool. The pin is slowly plunged into the joint between two materials to be welded and rotated as high speed. At the end of the weld, the single-piece pin tool is retracted and leaves a 'keyhole,' something which is unacceptable when welding cylindrical objects such as drums, pipes and storage tanks. Another drawback is the requirement for different-length pin tools when welding materials of varying thickness. An engineer at the MSFC helped design an automatic retractable pin tool that uses a computer-controlled motor to automatically retract the pin into the shoulder of the tool at the end of the weld, preventing keyholes. This design allows the pin angle and length to be adjusted for changes in material thickness and results in a smooth hole closure at the end of the weld. Benefits of friction stir welding, using the MSFC retractable pin tool technology, include the following: The ability to weld a wide range of alloys, including previously unweldable and composite materials; provision of twice the fatigue resistance of fusion welds and no keyholes; minimization of material distortion; no creation of hazards such as welding fumes, radiation, high voltage, liquid metals, or arcing; automatic retraction of the pin at the end of the weld; and maintaining full penetration of the pin.

  18. Microstructure Characterization of Al-TiC Surface Composite Fabricated by Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva, Apireddi; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Charan Kantumuchu, Venkata; Kumar, K. Ravi; Venkateswarlu, D.; Srinivas, B.; Jerome, S.

    2018-03-01

    Titanium carbide (TiC) is an exceedingly hard and wear refractory ceramic material. The surface properties of the material are very important and the corrosion, wear and fatigue resistance behaviour determines its ability and applications. It is necessary to modify the surface properties of the materials to enhance their performance. The present work aims on developing a new surface composite using commercially pure aluminum and TiC reinforcement powder with a significant fabrication technique called friction stir processing (FSP). The metal matrix composite of Al/TiC has been developed without any defects formation to investigate the particles distribution in the composite, microstructural changes and mechanical properties of the material. The microstructural observations exhibited that the grain refinement in the nugget compared to the base metal and FSP without TiC particles. The developed composite properties showed substantial improvement in micro-hardness, friction factor, wear resistance and microstructural characteristics in comparison to parent metal. On the other side, the ductility of the composite specimens was diminished over the substrate. The FSPed specimens were characterised using X-ray diffraction technique and revealed that the formation of AlTi compounds and the presence of Ti phases in the matrix. The microstructures of the samples illustrated the uniform distribution of particles in the newly developed metal matrix composite.

  19. A framework for shear driven dissolution of thermally stable particles during friction stir welding and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palanivel, S. [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute, Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Arora, A. [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Palaj, Gandhinagar 382355, Gujarat (India); Doherty, K.J. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Science Division, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Mishra, R.S., E-mail: Rajiv.Mishra@unt.edu [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute, Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A framework is proposed to explain the dissolution and fragmentation of particles during friction stir welding and processing. Two major mechanisms dissolve the particle during the process: (i) thermally activated diffusion, and (ii) dislocation and grain boundary sweeping of atoms. We use a three-dimensional coupled viscoplastic flow and heat transfer model to quantify these mechanisms. For illustration purposes, calculations were done on a thermally stable Mg{sub 2}Y intermetallic that dissolved during processing. The framework is universal and applies to any second phase dissolution and fragmentation during friction stir welding and processing, thus enabling a science-based approach to tailor microstructures.

  20. Ultrasonic Low-Friction Containment Plate for Thermal and Ultrasonic Stir Weld Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Karl; Short, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The thermal stir welding (TSW) process is finding applications in fabrication of space vehicles. In this process, workpieces to be joined by TSW are drawn, by heavy forces, between "containment plates," past the TSW tool that then causes joining of the separate plates. It is believed that the TSW process would be significantly improved by reducing the draw force, and that this could be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the workpieces and containment plates. Based on use of high-power ultrasonics in metal forming processes, where friction reduction in drawing dies has been achieved, it is believed that ultrasonic vibrations of the containment plates could achieve similar friction reduction in the TSW process. By applying ultrasonic vibrations to the containment plates in a longitudinal vibration mode, as well as by mounting and holding the containment plates in a specific manner such as to permit the plates to acoustically float, friction between the metal parts and the containment plates is greatly reduced, and so is the drawing force. The concept was to bring in the ultrasonics from the sides of the plates, permitting the ultrasonic hardware to be placed to the side, away from the equipment that contains the thermal stir tooling and that applies clamping forces to the plates. Tests demonstrated that one of the major objectives of applying ultrasonics to the thermal stir system, that of reducing draw force friction, should be achievable on a scaled-up system.

  1. An analysis to optimize the process parameters of friction stir welded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The friction stir welding (FSW) of steel is a challenging task. Experiments are conducted here, with a tool having a conical pin of 0.4mm clearance. The process parameters are optimized by using the Taguchi technique based on Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array. Experiments have been conducted based on three process ...

  2. Physics-based process model approach for detecting discontinuity during friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, Amber; Pfefferkorn, Frank E.; Duffie, Neil A.; Ferrier, Nicola J.; Smith, Christopher B.; Malukhin, Kostya; Zinn, Michael

    2015-02-12

    The goal of this work is to develop a method for detecting the creation of discontinuities during friction stir welding. This in situ weld monitoring method could significantly reduce the need for post-process inspection. A process force model and a discontinuity force model were created based on the state-of-the-art understanding of flow around an friction stir welding (FSW) tool. These models are used to predict the FSW forces and size of discontinuities formed in the weld. Friction stir welds with discontinuities and welds without discontinuities were created, and the differences in force dynamics were observed. In this paper, discontinuities were generated by reducing the tool rotation frequency and increasing the tool traverse speed in order to create "cold" welds. Experimental force data for welds with discontinuities and welds without discontinuities compared favorably with the predicted forces. The model currently overpredicts the discontinuity size.

  3. Analytic description of the frictionally engaged in-plane bending process incremental swivel bending (ISB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohn, Peter; Engel, Bernd; Groth, Sebastian

    2018-05-01

    Kinematic forming processes shape geometries by the process parameters to achieve a more universal process utilizations regarding geometric configurations. The kinematic forming process Incremental Swivel Bending (ISB) bends sheet metal strips or profiles in plane. The sequence for bending an arc increment is composed of the steps clamping, bending, force release and feed. The bending moment is frictionally engaged by two clamping units in a laterally adjustable bending pivot. A minimum clamping force hindering the material from slipping through the clamping units is a crucial criterion to achieve a well-defined incremental arc. Therefore, an analytic description of a singular bent increment is developed in this paper. The bending moment is calculated by the uniaxial stress distribution over the profiles' width depending on the bending pivot's position. By a Coulomb' based friction model, necessary clamping force is described in dependence of friction, offset, dimensions of the clamping tools and strip thickness as well as material parameters. Boundaries for the uniaxial stress calculation are given in dependence of friction, tools' dimensions and strip thickness. The results indicate that changing the bending pivot to an eccentric position significantly affects the process' bending moment and, hence, clamping force, which is given in dependence of yield stress and hardening exponent. FE simulations validate the model with satisfactory accordance.

  4. Tribological Processes of the Mechanisms of Free Motion of Impulsive Friction Variators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nedic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Free motion mechanism (FMM of the impulsive variators is one vital part in power transmiting of impulsive lever variators which oscillating motion of external envelope (coulisse converted in rotation movement of the output shaft. The elements of mechanism of free motion are exposed to friction and wear during the work, which may be extremely intensive in some cases. The paper analyzes the tribological processes on elements of free motion mechanism of impulsive friction variators with special report on wear of tribomehanical system: the external envelope (coulisse - roller and roller - shaft (star.

  5. Friction conditions in the bearing area of an aluminium extrusion process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, X.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2012-01-01

    In aluminium extrusion processes, friction inside the bearing channel is important for controlling the surface quality of the extrusion products. The contact materials show a large hardness difference, one being hot aluminium, and the other being hardened tool steel. Further, the contact pressure is

  6. Static friction in rubber-metal contacts with application to rubber pad forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, E.L.

    2006-01-01

    A static friction model suitable for rubber-metal contact is presented in this dissertation. In introduction, the motivation and the aims of the research are introduced together with the background regarding the related industrial application, which is the rubber pad forming process.

  7. Gradient nanostructured surface of a Cu plate processed by incremental frictional sliding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Chuanshi; Huang, Xiaoxu; Hansen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The flat surface of a Cu plate was processed by incremental frictional sliding at liquid nitrogen temperature. The surface treatment results in a hardened gradient surface layer as thick as 1 mm in the Cu plate, which contains a nanostructured layer on the top with a boundary spacing of the order...

  8. A study on the determination of diffusion coefficient of carbon in 304 austenitic stainless steels by internal friction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.S.; Kim, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Internal friction peaks associated with the presence of carbon in 18-8 type 304 stainless steel have been observed from measurements with a torsion pendulum. The temperature for maximum internal friction lies between 250degC and 300degC with a frequency of vibration. The height of the peak rises and the position of the peak shifts to a lower temperature with an increase of the carbon content. And a comparison of the activation energy and the diffusion coefficient determined by internal friction methods with those measured in conventional macro-diffusion experiments reveals that the diffusion data measured by internal friction method and the diffusion data measured by conventional method exist in the same line. It follows from the above fact that observed internal friction peak is associated with the stress-induced diffusion of carbon in face-centered cubic alloys. (Author)

  9. Surface enhancement of cold work tool steels by friction stir processing with a pinless tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M. I.; Verdera, D.; Vieira, M. T.; Rodrigues, D. M.

    2014-03-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of enhanced tool steel (AISI D2) surfaces produced using a friction stir welding (FSW) related procedure, called friction stir processing (FSP), are analysed in this work. The surface of the tool steel samples was processed using a WC-Co pinless tool and varying processing conditions. Microstructural analysis revealed that meanwhile the original substrate structure consisted of a heterogeneous distribution of coarse carbides in a ferritic matrix, the transformed surfaces consisted of very small carbides, homogenously distributed in a ferrite- bainite- martensite matrix. The morphology of the surfaces, as well as its mechanical properties, evaluated by hardness and tensile testing, were found to vary with increasing tool rotation speed. Surface hardness was drastically increased, relative to the initial hardness of bulk steel. This was attributed to ferrite and carbide refinement, as well as to martensite formation during solid state processing. At the highest rotation rates, tool sliding during processing deeply compromised the characteristics of the processed surfaces.

  10. Research on transient thermal process of a friction brake during repetitive cycles of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavchev, Yanko; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Dimitrov, Yavor

    2017-12-01

    Simplified models are used in the classical engineering analyses of the friction brake heating temperature during repetitive cycles of operation to determine basically the maximum and minimum brake temperatures. The objective of the present work is to broaden and complement the possibilities for research through a model that is based on the classical scheme of the Newton's law of cooling and improves the studies by adding a disturbance function for a corresponding braking process. A general case of braking in non-periodic repetitive mode is considered, for which a piecewise function is defined to apply pulse thermal loads to the system. Cases with rectangular and triangular waveforms are presented. Periodic repetitive braking process is also studied using a periodic rectangular waveform until a steady thermal state is achieved. Different numerical methods such as the Euler's method, the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta (RK4) and the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg 4-5 (RKF45) are used to solve the non-linear differential equation of the model. The constructed model allows during pre-engineering calculations to be determined effectively the time for reaching the steady thermal state of the brake, to be simulated actual braking modes in vehicles and material handling machines, and to be accounted for the thermal impact when performing fatigue calculations.

  11. DETERMINATION OF FRICTION PERFORMANCE INFLUENCE IN THE SYSTEM "BODY–BOGIE" ON THE FREIGHT CAR DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The main requirements for the design of a new generation of cars, according to the Program of rolling stock renovation, are the requirements reducing the operating costs and increasing the cost-effectiveness of their use, taking into account the achievements of scientific and technical thought. Due to the urgency of this subject the paper is devoted to the study of the friction coefficient influence in the bearing connection «center plate – center bowl – bearers»of freight cars on their main dynamic parameters – coefficients of horizontal and vertical dynamics, body acceleration, frame strength, derailment stability factor. Methodology. The study was conducted by numerical integration and mathematical modeling of the freight car dynamic loading using the software package «Dynamics of Rail Vehicles» («DYNRAIL». Findings. Investigations have shown that the safety movement parameters are influenced by both the friction parameters in bearing connection «center plate – center bowl – bearers» of freight cars in empty and loaded state with bogies TSNII-X3 (model 18-100. Effect have other components of freight car dynamics, namely: radii of curved track sections, height of outer rail, etc. Originality. The author investigated the friction influence on the car dynamic loading using new approaches to solving the problem of predicting the rolling stock dynamics. Prediction was carried out on the basis of significantly updated theoretical material that covers all history of the friction theory and includes the results of recent experimental studies because of the speed on the straights and curves of small-and medium-range sections of the road.Practical value. The obtained results have practical orientation. During the research and after modeling with the improved method of accounting of friction processes dependencies of main dynamic parameters of a four-freight gondola on the value of the friction coefficient in the "body

  12. Texture analysis of a friction stir processed 6061-T6 aluminum alloy using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, W.; Choo, H.; Brown, D.W.; Vogel, S.C.; Liaw, P.K.; Feng, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Time-of-flight neutron diffraction was used to investigate the texture changes in friction stir-processed (FSP) 6061-T6 aluminum alloy plates. Two different specimens were prepared with the purpose of separating the effects of frictional heating and severe plastic deformation on the changes of the preferred orientation in the as-received rolled plates: a plate processed with both stirring pin and tool shoulder, i.e., a regular FSP plate subjected to both severe plastic deformation and frictional heating (Case 1); and a plate processed only with the tool shoulder, i.e., subjected mainly to frictional heating (Case 2). The diffraction peak intensities provide insights into the texture variations at various locations across the centerline and through the thickness of the FSP plates. Comparison of the texture variations between Cases 1 and 2 clearly shows that the severe plastic deformation from the stirring pin affects the preferred orientation during the FSP, while heating alone from the tool shoulder has little effect

  13. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzner, Nathan

    Friction welding, a solid-state joining method, is presented as a novel alternative process step for lining mild steel pipe and forged components internally with a corrosion resistant (CR) metal alloy for petrochemical applications. Currently, fusion welding is commonly used for stainless steel overlay cladding, but this method is costly, time-consuming, and can lead to disbonding in service due to a hard martensite layer that forms at the interface due to partial mixing at the interface between the stainless steel CR metal and the mild steel base. Firstly, the process parameter space was explored for inertia friction butt welding using AISI type 304L stainless steel and AISI 1018 steel to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties effects. A conceptual model for heat flux density versus radial location at the faying surface was developed with consideration for non-uniform pressure distribution due to frictional forces. An existing 1 D analytical model for longitudinal transient temperature distribution was modified for the dissimilar metals case and to account for material lost to the flash. Microstructural results from the experimental dissimilar friction welds of 304L stainless steel to 1018 steel were used to discuss model validity. Secondly, the microstructure and mechanical property implications were considered for replacing the current fusion weld cladding processes with friction welding. The nominal friction weld exhibited a smaller heat softened zone in the 1018 steel than the fusion cladding. As determined by longitudinal tensile tests across the bond line, the nominal friction weld had higher strength, but lower apparent ductility, than the fusion welds due to the geometric requirements for neck formation adjacent to a rigid interface. Martensite was identified at the dissimilar friction weld interface, but the thickness was smaller than that of the fusion welds, and the morphology was discontinuous due to formation by a mechanism of solid

  14. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanare, S. P.; Kalyankar, V. D.

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding is emerging as a promising technique for joining of lighter metal alloys due to its several advantages over conventional fusion welding processes such as low thermal distortion, good mechanical properties, fine weld joint microstructure, etc. This review article mainly focuses on analysis of microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints. Various microstructure characterization techniques used by previous researchers such as optical microscopes, x-ray diffraction, electron probe microscope, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscopes with electron back scattered diffraction, electron dispersive microscopy, etc. are thoroughly overviewed and their results are discussed. The effects of friction stir welding process parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, tool plunge depth, axial force, tool shoulder diameter to tool pin diameter ratio, tool geometry etc. on microstructure and mechanical properties of welded joints are studied and critical observations are noted down. The microstructure examination carried out by previous researchers on various zones of welded joints such as weld zone, heat affected zone and base metal are studied and critical remarks have been presented. Mechanical performances of friction stir welded joints based on tensile test, micro-hardness test, etc. are discussed. This article includes exhaustive literature review of standard research articles which may become ready information for subsequent researchers to establish their line of action.

  15. Friction and wear characteristics of Al-Cu/C composites synthesized using partial liquid phase casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, W.B.; Gupta, M.; Lim, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    During the sliding of aluminium alloys dispersed with graphite particulates, a layer of graphite is usually present at the sliding interface. This tribo-layer significantly reduces the amount of direct metal-to-metal contact, giving rise to low friction and a low rate of wear, making these composites useful candidate materials for anti-friction applications. Such self-lubricating composites are commonly fabricated via the squeeze casting, slurry casting or powder metallurgy route. These processes are expensive while the less-expensive conventional casting route is limited by the agglomeration of graphite particles in the composites, giving rise to poor mechanical properties. In this work, graphite particulate-reinforced Al-4.5 wt.% Cu composites with two effective graphite contents (Al-4.5 Cu/4.2 wt.% C and Al-4.5 Cu/6.8 wt.% C) were synthesized through an innovative partial liquid phase casting (rheocasting) technique, which is a modification of the conventional casting process. Unlubricated (without the use of conventional liquid lubrication) friction and wear performance of these composites as well as the un-reinforced aluminium alloy was determined using a pin-on-disk tester. The results revealed that the graphite-reinforced composites have a higher wear rate than the un-reinforced matrix alloy while their frictional characteristics are very similar within the range of testing conditions. Combining these with the information gathered from worn-surface examinations and wear-debris analysis, it is suggested that there exists a certain threshold for the amount and size of graphite particulates in these composites to enable them to have improved tribological properties. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  16. Effect of process control mode on weld quality of friction stir welded plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Sorour, Sherif; Alian, Ahmed R. [Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process which requires no filler material where the heat input is generated by frictional energy between the tool and workpiece. The objective of the present work is to conduct a fully coupled thermomechanical finite element analysis based on Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation for both 'Force-Controlled' and 'Displacement-Controlled' FSW process to provide more detailed insight of their effect on the resulting joint quality. The developed finite element models use Johnson- Cook material model and temperature dependent physical properties for the welded plates. Efforts on proper modeling of the underlying process physics are done focusing on the heat generation of the tool/workpiece interface to overcome the shortcomings of previous investigations. Finite elements results show that 'Force-Controlled' FSW process provides better joint quality especially at higher traveling speed of the tool which comes to an agreement with published experimental results.

  17. METHOD OF THE DRIVE POWER DETERMINATION OF THE MECHANISMS OF THE BRIDGE CRANE MOVEMENT CONSIDERING THE ROLLING FRICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Bohomaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The value of drive resistance to its movement is the main parameter at calculating the drive power of bridge crane. The value of the wheel rolling friction on the rails is one of the important parts of the resistance to movement. It is necessary to determine the dependence of static (dynamic quantities of resistance to the bridge crane movement on a straight section of the track from the position of the bogie in the span, and explore the influence of the wheel flanges resistance for wear. Methodology. Using the analytical dependences for determining the rolling friction coefficient, that depends on the size of the half-width of the contact between the wheel and rail, the improved method for calculating the required drive power of the crane was proposed. Findings. With the proposed method of power calculation the characteristic curve of the crane wheel loads, the coefficient of rolling friction of the wheels and the crane resistance to movement from the position of the bogie on span were built. In the result of graphs analysis it was found that the engine power, obtained by the proposed method is higher than the recommended by the existing standards. The more precise formula for determining the total coefficient of sliding friction that takes into account the friction of wheel flanges on the rail is given. The characteristic curves of such coefficient of friction and the total resistance to movement of the position of the crane bogie were built. Originality. The scientists proposed an improved method of determining the required engine power of bridge crane, which takes into account the effect of rolling friction of the wheels on the rails and the bogie in the span. The improved formula for determining the coefficient of friction that takes into account the friction wheel flanges of the rail was given. The characteristic curve of this coefficient of friction and the total resistance movement of crane from the position of the crane bogie

  18. Low temperature enhanced ductility of friction stir processed 5083 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Mechanical Engineering Department, Centre of Excellence for Research in Engineering ... 0⋅95 μm, suggests the operation of superplastic deformation under these present experimental conditions. ... The tensile samples were wire cut, and then mechanically ... and the true stress–strain responses were determined. Optical ...

  19. Friction modeling on multiple scales for Deep drawing processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karupannasamy, Dinesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A deep drawing process is one of the widely used manufacturing techniques in the automotive industry because of its capability to produce complex shapes with sheet material, often performed using lubricants to ease the forming. Finite Element Methods (FEM) are popularly used at the design stage to

  20. Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhili [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan [Harriman, TN

    2010-07-27

    Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

  1. Comparison of corrosion behaviour of friction stir processed and laser melted AA 2219 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surekha, K.; Murty, B.S.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Poor corrosion resistance of AA 2219 can be improved by surface treatments. → FSP and LM leads to dissolution of second phase particles. → No literature available on comparison of corrosion behaviour after FSP and LM. → The study implies FSP is as good as LM in improving the corrosion resistance of AA 2219. -- Abstract: Dissolution of second phase particles (CuAl 2 ) present in AA 2219 aluminium improves the corrosion resistance of the alloy. Two surface treatment techniques, viz., solid state friction stir processing and fusion based laser melting lead to the reduction in CuAl 2 content and the effect of these processes on the corrosion behaviour of the alloy is compared in this study. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were carried out to compare corrosion behaviour. The corrosion resistance achieved by friction stir processing is comparable to that obtained by the laser melting technique.

  2. Microstructure and wear behavior of friction stir processed cast hypereutectic aluminum silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rosli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypereutectic as-cast Al-18Si-Cu-Ni alloy was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP. The resultant effect of FSP on the alloy was evaluated by microstructure analysis and wear tests (dry sliding. A significant microstructural modification and enhancement in wear behavior of Al-18Si-Cu-Ni alloy was recorded after friction stir processing. Wear resistance improvement was related to considerable modification in size, morphology and distribution of silicon particles, and hardness improvement. It was found that lower tool rotation speed was more effective to refine silicon particles and in turn increase wear resistance. Minimum Si particle mean area of about 47.8 µm2, and wear rate of 0.0155 mg/m was achieved.

  3. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiskumar, R., E-mail: sathiscit2011@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugan, N., E-mail: murugan@cit.edu.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, V V College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai, 627 657 Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph@karunya.edu [Centre for Research in Metallurgy (CRM), School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, 641 114 Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  4. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-11

    Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel to develop a linear friction welding (LFW) process model for this material...Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are... Martensitic Stainless Steel Report Title An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite-element analysis is combined with thermo-mechanical material

  5. High strain rate superplasticity in a friction stir processed 7075 Al alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, R.S.; Mahoney, M.W.; McFaden, S.X.; Mara, N.A.; Mukherjee, A.K.

    1999-12-31

    In this paper, the authors report the first results using friction stir processing (FSP). In the last ten years, a new technique of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has emerged as an exciting solid state joining technique for aluminum alloys. This technique, developed by The Welding Institute (TWI), involves traversing a rotating tool that produces intense plastic deformation through a stirring action. The localized heating is produced by friction between the tool shoulder and the sheet top surface, as well as plastic deformation of the material in contact with the tool. This results in a stirred zone with a very fine grain size in a single pass. Mahoney et al. observed a grain size of 3 {micro}m in a 7075 Al alloy. This process can be easily adopted as a processing technique to obtain fine grain size. FSP of a commercial 7075 Al alloy resulted in significant enhancement of superplastic properties. The optimum superplastic strain rate was 10{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} at 490 C in the FSP 7075 Al alloy, an improvement of more than an order of magnitude in strain rate. The present results suggest an exciting possibility to use a simple FSP technique to enhance grain size dependent properties.

  6. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW, which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results were analyzed by means of tensile tests, Vickers microhardness, metallographic tests and SEM-EDX. The strength of the joints varied with increasing friction time and the use of different pressure values. Joints were obtained with superior mechanical properties of the AA1050 aluminum, with fracture occurring in the aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analysis by EDX at the interface of the junction showed that interdiffusion occurs between the main chemical components of the materials involved. The RFW proves to be a great method for obtaining joints between dissimilar materials, which is not possible by fusion welding processes.

  7. A Procedure for Determining Tire-Road Friction Characteristics Using a Modification of the Magic Formula Based on Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Javier; Velasco, Juan M.; Guerra, Antonio J.; Hernández, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of tire-road friction characteristics is essential for the proper performance of most relevant vehicle active safety systems. Therefore, its determination is necessary to improve the effectiveness of these systems and to avoid or reduce the consequences of traffic accidents. For this reason, there is a great deal of literature concerning methods and devices for measuring and modeling tire-road friction. Most of these methods have focused on determining the road friction resistance, taking only road composition and making measurements in wet conditions into account. However, friction forces are also dependent on the tire type, since the contact is established between the tire and the road in real driving conditions. Thus, the type and characteristics of the tire have to be considered in the study of the interaction between the vehicle and the road. The aim of this work is to unify the study of the friction coefficient, taking into consideration the two existing bodies involved in the contact, i.e., the tire and road and the main factors that influence the forces in the contact. To this end, a modification of the Pacejka Magic Formula is proposed to include the effects of the main parameters that influence the contact, such as road composition and its state, tire type, vehicle speed, and slip between the tire and the road. To do so, real tests have been conducted on several roads and with different operating conditions. As a result, a more accurate tire-road friction model has been obtained. PMID:29562623

  8. A Procedure for Determining Tire-Road Friction Characteristics Using a Modification of the Magic Formula Based on Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Cabrera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of tire-road friction characteristics is essential for the proper performance of most relevant vehicle active safety systems. Therefore, its determination is necessary to improve the effectiveness of these systems and to avoid or reduce the consequences of traffic accidents. For this reason, there is a great deal of literature concerning methods and devices for measuring and modeling tire-road friction. Most of these methods have focused on determining the road friction resistance, taking only road composition and making measurements in wet conditions into account. However, friction forces are also dependent on the tire type, since the contact is established between the tire and the road in real driving conditions. Thus, the type and characteristics of the tire have to be considered in the study of the interaction between the vehicle and the road. The aim of this work is to unify the study of the friction coefficient, taking into consideration the two existing bodies involved in the contact, i.e., the tire and road and the main factors that influence the forces in the contact. To this end, a modification of the Pacejka Magic Formula is proposed to include the effects of the main parameters that influence the contact, such as road composition and its state, tire type, vehicle speed, and slip between the tire and the road. To do so, real tests have been conducted on several roads and with different operating conditions. As a result, a more accurate tire-road friction model has been obtained.

  9. A Procedure for Determining Tire-Road Friction Characteristics Using a Modification of the Magic Formula Based on Experimental Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Juan A; Castillo, Juan J; Pérez, Javier; Velasco, Juan M; Guerra, Antonio J; Hernández, Pedro

    2018-03-17

    Knowledge of tire-road friction characteristics is essential for the proper performance of most relevant vehicle active safety systems. Therefore, its determination is necessary to improve the effectiveness of these systems and to avoid or reduce the consequences of traffic accidents. For this reason, there is a great deal of literature concerning methods and devices for measuring and modeling tire-road friction. Most of these methods have focused on determining the road friction resistance, taking only road composition and making measurements in wet conditions into account. However, friction forces are also dependent on the tire type, since the contact is established between the tire and the road in real driving conditions. Thus, the type and characteristics of the tire have to be considered in the study of the interaction between the vehicle and the road. The aim of this work is to unify the study of the friction coefficient, taking into consideration the two existing bodies involved in the contact, i.e., the tire and road and the main factors that influence the forces in the contact. To this end, a modification of the Pacejka Magic Formula is proposed to include the effects of the main parameters that influence the contact, such as road composition and its state, tire type, vehicle speed, and slip between the tire and the road. To do so, real tests have been conducted on several roads and with different operating conditions. As a result, a more accurate tire-road friction model has been obtained.

  10. Frictional processes in smectite-rich gouges sheared at slow to high slip rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretusini, Stefano; Mittempergher, Silvia; Gualtieri, Alessandro; Di Toro, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    The slipping zones of shallow sections of megathrusts and of large landslides are often smectite-rich (e.g., montmorillonite type). Consequently, similar "frictional" processes operating at high slip rates (> 1 m/s) might be responsible of the large slips estimated in megathrust (50 m for the 2011 Tohoku Mw 9.1 earthquake) and measured in large landslides (500 m for the 1963 Vajont slide, Italy). At present, only rotary shear apparatuses can reproduce simultaneously the large slips and slip rates of these events. Noteworthy, the frictional processes proposed so far (thermal and thermochemical pressurization, etc.) remain rather obscure. Here we present preliminary results obtained with the ROtary Shear Apparatus (ROSA) installed at Padua University. Thirty-one experiments were performed at ambient conditions on pure end-members of (1) smectite-rich standard powders (STx-1b: ~68 wt% Ca-montmorillonite, ~30 wt% opal-CT and ~2 wt% quartz), (2) quartz powders (qtz) and (3) on 80:20 = Stx-1b:qtz mixtures. The gouges were sandwiched between two (1) hollow (25/15 mm external/internal diameter) or (2) solid (25 mm in diameter) stainless-steel made cylinders and confined by inner and outer Teflon rings (only outer for solid cylinders). Gouges were sheared at a normal stress of 5 MPa, slip rates V from 300 μm/s to 1.5 m/s and total slip of 3 m. The deformed gouges were investigated with quantitative (Rietveld method with internal standard) X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). In the smectite-rich standard endmember, (1) for 300 μm/s ≤ V ≤ 0.1 m/s, initial friction coefficient (μi) was 0.6±0.05 whereas the steady-state friction coefficient (μss) was velocity and slip strengthening (μss 0.85±0.05), (2) for 0.1 m/s 0.8 m/s, velocity and slip weakening (μi = 0.7±0.1 and μss = 0.25±0.05). In the 80:20 Stx-1b:qtz mixtures, (1) for 300 μm/s ≤ V ≤ 0.1 m/s, μi ranged was 0.7±0.05 and increased with slip to μss = 0.77±0

  11. Two new methods to determine the adhesion by means of internal friction in materials covered with films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorado, H. A.; Ghilarducci, A. A.; Salva, H. R.

    2006-01-01

    Two new models are proposed to determine the adhesion energy be means of the internal friction technique (IF) in thin films layered materials. for the first method is necessary to determine enthalpy by means of the IF technique, for which the adhesion work has been determined with experimental data. In the second method are necessary to perform IF tests at constant temperature. (Author)

  12. Optimization of the Process Parameters for Controlling Residual Stress and Distortion in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, numerical optimization of the process parameters, i.e. tool rotation speed and traverse speed, aiming minimization of the two conflicting objectives, i.e. the residual stresses and welding time, subjected to process-specific thermal constraints in friction stir welding......, is investigated. The welding process is simulated in 2-dimensions with a sequentially coupled transient thermo-mechanical model using ANSYS. The numerical optimization problem is implemented in modeFRONTIER and solved using the Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA-II). An engineering-wise evaluation or ranking...

  13. Use of Friction Stir Welding and Friction Stir Processing for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Joining Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. I. Cole; J. F. Jue

    2006-01-01

    Application of the latest developments in materials technology may greatly aid in the successful pursuit of next generation reactor and transmutation technologies. One such area where significant progress is needed is joining of advanced fuels and materials. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for joining traditionally difficult to join materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology, first developed in 1991, has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. An overview of the FSW technology is provided and two specific nuclear fuels and materials applications where the technique may be used to overcome limitations of conventional joining technologies are highlighted

  14. Determination of nuclear friction in strongly damped reactions from prescission neutron multiplicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczynski, J.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilschut, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    Nonfusion, fissionlike reactions in collisions of four heavy systems (well below the fusion extra-push energy threshold), for which Hinde and co-workers had measured the prescission neutron multiplicities, have been analyzed in terms of the deterministic dynamic model of Feldmeier coupled to a time-dependent statistical cascade calculation. In order to reproduce the measured prescission multiplicities and the observed (nearly symmetric) mass divisions, the energy dissipation must be dramatically changed with regard to the standard one-body dissipation: In the entrance channel, in the process of forming a composite system, the energy dissipation has to be reduced to at least half of the one-body dissipation strength (k s in ≤0.5), and in the exit channel (from a mononucleus shape to scission) it must be increased by a factor ranging for the studied reactions from k s out =4 to k s out =12. These results are compared with the temperature dependence of the friction coefficient, recently deduced by Hofman, Back, and Paul from data on the prescission giant dipole resonance emission in fusion-fission reactions. The combined picture of the temperature dependence of the friction coefficient, for both fusion-fission and nonfusion reactions, may indicate the onset of strong two-body dissipation already at a nuclear temperature of about 2 MeV. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  15. Simulation of the Thermal Hydraulic Processes in the Horizontal Steam Generator with the Use of the Different Interfacial Friction Correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melikhov, V.; Melikhov, O.; Parfenov, Y.; Nerovnov, A.

    2011-01-01

    The horizontal steam generator (SG) is one of specific features of Russian-type pressurized water reactors (VVERs). The main advantages of horizontal steam generator are connected with low steam loads on evaporation surface, simple separation scheme and high circulation ratio. The complex three-dimensional steam-water flows in the steam generator vessel influence significantly the processes of the steam separation, distribution, and deposition of the soluble and non soluble impurities and determine the efficiency and reliability of the steam generator operation. The 3D code for simulation of the three-dimensional steam-water flows in the steam generator could be effective tool for design and optimization of the horizontal steam generator. The results of the code calculations are determined mainly by the set of the correlations describing interaction of the steam-water mixture with the inner constructions of the SG and interfacial friction. The results obtained by 3D code STEG with the usage of the different interfacial friction correlations are presented and discussed in the paper. These results are compared with the experimental ones obtained at the experimental test facility PGV-1500 constructed for investigation of the processes in the horizontal steam generator

  16. Rubber friction and force transmission during the shearing process of actively-driven vacuum grippers on rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, vacuum grippers come in many different shapes and sizes. Their stability is guaranteed through specially manufactured metal fittings. These fittings are non-positively and positively connected to the elastic part of the vacuum gripper. The design of the elastic part may vary, though. Elastomer components are used to ensure tightness for the negative pressure in the active cave chamber of the vacuum gripper, as well as for the transfer of shearing forces, which acting parallel to the surface. Some vacuum grippers feature one elastomer for both the sealing function and the transfer of shear forces; other gripper types are equipped with various elastomers for those applications. The vacuum grippers described in this work are equipped with structured rubber friction pads, their tightness being ensured by sealing lips made of a flexible foam rubber. A restraint system consisting of one or several vacuum grippers must be sized prior to its actual practical use. For the transmission of shearing forces, which acting parallel to the surface, it is necessary to take the tribological system, consisting of the suction element's elastomer and the base material, into account since these loads put shearing stress on the vacuum gripper. In practice, however, a standardized value is given for the coefficient of friction μ; i.e. the ratio of transmissible frictional force to the normal force. This does neither include a detailed description of the elastomer used nor of the roughness of the base material. The standardized friction coefficients cannot be applied to the practical design of restraint systems. The present work includes the analysis of the load transmission and the modeling of the friction coefficients μ on rough surfaces during the shearing process of actively-driven vacuum grippers. Based on current theories, the phenomenon of elastomeric friction can be attributed to the two main components of hysteresis and adhesion friction. Both components are presented

  17. Microstructural transformations and mechanical properties of cast NiAl bronze: Effects of fusion welding and friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, M.D.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhilyaev, A.P.; McNelley, T.R.

    2007-01-01

    A plate of as-cast NiAl bronze (NAB) material was sectioned from a large casting. A six-pass fusion weld overlay was placed in a machined groove; a portion of the weld reinforcement was removed by milling and a single friction stir processing (FSP) pass was conducted in a direction transverse to the axis of and over the weld overlay. A procedure was developed for machining of miniature tensile samples and the distributions of strength and ductility were evaluated for the fusion weld metal; for the stir zone (SZ) produced by the friction stir processing; and for a region wherein friction stir processing had taken place over the fusion weld. A region of low ductility in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the fusion weld and in the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) of friction stir processed material was attributed to partial reversion of an equilibrium lamellar eutectoid constituent upon local heating above ∼800 deg. C and formation of non-equilibrium transformation products upon subsequent cooling. The adverse effect on ductility is worse in the heat affected zone of the fusion weld than in the thermomechanically affected zone of friction stir processing due to the lower heat input of the latter process. The implications of this work to engineering applications of friction stir processing are discussed

  18. Multi-objective Optimization of Process Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    The objective of this paper is to investigate optimum process parameters in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) to minimize residual stresses in the work piece and maximize production efficiency meanwhile satisfying process specific constraints as well. More specifically, the choices of tool rotational...... speed and traverse welding speed have been sought in order to achieve the goals mentioned above using an evolutionary multi-objective optimization (MOO) algorithm, i.e. non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II), integrated with a transient, 2- dimensional sequentially coupled thermo...

  19. The Investigations of Friction under Die Surface Vibration in Cold Forging Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinming, Sha

    investigation, and the second stage is to design and manufacture a more practical tool system which can be used to forging some industrial components with larger capacity. The high performance and power piezoelectric actuator stack as the vibration source will be used for designing the vibration system in order...... to 50% with vibration being applied in forming process. Furthermore, by using finite element method, a series of the simulations of the cold forging process under die surface excitation have been implemented in order to further understand the influence of vibration on friction, especially the influence...

  20. Microstructure and optical appearance of anodized friction stir processed Al - Metal oxide surface composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Bordo, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to impregnate Ti, Y and Ce oxide powders into the surface of an Aluminium alloy. The FSP processed surface composite was subsequently anodized with an aim to develop optical effects in the anodized layer owing to the presence of incorporated...... oxide particles which will influence the scattering of light. This paper presents the investigations on relation between microstructure of the FSP zone and optical appearance of the anodized layer due to incorporation of metal oxide particles and modification of the oxide particles due to the anodizing...

  1. An empirical model for friction in cold forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Eriksen, Morten; Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    With a system of simulative tribology tests for cold forging the friction stress for aluminum, steel and stainless steel provided with typical lubricants for cold forging has been determined for varying normal pressure, surface expansion, sliding length and tool/work piece interface temperature...... of normal pressure and tool/work piece interface temperature. The model is verified by process testing measuring friction at varying reductions in cold forward rod extrusion. KEY WORDS: empirical friction model, cold forging, simulative friction tests....

  2. EARTH’S ROTATIONAL DECELERATION: DETERMINATION OF TIDAL FRICTION INDEPENDENT OF TIMESCALES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper determines Earth's rotational deceleration without relying on atomic or ephemeris timescales. Earth's rotation defines the civil time standard called Universal Time (UT). Our previous paper did not examine tidal friction in depth when analyzing the timescale divergence between UT and International Atomic Time (TAI). We examine all available paleontological fossils and deposits for the direct measurements of Earth's past rotation rates, because that record includes all contributing effects. We examine paleontological reports that date Earth's rotation rate using corals, bivalves, brachiopods, rhythmites, and stromatolites. Contributions that vary Earth's moment of inertia, such as continental plate drifts, coastline changes, ice age formations, and viscous glacial rebounds, are superimposed with the secular deceleration. The average deceleration of Earth's rotation rate from all available fossil data is found to be (5.969 ± 1.762) × 10 −7 rad yr −2 . Our value is 99.8% of the total rotational deceleration determined by Christodoulidis et al., who used artificial satellite data, and our value is 96.6% of the expected tidal friction value obtained by Stephenson and Morrison. Taking the derivative of conserved angular momentum, the predicted lunar orbital deceleration caused by the average rotational deceleration corresponds closely to lunar models. When evaluating the significant time gaps between UT and TAI, Earth's rotational deceleration is a minor contributing factor. Also, the secular deceleration rate is necessary to correctly date ancient astronomical events. We strongly encourage that more ocean paleontological evidence be found to supplement the record to separate the many periodic variations embedded in these data

  3. EARTH’S ROTATIONAL DECELERATION: DETERMINATION OF TIDAL FRICTION INDEPENDENT OF TIMESCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deines, Steven D. [Donatech Corporation, Fairfield, IA 52556 (United States); Williams, Carol A., E-mail: steven.deines@gmail.com, E-mail: cw@math.usf.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Prof. emeritus), University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    This paper determines Earth's rotational deceleration without relying on atomic or ephemeris timescales. Earth's rotation defines the civil time standard called Universal Time (UT). Our previous paper did not examine tidal friction in depth when analyzing the timescale divergence between UT and International Atomic Time (TAI). We examine all available paleontological fossils and deposits for the direct measurements of Earth's past rotation rates, because that record includes all contributing effects. We examine paleontological reports that date Earth's rotation rate using corals, bivalves, brachiopods, rhythmites, and stromatolites. Contributions that vary Earth's moment of inertia, such as continental plate drifts, coastline changes, ice age formations, and viscous glacial rebounds, are superimposed with the secular deceleration. The average deceleration of Earth's rotation rate from all available fossil data is found to be (5.969 ± 1.762) × 10{sup −7} rad yr{sup −2}. Our value is 99.8% of the total rotational deceleration determined by Christodoulidis et al., who used artificial satellite data, and our value is 96.6% of the expected tidal friction value obtained by Stephenson and Morrison. Taking the derivative of conserved angular momentum, the predicted lunar orbital deceleration caused by the average rotational deceleration corresponds closely to lunar models. When evaluating the significant time gaps between UT and TAI, Earth's rotational deceleration is a minor contributing factor. Also, the secular deceleration rate is necessary to correctly date ancient astronomical events. We strongly encourage that more ocean paleontological evidence be found to supplement the record to separate the many periodic variations embedded in these data.

  4. Friction Hydro-Pillar Processing of a High Carbon Steel: Joint Structure and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanan, Luis Fernando; Vicharapu, Buchibabu; Bueno, Antonio Fernando Burkert; Clarke, Thomas; De, Amitava

    2018-04-01

    A coupled experimental and theoretical study is reported here on friction hydro-pillar processing of AISI 4140 steel, which is a novel solid-state joining technique to repair and fill crack holes in thick-walled components by an external stud. The stud is rotated and forced to fill a crack hole by plastic flow. During the process, frictional heating occurs along the interface of the stud and the wall of crack hole leading to thermal softening of the stud that eases its plastic deformation. The effect of the stud force, its rotational speed and the total processing time on the rate of heat generation and resulting transient temperature field is therefore examined to correlate the processing variables with the joint structure and properties in a systematic and quantitative manner, which is currently scarce in the published literature. The results show that a gentler stud force rate and greater processing time can promote proper filling of the crack hole and facilitate a defect-free joint between the stud and original component.

  5. Characteristic evaluation of process parameters of friction stir welding of aluminium 2024 hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadashiva, M.; Shivanand, H. K.; Vidyasagar, H. N.

    2018-04-01

    The Current work is aimed to investigate the effect of process parameters in friction stir welding of Aluminium 2024 base alloy and Aluminium 2024 matrix alloy reinforced with E Glass and Silicon Carbide reinforcements. The process involved a set of synthesis techniques incorporating stir casting methodology resulting in fabrication of the composite material. This composite material that is synthesized is then machined to obtain a plate of dimensions 100 mm * 50 mm * 6 mm. The plate is then friction stir welded at different set of parameters viz. the spindle speed of 600 rpm, 900 rpm and 1200 rpm and feed rate of 40 mm/min, 80 mm/min and 120 mm/min for analyzing the process capability. The study of the given set of parameters is predominantly important to understand the physics of the process that may lead to better properties of the joint, which is very much important in perspective to its use in advanced engineering applications, especially in aerospace domain that uses Aluminium 2024 alloy for wing and fuselage structures under tension.

  6. Frictional interactions in forming processes: New studies with transparent sapphire strip-drawing dies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R. S.; Lu, C. Y.; Wright, P. K.; Devenpeck, M. L.; Richmond, O.; Appleby, E. J.

    1982-05-01

    This research is concerned with the frictional interactions at the toolwork interfaces in the machining and strip-drawing processes. A novel feature is that transparent sapphire (single crystal Al2O3) is being used as the tool and die material. This allows the tribological features of the interface to be directly observed and recorded on movie-film. These qualitative studies provide information on the role of lubricants. In addition, techniques are being developed to quantify the velocity gradient along the interface. For example, in the drawing work it has been found that tracer markings (e.g. dye-spots), applied to the undrawn strip, remain intact during drawing and can be tracked along the sapphire/strip interface. Such data will be used as input to a finite-element, elasto-plastic-workhardening model of the deformation process. The latter can compute strip deformation characteristics, drawing forces and local coefficients of friction at the interface. Introductory results will be presented in this paper, obtained from drawing tin-plated mild steel with sapphire and cemented carbide dies. Drawing loads and die-separating forces will be presented and movie-films of the action of tracer markings at the interface shown. In order to demonstrate how this data can be used in an analysis of a large strain deformation process with friction, initial results from running the FIPDEF elasto-plastic code will be discussed. From a commercial viewpoint research on strip-drawing is of special interest to the can-making industry. From a physical viewpoint stripdrawing is of particular interest because it is a symmetrical, plane strain deformation and, in comparison with other metal processing operations, it is more readily modeled. However, until now the elasto-plastic codes that have been developed to predictively model drawing have had limitations: the most notable being that of quantifying the friction conditions at the die-work interface. Hence the specification of the

  7. Friction stir processed Al - Metal oxide surface composites: Anodization and optical appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Canulescu, Stela

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to impregnate metal oxide (TiO2, Y2O3 and CeO2) particles into the surface of an Aluminium alloy. The surface composites were then anodized in a sulphuric acid electrolyte. The effect of anodizing parameters on the resulting optical...... dark to greyish white. This is attributed to the localized microstructural and morphological differences around the metal oxide particles incorporated into the anodic alumina matrix. The metal oxide particles in the FSP zone electrochemically shadowed the underlying Al matrix and modified the local...

  8. Electrochemical properties in a seawater environment of 5456-H116 aluminum alloy subjected to optimal friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae-Cheul; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of aluminum alloy may be enhanced by modifying the microstructure of the metal by friction stir processing (FSP). Previous studies have demonstrated that the mechanical characteristics of 5456-H116 Al alloy subjected to FSP, at 250 rpm and 15 mm min -1 using a full screw probe, are similar to those of the original alloy. In the present work, the same alloy was processed under these optimal conditions, and the range of favorable protection potentials with regard to hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking was determined to lie between -1.3 and -0.7 V (versus Ag/AgCl). The electrochemical behavior of the specimens subjected to FSP was superior to that of the original 5456-H116 Al alloy.

  9. Electrochemical properties in a seawater environment of 5456-H116 aluminum alloy subjected to optimal friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Cheul; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2010-05-01

    The mechanical properties of aluminum alloy may be enhanced by modifying the microstructure of the metal by friction stir processing (FSP). Previous studies have demonstrated that the mechanical characteristics of 5456-H116 Al alloy subjected to FSP, at 250 rpm and 15 mm min-1 using a full screw probe, are similar to those of the original alloy. In the present work, the same alloy was processed under these optimal conditions, and the range of favorable protection potentials with regard to hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking was determined to lie between -1.3 and -0.7 V (versus Ag/AgCl). The electrochemical behavior of the specimens subjected to FSP was superior to that of the original 5456-H116 Al alloy.

  10. Process Parameters Optimization for Friction Stir Welding of Pure Aluminium to Brass (CuZn30 using Taguchi Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfar O. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the friction stir welding of dissimilar commercial pure aluminium and brass (CuZn30 plates was investigated and the process parameters were optimized using Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The considered process parameters were the rotational speed, traverse speed and pin offset. The optimum setting was determined with reference to ultimate tensile strength of the joint. The predicted optimum value of ultimate tensile strength was confirmed by experimental run using optimum parameters. Analysis of variance revealed that traverse speed is the most significant factor in controlling the joint tensile strength and pin offset also plays a significant role. In this investigation, the optimum tensile strength is 50% of aluminium base metal. Metallographic examination revealed that intermetallic compounds were formed in the interface of the optimum joint where the tensile failure was observed to take place.

  11. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajian, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei-Nejad, S.S.; Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadavi, S.M.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MA University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chung, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Engineering Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shokouhimehr, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3–6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  12. An investigation on SA 213-Tube to SA 387-Tube plate using friction welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, S. Pandia; Kumaraswamidhas, L. A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Jharkhand (India); Kumaran, S. Senthil [RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Tamil Nadu (India); Muthukumaran, S. [National Institute of Technology, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) is a relatively newer solid state welding process used for joining tube to tube plate of either similar or dissimilar materials with enhanced mechanical and metallurgical properties. In the present study, FWTPET has been used to weld SA 213 (Grade T12) tube with SA 387 (Grade 22) tube plate. The welded samples are found to have satisfactory joint strength and the Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that inter metallic compound is absent in the weld zone. The different weld joints have been identified and the phase composition is found using EDX and XRD. Microstructures have been analyzed using optical and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties such as hardness, compressive shear strength and peel test for different weld conditions are studied and the hardness survey revealed that there is increase in hardness at the weld interface due to grain refinement. The corrosion behavior for different weld conditions have been analyzed and the weld zone is found to have better corrosion resistance due to the influence of the grain refinement after FWTPET welding process. Hence, the present investigation is carried out to study the behavior of friction welded dissimilar joints of SA 213 tube and SA 387 tube plate joints and the results are presented. The present study confirms that a high quality tube to tube plate joint can be achieved using FWTPET process at 1120 rpm.

  13. Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Friction Stir-Processed AISI D2 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasavol, Noushin; Jafari, Hassan

    2015-05-01

    In this study, AISI D2 tool steel underwent friction stir processing (FSP). The microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance of the FSPed materials were then evaluated. A flat WC-Co tool was used; the rotation rate of the tool varied from 400 to 800 rpm, and the travel speed was maintained constant at 385 mm/s during the process. FSP improved mechanical properties and produced ultrafine-grained surface layers in the tool steel. Mechanical properties improvement is attributed to the homogenous distribution of two types of fine (0.2-0.3 μm) and coarse (1.6 μm) carbides in duplex ferrite-martensite matrix. In addition to the refinement of the carbides, the homogenous dispersion of the particles was found to be more effective in enhancing mechanical properties at 500 rpm tool rotation rate. The improved corrosion resistance was observed and is attributed to the volume fraction of low-angle grain boundaries produced after friction stir process of the AISI D2 steel.

  14. Solid state crack repair by friction stir processing in 304L stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Gunter; M.P.Miles; F.C.Liu; T.W Nelson

    2018-01-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was investigated as a method of repairing cracks in 12mm thick 304L stainless steel plate.Healing feasibility was demonstrated by processing a tapered crack using a PCBN/WRe tool with a 25 mm diameter shoulder and a pin length of 6.4 mm.The experiment showed that it was possible to heal a crack that begins narrow and then progressively grows up to a width of 2 mm.Bead on plate experiments were used to find the best parameters for creating a consolidated stir zone with the least amount of hardness difference compared to the base metal.Grain refinement in some specimens resulted in much higher stir zone hardness,compared to base metal.A plot of grain size versus microhardness showed a very strong inverse correlation between grain size and hardness,as expected from the HallPetch relationship.Corrosion testing was carried out in order to evaluate the effect of FSP on potential sensitization of the stir zone.After 1000h of intermittent immersion in 3.5% saline solution at room temperature it was found that no corrosion products formed on the base material controls or on any of the friction stir processed specimens.

  15. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Mahmoud [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Behrouz [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keivani, Rasoul [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  16. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, Mahmoud; Bagheri, Behrouz; Keivani, Rasoul

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation of the Friction Weld Process on 2195/2219 Grade Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Michael W.; Clark, Linda S.; Cox, Dwight E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center began an ambitious program designed to find alternative methods of repairing conventional TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welds and VPPA (Variable Polarity Plasma Arc) welds on the Space Shuttle External Tank without producing additional heat-related anomalies or conditions. Therefore, a relatively new method, invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, England, called Friction Stir Welding (FSW), was investigated for use in this application, as well as being used potentially as an initial weld process. As with the conventional repair welding processes, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) plays a crucial role in the verification of these repairs. Since it was feared that conventional NDE might have trouble with this type of weld structure (due to shape of nugget, grain structure, etc.) it was imperative that a complete study be performed to address the adequacy of the NDE process. This paper summarizes that process.

  18. Modelling of peak temperature during friction stir processing of magnesium alloy AZ91

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaira Vignesh, R.; Padmanaban, R.

    2018-02-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is a solid state processing technique with potential to modify the properties of the material through microstructural modification. The study of heat transfer in FSP aids in the identification of defects like flash, inadequate heat input, poor material flow and mixing etc. In this paper, transient temperature distribution during FSP of magnesium alloy AZ91 was simulated using finite element modelling. The numerical model results were validated using the experimental results from the published literature. The model was used to predict the peak temperature obtained during FSP for various process parameter combinations. The simulated peak temperature results were used to develop a statistical model. The effect of process parameters namely tool rotation speed, tool traverse speed and shoulder diameter of the tool on the peak temperature was investigated using the developed statistical model. It was found that peak temperature was directly proportional to tool rotation speed and shoulder diameter and inversely proportional to tool traverse speed.

  19. Hair-on-hair static friction coefficient can be determined by tying a knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Nicolas R

    2017-11-01

    Characterizing the tribological properties of the hair-hair interface is important to quantify the manageability of hair and to assess the performance of hair care products. Audoly et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 164301, 2007) derived an equation relating the self-friction coefficient of an elastic fiber to the dimensions of a simple, relaxed overhand knot made from this fiber. I experimentally tested and validated their equation using nylon thread and an independent measurement of its self-friction coefficient. I show that this methodology can be applied to provide high-throughput data on the static self-friction coefficient of single hair fibers in various conditions and to quantitatively assess how hair care treatments (conditioner, relaxant) alter frictional properties. I find that treatment of hair with 1M sodium hydroxide leads to a quick, irreversible self-friction coefficient increase; the resulting fine frictional fibers can be used to form very small knots for microsurgical vessel and organ ligature in medicine or embryology. The relaxed overhand knot method can more generally be used to measure the self-friction coefficients of a wide range of elastic fibers from the nano- (e.g. proteins, nanotubes) to the macro-scale (e.g. textile fiber, fiberglass). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of the frictional coefficient of the implant-antler interface: experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Istabrak; Keilig, Ludger; Staat, Manfred; Wahl, Gerhard; Bourauel, Christoph

    2012-10-01

    The similar bone structure of reindeer antler to human bone permits studying the osseointegration of dental implants in the jawbone. As the friction is one of the major factors that have a significant influence on the initial stability of immediately loaded dental implants, it is essential to define the frictional coefficient of the implant-antler interface. In this study, the kinetic frictional forces at the implant-antler interface were measured experimentally using an optomechanical setup and a stepping motor controller under different axial loads and sliding velocities. The corresponding mean values of the static and kinetic frictional coefficients were within the range of 0.5-0.7 and 0.3-0.5, respectively. An increase in the frictional forces with increasing applied axial loads was registered. The measurements showed an evidence of a decrease in the magnitude of the frictional coefficient with increasing sliding velocity. The results of this study provide a considerable assessment to clarify the suitable frictional coefficient to be used in the finite element contact analysis of antler specimens.

  1. Surface Modification by Friction Stir Processing of Low-Carbon Steel: Microstructure Investigation and Wear Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Behnoosh; Shamanian, Morteza; Salimijazi, Farshid; Salehi, Mehdi

    2018-02-01

    A low-carbon steel sheet with a thickness of 5 mm was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP) by one to four different passes. The microstructures of different regions were characterized using the optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The Vickers micro-harness was measured at the distance of 200 μm below the processed surfaces. The influence of pass numbers (PNs) on wear resistance was studied in terms of coefficients of friction (CoFs), weight losses and wear rates. SEM topographies of the worn surfaces were also studied to evaluate the wear mechanisms. Microstructure observations showed that Widmänstatten ferrite plates were formed in stir zones (SZs) and heat affected zones. As PN increased, these grains were widened due to the increment of the carbon diffusivity and lengthened because of the high heat input and microstructure anisotropy. Besides, increasing the PN causes increasing of the hardness and wear resistance, simultaneously. Specifically, the wear rate in the SZ was reduced from 2.8 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in base metal to 0.3 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in sample which was subjected to 4 FSP passes. However, variation in PN had no considerable effect on CoFs. Oxidative wear mechanism was observed on the worn surface of the steel and the FSPed samples while more debris was formed by increasing the PNs.

  2. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peat, Tom, E-mail: tompeat12@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios [Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, James Weir Building, 75 Montrose Street, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); McNutt, Philip [TWI Ltd., Granta Park, Cambridge CB21 6AL (United Kingdom); Iqbal, Naveed [TWI Technology Centre, Wallis Way, Catcliff, Rotherham, S60 5TZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • WC-CoCr, Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings were cold spray deposited on AA5083 and friction stir processed. • The SprayStirred WC-CoCr demonstrated a hardness increase of 100% over the cold sprayed coating. • As-deposited and SprayStirred coatings were examined under slurry erosion test conditions. • Mass and volume loss was measured following 20-min exposure to the slurry. • The WC-CoCr and Al2O3 demonstrated a reduction in volume loss of approx. 40% over the cold sprayed coating. - Abstract: This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide – cobalt chromium, chromium carbide – nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the

  3. Friction stir processing: a new grain refinement technique to achieve high strain rate superplasticity in commercial alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, R.S. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering; Mahoney, M.W. [Rockwell International Corp., Thousand Oaks, CA (United States). Science Center

    2001-07-01

    Friction stir processing is a new thermo-mechanical processing technique that leads to a microstructure amenable for high strain rate superplasticity in commercial aluminum alloys. Friction stirring produces a combination of very fine grain size and high grain boundary misorientation angles. Preliminary results on a 7075 Al demonstrate high strain rate superplasticity in the temperature range of 430-510 C. For example, an elongation of >1000% was observed at 490 C and 1 x 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}. This demonstrates a new possibility to economically obtain a superplastic microstructure in commercial aluminum alloys. Based on these results, a three-step manufacturing process to fabricate complex shaped components can be envisaged: cast sheet or hot-pressed powder metallurgy sheet + friction stir processing + superplastic forging or forming. (orig.)

  4. Frictional ageing from interfacial bonding and the origins of rate and state friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qunyang; Tullis, Terry E; Goldsby, David; Carpick, Robert W

    2011-11-30

    Earthquakes have long been recognized as being the result of stick-slip frictional instabilities. Over the past few decades, laboratory studies of rock friction have elucidated many aspects of tectonic fault zone processes and earthquake phenomena. Typically, the static friction of rocks grows logarithmically with time when they are held in stationary contact, but the mechanism responsible for this strengthening is not understood. This time-dependent increase of frictional strength, or frictional ageing, is one manifestation of the 'evolution effect' in rate and state friction theory. A prevailing view is that the time dependence of rock friction results from increases in contact area caused by creep of contacting asperities. Here we present the results of atomic force microscopy experiments that instead show that frictional ageing arises from the formation of interfacial chemical bonds, and the large magnitude of ageing at the nanometre scale is quantitatively consistent with what is required to explain observations in macroscopic rock friction experiments. The relative magnitude of the evolution effect compared with that of the 'direct effect'--the dependence of friction on instantaneous changes in slip velocity--determine whether unstable slip, leading to earthquakes, is possible. Understanding the mechanism underlying the evolution effect would enable us to formulate physically based frictional constitutive laws, rather than the current empirically based 'laws', allowing more confident extrapolation to natural faults.

  5. Development of a process envelope for friction stir welding of DH36 steel – A step change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumpis, Athanasios; Galloway, Alexander; Cater, Stephen; McPherson, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The friction stir welding speed on DH36 steel has been substantially increased. • Excellent quality welds offering potential economic advantages are obtained. • Friction stir welding of steel generates a very complex metallurgical system. • Slow and intermediate welding speed tensile samples fractured in the parent material. • Increasing traverse speed is seen to improve the impact toughness of the weld. - Abstract: Friction stir welding of steel presents an array of advantages across many industrial sectors compared to conventional fusion welding techniques. However, the fundamental knowledge of the friction stir welding process in relation to steel remains relatively limited. A microstructure and property evaluation of friction stir welded low alloy steel grade DH36 plate, commonly used in ship and marine applications has been undertaken. In this comprehensive study, plates of 2000 × 200 × 6 mm were butt welded together at varying rotational and traverse speeds. Samples were examined microscopically and by transverse tensile tests. In addition, the work was complemented by Charpy impact testing and micro-hardness testing in various regions of the weld. The study examined a wide range of process parameters; from this, a preliminary process parameter envelope has been developed and initial process parameter sets established that produce commercially attractive excellent quality welds through a substantial increase in the conventionally recognised weld traverse speed

  6. Friction and anchorage loading revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholakia, Kartik D

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary concepts of sliding mechanics explain that friction is inevitable. To overcome this frictional resistance, excess force is required to retract the tooth along the archwire (ie, individual retraction of canines, en masse retraction of anterior teeth), in addition to the amount of force required for tooth movement. The anterior tooth retraction force, in addition to excess force (to overcome friction), produces reciprocal protraction force on molars, thereby leading to increased anchorage loading. However, this traditional concept was challenged in recent literature, which was based on the finite element model, but did not bear correlation to the clinical scenario. This article will reinforce the fact that clinically, friction increases anchorage loading in all three planes of space, considering the fact that tooth movement is a quasistatic process rather than a purely continuous or static one, and that conventional ways of determining the effects of static or dynamic friction on anchorage load cannot be applied to clinical situations (which consist of anatomical resistance units and a complex muscular force system). The article does not aim to quantify friction and its effect on the amount of anchorage load. Rather, a new perspective regarding the role of various additional factors (which is not explained by contemporary concept) that may influence friction and anchorage loading is provided..

  7. Power characteristics of the metal compounds formation process during the friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzaev Radmir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An influence of the power characteristics on the formation process of the uniform metals compound during the welding with friction stirringis being examined in this article.A dependency between the machine-tool engine power input and the instrument tilt during the FSW for the aluminum alloy AD31, copper alloy M1, titanium alloy OT4-1 and steel St-3 low-alloyed has been explored. A question of the stabilization of power consumption process while the establishment of superplastic condition of welded metal during the FSW has also been reviewed. A dependency revealed between the power characteristics, the geometry of the formation, the rotation speeds, the longitudinal displacement of the tool and its dimensions for fixed values of the parameters during the FSW.

  8. Optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding based on residual stress analysis: a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2010-01-01

    The present paper considers the optimisation of process parameters in friction stir welding (FSW). More specifically, the choices of rotational speed and traverse welding speed have been investigated using genetic algorithms. The welding process is simulated in a transient, two......-dimensional sequentially coupled thermomechanical model in ANSYS. This model is then used in an optimisation case where the two objectives are the minimisation of the peak residual stresses and the maximisation of the welding speed. The results indicate that the objectives for the considered case are conflicting......, and this is presented as a Pareto optimal front. Moreover, a higher welding speed for a fixed rotational speed results, in general, in slightly higher stress levels in the tension zone, whereas a higher rotational speed for a fixed welding speed yields somewhat lower peak residual stress, however, a wider tension zone...

  9. Hybrid Search for Faster Production and Safer Process Conditions in Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate optimum process parameters and tool geometries in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) to minimize temperature difference between the leading edge of the tool probe and the work piece material in front of the tool shoulder, and simultaneously maximize traverse...... welding speed, which conflicts with the former objective. An evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm (i.e. NSGA-II), is applied to find multiple trade-off solutions followed by a gradient-based local search (i.e. SQP) to improve the convergence of the obtained Pareto-optimal front. In order...... choices have been offered based on several process specific performance and cost related criteria....

  10. Fabrication of novel fiber reinforced aluminum composites by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, Seyyed Mohammad; Karimi, Saeed; Jahromi, Seyyed Ahmad Jenabali, E-mail: jahromi@shirazu.ac.ir; Javadpour, Sirus; Zebarjad, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2015-04-24

    In this study, chopped and attrition milled high strength carbon, E-glass, and S-glass fibers have been used as the reinforcing agents in an aluminum alloy (Al1100) considered as the matrix. The Surface Metal Matrix Composites (SMMCs) then are produced by Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Tensile and micro-hardness examinations represent a magnificent improvement in the hardness, strength, ductility and toughness for all of the processed samples. Scanning Electron Micrographs reveal a proper distribution of the reinforcements in the matrix and a change in the fracture behavior of the FSPed specimens. The synergetic effects of reinforcing by fibers and Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) lead to an extra ordinary improvement in the mechanical properties.

  11. Experimental determination and evaluation of the friction behavior of geosynthetics; Experimentelle Ermittlung und Bewertung des Reibungsverhaltens von Geokunststoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Maik

    2016-08-17

    In many fields of geotechnical engineering geosynthetics have established itself as an alternative to common used earth materials. Particularly in landfill sealing systems many different types of geosynthetics are used together. In embankments geosynthetics form inclined planes. The safety against sliding must be proved for all contact surfaces. For this purpose, the knowledge of the friction behavior of the geosynthetics is required. Normally, the friction behavior is modeled analytically with the Coulomb failure criterion. The Coulomb friction parameters usually must be determined experimentally. In spite of the good state of the art and numerous studies into geosynthetics, in detail, there are still issues relating to the determination of friction behavior of geosynthetics, to the application of the Coulomb failure criterion and to the assessment of the friction parameters with a view to the time- and temperature-dependent behavior of synthetics. The main objective of this work is to contribute to a reliable determination of the friction behavior and to a correct assessment of the evaluated test results as the basis for a reliable and economical dimensioning of structures with geosynthetics. For this, the measurement technique of a standard large direct shear box was upgraded by the author, so that the effective normal stress can be measured below the test surface. Also tests with very small normal stresses can be carried out with this modification. Furthermore, a force-controlled test device was designed for studies of the influences arising from long-term combined compressive and shear loads and temperature. Based on experimental investigations inadequacies in the current experimental procedure are identified. In addition, the impact of factors are quantified, which are often ignored or considered to be marginal in practice. With further experimental investigations it is demonstrated that the linear Coulomb failure criterion is valid for limited normal stress

  12. Investigation of effects of process parameters on properties of friction stir welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Atul; Soota, Tarun; Rajput, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    This work deals with application of friction stir welding (FSW) using application of Taguchi orthogonal array. FSW procedure is used for joining the aluminium alloy AA6063-T0 plates in butt configuration with orthogonal combination of factors and their levels. The combination of factors involving tool rotation speed, tool travel speed and tool pin profile are used in three levels. Grey relational analysis (GRA) has been applied to select optimum level of factors for optimising UTS, ductility and hardness of joint. Experiments have been conducted with two different tool materials (HSS and HCHCr steel) with various factors level combinations for joining AA6063-T0. On the basis of grey relational grades at different levels of factors and analysis of variance (ANOVA) ideal combination of factors are determined. The influence of tool material is also studied.

  13. Microstructure evolution and texture development in a friction stir-processed AISI D2 tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasavol, N.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Vieira, M. T.; Jafarian, H. R.

    2014-02-01

    Crystallographic texture developments during friction stir processing (FSP) of AISI D2 tool were studied with respect to grain sizes in different tool rotation rates. Comparison of the grain sizes in various rotation rates confirmed that grain refinement occurred progressively in higher rotation rates by severe plastic deformation. It was found that the predominant mechanism during FSP should be dynamic recovery (DRV) happened concurrently with continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) caused by particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN). The developed shear texture relates to the ideal shear textures of D1 and D2 in bcc metals. The prevalence of highly dense arrangement of close-packed planes of bcc and the lowest Taylor factor showed the lowest compressive residual stress which is responsible for better mechanical properties compared with the grain-precipitate refinement.

  14. Microstructure and hardness performance of AA6061 aluminium composite using friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, C. D.; Fatchurrohman, N.

    2018-04-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA) is an industrial waste that has become a potential reinforced material for aluminium matrix composite (AMCs) due to low cost and abundantly available resources. Friction stir processing (FSP) has been introduced as a method to modify surface properties of the metal and alloy including theirs composite as well. The present work reports the production and characterization of AA6061 and AA6061/5 vol% RHA using FSP using parameters rotation speed 1000 rpm and traversed speed 25 mm/min. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy (OM). A homogenous dispersion of RHA particles was obtained in the composite. No agglomeration or segregation was observed. The produced composite exhibited a fine grain structure. An improvement in hardness profile was observed as AA6061/5 vol% RHA improves in hardness compared to FSPed of AA6061 without reinforcement.

  15. Impacts of friction stir processing on irradiation effects in vacuum-plasma-spray coated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kazumi, E-mail: ozawa.kazumi@jaea.go.jp [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi-Omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi-Omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    In order to examine the impacts of friction stir processing (FSP) on irradiation effects in vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) coated tungsten (W), nano indentation hardness was evaluated of three kinds of W materials after self-ion-irradiation to 5.0–5.4 dpa at 500 and 800 °C. The VPS-FSP clearly got grains refined and isotropic compared to bulk-W and the as-VPS-W. Nano indentation hardness remains unchanged for the as-VPS-W and VPS-FSP × 2-W irradiated to 5.4 dpa at 500 °C and it decreased from 1 dpa at 800 °C, while typical irradiation induced hardening was observed for the bulk-W irradiated at 500 °C.

  16. Influential Parameters and Numerical Simulation of Heat Generated in the Process of Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija KOVACEVIC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the problem of friction stir welding (FSW technology. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical process of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Presented are the basic analytical formulations for the definition of temperature fields. Analysis of influential parameters of welding FSW technology at the zone of the weld material and mechanical properties of the realized joint was performed. Influential welding parameters were defined based on tool geometry, technological parameters of processing and the axial load of tool. Specific problems with the FSW process are related to gaps (holes left behind by a tool at the end of the process and inflexibility of welding regarding the degree of variation of material thickness. Numerical simulation of process welding FSW proceeding was carried out on the example of Aluminum Alloy (AA 2219 using the ANSYS Mechanical ADPL (Transient Thermal software package. The defined was the temperature field in the welding process at specified time intervals.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.10022

  17. Microstructure characterization of the stir zone of submerged friction stir processed aluminum alloy 2219

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xiuli; Liu, Huijie; Lippold, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 2219-T6 was friction stir processed using a novel submerged processing technique to facilitate cooling. Processing was conducted at a constant tool traverse speed of 200 mm/min and spindle rotation speeds in the range from 600 to 800 rpm. The microstructural characteristics of the base metal and processed zone, including grain structure and precipitation behavior, were studied using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness maps were constructed on polished cross sections of as-processed samples. The effect of tool rotation speed on the microstructure and hardness of the stir zone was investigated. The average grain size of the stir zone was much smaller than that of the base metal, but the hardness was also lower due to the formation of equilibrium θ precipitates from the base metal θ′ precipitates. Stir zone hardness was found to decrease with increasing rotation speed (heat input). The effect of processing conditions on strength (hardness) was rationalized based on the competition between grain refinement strengthening and softening due to precipitate overaging. - Highlights: • SZ grain size (∼ 1 μm) is reduced by over one order of magnitude relative to the BM. • Hardness in the SZ is lower than that of the precipitation strengthened BM. • Metastable θ′ in the base metal transforms to equilibrium θ in the stir zone. • Softening in the SZ results from a decrease of precipitation strengthening

  18. Microstructure characterization of the stir zone of submerged friction stir processed aluminum alloy 2219

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xiuli, E-mail: feng.97@osu.edu [Welding Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Huijie, E-mail: liuhj@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lippold, John C., E-mail: lippold.1@osu.edu [Welding Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Aluminum alloy 2219-T6 was friction stir processed using a novel submerged processing technique to facilitate cooling. Processing was conducted at a constant tool traverse speed of 200 mm/min and spindle rotation speeds in the range from 600 to 800 rpm. The microstructural characteristics of the base metal and processed zone, including grain structure and precipitation behavior, were studied using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness maps were constructed on polished cross sections of as-processed samples. The effect of tool rotation speed on the microstructure and hardness of the stir zone was investigated. The average grain size of the stir zone was much smaller than that of the base metal, but the hardness was also lower due to the formation of equilibrium θ precipitates from the base metal θ′ precipitates. Stir zone hardness was found to decrease with increasing rotation speed (heat input). The effect of processing conditions on strength (hardness) was rationalized based on the competition between grain refinement strengthening and softening due to precipitate overaging. - Highlights: • SZ grain size (∼ 1 μm) is reduced by over one order of magnitude relative to the BM. • Hardness in the SZ is lower than that of the precipitation strengthened BM. • Metastable θ′ in the base metal transforms to equilibrium θ in the stir zone. • Softening in the SZ results from a decrease of precipitation strengthening.

  19. Determination of the Basic Friction Angle of Rock Surfaces by Tilt Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-Sic; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Kang, Seong-Seung; Jang, Bo-An

    2018-04-01

    Samples of Hwangdeung granite from Korea and Berea sandstone from USA, both containing sliding planes, were prepared by saw-cutting or polishing using either #100 or #600 grinding powders. Their basic friction angles were measured by direct shear testing, triaxial compression testing, and tilt testing. The direct shear tests and triaxial compression tests on the saw-cut, #100, and #600 surfaces indicated that the most reliable results were obtained from the #100 surface: basic friction angle of 29.4° for granite and 34.1° for sandstone. To examine the effect of surface conditions on the friction angle in tilt tests, the sliding angles were measured 50 times with two surface conditions (surfaces cleaned and not cleaned after each measurement). The initial sliding angles were high regardless of rock type and surface conditions and decreased exponentially as measurements continued. The characteristics of the sliding angles, differences between tilt tests, and dispersion between measurements in each test indicated that #100 surface produced the most reliable basic friction angle measurement. Without cleaning the surfaces, the average angles for granite (32 measurements) and sandstone (23 measurements) were similar to the basic friction angle. When 20-50 measurements without cleaning were averaged, the basic friction angle was within ± 2° for granite and ± 3° for sandstone. Sliding angles using five different tilting speeds were measured but the average was similar, indicating that tilting speed (between 0.2° and 1.6°/s) has little effect on the sliding angle. Sliding angles using four different sample sizes were measured with the best results obtained for samples larger than 8 × 8 cm.

  20. Effect of process parameters on mechanical properties of friction stir spot welded magnesium to aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, H.M.; Yuan, W.; Badarinarayan, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Lap-shear failure load of ∼2.5 kN was achieved in dissimilar Mg to Al spot welds. • Failure load depends on both welding geometrical features and IMCs formation. • Thin and discontinuous IMCs formed in stir zone are beneficial for weld strength. • Low heat input and good material mixing/interlocking is essential for high strength. - Abstract: Friction stir spot welding was applied to dissimilar cast magnesium (Mg) alloy AM60B and wrought aluminum (Al) alloy 6022-T4 under various welding conditions. The influence of tool rotation rate and shoulder plunge depth on lap-shear failure load was examined. Welds were made at four different tool rotation rates of 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500 revolution per minute (rpm) and various tool shoulder plunge depths from 0 mm to 0.9 mm. The cross section of each weld exhibited the formation of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in the stir zone. An increase in tool rotation rate decreased the width of the stir zone and resulted in lower lap-shear failure loads. The stir zone width increased and interlocking of IMCs was observed with an increase in tool shoulder plunge depth at 1000 rpm. High lap-shear failure loads were achieved in welds having a large stir zone width with formation of discontinuous IMCs at the tip of the interfacial hook. An average lap-shear failure load of 2.5 kN was achieved for welds made at 1000 rpm and 0.9 mm shoulder plunge. The present study suggests that the mechanical properties of friction stir spot welded dissimilar alloys are greatly influenced by the stir zone width, interfacial hooks and IMCs which are all weld process dependent

  1. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Process Parameters of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Tamjidy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of Friction Stir Welding (FSW has provided an alternative approach for producing high-quality welds, in a fast and reliable manner. This study focuses on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotational speed, tool traverse speed, tilt angle, and tool offset influence the mechanical properties of the friction stir welded joints significantly. A mathematical regression model is developed to determine the empirical relationship between the FSW process parameters and mechanical properties, and the results are validated. In order to obtain the optimal values of process parameters that simultaneously optimize the ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and minimum hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ, a metaheuristic, multi objective algorithm based on biogeography based optimization is proposed. The Pareto optimal frontiers for triple and dual objective functions are obtained and the best optimal solution is selected through using two different decision making techniques, technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS and Shannon’s entropy.

  2. Multi-Objective Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Process Parameters of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamjidy, Mehran; Baharudin, B T Hang Tuah; Paslar, Shahla; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Sulaiman, Shamsuddin; Fadaeifard, Firouz

    2017-05-15

    The development of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has provided an alternative approach for producing high-quality welds, in a fast and reliable manner. This study focuses on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar friction stir welding of AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys. The FSW process parameters such as tool rotational speed, tool traverse speed, tilt angle, and tool offset influence the mechanical properties of the friction stir welded joints significantly. A mathematical regression model is developed to determine the empirical relationship between the FSW process parameters and mechanical properties, and the results are validated. In order to obtain the optimal values of process parameters that simultaneously optimize the ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and minimum hardness in the heat affected zone (HAZ), a metaheuristic, multi objective algorithm based on biogeography based optimization is proposed. The Pareto optimal frontiers for triple and dual objective functions are obtained and the best optimal solution is selected through using two different decision making techniques, technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) and Shannon's entropy.

  3. Fabrication of Al/Graphite/Al2O3 Surface Hybrid Nano Composite by Friction Stir Processing and Investigating The Wear and Microstructural Properties of The Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mostafapour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing was applied for fabricating an aluminum alloy based hybrid nano composite reinforced with nano sized Al2O3 and micro sized graphite particles. A mixture of Al2O3 and graphite particles was packed into a groove with 1 mm width and 4.5 mm depth, which had been cut in 5083 aluminum plate of 10 mm thick. Packed groove was subjected to friction stir processing in order to implement powder mixture into the aluminum alloy matrix. Microstructural properties were investigated by means of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was found that reinforcement particle mixture was distributed uniformly in nugget zone. Wear resistance of composite was measured by dry sliding wear test. As a result, hybrid composite revealed significant reduction in wear rate in comparison with Al/AL2O3 composite produced by friction stir processing. Worn surface of the wear test samples were examined by SEM in order to determine wear mechanism.

  4. Fabrication of Surface Level Cu/Si Cp Nano composites by Friction Stir Processing Route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R. C.; Karunanithi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) technique has been successfully employed as low energy consumption route to prepare copper based surface level nano composites reinforced with nano sized silicon carbide particles (Si Cp). The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed, and tool tilt angle on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. Single pass FSP was performed based on Box-Behnken design at three factors in three levels. A cluster of blind holes 2 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth was used as particulate deposition technique in order to reduce the agglomeration problem during composite fabrication. K-type thermocouples were used to measure temperature histories during FSP. The results suggest that the heat generation during FSP plays a significant role in deciding the microstructure and microhardness of the surface composites. Microstructural observations revealed a uniform dispersion of nano sized Si Cp without any agglomeration problem and well bonded with copper matrix at different process parameter combinations. X-ray diffraction study shows that no intermetallic compound was produced after processing. The microhardness of nano composites was remarkably enhanced and about 95% more than that of copper matrix

  5. Fabrication of Surface Level Cu/SiCp Nanocomposites by Friction Stir Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cartigueyen Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP technique has been successfully employed as low energy consumption route to prepare copper based surface level nanocomposites reinforced with nanosized silicon carbide particles (SiCp. The effect of FSP parameters such as tool rotational speed, processing speed, and tool tilt angle on microstructure and microhardness was investigated. Single pass FSP was performed based on Box-Behnken design at three factors in three levels. A cluster of blind holes 2 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth was used as particulate deposition technique in order to reduce the agglomeration problem during composite fabrication. K-type thermocouples were used to measure temperature histories during FSP. The results suggest that the heat generation during FSP plays a significant role in deciding the microstructure and microhardness of the surface composites. Microstructural observations revealed a uniform dispersion of nanosized SiCp without any agglomeration problem and well bonded with copper matrix at different process parameter combinations. X-ray diffraction study shows that no intermetallic compound was produced after processing. The microhardness of nanocomposites was remarkably enhanced and about 95% more than that of copper matrix.

  6. Determining the friction factors for underground colliery bord and pillar workings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyer, CF

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available This project was mainly proposed to make available, to the coal mining industry a set of default friction values that could be used with more confidence in network simulation programs, during the project use was made of both underground...

  7. A research on determining the friction losses formed in the small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-18

    Jan 18, 2010 ... kler heads were used especially to irrigate landscapes areas (Rochester, 1995). ... friction in the pipe mentioned and the energy which was .... Where; Q is water flow (m3 s-1), A is cross sectional area of pipe,. (m2) and V is ...

  8. Determination of oral mucosal Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction from in-vivo contact pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junning; Suenaga, Hanako; Hogg, Michael; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Despite their considerable importance to biomechanics, there are no existing methods available to directly measure apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient of oral mucosa. This study aimed to develop an inverse procedure to determine these two biomechanical parameters by utilizing in vivo experiment of contact pressure between partial denture and beneath mucosa through nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis and surrogate response surface (RS) modelling technique. First, the in vivo denture-mucosa contact pressure was measured by a tactile electronic sensing sheet. Second, a 3D FE model was constructed based on the patient CT images. Third, a range of apparent Poisson's ratios and the coefficients of friction from literature was considered as the design variables in a series of FE runs for constructing a RS surrogate model. Finally, the discrepancy between computed in silico and measured in vivo results was minimized to identify the best matching Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction. The established non-invasive methodology was demonstrated effective to identify such biomechanical parameters of oral mucosa and can be potentially used for determining the biomaterial properties of other soft biological tissues.

  9. Estimation of Dynamic Friction Process of the Akatani Landslide Based on the Waveform Inversion and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M.; Mangeney, A.; Moretti, L.; Matsushi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding physical parameters, such as frictional coefficients, velocity change, and dynamic history, is important issue for assessing and managing the risks posed by deep-seated catastrophic landslides. Previously, landslide motion has been inferred qualitatively from topographic changes caused by the event, and occasionally from eyewitness reports. However, these conventional approaches are unable to evaluate source processes and dynamic parameters. In this study, we use broadband seismic recordings to trace the dynamic process of the deep-seated Akatani landslide that occurred on the Kii Peninsula, Japan, which is one of the best recorded large slope failures. Based on the previous results of waveform inversions and precise topographic surveys done before and after the event, we applied numerical simulations using the SHALTOP numerical model (Mangeney et al., 2007). This model describes homogeneous continuous granular flows on a 3D topography based on a depth averaged thin layer approximation. We assume a Coulomb's friction law with a constant friction coefficient, i. e. the friction is independent of the sliding velocity. We varied the friction coefficients in the simulation so that the resulting force acting on the surface agrees with the single force estimated from the seismic waveform inversion. Figure shows the force history of the east-west components after the band-pass filtering between 10-100 seconds. The force history of the simulation with frictional coefficient 0.27 (thin red line) the best agrees with the result of seismic waveform inversion (thick gray line). Although the amplitude is slightly different, phases are coherent for the main three pulses. This is an evidence that the point-source approximation works reasonably well for this particular event. The friction coefficient during the sliding was estimated to be 0.38 based on the seismic waveform inversion performed by the previous study and on the sliding block model (Yamada et al., 2013

  10. Variational transition state theory for multidimensional activated rate processes in the presence of anisotropic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Frishman, Anatoli M.; Pollak, Eli

    1994-09-01

    Variational transition state theory (VTST) is applied to the study of the activated escape of a particle trapped in a multidimensional potential well and coupled to a heat bath. Special attention is given to the dependence of the rate constant on the friction coefficients in the case of anisotropic friction. It is demonstrated explicitly that both the traditional as well as the nontraditional scenarios for the particle escape are recovered uniformly within the framework of VTST. Effects such as saddle point avoidance and friction dependence of the activation energy are derived from VTST using optimized planar dividing surfaces.

  11. Use of the quartz crystal microbalance to determine the monomeric friction coefficient of polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Mary M.

    1995-01-01

    When a thin film of polymer is coated on to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the QCM can be used to detect the rate of increase in weight of the polymer film as the volatile penetrant diffuses into the polymer. From this rate information the diffusion coefficient of the penetrant into the polymer can be computed. Calculations requiring this diffusion coefficient lead to values which approximate the monomeric friction coefficient of the polymer. This project has been concerned with the trial of crystal oscillating circuits suitable for driving polymer coated crystals in an atmosphere of penetrant. For these studies done at room temperature, natural rubber was used as an easily applied polymer that is readily penetrated by toluene vapors, qualities anticipated with polyimides when they are tested at T(g) in the presence of toluene. Three quartz crystal oscillator circuits were tested. The simplest circuit used +/- 5 volt dc and had a transistor to transistor logic (TTL) inverter chip that provides a 180 deg phase shift via a feed back loop. This oscillator circuit was stable but would not drive the crystal when the crystal was coated with polymer and subjected to toluene vapors. Removal of a variable resistor from this circuit increased stability but did not otherwise increase performance. Another driver circuit tested contained a two stage differential input, differential output, wide band video amplifier and also contain a feed back loop. The circuit voltage could not be varied and operated at +/- 5 volts dc; this circuit was also stable but failed to oscillate the polymer coated crystal in an atmosphere saturated with toluene vapors. The third oscillator circuit was of similar construction and relied on the same video amplifier but allowed operation with variable voltage. This circuit would drive the crystal when the crystal was submerged in liquid toluene and when the crystal was coated with polymer and immersed in toluene vapors. The frequency readings

  12. Development of quartz particulate reinforced AA6063 aluminum matrix composites via friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Joyson Abraham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP has been accepted as a potential method to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs without the drawbacks of liquid metallurgy methods. The present work focuses on the development of AMCs reinforced with quartz (SiO2 particles using FSP. Grooves with various dimensions were machined on AA6063 plates and compacted with quartz particles. A single pass FSP was carried out using a combination of optimized process parameters. The volume fraction of quartz particles in the AMCs was varied from 0 to 18 vol.% in steps of 6 vol.%. The developed AA6063/Quartz AMCs were characterized using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The quartz particles were distributed uniformly in the aluminum matrix irrespective of the location within the stir zone. The grains of the AA6063 were extensively refined by the combination of thermomechanical effect of FSP and the pinning effect of quartz particles. The dispersion of the quartz particles improved the microhardness and wear resistance of the AMCs. The role of quartz particles on the worn surface and wear debris is reported.

  13. Multi-Track Friction Stir Lap Welding of 2024 Aluminum Alloy: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengke Zou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir lap welding (FSLW raises the possibility of fabricating high-performance aluminum components at low cost and high efficiency. In this study, we mainly applied FSLW to fabricate multi-track 2024 aluminum alloy without using tool tilt angle, which is important for obtaining defect-free joint but significantly increases equipment cost. Firstly, systematic single-track FSLW experiments were conducted to attain appropriate processing parameters, and we found that defect-free single-track could also be obtained by the application of two-pass processing at a rotation speed of 1000 rpm and a traverse speed of 300 mm/min. Then, multi-track FSLW experiments were conducted and full density multi-track samples were fabricated at an overlapping rate of 20%. Finally, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the full density multi-track samples were investigated. The results indicated that ultrafine equiaxed grains with the grain diameter about 9.4 μm could be obtained in FSLW samples due to the dynamic recrystallization during FSLW, which leads to a yield strength of 117.2 MPa (17.55% higher than the rolled 2024-O alloy substrate and an elongation rate of 31.05% (113.84% higher than the substrate.

  14. Corrosion behavior of Al6061 alloy weldment produced by friction stir welding process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded lap joints of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Corrosion properties of welded lap joints were studied by cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. All tests were performed in an aerated 0.6 mol L−1 NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 6.5 at a temperature of 30 °C to characterize corrosion morphology and realize corrosion features of weld regions as opposed to the parent alloy. The microstructure of weld nugget (WN, heated affected zone (HAZ, and parent alloy were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the welding process has a major effect on the corrosion resistance, which possibly associated to the break-down and dissolution of intermetallic particles. It is supposed that an increasing in intermetallic distributed throughout the matrix of weld regions increases the galvanic corrosion couples. Furthermore, by decreasing the grain size in the weld regions, the susceptibility to corrosion is enhanced. The pitting corrosion and intergranular attack are the dominant corrosion types in the weld regions and the parent alloy.

  15. Generated forces and heat during the critical stages of friction stir welding and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Sadiq Aziz; Tahir, Abd Salam Md; Izamshah, R. [University Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Malacca (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    The solid-state behavior of friction stir welding process results in violent mechanical forces that should be mitigated, if not eliminated. Plunging and dwell time are the two critical stages of this welding process in terms of the generated forces and the related heat. In this study, several combinations of pre-decided penetration speeds, rotational speeds, tool designs, and dwell time periods were used to investigate these two critical stages. Moreover, a coupled-field thermal-structural finite element model was developed to validate the experimental results and the induced stresses. The experimental results revealed the relatively large changes in force and temperature during the first two stages compared with those during the translational tool movement stage. An important procedure to mitigate the undesired forces was then suggested. The model prediction of temperature values and their distribution were in good agreement with the experimental prediction. Therefore, the thermal history of this non-uniform heat distribution was used to estimate the induced thermal stresses. Despite the 37% increase in these stresses when 40 s dwell time was used instead of 5 s, these stresses showed no effect on the axial force values because of the soft material incidence and stir effects.

  16. Friction Stir Processing of Copper-Coated SiC Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we proposed a novel friction stir processing (FSP to produce a locally reinforced aluminum matrix composite (AMC by stirring copper-coated SiC particulate reinforcement into Al6061 alloy matrix. Electroless-plating process was applied to deposit the copper surface coating on the SiC particulate reinforcement for the purpose of improving the interfacial adhesion between SiC particles and Al matrix. The core-shell SiC structure provides a layer for the atomic diffusion between aluminum and copper to enhance the cohesion between reinforcing particles and matrix on one hand, the dispersion of fine copper in the Al matrix during FSP provides further dispersive strengthening and solid solution strengthening, on the other hand. Hardness distribution and tensile results across the stir zone validated the novel concept in improving the mechanical properties of AMC that was realized via FSP. Optical microscope (OM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM investigations were conducted to investigate the microstructure. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA, and X-ray diffraction (XRD were explored to analyze the atomic inter-diffusion and the formation of intermetallic at interface. The possible strengthening mechanisms of the AMC containing Cu-coated SiC particulate reinforcement were interpreted. The concept of strengthening developed in this work may open a new way of fabricating of particulate reinforced metal matrix composites.

  17. Analysis and Modeling of Friction Stir Processing-Based Crack Repairing in 2024 Aluminum Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Gang Ren; Lei Wang; Dao-Kui Xu; Li-Yang Xie; Zhan-Chang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    A friction stir processing-based method was used to repair cracks in the 2024 aluminum alloy plates.The temperature field and plastic material flow pattern were analyzed on the basis of experimental and finite element simulation results.Microstructure and tensile properties of the repaired specimens were studied.The results showed that the entire crack repairing was a solid-phase process and plastic materials tended to flow toward the shoulder center and then resulted in the repairing of cracks.Meanwhile,the coarse grain structures were refined in repaired zone (RZ),while the grains in thermal-mechanically affected zone and heat-affected zone were elongated and driven to grow up.Meanwhile,large phases are crushed into small particles and dispersed inside the RZ.Finally,the strength of the repaired specimens can be restored dramatically and their ductility can be partially restored.After heat treatment,the tensile properties of the repaired specimens can be further enhanced.

  18. Generated forces and heat during the critical stages of friction stir welding and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Sadiq Aziz; Tahir, Abd Salam Md; Izamshah, R.

    2015-01-01

    The solid-state behavior of friction stir welding process results in violent mechanical forces that should be mitigated, if not eliminated. Plunging and dwell time are the two critical stages of this welding process in terms of the generated forces and the related heat. In this study, several combinations of pre-decided penetration speeds, rotational speeds, tool designs, and dwell time periods were used to investigate these two critical stages. Moreover, a coupled-field thermal-structural finite element model was developed to validate the experimental results and the induced stresses. The experimental results revealed the relatively large changes in force and temperature during the first two stages compared with those during the translational tool movement stage. An important procedure to mitigate the undesired forces was then suggested. The model prediction of temperature values and their distribution were in good agreement with the experimental prediction. Therefore, the thermal history of this non-uniform heat distribution was used to estimate the induced thermal stresses. Despite the 37% increase in these stresses when 40 s dwell time was used instead of 5 s, these stresses showed no effect on the axial force values because of the soft material incidence and stir effects

  19. Microstructural characteristics and effects of TC4 titanium alloy processed by using friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo LI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding technique is used for the processing of TC4 titanium alloy under protective atmosphere, and it results with good formability. The research focues on the evolution mechanisms of α+β dual phase microstructure in stirred zone and the effects of processing parameters on structures hardness. The results show that with optimized technological parameters, stir zone structure experiences the α/β transformation, and finally changes to the α+β duplex structure which is based on the β phase. After mixing head leaves and the structure cools, the precipitated lamellar α phase is among and/or within-regions. Grain refining of α+β dual phase is obvious. The shortened α/β lamellar spacing distance may improve the strengthening effect of the α+β duplex phase and enhance the hardness of the stir zone. The increasing of the tool rotation speed could coarsen β-regions, while the increasing of the travel speed could help reduce the α phase ratio and generate needle-type Martensites.

  20. Experimental investigation on the effect of process environment on the mechanical properties of AA5083/Al2O3 nanocomposite fabricated via friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashjari, M.; Mostafapour Asl, A.; Rouhi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir processing, a lately devised grain refining and also microstructure homogenizing technique, has extensively been used on aluminum alloys. Significance of limiting the grain growth during the process, has made lots of researchers make endeavor to keep, as one of the ways of controlling grain growth, the process temperature low; one way of doing so, is performing the friction stir process under water, which keeps the peak temperature low and increases the cooling rate as well. In the present work, research has been done to make known the effects of doing submerged friction stir processing on mechanical properties of AA5083/Al 2 O 3p composite. The process was completed on each sample without changing the rotation and traverse speed of the tool. The pin of the tool was a threaded cylindrical one. Tensile and micro-hardness tests were used to evaluate the effect of the process on these properties of the samples. Also to study the microstructure of the samples, optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs were used. The results show that, underwater friction stir process is capable of producing defect-free AA5083/Al 2 O 3p nanocomposite. Analyzing the properties of the processed samples showed that, by significantly reducing the grain size, water environment has positive impact on the mechanical properties of the alloy; And that, Hall–Petch effect is more powerful than Orowan mechanism in enhancing the mechanical properties of the samples

  1. Detecting determinism from point processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G; Mormann, Florian; Kreuz, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The detection of a nonrandom structure from experimental data can be crucial for the classification, understanding, and interpretation of the generating process. We here introduce a rank-based nonlinear predictability score to detect determinism from point process data. Thanks to its modular nature, this approach can be adapted to whatever signature in the data one considers indicative of deterministic structure. After validating our approach using point process signals from deterministic and stochastic model dynamics, we show an application to neuronal spike trains recorded in the brain of an epilepsy patient. While we illustrate our approach in the context of temporal point processes, it can be readily applied to spatial point processes as well.

  2. Development of friction welding process of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyung Seop; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2004-01-01

    Bulk Metallic Glasses(BMG) with good mechanical properties have problems that engineering application fields have been limited because of limitation of the alloy size. In order to solving this problem, the friction welding of BMG has been tried using the superplastic-like deformation behavior under the supercooled liquid region. The apparatus for friction welding test was designed and constructed using pneumatic cylinder and gripper based on a conventional lathe. Friction welding have been tried to combination of same BMG alloy and crystalline alloys. The results of welding test were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, measurement of hardness and mechanical properties test. In order to obtain the optimized welding test conditions the temperature of friction interface was measured using Infrared thermal imager

  3. Effects of tool speeds and corresponding torque/energy on stir zone formation during friction stir welding/processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, S; Chen, Z W

    2009-01-01

    The way processing parameters and the measurable thermomechanical responses relate to the individual and combined flows forming the different processed zones during friction stir welding/processing has been studied. Experimentally, a cast Al-7Si-0.3Mg alloy was used to provide readily identifiable processed zones. A series of friction stir experiments covering a wide range of tool forward and rotation speeds were conducted followed by the measurement of individual and combined stir areas. It has been found that the basic modes of material flow did not change but the relative volume of each flow depended on both forward and rotation speeds. The trends observed in the present data explain how pin rotation relates to the material transportation mechanism and the associated torque required. This data also explains how forward speed, not rotation speed, relates to specific energy and the volume of the total stir zone.

  4. Contribution to the determination of nuclear friction by studying the de-excitation of nuclei in the transient regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassani, S.

    1985-01-01

    An old idea of Kramers is to consider nuclear fission as a diffusion process in phase space corresponding to the collective variable of fission. The fission width is taken as an escape rate of the system over the barrier potential. The evolution of the distribution of this collective variable and its conjugate is governed by a Fokker-Planck equation. In a quasistationary treatment Kramers obtained a fission rate which differs from the result given by the transition state method by a friction dependent factor. The non quasistationary solution of the Fokker-Planck equation allows to obtain an escape rate that presents a transient regime: from zero it grows and reaches asymptotically the Kramers' value. This time-dependent fission width is included in a formalism that describes the deexcitation of the compound nucleus in order to calculate the neutron multiplicities in competition with fission. A sensitive friction-dependence of the multiplicities is obtained. Using this formalism and comparing the results with data of a recent experiment gives a good agreement; resolving the disagreement between data and the usual statistical model at high energy. A range of values of the friction coefficient is deduced [fr

  5. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  6. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju

    2014-01-01

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si 3 N 4 tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  7. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  8. Effect of friction stir processing on erosion–corrosion behavior of nickel–aluminum bronze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfollahi, M.; Shamanian, M.; Saatchi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The average hardness value of the FSP samples was higher than cast sample. • Erosion–corrosion rate of the FSP samples was higher than cast sample. • The gravimetric analysis showed a negative synergy. - Abstract: In the present investigation, effects of Friction Stir Processing (FSP) on Erosion–Corrosion (E–C) behavior of Nickel–Aluminum Bronze (NAB) were studied by weight-loss measurements and surface characterization using an impingement jet test system. After FSP, the initial coarse microstructure of the cast NAB was transformed to a fine structure, and the porosity defects were eliminated. In addition, different FSP structures were produced by each rotation rate. Microhardness measurements showed a marked increase in FSP samples depending upon the FSP parameters. E–C tests were carried out by erodent at kinetic energies about 0.45 μJ and in 30°, 60° and 90° impact angles to simulate actual service conditions. The maximum weight-loss was observed in FSP samples and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) results showed signs of brittle fracture mechanism in FSP samples. By gravimetric analysis, the degree of synergy was evaluated at 0.45 μJ kinetic energy at normal impact angle and negative synergy result implies the presence of a protective film on all sample surfaces

  9. Application of laser ultrasonic method for on-line monitoring of friction stir spot welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Zhou, Jianghua

    2015-09-01

    Application of a laser ultrasonic method is developed for on-line monitoring of the friction stir spot welding (FSSW) process. Based on the technology of FSSW, laser-generated ultrasonic waves in a good weld and nonweld area are simulated by a finite element method. The reflected and transmitted waves are analyzed to disclose the properties of the welded interface. The noncontact-laser ultrasonic-inspection system was established to verify the numerical results. The reflected waves in the good-weld and nonweld area can be distinguished by time-of-flight. The transmitted waves evidently attenuate in the nonweld area in contrast to signal amplitude in the good weld area because of interfacial impedance difference. Laser ultrasonic C-scan images can sufficiently evaluate the intrinsic character of the weld area in comparison with traditional water-immersion ultrasonic testing results. The research results confirm that laser ultrasonics would be an effective method to realize the characterization of FSSW defects.

  10. Influence of friction stir welding process and tool parameters on strength properties of AA7075-T6 aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajakumar, S.; Muralidharan, C.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    The aircraft aluminium alloys generally present low weldability by traditional fusion welding process. The development of the friction stir welding has provided an alternative improved way of satisfactorily producing aluminium joints, in a faster and reliable manner. In this present work, the influence of process and tool parameters on tensile strength properties of AA7075-T 6 joints produced by friction stir welding was analysed. Square butt joints were fabricated by varying process parameters and tool parameters. Strength properties of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the microstructure, microhardness of weld nugget. From this investigation it is found that the joint fabricated at a tool rotational speed of 1400 rpm, welding speed of 60 mm/min, axial force of 8 kN, using the tool with 15 mm shoulder diameter, 5 mm pin diameter, 45 HRc tool hardness yielded higher strength properties compared to other joints.

  11. Wear Resistance Increase by Friction Stir Processing for Partial Magnesium Replacement in Aluminium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balos, Sebastian; Labus Zlatanovic, Danka; Janjatovic, Petar; Dramicanin, Miroslav; Rajnovic, Dragan; Sidjanin, Leposava

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the influence of friction stir processing (FSP) was evaluated as a way of increasing mechanical properties and a way of replacing the magnesium content in aluminium alloys. FSP was done on AA5754 H111 aluminium alloy, containing 3 % Mg, by using various types of tools and different welding speeds, rotational speeds and tilt angles. Wear test was done against SiC abrasive papers. SiC was used to simulate extreme abrasive wear conditions. The wear test was done on untreated AA5754 specimens, processed AA5754 specimens and untreated AA5083 H111 specimens, the latter containing 4.5 % Mg. AA5083 was chosen as an alternative to AA5754, but with a significantly higher Mg content. Base material microhardness was 60 HV1 and 80 HV1 for AA5754 and AA5083 alloys respectively. To find the effect of FSP on AA5754 alloy, microstructures were studied, mainly grain size in the stir zone. It was found, that an elevated processing and rotational speed, without tilt angle and the tool without a reservoir resulted in an increase in hardness of the AA5754 to 70 HV1, but with the occurrence of tunneling defect and the wear rate of 79.3 mg. Lower FSP parameters and a tilted tool with a reservoir resulted in microhardness of 68 HV1 and wear rate of 68.2 mg without tunneling. These wear values are lower than those obtained with unmodified Al-alloys: AA5754 97.2 mg and AA5083 86.3 mg. An increased wear resistance can be attributed to the combined effect of grain boundary strengthening mechanism and solid solution strengthening, versus only the latter in untreated alloys.

  12. Effect of medium on friction and wear properties of compacted graphite cast iron processed by biomimetic coupling laser remelting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qingchun; Zhou Hong; Wang Chengtao; Zhang Wei; Lin Pengyu; Sun Na; Ren Luquan

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated by the cuticles of soil animals, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) with biomimetic units on the surface was made by using a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process in air and various thicknesses water film, respectively. The microstructures of biomimetic units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in the melted zone. Microhardness was measured and the wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens as functions of different mediums as well as various water film thicknesses were investigated under dry sliding condition, respectively. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film are refined compared with that processed in air and had better wear resistance increased by 60%, the microhardness of biomimetic units has been improved significantly. The application of water film provided finer microstructures and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the friction properties and wear resistance of CGI.

  13. Effect of medium on friction and wear properties of compacted graphite cast iron processed by biomimetic coupling laser remelting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing-chun; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Cheng-tao; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Peng-yu; Sun, Na; Ren, Luquan

    2009-04-01

    Stimulated by the cuticles of soil animals, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) with biomimetic units on the surface was made by using a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process in air and various thicknesses water film, respectively. The microstructures of biomimetic units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in the melted zone. Microhardness was measured and the wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens as functions of different mediums as well as various water film thicknesses were investigated under dry sliding condition, respectively. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film are refined compared with that processed in air and had better wear resistance increased by 60%, the microhardness of biomimetic units has been improved significantly. The application of water film provided finer microstructures and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the friction properties and wear resistance of CGI.

  14. Neptunium determination in PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, Neetika; Kar, Aishwarya S.; Tomar, B.S.; Pandey, M.P.; Umadevi, K.

    2016-10-01

    237 Np is one of the most important minor actinides present in nuclear spent fuel both from environmental and application point of view. The routing of neptunium to the particular stream of PUREX process is necessary for its separation and purification as 237 Np is the target nuclide for production of 238 Pu. The routing of neptunium to a particular PUREX stream will also help in better nuclear waste management, which in turn, will impart less bearing on the environment considering its long half life, alpha emitting properties and mobile nature. In order to route Neptunium to a particular stream of PUREX process, it is imperative to understand the distribution of neptunium in various process streams. Owing to high dose of actual samples, the neptunium distribution was studied using 239 Np tracer by simulating actual column conditions of PUREX streams in lab scale. The present study deals with neptunium determination in actual PUREX streams samples also. (author)

  15. Deconvolution analysis to determine relaxation time spectra of internal friction peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cost, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    A new method for analysis of an internal friction vs temperature peak to obtain an approximation of the spectrum of relaxation time responsible for the peak is described. This method, referred to as direct spectrum analysis (DSA), is shown to provide an accurate estimate of the distribution of relaxation times. The method is validated for various spectra, and it is shown that: (1) It provides approximations to known input spectra which replicate the position, amplitude, width and shape with good accuracy (typically 10%). (2) It does not yield approximations which have false spectral peaks

  16. Artificial neural network modeling studies to predict the friction welding process parameters of Incoloy 800H joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Anand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on friction welding process parameter optimization using a hybrid technique of ANN and different optimization algorithms. This optimization techniques are not only for the effective process modelling, but also to illustrate the correlation between the input and output responses of the friction welding of Incoloy 800H. In addition the focus is also to obtain optimal strength and hardness of joints with minimum burn off length. ANN based approaches could model this welding process of INCOLOY 800H in both forward and reverse directions efficiently, which are required for the automation of the same. Five different training algorithms were used to train ANN for both forward and reverse mapping and ANN tuned force approach was used for optimization. The paper makes a robust comparison of the performances of the five algorithms employing standard statistical indices. The results showed that GANN with 4-9-3 for forward and 4-7-3 for reverse mapping arrangement could outperform the other four approaches in most of the cases but not in all. Experiments on tensile strength (TS, microhardness (H and burn off length (BOL of the joints were performed with optimised parameter. It is concluded that this ANN model with genetic algorithm may provide good ability to predict the friction welding process parameters to weld Incoloy 800H.

  17. Influence of Stored Strain on Fabricating of Al/SiC Nanocomposite by Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, M. Sarkari; Kazeminezhad, M.; Kokabi, A. H.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, 1050 aluminum (Al) sheets were annealed and severely deformed by 1, 2, and 3 passes of constrained groove pressing process to obtain the various initial stored strain values of 0, 1.16, 2.32, and 3.48, respectively. Friction stir processing (FSP) was then applied using SiC nanoparticles to fabricate Al/SiC nanocomposite with approximately 1.5 vol pct reinforced particles. Microstructural examinations revealed that an increase in the initial stored strain of the base metal led to the formation of finer grain structure after 1 pass of FSP. The finer grain structure occurred in the stir zone where a sufficient amount of nanoparticles with a relatively proper distribution existed. However, the initial stored strain value had a contrary influence in the regions with low volume fraction of nanoparticles. In fact, more stored strain in the base metal provided more driving force for both nucleation and grain growth of newly recrystallized grains at the stir zone. Pinning effect of well-distributed nanoparticles could effectively retard grain growth leading to the formation of very fine grain structure. Also it was observed that the initial stored strain values did not have impressive rule in the microstructural evolutions at the stir zone during the second and third FSP passes signifying that all of the stored energy in the base metal would be released after 1 pass of FSP. The results obtained with microhardness measurement at the stir zone were fairly in agreement with those achieved by the microstructure assessments.

  18. Influence of the processing variables on the performance of MAGCLA(TM): friction coefficient and radius of the particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto, Paulo A; Castelo-Grande, Teresa; Barbosa, Domingos; Estevez, A M

    2007-01-01

    This work presents simulation results for the behaviour of different particles in a new magnetic-classifier (MAGCLA(TM)), which is capable of separating and classifying particles according to their magnetic susceptibilities. In a previous article the results for a blank simulation were reported. In this paper the blank simulation is compared with the results obtained for the variation of two of the main processing variables: friction coefficient, μ, and the radius of the particles, r part , in the outcome results

  19. Enhancement of wear and ballistic resistance of armour grade AA7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sudhakar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial applications of aluminium and its alloys are restricted because of their poor tribological properties. Thermal spraying, laser surfacing, electron beam welding are the most widely used techniques to alter the surface morphology of base metal. Preliminary studies reveal that the coating and layering of aluminium alloys with ceramic particles enhance the ballistic resistance. Furthermore, among aluminium alloys, 7075 aluminium alloy exhibits high strength which can be compared to that of steels and has profound applications in the designing of lightweight fortification structures and integrated protection systems. Having limitations such as poor bond integrity, formation of detrimental phases and interfacial reaction between reinforcement and substrate using fusion route to deposit hard particles paves the way to adopt friction stir processing for fabricating surface composites using different sizes of boron carbide particles as reinforcement on armour grade 7075 aluminium alloy as matrix in the present investigation. Wear and ballistic tests were carried out to assess the performance of friction stir processed AA7075 alloy. Significant improvement in wear resistance of friction stir processed surface composites is attributed to the change in wear mechanism from abrasion to adhesion. It has also been observed that the surface metal matrix composites have shown better ballistic resistance compared to the substrate AA7075 alloy. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 has reduced the depth of penetration of the projectile to half that of base metal AA7075 alloy. For the first time, the friction stir processing technique was successfully used to improve the wear and ballistic resistances of armour grade high strength AA7075 alloy.

  20. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  1. Determination of the friction coefficient via the force autocorrelation function. A molecular dynamics investigation for a dense Lennard-Jones fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelsang, R.; Hoheisel, C.

    1987-01-01

    For a large region of dense fluid states of a Lennard-Jones system, they have calculated the friction coefficient by the force autocorrelation function of a Brownian-type particle by molecular dynamics (MD). The time integral over the force autocorrelation function showed an interesting behavior and the expected plateau value when the mass of the Brownian particle was chosen to be about a factor of 100 larger than the mass of the fluid particle. Sufficient agreement was found for the friction coefficient calculated by this way and that obtained by calculations of the self-diffusion coefficient using the common relation between these coefficients. Furthermore, a modified friction coefficient was determined by integration of the force autocorrelation function up to the first maximum. This coefficient can successfully be used to derive a reasonable soft part of the friction coefficient necessary for the Rice-Allnatt approximation for the shear velocity and simple liquids

  2. Influence of tool geometry and process parameters on macrostructure and static strength in friction stir spot welded polyethylene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Mustafa Kemal; Yuekler, Ahmet Irfan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → All velding parameters and different tool geometries have demonstrated a different effects on weld strength. → Friction stir spot welding of polyethylene mechanical scission is very important. → Metric screw the tool has a great influence on the weld strength of FSSW. -- Abstract: The effect of important welding parameters and tool properties that are effective on static strength in friction stir spot welds of polyethylene sheets were studied. Six different tool pin profiles (straight cylindrical, tapered cylindrical, threaded cylindrical, triangular, square and hexagonal) with different shoulder geometries, different pin length, pin angle and concavity angle were used to fabricate the joints. The tool rotational speed, tool plunge depth and dwell time were determined welding parameters. All the welding operations were done at the room temperature. Welding force and welding zone material temperature measurements were also done. Lap-shear tests were carried out to find the weld static strength. Weld cross section appearance observations were also done. From the experiments, the effect of pin profile, pin length, pin angle, dwell time and tool rotational speed on friction stir spot welding formation and weld strength was determined.

  3. Amorphization and Frictional Processes in Smectite-Quartz Gouge Mixtures Sheared from Sub-seismic to Seismic Slip Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretusini, S.; Mittempergher, S.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.; Gualtieri, A.; Plümper, O.

    2015-12-01

    Slipping zones in shallow sections of megathrusts and large landslides are often made of smectite and quartz gouge mixtures. Experiments aimed at investigating the frictional processes operating at high slip rates (>1 m/s) may unravel the mechanics of these natural phenomena. Here we present a new dataset obtained with two rotary shear apparatus (ROSA, Padua University; SHIVA, INGV-Rome). Experiments were performed at room humidity and temperature on four mixtures of smectite (Ca-Montmorillonite) and quartz with 68, 50, 25, 0 wt% of smectite. The gouges were slid for 3 m at normal stress of 5 MPa and slip rate V from 300 µm/s to 1.5 m/s. Temperature during the experiments was monitored with four thermocouples and modeled with COMSOL Multiphysics. In smectite-rich mixtures, the friction coefficient µ evolved with slip according to three slip rate regimes: in regime 1 (V0.3 m/s) µ had strong slip-weakening behavior. Instead, in quartz-rich mixtures the gouge had a monotonic slip-weakening behavior, independently of V. Temperature modelling showed that the fraction of work rate converted into heat decreased with increasing smectite content and slip rate. Quantitative X-ray powder diffraction (Rietveld method) indicates that the production of amorphous material from smectite breakdown increased with frictional work but was independent of work rate. Scanning Electron Microscopy investigation evidenced strain localization and presence of dehydrated clays for V≥0.3 m/s; instead, for V<0.3 m/s, strain was distributed and the gouge layer pervasively foliated. In conclusion, amorphization of the sheared gouges was not responsible of the measured frictional weakening. Instead, slip-weakening was concomitant to strain localization and possible vaporization of water adsorbed on smectite grain surfaces.

  4. Toward a physics-based rate and state friction law for earthquake nucleation processes in fault zones with granular gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdowsi, B.; Rubin, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Numerical simulations of earthquake nucleation rely on constitutive rate and state evolution laws to model earthquake initiation and propagation processes. The response of different state evolution laws to large velocity increases is an important feature of these constitutive relations that can significantly change the style of earthquake nucleation in numerical models. However, currently there is not a rigorous understanding of the physical origins of the response of bare rock or gouge-filled fault zones to large velocity increases. This in turn hinders our ability to design physics-based friction laws that can appropriately describe those responses. We here argue that most fault zones form a granular gouge after an initial shearing phase and that it is the behavior of the gouge layer that controls the fault friction. We perform numerical experiments of a confined sheared granular gouge under a range of confining stresses and driving velocities relevant to fault zones and apply 1-3 order of magnitude velocity steps to explore dynamical behavior of the system from grain- to macro-scales. We compare our numerical observations with experimental data from biaxial double-direct-shear fault gouge experiments under equivalent loading and driving conditions. Our intention is to first investigate the degree to which these numerical experiments, with Hertzian normal and Coulomb friction laws at the grain-grain contact scale and without any time-dependent plasticity, can reproduce experimental fault gouge behavior. We next compare the behavior observed in numerical experiments with predictions of the Dieterich (Aging) and Ruina (Slip) friction laws. Finally, the numerical observations at the grain and meso-scales will be used for designing a rate and state evolution law that takes into account recent advances in rheology of granular systems, including local and non-local effects, for a wide range of shear rates and slow and fast deformation regimes of the fault gouge.

  5. Friction-stir processing of a high-damping Mn-Cu alloy used for marine propellers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, S.P.; Edwards, D.P.; Majumdar, A. [Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Melbourne (Australia); Moutsos, S. [Centre for Advanced Materials Technology, Monash Univ. (Australia); Mahoney, M.W. [Rockwell Scientific, Thousand Oaks (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Mn-Cu alloys are used for specialised applications, such as marine propellers, where high noise-damping characteristics are required. These alloys tend to have more severe shrinkage porosity than conventional propeller alloys, and the corrosion resistance (including stress-corrosion and corrosion-fatigue resistance) of the alloys is not as high as desirable. Friction-stir processing (FSP) trials on one such alloy (tradename Sonoston) have shown that near-surface porosity can be eliminated and that the coarse, as-cast microstructure can be significantly refined. The corrosion resistance of processed material is substantially improved provided a heat treatment to relieve residual stress is carried out after FSP. (orig.)

  6. Effect of the Preheating Temperature on Process Time in Friction Stir Welding of Al 6061-T6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained and the deductions made from an analytical modeling involving friction stir welding of Al 6061-T6. A new database was developed to simulate the contact temperature between the tool and the workpiece. A second-order equation is proposed for simulating...... the temperature in the contact boundary and the thermal history during the plunge phase. The effect of the preheating temperature on the process time was investigated with the proposed model. The results show that an increase of the preheating time leads to a decrease in the process time up to the plunge...

  7. A study of the friction and wear processes of the structural components of fuel assemblies for water-cooled and water moderated power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, V.; Afanasiev, A.; Matvienko, I.; Drozdov, Y.; Puchkov, V.

    2011-01-01

    The friction forces affect the fuel assembly (FA) strength at all the stages of its lifecycle. The paper covers the methods and the results of the pre-irradiation experimental studies of the static and dynamic processes the friction forces are involved in. These comprise the FA assembling at the manufacturer, fuel rod flow-induced vibration and fretting-wear in the fuel rod-to-cell friction pairs, rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) movement in the FA guide tubes, FA bowing, FA loading-unloading into the core, irradiation-induced growth and thermal-mechanical fuel rod-to-spacer grid interaction. (authors)

  8. Thermal Phenomena in the Friction Process of the TG15 - Hard Anodic Coating Couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Służałek G.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a one-dimensional model of heat conduction in a couple consisting of a cylinder made of a sliding plastic material, TG15, and a cuboid made of alloy AW 6061 coated with a hard anodic coating, where the couple is heated with the heat generated during friction. TG15 is a composite material based on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE with a 15% graphite filler, used for piston rings in oil-free air-compressors. Measurement of temperature in the friction zone is extremely important for the understanding and analysis of the phenomena occurring therein. It is practically impossible to introduce a temperature sensor in such a place. Therefore, the interaction taking place in such a couple was modelled using numerical methods. In order to simplify and accelerate the calculations, a one-dimensional model and constant thermophysical parameters of the materials participating in friction were adopted. To solve the proposed model, the finite difference method was used (FDM. The resultant system of equations was solved by means of an explicit scheme.

  9. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogliati, Joshua J.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2010-01-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  10. Characterization of frictional melting processes in subduction zone faults by trace element and isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T.; Ujiie, K.

    2017-12-01

    Pseudotachylytes found in exhumed accretionary complexes, which are considered to be formed originally at seismogenic depths, are of great importance for elucidating frictional melting and concomitant dynamic weakening of the fault during earthquake in subduction zones. However, fluid-rich environment of the subduction zone faults tends to cause extensive alteration of the pseudotachylyte glass matrix in later stages, and thus it has been controversial that pseudotachylytes are rarely formed or rarely preserved. Chemical analysis of the fault rocks, especially on fluid-immobile trace elements and isotopes, can be a useful means to identify and quantify the frictional melting occurred in subduction zone faults. In this paper, we report major and trace element and Sr isotope compositions for pseudotachylyte-bearing dark veins and surrounding host rocks from the Mugi area of the Shimanto accretionary complex (Ujiie et al., J. Struct. Geol. 2007). Samples were collected from a rock chip along the microstructure using a micro-drilling technique, and then analyzed by ICP-MS and TIMS. Major element compositions of the dark veins showed a clear shift from the host rock composition toward the illite composition. The dark veins, either unaltered or completely altered, were also characterized by extreme enrichment in some of the trace elements such as Ti, Zr, Nb and Th. These results are consistent with disequilibrium melting of the fault zone. Model calculations revealed that the compositions of the dark veins can be produced by total melting of clay-rich matrix in the source rock, leaving plagioclase and quartz grains almost unmolten. The calculations also showed that the dark veins are far more enriched in melt component than that expected from the source rock compositions, suggesting migration and concentration of frictional melt during the earthquake faulting. Furthermore, Sr isotope data of the dark veins implied the occurrence of frictional melting in multiple stages

  11. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution using finite difference equations and estimation of the grain size during friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.S.; Singh, H.; Dhindaw, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Magnesium alloy AE42 was friction stir processed under different cooling conditions. ► Heat flow model was developed using finite difference heat equations. ► Generalized MATLAB code was developed for solving heat flow model. ► Regression equation for estimation of grain size was developed. - Abstract: The present investigation is aimed at developing a heat flow model to simulate temperature history during friction stir processing (FSP). A new approach of developing implicit form of finite difference heat equations solved using MATLAB code was used. A magnesium based alloy AE42 was friction stir processed (FSPed) at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions. Temperature history was continuously recorded in the nugget zone during FSP using data acquisition system and k type thermocouples. The developed code was validated at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions during FSP experimentation. The temperature history at different locations in the nugget zone at different instants of time was further utilized for the estimation of grain growth rate and final average grain size of the FSPed specimen. A regression equation relating the final grain size, maximum temperature during FSP and the cooling rate was developed. The metallurgical characterization was done using optical microscopy, SEM, and FIB-SIM analysis. The simulated temperature profiles and final average grain size were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The presence of fine precipitate particles generated in situ in the investigated magnesium alloy also contributed in the evolution of fine grain structure through Zener pining effect at the grain boundaries.

  12. A bottom-up approach for optimization of friction stir processing parameters; a study on aluminium 2024-T3 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadammal, Naresh; Kailas, Satish V.; Suwas, Satyam

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An experimental bottom-up approach has been developed for optimizing the process parameters for friction stir processing. • Optimum parameter processed samples were tested and characterized in detail. • Ultimate tensile strength of 1.3 times the base metal strength was obtained. • Residual stresses on the processed surface were only 10% of the yield strength of base metal. • Microstructure observations revealed fine equi-axed grains with precipitate particles at the grain boundaries. - Abstract: Friction stir processing (FSP) is emerging as one of the most competent severe plastic deformation (SPD) method for producing bulk ultra-fine grained materials with improved properties. Optimizing the process parameters for a defect free process is one of the challenging aspects of FSP to mark its commercial use. For the commercial aluminium alloy 2024-T3 plate of 6 mm thickness, a bottom-up approach has been attempted to optimize major independent parameters of the process such as plunge depth, tool rotation speed and traverse speed. Tensile properties of the optimum friction stir processed sample were correlated with the microstructural characterization done using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction (EBSD). Optimum parameters from the bottom-up approach have led to a defect free FSP having a maximum strength of 93% the base material strength. Micro tensile testing of the samples taken from the center of processed zone has shown an increased strength of 1.3 times the base material. Measured maximum longitudinal residual stress on the processed surface was only 30 MPa which was attributed to the solid state nature of FSP. Microstructural observation reveals significant grain refinement with less variation in the grain size across the thickness and a large amount of grain boundary precipitation compared to the base metal. The proposed experimental bottom-up approach can be applied as an effective method for

  13. Multi-response optimization of process parameters in friction stir welded AM20 magnesium alloy by Taguchi grey relational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Kumar Sahu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to optimize the process parameter to get the better mechanical properties of friction stir welded AM20 magnesium alloy using Taguchi Grey relational analysis (GRA. The considered process parameters are welding speed, tool rotation speed, shoulder diameter and plunging depth. The experiments were carried out by using Taguchi's L18 factorial design of experiment. The processes parameters were optimized and ranked the parameters based on the GRA. The percentage influence of each process parameter on the weld quality was also quantified. A validation experimental run was conducted using optimal process condition, which was obtained from the analysis, to show the improvement in mechanical properties of the joint. This study also shows the feasibility of the GRA with Taguchi technique for improvement in welding quality of magnesium alloy.

  14. Molecular dynamics modeling of bonding two materials by atomic scale friction stir welding at different process parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko S., Iv.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Using the molecular dynamics method, we simulated the atomic scale butt friction stir welding on two crystallites and varied the onset FSW tool plunge depth. The effects of the plunge depth value on the thermomechanical evolution of nanosized crystallites and mass transfer in the course of FSW have been studied. The increase of plunge depth values resulted in more intense heating and reducing the plasticized metal resistance to the tool movement. The mass transfer intensity was hardly dependent on the plunge depth value. The plunge depth was recommended to be used as a FSW process control parameter in addition to the commonly used ones.

  15. Measuring Search Frictions Using Japanese Microdata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, Masaru; Kohara, Miki; Machikita, Tomohiro

    This paper estimates matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labor market and presents determinants of search duration to explain the effect of unemployment benefits on a job seeker’s behavior. We employ administrative micro data that track the job search process of individ......This paper estimates matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labor market and presents determinants of search duration to explain the effect of unemployment benefits on a job seeker’s behavior. We employ administrative micro data that track the job search process...

  16. The Concept of Electrically Assisted Friction Stir Welding (EAFSW) and Application to the Processing of Various Metals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferrando, William A

    2008-01-01

    This report introduces a novel variant of conventional friction stir welding (FSW). Since 1991, friction stir welding provides an alternative to arc welding as a metal joining method in numerous applications...

  17. Effects of nanometric inclusions on the microstructural characteristics and strengthening of a friction-stir processed aluminum–magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F., E-mail: farzadkhodabakhshi83@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Zand Boulevard, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simchi, A., E-mail: simchi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Švec, P. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Simančík, F. [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, Bratislava (Slovakia); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-08-26

    An aluminum–magnesium alloy was friction-stir processed in the presence of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles which were pre-placed in a groove on the surface to produce a composite. Field emission-scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies show that solid state chemical reactions occur between the Al–Mg matrix and the ceramic particles upon the severe plastic deformation process. The microstructure of the aluminum alloy consists of a coarse grain structure, large complex (Fe,Mn,Cr){sub 3}SiAl{sub 12} particles, and small Mg{sub 2}Si precipitates. After friction stir processing, a deformed grain structure containing rod-like Al–Fe–Mn–Si precipitates is attained, along with cuboidal (~100 nm) Cr{sub 2} precipitates and spherical (~100 and 5 nm) Mg{sub 2}Si particles. In the presence of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, magnesium oxide (MgO) and titanium aluminide (Al{sub 3}Ti) nanophases are formed. It is shown that these microstructural modifications lead to a significant enhancement in the hardness and tensile strength of the aluminum alloy. The relationship between the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties and the role of hard inclusions are presented and discussed. An analysis based on strengthening models indicates that the yield strength of the nanocomposite is mainly controlled by dislocations and grain boundaries rather than the nano-scale inclusions.

  18. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of friction stir linear welded aluminum to magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, H.M.; Ghaffari, B.; Yuan, W.; Jordon, J.B.; Badarinarayan, H.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir linear welded wrought Al alloy AA6022-T4 to cast Mg alloy AM60B joints were examined. A process window was developed to initially identify the potential process conditions. Multitudes of welds were produced by varying the tool rotation rate and tool traverse speed. Welds produced at 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) tool rotation rate and either 50 mm/min or 75 mm/min tool traverse speed displayed the highest quasi-static failure load of ~3.3 kN per 30 mm wide lap-shear specimens. Analysis of cross sections of untested coupons indicated that the welds made at these optimum welding parameters had negligible microvoids and displayed a favorable weld geometry for the cold lap and hook features at the faying surface, compared to welds produced using other process parameters. Cross sections of the tested coupons indicated that the dominant crack initiated on the advancing side and progressed through the weld nugget, which consists of intermetallic compounds (IMC). This study demonstrates the feasibility of welding wrought Al and cast Mg alloy via friction stir linear welding with promising lap-shear strength results.

  19. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of friction stir linear welded aluminum to magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, H.M. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Ghaffari, B. [Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121 (United States); Yuan, W., E-mail: wei.yuan@hitachi-automotive.us [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Jordon, J.B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Badarinarayan, H. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    The microstructure and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir linear welded wrought Al alloy AA6022-T4 to cast Mg alloy AM60B joints were examined. A process window was developed to initially identify the potential process conditions. Multitudes of welds were produced by varying the tool rotation rate and tool traverse speed. Welds produced at 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) tool rotation rate and either 50 mm/min or 75 mm/min tool traverse speed displayed the highest quasi-static failure load of ~3.3 kN per 30 mm wide lap-shear specimens. Analysis of cross sections of untested coupons indicated that the welds made at these optimum welding parameters had negligible microvoids and displayed a favorable weld geometry for the cold lap and hook features at the faying surface, compared to welds produced using other process parameters. Cross sections of the tested coupons indicated that the dominant crack initiated on the advancing side and progressed through the weld nugget, which consists of intermetallic compounds (IMC). This study demonstrates the feasibility of welding wrought Al and cast Mg alloy via friction stir linear welding with promising lap-shear strength results.

  20. Genetic, metabolite and developmental determinism of fruit friction discolouration in pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Munazza; Brewer, Lester; Johnston, Jason; McGhie, Tony K; Gardiner, Susan E; Heyes, Julian A; Chagné, David

    2014-09-16

    The unattractive appearance of the surface of pear fruit caused by the postharvest disorder friction discolouration (FD) is responsible for significant consumer dissatisfaction in markets, leading to lower returns to growers. Developing an understanding of the genetic control of FD is essential to enable the full application of genomics-informed breeding for the development of new pear cultivars. Biochemical constituents [phenolic compounds and ascorbic acid (AsA)], polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, as well as skin anatomy, have been proposed to play important roles in FD susceptibility in studies on a limited number of cultivars. However, to date there has been no investigation on the biochemical and genetic control of FD, employing segregating populations. In this study, we used 250 seedlings from two segregating populations (POP369 and POP356) derived from interspecific crosses between Asian (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai and P. bretschneideri Rehd.) and European (P. communis) pears to identify genetic factors associated with susceptibility to FD. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based linkage maps suitable for QTL analysis were developed for the parents of both populations. The maps for population POP369 comprised 174 and 265 SNP markers for the male and female parent, respectively, while POP356 maps comprised 353 and 398 SNP markers for the male and female parent, respectively. Phenotypic data for 22 variables were measured over two successive years (2011 and 2012) for POP369 and one year (2011) only for POP356. A total of 221 QTLs were identified that were linked to 22 phenotyped variables, including QTLs associated with FD for both populations that were stable over the successive years. In addition, clear evidence of the influence of developmental factors (fruit maturity) on FD and other variables was also recorded. The QTLs associated with fruit firmness, PPO activity, AsA concentration and concentration of polyphenol compounds as well as FD are the first

  1. Modeling Friction in Modelica with the Lund-Grenoble Friction Model

    OpenAIRE

    Aberger, Martin; Otter, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the Lund-Grenoble friction model are summarized and different types of friction elements - bearing friction, clutch, one-way clutch, are implemented in Modelica using this friction formulation. The dynamic properties of these components are determined in simulations and compared with the friction models available in the Modelica standard library. This includes also an automatic gearbox model where 6 friction elements are coupled dynamically.

  2. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  3. Advanced Process Possibilities in Friction Crush Welding of Aluminum, Steel, and Copper by Using an Additional Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besler, Florian A.; Grant, Richard J.; Schindele, Paul; Stegmüller, Michael J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Joining sheet metal can be problematic using traditional friction welding techniques. Friction crush welding (FCW) offers a high speed process which requires a simple edge preparation and can be applied to out-of-plane geometries. In this work, an implementation of FCW was employed using an additional wire to weld sheets of EN AW5754 H22, DC01, and Cu-DHP. The joint is formed by bringing together two sheet metal parts, introducing a wire into the weld zone and employing a rotating disk which is subject to an external force. The requirements of the welding preparation and the fundamental process variables are shown. Thermal measurements were taken which give evidence about the maximum temperature in the welding center and the temperature in the periphery of the sheet metals being joined. The high welding speed along with a relatively low heat input results in a minimal distortion of the sheet metal and marginal metallurgical changes in the parent material. In the steel specimens, this FCW implementation produces a fine grain microstructure, enhancing mechanical properties in the region of the weld. Aluminum and copper produced mean bond strengths of 77 and 69 pct to that of the parent material, respectively, whilst the steel demonstrated a strength of 98 pct. Using a wire offers the opportunity to use a higher-alloyed additional material and to precisely adjust the additional material volume appropriate for a given material alignment and thickness.

  4. Microstructure and wear characterization of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with industrial waste fly ash particulates synthesized by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Nelson, R., E-mail: nelson.90.mech@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641114, Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph.2001@gmail.com [Center for Research in Metallurgy, School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641114, Tamil Nadu (India); Akinlabi, E.T., E-mail: etakinlabi@uj.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa)

    2016-08-15

    Fly ash (FA) is a waste product of coal combustion in thermal power plants which is available in massive quantities all over the world causing land pollution. This paper reports the characterization of AA6061 aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with FA particles synthesized using friction stir processing (FSP). The volume fraction of FA particles was varied from 0 to 18 in steps of 6. The prepared AMCs were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscattered diagram (EBSD). The wear rate was estimated using a pin-on-disc wear apparatus. FA particles were observed to be distributed homogeneously in the AMC irrespective of the location within the stir zone. The EBSD micrographs revealed remarkable grain refinement in the AMC. The incorporation of FA particles enhanced the microhardness and wear resistance of the AMC. The strengthening mechanisms of the AMC were discussed and correlated to the observed microstructures. The wear mechanisms were identified by characterizing the wear debris and worn surfaces. - Highlights: •Industrial waste fly ash was used to produce aluminum matrix composites. •Friction stir processing was used to produce AA6061/Fly Ash composite. •Fly ash particles refined the grains of aluminum matrix. •Fly ash particles enhanced the hardness and wear resistance. •Successful utilization of fly ash to make aluminum composites reduces land pollution.

  5. Modification of vacuum plasma sprayed tungsten coating on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels by friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ozawa, Kazumi; Morisada, Yoshiaki; Noh, Sanghoon; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied on vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W to improve its low thermal conductivity and weakness due to high porosity. • FSP can achieve significant improvement both in mechanical and thermal properties of VPS-W coating. • It was indicated that the double pass FSP at 600 rpm/50 mm/min/2 ton on VPS-W show the most dense microstructure and hardest mechanical property. • Hardness test over FSPed VPS-W layer revealed that the hardness of W becomes higher than that of bulk W. • The thermal conductivity of double pass FSPed VPS-W was about 80% of bulk W at 200 °C, and it becomes equivalent to that of bulk W over 800 °C. - Abstract: Tungsten (W) is the primary candidate material as a plasma facing material in fusion devices, as for its high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity and low sputtering rate, and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) technique is preferred as it is applicable for large area without brittle interlayer, but the thermal conductivity of W layer is very poor, and easy to detach, mainly caused by its porous structure. W Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied on VPS-W to improve these poor properties, and it was suggested that FSP can contribute to significant improvement in both mechanical and thermal properties of the VPS-W coating.

  6. Processing Determinants of Reading Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mark D.; McClelland, James L.

    1979-01-01

    Two groups of undergraduates differing in reading ability were tested on a number of reaction-time tasks designed to determine the speed of encoding visual information at several different levels, tests of sensory functions, verbal and quantitative reasoning ability, short-term auditory memory span, and ability to comprehend spoken text.…

  7. Controlling the length scale and distribution of the ductile phase in metallic glass composites through friction stir processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harpreet Singh; Mridha, Sanghita; Grewal, Harpreet Singh; Singh, Harpreet; Hofmann, Douglas C; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the refinement and uniform distribution of the crystalline dendritic phase by friction stir processing (FSP) of titanium based in situ ductile-phase reinforced metallic glass composite. The average size of the dendrites was reduced by almost a factor of five (from 24 μ m to 5 μ m) for the highest tool rotational speed of 900 rpm. The large inter-connected dendrites become more fragmented with increased circularity after processing. The changes in thermal characteristics were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The reduction in crystallization enthalpy after processing suggests partial devitrification due to the high strain plastic deformation. FSP resulted in increased hardness and modulus for both the amorphous matrix and the crystalline phase. This is explained by interaction of shear bands in amorphous matrix with the strain-hardened dendritic phase. Our approach offers a new strategy for microstructural design in metallic glass composites.

  8. Linking process and structure in the friction stir scribe joining of dissimilar materials: A computational approach with experimental support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Varun; Upadhyay, Piyush; Fifield, Leonard S.; Roosendaal, Timothy; Sun, Xin; Nelaturu, Phalgun; Carlson, Blair

    2018-04-01

    The friction stir welding (FSW) is a popular technique to join dissimilar materials in numerous applications. The solid state nature of the process enables joining materials with strikingly different physical properties. For the welds in lap configuration, an enhancement to this technology is made by introducing a short hard insert, referred to as cutting-scribe, at the bottom of the tool pin. The cutting-scribe induces deformation in the bottom plate which leads to the formation of mechanical interlocks or hook like structures at the interface of two materials. A thermo-mechanically coupled computational model employing coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is developed to quantitatively capture the morphology of these interlocks during the FSW process. The simulations using developed model are validated by the experimental observations.The identified interface morphology coupled with the predicted temperature field from this process-structure model can then be used to estimate the post-weld microstructure and joint strength.

  9. Quantitative Model of Price Diffusion and Market Friction Based on Trading as a Mechanistic Random Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Marcus G.; Farmer, J. Doyne; Gillemot, László; Iori, Giulia; Smith, Eric

    2003-03-01

    We model trading and price formation in a market under the assumption that order arrival and cancellations are Poisson random processes. This model makes testable predictions for the most basic properties of markets, such as the diffusion rate of prices (which is the standard measure of financial risk) and the spread and price impact functions (which are the main determinants of transaction cost). Guided by dimensional analysis, simulation, and mean-field theory, we find scaling relations in terms of order flow rates. We show that even under completely random order flow the need to store supply and demand to facilitate trading induces anomalous diffusion and temporal structure in prices.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Cu/SiC metal matrix composite fabricated via friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akramifard, H.R.; Shamanian, M.; Sabbaghian, M.; Esmailzadeh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Designing a net hole was effective to achieve uniform distribution SiC particles and prevent agglomeration of them. • SZ has fine and equiaxed grains and distribution of SiC particles in the matrix is almost uniform. • No intermetallic compound was formed after FSP. • In comparison to pure Cu, Cu/SiC composite shows higher hardness and better wear behavior. - Abstract: In the present investigation, pure Cu sheets were reinforced with 25 μm SiC particles to fabricate a composite surface layer by friction stir processing (FSP). In order to improve distribution of reinforcing SiC particles, a net of holes were designed by drill on the surface of pure Cu sheet. For evaluation of microstructure, Optical Microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used. Microstructural observation confirmed fine and equiaxed grains in the stir zone (SZ) and showed that SiC particles act as heterogeneous nucleation sites in the dynamic recrystallization of Cu grains. Moreover, agglomeration of particles was not observed and fine particles had a good distribution in SZ. In the SEM micrographs, porosities were detected as microstructure defects. Microhardness measurements showed that surface hardness was two times as high as that of substrate. The rotational wear tests demonstrated that use of SiC particles enhanced wear resistance and increased average friction coefficient of pure Cu. No intermetallic compound was found in Cu/SiC composite as revealed by XRD analysis

  11. Effect of Processing Parameters on Plastic Flow and Defect Formation in Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X. H.; Xue, P.; Wang, D.; Ni, D. R.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of processing parameters on material flow and defect formation during friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated on 6.0-mm-thick 2014Al-T6 rolled plates with an artificially thickened oxide layer on the butt surface as the marker material. It was found that the "S" line in the stir zone (SZ) rotated with the pin and stayed on the retreating side (RS) and advancing side (AS) at low and high heat inputs, respectively. When the tool rotation rate was extremely low, the oxide layer under the pin moved to the RS first and then to the AS perpendicular to the welding direction, rather than rotating with the pin. The material flow was driven by the shear stresses produced by the forces at the pin-workpiece interface. With increases of the rotation rate, the depth of the shoulder-affected zone (SAZ) first decreased and then increased due to the decreasing shoulder friction force and increasing heat input. Insufficient material flow appeared in the whole of the SZ at low rotation rates and in the bottom of the SZ at high rotation rates, resulting in the formation of the "S" line. The extremely inadequate material flow is the reason for the lack of penetration and the kissing bonds in the bottom of the SZ at extremely low and low rotation rates, respectively.

  12. Real-Time Dynamic Observation of Micro-Friction on the Contact Interface of Friction Lining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dekun; Chen, Kai; Guo, Yongbo

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the microscopic friction mechanism based on in situ microscopic observation in order to record the deformation and contact situation of friction lining during the frictional process. The results show that friction coefficient increased with the shear deformation and energy loss of the surfacee, respectively. Furthermore, the friction mechanism mainly included adhesive friction in the high-pressure and high-speed conditions, whereas hysteresis friction was in the low-pressure and low-speed conditions. The mixed-friction mechanism was in the period when the working conditions varied from high pressure and speed to low pressure and speed. PMID:29498677

  13. Effect of Process Variables on the Inertia Friction Welding of Superalloys LSHR and Mar-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, D. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Shivpuri, R.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of inertia friction welding process parameters on microstructure evolution, weld plane quality, and the tensile behavior of welds between dissimilar nickel-base superalloys was established. For this purpose, the fine-grain, powder metallurgy alloy LSHR was joined to coarse-grain cast Mar-M247 using a fixed level of initial kinetic energy, but different combinations of the flywheel moment of inertia and initial rotation speed. It was found that welds made with the largest moment of inertia resulted in a sound bond with the best microstructure and room-temperature tensile strength equal to or greater than that of the parent materials. A relationship between the moment of inertia and weld process efficiency was established. The post-weld tensile behavior was interpreted in the context of observed microstructure gradients and weld-line defects.

  14. Patterns and Determinants of Off-Farm Migration: Transfer frictions and persistency of relative income gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Olper, Alessandro; Raimondi, Valentina; Bertoni, Danilo; Cavicchioli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    The inter-sectoral migration of agricultural labour is a complex but fundamental process of economic development largely affected by the growth of agricultural productivity and the evolution of the agricultural relative income gap. Theory and some recent anecdotal evidence suggest that as an effect of large fixed and sunk costs of out-farm migration, the productivity gap between the agricultural and non-agricultural sectors should behave non-monotonically or following a U-shaped evolution dur...

  15. The friction influence on stress in micro extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piwnik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of metallic parts by forming methods is industrially widespread due to high production rate, high accuracy, dimension’s and shape’s repeatability and good surface quality. The application of metal extrusion methods for the production of micro parts is possible, but there are some technological problems caused by small dimensions. Size effect is appearing. One of size effect symptom in micro extrusion, is a significant influence of rough contact between workpiece and tool while processing. In the case of rough contact without friction, material flows in the vicinity of the die surface. In order to explain more accurately a friction distribution in this area, the plastic wave friction model is proposed. This paper analyses specifications of a metal extrusion in micro scale. Using the friction model, a substitute friction shear factor mz and its influence on extrusion loading curves is determined in relationship to size of asperities.

  16. Weldability of AISI 304 to copper by friction welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Balalan, Zulkuf [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2013-06-01

    Friction welding is a solid-state welding method, which can join different materials smoothly and is excessively used in manufacturing industry. Friction welding method is commonly used in welding applications of especially cylindrical components, pipes and materials with different properties, for which other welding methods remain incapable. AISI 304 stainless steel and a copper alloy of 99.6 % purity were used in this study. This couple was welded in the friction welding machine. After the welding process, samples were analyzed macroscopically and microscopically, and their microhardness was measured. Tensile test was used to determine the bond strength of materials that were joined using the friction welding method. At the end of the study, it was observed that AISI 304 stainless steel and copper could be welded smoothly using the friction welding method and the bond strength is close to the tensile strength of copper. (orig.)

  17. Measuring Search Frictions Using Japanese Microdata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, Masaru; Kohara, Miki; Machikita, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    This paper estimates individual-level matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labour market and presents the determinants of search duration. We employ administrative microdata that track the job search process of job seekers who left or lost their job in August 2005...

  18. Effect of Tip Shape of Frictional Stir Burnishing Tool on Processed Layer’s Hardness, Residual Stress and Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimasa Takada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir burnishing (FSB is a surface-enhancement method used after machining, without the need for an additional device. The FSB process is applied on a machine that uses rotation tools (e.g., machining center or multi-tasking machine. Therefore, the FSB process can be applied immediately after the cutting process using the same machine tool. Here, we apply the FSB to the shaft materials of 0.45% C steel using a multi-tasking machine. In the FSB process, the burnishing tool rotates at a high-revolution speed. The thin surface layer is rubbed and stirred as the temperature is increased and decreased. With the FSB process, high hardness or compressive residual stress can be obtained on the surface layer. However, when we applied the FSB process using a 3 mm diameter sphere tip shape tool, the surface roughness increased substantially (Ra = 20 µm. We therefore used four types of tip shape tools to examine the effect of burnishing tool tip radius on surface roughness, hardness, residual stress in the FSB process. Results indicated that the surface roughness was lowest (Ra = 10 µm when the tip radius tool diameter was large (30 mm.

  19. Effect of Multipass Friction Stir Processing on Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of 2507 Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M. K.; Gunasekaran, G.; Rao, A. G.; Kashyap, B. P.; Prabhu, N.

    2017-02-01

    The microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of 2507 super duplex stainless steel after multipass friction stir processing (FSP) were examined. A significant refinement in grain size of both ferrite and austenite was observed in stir zone resulting in improved yield and tensile strength. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and anodic polarization studies in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution showed nobler corrosion characteristics with increasing number of FSP passes. This was evident from the decrease in corrosion current density, decrease in passive current density, and increase in polarization resistance. Also, the decrease in density of defects, based on Mott-Schottky analysis, further confirms the improvement in corrosion resistance of 2507 super duplex stainless steel after multipass FSP.

  20. On the Process-Related Rivet Microstructural Evolution, Material Flow and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V/GFRP Friction-Riveted Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Z. Borba

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the current work, process-related thermo-mechanical changes in the rivet microstructure, joint local and global mechanical properties, and their correlation with the rivet plastic deformation regime were investigated for Ti-6Al-4V (rivet and glass-fiber-reinforced polyester (GF-P friction-riveted joints of a single polymeric base plate. Joints displaying similar quasi-static mechanical performance to conventional bolted joints were selected for detailed characterization. The mechanical performance was assessed on lap shear specimens, whereby the friction-riveted joints were connected with AA2198 gussets. Two levels of energy input were used, resulting in process temperatures varying from 460 ± 130 °C to 758 ± 56 °C and fast cooling rates (178 ± 15 °C/s, 59 ± 15 °C/s. A complex final microstructure was identified in the rivet. Whereas equiaxial α-grains with β-phase precipitated in their grain boundaries were identified in the rivet heat-affected zone, refined α′ martensite, Widmanstätten structures and β-fleck domains were present in the plastically deformed rivet volume. The transition from equiaxed to acicular structures resulted in an increase of up to 24% in microhardness in comparison to the base material. A study on the rivet material flow through microtexture of the α-Ti phase and β-fleck orientation revealed a strong effect of shear stress and forging which induced simple shear deformation. By combining advanced microstructural analysis techniques with local mechanical testing and temperature measurement, the nature of the complex rivet plastic deformational regime could be determined.

  1. On the Process-Related Rivet Microstructural Evolution, Material Flow and Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V/GFRP Friction-Riveted Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba, Natascha Z.; Afonso, Conrado R. M.; Blaga, Lucian; dos Santos, Jorge F.; Canto, Leonardo B.; Amancio-Filho, Sergio T.

    2017-01-01

    In the current work, process-related thermo-mechanical changes in the rivet microstructure, joint local and global mechanical properties, and their correlation with the rivet plastic deformation regime were investigated for Ti-6Al-4V (rivet) and glass-fiber-reinforced polyester (GF-P) friction-riveted joints of a single polymeric base plate. Joints displaying similar quasi-static mechanical performance to conventional bolted joints were selected for detailed characterization. The mechanical performance was assessed on lap shear specimens, whereby the friction-riveted joints were connected with AA2198 gussets. Two levels of energy input were used, resulting in process temperatures varying from 460 ± 130 °C to 758 ± 56 °C and fast cooling rates (178 ± 15 °C/s, 59 ± 15 °C/s). A complex final microstructure was identified in the rivet. Whereas equiaxial α-grains with β-phase precipitated in their grain boundaries were identified in the rivet heat-affected zone, refined α′ martensite, Widmanstätten structures and β-fleck domains were present in the plastically deformed rivet volume. The transition from equiaxed to acicular structures resulted in an increase of up to 24% in microhardness in comparison to the base material. A study on the rivet material flow through microtexture of the α-Ti phase and β-fleck orientation revealed a strong effect of shear stress and forging which induced simple shear deformation. By combining advanced microstructural analysis techniques with local mechanical testing and temperature measurement, the nature of the complex rivet plastic deformational regime could be determined. PMID:28772545

  2. Fabrication of Al5083 surface composites reinforced by CNTs and cerium oxide nano particles via friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, S.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranjbar, Khalil, E-mail: k_ranjbar@scu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehmolaei, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirani, A.R. [12th Ghaem Street, Bld. Hashemzadeh, Shahrak Golestan, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Using friction stir processing, an effect of CNTs and CeO{sub 2} reinforcements on mechanical and corrosion properties of Al5083 alloy is reported. • The strength of Al5083 was increased by 42%, its matrix grain size reduced five times, and hardness was doubled by the incorporation of CNTs-CeO{sub 2} mixture in the volume ratio of 75-25 respectively. • Unlike the CNTs, incorporation of nanosized CeO{sub 2} particles resulted in remarkable increase in pitting resistance of the alloy. - Abstract: In the present investigation, friction stir processing (FSP) was utilized to incorporate Multi Walled Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNT) and nanosized cerium oxide particles into the matrix of Al5083 alloy to form surface reinforced composites. The effect of these nanosized reinforcements either separately or in the combined form, on microstructural modification, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of FSPed Al5083 surface composites was studied. A threaded cylindrical hardened steel tool was used with the rotation speeds of 600 and 800 rpm and travel speeds of 35 and 45 mm/min and a tilt angle of 5°. Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of FSPed samples were evaluated and compared with the base alloy. The maximum tensile strength and hardness value were achieved for the hybrid composite containing a mixture of CNTs and cerium oxide in the volume ratio of 75-25, respectively, whereas a significant increase in pitting resistance of the base alloy was obtained when cerium oxide alone was incorporated. The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization tests and assessed in term of pitting potential and passivation range. Microstructural analysis carried out by using optical and electron microscopes showed that reinforcements are well dispersed inside the nugget zone (NZ), and remarkable grain refinement is gained. The study was aimed to fabricate surface composites with improved mechanical properties and

  3. CORROSION AND SURFACE PROTECTION IN MACHINE MATERIALS FRICTION HAVE DIFFERENT SURFACE PAIRS EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Senai YALCINKAYA

    2017-01-01

    Friction force, normal force, linear change. The normal force varies with the loads on the friction object. In order to determine the friction force and the friction coefficient, the friction object and the friction speed are used. The experimental work was carried out in three stages. In the first stage, the effect of normal force on the friction force was studied. In the second step, the friction force of the friction surface area is influenced. The effect of the change of the s...

  4. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: ► Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. ► Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. ► Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. ► Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  5. Sensitivity of Induced Seismic Sequences to Rate-and-State Frictional Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Kayla A.; Richards-Dinger, Keith B.; Dieterich, James H.

    2017-12-01

    It is well established that subsurface injection of fluids increases pore fluid pressures that may lead to shear failure along a preexisting fault surface. Concern among oil and gas, geothermal, and carbon storage operators has risen dramatically over the past decade due to the increase in the number and magnitude of induced earthquakes. Efforts to mitigate the risk associated with injection-induced earthquakes include modeling of the interaction between fluids and earthquake faults. Here we investigate this relationship with simulations that couple a geomechanical reservoir model and RSQSim, a physics-based earthquake simulator. RSQSim employs rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) that enables the investigation of the time-dependent nature of earthquake sequences. We explore the effect of two RSF parameters and normal stress on the spatiotemporal characteristics of injection-induced seismicity. We perform >200 simulations to systematically investigate the effect of these model components on the evolution of induced seismicity sequences and compare the spatiotemporal characteristics of our synthetic catalogs to observations of induced earthquakes. We find that the RSF parameters control the ability of seismicity to migrate away from the injection well, the total number and maximum magnitude of induced events. Additionally, the RSF parameters control the occurrence/absence of premonitory events. Lastly, we find that earthquake stress drops can be modulated by the normal stress and/or the RSF parameters. Insight gained from this study can aid in further development of models that address best practice protocols for injection operations, site-specific models of injection-induced earthquakes, and probabilistic hazard and risk assessments.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Heat Friction Contact Master Belt with the Gun Mount Barrel During the Process of High-Speed Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zezulinsky Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction in the gun mount barrel at sliding speeds of artillery projectile 500 - 700 m/s is not sufficiently studied. The main problem is to increase the efficiency of the master belt with a significant increase of the interaction parameters of the barrel with the projectile. To determine the effect of heating on the change of physical and mechanical properties of the surface layer and friction coefficient on the surface of the master belt were made mathematical modeling of heat transfer.

  7. Simulative testing of friction in warm/hot forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Lindegren, Maria

    The objective of sub-task 3.2 is to determine the friction values for different work piece materials, tool materials and lubricants as a function of the main process parameters under conditions reflecting those which are present in typical warm/hot forming operations i.e. surface expansion, work...... piece and tool temperature. Based on this experimental work establish mathematical formulations of friction as a function of the basic parameters....

  8. Anticipating the friction coefficient of friction materials used in automobiles by means of machine learning without using a test instrument

    OpenAIRE

    TİMUR, Mustafa; AYDIN, Fatih

    2013-01-01

    The most important factor for designs in which friction materials are used is the coefficient of friction. The coefficient of friction has been determined taking such variants as velocity, temperature, and pressure into account, which arise from various factors in friction materials, and by analyzing the effects of these variants on friction materials. Many test instruments have been produced in order to determine the coefficient of friction. In this article, a study about the use ...

  9. Friction stir welding process and material microstructure evolution modeling in 2000 and 5000 series of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalavarthy, Harshavardhan

    Interactions between the rotating and advancing pin-shaped tool (terminated at one end with a circular-cylindrical shoulder) with the clamped welding-plates and the associated material and heat transport during a Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process are studied computationally using a fully-coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis. To surmount potential numerical problems associated with extensive mesh distortions/entanglement, an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation was used which enabled adaptive re-meshing (to ensure the continuing presence of a high-quality mesh) while allowing full tracking of the material free surfaces. To demonstrate the utility of the present computational approach, the analysis is applied to the cases of same-alloy FSW of two Aluminum-alloy grades: (a) AA5083 (a solid-solution strengthened and strain-hardened/stabilized Al-Mg-Mn alloy); and (b) AA2139 (a precipitation hardened quaternary Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy). Both of these alloys are currently being used in military-vehicle hull structural and armor systems. In the case of non-age-hardenable AA5083, the dominant microstructure evolution processes taking place during FSW are extensive plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization of highly-deformed material subjected to elevated temperatures approaching the melting temperature. To account for the competition between plastic-deformation controlled strengthening and dynamic-recrystallization induced softening phenomena during the FSW process, the original Johnson-Cook strain- and strain-rate hardening and temperature-softening material strength model is modified in the present work using the available recrystallization-kinetics experimental data. In the case of AA2139, in addition to plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization, precipitates coarsening, over-aging, dissolution and re-precipitation had to be also considered. Limited data available in the open literature pertaining to the kinetics of the aforementioned

  10. Integrated Business Process Adaptation towards Friction-Free Business-to-Business Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    One key issue in process-aware E-commerce collaboration is the orchestration of business processes of multiple business partners throughout a supply chain network in an automated and seamless way. Since each partner has its own internal processes with different control flow structures and message interfaces, the real challenge lies in verifying…

  11. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  12. Spatiotemporal complexity of 2-D rupture nucleation process observed by direct monitoring during large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Eiichi; Tsuchida, Kotoyo; Kawakata, Hironori; Yamashita, Futoshi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Xu, Shiqing

    2018-05-01

    We were able to successfully capture rupture nucleation processes on a 2-D fault surface during large-scale biaxial friction experiments using metagabbro rock specimens. Several rupture nucleation patterns have been detected by a strain gauge array embedded inside the rock specimens as well as by that installed along the edge walls of the fault. In most cases, the unstable rupture started just after the rupture front touched both ends of the rock specimen (i.e., when rupture front extended to the entire width of the fault). In some cases, rupture initiated at multiple locations and the rupture fronts coalesced to generate unstable ruptures, which could only be detected from the observation inside the rock specimen. Therefore, we need to carefully examine the 2-D nucleation process of the rupture especially when analyzing the data measured only outside the rock specimen. At least the measurements should be done at both sides of the fault to identify the asymmetric rupture propagation on the fault surface, although this is not perfect yet. In the present experiment, we observed three typical types of the 2-D rupture propagation patterns, two of which were initiated at a single location either close to the fault edge or inside the fault. This initiation could be accelerated by the free surface effect at the fault edge. The third one was initiated at multiple locations and had a rupture coalescence at the middle of the fault. These geometrically complicated rupture initiation patterns are important for understanding the earthquake nucleation process in nature.

  13. The microstructure, texture, and room temperature mechanical properties of friction stir processed Mg-Y-Nd alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamili, A.M. [The Complex Laboratory of Hot Deformation and Thermomechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei-Hanzaki, A., E-mail: zareih@ut.ac.ir [The Complex Laboratory of Hot Deformation and Thermomechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abedi, H.R. [The Complex Laboratory of Hot Deformation and Thermomechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Minárik, P. [Department of Physics of Materials, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Soltani, R. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-06

    The effects of severe plastic straining, in the course of single and multi-pass friction stir processing (FSP), on the microstructure, texture and mechanical properties of an as-extruded WE43 Magnesium alloy are addressed in the present study. The latter was explored by applying a set of 1 and 3-passes FSP trials on the experimental material. The evolved microstructures were characterized through electron backscatter diffraction analyses. The results indicated an extraordinary reduction in grain size in addition to remarkable decrease in second phase volume fraction in the light of preferred strain rate and temperature conditions. The micro-textures of processed specimens were evaluated through plotting the Schmid factor maps and its distribution. The corresponding results showed that the basal planes poles intensity was increased after each step of FSP trials. The prismatic texture analyses also indicated the randomized and weakened distributed planes. The room temperature mechanical properties of the processed materials were also measured using tensile testing technique. The optimization of the strength and ductility values was attributed to the grain refinement, dynamic dissolution of the second phase and the texture strengthening at proper thermomechanical conditions.

  14. Application of acoustic emission technique and friction welding for excavator hose nipple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Yu Sik; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Friction welding is a very useful joining process to weld metals which have axially symmetric cross section. In this paper, the feasibility of industry application was determined by analyzing the mechanical properties of weld region for a specimen of tube-to-tube shape for excavator hose nipple with friction welding, and optimized welding variables were suggested. In order to accomplish this object, friction heating pressure and friction heating time were selected as the major process variables and the experiment was performed in three levels of each parameter. An acoustic emission(AE) technique was applied to evaluate the optimal friction welding conditions nondestructively. AE parameters of accumulative count and event were analyzed in terms of generating trend of AE signals across the full range of friction weld. The typical waveform and frequency spectrum of AE signals which is generated by friction weld were discussed. From this study the optimal welding variables could be suggested as rotating speed of 1300 rpm, friction heating pressure of 15 MPa, and friction heating time of 10 sec. AE event was a useful parameter to estimate the tensile strength of tube-to tube specimen with friction weld.

  15. Understanding and Observing Subglacial Friction Using Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, V. C.

    2017-12-01

    Glaciology began with a focus on understanding basic mechanical processes and producing physical models that could explain the principal observations. Recently, however, more attention has been paid to the wealth of recent observations, with many modeling efforts relying on data assimilation and empirical scalings, rather than being based on first-principles physics. Notably, ice sheet models commonly assume that subglacial friction is characterized by a "slipperiness" coefficient that is determined by inverting surface velocity observations. Predictions are usually then made by assuming these slipperiness coefficients are spatially and temporally fixed. However, this is only valid if slipperiness is an unchanging material property of the bed and, despite decades of work on subglacial friction, it has remained unclear how to best account for such subglacial physics in ice sheet models. Here, we describe how basic seismological concepts and observations can be used to improve our understanding and determination of subglacial friction. First, we discuss how standard models of granular friction can and should be used in basal friction laws for marine ice sheets, where very low effective pressures exist. We show that under realistic West Antarctic Ice Sheet conditions, standard Coulomb friction should apply in a relatively narrow zone near the grounding line and that this should transition abruptly as one moves inland to a different, perhaps Weertman-style, dependence of subglacial stress on velocity. We show that this subglacial friction law predicts significantly different ice sheet behavior even as compared with other friction laws that include effective pressure. Secondly, we explain how seismological observations of water flow noise and basal icequakes constrain subglacial physics in important ways. Seismically observed water flow noise can provide constraints on water pressures and channel sizes and geometry, leading to important data on subglacial friction

  16. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  17. Frictional behaviour of high performance fibrous tows: Friction experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Tow friction is an important mechanism in the production and processing of high performance fibrous tows. The frictional behaviour of these tows is anisotropic due to the texture of the filaments as well as the tows. This work describes capstan experiments that were performed to measure the

  18. Nonlinear friction model for servo press simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ninshu; Sugitomo, Nobuhiko; Kyuno, Takunori; Tamura, Shintaro; Naka, Tetsuo

    2013-12-01

    The friction coefficient was measured under an idealized condition for a pulse servo motion. The measured friction coefficient and its changing with both sliding distance and a pulse motion showed that the friction resistance can be reduced due to the re-lubrication during unloading process of the pulse servo motion. Based on the measured friction coefficient and its changes with sliding distance and re-lubrication of oil, a nonlinear friction model was developed. Using the newly developed the nonlinear friction model, a deep draw simulation was performed and the formability was evaluated. The results were compared with experimental ones and the effectiveness was verified.

  19. Microstructure and sliding wear characterization of Cu/TiB2 copper matrix composites fabricated via friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The poor wear performance of copper is improved by reinforcing hard ceramic particles. The present work reports the fabrication of Cu/TiB2 (0, 6, 12, 18 vol.% copper matrix composites (CMCs using friction stir processing (FSP. TiB2 particles were initially packed together into a machined groove and were subjected to FSP under a constant set of process parameters. The microstructure was observed using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The wear behavior was examined using a pin-on-disc apparatus. The micrographs showed a homogeneous distribution of TiB2 particles without aggregation and segregation. The distribution of TiB2 particles was closely persistent across the stir zone. TiB2 particles were well bonded with the copper matrix without any interfacial reaction. Many TiB2 particles fractured during FSP. The grains in the composite were extensively refined because of dynamic recrystallization and pinning effect of TiB2 particles. The wear behavior under dry sliding condition was presented in detail.

  20. Influence of ceramic particulate type on microstructure and tensile strength of aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP was applied to produce aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. Aluminum alloy AA6082 was used as the matrix material. Various ceramic particles, such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC, were used as reinforcement particle. AA6082 AMCs were produced using a set of optimized process parameters. The microstructure was studied using optical microscopy, filed emission scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diagram. The results indicated that the type of ceramic particle did not considerably vary the microstructure and ultimate tensile strength (UTS. Each type of ceramic particle provided a homogeneous dispersion in the stir zone irrespective of the location and good interfacial bonding. Nevertheless, AA6082/TiC AMC exhibited superior hardness and wear resistance compared to other AMCs produced in this work under the same set of experimental conditions. The strengthening mechanisms and the variation in the properties are correlated to the observed microstructure. The details of fracture mode are further presented.

  1. Effect of tool plunge depth on reinforcement particles distribution in surface composite fabrication via friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Rathee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium matrix surface composites are gaining alluring role especially in aerospace, defence, and marine industries. Friction stir processing (FSP is a promising novel solid state technique for surface composites fabrication. In this study, AA6061/SiC surface composites were fabricated and the effect of tool plunge depth on pattern of reinforcement particles dispersion in metal matrix was investigated. Six varying tool plunge depths were chosen at constant levels of shoulder diameter and tool tilt angle to observe the exclusive effect of plunge variation. Process parameters chosen for the experimentation are speed of rotation, travel speed and tool tilt angle which were taken as 1400 rpm, 40 mm/min, and 2.5°respectively. Macro and the microstructural study were performed using stereo zoom and optical microscope respectively. Results reflected that lower plunge depth levels lead to insufficient heat generation and cavity formation towards the stir zone center. On the other hand, higher levels of plunge depth result in ejection of reinforcement particles and even sticking of material to tool shoulder. Thus, an optimal plunge depth is needed in developing defect free surface composites.

  2. Internal friction in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin Filho, Pedro Iris

    1979-01-01

    The uranium dioxide inelastic properties were studied measuring internal friction at low frequencies (of the order of 1 Hz). The work was developed in the 160 to 400 deg C temperature range. The effect of stoichiometry variation was studied oxidizing the sample with consequent change of the defect structure originally present in the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The presence of a wide and irregular peak due to oxidation was observed at low temperatures. Activation energy calculations indicated the occurrence of various relaxation processes and assuming the existence of a peak between - 80 and - 70 deg C , the absolute value obtained for the activation energy (0,54 eV) is consistent with the observed values determined at medium and high frequencies for the stress induced reorientation of defects. The microstructure effect on the inelastic properties was studied for stoichiometric uranium dioxide, by varying grain size and porosity. These parameters have influence on the high temperature measurements of internal friction. The internal friction variation for temperatures higher than 340 deg C is thought to be due to grain boundary relaxation phenomena. (author)

  3. Effect of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welding A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Shashi Prakash [Noida Institute of Engineering and Technology, Greater Noida (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    In the present investigation, A356/C355 aluminium alloys are welded by friction stir welding by controlling various welding parameters. A356 and C355 aluminium alloys materials have a set of mechanical and physical properties that are ideally suited for application in aerospace and automobile industries and not widely used because of its poor weldebility. To overcome this barrier, weldebility analysis of A356 and C355 aluminium alloys with high speed steel (Wc-Co) tool has been investigated. An attempt has been made to investigate the influence of the rotational speed of the tools, the axial force and welding speed on tensile strength of A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint. The experiments were conducted on a milling machine. The main focus of investigation is to determine good tensile strength. Response surface methodology (box Behnken design) is chosen to design the optimum welding parameters leading to maximum tensile strength. The result shows that axial force increases, tensile strength decreases. Whereas tool rotational speed and welding speed increase, tensile strength increases. Optimum values of axial force (3 /KN), tool rotational speed (900 RPM) and welding speed (75 mm/min.) during welding of A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint to maximize the tensile strength (Predicted 223.2 MPa) have been find out.

  4. Effect of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welding A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Shashi Prakash

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, A356/C355 aluminium alloys are welded by friction stir welding by controlling various welding parameters. A356 and C355 aluminium alloys materials have a set of mechanical and physical properties that are ideally suited for application in aerospace and automobile industries and not widely used because of its poor weldebility. To overcome this barrier, weldebility analysis of A356 and C355 aluminium alloys with high speed steel (Wc-Co) tool has been investigated. An attempt has been made to investigate the influence of the rotational speed of the tools, the axial force and welding speed on tensile strength of A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint. The experiments were conducted on a milling machine. The main focus of investigation is to determine good tensile strength. Response surface methodology (box Behnken design) is chosen to design the optimum welding parameters leading to maximum tensile strength. The result shows that axial force increases, tensile strength decreases. Whereas tool rotational speed and welding speed increase, tensile strength increases. Optimum values of axial force (3 /KN), tool rotational speed (900 RPM) and welding speed (75 mm/min.) during welding of A356/C355 aluminium alloys joint to maximize the tensile strength (Predicted 223.2 MPa) have been find out.

  5. Characterization of molybdenum particles reinforced Al6082 aluminum matrix composites with improved ductility produced using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvakumar, S., E-mail: lathaselvam1963@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nehru Institute of Technology, Coimbatore 641105, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Palanivel, R., E-mail: rpalanivelme@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Ganesh Babu, B., E-mail: profbgb@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Roever College of Engineering and Technology, Perambalur 621212, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2017-03-15

    Aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with various ceramic particles suffer a loss in ductility. Hard metallic particles can be used as reinforcement to improve ductility. The present investigation focuses on using molybdenum (Mo) as potential reinforcement for Mo(0,6,12 and 18 vol.%)/6082Al AMCs produced using friction stir processing (FSP). Mo particles were successfully retained in the aluminum matrix in its elemental form without any interfacial reaction. A homogenous distribution of Mo particles in the composite was achieved. The distribution was independent upon the region within the stir zone. The grains in the composites were refined considerably due to dynamic recrystallization and pinning effect. The tensile test results showed that Mo particles improved the strength of the composite without compromising on ductility. The fracture surfaces of the composites were characterized with deeply developed dimples confirming appreciable ductility. - Highlights: •Molybdenum particles used as reinforcement for aluminum composites to improve ductility. •Molybdenum particles were retained in elemental form without interfacial reaction. •Homogeneous dispersion of molybdenum particles were observed in the composite. •Molybdenum particles improved tensile strength without major loss in ductility. •Deeply developed dimples on the fracture surfaces confirmed improved ductility.

  6. Effect of Post Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Microhardness of Friction Stir Processed NiAl Bronze (NAB Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Lv

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NiAl bronze (NAB alloy is prepared by using friction stir processing (FSP technique at a tool rotation rate of 1200 rpm and a traverse speed of 150 mm/min. A post heat treatment is performed at the temperature of 675 °C. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and microhardness is studied. The results show that the microstructure of the FSP NAB alloy consists of high density dislocations, retained β phase (β′ phase and recrystallized grains. When annealed at 675 °C, discontinuous static recrystallization (DSRX takes place. The content of β′ phase gradually decreases and fine κ phase is precipitated. After annealing for 2 h, both the microhardness of the FSP sample in the stir zone (SZ and the difference in hardness between the SZ and base metal decrease due to the reduction of the dislocation density and β′ phase, accompanying recrystallized grain coarsening. With further increasing of the annealing time to 4 h, the aforementioned difference in hardness nearly disappears.

  7. Characterization of molybdenum particles reinforced Al6082 aluminum matrix composites with improved ductility produced using friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvakumar, S.; Dinaharan, I.; Palanivel, R.; Ganesh Babu, B.

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with various ceramic particles suffer a loss in ductility. Hard metallic particles can be used as reinforcement to improve ductility. The present investigation focuses on using molybdenum (Mo) as potential reinforcement for Mo(0,6,12 and 18 vol.%)/6082Al AMCs produced using friction stir processing (FSP). Mo particles were successfully retained in the aluminum matrix in its elemental form without any interfacial reaction. A homogenous distribution of Mo particles in the composite was achieved. The distribution was independent upon the region within the stir zone. The grains in the composites were refined considerably due to dynamic recrystallization and pinning effect. The tensile test results showed that Mo particles improved the strength of the composite without compromising on ductility. The fracture surfaces of the composites were characterized with deeply developed dimples confirming appreciable ductility. - Highlights: •Molybdenum particles used as reinforcement for aluminum composites to improve ductility. •Molybdenum particles were retained in elemental form without interfacial reaction. •Homogeneous dispersion of molybdenum particles were observed in the composite. •Molybdenum particles improved tensile strength without major loss in ductility. •Deeply developed dimples on the fracture surfaces confirmed improved ductility.

  8. The Role of Friction Stir Processing (FSP Parameters on TiC Reinforced Surface Al7075-T651 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe García-Vázquez

    Full Text Available Abstract: Aluminum alloys are very promising for structural applications in aerospace, military and transportation industries due to their light weight, high strength-to-weight ratio and excellent resistance to corrosion. In comparison to unreinforced aluminum alloys, aluminum/aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced with ceramic phases exhibit higher strength and hardness, improved tribological characteristics. A novel surface modifying technique, friction stir processing (FSP, has been developed for fabrication of surface composite with an improved performance. The effect of FSP parameters such as number of passes, direction of each pass, sealed or unsealed groove on microstructure was investigated. In this work, nano-particles of TiC (2% in weight were added to aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 to produce a functional surface. Fixed parameters for this AA7075 alloy were used; rotation speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 300 mm/min and pin penetration of 2.8 mm. Optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM were employed to study the microstructure of the fabricated surface composites. The results indicated that the selected FSP parameters influenced the area of surface composite, distribution of TiC particles and micro-hardness of the surface composites. Finally, in order to evaluate rate wear the pin on disk test was carried out.

  9. A sustainable solid state recycling of pure aluminum by means of friction stir extrusion process (FSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehtedi, Mohamad El; Forcellese, Archimede; Simoncini, Michela; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2018-05-01

    In this research, the feasibility of solid-state recycling of pure aluminum AA1099 machining chips using FSE process is investigated. In the early stage, a FE simulation was conducted in order to optimize the die design and the process parameters in terms of plunge rotational speed and extrusion rate. The AA1099 aluminum chips were produced by turning of an as-received bar without lubrication. The chips were compacted on a MTS machine up to 150KN of load. The extruded samples were analyzed by optical and electron microscope in order to see the material flow and to characterize the microstructure. Finally, micro-hardness Vickers profiles were carried out, in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the obtained profiles, in order to investigate the homogeneity of the mechanical properties of the extrudate.

  10. Influence of fibre distribution and grain size on the mechanical behaviour of friction stir processed Mg–C composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, A., E-mail: anne.mertens@ulg.ac.be [Université de Liège, Faculty of Applied Science, A& M Department, Metallic Materials Science Unit (Belgium); Simar, A. [Université catholique de Louvain, Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (Belgium); Adrien, J.; Maire, E. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon (INSA Lyon), MATEIS Laboratory (France); Montrieux, H.-M. [Université de Liège, Faculty of Applied Science, A& M Department, Metallic Materials Science Unit (Belgium); Delannay, F. [Université catholique de Louvain, Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (Belgium); Lecomte-Beckers, J. [Université de Liège, Faculty of Applied Science, A& M Department, Metallic Materials Science Unit (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    Short C fibres–Mg matrix composites have been produced by friction stir processing sandwiches made of a layer of C fabric stacked between two sheets of Mg alloy AZ31B or AZ91D. This novel processing technique can allow the easy production of large-scale metal matrix composites. The paper investigates the microstructure of FSPed C fibre–Mg composites in relation with the fragmentation of the C fibres during FSP and their influence on the tensile properties. 3D X-ray tomography reveals that the fibres orient like onion rings and are more or less fragmented depending on the local shear stress during the process. The fibre volume fraction can be increased from 2.3% to 7.1% by reducing the nugget volume, i.e. by using a higher advancing speed in AZ31B alloy or a stronger matrix alloy, like AZ91D alloy. A higher fibre volume fraction leads to a smaller grain size which brings about an increase of the composite yield strength by 15 to 25%. However, a higher fibre volume fraction also leads to a lower fracture strain. Fracture surface observations reveal that damage occurs by fibre/matrix decohesion along fibres oriented perpendicularly to the loading direction. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • C–Mg MMCs were produced by FSP sandwiches made of a C fabric between Mg sheets. • Fibre fragmentation and erosion is larger when the temperature reached during FSP is lower. • A lower advancing speed brings a lower fibre volume fraction and a lower grain size. • X-ray tomography reveals that fibres orient along the FSP material flow. • The fibres and grain size reduction increase the yield strength by 15 to 25%.

  11. Determining probabilities of geologic events and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.L.; Mann, C.J.; Cranwell, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has recently published a probabilistic standard for releases of high-level radioactive waste from a mined geologic repository. The standard sets limits for contaminant releases with more than one chance in 100 of occurring within 10,000 years, and less strict limits for releases of lower probability. The standard offers no methods for determining probabilities of geologic events and processes, and no consensus exists in the waste-management community on how to do this. Sandia National Laboratories is developing a general method for determining probabilities of a given set of geologic events and processes. In addition, we will develop a repeatable method for dealing with events and processes whose probability cannot be determined. 22 refs., 4 figs

  12. Spectrum of Slip Processes on the Subduction Interface in a Continuum Framework Resolved by Rate-and State Dependent Friction and Adaptive Time Stepping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrendoerfer, R.; van Dinther, Y.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    To explore the relationships between subduction dynamics and the megathrust earthquake potential, we have recently developed a numerical model that bridges the gap between processes on geodynamic and earthquake cycle time scales. In a self-consistent, continuum-based framework including a visco-elasto-plastic constitutive relationship, cycles of megathrust earthquake-like ruptures were simulated through a purely slip rate-dependent friction, albeit with very low slip rates (van Dinther et al., JGR, 2013). In addition to much faster earthquakes, a range of aseismic slip processes operate at different time scales in nature. These aseismic processes likely accommodate a considerable amount of the plate convergence and are thus relevant in order to estimate the long-term seismic coupling and related hazard in subduction zones. To simulate and resolve this wide spectrum of slip processes, we innovatively implemented rate-and state dependent friction (RSF) and an adaptive time-stepping into our continuum framework. The RSF formulation, in contrast to our previous friction formulation, takes the dependency of frictional strength on a state variable into account. It thereby allows for continuous plastic yielding inside rate-weakening regions, which leads to aseismic slip. In contrast to the conventional RSF formulation, we relate slip velocities to strain rates and use an invariant formulation. Thus we do not require the a priori definition of infinitely thin, planar faults in a homogeneous elastic medium. With this new implementation of RSF, we succeed to produce consistent cycles of frictional instabilities. By changing the frictional parameter a, b, and the characteristic slip distance, we observe a transition from stable sliding to stick-slip behaviour. This transition is in general agreement with predictions from theoretical estimates of the nucleation size, thereby to first order validating our implementation. By incorporating adaptive time-stepping based on a

  13. A method for simultaneous determination of wear-resistance of structurally identical machine parts with mutual friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valigura, V.; Volyn'ski, A.

    1979-01-01

    There are mechanisms in the technique, boundary state of separate parts of which is determined by the process of wear of three elements of the mechanism, made of the same material (for example antifriction bearings). The main concept of wear determination in the case of such a mechanism is to conduct measurements by means of simultaneous application of three different methods, for example: the method of roentgen-fluorescence; the tracer technique with application of activation by means of irradiation by different elementary particles, practically by means of neutrons and protons; the method of artifical bases application. In the paper the method is presented having been developed in the Institute of Working Machines of the Poznan Polytechnic. This method of simultaneous investigation in the wear process of bearing rings, inner and outer, and rolling elements of roller bearings. All these elements of bearings are made of LX-15 steel. The method developed, permits to determine the wear sufficient for practical purposes sensitivity [ru

  14. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. We conducted a MedLine search using the key words "determinants", "antibiotic", and "antibiotic resistance" to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.

  15. Effect of heat treatment and number of passes on the microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir processed AZ91C magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadashpour, M.; Yeşildal, R. [University of Ataturk, Erzurum (Turkmenistan); Mostafapour, A.; Rezazade, V. [University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, the effect of heat treatment and number of passes on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir processed AZ91C magnesium alloy samples were investigated. From six samples of as-cast AZ91C magnesium alloy, three plates were pre-heated at temperature of 375°C for 3 hours, and then were treated at temperature of 415°C for 18 hours and finally were cooled down in air. Three plates were relinquished without heat treatment. 8 mm thick as-cast AZ91C magnesium alloy plates were friction stir processed at constant traverse speed of 40 mm/min and tool rotation speed of 1250 rpm. After process, microstructural characterization of samples was analyzed using optical microscopy and tensile and Vickers hardness tests were performed. It was found that heat treated samples had finer grains, higher hardness, improved tensile strength and elongation relative to non-heat treated ones. As the number of passes increased, higher UTS and TE were achieved due to finer grains and more dissolution of β phase (Mg17Al12). The micro-hardness characteristics and tensile improvement of the friction stir processed samples depend significantly on grain size, removal of voids and porosities and dissolution of β phase in the stir zone.

  16. Friction dampers, the positive side of friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Arteaga, I.; Nijmeijer, H.; Busturia, J.M.; Sas, P.; Munck, de M.

    2004-01-01

    Friction is frequently seen as an unwanted phenomenon whose influence has to be either minimised or controlled. In this work one of the positive sides of friction is investigated: friction damping. Friction dampers can be a cheap and efficient way to reduce the vibration levels of a wide range of

  17. Friction measurement and modelling in forward rod extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai; Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2003-01-01

    Forward extrusion is one of the important processes in bulk metal forming. Friction stress can be estimated from the slope of the load±displacement curve at the steady state after the maximum load in a forward extrusion test. In this paper, forward rod extrusion tests are carried out to determine...... as the lubricant. Friction stresses are obtained from measurements of slopes of extrusion pressure±punch travel curves at the steady state stage. Normal pressures are evaluated by using Mohr’s circle, in which shear ¯ow stresses are estimated at the maximum elastic deformation points from the same extrusion...... pressure±punch travel curves. It is found that the relationship between normal pressure and friction stress appears linear, and therefore Coulomb’s friction model ®ts the experimental data very well. Extrusion pressure±punch travel curves before the steady state can be divided into four stages: elastic...

  18. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly

  19. Process Approach to Determining Quality Inspection Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-08

    27 B.1 The Deming Rule...k1/k2? [5] At this stage it is assumed that the manufacturing process is capable and that inspection is effective. The Deming rule is explained in...justify reducing inspectors. (See Appendix B for Deming rule discussion.) Three quantities must be determined: p, the probability of a nonconformity

  20. Fabrication and characterization of functionally graded Al–SiC nanocomposite by using a novel multistep friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, Mojtaba; Farnoush, Hamidreza; Mohandesi, Jamshid Aghazadeh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel multistep FSP to fabricate functionally-graded bulk nanocomposites. • The composition of FG sample was changed from 18 to 0 wt% SiC along five layers. • The 3.2 times higher hardness than the base metal in FG sample along the thickness. • The 15% enhancement in hardness of FG sample with respect to homogenous sample. • Microhardness and inverse of interparticle spacing was correlated linearly. - Abstract: Functionally graded materials are one of the most promising candidates among advanced materials. However, some challenges still exist in its fabrication methods. The current study aims to produce functionally-graded bulk Al–SiC nanocomposites by a novel multistep friction stir processing (FSP) for the first time. The SiC nanoparticles were packed into a groove on the 6061 aluminum plate and FSP was performed by using a tool with pin length of 6 mm. Subsequently, FSP was reapplied on another groove by using a tool with a shorter pin length of 3.2 mm. The desirable distribution of SiC nanoparticles in the matrix was confirmed by scanning electron and atomic force microscopes. The composition of graded sample was changed continuously from 18 to 0 wt% SiC along the thickness. Accordingly, the microhardness profile showed a maximum of 160 Hv in the enriched zone which is 3.2 times higher than the hardness of the particle-depleted zone. However, a constant hardness value of 135 Hv was obtained along the thickness of homogenous sample which is 15% lower than that of superficial layer in graded sample. Moreover, the hardness values were linearly correlated with the inverse of interparticle spacing

  1. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Espinosa Franco1, Marina Altagracia Martínez2, Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez1, Albert I Wertheimer31Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM, Mexico; 2Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Xochimilco, Mexico; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USABackground: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community.Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem.Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded.Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance.Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.Keywords: antibiotic drug resistance

  2. A model to describe the surface gradient-nanograin formation and property of friction stir processed laser Co-Cr-Ni-Mo alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruidi; Yuan, Tiechui; Qiu, Zili

    2014-07-01

    A gradient-nanograin surface layer of Co-base alloy was prepared by friction stir processing (FSP) of laser-clad coating in this work. However, it is lack of a quantitatively function relationship between grain refinement and FSP conditions. Based on this, an analytic model is derived for the correlations between carbide size, hardness and rotary speed, layer depth during in-situ FSP of laser-clad Co-Cr-Ni-Mo alloy. The model is based on the principle of typical plastic flow in friction welding and dynamic recrystallization. The FSP experiment for modification of laser-clad Co-based alloy was conducted and its gradient nanograin and hardness were characterized. It shows that the model is consistent with experimental results.

  3. Theoretical Analysis of Unit Friction Force Working on the Metal Contact Surface with the Roll Change during Feedstock with Non-Uniform Temperature Distribution Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sygut P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of theoretical studies influence of non-uniform temperature distribution along the feedstock length to the unit friction force working on the metal contact surface with the roll change during the round bars 70 mm in diameter continuous rolling process. This value is one of the major factors affecting the grooves wear during the rolling process. The studies were carried out based on the actual engineering data for 160 × 160 mm square cross-section feedstock of steel S355J0. Numerical modelling of the rolling process was performed using Forge2008®, a finite-element based computer program.

  4. Frictional Heating with Time-Dependent Specific Power of Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topczewska Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper analytical solutions of the thermal problems of friction were received. The appropriate boundary-value problems of heat conduction were formulated and solved for a homogeneous semi–space (a brake disc heated on its free surface by frictional heat fluxes with different and time-dependent intensities. Solutions were obtained in dimensionless form using Duhamel's theorem. Based on received solutions, evolution and spatial distribution of the dimensionless temperature were analyzed using numerical methods. The numerical results allowed to determine influence of the time distribution of friction power on the spatio-temporal temperature distribution in brake disc.

  5. Numerical optimisation of friction stir welding: review of future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, the combination of increasingly more advanced numerical simulation software with high computational power has resulted in models for friction stir welding (FSW), which have improved the understanding of the determining physical phenomena behind the process substantially....... This has made optimisation of certain process parameters possible and has in turn led to better performing friction stir welded products, thus contributing to a general increase in the popularity of the process and its applications. However, most of these optimisation studies do not go well beyond manual...

  6. Process and apparatus for determining molecular spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesl, U.; Neusser, H.J.; Schlag, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    A process for determining molecular spectra in unseparated mixtures, in particular unseparated isotopic mixtures, which comprises allowing said mixture to successively flow through a photoreactor which is irradiated by an adjustable-wavelength laser and then through a mass spectrometer wherein the concentration of particles of specified mass is determined by variation of the wavelength of the laser or variation of the mass setting of the mass spectrometer in such a manner that a two-dimensional spectrum results having the parameters of wavelength and mass

  7. Optimization of friction stir welding process parameters to maximize tensile strength of stir cast AA6061-T6/AlNp composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashok Kumar, B.; Murugan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • AA6061/AlN p cast composite was welded by FSW process. • Regression models were developed to predict UTS and elongation of the FS welded joint. • FS welded joint using the optimized parameters exhibited maximum UTS and joint efficiency. • Defect free weld joint was obtained with optimized parameters value. - Abstract: Aluminium Matrix Composites (AMCs) reinforced with particulate form of reinforcement has replaced monolithic alloys in many engineering industries due to its superior mechanical properties and tailorable thermal and electrical properties. As aluminium nitride (AlN) has high specific strength, high thermal conductivity, high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant, low coefficient of thermal expansion and good compatibility with aluminium alloy, Al/AlN composite is extensively used in electronic packaging industries. Joining of AMCs is unavoidable in many engineering applications. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is one of the most suitable welding process to weld the AMCs reinforced with particulate form of ceramics without deteriorating its superior mechanical properties. An attempt has been made to develop regression models to predict the Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) and Percent Elongation (PE) of the friction stir welded AA6061 matrix composite reinforced with aluminium nitride particles (AlN p ) by correlating the significant parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force and percentage of AlN p reinforcement in the AA6061 matrix. Statistical software SYSTAT 12 and statistical tools such as analysis of variance (ANOVA) and student’s t test, have been used to validate the developed models. It was observed from the investigation that these factors independently influenced the UTS and PE of the friction stir welded composite joints. The developed regression models were optimized to maximize UTS of friction stir welded AA6061/AlN p composite joints

  8. Pressure and Friction Injuries in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shawn; Seiverling, Elizabeth; Silvis, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Pressure and friction injuries are common throughout the lifespan. A detailed history of the onset and progression of friction and pressure injuries is key to aiding clinicians in determining the underlying mechanism behind the development of the injury. Modifying or removing the forces that are creating pressure or friction is the key to both prevention and healing of these injuries. Proper care of pressure and friction injuries to the skin is important to prevent the development of infection. Patient education on positioning and ergonomics can help to prevent recurrence of pressure and friction injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interaction processes governing friction between tyre and road; Wechselwirkungen im Prozess der Reibung zwischen Reifen und Fahrbahn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, T.

    1998-12-31

    Friction between tyre and road is influenced by tyre and road parameters as well as, in some instances, by water or snow/ice. The dissertation investigates the interdependences between these influencing parameters. Experimental investigations on friction-slip curves of modern car tyres on real roads provide deeper knowledge on power transfer mechanisms. Apart from the contact conditions, also the viscoelastic properties of tyre materials with silica gel as filler material were investigated, with particular emphasis on the velocity dependence of the friction coefficient. The findings are presented in the form of velocity/slip characteristic fields of the friction coefficient measured on different surface types and are interpreted on the basis of the rubber friction theory. The interdisciplinary character of the investigations makes the dissertation interesting for experts in car engineering, roadway construction and tyre research and development. [Deutsch] Der Kraftschluss zwischen Reifen und Fahrbahn wird durch Einflussgroessen bestimmt, die sich dem Reifen und der Fahrbahn, eventuell vorhandenem Wasser oder Schnee/Eis zuordnen lassen. Zwischen diesen sich ueberlagernden Einflussgroessen gibt es eine Vielzahl von Wechselwirkungen, die in dieser Dissertation analysiert werden. Die experimentelle Untersuchung der Reibwert-Schlupf-Kurven moderner Pkw-Reifen auf realen Fahrbahnen erweitert das Verstaendnis fuer die Kraftuebertragungsmechanismen. Neben einer Betrachtung der Kontaktverhaeltnisse werden visko-elastische Eigenschaften von Reifenmischungen auch mit dem Fuellstoff Kieselsaeure untersucht. Vor allem die Geschwindigkeitsabhaengigkeit des Reibwertes wird behandelt. Als Ergebnis werden die Wechselwirkungen in Form von auf verschiedenen Oberflaechen gemessenen Geschwindigkeits-Schlupf-Kennfeldern des Reibwerts beschrieben und mit der Gummireibungstheorie interpretiert. Die Arbeit wendet sich wegen des interdisziplinaeren Charakters des Themas an Angehoerige der

  10. Evaluation of existing EPRI and INEL test data to determine the worm to worm gear coefficient of friction in Limitorque actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza, I.A.

    1996-12-01

    About the last sizing parameter for motor operated valves which has not been determined by utility or NRC sponsored testing is actuator efficiency. A by-product of EPRI testing for valve factors is the measurement of the actuator efficiencies. Motor sizing in this testing provides efficiency testing for motors running near synchronous speed. INEL testing, sponsored by the NRC, for stem factors and rate of loading provides complimentary data for motors loaded down to zero speed. This paper analyzes the data from these two test programs to determine the coefficient of friction for the worm to worm gear interface. This allowed the development of an algorithm for determining the efficiency of actuators which have not been tested. This paper compares the results of this algorithm to the test data to provide a measure of the accuracy of this method for calculating actuator efficiency.

  11. Evaluation of existing EPRI and INEL test data to determine the worm to worm gear coefficient of friction in Limitorque actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garza, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    About the last sizing parameter for motor operated valves which has not been determined by utility or NRC sponsored testing is actuator efficiency. A by-product of EPRI testing for valve factors is the measurement of the actuator efficiencies. Motor sizing in this testing provides efficiency testing for motors running near synchronous speed. INEL testing, sponsored by the NRC, for stem factors and rate of loading provides complimentary data for motors loaded down to zero speed. This paper analyzes the data from these two test programs to determine the coefficient of friction for the worm to worm gear interface. This allowed the development of an algorithm for determining the efficiency of actuators which have not been tested. This paper compares the results of this algorithm to the test data to provide a measure of the accuracy of this method for calculating actuator efficiency

  12. Vacuum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Sonnleitner, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    We know that in empty space there is no preferred state of rest. This is true both in special relativity but also in Newtonian mechanics with its associated Galilean relativity. It comes as something of a surprise, therefore, to discover the existence a friction force associated with spontaneous emission. The resolution of this paradox relies on a central idea from special relativity even though our derivation of it is non-relativistic. We examine the possibility that the physics underlying this effect might be explored in an ion trap, via the observation of a superposition of different mass states.

  13. Rubber friction and force transmission during the shearing process of actively-driven vacuum grippers on rough surfaces; Elastomerreibung und Kraftuebertragung beim Abscheren von aktiv betriebenen Vakuumgreifern auf rauen Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, Patrick

    2016-12-21

    Nowadays, vacuum grippers come in many different shapes and sizes. Their stability is guaranteed through specially manufactured metal fittings. These fittings are non-positively and positively connected to the elastic part of the vacuum gripper. The design of the elastic part may vary, though. Elastomer components are used to ensure tightness for the negative pressure in the active cave chamber of the vacuum gripper, as well as for the transfer of shearing forces, which acting parallel to the surface. Some vacuum grippers feature one elastomer for both the sealing function and the transfer of shear forces; other gripper types are equipped with various elastomers for those applications. The vacuum grippers described in this work are equipped with structured rubber friction pads, their tightness being ensured by sealing lips made of a flexible foam rubber. A restraint system consisting of one or several vacuum grippers must be sized prior to its actual practical use. For the transmission of shearing forces, which acting parallel to the surface, it is necessary to take the tribological system, consisting of the suction element's elastomer and the base material, into account since these loads put shearing stress on the vacuum gripper. In practice, however, a standardized value is given for the coefficient of friction μ; i.e. the ratio of transmissible frictional force to the normal force. This does neither include a detailed description of the elastomer used nor of the roughness of the base material. The standardized friction coefficients cannot be applied to the practical design of restraint systems. The present work includes the analysis of the load transmission and the modeling of the friction coefficients μ on rough surfaces during the shearing process of actively-driven vacuum grippers. Based on current theories, the phenomenon of elastomeric friction can be attributed to the two main components of hysteresis and adhesion friction. Both components are

  14. Two new methods to determine the adhesion by means of internal friction in materials covered with films; Dos nuevos metodos para determinar la adhesion mediante friccion interna en materiales recubiertos con peliculas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colorado, H. A.; Ghilarducci, A. A.; Salva, H. R.

    2006-07-01

    Two new models are proposed to determine the adhesion energy be means of the internal friction technique (IF) in thin films layered materials. for the first method is necessary to determine enthalpy by means of the IF technique, for which the adhesion work has been determined with experimental data. In the second method are necessary to perform IF tests at constant temperature. (Author)

  15. Frictional strength and heat flow of southern San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Frictional strength and heat flow of faults are two related subjects in geophysics and seismology. To date, the investigation on regional frictional strength and heat flow still stays at the stage of qualitative estimation. This paper is concentrated on the regional frictional strength and heat flow of the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF). Based on the in situ borehole measured stress data, using the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional normal stress, shear stress, and friction coefficient at various seismogenic depths. These new data indicate that the southern SAF is a weak fault within the depth of 15 km. As depth increases, all the regional normal and shear stresses and friction coefficient increase. The former two increase faster than the latter. Regional shear stress increment per kilometer equals 5.75 ± 0.05 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km; regional normal stress increment per kilometer is equal to 25.3 ± 0.1 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km. As depth increases, regional friction coefficient increment per kilometer decreases rapidly from 0.08 to 0.01/km at depths less than ~3 km. As depth increases from ~3 to ~5 km, it is 0.01/km and then from ~5 to 15 km, and it is 0.002/km. Previously, frictional strength could be qualitatively determined by heat flow measurements. It is difficult to obtain the quantitative heat flow data for the SAF because the measured heat flow data exhibit large scatter. However, our quantitative results of frictional strength can be employed to investigate the heat flow in the southern SAF. We use a physical quantity P f to describe heat flow. It represents the dissipative friction heat power per unit area generated by the relative motion of two tectonic plates accommodated by off-fault deformation. P f is called "fault friction heat." On the basis of our determined frictional strength data, utilizing the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional long-term fault

  16. Internal rotor friction instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  17. Frictional performance of ball screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Katuhiro; Takafuji, Kazuki

    1985-01-01

    As feed screws, ball screws have become to be adopted in place of trapezoidal threads. The structure of ball screws is complex, but those are the indispensable component of NC machine tools and machining centers, and are frequently used for industrial robots. As the problems in the operation of ball screws, there are damage, life and the performance related to friction. As to the damage and life, though there is the problem of the load distribution on balls, the results of the research on rolling bearings are applied. The friction of ball screws consists of the friction of balls and a spiral groove, the friction of a ball and a ball, the friction in a ball-circulating mechanism and the viscous friction of lubricating oil. It was decided to synthetically examine the frictional performance of ball screws, such as driving torque, the variation of driving torque, efficiency, the formation of oil film and so on, under the working condition of wide range, using the screws with different accuracy and the nuts of various circuit number. The experimental setup and the processing of the experimental data, the driving performance of ball screws and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. Estimating the workpiece-backingplate heat transfer coefficient in friction stirwelding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders; Stolpe, Mathias; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of the heat transfer coefficient between the workpiece and the backingplate in a friction stir welding process using inverse modelling. Design/methodology/approach - The magnitude and distribution of the heat...... in an inverse modeling approach to determine the heat transfer coefficient in friction stir welding. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited....

  19. Determination of hydroxylamine in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertel, D.; Weindel, P.

    1984-05-01

    In PUREX process solutions hydroxylamine or HAN (hydrolammonium nitrate) respectively, can be oxidized specifically to give nitrous acid, HNO 2 , which by sybsequent GRIESS reaction forms the well-known reddish azo-dye. Its absorbance is spectrophotometrically measured at 520 nm and results in linear calibration graphs covering the analytical range of 10 -5 to 10 -6 M NH 2 OH. The influence of other reductants (N 2 H 4 , Pu-III) as well as of further PUREX main constituents like U-VI, HNO 3 etc. was checked-up and determined quantitatively. There are no analytical limitations in case of HAN concentrations > 10 -2 M. (orig.) [de

  20. On high temperature internal friction in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotukhin, I.V.; Kalinin, Yu.E.; Roshchupkin, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    High temperature background of internal friction in amorphous lanthanum-aluminium alloys was investigated. More rapid growth of internal friction was observed at temperature ∼ 453 K reaching maximal value at 495 K. Crystallization process was accompanied by decrease of internal friction. Increase of mechanical vibration frequency to 1000 Hz leads to rise of internal friction background in the range of room temperatures and to decrease at temperatures above 370 K. Bend was observed on temperature dependence of internal friction at 440 K

  1. The role of friction in tow mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Friction plays and important role in the processing of fibrous materials: during production of tow materials, during textile manufacturing and during preforming operations for composite moulding processes. One of the poorly understood phenomena in these processes is the dynamic frictional behaviour

  2. Finite Element Analysis of the Amontons-Coulomb's Model using Local and Global Friction Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Menezes, L. F.; Ramalho, A.; Alves, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the abundant number of experimental friction tests that have been reported, the contact with friction modeling persists to be one of the factors that determine the effectiveness of sheet metal forming simulation. This difficulty can be understood due to the nature of the friction phenomena, which comprises the interaction of different factors connected to both sheet and tools' surfaces. Although in finite element numerical simulations friction models are commonly applied at the local level, they normally rely on parameters identified based on global experimental tests results. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the Amontons-Coulomb's friction coefficient identified using complementary tests: (i) load-scanning, at the local level and (ii) draw-bead, at the global level; to the numerical simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

  3. On Parameters Affecting Metal Flow and Friction in the Double Cup Extrusion Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai; Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    1998-01-01

    in numerical simulations often involve strain hardening because friction is expressed as a function of the flow stress or the flow shear stress. The double cup extrusion test is considered to be one of the process tests for determination of friction. In this test, varying heights of the upper and lower cups...... model with constant absolute value excluding the influence of strain hardening on friction was adopted in FEM simulations, in order to more clearly study the individual influence of strain hardening and friction on the metal flow (upper and lower cup height ratio) without interference between the two...... parameters. The predicted results show a good agreement with the experimental data. The influence of material strain hardening. friction and tool geometry on the metal flow in the test has been investigated. By comparisons of the cup height ratio as a function of the punch travel estimated by experiments...

  4. Comparisons of friction models in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    A friction model is one of the key input boundary conditions in finite element simulations. It is said that the friction model plays an important role in controlling the accuracy of necessary output results predicted. Among the various friction models, which one is of higher accuracy is still...... unknown and controversial. In this paper, finite element analyses applying five different friction models to experiments of upsetting of AA 6082 lubricated with four lubricants are presented. Frictional parameter values are determined by fitness of data of friction area ratio from finite element analysis...... to experimental results. It is found that calibration curves of the friction area ratio for all of the five chosen friction models used in the finite element simulation do fit the experimental results. Usually, calbration curves of the friction area ratio are more sensitive to friction at the tool...

  5. Dynamic Behavior of a Friction Pendulum with Elastomeric Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert-Rainer Gillich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient dynamic characteristics of a friction pendulum can be determined using experimental ways. Nowadays, numerical simulation techniques allow obtaining these characteristics using mathematical models. The express advantage is represented by almost unlimited possibilities to extract and quantified in the regime of "post processing" regarding the results. In terms of efficiency this means increased performance regarding the research and product development.

  6. α″ Martensite and Amorphous Phase Transformation Mechanism in TiNbTaZr Alloy Incorporated with TiO2 Particles During Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Ruoshi; Liu, Yiwei; Wang, Liqiang; Lu, Eryi; Xie, Lechun; Lu, Weijie; Wang, Kuaishe; Zhang, Lai-Chang

    2018-06-01

    This work studied the formation of the α″ martensite and amorphous phases of TiNbTaZr alloy incorporated with TiO2 particles during friction stir processing. Formation of the amorphous phase in the top surface mainly results from the dissolution of oxygen, rearrangement of the lattice structure, and dislocations. High-stress stemming caused by dislocations and high-stress concentrations at crystal-amorphous interfaces promote the formation of α″ martensite. Meanwhile, an α″ martensitic transformation is hindered by oxygen diffusion from TiO2 to the matrix, thereby increasing resistance to shear.

  7. The effect of texture and grain size on improving the mechanical properties of Mg-Al-Zn alloys by friction stir processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinhua; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Zhao; Li, Yaozu; Guo, Peng; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Yucheng

    2018-03-08

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was used to achieve grain refinement on Mg-Al-Zn alloys, which also brought in significant texture modification. The different micro-texture characteristics were found to cause irregular micro-hardness distribution in FSPed region. The effects of texture and grain size were investigated by comparative analyses with strongly textured rolling sheet. Grain refinement improved both strength and elongation in condition of a basal texture while such led to an increment in yield stress and a drop in elongation and ultimate stress when the basal texture was modified by FSP.

  8. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  9. [Study on friction and wear properties of dental zirconia ceramics processed by microwave and conventional sintering methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoxin, Hu; Ying, Yang; Yuemei, Jiang; Wenjing, Xia

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the wear of an antagonist and friction and wear properties of dental zirconia ceramic that was subjected to microwave and conventional sintering methods. Ten specimens were fabricated from Lava brand zirconia and randomly assigned to microwave and conventional sintering groups. A profile tester for surface roughness was used to measure roughness of the specimens. Wear test was performed, and steatite ceramic was used as antagonist. Friction coefficient curves were recorded, and wear volume were calculated. Finally, optical microscope was used to observe the surface morphology of zirconia and steatite ceramics. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the microstructure of zirconia. Wear volumes of microwave and conventionally sintered zirconia were (6.940±1.382)×10⁻², (7.952±1.815) ×10⁻² mm³, respectively. Moreover, wear volumes of antagonist after sintering by the considered methods were (14.189±4.745)×10⁻², (15.813±3.481)×10⁻² mm³, correspondingly. Statistically significant difference was not observed in the wear resistance of zirconia and wear volume of steatite ceramic upon exposure to two kinds of sintering methods. Optical microscopy showed that ploughed surfaces were apparent in zirconia. The wear surface of steatite ceramic against had craze, accompanied by plough. Scanning electron microscopy showed that zirconia was sintered compactly when subjected to both conventional sintering and microwave methods, whereas grains of zirconia sintered by microwave alone were smaller and more uniform. Two kinds of sintering methods are successfully used to produce dental zirconia ceramics with similar friction and wear properties.
.

  10. A Physics-Based Rock Friction Constitutive Law: Steady State Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonov, Einat; Scholz, Christopher H.

    2018-02-01

    Experiments measuring friction over a wide range of sliding velocities find that the value of the friction coefficient varies widely: friction is high and behaves according to the rate and state constitutive law during slow sliding, yet markedly weakens as the sliding velocity approaches seismic slip speeds. We introduce a physics-based theory to explain this behavior. Using conventional microphysics of creep, we calculate the velocity and temperature dependence of contact stresses during sliding, including the thermal effects of shear heating. Contacts are assumed to reach a coupled thermal and mechanical steady state, and friction is calculated for steady sliding. Results from theory provide good quantitative agreement with reported experimental results for quartz and granite friction over 11 orders of magnitude in velocity. The new model elucidates the physics of friction and predicts the connection between friction laws to independently determined material parameters. It predicts four frictional regimes as function of slip rate: at slow velocity friction is either velocity strengthening or weakening, depending on material parameters, and follows the rate and state friction law. Differences between surface and volume activation energies are the main control on velocity dependence. At intermediate velocity, for some material parameters, a distinct velocity strengthening regime emerges. At fast sliding, shear heating produces thermal softening of friction. At the fastest sliding, melting causes further weakening. This theory, with its four frictional regimes, fits well previously published experimental results under low temperature and normal stress.

  11. Noise and vibration in friction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sergienko, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The book analyzes the basic problems of oscillation processes and theoretical aspects of noise and vibration in friction systems. It presents generalized information available in literature data and results of the authors in vibroacoustics of friction joints, including car brakes and transmissions. The authors consider the main approaches to abatement of noise and vibration in non-stationary friction processes. Special attention is paid to materials science aspects, in particular to advanced composite materials used to improve the vibroacoustic characteristics of tribopairs The book is intended for researchers and technicians, students and post-graduates specializing in mechanical engineering, maintenance of machines and transport means, production certification, problems of friction and vibroacoustics.

  12. Acoustics of friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  13. Research on measurement and modeling of the gastro intestine's frictional characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kun Dong; Yan, Guo Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The frictional characteristics of an intestine are required basically for the development of a noninvasive endoscope for the human intestine. The frictional force is tested by measuring the current of the motor hauling the frictional coupons at an even speed. A multifunction data acquisition device with model NI-6008 USB is used and the data process is performed on the Labview software. Two kinds of materials with aluminum and copper are used. The surfaces are designed as triangle, rectangular, cylindrical and plane forms. The tested results indicate that the frictional resistance force includes the nominal frictional force and the visco-adhesive force. When the surface contour changes from the triangle to the rectangular, to the cylindrical and finally to the plane, the nominal frictional coefficients will decrease and the visco-adhesive force will increase. The nominal frictional force is related to the elastic restoring force, the real frictional force and the contact angle. The cohesive force is determined by the contact area and the contact angle. This research will provide some preliminary references to the design and the parameter selection of locomotion devices in the human gastro-intestine

  14. Enhancing Corrosion and Wear Resistance of AA6061 by Friction Stir Processing with Fe78Si₉B13 Glass Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lingyu; Liu, Yan; Shen, Kechang; Song, Chaoqun; Yang, Min; Kim, Kibuem; Wang, Weimin

    2015-08-07

    The AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy samples including annealed Fe 78 Si₉B 13 particles were prepared by friction stir processing (FSP) and investigated by various techniques. The Fe 78 Si₉B 13 -reinforced particles are uniformly dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix. The XRD results indicated that the lattice parameter of α-Al increases and the preferred orientation factors F of (200) plane of α-Al reduces after friction stir processing. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) for FSP samples increases at first with the temperature but then decreases as the temperature further increased, which can be explained by the dissolving of Mg and Si from β phase and Fe 78 Si₉B 13 particles. The corrosion and wear resistance of FSP samples have been improved compared with that of base metal, which can be attributed to the reduction of grain size and the CTE mismatch between the base metal and reinforced particles by FSP, and the lubrication effect of Fe 78 Si₉B 13 particles also plays a role in improving wear resistance. In particular, the FSP sample with reinforced particles in amorphous state exhibited superior corrosion and wear resistance due to the unique metastable structure.

  15. Enhancing Corrosion and Wear Resistance of AA6061 by Friction Stir Processing with Fe78Si9B13 Glass Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Guo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy samples including annealed Fe78Si9B13 particles were prepared by friction stir processing (FSP and investigated by various techniques. The Fe78Si9B13-reinforced particles are uniformly dispersed in the aluminum alloy matrix. The XRD results indicated that the lattice parameter of α-Al increases and the preferred orientation factors F of (200 plane of α-Al reduces after friction stir processing. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE for FSP samples increases at first with the temperature but then decreases as the temperature further increased, which can be explained by the dissolving of Mg and Si from β phase and Fe78Si9B13 particles. The corrosion and wear resistance of FSP samples have been improved compared with that of base metal, which can be attributed to the reduction of grain size and the CTE mismatch between the base metal and reinforced particles by FSP, and the lubrication effect of Fe78Si9B13 particles also plays a role in improving wear resistance. In particular, the FSP sample with reinforced particles in amorphous state exhibited superior corrosion and wear resistance due to the unique metastable structure.

  16. Effects of alumina nanoparticles on the microstructure, strength and wear resistance of poly(methyl methacrylate)-based nanocomposites prepared by friction stir processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajani Derazkola, Hamed; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2018-03-01

    In this study, alumina-reinforced poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposites (PMMA/Al 2 O 3 ) containing up to 20vol% nanoparticles with an average diameter of 50nm were prepared by friction stir processing. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction on the microstructural features and mechanical properties of PMMA were studied. It is shown that by using a frustum pin tool and employing an appropriate processing condition, i.e. a rotational speed of 1600rpm/min and transverse velocity of 120mm/min, defect free nanocomposites at microscale with fine distribution of the nanoparticles can successfully been prepared. Mechanical evaluations including tensile, flexural, hardness and impact tests indicate that the strength and toughness of the material gradually increases with the nanoparticle concentration and reach to a flexural strength of 129MPa, hardness of 101 Shore D, and impact energy 2kJ/m 2 for the nanocomposite containing 20vol% alumina. These values are about 10% and 20% better than untreated and FSP-treated PMMA (without alumina addition). Fractographic studies indicate typical brittle features with crack deflection around the nanoparticles. More interestingly, the sliding wear rate in a pin-on-disk configuration and the friction coefficient are reduced up to 50% by addition of alumina nanoparticles. The worn surfaces exhibit typical sliding and ploughing features. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Laser cladding assisted by friction stir processing for preparation of deformed crack-free Ni-Cr-Fe coating with nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Siyao; Li, Ruidi; Yuan, Tiechui; Chen, Chao; Zhou, Kechao; Song, Bo; Shi, Yusheng

    2018-02-01

    Although laser cladding has find its widespread application in surface hardening, this technology has been significantly limited by the solidification crack, which usually initiates along grain boundary due to the brittle precipitation in grain boundary and networks formation during the laser rapid melting/solidification process. This paper proposed a novel laser cladding technology assisted by friction stir processing (FSP) to eliminate the usual metallurgical defects by the thermomechanical coupling effect of FSP with the Ni-Cr-Fe as representative coating material. By the FSP assisted laser cladding, the crack in laser cladding Ni-Cr-Fe coating was eliminated and the coarse networks of laser cladding coating was transformed into dispersed nanoparticles. Moreover, the plastic layers with thicknesses 47-140 μm can be observed, with gradient grain refinement from substrate to the top surface in which grain size reached 300 nm and laser photocoagulation net second phase crushed in the layer. In addition, cracks closed in the plastic zone. The refinement of grain resulted the hardness increased to over 400 HV, much higher than the 300 HV of the laser cladding structure. After FSP, the friction coefficient decreased from 0.6167 to 0.5645 which promoted the wear resistance.

  18. The effect of friction in coulombian damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahad, H. S.; Tudor, A.; Vlase, M.; Cerbu, N.; Subhi, K. A.

    2017-02-01

    The study aimed to analyze the damping phenomenon in a system with variable friction, Stribeck type. Shock absorbers with limit and dry friction, is called coulombian shock-absorbers. The physical damping vibration phenomenon, in equipment, is based on friction between the cushioning gasket and the output regulator of the shock-absorber. Friction between them can be dry, limit, mixture or fluid. The friction is depending on the contact pressure and lubricant presence. It is defined dimensionless form for the Striebeck curve (µ friction coefficient - sliding speed v). The friction may damp a vibratory movement or can maintain it (self-vibration), depending on the µ with v (it can increase / decrease or it can be relative constant). The solutions of differential equation of movement are obtained for some work condition of one damper for automatic washing machine. The friction force can transfer partial or total energy or generates excitation energy in damper. The damping efficiency is defined and is determined analytical for the constant friction coefficient and for the parabolic friction coefficient.

  19. Kinetic Friction of Sport Fabrics on Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Nachbauer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available After falls, skiers or snowboarders often slide on the slope and may collide with obstacles. Thus, the skier’s friction on snow is an important factor to reduce incidence and severity of impact injuries. The purpose of this study was to measure snow friction of different fabrics of ski garments with respect to roughness, speed, and contact pressure. Three types of fabrics were investigated: a commercially available ski overall, a smooth downhill racing suit, and a dimpled downhill racing suit. Friction was measured for fabrics taped on a short ski using a linear tribometer. The fabrics’ roughness was determined by focus variation microscopy. Friction coefficients were between 0.19 and 0.48. Roughness, friction coefficient, and friction force were highest for the dimpled race suit. The friction force of the fabrics was higher for the higher contact pressure than for the lower one at all speeds. It was concluded that the main friction mechanism for the fabrics was dry friction. Only the fabric with the roughest surface showed friction coefficients, which were high enough to sufficiently decelerate a sliding skier on beginner and intermediate slopes.

  20. Nano-friction behavior of phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lichun; Liu, Bo; Srikanth, Narasimalu; Tian, Yu; Zhou, Kun

    2017-09-01

    Nano-friction of phosphorene plays a significant role in affecting the controllability and efficiency of applying strain engineering to tune its properties. So far, the friction behavior of phosphorene has not been studied. This work studies the friction of single-layer and bilayer phosphorene on an amorphous silicon substrate by sliding a rigid tip. For the single-layer phosphorene, it is found that its friction is highly anisotropic, i.e. the friction is larger along the armchair direction than that along the zigzag direction. Moreover, pre-strain of the phosphorene also exhibits anisotropic effects. The friction increases with the pre-strain along the zigzag direction, but decreases with that along the armchair direction. Furthermore, the strong adhesion between the phosphorene and its substrate increases the friction between the phosphorene and the tip. For bilayer phosphorene, its friction highly depends on its stacking mode, which determines the contact interface with a commensurate or incommensurate pattern. This friction behavior is quite unique and greatly differs from that of graphene and molybdenum disulfide. Detailed analysis reveals that this behavior results from the combination effect of the friction contact area, the potential-energy profile of phosphorene, and its unique elongation.

  1. Probing into frictional contact dynamics by ultrasound and electrical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changshan Jin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction arises in the interface of friction pair, and therefore, it is difficult to detect it. Ultrasonic means, as a NDT, is the correct alternative. This paper introduces a means of detecting dynamic contact and an interpretation of behaviors of dry friction. It has been determined that frictional surfaces have a specific property of dynamic response hardening (DRH. Dynamic response forces and oscillation arise during static–kinetic transition process. While the contact zone of sliding surfaces appears “hard” in motion, it appears “soft” at rest. Consequently, a separation of the surfaces occurs and the real area of contact is decreased as sliding velocity increases. This is the cause of F–v descent phenomenon. When the friction comes to a rest, the remaining process of DRH and micro-oscillation do not disappear instantaneously, instead they gradually return to their original static position. The contact area, therefore, is increased by rest period (F–T ascent characteristics. Based on analogies between a solid unit (η–m–k and an R-L-C circuit, the DRH is demonstrated by electrical simulations.

  2. Study Friction Distribution during the Cold Rolling of Material by Matroll Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahi, H.; Dehghani, K.

    2007-01-01

    Rolling process is one of the most important ways of metal forming. Since the results of this process are almost finished product, therefore controlling the parameters affecting this process is very important in order to have cold rolling products with high quality. Among the parameters knowing the coefficient of friction within the roll gap is known as the most significant one. That is because other rolling parameters such as rolling force, pressure in the roll gap, forward slip, surface quality of sheet, and the life of work rolls are directly influenced by friction. On the other hand, in rolling calculation due to lake of a true amount for coefficient of friction a supposed value is considered for it. In this study, a new software (Matroll), is introduced which can determine the coefficient of friction (COF) and plot the friction hills for an industrial mill. Besides, based on rolling equations, it offers about 30 rolling parameters as outputs. Having the rolling characteristics as inputs, the software is able to calculate the coefficient of friction. Many rolling passes were performed on real industrial aluminum mill. The coefficient of friction was obtained for all passes. The results are in good agreement with the findings of the other researchers

  3. Internal Friction Angle of Metal Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Zegzulka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal powders are components with multidisciplinary usage as their application is very broad. Their consistent characterization across all disciplines is important for ensuring repeatable and trouble-free processes. Ten metal powders were tested in the study. In all cases, the particle size distribution and morphology (scanning electron microscope—SEM photos were determined. The aim of this work was to inspect the flow behavior of metal powders through another measured characteristic, namely the angle of internal friction. The measured values of the effective internal friction angle in the range 28.6–32.9°, together with the spherical particle shape and the particle size distribution, revealed the likely dominant mode of the metal particle transfer mechanism for stainless steel 316L, zinc and aluminum powder. This third piston flow mechanism is described and illustrated in detail. The angle of internal friction is mentioned as another suitable parameter for the characterization of metal powders, not only for the relative simplicity of the determination but also for gaining insight into the method of the movement of individual particles during the flow.

  4. High temperature internal friction in pure aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboagye, J.K.; Payida, D.S.

    1982-05-01

    The temperature dependence of internal friction of nearly pure aluminium (99.99% aluminium) has been carefully measured as a function of annealing temperature and hence grain size. The results indicate that, provided the frequency and annealing temperature are held constant, the internal friction increases with temperature until some maximum value is attained and then begins to go down as the temperature is further increased. It is also noted that the internal friction decreases with annealing temperature and that annealing time has the same effect as annealing temperature. It is also noted that the internal friction peak is shifted towards higher temperatures as annealing temperature is increased. It is surmised that the grain size or the total grain boundary volume determines the height of the internal friction curve and that the order-disorder transitions at the grain boundaries induced by both entropy and energy gradients give rise to internal friction peaks in polycrystals. (author)

  5. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  6. CORROSION AND SURFACE PROTECTION IN MACHINE MATERIALS FRICTION HAVE DIFFERENT SURFACE PAIRS EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senai YALCINKAYA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Friction force, normal force, linear change. The normal force varies with the loads on the friction object. In order to determine the friction force and the friction coefficient, the friction object and the friction speed are used. The experimental work was carried out in three stages. In the first stage, the effect of normal force on the friction force was studied. In the second step, the friction force of the friction surface area is influenced. The effect of the change of the shear rate in step 3 on the friction force was investigated. At the last stage, the experimental study of the effect of the material selection on the friction force was made and it was seen that the aluminum / brass surface pair had the smallest friction coefficient as a result of the opening. The greatest coefficient of friction is found in the pair of glass / felt objects.

  7. Development of empirical relationships for prediction of mechanical and wear properties of AA6082 aluminum matrix composites produced using friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dinaharan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Processing (FSP has been established as a potential solid state production method to prepare aluminum matrix composites (AMCs. FSP was effectively applied to produce AA6082 AMCs reinforced with various ceramic particles such as SiC, Al2O3, TiC, B4C and WC in this work. Empirical relationships were estimated to predict the influence of FSP process parameters on the properties such as area of stir zone, microhardness and wear rate of AMCs. FSP experiments were executed using a central composite rotatable design consisting of four factors and five levels. The FSP parameters analyzed were tool rotational speed, traverse speed, groove width and type of ceramic particle. The effect of those parameters on the properties of AMCs was deduced using the developed empirical relationships. The predicted trends were explained with the aid of observed macro and microstructures.

  8. Microstructures and mechanical properties of Al/Al2O3 surface nano-composite layer produced by friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiei-Zarghani, A.; Kashani-Bozorg, S.F.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a new processing technique, friction stir processing (FSP) was attempted to incorporate nano-sized Al 2 O 3 into 6082 aluminum alloy to form particulate composite surface layer. Samples were subjected to various numbers of FSP passes from one to four, with and without Al 2 O 3 powder. Microstructural observations were carried out by employing optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the cross sections both parallel and perpendicular to the tool traverse direction. Mechanical properties include microhardness and wear resistance, were evaluated in detail. The results show that the increasing in number of FSP passes causes a more uniform in distribution of nano-sized alumina particles. The microhardness of the surface improves by three times as compared to that of the as-received Al alloy. A significant improvement in wear resistance in the nano-composite surfaced Al is observed as compared to the as-received Al

  9. Method for Friction Force Estimation on the Flank of Cutting Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Huerta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction forces are present in any machining process. These forces could play an important role in the dynamics of the system. In the cutting process, friction is mainly present in the rake face and the flank of the tool. Although the one that acts on the rake face has a major influence, the other one can become also important and could take part in the stability of the system. In this work, experimental identification of the friction on the flank is presented. The experimental determination was carried out by machining aluminum samples in a CNC lathe. As a result, two friction functions were obtained as a function of the cutting speed and the relative motion of the contact elements. Experiments using a worn and a new insert were carried out. Force and acceleration were recorded simultaneously and, from these results, different friction levels were observed depending on the cutting parameters, such as cutting speed, feed rate, and tool condition. Finally, a friction model for the flank friction is presented.

  10. Lateral position detection and control for friction stir systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul; Lammlein, David; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, Don Mitchell; Strauss, Alvin M.; Delapp, David; Hartman, Daniel A.

    2010-12-14

    A friction stir system for processing at least a first workpiece includes a spindle actuator coupled to a rotary tool comprising a rotating member for contacting and processing the first workpiece. A detection system is provided for obtaining information related to a lateral alignment of the rotating member. The detection system comprises at least one sensor for measuring a force experienced by the rotary tool or a parameter related to the force experienced by the rotary tool during processing, wherein the sensor provides sensor signals. A signal processing system is coupled to receive and analyze the sensor signals and determine a lateral alignment of the rotating member relative to a selected lateral position, a selected path, or a direction to decrease a lateral distance relative to the selected lateral position or selected path. In one embodiment, the friction stir system can be embodied as a closed loop tracking system, such as a robot-based tracked friction stir welding (FSW) or friction stir processing (FSP) system.

  11. Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum explains the friction stir welding process in terms of two basic concepts: the concentration of deformation in a shear surface enveloping the tool and the composition of the overall plastic flow field around the tool from simple flow field components. It is demonstrated how weld structure may be understood and torque, drag, and lateral tool forces may be estimated using these concepts. Some discrepancies between computations and accompanying empirical data are discussed in the text. This work is intended to be helpful to engineers in diagnosing problems and advancing technology.

  12. Benchmarking of direct and indirect friction tests in micro forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rasmus Solmer; Calaon, Matteo; Arentoft, M.

    2012-01-01

    The sizeable increase in metal forming friction at micro scale, due to the existence of size effects, constitutes a barrier to the realization of industrial micro forming processes. In the quest for improved frictional conditions in micro scale forming operations, friction tests are applied...... to qualify the tribological performance of the particular forming scenario. In this work the application of a simulative sliding friction test at micro scale is studied. The test setup makes it possible to measure the coefficient of friction as a function of the sliding motion. The results confirm a sizeable...... increase in the coefficient of friction when the work piece size is scaled down. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications....

  13. Effects of tempering on internal friction of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, J.J.; Ghilarducci, A.A.; Salva, H.R.; Chaves, C.A.; Velez, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Time tempering dependent microstructure of two steels is studied by internal friction. → Internal friction indicates the interactions of dislocations with carbon and carbides. → Internal friction detects the first stage of tempering. → Precipitation hardening is detected by the decrease in the background. - Abstract: Two steels containing 0.626 and 0.71 wt.% carbon have been studied to determine the effects of tempering on the microstructure and the internal friction. The steels were annealed at 1093 K, quenched into water and tempered for 60 min at 423 K, 573 K and 723 K. The increase of the tempering time diminishes the martensite tetragonality due to the redistribution of carbon atoms from octahedrical interstitial sites to dislocations. Internal friction spectrum is decomposed into five peaks and an exponential background, which are attributed to the carbide precipitation and the dislocation relaxation process. Simultaneous presence of peaks P1 and P2 indicates the interaction of dislocations with the segregated carbon and carbide precipitate.

  14. Effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanic properties of friction welded AISI 1040/Duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İhsan Kırık

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on the characteristic microstructure and mechanic properties of friction time on the couple steels AISI 1040/AISI 2205 stainless steel joining with friction welding method was experimentally investigated. Friction welding experiment were carried out in privately prepared PLC controlled continuous friction welding machine by us. Joints were carried out under 1700 rpm rotation speed, with 30MPa process friction pressure, 60MPa forging pressure, 4 second forging pressure and under 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 second friction time, respectively. After friction welding, the bonding interface microstructures of the specimens were examined by SEM microscopy and EDS analysis. After weld microhardness and tensile strength of specimens were carried out. The result of applied tests and observations pointed out that the properties of microstructure were changed with friction time increased. The excellent tensile strength of joint observed on 1700 rpm rotation speed and 3 second friction time sample.

  15. High speed friction microscopy and nanoscale friction coefficient mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosse, James L; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for friction coefficient mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true maps of the coefficient of friction can be uniquely calculated for heterogeneous surfaces. These parameters are determined at a scan velocity as fast as 2 mm s −1 for microfabricated SiO 2 mesas and Au coated pits, yielding results that are identical to traditional speed measurements despite being ∼1000 times faster. To demonstrate the upper limit of sliding velocity for the custom setup, the friction properties of mica are reported from 200 µm s −1 up to 2 cm s −1 . While FCM is applicable to any AFM and scanning speed, quantitative nanotribology investigations of heterogeneous sliding or rolling components are therefore uniquely possible, even at realistic velocities for devices such as MEMS, biological implants, or data storage systems. (paper)

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2006-05-29

    A comprehensive examination of theoretical models for the friction force, in use by the electron cooling community, was performed. Here, they present their insights about the models gained as a result of comparison between the friction force formulas and direct numerical simulations, as well as studies of the cooling process as a whole.

  17. Volatility Determination in an Ambit Process Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Graversen, Svend-Erik

    The probability limit behaviour of normalised quadratic variation is studied for a simple tempo-spatial ambit process, with particular regard to the question of volatility memorylessness.......The probability limit behaviour of normalised quadratic variation is studied for a simple tempo-spatial ambit process, with particular regard to the question of volatility memorylessness....

  18. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  19. A Simple Device For Measuring Skin Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A.B

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple device for measuring skin friction in vivo is described. The frictional coefficient of normal Indian skin and the effect of hydration and application of talc and glycerol on the frictional coefficient and also the friction of ichthyotic skin have been determined with its help. The average value of friction of friction of normal India skin at forearm is found to be 0.41 +- 0.08, the hydration raises the value to 0.71 +- 0.11 and the effect of glycerol is also to school it up to 0.70+- 0.05, almost equal to that of water. The effect of talc however is opposite and its application lowers the friction to 0.21+-0.07. The mean coeff of friction for ichthyotic skin is found to be 0.21+- 0.0.5, which closely agrees with talc-treated normal skin. A good positive correlation (p<0.01 between friction and sebum level at skin site, with r = 0.64, has been observed.

  20. Effects of processing parameters on the friction stir spot joining of Al5083-O aluminum alloy to DP590 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Back-Sub; Bang, Hee-Seon; Jeong, Su-Ok; Choi, Woo-Seong; Kwon, Yong-Hyuk; Bang, Han-Sur

    2017-05-01

    Two dissimilar materials, aluminum alloy Al5083-O and advanced high strength steel DP590, were successfully joined by using friction stir spot joining (FSSJ). Satisfactory joint strengths were obtained at a rotational speed of 300 rpm and a plunge depth of 0.7 mm. Resulting joints were welded without a non-welded zone. This may be attributed to the enhanced smooth material flow owing to sufficient stirring effect and tool down force between the upper Al5083-O side and the lower DP590 side. The maximum tensile shear strength was 6.5 kN, which was higher than the joint strength required by the conventional method of resistance spot welding. The main fracture mode was plug fracture in the tensile shear test of joints. An intermetallic compound (IMC) layer with material Al-Fe joints. Thus, the use of FSSJ to weld the dissimilar materials Al5083-O and DP590 resulted in mechanically and metallurgically sound joints.

  1. Metallurgical and Corrosion Characterization of POST Weld Heat Treated Duplex Stainless Steel (uns S31803) Joints by Friction Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif M., Mohammed; Shrikrishna, Kulkarni Anup; Sathiya, P.

    2016-02-01

    The present study focuses on the metallurgical and corrosion characterization of post weld heat treated duplex stainless steel joints. After friction welding, it was confirmed that there is an increase in ferrite content at weld interface due to dynamic recrystallization. This caused the weldments prone to pitting corrosion attack. Hence the post weld heat treatments were performed at three temperatures 1080∘C, 1150∘C and 1200∘C with 15min of aging time. This was followed by water and oil quenching. The volume fraction of ferrite to austenite ratio was balanced and highest pit nucleation resistance were achieved after PWHT at 1080∘C followed by water quench and at 1150∘C followed by oil quench. This had happened exactly at parameter set containing heating pressure (HP):40 heating time (HT):4 upsetting pressure (UP):80 upsetting time (UP):2 (experiment no. 5). Dual phase presence and absence of precipitates were conformed through TEM which follow Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. PREN of ferrite was decreasing with increase in temperature and that of austenite increased. The equilibrium temperature for water quenching was around 1100∘C and that for oil quenching was around 1140∘C. The pit depths were found to be in the range of 100nm and width of 1.5-2μm.

  2. Origins of Rolling Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2017-01-01

    When a hard object rolls on a soft surface, or vice versa, rolling friction arises from deformation of the soft object or the soft surface. The friction force can be described in terms of an offset in the normal reaction force or in terms of energy loss arising from the deformation. The origin of the friction force itself is not entirely clear. It…

  3. Environmental Determinants of Lexical Processing Effort

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Institute for Adaptive and Neural Computation A central concern of psycholinguistic research is explaining the relative ease or difficulty involved in processing words. In this thesis, we explore the connection between lexical processing effort and measurable properties of the linguistic environment. Distributional information (information about a word’s contexts of use) is easily extracted from large language corpora in the form of co-occurrence statistics. We claim that su...

  4. Enhanced mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint using two-pass friction stir processing with rapid cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Nan, E-mail: xunan@hhu.edu.cn; Bao, Yefeng

    2016-02-08

    In this study, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint was subjected to two-pass rapid cooling friction stir processing (RC-FSP). The main results show that, two-pass RC-FSP causes the significant dissolution of the coarse eutectic β-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase into the magnesium matrix and the remarkable grain refinement in the stir zone. The low-hardness region which frequently located at heat-affected zone was eliminated. The stir zone showed ultrafine grains of 3.1 μm, and exhibited a good combination of ultrahigh tensile strength of 284 MPa and large elongation of 7.1%. This work provides an effective strategy to enhance the strength of TIG welded magnesium alloy joint without ductility loss.

  5. Achieving excellent thermal stability and very high activation energy in an ultrafine-grained magnesium silver rare earth alloy prepared by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan MD, F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Panigrahi, S.K., E-mail: skpanigrahi@iitm.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2016-10-15

    Ultrafine-grained microstructure of a QE22 alloy prepared by Friction Stir processing (FSP) is isochronally annealed to study the thermal stability and grain growth kinetics. The FSPed microstructure of QE22 alloy is thermally stable under ultrafine-grained regime up to 300 °C and the activation energy required for grain growth is found to be exceptionally high as compared to conventional ultrafine-grained magnesium alloys. The high thermal stability and activation energy of the FSPed QE22 alloy is due to Zener pinning effect from thermally stable eutectic Mg{sub 12}Nd and fine precipitates Mg{sub 12}Nd{sub 2}Ag and solute drag effect from segregation of Neodymium (Nd) solute atoms at grain boundaries.

  6. Enhanced mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint using two-pass friction stir processing with rapid cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Nan; Bao, Yefeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint was subjected to two-pass rapid cooling friction stir processing (RC-FSP). The main results show that, two-pass RC-FSP causes the significant dissolution of the coarse eutectic β-Mg_1_7Al_1_2 phase into the magnesium matrix and the remarkable grain refinement in the stir zone. The low-hardness region which frequently located at heat-affected zone was eliminated. The stir zone showed ultrafine grains of 3.1 μm, and exhibited a good combination of ultrahigh tensile strength of 284 MPa and large elongation of 7.1%. This work provides an effective strategy to enhance the strength of TIG welded magnesium alloy joint without ductility loss.

  7. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-02-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not completely understood. We show that slow rupture is an intrinsic and robust property of simple non-monotonic rate-and-state friction laws. It is associated with a new velocity scale cmin, determined by the friction law, below which steady state rupture cannot propagate. We further show that rupture can occur in a continuum of states, spanning a wide range of velocities from cmin to elastic wave-speeds, and predict different properties for slow rupture and ordinary fast rupture. Our results are qualitatively consistent with recent high-resolution laboratory experiments and may provide a theoretical framework for understanding slow rupture phenomena along frictional interfaces.

  8. Determination of acrylamide concentration in processed food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, acrylamide concentration in processed food products have become a very serious health issue. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Scientific Committee for Food (SCF) of the European Union also confirmed this concern. In laboratory scale, it was found that acrylamide causes tumors in animals.

  9. Intraoral corrosion of self-ligating metallic brackets and archwires and the effect on friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tima, Lori Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the frictional coefficient was affected due to intraoral use. A secondary aim of this study was to determine whether or not there was a relationship between corrosion of orthodontic alloys and friction via scanning electron microscopic qualitative analysis. Orthodontic brackets and 0.019 x 0.025 inch stainless steel archwires were collected and divided into three groups of n=10: used bracket and used wires (UBUW), used brackets and new wires (UBNW), and new brackets and new wires (NBNW). New materials were as-received from the manufacturer, and used materials were clinically used bracket and wires collected from patients following orthodontic treatment. Archwires were pulled through bracket slots at a rate of 0.5mm/min while friction forces were measured. Following a cleaning process, the surface topography of the bracket slots was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on a 1-factor MANOVA, there was no significant group effect (all p>0.05) on frictional forces. Partial eta squared values indicated that intraoral exposure had only a small effect on frictional forces (≤ 3%). Qualitative analysis of SEM images did not show an association between surface characteristics of the bracket slots and magnitude of frictional force. Results suggest that surface corrosion from intraoral use does not significantly affect friction at the bracket wire interface.

  10. Influence of tool geometry and processing parameters on welding defects and mechanical properties for friction stir welding of 6061 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneji, A.; Ali, M.; Pervaiz, S.

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a form of solid state welding process for joining metals, alloys, and selective composites. Over the years, FSW development has provided an improved way of producing welding joints, and consequently got accepted in numerous industries such as aerospace, automotive, rail and marine etc. In FSW, the base metal properties control the material’s plastic flow under the influence of a rotating tool whereas, the process and tool parameters play a vital role in the quality of weld. In the current investigation, an array of square butt joints of 6061 Aluminum alloy was to be welded under varying FSW process and tool geometry related parameters, after which the resulting weld was evaluated for the corresponding mechanical properties and welding defects. The study incorporates FSW process and tool parameters such as welding speed, pin height and pin thread pitch as input parameters. However, the weld quality related defects and mechanical properties were treated as output parameters. The experimentation paves way to investigate the correlation between the inputs and the outputs. The correlation between inputs and outputs were used as tool to predict the optimized FSW process and tool parameters for a desired weld output of the base metals under investigation. The study also provides reflection on the effect of said parameters on a welding defect such as wormhole.

  11. Deformation processes and weakening mechanisms within the frictional viscous transition zone of major crustal-scale faults: insights from the Great Glen Fault Zone, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Strachan, R. A.

    2000-05-01

    The Great Glen Fault Zone (GGFZ), Scotland, is a typical example of a crustal-scale, reactivated strike-slip fault within the continental crust. Analysis of intensely strained fault rocks from the core of the GGFZ near Fort William provides a unique insight into the nature of deformation associated with the main phase of (sinistral) movements along the fault zone. In this region, an exhumed sequence of complex mid-crustal deformation textures that developed in the region of the frictional-viscous transition (ca. 8-15 km depth) is preserved. Fault rock fabrics vary from mylonitic in quartzites to cataclastic in micaceous shear zones and feldspathic psammites. Protolith mineralogy exerted a strong control on the initial textural development and distribution of the fault rocks. At lower strains, crystal-plastic deformation occurred in quartz-dominated lithologies to produce mylonites simultaneously with widespread fracturing and cataclasis in feldspar- and mica-dominated rocks. At higher strains, shearing appears to increasingly localise into interconnected networks of cataclastic shear zones, many of which are strongly foliated. Textures indicative of fluid-assisted diffusive mass transfer mechanisms are widespread in such regions and suggest that a hydrous fluid-assisted, grainsize-controlled switch in deformation behaviour followed the brittle comminution of grains. The fault zone textural evolution implies that a strain-induced, fluid-assisted shallowing and narrowing of the frictional-viscous transition occurred with increasing strain. It is proposed that this led to an overall weakening of the fault zone and that equivalent processes may occur along many other long-lived, crustal-scale dislocations.

  12. Non-dimensional characterization of the friction stir/spot welding process using a simple Couette flow model part I: Constant property Bingham plastic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Gregory A.; Langerman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A simplified model for the material flow created during a friction stir/spot welding process has been developed using a boundary driven cylindrical Couette flow model with a specified heat flux at the inner cylinder for a Bingham plastic material. Non-dimensionalization of the constant property governing equations identified three parameters that influence the velocity and temperature fields. Analytic solutions to these equations are presented and some representative results from a parametric study (parameters chosen and varied over ranges expected for the welding of a wide variety of metals) are discussed. The results also provide an expression for the critical radius (location of vanishing material velocity) as functions of the relevant non-dimensional parameters. A final study was conducted in which values for the non-dimensional heat flux parameter were chosen to produce peak dimensional temperatures on the order of 80% of the melting temperature for a typical 2000 series aluminum. Under these conditions it was discovered that the ratio of the maximum rate of shear work within the material (viscous dissipation) to the rate of energy input at the boundary due to frictional heating, ranged from about 0.0005% for the lowest pin tool rotation rate, to about 1.3% for the highest tool rotation rate studied. Curve fits to previous Gleeble data taken for a number of aluminum alloys provide reasonable justification for the Bingham plastic constitutive model, and although these fits indicate a strong temperature dependence for critical flow stress and viscosity, this work provides a simple tool for more sophisticated model validation. Part II of this study will present numerical solutions for velocity and temperature fields resulting from the non-linear coupling of the momentum and energy equations created by temperature dependent transport properties

  13. Determination of Ag in technique process research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Tao; Zhang Lihua; Fan Dejun; Liu Huanliang; Wu Jizong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the chromogenic reaction of Ag with p-dimethylamino benzyl rhodanine, a new spectrophotometric method for determination of Ag in the presence of PVA-124 and Triton X-100 as surfactant is established. The factors such as acidity, reaction time and the concentration of surfactant were studied. The results show that the appropriate conditions are as the following. The concentrations of p-dimethylamino benzyl rhodanine, PVA and Triton X-100 are 0.1 g·L -1 , 10 g·L -1 and 0.16% respectively. Acidity is 1.0 mol·L -1 . Reaction time is 20 minutes. Absorption wavelength is 470 nm. The influence of several coexisting ions, especially Pu (Ⅳ) on analyzing Ag is also studied. The results indicate that when the concentration of Ag is less than five times of the concentration of Pu. PMBP is used to extract Pu (Ⅳ). The optimum extraction conditions are as follows. The concentration of PMBP is 0.1 mol·L-1. Acidity is 2.0 mol·L-1. The ratio of organic and water phase is 1:1. Extraction time is 3 minutes. Conformity to Berr's law was obtained with the scope of 0.1-1.0 μg·mL -1 . The determination limit of Ag is 0.1 μg·mL -1 . The relative standard deviation for this method is 2.6% (n=3). The recovery is 104-114%. (authors)

  14. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanov, A; Fontaine, J; Martin, J-M; Mogne, T L; Nevshupa, R

    2008-01-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H 2 and CH 4 . During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it

  15. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  16. On the geometric phenomenology of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shankar; Merin, A P; Nitsure, Nitin

    2017-09-06

    In this note we introduce a hierarchy of phase spaces for static friction, which give a graphical way to systematically quantify the directional dependence in static friction via subregions of the phase spaces. We experimentally plot these subregions to obtain phenomenological descriptions for static friction in various examples where the macroscopic shape of the object affects the frictional response. The phase spaces have the universal property that for any experiment in which a given object is put on a substrate fashioned from a chosen material with a specified nature of contact, the frictional behaviour can be read off from a uniquely determined classifying map on the control space of the experiment which takes values in the appropriate phase space.

  17. A simple criterion for determining the static friction force between nanowires and flat substrates using the most-bent-state method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lizhen; Wang, Shiliang; Huang, Han

    2015-04-24

    A simple criterion was developed to assess the appropriateness of the currently available models that estimate the static friction force between nanowires and substrates using the 'most-bent-state' method. Our experimental testing of the static friction force between Al2O3 nanowires and Si substrate verified our theoretical analysis, as well as the establishment of the criterion. It was found that the models are valid only for the bent nanowires with the ratio of wire length over the minimum curvature radius [Formula: see text] no greater than 1. For the cases with [Formula: see text] greater than 1, the static friction force was overestimated as it neglected the effect of its tangential component.

  18. Financial Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Jensen, Mads

    at a pre-specified price, no later than a pre-specified date. For example, an option can grant the right to buy 100 General Electric shares for USD 31 each no later than October 21, 2016. An interesting issue is determining when an option is optimally exercised. Merton (1973) shows that in a world without......A call option on a stock is a common and widely used derivative. On an average trading day in 2015, more than 800,000 such options traded on the Chicago Board Options Exchange, the largest options exchange in the United States. Each option grants its owner the right to buy 100 of a specific stock...

  19. High-velocity frictional properties of gabbro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Akito; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    High-velocity friction experiments have been performed on a pair of hollow-cylindrical specimens of gabbro initially at room temperature, at slip rates from 7.5 mm/s to 1.8 m/s, with total circumferential displacements of 125 to 174 m, and at normal stresses to 5 MPa, using a rotary-shear high-speed friction testing machine. Steady-state friction increases slightly with increasing slip rate at slip rates to about 100 mm/s (velocity strengthening) and it decreases markedly with increasing slip rate at higher velocities (velocity weakening). Steady-state friction in the velocity weakening regime is lower for the non-melting case than the frictional melting case, due perhaps to severe thermal fracturing. A very large peak friction is always recognized upon the initiation of visible frictional melting, presumably owing to the welding of fault surfaces upon the solidification of melt patches. Frictional properties thus change dramatically with increasing displacement at high velocities, and such a non-linear effect must be incorporated into the analysis of earthquake initiation processes.

  20. Influence of CNTs decomposition during reactive friction-stir processing of an Al-Mg alloy on the correlation between microstructural characteristics and microtextural components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabakhshi, F; Nosko, M; Gerlich, A P

    2018-05-03

    Multipass friction-stir processing was employed to uniformly disperse multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNTs) within an Al-Mg alloy metal matrix. Decomposition of MW-CNTs occurs in situ as a result of solid-state chemical reactions, forming fullerene (C60) and aluminium carbide (Al 4 C 3 ) phases during reactive high temperature severe plastic processing. The effects of this decomposition on the microstructural features, dynamic restoration mechanisms and crystallographic microtextural developments are studied for the first time by using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The formation of an equiaxed grain structure with an average size of ∼1.5 μm occurs within the stirred zone (SZ) under the influence of inclusions which hinder grain boundary migration via Zener-Smith pinning mechanisms during the discontinuous dynamic recrystallisation (DDRX). Formation of two strong Cubic and Brass microtextural components in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and thermomechanical affected zone (TMAZ) was noted as compared to the completely random and Cube components found in the base and SZ regions, respectively. The microstructural modification led to hardening and tensile strength improvement for the processed nanocomposite by ∼55% and 110%, respectively with respect to the annealed Al-Mg base alloy. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. In-process tool rotational speed variation with constant heat input in friction stir welding of AZ31 sheets with variable thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Forcellese, Archimede; Fratini, Livan; Simoncini, Michela

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, friction stir welding experiments on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets, characterized by a variable thickness along the welding line, were carried out. The approach adapted during welding consisted in maintaining constant the heat input to the joint. To this purpose, the rotational speed of the pin tool was increased with decreasing thickness and decreased with increasing thickness in order to obtain the same temperatures during welding. The amount by which the rotational speed was changed as a function of the sheet thickness was defined on the basis of the results given by FEM simulations of the FSW process. Finally, the effect of the in-process variation of the tool rotational speed on the mechanical and microstructural properties of FSWed joints was analysed by comparing both the nominal stress vs. nominal strain curves and microstructure of FSWed joints obtained in different process conditions. It was observed that FSW performed by keeping constant the heat input to the joint leads to almost coincident results both in terms of the curve shape, ultimate tensile strength and ultimate elongation values, and microstructure.

  2. Mathematical Modelling of a Friction Stir Welding Process to Predict the Joint Strength of Two Dissimilar Aluminium Alloys Using Experimental Data and Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Yunus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is the most popular and efficient method of solid-state joining for similar as well as dissimilar metals and alloys. It is mostly used in applications for aerospace, rail, automotive, and marine industries. Many researchers are currently working with different perspectives on this FSW process for various combinations of materials. The general input process parameters are the thickness of the plate, axial load, rotational speed, welding speed, and tilt angle. The output parameters are joint hardness, % of elongation, and impact and yield strengths. Genetic programming (GP is a relatively new method of evolutionary computing with the principal advantage of this approach being to evaluate efficacious predictive mathematical models or equations without any prior assumption regarding the possible form of the functional relationship. This paper both defines and illustrates how GP can be applied to the FSW process to derive precise relationships between the output and input parameters in order to obtain a generalized prediction model. A GP model will assist engineers in quantifying the performance of FSW, and the results from this study can then be utilized to estimate future requirements based on the historical data to provide a robust solution. The obtained results from the GP models showed good agreement with experimental and target data at an average prediction error of 0.72%.

  3. Microstructures, mechanical, and biological properties of a novel Ti-6V-4V/zinc surface nanocomposite prepared by friction stir processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu C

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chenyuan Zhu,1,2,* Yuting Lv,3,4,* Chao Qian,1,2,* Zihao Ding,3,5 Ting Jiao,1,2 Xiaoyu Gu,1,2 Eryi Lu,6 Liqiang Wang,3 Fuqiang Zhang1,2 1Department of Prosthodontics, Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Shanghai Research Institute of Stomatology, National Clinical Research Center of Stomatology, 3State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 4College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Department of Stomatology, Ren Ji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The interaction between the material and the organism affects the survival rate of the orthopedic or dental implant in vivo. Friction stir processing (FSP is considered a new solid-state processing technology for surface modification. Purpose: This study aims to strengthen the surface mechanical properties and promote the osteogenic capacity of the biomaterial by constructing a Ti-6Al-4V (TC4/zinc (Zn surface nanocomposites through FSP. Methods: FSP was used to modify the surface of TC4. The microstructures and mechanical properties were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nanoindentation and Vickers hardness. The biological properties of the modified surface were evaluated by the in vitro and in vivo study. Results: The results showed that nanocrystalline and numerous β regions, grain boundary a phase, coarser acicular α phase and finer acicular martensite α' appeared because of the severe plastic deformation caused by FSP, resulting in a decreased elastic modulus and an increased surface hardness. With the addition of

  4. Machine Learning of Fault Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. A.; Rouet-Leduc, B.; Hulbert, C.; Marone, C.; Guyer, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    We are applying machine learning (ML) techniques to continuous acoustic emission (AE) data from laboratory earthquake experiments. Our goal is to apply explicit ML methods to this acoustic datathe AE in order to infer frictional properties of a laboratory fault. The experiment is a double direct shear apparatus comprised of fault blocks surrounding fault gouge comprised of glass beads or quartz powder. Fault characteristics are recorded, including shear stress, applied load (bulk friction = shear stress/normal load) and shear velocity. The raw acoustic signal is continuously recorded. We rely on explicit decision tree approaches (Random Forest and Gradient Boosted Trees) that allow us to identify important features linked to the fault friction. A training procedure that employs both the AE and the recorded shear stress from the experiment is first conducted. Then, testing takes place on data the algorithm has never seen before, using only the continuous AE signal. We find that these methods provide rich information regarding frictional processes during slip (Rouet-Leduc et al., 2017a; Hulbert et al., 2017). In addition, similar machine learning approaches predict failure times, as well as slip magnitudes in some cases. We find that these methods work for both stick slip and slow slip experiments, for periodic slip and for aperiodic slip. We also derive a fundamental relationship between the AE and the friction describing the frictional behavior of any earthquake slip cycle in a given experiment (Rouet-Leduc et al., 2017b). Our goal is to ultimately scale these approaches to Earth geophysical data to probe fault friction. References Rouet-Leduc, B., C. Hulbert, N. Lubbers, K. Barros, C. Humphreys and P. A. Johnson, Machine learning predicts laboratory earthquakes, in review (2017). https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.05774Rouet-LeDuc, B. et al., Friction Laws Derived From the Acoustic Emissions of a Laboratory Fault by Machine Learning (2017), AGU Fall Meeting Session S025

  5. Modeling Friction Performance of Drill String Torsional Oscillation Using Dynamic Friction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingming Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drill string torsional and longitudinal oscillation can significantly reduce axial drag in horizontal drilling. An improved theoretical model for the analysis of the frictional force was proposed based on microscopic contact deformation theory and a bristle model. The established model, an improved dynamic friction model established for drill strings in a wellbore, was used to determine the relationship of friction force changes and the drill string torsional vibration. The model results were in good agreement with the experimental data, verifying the accuracy of the established model. The analysis of the influence of drilling mud properties indicated that there is an approximately linear relationship between the axial friction force and dynamic shear and viscosity. The influence of drill string torsional oscillation on the axial friction force is discussed. The results indicated that the drill string transverse velocity is a prerequisite for reducing axial friction. In addition, low amplitude of torsional vibration speed can significantly reduce axial friction. Then, increasing the amplitude of transverse vibration speed, the effect of axial reduction is not significant. In addition, by involving general field drilling parameters, this model can accurately describe the friction behavior and quantitatively predict the frictional resistance in horizontal drilling.

  6. Friction Compensation in the Upsetting of Cylindrical Test Specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Martins, P. A. F.; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript presents a combined numerical andexperimental methodology for determining the stress-straincurve of metallic materials from the measurements of forceand displacement obtained in the axial compression of cylindrical test specimens with friction between the specimens and the platens....... The methodology is based on minimizing the errorbetween the average surface pressure obtained from the experimental measurements of the force and displacement and thatobtained from the slab method of analysis of metal plasticity.Three different friction models based on Coulomb friction, the constant friction...... model or combined friction models are utilized .Experimental results obtained from cylindrical and Rastegaev test specimens with different lubricants combined with the experimental determination of friction by means of ring compression tests allows compensating the effect of friction...

  7. Friction Welding of Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys with Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ambroziak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our actual knowledge and experience in joining dissimilar materials with the use of friction welding method. The joints of aluminium and aluminium alloys with the different types of steel were studied. The structural effects occurring during the welding process were described. The mechanical properties using, for example, (i microhardness measurements, (ii tensile tests, (iii bending tests, and (iv shearing tests were determined. In order to obtain high-quality joints the influence of different configurations of the process such as (i changing the geometry of bonding surface, (ii using the interlayer, or (iii heat treatment was analyzed. Finally, the issues related to the selection of optimal parameters of friction welding process were also investigated.

  8. Proximity friction reexamined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krappe, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of inelastic excitations to radial and tangential friction form-factors in heavy-ion collisions is investigated in the frame-work of perturbation theory. The dependence of the form factors on the essential geometrical and level-density parameters of the scattering system is exhibited in a rather closed form. The conditions for the existence of time-local friction coefficients are discussed. Results are compared to form factors from other models, in particular the transfer-related proximity friction. For the radial friction coefficient the inelastic excitation mechanism seems to be the dominant contribution in peripheral collisions. (orig.)

  9. Wave friction factor rediscovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, J. P.

    2012-02-01

    The wave friction factor is commonly expressed as a function of the horizontal water particle semi-excursion ( A wb) at the top of the boundary layer. A wb, in turn, is normally derived from linear wave theory by {{U_{{wb}}/T_{{w}}}}{{2π }} , where U wb is the maximum water particle velocity measured at the top of the boundary layer and T w is the wave period. However, it is shown here that A wb determined in this way deviates drastically from its real value under both linear and non-linear waves. Three equations for smooth, transitional and rough boundary conditions, respectively, are proposed to solve this problem, all three being a function of U wb, T w, and δ, the thickness of the boundary layer. Because these variables can be determined theoretically for any bottom slope and water depth using the deepwater wave conditions, there is no need to physically measure them. Although differing substantially from many modern attempts to define the wave friction factor, the results coincide with equations proposed in the 1960s for either smooth or rough boundary conditions. The findings also confirm that the long-held notion of circular water particle motion down to the bottom in deepwater conditions is erroneous, the motion in fact being circular at the surface and elliptical at depth in both deep and shallow water conditions, with only horizontal motion at the top of the boundary layer. The new equations are incorporated in an updated version (WAVECALC II) of the Excel program published earlier in this journal by Le Roux et al. Geo-Mar Lett 30(5): 549-560, (2010).

  10. Nonlinear friction dynamics on polymer surface under accelerated movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuki Aita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear phenomena on the soft material surface are one of the most exciting topics of chemical physics. However, only a few reports exist on the friction phenomena under accelerated movement, because friction between two solid surfaces is considered a linear phenomenon in many cases. We aim to investigate how nonlinear accelerated motion affects friction on solid surfaces. In the present study, we evaluate the frictional forces between two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE resins using an advanced friction evaluation system. On PTFE surfaces, the normalized delay time δ, which is the time lag in the response of the friction force to the accelerated movement, is observed in the pre-sliding friction process. Under high-velocity conditions, kinetic friction increases with velocity. Based on these experimental results, we propose a two-phase nonlinear model including a pre-sliding process (from the beginning of sliding of a contact probe to the establishment of static friction and a kinetic friction process. The present model consists of several factors including velocity, acceleration, stiffness, viscosity, and vertical force. The findings reflecting the viscoelastic properties of soft material is useful for various fields such as in the fabrication of clothes, cosmetics, automotive materials, and virtual reality systems as well as for understanding friction phenomena on soft material surfaces.

  11. Microstructure modification of 2024 aluminum alloy produced by friction drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, A.A., E-mail: alan@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Fortuna, S.V. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Kolubaev, E.A. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Kalashnikova, T.A. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-13

    In this study modification of AA2024 microstructure produced by friction drilling was investigated. To reveal the role of deformation, high temperature and friction on microstructure modification methods of optical and scanning electron microscopy and microhardness test were used. Different zones of material around friction drilling hole has a special characterization through grain size, volume fraction and size of incoherent second phase particles and microhardness. It has been found that deformation, high temperature and friction in friction drilling process lead to recrystallization of grain structure and dissolution of incoherent second phase particles due to strain-induced dissolution effect. Microhardness of recrystallized material has increased.

  12. Anisotropy in cohesive, frictional granular media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luding, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    The modelling of cohesive, frictional granular materials with a discrete particle molecular dynamics is reviewed. From the structure of the quasi-static granular solid, the fabric, stress, and stiffness tensors are determined, including both normal and tangential forces. The influence of the material properties on the flow behaviour is also reported, including relations between the microscopic attractive force and the macroscopic cohesion as well as the dependence of the macroscopic friction on the microscopic contact friction coefficient. Related to the dynamics, the anisotropy of both structure and stress are exponentially approaching the maximum

  13. Internal Friction And Instabilities Of Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of effects of internal friction on dynamics of rotors prompted by concern over instabilities in rotors of turbomachines. Theoretical and experimental studies described. Theoretical involved development of nonlinear mathematical models of internal friction in three joints found in turbomachinery - axial splines, Curvic(TM) splines, and interference fits between smooth cylindrical surfaces. Experimental included traction tests to determine the coefficients of friction of rotor alloys at various temperatures, bending-mode-vibration tests of shafts equipped with various joints and rotordynamic tests of shafts with axial-spline and interference-fit joints.

  14. Relating stick-slip friction experiments to earthquake source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Arthur F.

    2012-01-01

    Analytical results for parameters, such as static stress drop, for stick-slip friction experiments, with arbitrary input parameters, can be determined by solving an energy-balance equation. These results can then be related to a given earthquake based on its seismic moment and the maximum slip within its rupture zone, assuming that the rupture process entails the same physics as stick-slip friction. This analysis yields overshoots and ratios of apparent stress to static stress drop of about 0.25. The inferred earthquake source parameters static stress drop, apparent stress, slip rate, and radiated energy are robust inasmuch as they are largely independent of the experimental parameters used in their estimation. Instead, these earthquake parameters depend on C, the ratio of maximum slip to the cube root of the seismic moment. C is controlled by the normal stress applied to the rupture plane and the difference between the static and dynamic coefficients of friction. Estimating yield stress and seismic efficiency using the same procedure is only possible when the actual static and dynamic coefficients of friction are known within the earthquake rupture zone.

  15. Investigation on the effect of Friction Stir Processing Parameters on Micro-structure and Micro-hardness of Rice Husk Ash reinforced Al6061 Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Farhana, N.; Marini, C. D.

    2018-03-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is an alternative way to produce the surface composites of aluminium alloy in order to modify the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties. In this experiment, Al6061 aluminium alloy has been chosen to be used as the matrix base plate for the FSP. Al606 has potential for the use in advanced application but it has low wear resistance. While, the reinforced used was rice husk ash (RHA) in order to produce surface composites which increased the micro hardness of the plate composites. The Al6061 was stirred individually and with 5 weight % of RHA at three different tool rotational speeds of 800 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1200 rpm. After running the FSP, the result in the distribution of particles and the micro hardness of the specimens were identified. The result showed that Al6061 plate with the existing 5 weight % of RHA reinforced at the highest of tool rotational speeds of 1200rpm has the best distribution of particles and the highest result in average of micro hardness with 80Hv.

  16. Analysis of Microstructure Refinement During Single-Pass and Multi-Pass Friction Stir Processing of Nial Propeller Bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    material. For example, tool steel can be used in aluminum, but tungsten-based alloys should be used in copper and titanium based alloys. The material...many other alloys such as copper, nickel, titanium, magnesium, and steels . In addition, each processed alloy had other material characteristics that... bainitic transformation is also possible. The martencite is a B2 structure with a lattice parameter of 2.85±0.03Å [8]. The B2 structure is a BCC structure

  17. Development of a penetration friction apparatus (PFA) to measure the frictional performance of surgical suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gangqiang; Ren, Tianhui; Lette, Walter; Zeng, Xiangqiong; van der Heide, Emile

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays there is a wide variety of surgical sutures available in the market. Surgical sutures have different sizes, structures, materials and coatings, whereas they are being used for various surgeries. The frictional performances of surgical sutures have been found to play a vital role in their functionality. The high friction force of surgical sutures in the suturing process may cause inflammation and pain to the person, leading to a longer recovery time, and the second trauma of soft or fragile tissue. Thus, the investigation into the frictional performance of surgical suture is essential. Despite the unquestionable fact, little is actually known on the friction performances of surgical suture-tissue due to the lack of appropriate test equipment. This study presents a new penetration friction apparatus (PFA) that allowed for the evaluation of the friction performances of various surgical needles and sutures during the suturing process, under different contact conditions. It considered the deformation of tissue and can realize the puncture force measurements of surgical needles as well as the friction force of surgical sutures. The developed PFA could accurately evaluate and understand the frictional behaviour of surgical suture-tissue in the simulating clinical conditions. The forces measured by the PFA showed the same trend as that reported in literatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. FRICTION TORQUE IN THE SLIDE BEARINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONDARENKO L. N.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Problem statement. Until now slide bearings are used widely in engineering. But the calculation is made on obsolete method that is based on undetermined parameters such as wear of the bearing shell. It is accepted in the literature that if the shaft and liner material are homogeneous, the workpiece surface are cylindrical as they wear and contact between them occurs at all points contact arc. Research objective. The purpose of this study is determine a friction torque in the slide bearings of power-basis parameters. Conclusions. Since the friction is primarily responsible for wear of cinematic pairs “pin – liner” and “pivot – liner” slide bearings. It is shown that the friction torquesof angles wrap, that are obtained by the formulas and given in literature, are not only qualitatively but also quantitatively, namely, the calculation by literature to the formulas the friction torques are proportional to the angle wrap and the calculation by improved formulas the friction torques are inversely proportional to the angle wrap due to the reduction the normal pressure. Underreporting friction torque at large angle wrap is between 40 and 15 %. The difference in the magnitude of friction torque in the run-in and run-out cinematic pairs with real method of machining is 2...3 %, which it is possible to declare of reducing the finish of contacting surface of slide bearings.

  19. Friction-stir processing of an AA8026-TiB{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hybrid nanocomposite: Microstructural developments and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandari, H.; Taheri, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75168 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodabakhshi, F., E-mail: farzadkhodabakhshi83@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Zand Boulevard, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-13

    In this study, micro- and nano-sized TiB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were incorporated separately and simultaneously through the AA8026 aluminum base alloy during multi-pass friction stir processing (FSP) with 100% overlapping to fabricate metal matrix mono and hybrid nanocomposites. Various FSP conditions including different rotational speeds (w), traverse velocities (v), and processing pass numbers were assessed to attain a homogenous distribution of reinforcing particles through the Al-metal matrix. Moreover, the impacts of size (micro or nano) and type of reinforcement particles (TiB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on the process-ability of single and hybrid nanocomposite systems were examined. Microstructures of different zones and distributions of reinforcing ceramic particles through the Al-matrix under various processing conditions were studied and characterized by using optical (OM), scanning (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, respectively. The main mechanical characteristics of the prepared nanocomposites, such as, indentation Vickers hardness, tensile properties, and wear resistance were measured and compared for all of the various processing conditions. By optimization of the FSP parameters, as a rotational speed of 1600 rpm and a traverse velocity of 40 mm/min after 4 passes, a uniform AA8026-TiB{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hybrid nanocomposite was attained with significant improvements (~70–100%) in the different mechanical properties. As a result, the tensile yield strength of ~270 MPa, elongation of ~4.5%, and indentation Vickers hardness of ~141 HV were obtained. Also, the average wear rate was reduced from the 21×10{sup −3} mg/m value for the AA8026 base alloy down to 2.6×10{sup −3} mg/m for the best processed nanocomposite. A direct relationship between the wear rate and the indentation hardness resistance was demonstrated. Finally, effects of FSP processing conditions and reinforcement particles (type and

  20. Prediction and optimization of friction welding parameters for super duplex stainless steel (UNS S32760) joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udayakumar, T.; Raja, K.; Afsal Husain, T.M.; Sathiya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion resistance and impact strength – predicted by response surface methodology. • Burn off length has highest significance on corrosion resistance. • Friction force is a strong determinant in changing impact strength. • Pareto front points generated by genetic algorithm aid to fix input control variable. • Pareto front will be a trade-off between corrosion resistance and impact strength. - Abstract: Friction welding finds widespread industrial use as a mass production process for joining materials. Friction welding process allows welding of several materials that are extremely difficult to fusion weld. Friction welding process parameters play a significant role in making good quality joints. To produce a good quality joint it is important to set up proper welding process parameters. This can be done by employing optimization techniques. This paper presents a multi objective optimization method for optimizing the process parameters during friction welding process. The proposed method combines the response surface methodology (RSM) with an intelligent optimization algorithm, i.e. genetic algorithm (GA). Corrosion resistance and impact strength of friction welded super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) (UNS S32760) joints were investigated considering three process parameters: friction force (F), upset force (U) and burn off length (B). Mathematical models were developed and the responses were adequately predicted. Direct and interaction effects of process parameters on responses were studied by plotting graphs. Burn off length has high significance on corrosion current followed by upset force and friction force. In the case of impact strength, friction force has high significance followed by upset force and burn off length. Multi objective optimization for maximizing the impact strength and minimizing the corrosion current (maximizing corrosion resistance) was carried out using GA with the RSM model. The optimization procedure resulted in

  1. Determinants of Successful Internationalisation Processes in Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Henry; Guzmán, Alexander; Trujillo, María-Andrea

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the internationalisation process in business schools as a response to the globalisation phenomena and argue that environmental pressures, isomorphic forces, the pool of internal resources and the alignment of the process with the institution's general strategic plan are the main determinants of a successful internationalisation process.…

  2. Hedging, arbitrage and optimality with superlinear frictions

    OpenAIRE

    Guasoni, Paolo; Rásonyi, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    In a continuous-time model with multiple assets described by c\\`{a}dl\\`{a}g processes, this paper characterizes superhedging prices, absence of arbitrage, and utility maximizing strategies, under general frictions that make execution prices arbitrarily unfavorable for high trading intensity. Such frictions induce a duality between feasible trading strategies and shadow execution prices with a martingale measure. Utility maximizing strategies exist even if arbitrage is present, because it is n...

  3. Friction Welding of Titanium and Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi, HASUI; Yoichi, KIRA; Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University; Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd.

    1985-01-01

    Titanium-steel is a combination of dissimilar materials, which are difficult to weld in general, owing to inevitable formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. A prominent feature of friction welding process is ability to weld dissimilar materials in many kinds of combinations. This report deals with friction weldabilily of pure titanium and S25C steel, which are 12 mm in diameter. Main results are summarized as follows; (1) Suitable welding conditions to obtain a sound weld, which has a j...

  4. Modeling and data analysis of the NASA-WSTF frictional heating apparatus - Effects of test parameters on friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sheng-Hu; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Benz, Frank J.; Yuen, Walter W.

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical model is being developed jointly by the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) to analyze data generated from the WSTF frictional heating test facility. Analyses of the data generated in the first seconds of the frictional heating test are shown to be effective in determining the friction coefficient between the rubbing interfaces. Different friction coefficients for carobn steel and Monel K-500 are observed. The initial condition of the surface is shown to affect only the initial value of the friction coefficient but to have no significant influence on the average steady-state friction coefficient. Rotational speed and the formation of oxide film on the rotating surfaces are shown to have a significant effect on the friction coefficient.

  5. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Kamada, Hiroto; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-21

    Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%-78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE) analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  6. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%–78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  7. Dissimilar friction stir welds in AA5083-AA6082: The effect of process parameters on residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steuwer, A.; Peel, M.J.; Withers, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of tool traverse and rotation speeds on the residual stresses are quantified for welds between non-age-hardening AA5083 and age-hardening AA6082 and compared to single alloy joints made from each of the two constituents. The residual stresses have been characterised non-destructively by neutron diffraction and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The region around the weld line was characterised by significant tensile residual stress fields which are balanced by compressive stresses in the parent material. The rotation speed of the tool has been found to have a substantially greater influence than the transverse speed on the properties and residual stresses in the welds, particularly on the AA5083 side where the location of the peak stress moves from the stir zone to beyond the edge of the tool shoulder. The changes in residual stress are related to microstructural and hardness changes as determined in a previous study . In particular the larger stresses under the weld tool on the AA5083 side compared to the AA6082 side are related to a transient reduction in yield stress due to dissolution of the hardening precipitates during welding prior to natural aging after welding

  8. Rupture Speed and Dynamic Frictional Processes for the 1995 ML4.1 Shacheng, Hebei, China, Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B.; Shi, B.

    2010-12-01

    An earthquake with ML4.1 occurred at Shacheng, Hebei, China, on July 20, 1995, followed by 28 aftershocks with 0.9≤ML≤4.0 (Chen et al, 2005). According to ZÚÑIGA (1993), for the 1995 ML4.1 Shacheng earthquake sequence, the main shock is corresponding to undershoot, while aftershocks should match overshoot. With the suggestion that the dynamic rupture processes of the overshoot aftershocks could be related to the crack (sub-fault) extension inside the main fault. After main shock, the local stresses concentration inside the fault may play a dominant role in sustain the crack extending. Therefore, the main energy dissipation mechanism should be the aftershocks fracturing process associated with the crack extending. We derived minimum radiation energy criterion (MREC) following variational principle (Kanamori and Rivera, 2004)(ES/M0')min≧[3M0/(ɛπμR3)](v/β)3, where ES and M0' are radiated energy and seismic moment gained from observation, μ is the modulus of fault rigidity, ɛ is the parameter of ɛ=M0'/M0,M0 is seismic moment and R is rupture size on the fault, v and β are rupture speed and S-wave speed. From II and III crack extending model, we attempt to reconcile a uniform expression for calculate seismic radiation efficiency ηG, which can be used to restrict the upper limit efficiency and avoid the non-physics phenomenon that radiation efficiency is larger than 1. In ML 4.1 Shacheng earthquake sequence, the rupture speed of the main shock was about 0.86 of S-wave speed β according to MREC, closing to the Rayleigh wave speed, while the rupture speeds of the remained 28 aftershocks ranged from 0.05β to 0.55β. The rupture speed was 0.9β, and most of the aftershocks are no more than 0.35β using II and III crack extending model. In addition, the seismic radiation efficiencies for this earthquake sequence were: for the most aftershocks, the radiation efficiencies were less than 10%, inferring a low seismic efficiency, whereas the radiation efficiency

  9. Transient effects in friction fractal asperity creep

    CERN Document Server

    Goedecke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Transient friction effects determine the behavior of a wide class of mechatronic systems. Classic examples are squealing brakes, stiction in robotic arms, or stick-slip in linear drives. To properly design and understand mechatronic systems of this type, good quantitative models of transient friction effects are of primary interest. The theory developed in this book approaches this problem bottom-up, by deriving the behavior of macroscopic friction surfaces from the microscopic surface physics. The model is based on two assumptions: First, rough surfaces are inherently fractal, exhibiting roughness on a wide range of scales. Second, transient friction effects are caused by creep enlargement of the real area of contact between two bodies. This work demonstrates the results of extensive Finite Element analyses of the creep behavior of surface asperities, and proposes a generalized multi-scale area iteration for calculating the time-dependent real contact between two bodies. The toolset is then demonstrated both...

  10. Tuning the Friction of Silicon Surfaces Using Nanopatterns at the Nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction and wear become significant at small scale lengths, particularly in MEMS/NEMS. Nanopatterns are regarded as a potential approach to solve these problems. In this paper, we investigated the friction behavior of nanopatterned silicon surfaces with a periodical rectangular groove array in dry and wear-less single-asperity contact at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics simulations. The synchronous and periodic oscillations of the normal load and friction force with the sliding distance were determined at frequencies defined by the nanopattern period. The linear load dependence of the friction force is always observed for the nanopatterned surface and is independent of the nanopattern geometry. We show that the linear friction law is a formal Amontons’ friction law, while the significant linear dependence of the friction force-versus-real contact area and real contact area-versus-normal load captures the general features of the nanoscale friction for the nanopatterned surface. Interestingly, the nanopattern increases the friction force at the nanoscale, and the desired friction reduction is also observed. The enlargement and reduction of the friction critically depended on the nanopattern period rather than the area ratio. Our simulation results reveal that the nanopattern can modulate the friction behavior at the nanoscale from the friction signal to the friction law and to the value of the friction force. Thus, elaborate nanopatterning is an effective strategy for tuning the friction behavior at the nanoscale.

  11. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  12. Strengthening analyses and mechanical assessment of Ti/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-composites produced by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafiei-Zarghani, Aziz, E-mail: ashafiei@ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence for Surface Engineering and Corrosion Protection of Industries, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kashani-Bozorg, Seyed Farshid, E-mail: fkashani@ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence for Surface Engineering and Corrosion Protection of Industries, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gerlich, Adrian P., E-mail: adrian.gerlich@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2015-04-17

    The present work investigates strengthening mechanisms and mechanical assessment of Ti/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-composites produced by friction stir processing of commercially pure titanium using nano-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with different volume fractions and particle sizes. Microstructural analyses were conducted to characterize the grain size of matrix, size and dispersion of reinforcing particles. The mean grain size of the composites ranged from ~0.7 to 1.1 μm that is much lower than 28 μm of the as-received material. Reduction of grain size was found to be in agreement with Rios approach (based on energy dissipated during the motion of an interface through particle dispersion), and showed deviation from Zener pinning model. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies revealed a near uniform dispersion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-particles, with only a small fraction of widely spaced clusters. The maximum compression yield strength of the fabricated nano-composite (Ti/3.9%vol of 20 nm-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was found to be ~494 MPa that is ~1.5 times higher than that of the as-received material. Strengthening analyses based on grain refining (Hall–Petch approach), load transfer from matrix to reinforcements, Orowan looping, and enhanced dislocation density due to thermal mismatch effects were carried out considering Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reinforcement with different volume fractions and sizes. However, Hall–Petch approach was found to be the dominant mechanism for the enhancement of yield strength.

  13. Microstructure, microtexture and precipitation in the ultrafine-grained surface layer of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy processed by sliding friction treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanxia [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Yang, Yanqing, E-mail: yqyang@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Feng, Zongqiang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhao, Guangming; Huang, Bin; Luo, Xian [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Zhang, Yusheng; Zhang, Wei [Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Precipitate redistribution and texture evolution are usually two concurrent aspects accompanying grain refinement induced by various surface treatment. However, the detailed precipitate redistribution characteristics and process, as well as crystallographic texture in the surface refined grain layer, are still far from full understanding. In this study, we focused on the microstructural and crystallographic features of the sliding friction treatment (SFT) induced surface deformation layer in a 7050 aluminum alloy. With the combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high angle angular dark field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) observations, a surface ultrafine grain (UFG) layer composed of both equiaxed and lamellar ultrafine grains and decorated by high density of coarse grain boundary precipitates (GBPs) were revealed. Further precession electron diffraction (PED) assisted orientation mapping unraveled that high angle grain boundaries rather than low angle grain boundaries are the most favorable nucleation sites for GBPs. The prominent precipitate redistribution can be divided into three successive and interrelated stages, i.e. the mechanically induced precipitate dissolution, solute diffusion and reprecipitation. The quantitative prediction based on pipe diffusion along dislocations and grain boundary diffusion proved the distribution feasibility of GBPs around UFGs. Based on PED and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses, the crystallographic texture of the surface UFG layer was identified as a shear texture composed of major rotated cube texture (001) 〈110〉 and minor (111) 〈112〉, while that of the adjoining lamellar coarse grained matrix was pure brass. The SFT induced surface severe shear deformation is responsible for texture evolution. - Highlights: •The surface ultrafine grain layer in a 7050 aluminum alloy was focused. •Precipitate redistribution and texture evolution were discussed. •The quantitative prediction proved the

  14. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  15. Charts Adapted from Van Driest's Turbulent Flat-plate Theory for Determining Values of Turbulent Aerodynamic Friction and Heat-transfer Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dorothy B; Faget, Maxime A

    1956-01-01

    A modified method of Van Driest's flat-plate theory for turbulent boundary layer has been found to simplify the calculation of local skin-friction coefficients which, in turn, have made it possible to obtain through Reynolds analogy theoretical turbulent heat-transfer coefficients in the form of Stanton number. A general formula is given and charts are presented from which the modified method can be solved for Mach numbers 1.0 to 12.0, temperature ratios 0.2 to 6.0, and Reynolds numbers 0.2 times 10 to the 6th power to 200 times 10 to the 6th power.

  16. Determination of strain rate in Friction Stir Welding by three-dimensional visualization of material flow using X-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisada, Y.; Imaizumi, T.; Fujii, H.

    2015-01-01

    Recrystallization, which is mainly caused by the induced strain, is one of the most important factors of Friction Stir Welding. In this study, strain and strain rate are directly obtained by the change in the material flow velocity which is observed by three-dimensional visualization of the material flow. The grain size of the pure aluminum in the stir zone estimated by the Zener–Hollomon parameter using the obtained strain rate shows good agreement with that observed by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction mapping

  17. Friction and drag forces on spheres propagating down inclined planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Yi Hui; Longmire, Ellen

    2017-11-01

    When a submerged sphere propagates along an inclined wall at terminal velocity, it experiences gravity, drag, lift, and friction forces. In the related equations of motion, the drag, lift and friction coefficients are unknown. Experiments are conducted to determine the friction and drag coefficients of the sphere over a range of Reynolds numbers. Through high speed imaging, translational and rotational velocities of spheres propagating along a glass plate are determined in liquids with several viscosities. The onset of sliding motion is identified by computing the dimensionless rotation rate of the sphere. Using drag and lift coefficients for Re friction coefficients are calculated for several materials. The friction coefficients are then employed to estimate the drag coefficient for 350 frictional force over this Re range. Supported by NSF (CBET-1510154).

  18. Estimating Fault Friction From Seismic Signals in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet-Leduc, Bertrand; Hulbert, Claudia; Bolton, David C.; Ren, Christopher X.; Riviere, Jacques; Marone, Chris; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, Paul A.

    2018-02-01

    Nearly all aspects of earthquake rupture are controlled by the friction along the fault that progressively increases with tectonic forcing but in general cannot be directly measured. We show that fault friction can be determined at any time, from the continuous seismic signal. In a classic laboratory experiment of repeating earthquakes, we find that the seismic signal follows a specific pattern with respect to fault friction, allowing us to determine the fault's position within its failure cycle. Using machine learning, we show that instantaneous statistical characteristics of the seismic signal are a fingerprint of the fault zone shear stress and frictional state. Further analysis of this fingerprint leads to a simple equation of state quantitatively relating the seismic signal power and the friction on the fault. These results show that fault zone frictional characteristics and the state of stress in the surroundings of the fault can be inferred from seismic waves, at least in the laboratory.

  19. Paediatric treadmill friction injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremijenko, Luke; Mott, Jonathan; Wallis, Belinda; Kimble, Roy

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the severity and incidence of children injured by treadmills and to promote the implementation of safety standards. This retrospective review of children with treadmill friction injuries was conducted in a single tertiary-level burns centre in Australia between January 1997 and June 2007. The study revealed 37 children who sustained paediatric treadmill friction injuries. This was a presentation of 1% of all burns. Thirty-three (90%) of the injuries occurred in the last 3.5 years (January 2004 to June 2007). The modal age was 3.2 years. Thirty-three (90%) injuries were either full thickness or deep partial friction burns. Eleven (30%) required split thickness skin grafts. Of those who became entrapped, 100% required skin grafting. This study found that paediatric treadmill friction injuries are severe and increasing in incidence. Australian standards should be developed, implemented and mandated to reduce this preventable and severe injury.

  20. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  1. Ultrasonic friction power during thermosonic Au and Cu ball bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A; Mayer, M; Zhou, Y; Qin, I; Huynh, C; Meyer, M

    2010-01-01

    The ultrasonic friction power during thermosonic ball bonding with Au and Cu wires, both 25 μm in diameter, is derived with an improved method from experimental measurements during the bonding process. Experimental data include the current delivered to the ultrasonic transducer and the tangential force measured using piezoresistive microsensors integrated close to the Al bonding pad. The improvement results from a new, more accurate method to derive the mechanical compliance of the ultrasonic system. The method employs a bond process modification in which the ultrasonic current is ramped up sequentially in three steps. In the first two steps, the ultrasonic current is set to levels that are too low to cause sliding. The bonding takes place during the third step, when the current is ramped up to the optimum value required for making good quality bonds. The ultrasonic compliance values are derived from the first two steps and are 8.2 ± 0.5 μm N -1 and 7.7 ± 0.5 μm N -1 for the Au and Cu processes, respectively. These values are determined within an average error estimate of ±6%, substantially lower than the ±10% estimated with a previously reported method. The ultrasonic compliance in the case of Au is 6% higher due to the lower elastic modulus of Au compared with that of Cu. Typical maximum values of relative sliding amplitude of ultrasonic friction at the interface are 655 nm and 766 nm for the Au and Cu processes. These values are 81% of the free-air vibration amplitude of the bonding capillary tip for the respective ultrasonic current settings. Due to bond growth, which damps relative motion between the ball and the pad, the final relative amplitude at the bond interface is reduced to 4% of the equivalent free-air amplitude. Even though the maximum value of relative amplitude is 17% higher in the Cu process compared with the Au process, the average total interfacial sliding is 519 μm in the Cu process, which is 31% lower than that in the Au process (759

  2. Evaluation of deep drawing force under different friction conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lăzărescu Lucian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the variation of the required punch load during the deep drawing process under different friction conditions. In this regards, several deep-drawing tests of cylindrical cups were conducted under four friction conditions at the tool–blank interface. The first case was the dry deep-drawing, considered as a reference friction condition, while in the other three cases hydraulic oil, lithium-based grease and animal fat were used as lubricants. For each friction case, three levels of blank holding force were adopted, namely 10, 20 and 25 kN. The finite element simulation of the deep-drawing process was used to generate a set of calibration curves. By overlapping the experimental load-stroke curves on the calibration curves, the friction coefficient was estimated for each friction case.

  3. Frictional processes during flank motion at Mount Etna (Italy): experimental characterisation of slip on similar and dissimilar volcanic and sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Wojciech; Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Castagna, Angela; Mitchell, Thomas; Heap, Michael; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Hirose, Takehiro; Dingwell, Donald

    2015-04-01

    The edifice of Mount Etna (Italy) is structurally unstable, exhibiting a near continuous ESE seaward sliding along a set of faults due to interplay between regional tectonics, gravity instability and magma intrusion. Continuous seismic and ground deformation monitoring reveals the resulting large-scale flank motion at variable rates. The mechanisms controlling this faulting kinetic remains, however, poorly constrained. Examination of the fault zones reveals a range of rock types along the different fault segments: fresh and altered basalt, clay and limestone. As lithological contrasts can jeopardise the structural stability of an edifice, we experimentally investigate the frictional properties of these rocks using low- to high-velocity-rotary shear tests on similar and dissimilar rocks to better understand episodes of slow flank motion as well as rapid and catastrophic sector collapse events. The first set of experiments was performed at velocities up to 1.2 m/s and at normal stresses of 1.5 MPa, commensurate with depths of the contacts seen in the Etna edifice. Friction experiments on clay gouge shows the strong rate-weakening dependence of slip in this material as well as the release of carbon dioxide. Friction experiments on solid rocks show a wider range of mechanical behaviour. At high velocity (>0.6 m/s) volcanic rocks tend to melt whereas the clay and limestone do not; rather they decarbonate, which prevents the rock from achieving the temperature required for melting. Experiments on dissimilar rocks clearly show that composition of host rocks affects the composition and viscosity of the resultant frictional melt, which can have a dramatic effect on shear stress leading to fault weakening or strengthening depending on the combination of host rock samples. A series of low- to moderate-slip velocity experiments is now being conducted to complement our dataset and provide a more complete rock friction model applicable to Mount Etna.

  4. Implementing unsteady friction in pressure-time measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Pontus; Ramdal, Jorgen; Cervantes, Michel; Nielsen, Torbjørn Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory measurements using the pressure‐time method showed a velocity or Reynolds number dependent error of the flow estimate. It was suspected that the quasi steady friction formulation of the method was the cause. This was investigated, and it was proved that implementing a model for unsteady friction into the calculations improved the result. This paper presents the process of this investigation, and proposes a new method for treatment of the friction term in the pressure‐time method.

  5. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  6. The friction coefficient and its relation to the contact fatigue characteristics of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    The process of friction has been treated within the framework of an ergodynamic concept of deformable bodies. Equations of the friction energy balance are derived and a structure-energy interpretation of the friction process proposed. The friction parameter ranges within the domain of compatibility have been computed for tribosystems. The friction coefficient is shown to be a characteristic of the fatigue, wear resistance, and order (disorder) parameter of a tribosystem. Equations of state of a tribosystem and universal friction constants have been proposed. 31 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Micro- and macroscale coefficients of friction of cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomboy, Gilson; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang, Kejin

    2013-01-01

    Millions of metric tons of cementitious materials are produced, transported and used in construction each year. The ease or difficulty of handling cementitious materials is greatly influenced by the material friction properties. In the present study, the coefficients of friction of cementitious materials were measured at the microscale and macroscale. The materials tested were commercially-available Portland cement, Class C fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag. At the microscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from the interaction forces between cementitious particles using an Atomic Force Microscope. At the macroscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from stresses on bulk cementitious materials under direct shear. The study indicated that the microscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.020 to 0.059, and the macroscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.56 to 0.75. The fly ash studied had the highest microscale coefficient of friction and the lowest macroscale coefficient of friction. -- Highlights: •Microscale (interparticle) coefficient of friction (COF) was determined with AFM. •Macroscale (bulk) COF was measured under direct shear. •Fly ash had the highest microscale COF and the lowest macroscale COF. •Portland cement against GGBFS had the lowest microscale COF. •Portland cement against Portland cement had the highest macroscale COF

  8. Friction stir processing of an aluminum-magnesium alloy with pre-placing elemental titanium powder: In-situ formation of an Al{sub 3}Ti-reinforced nanocomposite and materials characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F., E-mail: farzadkhodabakhshi83@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Zand Boulevard, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simchi, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Avenue, 14588 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    A fine-grained Al–Mg/Al{sub 3}Ti nanocomposite was fabricated by friction stir processing (FSP) of an aluminum-magnesium (AA5052) alloy with pre-placed titanium powder in the stirred zone. Microstructural evolutions and formation of intermetallic phases were analyzed by optical and electron microscopic techniques across the thickness section of the processed sheets. The microstructure of the nanocomposite consisted of a fine-grained aluminum matrix (1.5 µm), un-reacted titanium particles (<40 µm) and reinforcement particles of Al{sub 3}Ti (<100 nm) and Mg{sub 2}Si (<100 nm). Detailed microstructural analysis indicated solid-state interfacial reactions between the aluminum matrix and micro-sized titanium particles to form Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallic phase. The hard inclusions were then fractured and re-distributed in the metal matrix by the severe thermo-mechanical conditions imposed by FSP. Evaluation of mechanical properties by hardness measurement and uniaxial tensile test determined significant enhancement in the mechanical strength (by 2.5 order of magnetite) with a high ductility (~22%). Based on a dislocation-based model analysis, it was suggested that the strength enhancement was governed by grain refinement and the presence of hard inclusions (4 vol%) in the metal matrix. Fractographic studies also showed a ductile-brittle fracture mode for the nanocomposite compared with fully ductile rupture of the annealed alloy as well as the FSPed specimen without pre-placing titanium particles. - Highlights: • FSP was employed to fabricate in situ nanocomposite. • The AA5052 Al alloy with pre-placed micro-sized Ti particles were utilized. • The structural analysis was revealed that the in situ formation of Al{sub 3}Ti nanophase. • The SZ grain structure was refined by PSN and ZHP mechanisms during DRX. • Hardness and tensile strength were improved up to ~2.5 times with a good ductility.

  9. Chemical origins of frictional aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2012-11-02

    Although the basic laws of friction are simple enough to be taught in elementary physics classes and although friction has been widely studied for centuries, in the current state of knowledge it is still not possible to predict a friction force from fundamental principles. One of the highly debated topics in this field is the origin of static friction. For most macroscopic contacts between two solids, static friction will increase logarithmically with time, a phenomenon that is referred to as aging of the interface. One known reason for the logarithmic growth of static friction is the deformation creep in plastic contacts. However, this mechanism cannot explain frictional aging observed in the absence of roughness and plasticity. Here, we discover molecular mechanisms that can lead to a logarithmic increase of friction based purely on interfacial chemistry. Predictions of our model are consistent with published experimental data on the friction of silica.

  10. Friction welded closures of waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste presently stored in underground tanks is to undergo a vitrifying process which will immobilize it into a solid form. This solid waste will be contained in a stainless steel canister. The canister opening requires a positive-seal weld, the properties and thickness of which must be at least equal to those of the canister material. All studies and tests performed in the work discussed in this paper have the inertia friction welding concept to be highly feasible in this application. This paper describes the decision to investigate the inertia friction welding process, the inertia friction welding process itself, and a proposed equipment design concept. This system would provide a positive, reliable, inspectable, and full-thickness seal weld while utilizing easily maintainable equipment. This high-quality weld can be achieved even in highly contaminated hot cell

  11. Risk Importance Determination Process of CANDU Maintenance Rule Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Mi Ro; Jo, Ha Yan; Hwang, Mi Jeong

    2009-01-01

    In Korea, Maintenance Rule (MR) programs development for all PWR were completed. However, in case of PHWR (CANDU type, Wolsong Unit 1,2,3,4), the study of MR program was delayed, since the design concepts and operating experiences are different from those of PWR. This paper describes the process and results for the risk importance determination process of functions in scope. The risk importance was determined by PSA Basic Event Mapping and Delphi method. For Delphi evaluation, Delphi evaluation item for CANDU need to be developed because the design and normal operation functions are different from PWR

  12. Methods and devices used to measure friction in rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, J.; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    Friction at the workpiece-die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals; yet it remains the least understood. Hence there is a need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms. To gain...... a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure frictional stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods that have been used...... to measure friction in rolling in the past and discusses some of the recent sensor designs that can now be used to measure friction both in production situations and for research purposes....

  13. Anomalous friction of graphene nanoribbons on waved graphenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Friction plays a critical role in the function and maintenance of small-scale structures, where the conventional Coulomb friction law often fails. To probe the friction at small scales, here we present a molecular dynamics study on the process of dragging graphene nanoribbons on waved graphene substrates. The simulation shows that the induced friction on graphene with zero waviness is ultra-low and closely related to the surface energy barrier. On waved graphenes, the friction generally increases with the amplitude of the wave at a fixed period, but anomalously increases and then decreases with the period at a fixed amplitude. These findings provide insights into the ultra-low friction at small scales, as well as some guidelines into the fabrication of graphene-based nano-composites with high performance.

  14. Frictional behaviour of megathrust fault gouges under in-situ subduction zone conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, S.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Subduction zone megathrusts generate the largest earthquakes and tsunamis known. Understanding and modelling “seismogenesis” on such faults requires an understanding of the frictional processes that control nucleation and propagation of seismic slip. However, experimental data on the frictional

  15. Standard test method for measurement of web/roller friction characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the simulation of a roller/web transport tribosystem and the measurement of the static and kinetic coefficient of friction of the web/roller couple when sliding occurs between the two. The objective of this test method is to provide users with web/roller friction information that can be used for process control, design calculations, and for any other function where web/roller friction needs to be known. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. Friction of ceramic and metal hip hemi-endoprostheses against cadaveric acetabula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, L P; Degreif, J; Rudig, L; Mehler, D; Hely, H; Rommens, P M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of hip arthroplasty have dealt mainly with total endoprosthesis, while tribology measurement values of hemi-endoprosthetic implants are rare. The small amount of experimental tribological data concerning materials of hemi-endoprosthetic implants in the form of pendulum trials, animal experiments, in vivo measurements on human hip joints and pin on disc studies report friction coefficients between 0.014 and 0.57; the friction coefficients measured in fresh human cadaver hip joints were determined between 0.001 and 0.08. The HEPFlEx-hip simulator was constructed to test the friction coefficients of unipolar femur head hemi-endoprostheses made of metal or ceramic against fresh cadaveric acetabula. Its plane of movement is uniaxial with a flexion-extension movement of +30/-18 degrees . The force is produced pneumatically dynamic with amounts of 2.5 kN. Newborn calf serum serves as a lubricant. We mounted 20 fresh porcine acetabula and 10 fresh human cadaver acetabula in the HEPFlEx-hip simulator and compared the two unipolar femur head hemi-endoprostheses (metal vs. ceramic). The mean friction coefficients against porcine acetabula were micro=0.017-0.082 for ceramic and micro=0.020-0.101 for metal; against human cadaver acetabula micro=0.017-0.083 for ceramic and micro=0.019-0.118 for metal. The frictional coefficient deltas (metal-ceramic) values of all measurements were Deltamicro=0.004 for porcine acetabula and Deltamicro=0.001 for cadaver acetabula. Box-plots graphics document significantly lower frictional coefficients of the ceramics. The lower frictional coefficients of ceramic compared to metal against fresh cadaveric acetabula may have a clinical impact on the process of the protrusion of the corresponding femoral head through the acetabulum.

  17. Frictional coefficient depending on active friction radius with BPV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frictional coefficient depending on active friction radius with BPV and BTV in automobile disc braking system. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Journal Home · ABOUT ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  18. Friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winiczenko, Radoslaw; Kaczorowski, Mieczyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The results of the study of the friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers are presented. → The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. → In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. → The process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the interface. -- Abstract: In this paper, ductile cast iron-austenitic stainless steel, ductile cast iron-pure Armco iron and ductile cast iron-low carbon steel interlayers were welded, using the friction welding method. The tensile strength of the joints was determined, using a conventional tensile test machine. Moreover, the hardness across the interface of materials was measured on metallographic specimens. The fracture surface and microstructure of the joints was examined using either light stereoscope microscopy as well as electron microscopy. In this case, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied. The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. It was concluded that the process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the ductile cast iron-stainless steel interface. This leads to increase in carbon concentration in stainless steel where chromium carbides were formed, the size and distribution of which was dependent on the distance from the interface.

  19. Estudo da microestrutura formada no processo de soldagem por atrito em aço C-Mn com pino consumível Microstructural evaluation of a C-Mn steel welded by the friction hidro-pillar process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Rodrigo de Lima Lessa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A soldagem por arco elétrico é a técnica mais empregada para reparar estruturas de grande porte, mas apresenta desvantagens associadas à solidificação do metal de solda. Então a utilização de processos de solda por atrito, especificamente o processo FHPP (Friction Hydro Pillar Processing que consiste na utilização de pinos para reparo por atrito, apresenta vantagens por ser um processo realizado no estado sólido. Menores temperaturas estão envolvidas e não existe influência do ambiente externo, minimizando os problemas nos reparos estruturais. Este trabalho teve como objetivo observar a variação dos parâmetros do processo e os efeitos desses na microestrutura e qualidade do reparo. O estudo comparou diferentes forças axiais nos reparos com aço C-Mn através de metalografias e perfis de microdureza. Uma força axial maior resultou em um menor tempo de processo, em uma microestrutura mais homogênea e evitou os defeitos "falta de adesão" na zona de ligação e "cisalhamento a quente" do pino.The arc welding it is the most used technique to repair large structures, however, has disadvantages that result from the solidification of the weld metal. So the use of friction welding, specifically the FHPP (friction hydro pillar processing process that consists on using plugs for friction repair, presents advantages because it is a process that is carried out on the solid state. Lower temperatures are involved and do not have the influence of the external environment, minimizing the problems on structure repairs. This work has the objective of observe the process parameters variation and their effects on microstructure and on the quality of the repair. The study compared different axial forces on repairs whit C-Mn steel through of metallographic and microhardness profiles. A higher axial force results in less time of process, in a more homogeneous microstructure, and avoided the defects "noncompliance" in the bounding zone and "hot

  20. Internal friction in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of studies conducted to relate internal friction measurements in U to allotropic transformations. It was found that several internal friction peaks occur in α-uranium whose magnitude changed drastically after annealing in the β phase. All of the allotropic transformations in uranium are diffusional in nature under slow heating and cooling conditions. Creep at regions of high stress concentration appears to be responsible for high temperature internal friction in α-uranium. The activation energy for grain boundary relaxation in α-uranium was found to be 65.1 +- 4 kcal/mole. Impurity atoms interfere with the basic mechanism for grain boundary relaxation resulting in a distribution in activation energies. A considerable distribution in ln tau 0 was also found which is a measure of the distribution in local order and in the Debye frequency around a grain boundary

  1. 20 CFR 404.1619 - Quick disability determination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quick disability determination process. 404.1619 Section 404.1619 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... that is fully favorable to the individual or if there is an unresolved disagreement between the...

  2. 20 CFR 416.1019 - Quick disability determination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quick disability determination process. 416.1019 Section 416.1019 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME... disagreement between the disability examiner and the medical or psychological consultant, the State agency will...

  3. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on

  4. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, E. van der

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables.This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the

  5. Process to determine light elements content of steel and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintella, Cristina M.A.L.T.M.H.; Castro, Martha T.P.O. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (IQ/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. LabLaser; Mac-Culloch, Joao N.L.M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present work reports a process to determine qualitatively and quantitatively elements of molar mass inferior to 23 within materials, by X rays spectra associated with multivariate data analysis, or chemometric analysis. The spectra is acquired between 5 keV and 22 keV when the materials are exposed to X radiation. Here is reported the direct determination of carbon content in steel and metallic alloys. The process is more effective when using spectral regions which are not usually used. From the analysis of these spectral regions which were not considered before, it was possible to detect light elements with molar mass lower than 23, which have low capacity of absorbing and emitting radiation, but have high capacity of scattering radiation. The process here reported has the advantage that X-Ray spectra obtained are calibrated multivariately, showing high potential for development in order to be used in a portable field equipment. (author)

  6. An empirically based steady state friction law and implications for fault stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, E; Nielsen, S; Violay, M; Di Toro, G

    2016-04-16

    Empirically based rate-and-state friction laws (RSFLs) have been proposed to model the dependence of friction forces with slip and time. The relevance of the RSFL for earthquake mechanics is that few constitutive parameters define critical conditions for fault stability (i.e., critical stiffness and frictional fault behavior). However, the RSFLs were determined from experiments conducted at subseismic slip rates ( V   0.1 m/s) remains questionable on the basis of the experimental evidence of (1) large dynamic weakening and (2) activation of particular fault lubrication processes at seismic slip rates. Here we propose a modified RSFL (MFL) based on the review of a large published and unpublished data set of rock friction experiments performed with different testing machines. The MFL, valid at steady state conditions from subseismic to seismic slip rates (0.1 µm/s fault frictional stability with implications for slip event styles and relevance for models of seismic rupture nucleation, propagation, and arrest.

  7. Accurate solutions of Colebrook-White's friction factor formulae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimations of friction factor (Ff) in pipeline systems and fluid transport are essential ingredients in engineering fields and processes. In this paper explicit friction factor formulae (Fff) were proposed and evaluated with an aim of developing error free Fff. General Fff that relate Ff, Reynolds number (Re) and relative roughness ...

  8. Cladding of Advanced Al Alloys Employing Friction Stir Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stelt, A.A.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler

  9. Labour market frictions and migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The 4th contribution to the series INT-AR papers is dedicated to the methods of assessing labour market frictions. The paper provides a (brief) international comparison of the role of labour migration in solving these frictions.

  10. Experimental research on friction factor of end faces of contacting mechanical seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Long; Gu, Bo-qin; Feng, Xiu; Sun, Jian-jun

    2008-11-01

    The friction of the seal faces is the most important phenomenon in working process of contacting mechanical seals. The friction factor f is a key parameter for expressing the friction regime of the seal faces, the frictional power, the wearing capacity, the friction heat productivity, the temperature distortion of the end face and the temperature of the end face. The relationship between the friction factor f and the friction regime of the end faces of contacting mechanical seals was discussed from a microscopic point of view. The friction factor is usually worked out by the friction torque which is measured in the test. In the computer aided testing device of the mechanical seal system, the experimental investigations on the basic performance of the B104a-70 contacting mechanical seal was carried out. The test results indicate that the bigger the spring pressure of B104a-70 contacting mechanical seal, the bigger the friction factor. When the spring pressure is less, the bigger the rotational speed, the bigger the friction factor. But when the spring pressure is equal to 0.0866 MPa, the friction factor is not almost influenced by the rotational speed. When the rotational speed and spring pressure are less, the medium pressure has a less influence on the friction factor. When the rotational speed or spring pressure is bigger, the bigger the medium pressure, the less the friction factor.

  11. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  12. Determination of import process during Yucca Mountain Site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, P.S.; Gwyn, D.W.; Wemheuer, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    Construction of an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) for characterizing the Yucca Mountain site precedes the design of a potential repository, with site characterization testing and ESF construction conducted as parallel activities. As a result of this fact, a program is required to: (1) provide for inclusion of the underground excavation into a potential repository, (2) minimize the potential impact of ESF construction on site characterization test results, and (3) minimize the potential impact of ESF construction and site characterization testing on the waste isolation capabilities of the site. At Yucca Mountain, the Determination of Importance (DI) process fulfills these goals. This paper addresses the evolution of the DI process; describes how the DI process fits into design, testing, and construction programs: and discusses how the process is implemented through specification requirements

  13. Impact Damage Evaluation Method of Friction Disc Based on High-Speed Photography and Tooth-Root Stress Coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L; Shao, Y M; Liu, J; Zheng, H L

    2015-01-01

    The stability of friction disc could be seriously affected by the tooth surface damage due to poor working conditions of the wet multi-disc brake in heavy trucks. There are few current works focused on the damage of the friction disc caused by torsion-vibration impacts. Hence, it is necessary to investigate its damage mechanisms and evaluation methods. In this paper, a damage mechanism description and evaluation method of a friction disc based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling is proposed. According to the HighSpeed Photography, the collision process between the friction disc and hub is recorded, which can be used to determine the contact position and deformation. Combined with the strain-stress data obtained by the strain gauge at the place of the tooth-root, the impact force and property are studied. In order to obtain the evaluation method, the damage surface morphology data of the friction disc extracted by 3D Super Depth Digital Microscope (VH-Z100R) is compared with the impact force and property. The quantitative relationships between the amount of deformation and collision number are obtained using a fitting analysis method. The experimental results show that the damage of the friction disc can be evaluated by the proposed impact damage evaluation method based on the high-speed photography and tooth-root stress coupling. (paper)

  14. Determination of reduction yield of lithium metal reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In Kyu; Cho, Young Hwan; Kim, Taek Jin; Jee, Kwang Young

    2004-01-01

    Metal reduction of spent oxide fuel is the first step for the effective storage of spent fuel in Korea as well as transmutation purpose of long-lived radio-nuclides. During the reduction of uranium oxide by lithium metal to uranium metal, lithium oxide is stoichiometrically produced. By determining the concentration of lithium oxide in lithium chloride, we can estimate that how much uranium oxide is converted to uranium metal. Previous method to determine the lithium oxide concentration in lithium chloride is tedious and timing consuming. This paper describe the on-line monitoring method of lithium oxide during the reduction process

  15. Friction in sheet metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, D.; Liljebgren, M.; Berglund, J.

    2010-01-01

    and calls for functional tool surfaces that are durable in these severe tribological conditions. In this study the influence of tool surface topography on friction has been investigated. The frictional response was studied in a Bending Under Tension test. The results did show that a low frictional response...

  16. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 10(8) and between 10(-7) and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  17. Student figures in friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

    , students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures...

  18. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Emile; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Masen, Marc Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is

  19. Coulomb Friction Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleberry, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    Standard hydraulic shock absorber modified to form coulomb (linear friction) damper. Device damps very small velocities and is well suited for use with large masses mounted on soft springs. Damping force is easily adjusted for different loads. Dampers are more reliable than fluid dampers and also more economical to build and to maintain.

  20. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  1. Friction welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Ryuichi; Hatanaka, Tatsuo.

    1969-01-01

    A friction welding method for forming a lattice-shaped base and tie plate supporter for fuel elements is disclosed in which a plate formed with a concavity along its edge is pressure welded to a rotating member such as a boss by longitudinally contacting the projecting surfaces remaining on either side of the concavity with the rotating member during the high speed rotation thereof in the presence of an inert gas. Since only the two projecting surfaces of the plate are fused by friction to the rotary member, heat expansion is absorbed by the concavity to prevent distortion; moreover, a two point contact surface assures a stable fitting and promotes the construction of a rigid lattice in which a number of the abovementioned plates are friction welded between rotating members to form any desired complex arrangement. The inert has serves to protect the material quality of the contacting surfaces from air during the welding step. The present invention thus provides a method in which even Zircaloy may be friction welded in place of casting stainless steel in the construction of supporting lattices to thereby enhance neutron economy. (K. J. Owens)

  2. Confinement-Dependent Friction in Peptide Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, Aykut; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Friction within globular proteins or between adhering macromolecules crucially determines the kinetics of protein folding, the formation, and the relaxation of self-assembled molecular systems. One fundamental question is how these friction effects depend on the local environment and in particular on the presence of water. In this model study, we use fully atomistic MD simulations with explicit water to obtain friction forces as a single polyglycine peptide chain is pulled out of a bundle of k adhering parallel polyglycine peptide chains. The whole system is periodically replicated along the peptide axes, so a stationary state at prescribed mean sliding velocity V is achieved. The aggregation number is varied between k = 2 (two peptide chains adhering to each other with plenty of water present at the adhesion sites) and k = 7 (one peptide chain pulled out from a close-packed cylindrical array of six neighboring peptide chains with no water inside the bundle). The friction coefficient per hydrogen bond, extrapolated to the viscous limit of vanishing pulling velocity V → 0, exhibits an increase by five orders of magnitude when going from k = 2 to k = 7. This dramatic confinement-induced friction enhancement we argue to be due to a combination of water depletion and increased hydrogen-bond cooperativity. PMID:23528088

  3. The use KPI's to determine the waste in production process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsos, G.; Iacob, C. C.; Calefariu, G.

    2016-11-01

    In theory and practice of management is well-known Lean approach about forms of waste from production processes (Muda) and the method VSM (Value Stream Map), one of the most effective methods for determining the activities generating value within industrial companies. It is also obvious concern of the specialists for performance measurement regardless of purview of the organizations. The literature review has shown that the link between performance indicators and the objectives of the companies is researched in detail. However, the correlation between indicators and the forms of waste that generate deviations from the setpoints is rather nature practical and it depends on the talent and managerial skills of those directing production processes. The paper presents the results of a applied study, performed by the authors, through which it was has sought to will create a system of performance indicators specific to manufacturing activity that to be a useful tool to quantify the losses and to determining ways to improve default losses.

  4. Decreasing Friction Sensitivity for Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyáš, Robert; Šelešovský, Jakub

    2014-04-01

    Primary explosives are a group of explosives that are widely used in various initiating devices. One of their properties is sufficient sensitivity to initiating stimuli. However, their sensitivity often introduces a safety risk during their production and subsequent handling. It is generally known that water can be used to desensitize these compounds. The most commonly used industrial primary explosives (lead azide, lead styphnate, tetrazene, and diazodinitrophenol) were mixed with water in various ratios and the sensitivity to friction was determined for all mixtures. It was found that even a small addition of water (5-10%) considerably lowered the friction sensitivity.

  5. Friction measurements of steel on refractory bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiselstein, L.E.

    1981-08-01

    During startup or shutdown of a pool-type LMFBR, substantial shear stresses may arise between the base of the steel reactor vessel and the refractory brick support base. The magnitude of these stresses, which result from differences in thermal expansion, can be estimated if the friction coefficient is known. This report describes experiments to determine friction coefficients between 2 1/4 Cr-1Mo steel and several refractory materials and to examine effects to contact pressure, temperature, sliding velocity, lubricants, and surface condition

  6. Characterization of the dynamic friction of woven fabrics: Experimental methods and benchmark results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, Ulrich; Akkerman, Remko; Fetfatsidis, K.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Schumacher, J.; Ziegmann, G.; Allaoui, S.; Hivet, G.; Maron, B.; Vanclooster, K.; Lomov, S.V.

    2014-01-01

    A benchmark exercise was conducted to compare various friction test set-ups with respect to the measured coefficients of friction. The friction was determined between Twintex®PP, a fabric of commingled yarns of glass and polypropylene filaments, and a metal surface. The same material was supplied to

  7. Development of a Simulink® toolbox for friction control design and compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor DUMITRIU

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the development of a MATLAB/Simulink® library for servo-systems with friction as a part of a new simulation platform dedicated to model, analysis and control design of friction. It is well known that friction is a very important process for the control engineering both for high-precision servo – mechanisms and simple pneumatic and hydraulic systems. Highly nonlinear process, friction may result in steady state errors, limit cycles and poor performance. It is therefore important for control engineering to understand friction phenomena and to know how to deal with them. Moreover, a reliable library of friction models that captures the friction behavior provides an important tool in order to investigate by analysis and simulation the properties of friction that are relevant to control design.

  8. Friction modelling of preloaded tube contact dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.A.; Rogers, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Many loosely supported components are subjected to flow-induced vibration leading to localized wear. Life prediction depends on robust and accurate modelling of the nonlinear dynamics as the components interact with their supports. The output of such analysis is the component dynamic response and impact forces, including friction forces during stick-slip motions. Such results are used to determine the normal work rates, which are utilized to predict fretting wear damage. Accurate estimates of these parameters are essential. This paper presents simulations of a loosely supported fuel-channel tube subject to turbulence excitation. The effects of tube/support clearance and preload are investigated. Several friction models, including velocity-limited, spring-damper, and force-balance are utilized. A comparison of these models is carried out to investigate their accuracy. The results show good agreement with experimental work rates when a simple iterative procedure to update the friction forces is used. (authors)

  9. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyáš, Robert; Šelešovský, Jakub; Musil, Tomáš

    2012-04-30

    The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Friction modelling of preloaded tube contact dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.A.; Rogers, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Many loosely supported components are subjected to flow-induced vibration leading to localized wear. Life prediction depends on robust and accurate modelling of the nonlinear dynamics as the components interact with their supports. The output of such analysis is the component dynamic response and impact forces, including friction forces during stick-slip motions. Such results are used to determine the normal work rates, which are utilized to predict fretting wear damage. Accurate estimates of these parameters are essential. This paper presents simulations of a loosely supported fuel-channel tube subject to turbulence excitation. The effects of tube/support clearance and preload are investigated. Several friction models, including velocity-limited, spring-damper and force-balance are utilized. A comparison of these models is carried out to investigate their accuracy. The results show good agreement with experimental work rates when a simple iterative procedure to update the friction forces is used

  11. Rapid determination of fluorine in the pulp process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, V.V.; Kustov, V.N.; Levitskaya, O.N.

    1994-01-01

    The control of enrichment of mineral raw materials in order to increase the yield of enriched minerals is an important problem of modern industry. A possible solution is an automatic control system (ACS), which makes possible the monitoring and optimization of the enrichment. In terms of future applications, the nuclear-physical analysis, which is based on the use of a radionuclide source of neutrons, is a promising method. The advantages of this method (high rate, the possibility of performing the analysis directly in the flow, high accuracy, and high sensitivity) make themselves evident in the determination of short-lived isotopes, such as F, Ag, Si, Al, V, etc. Both an instrumental complex and a method for the rapid neutron activation determination (RNAD) of fluorine in the pulp flow of the enrichment process of raw materials were developed at the Institute of Chemistry, Far East Division, Russian Academy of Sciences. The analytical complex for RNAD comprises an activator; a densitometer; a pump; a pulp-feed system; a gamma-ray detector; a data acquisition apparatus; and a computer for processing the input/output data and controlling the analysis. The authors found that the RNAD of fluorine using radionuclide Pu-Be sources allows the determination in a 6-L pulp under recirculation conditions with an error of less than 1% in 3-5 minutes. The method allows the routine monitoring of the enrichment process of mineral raw materials

  12. Friction coefficients of PTFE bearing liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C. M.

    1979-01-01

    Data discusses frictional characteristics of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) under temperature extremes and in vacuum environment. Tests were also run on reduced scale hardware to determine effects of vacuum. Data is used as reference by designers of aircraft-control system rod-end bearings and for bearings used in polar regions.

  13. Colorimetric determination of reducing normality in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.

    1983-07-01

    Adjustment of the valence state of plutonium from extractable Pu(IV) to nonextractable Pu(III) in the Purex process is accomplished by addition of reductants such as Fe(II), hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), or U(IV). To implement on-line monitoring of this reduction step for improved process control at the Savannah River Plant, a simple colorimetric method for determining excess reductant (reducing normality) was developed. The method is based on formation of a colored complex of Fe(II) with FerroZine (Hach Chemical Company). The concentration of Fe(II) is determined directly. The concentration of HAN or U(IV), in addition to Fe(II), is determined indirectly as Fe(II), produced through reduction of Fe(III). Experimental conditions for a HAN-Fe(III) reaction of known stoichiometry were established. The effect of hydrazine, which stabilizes U(IV), was also determined. Real-time measurements of color development were made that simulated on-line performance. A laboratory analytical procedure is included. 5 references, 8 figures

  14. Missile rolling tail brake torque system. [simulating bearing friction on canard controlled missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. T. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for simulating varying levels of friction in the bearings of a free rolling tail afterbody on a canard-controlled missile to determine friction effects on aerodynamic control characteristics is described. A ring located between the missile body and the afterbody is utilized in a servo system to create varying levels of friction between the missile body and the afterbody to simulate bearing friction.

  15. Determination of Properties of Selected Fresh and Processed Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley G. Cabrera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the chemical properties, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity and toxicity level of fresh and processed medicinal plants such as corn (Zea mays silk, pancitpancitan (Peperomiapellucida leaves, pandan (Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves, and commercially available tea. The toxicity level of the samples was measured using the Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay (BSLA. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. Results showed that in terms of chemical properties there is significant difference between fresh and processed corn silk except in crude fiber content was noted. Based on proximate analyses of fresh and processed medicinal plants specifically in terms of % moisture, %crude protein and % total carbohydrates were also observed. In addition, there is also significant difference on bioactive compound contents such as total flavonoids and total phenolics between fresh and processed corn silk except in total vitamin E (TVE content. Pandan and pancit-pancitan showed significant difference in all bioactive compounds except in total antioxidant content (TAC. Fresh pancit-pancitan has the highest total phenolics content (TPC and TAC, while the fresh and processed corn silk has the lowest TAC and TVE content, respectively. Furthermore, results of BSLA for the three medicinal plants and commercially available tea extract showed after 24 hours exposure significant difference in toxicity level was observed. The percentage mortality increased with an increase in exposure time of the three medicinal plants and tea extract. The results of the study can served as baseline data for further processing and commercialization of these medicinal plants.

  16. Mechanisms of friction in diamondlike nanocomposite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharf, T. W.; Ohlhausen, J. A.; Tallant, D. R.; Prasad, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    Diamondlike nanocomposite (DLN) coatings (C:H:Si:O) processed from siloxane precursors by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition are well known for their low friction and wear behaviors. In the current study, we have investigated the fundamental mechanisms of friction and interfacial shear strength in DLN coatings and the roles of contact stress and environment on their tribological behavior. Friction and wear measurements were performed from 0.25 to 0.6 GPa contact pressures in three environments: dry ( 2 containing fragments, whereas those formed in dry nitrogen had hydrogenated and long range ordered carbons with practically no SiO 2 fragments, ultimately resulting in much lower interfacial shear strength and COF

  17. Acting on frictions: Learning blocks and flows in knowledge intensive organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma-Frankema, K.M.; Rosendaal, B.W.; Taminiau, Y.T.A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose - It is argued in this paper that opportunities for learning manifest themselves in the form of frictions between the structure-as-experienced by actors and the structure-as-preferred. These frictions are considered as potential triggers of learning processes. The concept of friction

  18. A case study: application of statistical process control tool for determining process capability and sigma level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vikram; Bairagi, Mukesh; Trivedi, P; Nagar, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Statistical process control is the application of statistical methods to the measurement and analysis of variation process. Various regulatory authorities such as Validation Guidance for Industry (2011), International Conference on Harmonisation ICH Q10 (2009), the Health Canada guidelines (2009), Health Science Authority, Singapore: Guidance for Product Quality Review (2008), and International Organization for Standardization ISO-9000:2005 provide regulatory support for the application of statistical process control for better process control and understanding. In this study risk assessments, normal probability distributions, control charts, and capability charts are employed for selection of critical quality attributes, determination of normal probability distribution, statistical stability, and capability of production processes, respectively. The objective of this study is to determine tablet production process quality in the form of sigma process capability. By interpreting data and graph trends, forecasting of critical quality attributes, sigma process capability, and stability of process were studied. The overall study contributes to an assessment of process at the sigma level with respect to out-of-specification attributes produced. Finally, the study will point to an area where the application of quality improvement and quality risk assessment principles for achievement of six sigma-capable processes is possible. Statistical process control is the most advantageous tool for determination of the quality of any production process. This tool is new for the pharmaceutical tablet production process. In the case of pharmaceutical tablet production processes, the quality control parameters act as quality assessment parameters. Application of risk assessment provides selection of critical quality attributes among quality control parameters. Sequential application of normality distributions, control charts, and capability analyses provides a valid statistical

  19. Modelling and Testing of Friction in Forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge about friction is still limited in forging. The theoretical models applied presently for process analysis are not satisfactory compared to the advanced and detailed studies possible to carry out by plastic FEM analyses and more refined models have to be based on experimental testing...

  20. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  1. Measuring internal friction at sonic and ultrasonic frequencies in high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.R.; Russell, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Internal friction measurements provide a sensitive means for probing some structural properties of materials. Defect relaxation processes and phase changes are frequently reflected in internal friction measurements as a function of temperature. Relaxation processes associated with oxygen content have been observed in YBCO and BSCCO (2212). By measuring the internal friction at different frequencies activation energies associated with relaxation processes can be determined. Structural changes are temperature dependent and independent of frequency. The composite bar technique developed employs a piezoelectric quartz bar (with lengths of 2 cm or 3 cm and resonant frequencies of approximately 85 kHz or 120 kHz) with a resonant bar of HTSC attached to one end. The quartz bar is suspended at its nodal points and the system excited electrically using a regenerative feedback system. The composite bar method can also be used at low kilohertz frequencies by attaching the HTSC specimen used in the previous technique to the end of a much longer (e g 30 cm) fused silica rod which has very low damping. The resulting composite bar can be excited electrostatically or electromagnetically at frequencies below 10 kHz. The internal friction can be measured by scanning through the resonant frequency and measuring the bandwidth or by observing the decay of free oscillation in the bar. The advantage of using the two composite bar techniques is that the measurements can be made on the same specimen at different frequencies

  2. Improving friction stir welding of blanks of different thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratini, L. [Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: abaqus@dtpm.unipa.it; Buffa, G. [Dipartimento di Tecnologia Meccanica, Produzione e Ingegneria Gestionale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Shivpuri, R. [Ohio State University, Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2007-06-25

    Friction stir welding (FSW) appears to be a promising process even in the welding of blanks of different thicknesses. Actually, such particular tailor welded blanks (TWBs) are usually characterized by a reduction in ductility due to the utilized fusion welding process. In this paper the authors, starting from a preliminary feasibility study, investigate the possibility to improve the mechanical performances of friction stir welded blanks of aluminum alloy with different thicknesses. Both experiments and a FE analyses are developed for a few case studies with different thickness ratios between the blanks. The numerical investigations are performed with the aim to highlight the material temperature distribution during the process in order to determine process conditions for which an almost symmetric thermal flow is obtained in the two blanks of the joint. In this way, a few simple process design rules are derived and verified through experiments. In particular a thickness ratio up to 2 was considered and a joint resistance of about the 80% of the parent material ultimate tensile strength was observed.

  3. Improving friction stir welding of blanks of different thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, L.; Buffa, G.; Shivpuri, R.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) appears to be a promising process even in the welding of blanks of different thicknesses. Actually, such particular tailor welded blanks (TWBs) are usually characterized by a reduction in ductility due to the utilized fusion welding process. In this paper the authors, starting from a preliminary feasibility study, investigate the possibility to improve the mechanical performances of friction stir welded blanks of aluminum alloy with different thicknesses. Both experiments and a FE analyses are developed for a few case studies with different thickness ratios between the blanks. The numerical investigations are performed with the aim to highlight the material temperature distribution during the process in order to determine process conditions for which an almost symmetric thermal flow is obtained in the two blanks of the joint. In this way, a few simple process design rules are derived and verified through experiments. In particular a thickness ratio up to 2 was considered and a joint resistance of about the 80% of the parent material ultimate tensile strength was observed

  4. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  5. Prolegomena to the Study of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The literature contains many approaches toward modeling of the friction stir welding (FSW) process with varying treatments of the weld metal properties. It is worthwhile to consider certain fundamental features of the process before attempting to interpret FSW phenomena: Because of the unique character of metal deformation (as opposed to, say, viscous deformation) a velocity "discontinuity" or shear surface occurs in FSW and determines much of the character of the welding mechanism. A shear surface may not always produce a sound bond. Balancing mechanical power input against conduction and convection heat losses yields a relation, a "temperature index", between spindle speed and travel speed to maintain constant weld temperature. But many process features are only weakly dependent upon temperature. Thus, unlike modeling of metal forming processes, it may be that modeling the FSW process independently of the material conditions has some merit.

  6. Process for determining the remediation category of hazardous substance sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieben, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation process has been developed that aids in selecting the appropriate remediation category of hazardous substance sites. Three general remediation categories have been established: No further Action: Potential Early Action: and Defer for RI/FS or Transition/Decontamination and Decommissioning. This evaluation method is a preliminary screening process only and will not identify the most appropriate remediation alternative for each site. The remedy selection process can proceed only after a remediation category is determined for each site. All sites are evaluated at a preliminary screening level to determine the general remediation category. After the first screen, a secondary evaluation is performed on both the PEA sites and the DEFER sites. For PEAs, this secondary evaluation will incorporate additional specific factors, such as a screening level risk assessment. For the DEFER sites feasibility factors will be used to distinguish between the sites which should undergo a normal RI/FS and the sites which will be recommended to be remediated in association with D ampersand D of buildings. Ultimately, all of the sites will be placed into one of four remediation categories

  7. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  8. Sample processing method for the determination of perchlorate in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyke, Jason V.; Kirk, Andrea B.; Kalyani Martinelango, P.; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many different water sources and foods have been reported to contain perchlorate. Studies indicate that significant levels of perchlorate are present in both human and dairy milk. The determination of perchlorate in milk is particularly important due to its potential health impact on infants and children. As for many other biological samples, sample preparation is more time consuming than the analysis itself. The concurrent presence of large amounts of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, etc., demands some initial cleanup; otherwise the separation column lifetime and the limit of detection are both greatly compromised. Reported milk processing methods require the addition of chemicals such as ethanol, acetic acid or acetonitrile. Reagent addition is undesirable in trace analysis. We report here an essentially reagent-free sample preparation method for the determination of perchlorate in milk. Milk samples are spiked with isotopically labeled perchlorate and centrifuged to remove lipids. The resulting liquid is placed in a disposable centrifugal ultrafilter device with a molecular weight cutoff of 10 kDa, and centrifuged. Approximately 5-10 ml of clear liquid, ready for analysis, is obtained from a 20 ml milk sample. Both bovine and human milk samples have been successfully processed and analyzed by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry (IC-MS). Standard addition experiments show good recoveries. The repeatability of the analytical result for the same sample in multiple sample cleanup runs ranged from 3 to 6% R.S.D. This processing technique has also been successfully applied for the determination of iodide and thiocyanate in milk

  9. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  10. Psychophysical evaluation of a variable friction tactile interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samur, Evren; Colgate, J. Edward; Peshkin, Michael A.

    2009-02-01

    This study explores the haptic rendering capabilities of a variable friction tactile interface through psychophysical experiments. In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the sensory resolution associated with the Tactile Pattern Display (TPaD), friction discrimination experiments are conducted. During the experiments, subjects are asked to explore the glass surface of the TPaD using their bare index fingers, to feel the friction on the surface, and to compare the slipperiness of two stimuli, displayed in sequential order. The fingertip position data is collected by an infrared frame and normal and translational forces applied by the finger are measured by force sensors attached to the TPaD. The recorded data is used to calculate the coefficient of friction between the fingertip and the TPaD. The experiments determine the just noticeable difference (JND) of friction coefficient for humans interacting with the TPaD.

  11. Determination of a cleaning and decontamination process using solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutot, P.; Schipfer, P.

    1967-03-01

    This work has been carried out on samples of the white cotton serge material of which most of the working overalls of the Nuclear Research Centre are made. The aims are: - to determine,from the decontamination and cleaning points of view, the efficiency of various solvents (white-spirit, trichloroethylene, perchlorethylene and tri-chloro-trifluoroethane) and the role of additives likely to improve the treatment; - to control the textile from the wear and shrinkage points of view; - to try to develop a basic cleaning and decontamination process as a function of the possibilities of each solvent considered. (authors) [fr

  12. Universal Aging Mechanism for Static and Sliding Friction of Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Michael; Dietzel, Dirk; Tekiel, Antoni; Topple, Jessica; Grütter, Peter; Schirmeisen, André

    2016-07-08

    The term "contact aging" refers to the temporal evolution of the interface between a slider and a substrate usually resulting in increasing friction with time. Current phenomenological models for multiasperity contacts anticipate that such aging is not only the driving force behind the transition from static to sliding friction, but at the same time influences the general dynamics of the sliding friction process. To correlate static and sliding friction on the nanoscale, we show experimental evidence of stick-slip friction for nanoparticles sliding on graphite over a wide dynamic range. We can assign defined periods of aging to the stick phases of the particles, which agree with simulations explicitly including contact aging. Additional slide-hold-slide experiments for the same system allow linking the sliding friction results to static friction measurements, where both friction mechanisms can be universally described by a common aging formalism.

  13. Factors determining the viability of radiation processing in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, H.J. van der

    1988-01-01

    In the fifteen years since the introduction of radiation processing to South Africa, four commercial irradiation facilities have been established. These are involved in the processing of a large variety of products, from syringes and prostheses to strawberries and sugar yeast. Three of the facilities are devoted mainly to food irradiation and several thousand tonnes are now processed annually. During this period it was repeatedly experienced that the successful introduction of radiation processing in general, and food radurization in particular, on a commercial scale was critically dependent on the following factors: acceptance by the producer, industry and consumer; initial capital expenditure; running costs and overheads in general; and continuous throughput. All of these factors contribute to the processing cost which is the ultimate factor in determining the value/price ratio for the potential entrepreneur and customer of this new technology. After a market survey had identified the need for a new food irradiation facility to cope with the growing interest in commercial food radurization in the Western Cape, the above-mentioned factors were of cardinal importance in the design and manufacture of a new irradiator. The resulting batch-pallet facility which was commissioned in August 1986, is rather inefficient as far as energy utilization is concerned but this shortcoming is compensated for by its low cost, versatility and low hold-up. Although the facility has limitations as far as the processing of really large volumes of produce is concerned, it is particularly suitable not only for developing countries, but for developed countries in the introductory phase of commercial food radurization. (author)

  14. The influence of surface topography on the forming friction of automotive aluminum sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Pamela Ann [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1998-05-01

    Interest in utilizing aluminum alloys in automobiles has increased in recent years as a result of the desire to lower automobile weight and, consequently, increase fuel economy. While aluminum alloy use in cast parts has increased, outer body panel applications are still being investigated. The industry is interested in improving the formability of these sheet alloys by a combination of alloy design and processing. A different avenue of improving the formability of these alloys may be through patterning of the sheet surface. Surface patterns hold the lubricant during the forming process, with a resulting decrease in the sheet-die surface contact. While it has been speculated that an optimum surface pattern would consist of discrete cavities, detailed investigation into the reduction of forming friction by utilizing discrete patterns is lacking. A series of discrete patterns were investigated to determine the dependence of the forming friction of automotive aluminum alloys on pattern lubricant carrying capacity and on material strength. Automotive aluminum alloys used in outer body panel applications were rolled on experimental rolls that had been prepared with a variety of discrete patterns. All patterns for each alloy were characterized before and after testing both optically and, to determine pattern lubricant capacity, using three dimensional laser profilometry. A draw bead simulation (DBS) friction tester was designed and fabricated to determine the forming friction of the patterned sheets. Tensile testing and frictionless DBS testing were performed to ascertain the material properties of each sheet. The most striking result of this work was the inversely linear dependence of forming friction on the lubricant carrying capacity of the discrete patterns.

  15. Nanoscale electrowetting effects observed by using friction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Reynier; Guan, Li; Zhu, Xiao-Yang; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2011-06-21

    We report the study of electrowetting (EW) effects under strong electric field on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface by using friction force microscopy (FFM). The friction force dependence on the electric field at nanometer scale can be closely related to electrowetting process based on the fact that at this scale frictional behavior is highly affected by capillary phenomena. By measuring the frictional signal between a conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and the PMMA surface, the ideal EW region (Young-Lippmann equation) and the EW saturation were identified. The change in the interfacial contact between the tip and the PMMA surface with the electric field strength is closely associated with the transition from the ideal EW region to the EW saturation. In addition, a reduction of the friction coefficient was observed when increasing the applied electric field in the ideal EW region. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Celtic Stone Dynamics Revisited Using Dry Friction and Rolling Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Awrejcewicz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The integral model of dry friction components is built with assumption of classical Coulomb friction law and with specially developed model of normal stress distribution coupled with rolling resistance for elliptic contact shape. In order to avoid a necessity of numerical integration over the contact area at each the numerical simulation step, few versions of approximate model are developed and then tested numerically. In the numerical experiments the simulation results of the Celtic stone with the friction forces modelled by the use of approximants of different complexity (from no coupling between friction force and torque to the second order Padé approximation are compared to results obtained from model with friction approximated in the form of piecewise polynomial functions (based on the Taylor series with hertzian stress distribution. The coefficients of the corresponding approximate models are found by the use of optimization methods, like as in identification process using the real experiment data.

  17. Frictional properties of single crystals HMX, RDX and PETN explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.Q.; Huang, F.L.

    2010-01-01

    The frictional properties of single crystals of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) secondary explosives are examined using a sensitive friction machine. The explosive crystals used for the measurements are at least 3.5 mm wide. The friction coefficients between crystals of the same explosive (i.e., HMX on HMX, etc.), crystals of different explosives (i.e., HMX on RDX, etc.), and each explosive and a well-polished gauge steel surface are determined. The frictional surfaces are also studied under an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) to analyze surface microstructural changes under increasing loading forces. The friction coefficients vary considerably with increasing normal loading forces and are particularly sensitive to slider shapes, crystal roughness and the mechanical properties of both the slider and the sample. With increasing loading forces, most friction experiments show surface damage, consisting of grooves, debris, and nano-particles, on both the slider and sample. In some cases, a strong evidence of a localized molten state is found in the central region of the friction track. Possible mechanisms that affect the friction coefficient are discussed based on microscopic observations.

  18. A study on a characteristic of stem friction coefficient for motor operated flexible wedge gate valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Woong; Park, Sung-Geun; Lee, Sang-Guk; Kang, Shin-Cheul

    2009-01-01

    Stem friction coefficient is a coefficient that represents friction between thread leads of the stem and stem nut. It is an important factor to determine output thrust delivered from the actuator to the valve stem in assessing performance of motor operated valves. This study analyzes the effects of changes in differential pressure on stem friction coefficient, and determines the bounding value of stem friction coefficient. A dynamic test was conducted on multiple flexible wedge gate valves in various differential pressure conditions, and the test data was statistically analyzed to determine the bounding value. The results show that stem friction coefficient in middle and high differential pressure is influenced by fluid pressure, while stem friction coefficient in low differential pressure is almost not affected by fluid pressure. In addition, it is found that the bounding value of stem friction coefficient is higher in a closing stroke than in an opening stroke.

  19. Bioinspired orientation-dependent friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Longjian; Iturri, Jagoba; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; del Campo, Aránzazu

    2014-09-23

    Spatular terminals on the toe pads of a gecko play an important role in directional adhesion and friction required for reversible attachment. Inspired by the toe pad design of a gecko, we study friction of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars terminated with asymmetric (spatular-shaped) overhangs. Friction forces in the direction of and against the spatular end were evaluated and compared to friction forces on symmetric T-shaped pillars and pillars without overhangs. The shape of friction curves and the values of friction forces on spatula-terminated pillars were orientation-dependent. Kinetic friction forces were enhanced when shearing against the spatular end, while static friction was stronger in the direction toward the spatular end. The overall friction force was higher in the direction against the spatula end. The maximum value was limited by the mechanical stability of the overhangs during shear. The aspect ratio of the pillar had a strong influence on the magnitude of the friction force, and its contribution surpassed and masked that of the spatular tip for aspect ratios of >2.

  20. Evaluation of interfacial bonding in dissimilar materials of YSZ-alumina composites to 6061 aluminium alloy using friction welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uday, M.B.; Ahmad Fauzi, M.N.; Zuhailawati, H.; Ismail, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Friction-welding process. → Joining between ceramic composite and metal alloy. → Slip casting of the yttria stabilized zirconia/alumina composite samples. - Abstract: The interfacial microstructures characteristics of alumina ceramic body reinforced with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was evaluated after friction welding to 6061 aluminum alloy using optical and electron microscopy. Alumina rods containing 25 and 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia were fabricated by slip casting in plaster of Paris (POP) molds and subsequently sintered at 1600 deg. C. On the other hand, aluminum rods were machine down to the required dimension using a lathe machine. The diameter of the ceramic and the metal rods was 16 mm. Rotational speeds for the friction welding were varied between 900 and 1800 rpm. The friction pressure was maintained at 7 MPa for a friction time of 30 s. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the microstructure of the resultant joints, particularly at the interface. The joints were also examined with EDX line (energy dispersive X-ray) in order to determine the phases formed during the welding. The mechanical properties of the friction welded YSZ-Al 2 O 3 composite to 6061 alloy were determined with a four-point bend test and Vickers microhardness. The experimental results showed the degree of deformation varied significantly for the 6061 Al alloy than the ceramic composite part. The mechanical strength of friction-welded ceramic composite/6061 Al alloy components were obviously affected by joining rotational speed selected which decreases in strength with increasing rotational speed.

  1. Frictional behaviour of high performance fibrouws tows: A contact mechanics model of tow -metal friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Composites forming processes involve mechanical interactions on the ply, tow, and filament level. The deformations that occur during forming processes are governed by friction between tows and tooling material on the mesoscopic level and consequently between filaments and a counterface on the

  2. Frictional behavior of carbon fiber tows: a contact mechanics model of tow–tow friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Bo; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Rietman, Bert; Akkerman, Remko

    2014-01-01

    Composite-forming processes involve mechanical interactions at the ply, tow, and filament level. The deformations that occur during forming processes are governed by friction between the contacting tows on the mesoscopic level and consequently between filaments on the microscopic level. A thorough

  3. Analisa Kekuatan Sambungan Pipa Baja Karbon dan Besi Cor Berbasis Teknologi Las Gesek (Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Husodo

    2016-12-01

    process of switching to an alternative method for frictionwelding manufacturing process motorcycle handlebar. The study was conducted with three variations of pressurewrought by 375, 437.5 and 500 kgf / cm 2, while the frictional pressure of 62.5 kgf / cm 2 and the length of time string 120seconds. The resulting test samples tested microstructure with metallografi done while the mechanical propertieshardness testing and tensile strength. The analysis were performed to determine the chances of friction welding is usedas an alternative production process motorcycle handlebar. It can be deduced that the friction welding method can beused to connect two pieces of metal of different steel compositions, namely low carbon steel pipe with cast iron. Weldstrength will increase when the pressure forging also increased. The highest weld strength was 546.66 N / mm2.Keywords: Friction weldingl, low carbon steel pipe, cast iron, forging pressure, friction pressure

  4. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyáš, Robert; Šelešovský, Jakub; Musil, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The friction sensitivity of 14 samples of primary explosives was determined. ► The same apparatus (small scale BAM) and the same method (probit analysis) was used. ► The crystal shapes and sizes were documented with microscopy. ► Almost all samples are less sensitive than lead azide, which is commercially used. ► The organic peroxides (TATP, DADP, HMTD) are not as sensitive as often reported. - Abstract: The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature.

  5. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert, E-mail: robert.matyas@upce.cz [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Pardubice 532 10 (Czech Republic); Selesovsky, Jakub; Musil, Tomas [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Pardubice 532 10 (Czech Republic)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The friction sensitivity of 14 samples of primary explosives was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The same apparatus (small scale BAM) and the same method (probit analysis) was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal shapes and sizes were documented with microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost all samples are less sensitive than lead azide, which is commercially used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The organic peroxides (TATP, DADP, HMTD) are not as sensitive as often reported. - Abstract: The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature.

  6. Network formation determined by the diffusion process of random walkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nobutoshi

    2008-01-01

    We studied the diffusion process of random walkers in networks formed by their traces. This model considers the rise and fall of links determined by the frequency of transports of random walkers. In order to examine the relation between the formed network and the diffusion process, a situation in which multiple random walkers start from the same vertex is investigated. The difference in diffusion rate of random walkers according to the difference in dimension of the initial lattice is very important for determining the time evolution of the networks. For example, complete subgraphs can be formed on a one-dimensional lattice while a graph with a power-law vertex degree distribution is formed on a two-dimensional lattice. We derived some formulae for predicting network changes for the 1D case, such as the time evolution of the size of nearly complete subgraphs and conditions for their collapse. The networks formed on the 2D lattice are characterized by the existence of clusters of highly connected vertices and their life time. As the life time of such clusters tends to be small, the exponent of the power-law distribution changes from γ ≅ 1-2 to γ ≅ 3

  7. DETERMINATION OF DIVERSITY OF THE WORKSTATUSES IN THE IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TKACH T. V.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Implementation of the plans is accompanied by an increase in the uncertainty of the state of the production system, which largely depends on the organizational and technological decisions laid down in the calendar plan at the stage of its development. Determining the changes in the diversity of the system statuses, in terms of the implementation stages of the plan, will allow to outline the likely crisis periods and to prepare for them in advance. In accordance with this, research in the field of improving of the methodology for developing the calendar plans in order to expand of the factors on which its feasibility is assessed, determines the relevance of this work. Purpose of the article. To determine the impact of organizational and technological decisions of the calendar plan on the appearance of parametric failures of a separate work. Conclusion. A methodology for calculating the dynamics of the diversity of possible statuses the process of the eхecuting of a separate work, to monitor the intensity of the increase in the uncertainty of the system status by the stages of the implementation of the calendar plan.

  8. Mechanisms of shock-induced dynamic friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, R E; Ball, G J; Keightley, P T

    2006-01-01

    . Instead the pressure and sliding velocity determine whether the impulse will be very high or very low. The next generation of friction models for hydrocodes will need to account for these factors

  9. Acoustic emission evolution during sliding friction of Hadfield steel single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Novitskaya, O. S.; Kolubaev, A. V.; Sizova, O. V.

    2017-12-01

    Friction is a complex dynamic process. Direct observation of processes occurring in the friction zone is impossible due to a small size of a real contact area and, as a consequence, requires various additional methods applicable to monitor a tribological contact state. One of such methods consists in the analysis of acoustic emission data of a tribological contact. The use of acoustic emission entails the problem of interpreting physical sources of signals. In this paper, we analyze the evolution of acoustic emission signal frames in friction of Hadfield steel single crystals. The chosen crystallographic orientation of single crystals enables to identify four stages related to friction development as well as acoustic emission signals inherent in these stages. Acoustic emission signal parameters are studied in more detail by the short-time Fourier transform used to determine the time variation of the median frequency and its power spectrum. The results obtained will facilitate the development of a more precise method to monitor the tribological contact based on the acoustic emission method.

  10. Effect of friction time on the properties of friction welded YSZ‐alumina composite and 6061 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday M. Basheer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of alumina 0, 25, 50 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ composite and 6061 aluminium alloy joints formed by friction welding. The alumina-YSZ composites were prepared through slip casting in plaster of Paris molds (POP and subsequently sintered at 1600°C, while the aluminium rods were machined down using a lathe machine to the dimension required. The welding process was carried out under different rotational speeds and friction times, while friction force (0.5 ton-force was kept constant. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the interface of the joints structure. The experimental results showed that the friction time has a significant effect on joint structure and mechanical properties.

  11. Identification of GMS friction model without friction force measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grami, Said; Aissaoui, Hicham

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with an online identification of the Generalized Maxwell Slip (GMS) friction model for both presliding and sliding regime at the same time. This identification is based on robust adaptive observer without friction force measurement. To apply the observer, a new approach of calculating the filtered friction force from the measurable signals is introduced. Moreover, two approximations are proposed to get the friction model linear over the unknown parameters and an approach of suitable filtering is introduced to guarantee the continuity of the model. Simulation results are presented to prove the efficiency of the approach of identification.

  12. Change in Frictional Behavior during Olivine Serpentinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, T.; Zhu, W.; French, M. E.; Belzer, B.

    2017-12-01

    Hydration of mantle peridotites (serpentinization) is pervasive at plate boundaries. It is widely accepted that serpentinization is intrinsically linked to hydromechanical processes within the sub-seafloor, where the interplay between cracking, fluid supply and chemical reactions is responsible for a spectrum of fault slip, from earthquake swarms at the transform faults, to slow slip events at the subduction zone. Previous studies demonstrate that serpentine minerals can either promote slip or creep depend on many factors that include sliding velocity, temperature, pressure, interstitial fluids, etc. One missing link from the experimental investigation of serpentine to observations of tectonic faults is the extent of alteration necessary for changing the frictional behaviors. We quantify changes in frictional behavior due to serpentinization by conducting experiments after in-situ serpentinization of olivine gouge. In the sample configuration a layer of powder is sandwiched between porous sandstone blocks with 35° saw-cut surface. The starting material of fine-grained (63 120 µm) olivine powder is reacted with deionized water for 72 hours at 150°C before loading starts. Under the conventional triaxial configuration, the sample is stressed until sliding occurs within the gouge. A series of velocity-steps is then performed to measure the response of friction coefficient to variations of sliding velocity from which the rate-and-state parameters are deduced. For comparison, we measured the frictional behavior of unaltered olivine and pure serpentine gouges.Our results confirm that serpentinization causes reduced frictional strength and velocity weakening. In unaltered olivine gouge, an increase in frictional resistance with increasing sliding velocity is observed, whereas the serpentinized olivine and serpentine gouges favor velocity weakening behaviors at the same conditions. Furthermore, we observed that high pore pressures cause velocity weakening in olivine but

  13. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nicolaas P.; Gutkowski, Witold; Rothenburg, L.; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle

  14. Determination of lead 210 in scales from industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Lígia S.; Moreira, Rubens M.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Barbosa, João B.S.

    2017-01-01

    Industrial processes such as oil and gas extraction and groundwater exploitation are examples of installations that can accumulate naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) during the extraction and production. Lead-210 deposits in the production can be formed by the same mechanisms that occur in the environment through the support of Radon-222, (where 210 Pb is produced at 222 Rn decay) or without support, as 210 Pb. The objective of this work is to evaluate the mineralogical characteristics and determine the activity of lead-210 in the scales using the X-Ray Diffraction and Gamma Spectrometry techniques. Were analyzed fifteen samples, four scales from oil industry, ten scales from groundwater conductors and one for groundwater supply pipe. The highest activity found in the oil scale and groundwater conductors scale was 0.30 ± 0.06 Bq g -1 and 3.80 ± 0.20 Bq g -1 , respectively. (author)

  15. Determination of action zone in the nuclear / radiology handling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade Awalludin

    2013-01-01

    Assessment has been conducted on determination of action zone in nuclear or radiological emergency. The assessment is taken into account radiological risk level in nuclear or radiological emergency management process outside nuclear installation. Managing of nuclear emergency is same as that one of other emergency by adding the principles of radiation protection. This study aims to provide guidance in making of safety and security perimeter outside the nuclear installation for first responders during nuclear/radiological emergency based on dose rate, contamination level or distance from the scene. Separation of working zone is important for first responder safety that works in radiological environment in the event of nuclear or radiation emergency without violating their standard operating procedure. Value limit of safety and security perimeter has been made according to the conditions in Indonesia and considering the applicability in practical. (author)

  16. Determination of lead 210 in scales from industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Lígia S.; Moreira, Rubens M.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Barbosa, João B.S., E-mail: ligsfaria@gmail.com, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br, E-mail: gfk@cdtn.br, E-mail: jbsb@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Industrial processes such as oil and gas extraction and groundwater exploitation are examples of installations that can accumulate naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) during the extraction and production. Lead-210 deposits in the production can be formed by the same mechanisms that occur in the environment through the support of Radon-222, (where {sup 210}Pb is produced at {sup 222}Rn decay) or without support, as {sup 210}Pb. The objective of this work is to evaluate the mineralogical characteristics and determine the activity of lead-210 in the scales using the X-Ray Diffraction and Gamma Spectrometry techniques. Were analyzed fifteen samples, four scales from oil industry, ten scales from groundwater conductors and one for groundwater supply pipe. The highest activity found in the oil scale and groundwater conductors scale was 0.30 ± 0.06 Bq g{sup -1} and 3.80 ± 0.20 Bq g{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  17. Argo packing friction research update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanTassell, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper focuses on the issue of valve packing friction and its affect on the operability of motor- and air-operated valves (MOVs and AOVs). At this time, most nuclear power plants are required to perform postmaintenance testing following a packing adjustment or replacement. In many cases, the friction generated by the packing does not impact the operability window of a valve. However, to date there has not been a concerted effort to substantiate this claim. To quantify the effects of packing friction, it has become necessary to develop a formula to predict the friction effects accurately. This formula provides a much more accurate method of predicting packing friction than previously used factors based strictly on stem diameter. Over the past 5 years, Argo Packing Company has been developing and testing improved graphite packing systems at research facilities, such as AECL Chalk River and Wyle Laboratories. Much of this testing has centered around reducing and predicting friction that is related to packing. In addition, diagnostic testing for Generic Letter 89-10 MOVs and AOVs has created a significant data base. In July 1992 Argo asked several utilities to provide running load data that could be used to quantify packing friction repeatability and predictability. This technical paper provides the basis to predict packing friction, which will improve calculations for thrust requirements for Generic Leter 89-10 and future AOV programs. In addition, having an accurate packing friction formula will improve packing performance when low running loads are identified that would indicate insufficient sealing force

  18. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface.

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite in simulated Purex Process solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, I.daC. de; Matsuda, H T; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1984-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method for nitrite determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is presented, utilizing the Griess reagent for the formation of the coloured azocompound with an absorption maximum at 525 nm. Molar absortivity was 36,262 and the sensitivity of the method 10/sup -6/M for nitrite. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 2 to 30..mu..g NO/sup -//sub 2//25 ml in cells of 1 cm optical path. The method can be used in the presence of uranium up to limits of an U/NO/sup -//sub 2/ ratio of 150. Test solutions were prepared to simulate composition and concentrations as obtained by irradiating standard fuel with a neutro flux of 3.2 x 10/sup 13/ n.s/sup -1/.cm/sup -2/, with a burn-up value of 33,000 Mwd/T and cooling time of two years. Nitrite determinations in these solutions were accurate within limits of 5%.

  20. Analysis of the unstressed lattice spacing, d0, for the determination of the residual stress in a friction stir welded plate of an age-hardenable aluminum alloy – Use of equilibrium conditions and a genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cioffi, F.; Hidalgo, J.I.; Fernández, R.; Pirling, T.; Fernández, B.; Gesto, D.; Puente Orench, I.; Rey, P.; González-Doncel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Procedures based on equilibrium conditions (stress and bending moment) have been used to obtain an unstressed lattice spacing, d 0 , as a crucial requirement for calculating the residual stress (RS) profile across a joint conducted on a 10 mm thick plate of age-hardenable AA2024 alloy by friction stir welding (FSW). Two procedures have been used that take advantage of neutron diffraction measurements. First, equilibrium conditions were imposed on sections parallel to the weld so that a constant d 0 value corresponding to the base material region could be calculated analytically. Second, balance conditions were imposed on a section transverse to the weld. Then, using the data and a genetic algorithm, suitable d 0 values for the different regions of the weld have been found. For several reasons, the comb method has proved to be inappropriate for RS determination in the case of age-hardenable alloys. However, the equilibrium conditions, together with the genetic algorithm, has been shown to be very suitable for determining RS profiles in FSW joints of these alloys, where inherent microstructural variations of d 0 across the weld are expected