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Sample records for friction lab scale

  1. Evolution of seismic signals and slip patterns along subduction zones: insights from a friction lab scale experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Voisin, Christophe; Larose, Eric; Renard, François

    2008-01-01

    Continuous GPS and broadband seismic monitoring have revealed a variety of disparate slip patterns especially in shallow dipping subduction zones, among which regular earthquakes, slow slip events and silent quakes1,2. Slow slip events are sometimes accompanied by Non Volcanic Tremors (NVT), which origin remains unclear3, either related to fluid migration or to friction. The present understanding of the whole menagerie of slip patterns is based upon numerical simulations imposing ad hoc values of the rate and state parameters a and b4-6 derived from the temperature dependence of a and b of a wet granite gouge7. Here we investigate the influence of the cumulative slip on the frictional and acoustic patterns of a lab scale subduction zone. Shallow loud earthquakes (stick-slip events), medium depth slow, deeper silent quakes (smooth sliding oscillations) and deepest steady-state creep (continuous sliding) are reproduced by the ageing of contact interface with cumulative displacement8. The Acoustic Emission evolv...

  2. Multiscaling behavior of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesar, M.; Jamali, T.; Sadeghi, A.; Movahed, S. M. S.; Fesler, G.; Meyer, E.; Khoshnevisan, B.; Jafari, G. R.

    2017-06-01

    The scaling behavior of friction between rough surfaces is a well-known phenomenon. It might be asked whether such a scaling feature also exists for friction at an atomic scale despite the absence of roughness on atomically flat surfaces. Indeed, other types of fluctuations, e.g., thermal and instrumental fluctuations, become appreciable at this length scale and can lead to scaling behavior of the measured atomic-scale friction. We investigate this using the lateral force exerted on the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) when the tip is dragged over the clean NaCl (001) surface in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. Here the focus is on the fluctuations of the lateral force profile rather than its saw-tooth trend; we first eliminate the trend using the singular value decomposition technique and then explore the scaling behavior of the detrended data, which contains only fluctuations, using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. The results demonstrate a scaling behavior for the friction data ranging from 0.2 to 2 nm with the Hurst exponent H =0.61 ±0.02 at a 1 σ confidence interval. Moreover, the dependence of the generalized Hurst exponent, h (q ) , on the index variable q confirms the multifractal or multiscaling behavior of the nanofriction data. These results prove that fluctuation of nanofriction empirical data has a multifractal behavior which deviates from white noise.

  3. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied. Ki...

  4. Atomic-scale friction : thermal effects and capillary condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinesh, Kochupurackal Balakrishna Pillai

    2006-01-01

    This work entitled as "Atomic-scale friction: thermal effects and capillary condensation" is a study on the fundamental aspects of the origin of friction from the atomic-scale. We study two realistic aspects of atomic-scale friction, namely the effect of temperature and the effect of relative humidi

  5. A Lab-Scale CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Mark E.; Finn, Cory K.; Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Sun, Sidney; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that prohibitive resupply costs for extended-duration manned space flight missions will demand that a high degree of recycling and in situ food production be implemented. A prime candidate for in situ food production is the growth of higher level plants. Research in the area of plant physiology is currently underway at many institutions. This research is aimed at the characterization and optimization of gas exchange, transpiration and food production of higher plants in order to support human life in space. However, there are a number of unresolved issues involved in making plant chambers an integral part of a closed life support system. For example, issues pertaining to the integration of tightly coupled, non-linear systems with small buffer volumes will need to be better understood in order to ensure successful long term operation of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The Advanced Life Support Division at NASA Ames Research Center has embarked on a program to explore some of these issues and demonstrate the feasibility of the CELSS concept. The primary goal of the Laboratory Scale CELSS Project is to develop a fully-functioning integrated CELSS on a laboratory scale in order to provide insight, knowledge and experience applicable to the design of human-rated CELSS facilities. Phase I of this program involves the integration of a plant chamber with a solid waste processor. This paper will describe the requirements, design and some experimental results from Phase I of the Laboratory Scale CELSS Program.

  6. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  7. Nanoscience friction and rheology on the nanometer scale

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, E; Gyalog, T; Overney, R M

    1998-01-01

    Friction force microscopy is an important analytical tool in the field of tribology on the nanometer-scale. The contact area between the probing tip and the sample is reduced to some square nanometers, corresponding to the ideal of a single asperity contact. Traditional concepts, such as friction coefficients, adhesion and elasticity and stick-slip are re-examined with this novel technique. New concepts based upon classical and quantum mechanics are investigated.Contents: Introduction and Motivation; Instruments; Normal Forces at the Atomic Scale; Understanding of Lateral Forces; Dissipation Mechanisms; Nanorheology and Nanoconfinement; Generation of Ultrasonic Waves in Sliding Friction; Friction Force Microscopy Experiments; Appendix: Instrumental Aspects of Force Microscopy.Readership: Graduate and researchers in physics, chemistry and materials science.

  8. Scale effects in sliding friction: An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1991-07-24

    Solid friction is considered by some to be a fundamental property of two contacting materials, while others consider it to be a property of the larger tribosystem in which the materials are contained. A set of sliding friction experiments were designed to investigate the hypothesis that the unlubricated sliding friction between two materials is indeed a tribosystems-related property and that the relative influence of the materials properties or those of the machine on friction varies from one situation to another. Three tribometers were used: a friction microprobe (FMP), a typical laboratory-scale reciprocating pin-on-flat device, and a heavy-duty commercial wear tester. The slider material was stainless steel (AISI 440C) and the flat specimen material was an ordered alloy of Ni{sub 3}Al (IC-50). Sphere-on-flat geometry was used at ambient conditions and at normal forces ranging from 0.01 N to 100 N and average sliding velocities of 0.01 to 100.0 mm/s. The nominal, steady-state sliding friction coefficient tended to decrease with increases in normal force for each of the three tribometers, and the steady state value of sliding friction tended to increase as the mass of the machine increased. The variation of the friction force during sliding was also a characteristic of the test system. These studies provide further support to the idea that the friction of both laboratory-scale and engineering tribosystems should be treated as a parameter which may take on a range of characteristic values and not conceived as having a single, unique value for each material pair.

  9. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yalin

    Nanotribology is a research field to study friction, adhesion, wear and lubrication occurred between two sliding interfaces at nano scale. This study is motivated by the demanding need of miniaturization mechanical components in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), improvement of durability in magnetic storage system, and other industrial applications. Overcoming tribological failure and finding ways to control friction at small scale have become keys to commercialize MEMS with sliding components as well as to stimulate the technological innovation associated with the development of MEMS. In addition to the industrial applications, such research is also scientifically fascinating because it opens a door to understand macroscopic friction from the most bottom atomic level, and therefore serves as a bridge between science and engineering. This thesis focuses on solid/solid atomic friction and its associated energy dissipation through theoretical analysis, atomistic simulation, transition state theory, and close collaboration with experimentalists. Reduced-order models have many advantages for its simplification and capacity to simulating long-time event. We will apply Prandtl-Tomlinson models and their extensions to interpret dry atomic-scale friction. We begin with the fundamental equations and build on them step-by-step from the simple quasistatic one-spring, one-mass model for predicting transitions between friction regimes to the two-dimensional and multi-atom models for describing the effect of contact area. Theoretical analysis, numerical implementation, and predicted physical phenomena are all discussed. In the process, we demonstrate the significant potential for this approach to yield new fundamental understanding of atomic-scale friction. Atomistic modeling can never be overemphasized in the investigation of atomic friction, in which each single atom could play a significant role, but is hard to be captured experimentally. In atomic friction, the

  10. Lab-scale hydrogen peroxide data from ECBC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from small lab scale tests conducted at ECBC. It contains efficacy data as well as data on env conditions such as temperature, RH, and hydrogen peroxide vapor...

  11. Scaling laws of gelatin hydrogels for steady dynamic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinit; Singh, Arun K.

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we use population balance based dynamic friction model for steady sliding to develop scaling laws in the terms of mesh size of gelatin hydrogels. First of all, it is observed in the sliding experiments that shear modulus of gelatin hydrogels depends on sliding velocity. This dependence is more evident in the case of low sliding velocity. Moreover, relaxation time constant of a dangling chain at the sliding interface scales with the same exponent as its stiffness. The scaling law is also developed for chain density and viscous retardation at the sliding interface. It is also established that the Hookean-based dynamic friction model is sufficient to study frictional behaviour of hydrogels. The reason for this observation is attributed to the weak bonding between a gelatin hydrogel and glass interface.

  12. Lab and Bench-Scale Pelletization of Torrefied Wood Chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Lei; Nielsen, Niels Peter K.; Stelte, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Combined torrefaction and pelletization is used to increase the fuel value of biomass by increasing its energy density and improving its handling and combustion properties. In the present study, a single-pellet press tool was used to screen for the effects of pellet die temperature, moisture...... up from single-pellet press to bench-scale pelletizer. Tuning moisture content or increasing the die temperature did not ease the pellet production of torrefied wood chips significantly. The addition of rapeseed oil as a lubricant reduced the static friction by half and stabilized pellet production...... content, additive addition, and the degree of torrefaction on the pelletizing properties and pellet quality, i.e., density, static friction, and pellet strength. Results were compared with pellet production using a bench-scale pelletizer. The results indicate that friction is the key factor when scaling...

  13. LLNL Small-Scale Friction sensitivity (BAM) Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1996-06-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives, propellants and other energetic materials, is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. Testing is done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior, or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing {open_quotes}BAM{close_quotes} Small-Scale Friction Test, and the methods used to determine the friction sensitivity pertinent to handling energetic materials. The accumulated data for the materials tested is not listed here - that information is in a database. Included is, however, a short list of (1) materials that had an unusual response, and (2), a few {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} materials representing the range of typical responses usually seen.

  14. From lab to full-scale ultrafiltration in microalgae harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenten, I. G.; Steven, S.; Dwiputra, A.; Khoiruddin; Hakim, A. N.

    2017-07-01

    Ponding system is generally used for microalgae cultivation. However, selection of appropriate technology for the harvesting process is challenging due to the low cell density of cultivated microalgae from the ponding system and the large volume of water to be handled. One of the promising technologies for microalgae harvesting is ultrafiltration (UF). In this study, the performance of UF during harvesting of microalgae in a lab- and a full-scale test is investigated. The performances of both scales are compared and analyzed to provide an understanding of several aspects which affect the yield produced from lab and actual conditions. Furthermore, a unique self-standing non-modular UF is introduced in the full-scale test. The non-modular UF exhibits several advantages, such as simple piping and connection, single pump for filtration and backwashing, and smaller footprint. With those advantages, the non-modular UF could be a promising technology for microalgae harvesting in industrial-scale.

  15. Dense String Networks and the One Scale Model with Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Aulakh, Charanjit S; Soni, V; Aulakh, Charanjit S.; Nagasawa, Michiyasu; Soni, Vikram

    1999-01-01

    We examine the behaviour of string networks with the initial string length densities ($ \\sim T_c^2$) and velocities ($ \\sim 1$) expected on the basis of the Kibble mechanism for string formation during a second order phase transition at $T_c$ in the context of the one scale model with friction. The inclusion of friction and use of the natural initial conditions modifies the current picture of string networks in a basic way.We find that a novel transient regime takes the initially dense and fast network to a sparse (string length density $\\sim T_c^3/M_P$) and slow ($v \\sim (T_c/M_P)^{1/2}$) state in a very short time $\\sim 0.1 t_c$ (where $t_c$ is the time of the phase transition that produces the strings). This allows it to join smoothly on to the well known Kibble Regime which prevails at late times in the friction dominated epoch (with the network scale $L\\sim t^{5/4}$ while the network r.m.s velocity $v \\sim t^{1/4}$) which requires initial conditions of this magnitude. Thus essentially irrespective of str...

  16. Lab-scale Technology for Biogas Production from Lignocellulose Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Krátký

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently-operating biogas plants are based on the treatment of lignocellulose biomass, which is included in materials such as agriculture and forestry wastes, municipal solid wastes, waste paper, wood and herbaceous energy crops. Lab-scale biogas technology was specially developed for evaluating the anaerobic biodegrability and the specific methane yields of solid organic substrates. This technology falls into two main categories – pretreatment equipments, and fermentation equipments. Pretreatment units use physical principles based on mechanical comminution (ball mills, macerator orhydrothermal treatment (liquid hot water pretreatment technology. The biochemical methane potential test is used to evaluate the specific methane yields of treated or non-treated organic substrates. This test can be performed both by lab testing units and by lab fermenter.

  17. Frictional sliding in layered rock: laboratory-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buescher, B.J.; Perry, K.E. Jr.; Epstein, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    The work is part of the rock mechanics effort for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program. The laboratory-scale experiments are intended to provide high quality data on the mechanical behavior of jointed structures that can be used to validate complex numerical models for rock-mass behavior. Frictional sliding between simulated rock joints was studied using phase shifting moire interferometry. A model, constructed from stacks of machined and sandblasted granite plates, contained a central hole bore normal to the place so that frictional slip would be induced between the plates near the hole under compressive loading. Results show a clear evolution of slip with increasing load. Since the rock was not cycled through loading- unloading, the quantitative differences between the three data sets are probably due to a ``wearing-in`` effect. The highly variable spatial frequency of the data is probably due to the large grain size of the granite and the stochastic frictional processes. An unusual feature of the evolution of slip with increasing load is that as the load gets larger, some plates seem to return to a null position. Figs, 6 refs.

  18. A Multi-scale Friction Model for Sheet Metal Forming Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Huetink, Han; Chang, K; Nam Han, H; Huh, H; Barlat, F; Lee, M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-scale friction model for large-scale forming simulations based on the surface changes on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when it is subjected to normal loading and stretching. Consequently, the frictional behavior between contacting surfaces,

  19. Formation and rupture of capillary bridges in atomic scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barel, Itay; Filippov, Aleksander E.; Urbakh, M.

    2012-10-01

    While formation of capillary bridges significantly contributes to the adhesion and friction at micro- and nanoscales, many key aspects of dynamics of capillary condensation and its effect on friction forces are still not well understood. Here, by analytical model and numerical simulations, we address the origin of reduction of friction force with velocity and increase of friction with temperature, which have been experimentally observed under humid ambient conditions. These observations differ significantly from the results of friction experiments carried out under ultrahigh vacuum, and disagree with predictions of thermal Prandtl-Tomlinson model of friction. Our calculations demonstrate what information on the kinetics of capillary condensation can be extracted from measurements of friction forces and suggest optimal conditions for obtaining this information.

  20. A BAROTROPIC QUASI-GEOSTROPHIC MODEL WITH LARGE-SCALE TOPOGRAPHY, FRICTION AND HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the barotropic equations including large-scale topography, friction and heat factor, a barotropic quasi-geostrophic model with large-scale topography, friction and heating is obtained by means of scale analysis and small parameter method. It is shown that this equation is a basic one, which is used to study the influence of the Tibetan Plateau on the large-scale flow in the atmosphere. If the friction and heating effect of large-scale topography are neglected, this model will degenerate to the general barotropic quasi-geostrophic one.

  1. Scale effects in metal-forming friction and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin; Calaon, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    equipment is developed for studies of the size effect in metal-forming friction in the range from macro-to microscale. Investigations confirm a significant friction increase when downscaling. Visual inspection of the workpieces shows this to be explained by the amount of open and closed lubricant pockets....

  2. Atomic-scale friction behavior of layered graphene and graphene-like BN materials modulated by interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Liu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    The understanding of fundamental issues related to friction at the atomic scale remains a great challenge due to the large difference between macroscopic and microscopic frictional behaviors. Here based on first-principles calculations, the applicability of macroscopic friction laws to the atomic scale is studied. The underlying mechanism that governs friction behavior is also explored. A completely new perspective of understanding the friction at the atomic scale is presented according to the observation of the applicability of friction law at the atomic scale and the variations of interaction potential induced by the number of layer and normal load.

  3. Atomic-Scale Friction and Microfriction of Graphite and Diamond Using Friction Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-07

    19), 2642-2645 (1991). 21 [12] R. M. Overney, E. Meyer, J. Frommer , D. Brodbeck, R. Luithi, L. Howald, H. -J. GUntherodt, M. Fuji.,La, H. Takano, and Y...Meyer, R. Overney, D. Brodbeck, L. Howard, R. Luithi, J. Frommer , and H. -J. Guntherodt, "Friction and Wear of Langmuir-Blodgett Films Observed by...Friction Force Microscopy", Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol. 69(12), 1777-1780 (1992). [14] E. Meyer, R. Overney, R. Luthi, D. Brodbeck, L. Howald, J. Frommer , H

  4. Electronic friction at the atomic scale: Conduction, electrostatic and magnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jacqueline; Altfeder, Igor

    2013-03-01

    We have performed a magnetic probe microscopy study of levitation and atomic-scale friction for Fe on YBCO (Tc = 92.5K) in the temperature range 65 - 293 K, to explore electronic contributions to friction at the atomic scale. The samples were prepared with oxygen-depleted surfaces, with thin semiconducting surface layers present atop the bulk. Below Tc, the friction coefficient was observed to be constant at 0.19 and exhibited no correlation with the strength of superconducting levitation forces observed below Tc. The friction coefficient exhibited a change in slope within experimental error of Tc that increased progressively above Tc and reached 0.33 by room temperature. The results were analyzed within the context of underlying atomic-scale electronic and phononic mechanisms that give rise to friction we conclude that contact electrification and static electricity play a significant role above Tc. Supported by NSF and AFOSR.

  5. Direct testing of scale effects in metal forming friction and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Calaon, Matteo; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin

    2010-01-01

    work a new test equipment is developed for direct friction measurements in the range from macro to micro scale. Investigations confirm a significant friction increase when downscaling. Visual inspection of the work pieces show this to be explained by the amount of open and closed lubricant pockets....

  6. Experimental and numerical friction characterization for large-scale forming simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Hora, P.

    2013-01-01

    A new trend in forming simulation technology is the development of friction models applicable to large scale forming simulations. In this respect, the optimization of forming processes and the success of newly developed friction models requires a complete understanding of the tribological behavior

  7. Fault zone rheology and length scales of frictional failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagereng, A.

    2011-12-01

    Faults have a finite thickness and commonly contain fault rocks of heterogeneous composition, leading to rheological contrasts between intermingled lithologies (at the macroscale) and minerals (at the microscale) within the fault zone. The distribution and volumetric ratio of materials with different viscosity, frictional behavior, and preferred deformation mechanism, may therefore be a critical factor controlling the bulk rheology of heterogeneous fault zones. For example, at subgreenschist facies metamorphic conditions, fine-grained phyllosilicate-dominated mudstones tend to experience viscous shearing flow by dissolution-precipitation creep, whereas coarse grained quartz-dominated sandstones tend to act like competent, brittle volumes. In the rock record, deformation of mixed lithologies is well represented in tectonic mélanges. The subgreenschist facies (P defined by slickenfibre-coated shear surfaces linked by quartz-calcite extension veins. The frequency-size distribution of competent lenses (phacoids) in the Chrystalls Beach Complex follows a power-law distribution and is scale-invariant. The exponent of the power-law distribution varies with dominant deformation style, and is high in zones of dominantly continuous deformation - relating to a high matrix fraction, predominance of small phacoids, and small phacoid aspect ratios, whereas a low power-law exponent relates to a small matrix fraction and localized deformation accommodated on shear discontinuities. This variation in power-law exponent indicates that whether deformation occurs predominantly by continuous or discontinuous deformation may be predicted from the shape of the frequency-size distribution of competent lenses, and supports the hypothesis that bulk rheology is determined by the volume fraction of competent material. The distribution of competent material likely affects the seismic style of actively deforming fault zones. The length scales of shear discontinuities are likely to be a factor

  8. Lab-Scale Fiber Spinning Experimental Design Cost Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. Moreland

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Many statistical experimental designs are too costlyor require too much raw material to be feasible forlab-scale fiber spinning experiments. In this study afour-factor response surface design is presented tostudy the fiber spinning process in detail at the labscale. The time, cost, and amount of raw materialrequired to execute the proposed design are comparedto the typical completely randomized 24 factorialdesign used in fiber spinning experiments and also toa standard four-factor response surface design.Sample fiber data as well as analysis from a typicalstatistical software package is provided to furtherdemonstrate the differences between each design. Bydesignating some treatment factors in the design ashard-to-change, split-plotting is used to reduce thetime, cost, and amount of raw material required tocomplete the experiment. The proposed split-plotdesign is faster and less expensive than a typicalfactorial design and has the advantage of fitting amore complex second-order model to the system.When compared to a standard response surfacedesign, the proposed split-plot design provides thesame second-order modeling capabilities but reducesthe cost of the experiment by 53%, the total time by36%, and the amount of polymer required by 24%.Thus, a split-plot response surface design based onhard-to-change factors is recommended in lab-scalespinning.

  9. Small scale substructure, collapse time and dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Gambera, M

    1996-01-01

    We solve numerically the equations of motion for the collapse of a shell of baryonic matter, made of galaxies and substructure of $ 10^{6} M_{\\odot} \\div 10^{9} M_{\\odot}$, taking into account the dynamical friction and the parameters on which it depends: the peaks' height $\

  10. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Sun; Yi-Zhou Qi; Wengen Ouyang; Xi-Qiao Feng; Qunyang Li

    2016-01-01

    Although atomic stick–slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competi-tion of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves nor-mally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effec-tively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  11. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Qi, Yi-Zhou; Ouyang, Wengen; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Li, Qunyang

    2016-08-01

    Although atomic stick-slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competition of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves normally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effectively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of atomic-scale frictional behavior of corrugated nano-structured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Joon; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2012-07-01

    Surface morphology is one of the critical parameters that affect the frictional behavior of two contacting bodies in relative motion. It is important because the real contact area as well as the contact stiffness is dictated by the micro- and nano-scale geometry of the surface. In this regard, the frictional behavior may be controlled by varying the surface morphology through nano-structuring. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of contact area and structural stiffness of corrugated nano-structures on the fundamental frictional behavior at the atomic-scale. The nano-structured surface was modeled as an array of corrugated carbon atoms with a given periodicity. It was found that the friction coefficient of the nano-structured surface was lower than that of a smooth surface under specific contact conditions. The effect of applied load on the friction coefficient was dependent on the size of the corrugation. Furthermore, stiffness of the nano-structure was identified to be an important variable in dictating the frictional behavior.

  13. Metabolic engineering of strains: from industrial-scale to lab-scale chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Alper, Hal S

    2015-03-01

    A plethora of successful metabolic engineering case studies have been published over the past several decades. Here, we highlight a collection of microbially produced chemicals using a historical framework, starting with titers ranging from industrial scale (more than 50 g/L), to medium-scale (5-50 g/L), and lab-scale (0-5 g/L). Although engineered Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae emerge as prominent hosts in the literature as a result of well-developed genetic engineering tools, several novel native-producing strains are gaining attention. This review catalogs the current progress of metabolic engineering towards production of compounds such as acids, alcohols, amino acids, natural organic compounds, and others.

  14. Fed-batch CHO cell culture for lab-scale antibody production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Ley, Daniel; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2016-01-01

    Fed-batch culture is the most commonly used upstream process in industry today for recombinant monoclonal antibody production using Chinese hamster ovary cells. Developing and optimizing this process in the lab is crucial for establishing process knowledge, which enable rapid and predictable tech......-transfer to manufacturing scale. In this chapter, we will describe stepwise how to carry out fed-batch CHO cell culture for lab-scale antibody production....

  15. Lateral vibration effects in atomic-scale friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R. [Climate and Environment Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fajardo, O. Y.; Mazo, J. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Meyer, E. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Gnecco, E. [Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, IMDEA Nanociencia, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-24

    The influence of lateral vibrations on the stick-slip motion of a nanotip elastically pulled on a flat crystal surface is studied by atomic force microscopy measurements on a NaCl(001) surface in ultra-high vacuum. The slippage of the nanotip across the crystal lattice is anticipated at increasing driving amplitude, similarly to what is observed in presence of normal vibrations. This lowers the average friction force, as explained by the Prandtl-Tomlinson model with lateral vibrations superimposed at finite temperature. Nevertheless, the peak values of the lateral force, and the total energy losses, are expected to increase with the excitation amplitude, which may limit the practical relevance of this effect.

  16. Quantification of Subjective Scaling of Friction Using a Fingertip Biomechanical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdolvahab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjective scaling of friction is important in many applications in haptic technology. A nonhomogeneous biomechanical finite element model of fingertip is proposed in order to predict neural response of sensitive mechanoreceptors to frictional stimuli (Slowly Adapting SAII receptors under the glabrous skin. In a guided psychophysical experiment, ten human subjects were asked to scale several standard surfaces based on the perception of their frictional properties. Contact forces deployed during the exploratory time of one of the participants were captured in order to estimate required parameters for the model of contact in the simulation procedure. Consequently, the strain energy density at the location of a selective mechanoreceptor in the finite element model as a measure of discharge rate of the neural unit was compared to the subject’s perceptual evaluation of the relevant stimuli. It was observed that the subject’s scores correlate with the discharge rate of the given receptor.

  17. Scaling of friction and fracture energy in experiments and seismological estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S. B.; Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Smith, S. A.; Di Toro, G.

    2012-12-01

    Experiments performed on rocks at deformation conditions typical of seismic slip, show an extremely low friction coefficient, the activation of lubrication processes and a power-law strength decay from a peak value to a residual, steady-state value. The weakening of friction σ f as a function of slip u is best fit by a power-law in the form σ f = A (u+uo)-α +σ SS where σ SS is a residual friction at steady-state, A is a normalizing factor, uo is a small constant and the exponent α is close to 0.4. The resulting experimental fracture energy G(u) (defined, for a given slip amount u, as the integral between the frictional curve and the minimum frictional level reached σ f(u) ) also scales as a power-law, in some aspects in agreement with the seismological estimate G'(u) proposed by Abercrombie and Rice (2005). Since G' is obtained by estimating the amount of dissipation with respect to strain energy and radiated energy, it implicitly incorporates additional energy sinks, which we discuss, other than frictional dissipation alone (anelastic damage due to high off-fault dynamic stress close to the rupture tip; dissipation during slip-localizing process within fault gouge of finite thickness; strain accommodating fault roughness at different scales). As a consequence G' should be larger or equal to G measured in friction experiments. The values of G and G' are comparable for slips of about u= 0.01m (G ≈ 104 J/m2). Both gradually increase with slip up to about 106 J/m2, however, it appears that fracture energy G' is slightly larger than G in the range of slip 0.1 5.5).

  18. End-effects-regime in full scale and lab scale rocket nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Raymundo; Tinney, Charles; Baars, Woutijn; Ruf, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Modern rockets utilize a thrust-optimized parabolic-contour design for their nozzles for its high performance and reliability. However, the evolving internal flow structures within these high area ratio rocket nozzles during start up generate a powerful amount of vibro-acoustic loads that act on the launch vehicle. Modern rockets must be designed to accommodate for these heavy loads or else risk a catastrophic failure. This study quantifies a particular moment referred to as the ``end-effects regime,'' or the largest source of vibro-acoustic loading during start-up [Nave & Coffey, AIAA Paper 1973-1284]. Measurements from full scale ignitions are compared with aerodynamically scaled representations in a fully anechoic chamber. Laboratory scale data is then matched with both static and dynamic wall pressure measurements to capture the associating shock structures within the nozzle. The event generated during the ``end-effects regime'' was successfully reproduced in the both the lab-scale models, and was characterized in terms of its mean, variance and skewness, as well as the spectral properties of the signal obtained by way of time-frequency analyses.

  19. Virus removal retention challenge tests performed at lab scale and pilot scale during operation of membrane units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, H; Machinal, C; Labaye, Ivan; Schrotter, J C

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the virus retention capabilities of UF units during operation is essential for the operators of drinking water treatment facilities in order to guarantee an efficient and stable removal of viruses through time. In previous studies, an effective method (MS2-phage challenge tests) was developed by the Water Research Center of Veolia Environnement for the measurement of the virus retention rates (Log Removal Rate, LRV) of commercially available hollow fiber membranes at lab scale. In the present work, the protocol for monitoring membrane performance was transferred from lab scale to pilot scale. Membrane performances were evaluated during pilot trial and compared to the results obtained at lab scale with fibers taken from the pilot plant modules. PFU culture method was compared to RT-PCR method for the calculation of LRV in both cases. Preliminary tests at lab scale showed that both methods can be used interchangeably. For tests conducted on virgin membrane, a good consistency was observed between lab and pilot scale results with the two analytical methods used. This work intends to show that a reliable determination of the membranes performances based on RT-PCR analytical method can be achieved during the operation of the UF units.

  20. Scale dependence of interface dislocation storage governing the frictional sliding of single asperities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-08-01

    Single-asperity friction tests have found a critical dependence of friction stress on the nanoscale contact size, as successfully explained by the nucleation of interface dislocations as opposed to concurrent sliding of all the interfacial atoms in contact. Modeling and simulation results, however, vary when the motion and interactions of multiple dislocations dominate at a larger scale regime. A Rice-Peierls framework is employed to investigate the multiplication and storage of interface dislocations, and the critical conditions for dislocation initiation and steady-state gliding are determined numerically. Our findings identify the key parameters that govern various friction mechanisms in the Hurtado-Kim and Deshpande-Needleman-van der Giessen models.

  1. Friction and scale-dependent deformation processes of large experimental carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesei, Telemaco; Carpenter, Brett M.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Scuderi, Marco M.; Sagy, Amir; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Collettini, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    We studied the frictional behaviour and deformation products of large (20 cm × 20 cm bare surfaces) experimental limestone faults. We sheared samples in a direct shear configuration, with an imposed normal force of 40-200 kN and shear velocity of 10 μm/s. The steady-state shearing of these surfaces yielded a coefficient of friction 0.7hold-slide tests, is null (Δμ≤0 upon re-shear). Moreover, sliding of these surfaces is accompanied by dilatation and production of grooves, gouge striations and fault mirrors. These products are entirely analogous to slip surface phenomena found on natural limestone-bearing faults at both the macroscale and at the microscale. We infer that high friction, accompanied by dilatant deformation, and null frictional healing are the macroscopic effect of brittle damage on the sliding surface, constrained by the strength of the rock and by fast healing processes in the gouge. Simultaneously to brittle failure, plastic deformation occurs on the sliding surface and inside the intact rock via nanoparticle formation (mirrors) and twinning at the micron scale. Because of the similarity between experimental and natural structures, we suggest that sliding of carbonate-bearing faults in the uppermost crust could be characterized by high friction, fast healing and strongly dilatant deformation, which would help to explain shallow seismicity frequently documented in carbonatic terrains such as the Northern Apennines of Italy.

  2. Linking microstructural evolution and macro-scale friction behavior in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argibay, N.; Chandross, M.; Cheng, S.; Michael, J. R.

    2017-03-01

    A correlation is established between the macro-scale friction regimes of metals and a transition between two dominant atomistic mechanisms of deformation. Metals tend to exhibit bi-stable friction behavior -- low and converging or high and diverging. These general trends in behavior are shown to be largely explained using a simplified model based on grain size evolution, as a function of contact stress and temperature, and are demonstrated for pure copper and gold. Specifically, the low friction regime is linked to the formation of ultra-nanocrystalline surface films (10 to 20 nm), driving toward shear accommodation by grain boundary sliding. Above a critical combination of stress and temperature -- demonstrated to be a material property -- shear accommodation transitions to dislocation dominated plasticity and high friction. We utilize a combination of experimental and computational methods to develop and validate the proposed structure-property relationship. This quantitative framework provides a shift from phenomenological to mechanistic and predictive fundamental understanding of friction for crystalline materials, including engineering alloys.

  3. Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Lab Scale Experiment Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, Ben

    2011-05-27

    The sulfur-iodine (SI) cycle was deermined to be the best cycle for coupling to a high temperature reactor (HTR) because of its high efficiency and potential for further improvement. The Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has also selected the SI process for further development and has successfully completed bench-scale demonstrations of the SI process at atmospheric pressure. JEA also plans to proceed with pilot-scale demonstrations of the SI process and eventually plans to couple an SI demonstration plant to its High Temperature Test Reactor (HHTR). As part of an international NERI project, GA, SNL, and the Frech Commissariat L'Energie Atomique performed laboratory-scale demonstrations of the SI process at prototypical temperatures and pressures. This demonstration was performed at GA in San Diego, CA and concluded in April 2009.

  4. Nano-scale Interfacial Friction Behavior between Two Kinds of Materials in MEMS Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; LIAO Linbo; DING Jianning; YANG Jichang; LI Changsheng; FAN Zen; LIN Zhiyong

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article was to provide a systematic method to perform molecular dynamics simulation or evaluation for nano-scale interfacial friction behavior between two kinds of materials in MEMS design. Friction is an important factor affecting the performance and reliability of MEMS. The model of the nano-scale interfacial friction behavior between two kinds of materials was presented based on the Newton's equations of motion. The Morse potential function was selected for the model. The improved Verlet algorithm was employed to resolve the model, the atom trajectories and the law of the interfacial friction behavior. Comparisons with experimental data in other paper confirm the validity of the model. Using the model it is possible to simulate or evaluate the importance of different factors for designing of the nano-scale interfacial friction behavior between two kinds of materials in MEMS.

  5. The nature of the frictional force at the macro-, micro-, and nano-scales

    OpenAIRE

    Broitman, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is accepted that the friction force is a combined effect arising from various phenomena: adhesive forces, capillary forces, contact elasticity, topography, surface chemistry, and generation of a third body, etc. Any of them can dominate depending on the experimental force and length scales of the study. Typical forces in macro-tribology are in the Newtons, while are reduced to milli-/micro-Newtons, and nano-Newtons in micro- and nano-tribology, respectively. In this paper, experim...

  6. Investigation of scale effects and directionality dependence on friction and adhesion of human hair using AFM and macroscale friction test apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaTorre, Carmen; Bhushan, Bharat

    2006-01-01

    Macroscale testing of human hair tribological properties has been widely used to aid in the development of better shampoos and conditioners. Recently, literature has focused on using the atomic force microscope (AFM) to study surface roughness, coefficient of friction, adhesive force, and wear (tribological properties) on the nanoscale in order to increase understanding about how shampoos and conditioners interact with the hair cuticle. Since there are both similarities and differences when comparing the tribological trends at both scales, it is thus recognized that scale effects are an important aspect of studying the tribology of hair. However, no microscale tribological data for hair exists in literature. This is unfortunate because many interactions between hair-skin, hair-comb, and hair-hair contact takes place at microasperities ranging from a few mum to hundreds of mum. Thus, to bridge the gap between the macro- and nanoscale data, as well as to gain a full understanding of the mechanisms behind the trends, it is now worthwhile to look at hair tribology on the microscale. Presented in this paper are coefficient of friction and adhesive force data on various scales for virgin and chemically damaged hair, both with and without conditioner treatment. Macroscale coefficient of friction was determined using a traditional friction test apparatus. Microscale and nanoscale tribological characterization was performed with AFM tips of various radii. The nano-, micro-, and macroscale trends are compared and the mechanisms behind the scale effects are discussed. Since the coefficient of friction changes drastically (on any scale) depending on whether the direction of motion is along or against the cuticle scales, the directionality dependence and responsible mechanisms are discussed.

  7. Investigation of scale effects and directionality dependence on friction and adhesion of human hair using AFM and macroscale friction test apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaTorre, Carmen [Nanotribology Laboratory for Information Storage and MEMS/NEMS (NLIM), Ohio State University, Suite 255, 650 Ackerman Road, Columbus, OH 43202 (United States); Bhushan, Bharat [Nanotribology Laboratory for Information Storage and MEMS/NEMS (NLIM), Ohio State University, Suite 255, 650 Ackerman Road, Columbus, OH 43202 (United States)]. E-mail: bhushan.2@osu.edu

    2006-06-15

    Macroscale testing of human hair tribological properties has been widely used to aid in the development of better shampoos and conditioners. Recently, literature has focused on using the atomic force microscope (AFM) to study surface roughness, coefficient of friction, adhesive force, and wear (tribological properties) on the nanoscale in order to increase understanding about how shampoos and conditioners interact with the hair cuticle. Since there are both similarities and differences when comparing the tribological trends at both scales, it is thus recognized that scale effects are an important aspect of studying the tribology of hair. However, no microscale tribological data for hair exists in literature. This is unfortunate because many interactions between hair-skin, hair-comb, and hair-hair contact takes place at microasperities ranging from a few {mu}m to hundreds of {mu}m. Thus, to bridge the gap between the macro- and nanoscale data, as well as to gain a full understanding of the mechanisms behind the trends, it is now worthwhile to look at hair tribology on the microscale. Presented in this paper are coefficient of friction and adhesive force data on various scales for virgin and chemically damaged hair, both with and without conditioner treatment. Macroscale coefficient of friction was determined using a traditional friction test apparatus. Microscale and nanoscale tribological characterization was performed with AFM tips of various radii. The nano-, micro-, and macroscale trends are compared and the mechanisms behind the scale effects are discussed. Since the coefficient of friction changes drastically (on any scale) depending on whether the direction of motion is along or against the cuticle scales, the directionality dependence and responsible mechanisms are discussed.

  8. Lab on a chip Canada--rapid diffusion over large length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncker, David; Wheeler, Aaron R; Sinton, David

    2013-07-07

    The roots of lab on a chip in Canada are deep, comprising of some of the earliest contributions and first demonstrations of the potential of microfluidic chips. In an editorial leading off this special issue, Jed Harrison of University of Alberta reflects on these early days and Canada's role in the field's development (DOI: 10.1039/c3lc50522g). Over the last decade, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip research efforts grew exponentially - rapidly diffusing across the vast Canadian length scales.

  9. Apparent Dependence of Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Parameters on Loading Velocity and Cumulative Displacement Inferred from Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Yumi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Noda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the constitutive parameters in the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law by conducting numerical simulations, using the friction data from large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments for Indian metagabbro. The sliding surface area was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide, slid for 400 s under a normal stress of 1.33 MPa at a loading velocity of either 0.1 or 1.0 mm/s. During the experiments, many stick-slips were observed and those features were as follows. (1) The friction drop and recurrence time of the stick-slip events increased with cumulative slip displacement in an experiment before which the gouges on the surface were removed, but they became almost constant throughout an experiment conducted after several experiments without gouge removal. (2) The friction drop was larger and the recurrence time was shorter in the experiments with faster loading velocity. We applied a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model with mass to estimate the RSF parameters by fitting the stick-slip intervals and slip-weakening curves measured based on spring force and acceleration of the specimens. We developed an efficient algorithm for the numerical time integration, and we conducted forward modeling for evolution parameters ( b) and the state-evolution distances (L_{{c}}), keeping the direct effect parameter ( a) constant. We then identified the confident range of b and L_{{c}} values. Comparison between the results of the experiments and our simulations suggests that both b and L_{{c}} increase as the cumulative slip displacement increases, and b increases and L_{{c}} decreases as the loading velocity increases. Conventional RSF laws could not explain the large-scale friction data, and more complex state evolution laws are needed.

  10. Apparent Dependence of Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Parameters on Loading Velocity and Cumulative Displacement Inferred from Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Yumi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Noda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the constitutive parameters in the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law by conducting numerical simulations, using the friction data from large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments for Indian metagabbro. The sliding surface area was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide, slid for 400 s under a normal stress of 1.33 MPa at a loading velocity of either 0.1 or 1.0 mm/s. During the experiments, many stick-slips were observed and those features were as follows. (1) The friction drop and recurrence time of the stick-slip events increased with cumulative slip displacement in an experiment before which the gouges on the surface were removed, but they became almost constant throughout an experiment conducted after several experiments without gouge removal. (2) The friction drop was larger and the recurrence time was shorter in the experiments with faster loading velocity. We applied a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model with mass to estimate the RSF parameters by fitting the stick-slip intervals and slip-weakening curves measured based on spring force and acceleration of the specimens. We developed an efficient algorithm for the numerical time integration, and we conducted forward modeling for evolution parameters (b) and the state-evolution distances (L_{c} ), keeping the direct effect parameter (a) constant. We then identified the confident range of b and L_{c} values. Comparison between the results of the experiments and our simulations suggests that both b and L_{c} increase as the cumulative slip displacement increases, and b increases and L_{c} decreases as the loading velocity increases. Conventional RSF laws could not explain the large-scale friction data, and more complex state evolution laws are needed.

  11. Anaerobic co-digestion of kitchen waste and fruit/vegetable waste: lab-scale and pilot-scale studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Shen, Fei; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Liu, Yanping; Zhu, Baoning; Li, Xiujin

    2014-12-01

    The anaerobic digestion performances of kitchen waste (KW) and fruit/vegetable waste (FVW) were investigated for establishing engineering digestion system. The study was conducted from lab-scale to pilot-scale, including batch, single-phase and two-phase experiments. The lab-scale experimental results showed that the ratio of FVW to KW at 5:8 presented higher methane productivity (0.725 L CH4/g VS), and thereby was recommended. Two-phase digestion appeared to have higher treatment capacity and better buffer ability for high organic loading rate (OLR) (up to 5.0 g(VS) L(-1) d(-1)), compared with the low OLR of 3.5 g(VS) L(-1) d(-1) for single-phase system. For two-phase digestion, the pilot-scale system showed similar performances to those of lab-scale one, except slightly lower maximum OLR of 4.5 g(VS) L(-1) d(-1) was allowed. The pilot-scale system proved to be profitable with a net profit of 10.173$/ton as higher OLR (⩾ 3.0 g(VS) L(-1) d(-1)) was used.

  12. Hydroscoop - Bulletin of the small-scale hydraulic laboratory MHyLab; Hydroscoop - Bulletin d'information MHyLab laboratoire de petite hydraulique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis, V.

    2009-07-01

    This is issue Nr. 5 of the news bulletin of MHyLab, the small-scale hydraulic laboratory in Montcherand, Switzerland. The history of MHyLab development is recalled. The objective of the laboratory is given: the laboratory development of efficient and reliable turbines for the entire small-scale hydraulic range (power: 10 to 2000 kW, flow rate: 0.01 to 10 m{sup 3}/s, hydraulic head: 1 m up to more than 700 m). The first period (1997-2001) was devoted to Pelton turbines for high heads (60 to 70 m) and the second (2001-2009) to Kaplan turbines for low and very low heads (1 to 30 m). In the third period (beginning 2008) diagonal turbines for medium heads (25 to 100 m) are being developed. MHyLab designed, modelled and tested all these different types. The small-scale hydraulic market developed unexpectedly quickly. The potential of small-scale hydraulics in the Canton of Vaud, western Switzerland is presented. Three implemented projects are reported on as examples for MHyLab activities on the market place. The MHyLab staff is presented.

  13. Does the stellar distribution flare? A comparison of stellar scale heights with LAB HI data

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, P M W; Dedes, L; Haud, U

    2014-01-01

    The question, whether the stellar populations in the Milky Way take part in flaring of the scale heights as observed for the HI gas is a matter of debate. Standard mass models for the Milky Way assume a constant scale height for each of the different stellar distributions. However, there is mounting evidence that at least some of the stellar distributions reach at large galactocentric distances high altitudes that are incompatible with a constant scale height. We discuss recent observational evidence for stellar flaring and compare it with HI data from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) survey. Within the systemic and statistical uncertainties we find a good agreement between both.

  14. Batch and semi-continuous microalgal TAG production in lab-scale and outdoor photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Giulia; Bosma, Rouke; Ji, Fang; Lamers, Packo; Barbosa, Maria J; Wijffels, René H

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal triglycerides (TAGs) represent a sustainable feedstock for food, chemical and biofuel industries. The operational strategy (batch, semi-continuous, continuous cultivations) has an impact on the TAG productivity. In this study, semi-continuous (i.e. with fixed harvesting frequency) and batch cultivations were compared on TAG production both at lab-scale and in outdoor cultivations. At lab-scale, the semi-continuous TAG productivity was highest for a cycle time of 2 days (SC1; 0.21 g L(-1) day(-1)) and similar to the maximum obtained with the batch (optimal harvest time; 0.23 g L(-1) day(-1)). Although TAG content was lower for SC1 (22 %) than for the batch (35 %), higher biomass productivities were obtained with SC1. Outdoors, semi-continuous cultivations were subjected to a lower degree of stress (i.e. higher amount of nitrogen present in the system relative to the given irradiance) compared to lab-scale. This yielded low and similar TAG contents (10-13 %) in the different semi-continuous runs that were outdone by the batch on both TAG content (15-25 %) and productivity (batch, 0.97-2.46 g m(-2) day(-1); semi-continuous, 0.35-0.85 g m(-2) day(-1)). The lab-scale experiments showed that semi-continuous strategies, besides leading to similar TAG productivities compared to the batch, could make TAG production cost effective by valorising also non-TAG compounds. However, optimization of outdoor semi-continuous cultivations is still required. For instance, the nitrogen supply and the harvest frequency should be adjusted on the total irradiance. Additionally, future research should focus on recovery metabolism upon nitrogen resupply.

  15. iLab 20M: A Large-scale Controlled Object Dataset to Investigate Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    iLab-20M: A large-scale controlled object dataset to investigate deep learning Ali Borji1 Saeed Izadi2 Laurent Itti3 1Center for Research in Computer...the emer- gence of highly popular deep learning models. While be- ing very useful for learning invariance to object inter- and intra-class shape...knowledge delivery to CNNs. We also discuss how our analyses can lead the field to develop more efficient deep learning methods. 1. Introduction

  16. Length Scaling of Shear Zones at the Frictional-Viscous Transition (FVT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrank, C. E.; Handy, M. R.; Fusseis, F.

    2005-12-01

    We present a new method for determining the characteristic length scales of strain localization in crustal scale shear zones. This entails determining two parameters that describe the degree of strain heterogeneity in natural shear zones: (1) the strain localization factor, LfRA, defined as the ratio of the shear zone area to a chosen reference area, ARA, and (2) the relative localization intensity, Iloc, a function of the ratio of the mean shear strain to the maximum shear strain measured in a transect of the shear zone. ARA is a geometric homogenization scale determined from autocorrelation functions (ACF) of 2-D images (thin sections, foliation maps and aerial photographs) of shear zone networks on different scales that formed during a single deformational event. When applied to shear zones from a well exposed segment of the frictional-to-viscous transition (FVT) in NE Spain, we found that maxima in LfRA on the mm, cm, m and km scales coincided with the length scales of existing mineralogical and lithological heterogeneities. On any of these characteristic length scales, Iloc increased both along and across the length of the shear zones, suggesting that the shear zones weakening as a function of time and strain. This is consistent with structural evidence for progressive weakening of the crust on the characteristic length scales of strain heterogeneity.

  17. Model-based strategy for cell culture seed train layout verified at lab scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Simon; Platas-Barradas, Oscar; Pörtner, Ralf; Frahm, Björn

    2016-08-01

    Cell culture seed trains-the generation of a sufficient viable cell number for the inoculation of the production scale bioreactor, starting from incubator scale-are time- and cost-intensive. Accordingly, a seed train offers potential for optimization regarding its layout and the corresponding proceedings. A tool has been developed to determine the optimal points in time for cell passaging from one scale into the next and it has been applied to two different cell lines at lab scale, AGE1.HN AAT and CHO-K1. For evaluation, experimental seed train realization has been evaluated in comparison to its layout. In case of the AGE1.HN AAT cell line, the results have also been compared to the formerly manually designed seed train. The tool provides the same seed train layout based on the data of only two batches.

  18. A study on the effect of flat plate friction resistance on speed performance prediction of full scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flat plate friction lines hare been used in the process to estimate speed performance of full-scale ships in model tests. The results of the previous studies showed considerable differences in determining form factors depending on changes in plate friction lines and Reynolds numbers. These differences had a great influence on estimation of speed performance of full-scale ships. This study- was conducted in two parts. In the first part, the scale effect of the form factor depending on change in the Reynolds number was studied based on CFD, in connection with three kinds of friction resistance curves: the ITTC-1957, the curve proposed by Grigson (1993; 1996, and the curve developed by Katsui et al (2005. In the second part, change in the form factor by three kinds of

  19. Preliminary Study of Single-Phase Natural Circulation for Lab-scaled Molten Salt Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yukyung; Kang, Sarah; Kim, In Guk; Seo, Seok Bin; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Advanced reactors such as MSR (FHR), VHTR and AHTR utilized molten salt as a coolant for efficiency and safety which has advantages in higher heat capacity, lower pumping power and scale compared to liquid metal. It becomes more necessary to study on the characteristics of molten salt. However, due to several characteristics such as high operating temperature, large-scale facility and preventing solidification, satisfying that condition for study has difficulties. Thus simulant fluid was used with scaling method for lab-scale experiment. Scaled experiment enables simulant fluid to simulate fluid mechanics and heat transfer behavior of molten salt on lower operating temperature and reduced scale. In this paper, as a proof test of the scaled experiment, simplified single-phase natural circulation loop was designed in a lab-scale and applied to the passive safety system in advanced reactor in which molten salt is considered as a major coolant of the system. For the application of the improved safety system, prototype was based on the primary loop of the test-scale DRACS, the main passive safety system in FHR, developed at the OSU. For preliminary experiment, single-phase natural circulation under low power was performed. DOWTHERM A and DOWTHERM RP were selected as simulant candidates. Then, study of feasibility with simulant was conducted based on the scaling law for heat transfer characteristics and geometric parameters. Additionally, simulation with MARS code and ANSYS-CFX with the same condition of natural circulation was carried out as verification. For the accurate code simulation, thermo-physical properties of DOWTHERM A and RP were developed and implemented into MARS code. In this study, single-phase natural circulation experiment was performed with simulant oil, DOWTHERM RP, based on the passive safety system of FHR. Feasibility of similarity experiment for molten salt with oil simulant was confirmed by scaling method. In addition, simulation with two

  20. Characterization of Membrane Foulants in Full-scale and Lab-scale Membrane Bioreactors for Wastewater Treatment and Reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Matar, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) offer promising solution for wastewater treatment and reuse to address the problem of water scarcity. Nevertheless, this technology is still facing challenges associated with membrane biofouling. This phenomenon has been mainly investigated in lab-scale MBRs with little or no insight on biofouling in full-scale MBR plants. Furthermore, the temporal dynamics of biofouling microbial communities and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are less studied. Herein, a multidisciplinary approach was adopted to address the above knowledge gaps in lab- and full-scale MBRs. In the full-scale MBR study, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing with multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the early and mature biofilm communities from five full-scale MBRs differed significantly from the source community (i.e. activated sludge), and random immigration of species from the source community was unlikely to shape the community structure of biofilms. Also, a core biofouling community was shared between the five MBR plants sampled despite differences in their operating conditions. In the lab-scale MBR studies, temporal dynamics of microbial communities and their EPS products were monitored on different hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes during 30 days. At the early stages of filtration (1 d), the same early colonizers belonging to the class Betaproteobacteria were identified on all the membranes. However, their relative abundance decreased on day 20 and 30, and sequence reads belonging to the phylum Firmicutes and Chlorobi became dominant on all the membranes on day 20 and 30. In addition, the intrinsic membrane characteristic did not select any specific EPS fractions at the initial stages of filtration and the same EPS foulants developed with time on the hydrophobic and hydrophilic membranes. Our results indicated that the membrane surface characteristics did not select for specific biofouling communities or EPS foulants, and the same early

  1. Transfer of tracers and pesticides in lab scale wetland systems: the role of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, R.; Imfeld, G.; Lange, J.

    2012-04-01

    Surface wetlands can collect contaminated runoff from urban or agricultural catchments and have intrinsic physical, chemical and biological retention and removal processes useful for mitigating contaminants, including pesticides, and thus limiting the contamination of aquatic ecosystems. Yet little is known about the transfer of pesticides between wetlands collecting pesticides runoff and groundwater, and the subsequent threat of groundwater contamination. In particular, the influence of wetland vegetation and related processes during pesticide transfer is largely unknown. Here we evaluate the transfer of the widely used herbicide Isoproturon (IPU) and the fungicide Metalaxyl (MTX) with that of Uranine (UR) and Sulphorhodamine (SRB) in a vegetated and a non-vegetated lab-scale wetland. UR and SRB had successfully served as a reference for pesticides in surface wetlands. We filled two 65 cm long and 15 cm diameter borosilicate columns with sediment cores from a wetland, one without and one with vegetation (Phragmites australis, Cav.). When a constant flow-through rate of 0.33 ml min-1 was reached, tracers and pesticides were injected simultaneously and continuously. The hydrological mass balance and tracer concentrations were measured daily at the outlet of the lab-scale wetland. Samples for pesticides and hydrochemical analyses were collected biweekly. The lab-scale wetlands were covered to limit evaporation and light decay of injected compounds. The reactive transfer of compounds in the vegetated and non-vegetated lab-scale wetland was compared based on breakthrough curves (BTC's) and model parameters of the lumped parameter model CXTFIT. The hydrologic balance revealed that the intensity of transpiration and hence plant activity in the lab-scale wetlands progressively decreased and then apparently ceased after about eight days following continuous pesticide injection. In this first phase, no significant difference in the hydrologic balances could be observed

  2. Using Models at the Mesoscopic Scale in Teaching Physics: Two Experimental Interventions in Solid Friction and Fluid Statics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Viennot, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the didactic suitability of introducing models at an intermediate (i.e. mesoscopic) scale in teaching certain subjects, at an early stage. The design and evaluation of two short sequences based on this rationale will be outlined: one bears on propulsion by solid friction, the other on fluid statics in the presence of gravity.…

  3. Degradation of Methanethiol by Methylotrophic Methanogenic Archaea in a Lab-Scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, de F.A.M.; Leerdam, van R.C.; Lomans, B.P.; Smidt, H.; Lens, P.N.L.; Janssen, A.J.H.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor inoculated with granular sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant treating paper mill wastewater, methanethiol (MT) was degraded at 30°C to H2S, CO2, and CH4. At a hydraulic retention time of 9 h, a maximum influent concentration of 6

  4. Acoustics of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  5. The origins of friction and the growth of graphene, investigated at the atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarle, van D.W.

    2016-01-01

    This work covers two closely related topics: a theoretical study on the origins of friction and an experimental study on the growth of graphene. Both fundamental studies are focusing on the atomic processes involved. The study on friction treats the dissipation that takes places at one single fricti

  6. Stability of a lab-scale biofilm for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, Christina Maria; Harremoës, Poul; Mosbæk, Hans

    2001-01-01

    A lab-scale biofilm reactor for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate was operated for one and a half years. Despite using only well defined synthetic wastewater and well defined operation, the activity varied significantly over the months. It was speculated that microbial population...... to the importance of the history of the bacteria when considering biological P removal, on-line measurements are strongly recommended for research on this subject. Microbial characterisation methods are recommended as an assisting tool in further research....... with different start concentrations of acetate, nitrate or phosphate were conducted. These verified 0.5 and 0 order removal rates in the bulk water depending on the concentration. This was taken as an indication of a zonation of the biofilm. Due to the measured variability in the activity and due...

  7. Lab-scale phytotreatment of old landfill leachate using different energy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Malagoli, Mario; Garbo, Francesco; Pivato, Alberto; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-09-01

    Old landfill leachate was treated in lab-scale phytotreatment units using three oleaginous species: sunflower (H), soybean (S) and rapeseed (R). The specific objectives of this study were to identify the effects of plant species combinations with two different soil textures on the reduction of COD, total N (nitrogen) and total P (phosphorous); to identify the correlation between biomass growth and removal efficiency; to assess the potential of oily seeds for the production of biodiesel. The experimental test was carried out using 20L volume pots installed in a greenhouse under different leachate percentages in the feeding and subsequent COD, N and P loads. Significant removal efficiencies were achieved: COD (ɳ>80%), total N (ɳ>70%) and total P (ɳ>95%). Better performances were displayed by the clayey soil. Plants irrigated with leachate, when compared to control units fed only with water and nutrient solution (Hoagland solution), developed a larger plant mass. Sunflower was the best performing species.

  8. Stability of a lab-scale biofilm for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, Christina Maria; Harremoës, Poul; Mosbæk, Hans

    2001-01-01

    A lab-scale biofilm reactor for simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrate was operated for one and a half years. Despite using only well defined synthetic wastewater and well defined operation, the activity varied significantly over the months. It was speculated that microbial population...... to the importance of the history of the bacteria when considering biological P removal, on-line measurements are strongly recommended for research on this subject. Microbial characterisation methods are recommended as an assisting tool in further research....... with different start concentrations of acetate, nitrate or phosphate were conducted. These verified 0.5 and 0 order removal rates in the bulk water depending on the concentration. This was taken as an indication of a zonation of the biofilm. Due to the measured variability in the activity and due...

  9. Monitoring CO2 invasion processes at the pore scale using geological labs on chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, S; Liu, N; Diouf, A; Bernard, D; Lecoutre, C; Garrabos, Y; Marre, S

    2016-09-21

    In order to investigate at the pore scale the mechanisms involved during CO2 injection in a water saturated pore network, a series of displacement experiments is reported using high pressure micromodels (geological labs on chip - GLoCs) working under real geological conditions (25 < T (°C) < 75 and 4.5 < p (MPa) < 8). The experiments were focused on the influence of three experimental parameters: (i) the p, T conditions, (ii) the injection flow rates and (iii) the pore network characteristics. By using on-chip optical characterization and imaging approaches, the CO2 saturation curves as a function of either time or the number of pore volume injected were determined. Three main mechanisms were observed during CO2 injection, namely, invasion, percolation and drying, which are discussed in this paper. Interestingly, besides conventional mechanisms, two counterintuitive situations were observed during the invasion and drying processes.

  10. CO2 Absorption in a Lab-Scale Fixed Solid Bed Reactor: Modelling and Experimental Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gabbrielli

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The CO2 absorption in a lab-scale fixed solid bed reactor filled with different solid sorbents has been studied under different operative conditions regarding temperature (20-200°C and input gas composition (N2, O2, CO2, H2O at 1bar pressure. The gas leaving the reactor has been analysed to measure the CO2 and O2 concentrations and, consequently, to evaluate the overall CO2 removal efficiency. In order to study the influence of solid sorbent type (i.e. CaO, coal bottom ash, limestone and blast furnace slag and of mass and heat transfer processes on CO2 removal efficiency, a one-dimensional time dependent mathematical model of the reactor, which may be considered a Plug Flow Reactor, has been developed. The quality of the model has been confirmed using the experimental results.

  11. Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Jacopo; Örlü, Ramis; Chin, Cheng; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-12-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of the control strategy introduced by Schoppa and Hussain [Phys. Fluids 10, 1049 (1998), 10.1063/1.869789] as a function of Reynolds number (Re). The skin-friction drag reduction method proposed by these authors, consisting of streamwise-invariant, counter-rotating vortices, was analyzed by Canton et al. [Flow, Turbul. Combust. 97, 811 (2016), 10.1007/s10494-016-9723-8] in turbulent channel flows for friction Reynolds numbers (Reτ) corresponding to the value of the original study (i.e., 104) and 180. For these Re, a slightly modified version of the method proved to be successful and was capable of providing a drag reduction of up to 18%. The present study analyzes the Reynolds number dependence of this drag-reducing strategy by performing two sets of direct numerical simulations (DNS) for Reτ=360 and 550. A detailed analysis of the method as a function of the control parameters (amplitude and wavelength) and Re confirms, on the one hand, the effectiveness of the large-scale vortices at low Re and, on the other hand, the decreasing and finally vanishing effectiveness of this method for higher Re. In particular, no drag reduction can be achieved for Reτ=550 for any combination of the parameters controlling the vortices. For low Reynolds numbers, the large-scale vortices are able to affect the near-wall cycle and alter the wall-shear-stress distribution to cause an overall drag reduction effect, in accordance with most control strategies. For higher Re, instead, the present method fails to penetrate the near-wall region and cannot induce the spanwise velocity variation observed in other more established control strategies, which focus on the near-wall cycle. Despite the negative outcome, the present results demonstrate the shortcomings of the control strategy and show that future focus should be on methods that directly target the near-wall region or other suitable alternatives.

  12. Population heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli lab scale cultivations simulating industrial scale bioprocesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena

    in different cultivations modes, in steady state at different growth rates and in response to glucose perturbation in continuous culture, simulating the feeding zone of a large scale fed-batch fermentation and in batch culture to characterise the single cell behaviour in a dynamic environment. Furthermore......Today it is well known that a population of cells in a bioreactor is heterogeneous, opposite to traditional belief, and thus exhibiting distributions of single cell properties e.g. cell size, viability and metabolic activity rather than having a set of characteristics that can be described...... by averaged values. Population distributions always exist, but are significantly pronounced due to a combination of metabolic and stress responses of single cells travelling throughout the reactor experiencing gradients of substrate, pH and oxygen caused by non-ideal mixing in industrial scale bioprocesses...

  13. Transport of pesticides and artificial tracers in vertical-flow lab-scale wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, Romy; Imfeld, Gwenaël.; Lange, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Wetland systems can be hydrologically connected to a shallow aquifer and intercept upward flow of pesticide-contaminated water during groundwater discharge. However, pesticide transport and attenuation through wetland sediments (WSs) intercepting contaminated water is rarely evaluated quantitatively. The use of artificial tracers to evaluate pesticide transport and associated risks is a fairly new approach that requires evaluation and validation. Here we evaluate during 84 days the transport of two pesticides (i.e., isoproturon (IPU) and metalaxyl (MTX)) and three tracers (i.e., bromide (Br), uranine (UR), and sulforhodamine B (SRB)) in upward vertical-flow vegetated and nonvegetated lab-scale wetlands. The lab-scale wetlands were filled with outdoor WSs and were continuously supplied with tracers and the pesticide-contaminated water. The transport of IPU and UR was characterized by high solute recovery (approximately 80%) and low retardation compared to Br. The detection of desmethylisoproturon in the wetlands indicated IPU degradation. SRB showed larger retardation (>3) and lower recovery (approximately 60%) compared to Br, indicating that sorption controlled SRB transport. MTX was moderately retarded (approximately 1.5), and its load attenuation in the wetland reached 40%. In the vegetated wetland, preferential flow along the roots decreased interactions between solutes and sediments, resulting in larger pesticide and tracer recovery. Our results show that UR and IPU have similar transport characteristics under the tested subsurface-flow conditions, whereas SRB may serve as a proxy for less mobile and more persistent pesticides. Since UR and SRB are not significantly affected by degradation, their use as proxies for fast degrading pollutants may be limited. We anticipate our results to be a starting point for considering artificial tracers for investigating pesticide transport in environments at groundwater/surface-water interfaces.

  14. Recirculation of reverse osmosis concentrate in lab-scale anaerobic and aerobic landfill simulation reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello; Raga, Roberto; Pivato, Alberto; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Leachate treatment is a major issue in the context of landfill management, particularly in view of the consistent changes manifested over time in the quality and quantity of leachate produced, linked to both waste and landfill characteristics, which renders the procedure technically difficult and expensive. Leachate recirculation may afford a series of potential advantages, including improvement of leachate quality, enhancement of gas production, acceleration of biochemical processes, control of moisture content, as well as nutrients and microbe migration within the landfill. Recirculation of the products of leachate treatment, such as reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate, is a less common practice, with widespread controversy relating to its suitability, potential impacts on landfill management and future gaseous and leachable emissions. Scientific literature provides the results of only a few full-scale applications of concentrate recirculation. In some cases, an increase of COD and ammonium nitrogen in leachate was observed, coupled with an increase of salinity; which, additionally, might negatively affect performance of the RO plant itself. In other cases, not only did leachate production not increase significantly but the characteristics of leachate extracted from the well closest to the re-injection point also remained unchanged. This paper presents the results of lab-scale tests conducted in landfill simulation reactors, in which the effects of injection of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill leachate RO concentrate were evaluated. Six reactors were managed with different weekly concentrate inputs, under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions, with the aim of investigating the short and long-term effects of this practice on landfill emissions. Lab-scale tests resulted in a more reliable identification of compound accumulation and kinetic changes than full-scale applications, further enhancing the development of a mass balance in which gaseous emissions and waste

  15. Aeration of the teuftal landfill: Field scale concept and lab scale simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzkowski, Marco; Walker, Beat; Kuchta, Kerstin; Raga, Roberto; Stegmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Long lasting post-closure care (PCC) is often the major financial burden for operators of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Beside costs for the installation and maintenance of technical equipment and barriers, in particular long term treatment of leachate and landfill gas has to be paid from capital surplus. Estimations based on laboratory experiments project time periods of many decades until leachate quality allows for direct discharge (i.e. no need for further purification). Projections based on leachate samples derived from the last 37years for 35 German landfills confirm these assumption. Moreover, the data illustrate that in particular ammonium nitrogen concentrations are likely to fall below limit values only after a period of 300years. In order to avoid long lasting PCC the operator of Teuftal landfill, located in the Swiss canton Bern, decided to biologically stabilize the landfill by means of a combined in situ aeration and moisturization approach. In December 2014 the aeration started at a landfill section containing approximately 30% of the total landfill volume. From summer 2016 onwards the remaining part of the landfill will be aerated. Landfill aeration through horizontal gas and leachate drains is carried out for the first time in field scale in Europe. The technical concept is described in the paper. Parallel to field scale aeration, investigations for the carbon and nitrogen turnover are carried out by means of both simulated aerated landfills and simulated anaerobic landfills. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that aeration is capable to enhance, both carbon mobilization and discharge via the gas phase. This effect comes along with a significant increase in bio-stabilization of the waste organic fraction, which positively affects the landfill emission behavior in the long run. In terms of leachate pollution reduction it could be demonstrated that the organic load decrease fast and widely independent of the adjusted aeration

  16. Lab-scale experimental strategy for determining micropollutant partition coefficient and biodegradation constants in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomiès, M; Choubert, J M; Wisniewski, C; Miège, C; Budzinski, H; Coquery, M

    2015-03-01

    The nitrifying/denitrifying activated sludge process removes several micropollutants from wastewater by sorption onto sludge and/or biodegradation. The objective of this paper is to propose and evaluate a lab-scale experimental strategy for the determination of partition coefficient and biodegradation constant for micropollutant with an objective of modelling their removal. Four pharmaceutical compounds (ibuprofen, atenolol, diclofenac and fluoxetine) covering a wide hydrophobicity range (log Kow from 0.16 to 4.51) were chosen. Dissolved and particulate concentrations were monitored for 4 days, inside two reactors working under aerobic and anoxic conditions, and under different substrate feed conditions (biodegradable carbon and nitrogen). We determined the mechanisms responsible for the removal of the target compounds: (i) ibuprofen was biodegraded, mainly under aerobic conditions by cometabolism with biodegradable carbon, whereas anoxic conditions suppressed biodegradation; (ii) atenolol was biodegraded under both aerobic and anoxic conditions (with a higher biodegradation rate under aerobic conditions), and cometabolism with biodegradable carbon was the main mechanism; (iii) diclofenac and fluoxetine were removed by sorption only. Finally, the abilities of our strategy were evaluated by testing the suitability of the parameters for simulating effluent concentrations and removal efficiency at a full-scale plant.

  17. Optimisation of biogas production from manure through serial digestion: lab-scale and pilot-scale studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaparaju, Prasad; Ellegaard, Lars; Angelidaki, Irini

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the possibility of optimizing biogas production from manure by serial digestion was investigated. In the lab-scale experiments, process performance and biogas production of serial digestion, two methanogenic continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) connected in series, was compared to a conventional one-step CSTR process. The one-step process was operated at 55 degrees C with 15d HRT and 5l working volume (control). For serial digestion, the total working volume of 5l was distributed as 70/30%, 50/50%, 30/70% or 13/87% between the two methanogenic reactors, respectively. Results showed that serial digestion improved biogas production from manure compared to one-step process. Among the tested reactor configurations, best results were obtained when serial reactors were operated with 70/30% and 50/50% volume distribution. Serial digestion at 70/30% and 50/50% volume distribution produced 13-17.8% more biogas and methane and, contained low VFA and residual methane potential loss in the effluent compared to the one-step CSTR process. At 30/70% volume distribution, an increase in biogas production was also noticed but the process was very unstable with low methane production. At 13/87% volume distribution, no difference in biogas production was noticed and methane production was much lower than the one-step CSTR process. Pilot-scale experiments also showed that serial digestion with 77/23% volume distribution could improve biogas yields by 1.9-6.1% compared to one-step process. The study thus suggests that the biogas production from manure can be optimized through serial digestion with an optimal volume distribution of 70/30% or 50/50% as the operational fluctuations are typically high during full scale application. However, process temperature between the two methanogenic reactors should be as close as possible in order to derive the benefits of serial coupling.

  18. Nitrous oxide production during nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater in lab-scale sequencing batch reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiuhong; PENG Yi; WU Changyong; AKIO Takigawa; PENG Yongzhen

    2008-01-01

    The production of N2O during nitrogen removal from real domestic wastewater was investigated in a lab-scale aerobic-anoxic sequencing batch reactor with a working volume of 14 L.The results showed that the total N2O-N production reached higher than 1.87 mg/L,and up to 4% of removed nitrogen was converted into N2O.In addition,N2O led to a much higher greenhouse effect than CO2 during aerobic reaction phase,this proved that N2O production could not be neglected.The N2O-N production during nitrification Was 1.85 mg/L,whereas,during denitrification,no N2O was produced,nitrification was the main source of N2O production during nitrogen removal.Furthermore,during denitrification,the dissolved N2O at the end of aeration Was found to be further reduced to N2.Denitrification thus had the potential of controlling N2O production.

  19. Experimental investigation of fuel regression rate in a HTPB based lab-scale hybrid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xintian; Tian, Hui; Yu, Nanjia; Cai, Guobiao

    2014-12-01

    The fuel regression rate is an important parameter in the design process of the hybrid rocket motor. Additives in the solid fuel may have influences on the fuel regression rate, which will affect the internal ballistics of the motor. A series of firing experiments have been conducted on lab-scale hybrid rocket motors with 98% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidizer and hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based fuels in this paper. An innovative fuel regression rate analysis method is established to diminish the errors caused by start and tailing stages in a short time firing test. The effects of the metal Mg, Al, aromatic hydrocarbon anthracene (C14H10), and carbon black (C) on the fuel regression rate are investigated. The fuel regression rate formulas of different fuel components are fitted according to the experiment data. The results indicate that the influence of C14H10 on the fuel regression rate of HTPB is not evident. However, the metal additives in the HTPB fuel can increase the fuel regression rate significantly.

  20. Symbiotic relationship analysis of predominant bacteria in a lab-scale anammox UASB bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujia; Hu, Xiaomin; Jiang, Binhui; Song, Zhenhui; Ma, Yongguang

    2016-04-01

    In order to provide the comprehensive insight into the key microbial groups in anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process, high-throughput sequencing analysis has been used for the investigation of the bacterial communities of a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) anammox bioreactor. Results revealed that 109 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; out of 14,820 reads) were identified and a domination of anammox bacteria of Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis (OTU474, 35.42 %), along with heterotrophs of Limnobacter sp. MED105 (OTU951, 14.98 %), Anerolinea thermophila UNI-1 (OTU465 and OTU833, 6.60 and 3.93 %), Azoarcus sp. B72 (OTU26, 9.47 %), and Ignavibacterium sp. JCM 16511 (OTU459, 8.33 %) were detected. Metabolic pathway analysis showed that Candidatus K. stuttgartiensis encountered gene defect in synthesizing a series of metabolic cofactors for growth, implying that K. stuttgartiensis is auxotrophic. Coincidentally, the other dominant species severally showed complete metabolic pathways with full set gene encoding to corresponding cofactors presented in the surrounding environment. Furthermore, it was likely that the survival of heterotrophs in the autotrophic system indicates the existence of a symbiotic and mutual relationship in anammox system.

  1. A preliminary and qualitative study of resource ratio theory to nitrifying lab-scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Micol; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Beneduce, Luciano; Graham, David W; Head, Ian M; Curtis, Thomas P

    2015-05-01

    The incorporation of microbial diversity in design would ideally require predictive theory that would relate operational parameters to the numbers and distribution of taxa. Resource ratio-theory (RRT) might be one such theory. Based on Monod kinetics, it explains diversity in function of resource-ratio and richness. However, to be usable in biological engineered system, the growth parameters of all the bacteria under consideration and the resource supply and diffusion parameters for all the relevant nutrients should be determined. This is challenging, but plausible, at least for low diversity groups with simple resource requirements like the ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). One of the major successes of RRT was its ability to explain the 'paradox of enrichment' which states that diversity first increases and then decreases with resource richness. Here, we demonstrate that this pattern can be seen in lab-scale-activated sludge reactors and parallel simulations that incorporate the principles of RRT in a floc-based system. High and low ammonia and oxygen were supplied to continuous flow bioreactors with resource conditions correlating with the composition and diversity of resident AOB communities based on AOB 16S rDNA clone libraries. Neither the experimental work nor the simulations are definitive proof for the application of RRT in this context. However, it is sufficient evidence that such approach might work and justify a more rigorous investigation.

  2. Micromechanics of sea ice frictional slip from test basin scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammonds, Peter R.; Hatton, Daniel C.; Feltham, Daniel L.

    2017-02-01

    We have conducted a series of high-resolution friction experiments on large floating saline ice floes in an environmental test basin. In these experiments, a central ice floe was pushed between two other floes, sliding along two interfacial faults. The frictional motion was predominantly stick-slip. Shear stresses, normal stresses, local strains and slip displacement were measured along the sliding faults, and acoustic emissions were monitored. High-resolution measurements during a single stick-slip cycle at several positions along the fault allowed us to identify two phases of frictional slip: a nucleation phase, where a nucleation zone begins to slip before the rest of the fault, and a propagation phase when the entire fault is slipping. This is slip-weakening behaviour. We have therefore characterized what we consider to be a key deformation mechanism in Arctic Ocean dynamics. In order to understand the micromechanics of sea ice friction, we have employed a theoretical constitutive relation (i.e. an equation for shear stress in terms of temperature, normal load, acceleration, velocity and slip displacement) derived from the physics of asperity-asperity contact and sliding (Hatton et al. 2009 Phil. Mag. 89, 2771-2799 (doi:10.1080/14786430903113769)). We find that our experimental data conform reasonably with this frictional law once slip weakening is introduced. We find that the constitutive relation follows Archard's law rather than Amontons' law, with ? (where τ is the shear stress and σn is the normal stress) and n = 26/27, with a fractal asperity distribution, where the frictional shear stress, τ = ffractal Tmlws, where ffractal is the fractal asperity height distribution, Tml is the shear strength for frictional melting and lubrication and ws is the slip weakening. We can therefore deduce that the interfacial faults failed in shear for these experimental conditions through processes of brittle failure of asperities in shear, and, at higher velocities

  3. Forces between clustered stereocilia minimize friction in the ear on a subnanometre scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozlov, A.S.; Baumgart, J.; Risler, T.; Versteegh, C.P.C.; Hudspeth, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of sound begins when energy derived from an acoustic stimulus deflects the hair bundles on top of hair cells1. As hair bundles move, the viscous friction between stereocilia and the surrounding liquid poses a fundamental physical challenge to the ear’s high sensitivity and sharp

  4. A Method to Estimate Friction Coefficient from Orientation Distribution of Meso-scale Faults: Applications to Faults in Forearc Sediment and Underplated Tectonic Mélange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.

    2015-12-01

    Friction coefficients along faults control the brittle strength of the earth's upper crust, although it is difficult to estimate them especially of ancient geological faults. Several previous studies tried to determine the friction coefficient of meso-scale faults from their orientation distribution as follows. Fault-slip analysis through stress tensor inversion techniques gives principal stress axes and a stress ratio, which allows us to draw a normalized Mohr's circle. Assuming that a faulting occurs when the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on it, i.e., the slip tendency, exceeds the friction coefficient, one can find a linear boundary of distribution of points corresponding to faults on Mohr diagram. The slope of the boundary (friction envelope) provides the friction coefficient. This method has a difficulty in graphically and manually recognizing the linear boundary of distribution on the Mohr diagram. This study automated the determination of friction coefficient by considering the fluctuations of fluid pressure and differential stress. These unknown factors are expected to make difference in density of points representing faults on the Mohr diagram. Since the density is controlled by the friction coefficient, we can optimize the friction coefficient so as to explain the density distribution. The method was applied to two examples of natural meso-scale faults. The first example is from the Pleistocene Kazusa Group, central Japan, which filled a forearc basin of the Sagami Trough. Stress inversion analysis showed WNW-ENE trending tensional stress with a low stress ratio. The friction coefficient was determined to be around 0.66, which is typical value for sandstone. The Second example is from an underplated tectonic mélange in the Cretaceous to Paleogene Shimanto accretionary complex in southwest Japan along the Nankai Trough. The stress condition was determined to be an axial compression perpendicular to the foliation of shale matrix. The friction

  5. Microvolume TOC Analysis as Useful Tool in the Evaluation of Lab Scale Photocatalytic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegie Cool

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis methods that require small volumes of aqueous samples can be of large benefit for applications when expensive chemicals are involved or available volumes are substantially small and concentrations are low. A new method is presented to allow microvolume liquid injections on TOC equipment using a special designed Shimadzu gas injection kit® in combination with a high precision syringe and Chaney adapter. Next to details on the methodology of microvolume TOC injections, the technique is shown to be beneficial to evaluate the efficiency of photocatalytic dye degradation on titania materials in terms of CO2 conversion simultaneously with classic UV-Vis analysis measurements within a lab scale photocatalytic test setup (volume <100 mL. The possibility to allow multiple microvolume samplings in short time intervals during several hours without a substantial decrease in volume/catalyst ratio is of particular value for the evaluation of photocatalysts. By combining both techniques at short time intervals, additional knowledge of the degradation process/mechanism, kinetics and the efficiency can be obtained in a direct way. Moreover, the developed μV-TOC analysis is specifically useful in those applications in which low sample volumes in combination with low concentrations are involved. For example, μV-TOC can similarly be put into service in a wide range of small volume setups, e.g., analytes from high-throughput screening, pharmaceutical applications and other advanced oxidation processes that formally could not be analyzed due to limited sample volumes and often low concentrations.

  6. Hydrologic Process Regularization for Improved Geoelectrical Monitoring of a Lab-Scale Saline Tracer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oware, E. K.; Moysey, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Regularization stabilizes the geophysical imaging problem resulting from sparse and noisy measurements that render solutions unstable and non-unique. Conventional regularization constraints are, however, independent of the physics of the underlying process and often produce smoothed-out tomograms with mass underestimation. Cascaded time-lapse (CTL) is a widely used reconstruction technique for monitoring wherein a tomogram obtained from the background dataset is employed as starting model for the inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets. In contrast, a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)-constrained inversion framework enforces physics-based regularization based upon prior understanding of the expected evolution of state variables. The physics-based constraints are represented in the form of POD basis vectors. The basis vectors are constructed from numerically generated training images (TIs) that mimic the desired process. The target can be reconstructed from a small number of selected basis vectors, hence, there is a reduction in the number of inversion parameters compared to the full dimensional space. The inversion involves finding the optimal combination of the selected basis vectors conditioned on the geophysical measurements. We apply the algorithm to 2-D lab-scale saline transport experiments with electrical resistivity (ER) monitoring. We consider two transport scenarios with one and two mass injection points evolving into unimodal and bimodal plume morphologies, respectively. The unimodal plume is consistent with the assumptions underlying the generation of the TIs, whereas bimodality in plume morphology was not conceptualized. We compare difference tomograms retrieved from POD with those obtained from CTL. Qualitative comparisons of the difference tomograms with images of their corresponding dye plumes suggest that POD recovered more compact plumes in contrast to those of CTL. While mass recovery generally deteriorated with increasing number of time

  7. Microalgae based biorefinery: evaluation of oil extraction methods in terms of efficiency, costs, toxicity and energy in lab-scale

    OpenAIRE

    Ángel Darío González-Delgado; Viatcheslav Kafarov

    2013-01-01

    Several alternatives of microalgal metabolites extraction and transformation are being studied for achieving the total utilization of this energy crop of great interest worldwide. Microalgae oil extraction is a key stage in microalgal biodiesel production chains and their efficiency affects significantly the global process efficiency. In this study, a comparison of five oil extraction methods in lab-scale was made taking as additional parameters, besides extraction efficiency, the costs of me...

  8. Performance of a lab-scale bio-electrochemical assisted septic tank for the anaerobic treatment of black

    OpenAIRE

    Zamalloa Nalvarte, Carlos Enrique; Arends, Jan; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2013-01-01

    Septic tanks are used for the removal of organic particulates in wastewaters by physical accumulation instead of through the biological production of biogas. Improved biogas production in septic tanks is crucial to increase the potential of this system for both energy generation and organic matter removal. In this study, the effect on the biogas production and biogas quality of coupling a 20 L lab-scale septic tank with a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated and compared with a ...

  9. The carreau-yasuda fluids: a skin friction equation for turbulent flow in pipes and kolmogorov dissipative scales

    OpenAIRE

    ANDRADE, Luiz Claudio Fialho; PETRONÍLIO, Jamilson A.; MANESCHY, Carlos Edilson de Almeida; CRUZ, Daniel Onofre de Almeida

    2007-01-01

    In this work the turbulent flow of the Non-Newtonian Carreau-Yasuda fluid will be studied. A skin friction equation for the turbulent flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluids will be derived assuming a logarithmic behavior of the turbulent mean velocity for the near wall flow out of the viscous sub layer. An alternative near wall characteristic length scale which takes into account the effects of the relaxation time will be introduced. The characteristic length will be obtained through the analysis of v...

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Tribology on the Small Scale: A Bottom Up Approach to Friction, Lubrication, and Wear Tribology on the Small Scale: A Bottom Up Approach to Friction, Lubrication, and Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainsworth, S.

    2008-11-01

    Friction, lubrication and wear interactions between materials make considerable differences to how efficient our engines are, whether or not we ski downhill faster than others, or whether the shoes that we are wearing give us sufficient grip to successfully navigate the marble floors of buildings. Traditionally, tribologists have focussed on the macroscopic issues of tribological problems, looking at the design of components, the viscosity of oils and the mechanical properties of surfaces to understand how components interact to give the desired friction and wear properties. However, in the last twenty years there has been an increasing realization that the processes that are controlling these macroscopic interactions are determined by what happens on the atomic and microscopic scale. Further, with the advent of nano- and micro-electro mechanical systems (NEMs and MEMs), macroscopic scale tribological interactions do not influence the tribology of these devices in the same way, and capillary forces and van der Waal's forces play an increased role in determining whether these devices function successfully. This book aims to fill a gap in the area of tribology textbooks by addressing the important advances that have been made in our understanding of the science of nano- and micro-scale tribological interactions. The book is aimed at advanced undergraduate and graduate level students on engineering programmes, academics and scientists interested in atomic and microscopic scale tribological interactions, and engineers and scientists who are not tribologists per se but work in technologies (such as NEMs/MEMs) where tribology is of importance. Whilst the target audience appears to be largely engineers, the book should have wider appeal to physicists, chemists and modellers with interests in tribological interactions. The book consists of twelve chapters with an introduction to the general significance of tribology and a brief history of modern tribology, followed by more

  11. Fundamental structural characteristics of planar granular assemblies: Self-organization and scaling away friction and initial state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Takashi; Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2017-03-01

    . We conclude that, in principle, the microstructural characteristics are governed mainly by the packing procedure, while the effects of intergranular friction and initial states are details that can be scaled away. However, mechanical stability constraints suppress slightly the occurrence of small quadron volumes in cells of order ≥6 , and the magnitude of this effect does depend on friction. We quantify in detail this dependence and the deviation it causes from an exact collapse for these cells. (vi) We argue that our results support strongly the view that ensemble granular statistical mechanics does not satisfy the uniform measure assumption of conventional statistical mechanics. Results (i)-(iv) have been reported in the aforementioned reference, and they are reviewed and elaborated on here.

  12. Tobermolite effects on methane removal activity and microbial community of a lab-scale soil biocover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Eun; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kim, Tae Gwan; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2014-07-01

    Three identical lab-scale biocovers were packed with an engineered soil (BC 1), tobermolite only (BC 2), and a mixture of the soil and tobermolite (BC 3), and were operated at an inlet load of 338-400 g-CH4 m(-2) d(-1) and a space velocity of 0.12 h(-1). The methane removal capacity was 293 ± 47 g-CH4 m(-2) d(-1) in steady state in the BC 3, which was significantly higher than those in the BC 1 and BC 2 (106 ± 24 and 114 ± 48 g-CH4 m(-2) d(-1), respectively). Quantitative PCR indicated that bacterial and methanotrophic densities (6.62-6.78 × 10(7) 16S rDNA gene copy number g-dry sample(-1) and 1.37-2.23 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number g-dry sample(-1) in the BC 1 and BC 3, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the BC 2. Ribosomal tag pyrosequencing showed that methanotrophs comprised approximately 60 % of the bacterial community in the BC 2 and BC 3, while they only comprised 43 % in the BC 1. The engineered soil favored the growth of total bacteria including methanotrophs, while the presence of tobermolite enhanced the relative abundance of methanotrophs, resulting in an improved habitat for methanotrophs as well as greater methane mitigation performance in the mixture. Moreover, a batch experiment indicated that the soil and tobermolite mixture could display a stable methane oxidation level over wide temperature (20-40 °C, at least 38 μmol g-dry sample(-1) h(-1)) and pH (5-8, at least 61 μmol g-dry sample(-1) h(-1)) ranges. In conclusion, the soil and tobermolite mixture is promising for methane mitigation.

  13. A two-scale model for frictional cracks in 3D fractured brittle media with the extended finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Borja, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Stress concentration induced by the heterogeneity in brittle geomaterials is generally considered as the driving force in the evolution of the microstructure (such as the crack and pore microstructure). Specifically, modeling heterogeneity is key to properly predicting the nucleation, coalescence and propagation of micro-cracks in brittle solids. In this paper, we propose a two-scale model for frictional cracks in fractured brittle media. The major crack in the study domain is modeled at a macro level, while the micro-cracks are modeled at a finer scale. The macro-scale behavior is described by a standard boundary value problem. The finer-scale problem is modeled using the notion of representative elementary volume (REV) consisting of a solid volume with distributed micro-cracks. Periodic boundary condition and small strain formulation are assumed in the finer-scale analysis. The scale bridging mechanism is borrowed from the standard homogenization technique. The proposed model is implemented with the extended finite element method. The macro stress at each Gauss point in the finite element formulation is computed as the volume average of finer-scale stresses in each corresponding REV. The macro tangent operator is computed using a perturbation method. For 3D problems, six independent linear perturbation analyses are carried out for each numerical integration point. Our numerical examples capture the nucleation and coalescence of micro-cracks, which can be used to infer the potential propagation direction of the major crack.

  14. Treatment of Simulated Shipboard Gray Water in a Lab-Scale Membrane Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    conditions that can cause excessive levels of filamentous bacteria includes low F:M ratio, low DO levels, and completely mixed conditions ( Metcalf and Eddy ...which tends to have F:M of 0.04 to 0.10 day-1 ( Metcalf and Eddy , 2003). The lab system, which alternated between aeration and no aeration for...nitrates recycled into the anaerobic reactor ( Metcalf and Eddy , 2003). As such, one would not expect TP removal in the single tank system used for

  15. Multi-offset ground-penetrating radar imaging of a lab-scale infiltration test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Mangel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A lab scale infiltration experiment was conducted in a sand tank to evaluate the use of time-lapse multi-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR data for monitoring dynamic hydrologic events in the vadose zone. Sets of 21 GPR traces at offsets between 0.44–0.9 m were recorded every 30 s during a 3 h infiltration experiment to produce a data cube that can be viewed as multi-offset gathers at unique times or common offset images, tracking changes in arrivals through time. Specifically, we investigated whether this data can be used to estimate changes in average soil water content during wetting and drying and to track the migration of the wetting front during an infiltration event. For the first problem we found that normal-moveout (NMO analysis of the GPR reflection from the bottom of the sand layer provided water content estimates ranging between 0.10–0.30 volumetric water content, which underestimated the value determined by depth averaging a vertical array of six moisture probes by 0.03–0.05 volumetric water content. Relative errors in the estimated depth to the bottom of the 0.6 m thick sand layer were typically on the order of 2%, though increased as high as 25% as the wetting front approached the bottom of the tank. NMO analysis of the wetting front reflection during the infiltration event generally underestimated the depth of the front with discrepancies between GPR and moisture probe estimates approaching 0.15 m. The analysis also resulted in underestimates of water content in the wetted zone on the order of 0.06 volumetric water content and a wetting front velocity equal to about half the rate inferred from the probe measurements. In a parallel modeling effort we found that HYDRUS-1D also underestimates the observed average tank water content determined from the probes by approximately 0.01–0.03 volumetric water content, despite the fact that the model was calibrated to the probe data. This error suggests that the assumed conceptual

  16. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  17. Biodiesel blend (B10 treated with a multifunctional additive (biocide under simulated stored conditions: a field and lab scale monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane R. Zimmer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial contamination of stored diesel/biodiesel fuel over time and the consequent changes in the fuel chemical composition is of serious concern. The use of biocides has also been shown to be an effective strategy to address this challenge but in some countries like Brazil, no products have been released and licensed to be used yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multifunctional additive containing a biocide (i.e., 3,3-methylenebis(5-methyloxazolidine; in short MBO as 50% of its formulation (AM-MBO50 for controlling microbial contamination under simulated storage conditions. The experiment was conducted under two conditions: at lab-scale and in the field (real-world condition. In both experiments, B10 blend treated with AM-MBO50 as well as the untreated fuel blend were stored under simulated storage conditions for 35 and 90 d, respectively. The additive effectiveness and the changes in oxidative stability, water content, density, and viscosity were monitored. The results showed that the evaluated product was an efficient treatment to control microbial growth at 1000 ppm concentration, presenting a biocide action after 7 d in the tanks containing the treated fuel and with a low microbial challenge and a biostatic action in the tanks containing the treated fuel and with a high microbial challenge. In the tanks containing the fuel treated with AM-MBO50, no adhesion of biofilm in the oil/water interface nor meaningful changes in the quality parameters such as oxidative stability, water content, viscosity, and density were observed after 90 d. A comparison between the lab-scale and field results showed that the application conditions determined at the lab-scale can only serve as preliminary guidance for the field (real-world application and that they should be monitored and adjusted for each specific system.

  18. Role of interparticle friction and particle-scale elasticity in the shear-strength mechanism of three-dimensional granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, S. J.; Kruyt, N. P.

    2009-03-01

    The interlink between particle-scale properties and macroscopic behavior of three-dimensional granular media subjected to mechanical loading is studied intensively by scientists and engineers, but not yet well understood. Here we study the role of key particle-scale properties, such as interparticle friction and particle elastic modulus, in the functioning of dual contact force networks, viz., strong and weak contacts, in mobilizing shear strength in dense granular media subjected to quasistatic shearing. The study is based on three-dimensional discrete element method in which particle-scale constitutive relations are based on well-established nonlinear theories of contact mechanics. The underlying distinctive contributions of these force networks to the macroscopic stress tensor of sheared granular media are examined here in detail to find out how particle-scale friction and particle-scale elasticity (or particle-scale stiffness) affect the mechanism of mobilization of macroscopic shear strength and other related properties. We reveal that interparticle friction mobilizes shear strength through bimodal contribution, i.e., through both major and minor principal stresses. However, against expectation, the contribution of particle-scale elasticity is mostly unimodal, i.e., through the minor principal stress component, but hardly by the major principal stress. The packing fraction and the geometric stability of the assemblies (expressed by the mechanical coordination number) increase for decrease in interparticle friction and elasticity of particles. Although peak shear strength increases with interparticle friction, the deviator strain level at which granular systems attain peak shear strength is mostly independent of interparticle friction. Granular assemblies attain peak shear strength (and maximum fabric anisotropy of strong contacts) when a critical value of the mechanical coordination number is attained. Irrespective of the interparticle friction and elasticity

  19. Biodegradation by bioaugmentation of dairy wastewater by fungal consortium on a bioreactor lab-scale and on a pilot-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelal, Hayet; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2013-09-01

    A fungal consortium including Aspergillus niger, Mucor hiemalis and Galactomyces geotrichum was tested for the treatment of dairy wastewater. The bio-augmentation method was tested at lab-scale (4 L), at pilot scale (110 L) and at an industrial scale in Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP). The positive impact of fungal addition was confirmed when fungi was beforehand accelerated by pre-culture on whey (5 g/L lactose) or on the dairy effluent. Indeed, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal yields increased from 55% to 75% for model medium, diluted milk. While after inoculation of an industrial biological tank from a dairy factory with the fungal consortium accelerated by pre-cultivation in a 1000 L pilot plant, the outlet COD values decreased from values above the standard one (100 mg/L) to values in the range of 50-70 mg/L. In addition, there was a clear impact of fungal addition on the 'hard' or non-biodegradable COD owing to the significant reduction of the increase of the COD on BOD5 ratio between the inlet and the outlet of the biological tank of WWTP. It was in the range of 451%-1111% before adding fungal consortium, and in the range of 257%-153% after bio-augmentation with fungi. An inoculated bioreactor with fungal consortium was developed at lab-scale and demonstrated successfully at pilot scale in

  20. Biodegradation by bioaugmentation of dairy wastewater by fungal consortium on a bioreactor lab-scale and on a pilot-scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hayet Djelal; Abdeltif Amrane

    2013-01-01

    A fungal consortium including Aspergillus niger,Mucor hiemalis and Galactomyces geotrichum was tested for the treatment of dairy wastewater.The bio-augmentation method was tested at lab-scale (4 L),at pilot scale (110 L) and at an industrial scale in Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP).The positive impact of fungal addition was confirmed when fungi was beforehand accelerated by pre-culture on whey (5 g/L lactose) or on the dairy effluent.Indeed,chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal yields increased from 55% to 75%for model medium,diluted milk.While after inoculation of an industrial biological tank from a dairy factory with the fungal consortium accelerated by pre-cultivation in a 1000L pilot plant,the outlet COD values decreased from values above the standard one (100 mg/L)to values in the range of 50-70 mg/L.In addition,there was a clear impact of fungal addition on the 'hard' or non-biodegradable COD owing to the significant reduction of the increase of the COD on BOD5 ratio between the inlet and the outlet of the biological tank of WWTP.It was in the range of 451%-1111% before adding fungal consortium,and in the range of 257%-153% after bio-augmentation with fungi.An inoculated bioreactor with fungal consortium was developed at lab-scale and demonstrated successfully at pilot scale in WWTP.

  1. Measurement of α-particle quenching in LAB based scintillator in independent small-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krosigk, B. von [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Chen, M.; Liu, X.; Wright, A. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Bronx Community College, Bronx, NY (United States); Junghans, A.R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Koegler, T. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kraus, C. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON (Canada); Kuckert, L. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Nolte, R. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); O' Keeffe, H.M. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Lancaster University, Physics Department, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Tseung, H.W.C. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rochester, MN (United States); Wilson, J.R. [Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Yeh, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    The α-particle light response of liquid scintillators based on linear alkylbenzene (LAB) has been measured with three different experimental approaches. In the first approach, α-particles were produced in the scintillator via {sup 12}C(n,α){sup 9}Be reactions. In the second approach, the scintillator was loaded with 2 % of {sup nat}Sm providing an α-emitter, {sup 147}Sm, as an internal source. In the third approach, a scintillator flask was deployed into the water-filled SNO+ detector and the radioactive contaminants {sup 222}Rn, {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po provided the α-particle signal. The behavior of the observed α-particle light outputs are in agreement with each case successfully described by Birks' law. The resulting Birks parameter kB ranges from (0.0066 ± 0.0016) to (0.0076 ± 0.0003) cm/MeV. In the first approach, the α-particle light response was measured simultaneously with the light response of recoil protons produced via neutron- proton elastic scattering. This enabled a first time a direct comparison of kB describing the proton and the α-particle response of LAB based scintillator. The observed kB values describing the two light response functions deviate by more than 5σ. The presented results are valuable for all current and future detectors, using LAB based scintillator as target, since they depend on an accurate knowledge of the scintillator response to different particles. (orig.)

  2. Large-Scale Production of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C.

    2003-01-01

    We report on our interdisciplinary program to use the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J-Lab) for high-volume pulsed laser vaporization synthesis of carbon nanotubes. Based in part on the funding of from this project, a novel nanotube production system was designed, tested, and patented. Using this new system nanotube production rates over 100 times faster than conventional laser systems were achieved. Analysis of the material produced shows that it is of as high a quality as the standard laser-based materials.

  3. Beyond the Usability Lab Conducting Large-scale Online User Experience Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, William; Tullis, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Usability testing and user experience research typically take place in a controlled lab with small groups. While this type of testing is essential to user experience design, more companies are also looking to test large sample sizes to be able compare data according to specific user populations and see how their experiences differ across user groups. But few usability professionals have experience in setting up these studies, analyzing the data, and presenting it in effective ways.  Online usability testing offers the solution by allowing testers to elicit feedback simultaneously from 1,0

  4. Microalgae based biorefinery: evaluation of oil extraction methods in terms of efficiency, costs, toxicity and energy in lab-scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Darío González-Delgado

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Several alternatives of microalgal metabolites extraction and transformation are being studied for achieving the total utilization of this energy crop of great interest worldwide. Microalgae oil extraction is a key stage in microalgal biodiesel production chains and their efficiency affects significantly the global process efficiency. In this study, a comparison of five oil extraction methods in lab-scale was made taking as additional parameters, besides extraction efficiency, the costs of method performing, energy requirements, and toxicity of solvents used, in order to elucidate the convenience of their incorporation to a microalgae-based topology of biorefinery. Methods analyzed were Solvent extraction assisted with high speed homogenization (SHE, Continuous reflux solvent extraction (CSE, Hexane based extraction (HBE, Cyclohexane based extraction (CBE and Ethanol-hexane extraction (EHE, for this evaluation were used the microalgae strains Nannochloropsis sp., Guinardia sp., Closterium sp., Amphiprora sp. and Navicula sp., obtained from a Colombian microalgae bioprospecting. In addition, morphological response of strains to oil extraction methods was also evaluated by optic microscopy. Results shows that although there is not a unique oil extraction method which excels in all parameters evaluated, CSE, SHE and HBE appears as promising alternatives, while HBE method is shown as the more convenient for using in lab-scale and potentially scalable for implementation in a microalgae based biorefinery

  5. Elements of friction theory and nanotribology from statistical physics to quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Gnecco, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Combining the classical theories of contact mechanics and lubrication with the study of friction on the nanometer range, this multi-scale book for researchers and students alike guides the reader deftly through the mechanisms governing friction processes, based on state-of-the-art models and experimental results. The first book in the field to incorporate recent research on nanotribology with classical theories of contact mechanics, this unique text explores atomic scale scratches, non-contact friction and fishing of molecular nanowires as observed in the lab. Beginning with simple key concepts, the reader is guided through progressively more complex topics, such as contact of self-affine surfaces and nanomanipulation, in a consistent style, encompassing both macroscopic and atomistic descriptions of friction, and using unified notations to enable use by physicists and engineers across the scientific community.

  6. NRF2011-EDU001-EL001 EduLab Project Scaling-up Reflections on Using Open Source Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Loo Kang; Lye, Sze Yee

    2014-01-01

    eduLab (MOE, 2012b) is a key programme under the third MasterPlan for ICT in Education (mp3) where teachers with good ideas for an ICT-enhanced lesson or curriculum (learning with computer models through inquiry, example PhET (PhET, 2011) can come together to collaborate. eduLab aims to support teachers to develop, prototype and test-bed their lesson ideas (journey in 2012-2014) while ensuring that the results, in the form of complete lesson packages (see http://edulab.moe.edu.sg/edulab-programmes/existing-projects third project), are scalable across schools to benefit the wider teaching community. Our models and lessons are downloadable here http://weelookang.blogspot.sg/2013/03/moe-excel-fest-2013-scaling.html We have collaborated with namely Professor Francisco Esquembre, Professor Fu-Kwun Hwang and Wolfgang Christian and created Open Source Computer Models on the topic of 1 Dimensional Collision (Loo Kang Wee, 2012b), Falling Magnet in Coil, Ripple Tank (Duffy, 2010; G. H. Goh et al., 2012; Ong, Ng, Goh, ...

  7. Scaling properties of velocity and temperature spectra above the surface friction layer in a convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. McNaughton

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report velocity and temperature spectra measured at nine levels from 1.42 meters up to 25.7 m over a smooth playa in Western Utah. Data are from highly convective conditions when the magnitude of the Obukhov length (our proxy for the depth of the surface friction layer was less than 2 m. Our results are somewhat similar to the results reported from the Minnesota experiment of Kaimal et al. (1976, but show significant differences in detail. Our velocity spectra show no evidence of buoyant production of kinetic energy at at the scale of the thermal structures. We interpret our velocity spectra to be the result of outer eddies interacting with the ground, not "local free convection".

    We observe that velocity spectra represent the spectral distribution of the kinetic energy of the turbulence, so we use energy scales based on total turbulence energy in the convective boundary layer (CBL to collapse our spectra. For the horizontal velocity spectra this scale is (zi εo2/3, where zi is inversion height and εo is the dissipation rate in the bulk CBL. This scale functionally replaces the Deardorff convective velocity scale. Vertical motions are blocked by the ground, so the outer eddies most effective in creating vertical motions come from the inertial subrange of the outer turbulence. We deduce that the appropriate scale for the peak region of the vertical velocity spectra is (z εo2/3 where z is height above ground. Deviations from perfect spectral collapse under these scalings at large and small wavenumbers are explained in terms of the energy transport and the eddy structures of the flow.

    We find that the peaks of the temperature spectra collapse when wavenumbers are scaled using (z1/2 zi1/2. That is, the lengths of the thermal structures depend on both the lengths of the

  8. Compression Buckling Behavior of Large-Scale Friction Stir Welded and Riveted 2090-T83 Al-Li Alloy Skin-Stiffener Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Hafley, Robert A.; Wagner, John A.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Pecquet, Robert W.; Blum, Celia M.; Arbegast, William J.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement for traditional rivet fastening for launch vehicle dry bay construction, a large-scale friction stir welded 2090-T83 aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy skin-stiffener panel was designed and fabricated by Lockheed-Martin Space Systems Company - Michoud Operations (LMSS) as part of NASA Space Act Agreement (SAA) 446. The friction stir welded panel and a conventional riveted panel were tested to failure in compression at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The present paper describes the compression test results, stress analysis, and associated failure behavior of these panels. The test results provide useful data to support future optimization of FSW processes and structural design configurations for launch vehicle dry bay structures.

  9. Measurement of $\\alpha$-particle quenching in LAB based scintillator in independent small-scale experiments

    CERN Document Server

    von Krosigk, B; Hans, S; Junghans, A R; Kögler, T; Kraus, C; Kuckert, L; Liu, X; Nolte, R; O'Keeffe, H M; Tseung, H S Wan Chan; Wilson, J R; Wright, A; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2015-01-01

    The $\\alpha$-particle light response of liquid scintillators based on linear alkylbenzene (LAB) has been measured with three different experimental approaches. In the first approach, $\\alpha$-particles were produced in the scintillator via $^{12}$C($n$,$\\alpha$)$^9$Be reactions. In the second approach, the scintillator was loaded with 2% of $^{\\mathrm{nat}}$Sm providing an $\\alpha$-emitter, $^{147}$Sm, as an internal source. In the third approach, a scintillator flask was deployed into the water-filled SNO+ detector and the radioactive contaminants $^{222}$Rn, $^{218}$Po and $^{214}$Po provided the $\\alpha$-particle signal. The behavior of the observed $\\alpha$-particle light outputs are in agreement with each case successfully described by Birks' law. The resulting Birks parameter $kB$ ranges from $(0.0071\\pm0.0003)$ cm/MeV to $(0.0076\\pm0.0003)$ cm/MeV. In the first approach, the $\\alpha$-particle light response was measured simultaneously with the light response of recoil protons produced via neutron-proto...

  10. In Situ Bioremediation by Natural Attenuation: from Lab to Field Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwart, S. A.; Thornton, S.; Rees, H.; Lerner, D.; Wilson, R.; Romero-Gonzalez, M.

    2007-03-01

    In Situ Bioremediation is a passive technology to degrade soil and groundwater contamination in order to reduce environmental and human health risk. Natural attenuation is the application of engineering biotechnology principles to soil and groundwater systems as natural bioreactors to transform or immobilize contamination to less toxic or less bioavailable forms. Current advances in computational methods and site investigation techniques now allow detailed numerical models to be adequately parameterized for interpretation of processes and their interactions in the complex sub-surface system. Clues about biodegradation processes point to the dominant but poorly understood behaviour of attached growth microbial populations that exist within the context of biofilm formation. New techniques that combine biological imaging with non-destructive chemical analysis are providing new insights into attached growth influence on Natural Attenuation. Laboratory studies have been carried out in porous media packed bed reactors that physically simulate plume formation in aquifers. Key results show that only a small percentage of the total biomass within the plume is metabolically active and that activity is greatest at the plume fringe. This increased activity coincides with the zone where dispersive mixing brings dissolved O2 from outside the plume in contact with the contamination and microbes. The exciting new experimental approaches in lab systems offer tremendous potential to move Natural Attenuation and other in situ bioremediation approaches away from purely empirical engineering approaches, to process descriptions that are far more strongly based on first principles and that have a far greater predictive capacity for remediation performance assessment.

  11. Does the stellar distribution flare? A comparison of stellar scale heights with LAB H I data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.; Dedes, L. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Haud, U., E-mail: pkalberla@astro.uni-bonn.de [Tartu Observatory, 61602 Tõravere (Estonia)

    2014-10-10

    The question of whether the stellar populations in the Milky Way take part in the flaring of scale heights as observed for the H I gas is a matter of debate. Standard mass models for the Milky Way assume a constant scale height for each of the different stellar distributions. However, there is mounting evidence that at least some of the stellar distributions reach, at large galactocentric distances, high altitudes, which are incompatible with a constant scale height. We discuss recent observational evidence for stellar flaring and compare it with H I data from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn survey. Within the systemic and statistical uncertainties we find a good agreement between both.

  12. Does the Stellar Distribution Flare? A Comparison of Stellar Scale Heights with LAB H I Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.; Dedes, L.; Haud, U.

    2014-10-01

    The question of whether the stellar populations in the Milky Way take part in the flaring of scale heights as observed for the H I gas is a matter of debate. Standard mass models for the Milky Way assume a constant scale height for each of the different stellar distributions. However, there is mounting evidence that at least some of the stellar distributions reach, at large galactocentric distances, high altitudes, which are incompatible with a constant scale height. We discuss recent observational evidence for stellar flaring and compare it with H I data from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn survey. Within the systemic and statistical uncertainties we find a good agreement between both.

  13. Vision Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Vision Lab personnel perform research, development, testing and evaluation of eye protection and vision performance. The lab maintains and continues to develop...

  14. Spatiotemporal signature of methane venting from lake sediments: from lab to field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandella, B.; Pillsbury, L.; Weber, T.; Ruppel, C. D.; Hemond, H.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and the production and emission of methane from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans both contributes to and may be exacerbated by climate change. In some of these shallow-water settings, methane fluxes are often controlled by episodic free-gas venting. The fraction of the methane released from the sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere impacts the magnitude of the climate forcing, and this fraction depends critically on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of the bubble releases. Here, we present measurements of the episodicity, spacing and persistence of ebullition from the laboratory scale (1-50 cm) to the field scale (0.5-20 m). Field observations were made using a fixed-location Imagenex DeltaT 837B multibeam sonar, which was calibrated to quantify gas fluxes with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution (~0.5 m, 1 Hz). The field scale results show a pattern of short range spatiotemporal clustering (radiustriggering nearby aftershock ebullition episodes. The fine-scale (1-50 cm) experiment recorded ebullition from sediments that were dredged from the field site, reconstituted and incubated in the laboratory to generate methane. This experiment shows the degree of re-use of specific outlets, with implications for the scale of lateral methane transport and the role of hysteresis on sediment cohesion (healing of closed conduits). The details of the short range clustering process helps to identify the mechanism by which gas venting triggers nearby "aftershock" episodes of gas release. Taken together, these results point towards a better understanding of the microscale processes controlling methane venting from deformable sediments, as well as their impact on large-scale methane fluxes from shallow-water bodies.Figure: Short-range spatial clustering, quantified with the Radial Distribution Function (RDF>1, r<2), dissipates to a homogeneous signature (RDF = 1) over

  15. Leaching behaviour of different scrap materials at recovery and recycling companies: full-, pilot- and lab-scale investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeel, E; Chys, M; Depuydt, V; Folens, K; Du Laing, G; Verliefde, A; Van Hulle, S W H

    2014-12-01

    Scrap material recovery and recycling companies are confronted with waste water that has a highly fluctuating flow rate and composition. Common pollutants, such as COD, nutrients and suspended solids, potentially toxic metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and poly chlorinated biphenyls can exceed the discharge limits. An analysis of the leaching behaviour of different scrap materials and scrap yard sweepings was performed at full-scale, pilot-scale and lab-scale in order to find possible preventive solutions for this waste water problem. The results of these leaching tests (with concentrations that frequently exceeded the Flemish discharge limits) showed the importance of regular sweeping campaigns at the company, leak proof or covered storage of specific scrap materials and oil/water separation on particular leachates. The particulate versus dissolved fraction was also studied for the pollutants. For example, up to 98% of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons, poly chlorinated biphenyls and some metals were in the particulate form. This confirms the (potential) applicability of sedimentation and filtration techniques for the treatment of the majority of the leachates, and as such the rainwater run-off as a whole.

  16. Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Potential: Simulation of Lab and Industrial-Scale Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan Hamawand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simulation was carried out using BioWin 3.1 to test the capability of the software to predict the biogas potential for two different anaerobic systems. The two scenarios included: (1 a laboratory-scale batch reactor; and (2 an industrial-scale anaerobic continuous lagoon digester. The measured data related to the operating conditions, the reactor design parameters and the chemical properties of influent wastewater were entered into BioWin. A sensitivity analysis was carried out to identify the sensitivity of the most important default parameters in the software’s models. BioWin was then calibrated by matching the predicted data with measured data and used to simulate other parameters that were unmeasured or deemed uncertain. In addition, statistical analyses were carried out using evaluation indices, such as the coefficient of determination (R-squared, the correlation coefficient (r and its significance (p-value, the general standard deviation (SD and the Willmott index of agreement, to evaluate the agreement between the software prediction and the measured data. The results have shown that after calibration, BioWin can be used reliably to simulate both small-scale batch reactors and industrial-scale digesters with a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE of less than 10% and very good values of the indexes. Furthermore, by changing the default parameters in BioWin, which is a way of calibrating the models in the software, as well, this may provide information about the performance of the digester. Furthermore, the results of this study showed there may be an over estimation for biogas generated from industrial-scale digesters. More sophisticated analytical devices may be required for reliable measurements of biogas quality and quantity.

  17. ShearLab: A Rational Design of a Digital Parabolic Scaling Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Kutyniok, Gitta; Zhuang, Xiaosheng

    2011-01-01

    Multivariate problems are typically governed by anisotropic features such as edges in images. A common bracket of most of the various directional representation systems which have been proposed to deliver sparse approximations of such features is the utilization of parabolic scaling. One prominent example is the shearlet system. Our objective in this paper is three-fold: We firstly develop a digital shearlet theory which is rationally designed in the sense that it is the digitization of the existing shearlet theory for continuous data. This implicates that shearlet theory provides a unified treatment of both the continuum and digital realm. Secondly, we analyze the utilization of pseudo-polar grids and the pseudo-polar Fourier transform for digital implementations of parabolic scaling algorithms. We derive an isometric pseudo-polar Fourier transform by careful weighting of the pseudo-polar grid, allowing exploitation of its adjoint for the inverse transform. This leads to a digital implementation of the shear...

  18. Large-scale laboratory testing of bedload-monitoring technologies: overview of the StreamLab06 Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Jeffrey D.G.; Gray, John R.; Davis, Broderick E.; Ellis, Chris; Johnson, Sara; Gray, John R.; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-month-long, large-scale flume experiment involving research and testing of selected conventional and surrogate bedload-monitoring technologies was conducted in the Main Channel at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory under the auspices of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics. These experiments, dubbed StreamLab06, involved 25 researchers and volunteers from academia, government, and the private sector. The research channel was equipped with a sediment-recirculation system and a sediment-flux monitoring system that allowed continuous measurement of sediment flux in the flume and provided a data set by which samplers were evaluated. Selected bedload-measurement technologies were tested under a range of flow and sediment-transport conditions. The experiment was conducted in two phases. The bed material in phase I was well-sorted siliceous sand (0.6-1.8 mm median diameter). A gravel mixture (1-32 mm median diameter) composed the bed material in phase II. Four conventional bedload samplers – a standard Helley-Smith, Elwha, BLH-84, and Toutle River II (TR-2) sampler – were manually deployed as part of both experiment phases. Bedload traps were deployed in study Phase II. Two surrogate bedload samplers – stationarymounted down-looking 600 kHz and 1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profilers – were deployed in experiment phase II. This paper presents an overview of the experiment including the specific data-collection technologies used and the ambient hydraulic, sediment-transport and environmental conditions measured as part of the experiment. All data collected as part of the StreamLab06 experiments are, or will be available to the research community.

  19. Automated lab-scale visualization of the influence of water table transients on LNAPL source zone dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, S.; Herbert, A. W.; Rivett, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    For buoyant LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids), fluctuating water table conditions significantly influence capillary-held mass above and below the water table and the quantity of mobile free product floating on the water table. Risks posed by such a dynamic LNAPL source zone vary over time as water tables oscillate from say tidal influences, seasonality or other anthropogenic influences. Whist LNAPL dynamics are evident at field scale, measurements of say LNAPL thickness variation in a well are not very revealing of the actual source zone dynamic nature and point to the importance of lab visualization and modelling studies. We report on the recently completed lab phase of our study in which 2-D sand tanks have been used to visualize hydrocarbon LNAPL redistribution under transient water table conditions, particularly cyclic oscillations. We have developed a fully automated system to: i) Program cyclic water table fluctuations via Raspberry PiTM based electronics; ii) Dynamically monitor the saturation distributions of all fluids (red-dyed-LNAPL, blue-dyed-water and air phase by difference) using high temporal frequency and spatial resolution multi-spectral photography; and iii) Efficiently interpret the imaged data produced via multi-spectral image analysis. Such automated data acquisition and processing has permitted the LNAPL release and its redistribution under oscillating water table conditions to be shown in vivid short video formats of original images and contoured fluid saturations. We present a series of these videos secured under a variety of sand-tank scenarios that aim to understand the controlling influences of fluctuation amplitude and frequency, the influence of lower permeability heterogeneities, and the significance of LNAPL release timing relative to water table position. Our preliminary interpretations of these data will be presented alongside our discussion of the implications for characterization and remediation of LNAPL contaminated sites

  20. Combustion characteristics of paper mill sludge in a lab-scale combustor with internally cycloned circulating fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D; Jang, S; Hwang, J

    2005-01-01

    After performing a series of batch type experiments using a lab-scale combustor, consideration was given to the use of an internally cycloned circulating fluidized bed combustor (ICCFBC) for a paper mill sludge. Operation parameters including water content, feeding mass of the sludge, and secondary air injection ratio were varied to understand their effects on combustion performance, which was examined in terms of carbon conversion rate (CCR) and the emission rates of CO, C(x)H(y) and NO(x). The combustion of paper mill sludge in the ICCFBC was compared to the reaction mechanisms of a conventional solid fuel combustion, characterized by kinetics limited reaction zone, diffusion limited reaction zone, and transition zone. The results of the parametric study showed that a 35% water content and 60 g feeding mass generated the best condition for combustion. Meanwhile, areal mass burning rate, which is an important design and operation parameter at an industrial scale plant, was estimated by a conceptual equation. The areal mass burning rate corresponding to the best combustion condition was approximately 400 kg/hm(2) for 35% water content. The secondary air injection generating swirling flow enhanced the mixing between the gas phase components as well as the solid phase components, and improved the combustion efficiency by increasing the carbon conversion rate and reducing pollutant emissions.

  1. Squeezing out hydrated protons: low-frictional-energy triboelectric insulator charging on a microscopic scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Knorr

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Though triboelectric charging of insulators is common, neither its mechanism nor the nature of the charge is well known. Most research has focused on the integral amount of charge transferred between two materials upon contact, establishing, e.g., a triboelectric series. Here, the charge distribution of tracks on insulating polymer films rubbed by polymer-covered pointed swabs is investigated in high resolution by Kelvin probe force microscopy. Pronounced bipolar charging was observed for all nine rubbing combinations of three different polymers, with absolute surface potentials of up to several volts distributed in streaks along the rubbing direction and varying in polarity on μm-length scales perpendicular to the rubbing direction. Charge densities increased considerably for rubbing in higher relative humidity, for higher rubbing loads, and for more hydrophilic polymers. The ends of rubbed tracks had positively charged rims. Surface potential decay with time was strongly accelerated in increased humidity, particularly for polymers with high water permeability. Based on these observations, a mechanism is proposed of triboelectrification by extrusions of prevalently hydrated protons, stemming from adsorbed and dissociated water, along pressure gradients on the surface by the mechanical action of the swab. The validity of this mechanism is supported by explanations given recently in the literature for positive streaming currents of water at polymer surfaces and by reports of negative charging of insulators tapped by accelerated water droplets and of potential built up between the front and the back of a rubbing piece, observations already made in the 19th century. For more brittle polymers, strongly negatively charged microscopic abrasive particles were frequently observed on the rubbed tracks. The negative charge of those particles is presumably due in part to triboemission of electrons by polymer chain scission, forming radicals and negatively

  2. Gasification and pyrolysis of different biomasses in lab scale system: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gądek W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gasification and pyrolysis are very promising technologies for clean energy production especially from low rank fuels. Biomass and wastes with high chlorine, alkali and even heavy metals content are fuels preferential for thermal utilization. However, several problems during combustion in conventional steam boilers occurs e.g. slagging, fouling, chlorine corrosion, boiler efficiency deterioration. New efficient and cost effective technologies are needed, even in small-scale applications. The main objective of this work was to compare the thermochemical behaviour and process parameters effects of different biomass under air gasification and pyrolysis conditions. Three important fuels for European power industry were selected: woody biomass and two residual biomass, such as oat straw and dried citrus wastes. In order to evaluate the possibility to use different feedstocks or to combine and/or integrate them in thermochemical processes, a comparison among typical and untypical feedstocks is needed. Tests performed on small scale fixed bed reactor show the gas yield, its composition and LHV parameter. The results were performed in Royal Institute of Technology (KTH in Sweden during BRISK program (Biofuels Research Infrastructure for Sharing Knowledge.

  3. Production of leucine amino peptidase in lab scale bioreactors using Streptomyces gedanensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahulan, Raji; Dhar, Kiran S; Madhavan Nampoothiri, K; Pandey, Ashok

    2011-09-01

    Studies were conducted on the production of leucine amino peptidase (LAP) by Streptomyces gedanensis to ascertain the performance of the process in shake flask, parallel fermenter and 5-L fermenter utilizing soy bean meal as the carbon source. Experiments were conducted to analyze the effects of aeration and agitation rate on cell growth and LAP production. The results unveiled that an agitation rate of 300 rpm, 50% dissolved oxygen (DO) upholding and 0.15 vvm strategies were the optimal for the enzyme production, yielding 22.72 ± 0.11 IU/mL LAP in parallel fermenter which was comparable to flask level (24.65 ± 0.12 IU/mL LAP) fermentation. Further scale-up, in 5-L fermenter showed 50% DO and 1 vvm aeration rate was the best, producing optimum and the production was 20.09 ± 0.06 IU/mL LAP. The information obtained could be useful to design a strategy to improve a large-scale bioreactor cultivation of cells and production of LAP.

  4. Competition and coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, acetogens and methanogens in a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor as affected by changing substrate to sulfate ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dar, S.A.; Kleerebezem, R.; Stams, A.J.M.; Kuenen, J.G.; Muyzer, G.

    2008-01-01

    The microbial population structure and function of natural anaerobic communities maintained in lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactors at different lactate to sulfate ratios and in the absence of sulfate were analyzed using an integrated approach of molecular techniques and chemical analysis. T

  5. Self-heating of dried industrial wastewater sludge: lab-scale investigation of supporting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Zassa, M; Biasin, A; Zerlottin, M; Refosco, D; Canu, P

    2013-06-01

    We studied the reactivity of dried sludge produced by treatment of wastewater, mainly from tanneries. The solids transformations have been first characterized with thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) proving that exothermic transformation takes place at fairly low temperature, before the total organic combustion that occurs in air above 400°C. The onset of low temperature reactions depends on the heating rate and it can be below 100°C at very small heating rate. Then, we reproducibly determined the conditions to trigger dried sludge self-heating at the laboratory scale, on samples in the 0.2-0.3 kg size. Thermal insulation, some aeration and addition of water are key factors. Mastering the self-heating at this scale allows more detailed investigations as well as manipulation of conditions, to understand its nature, course and remediation. Here we report proves and discussions on the role of air, water, particle size, porosity and biological activity, as well as proving that also dried sludge from similar sources lead to self-heating. Tests demonstrate that air and water are simultaneously required for significant self-heating to occur. They act in diverging directions, both triggering the onset of the reactions and damping the temperature rise, by supporting heat loss. The higher the O2 concentration, the higher the solids heating rate. More added water prolongs the exothermic phase. Further additions of water can reactivate the material. Water emphasizes the exothermic processes, but it is not sufficient to start it in an air-free atmosphere. The initial solid moisture concentration (between 8% and 15%) affects the onset of self-heating as intuitive. The sludge particles size strongly determines the strength and extent of the heat release, indicating that surface reactions are taking place. In pelletized particles, limitations to water and air permeability mitigates the reaction course.

  6. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  7. A new Large Lab-scale Facility for Hydro-Geophysical Experiments: Hydrogeosite

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Penna, V.; Cuomo, V.; Rizzo, E.; Fiore, S.; Troisi, S.; Straface, S.

    2006-12-01

    ; piezometric probes; grid of electrodes (in surface and holes) for geoelectrical measurements (DC, IP and SP); GPR antennae. The Hydrogeosite will serve several research activities and it represents an intermediate stage between laboratory experiments and field survey. Therefore, it has the advantage to obtain controlled results, like in a laboratory experiment, but at scales comparable to the field ones. The new Laboratory of Hydrogeophysics of IMAA-CNR would like to have placed the facility at international researcher disposal to study a wide spectra of hydrogeological phenomena, to assess new geophysical techniques and to test new sensors and instruments, etc.. Research centers interested to plan experiments in this full-scale model are welcome.

  8. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency.

  9. Numerical simulations of lab-scale brine-water mixing experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Imane; Webb, Stephen Walter

    2006-10-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments simulating the injection of fresh water into brine in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern were performed at Sandia National Laboratories for various conditions of injection rate and small and large injection tube diameters. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code FLUENT was used to simulate these experiments to evaluate the predictive capability of FLUENT for brine-water mixing in an SPR cavern. The data-model comparisons show that FLUENT simulations predict the mixing plume depth reasonably well. Predictions of the near-wall brine concentrations compare very well with the experimental data. The simulated time for the mixing plume to reach the vessel wall was underpredicted for the small injection tubes but reasonable for the large injection tubes. The difference in the time to reach the wall is probably due to the three-dimensional nature of the mixing plume as it spreads out at the air-brine or oil-brine interface. The depth of the mixing plume as it spreads out along the interface was within a factor of 2 of the experimental data. The FLUENT simulation results predict the plume mixing accurately, especially the water concentration when the mixing plume reaches the wall. This parameter value is the most significant feature of the mixing process because it will determine the amount of enhanced leaching at the oil-brine interface.

  10. Evaluation of advection-aridity complementary relations at the lab scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Aminzadeh, Milad; Roderick, Michael L.; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    A common view of evaporation from terrestrial surfaces considers limitations due to water supply in arid regions, and atmospheric demand (or energy) limitations to evaporation from wet surfaces in temperate regions. Evidence suggests that at large scales, energy and water limitations are not independent. While a surface dries and a larger fraction of the radiative energy is converted into sensible heat, that heat is injected into the air and altering its properties. This land-atmosphere feedback gives rise to the so-called complementary relationship (Bouchet 1963), referring to the simultaneous decrease in actual evaporation while potential evaporation increases as the surface dries. The effect of surface drying on atmospheric water demand is two-fold: an increase in air temperature and a decrease in water vapour content for fixed advective exchange rate across the system boundaries. To isolate the various mechanisms and improve understanding of the feedbacks, we designed an insulated wind tunnel, where wind speed, radiation, surface moisture and exchange rates of air and heat across the boundaries are controlled. Preliminary results show the magnitude of the feedbacks in terms of air and surface temperatures, and evaporation rates from drying and wet surfaces simultaneously. Experimental and associated simulation results provide a direct demonstration of the roles of advective exchange and the interplay between atmospheric boundary layer thickness and temporal variations in radiative energy input in determining the strength of surface-atmosphere feedbacks and the resulting phenomenon known as the complementary relationship.

  11. Characterization of biofouling in a lab-scale forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (FOMBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiaoyun; Jie, Yap Wei; Loong, Winson Lay Chee; Zhang, Jinsong; Fane, Anthony G; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A; McDougald, Diane

    2014-07-01

    Forward osmosis membrane bioreactors (FOMBR) provide high quality permeate, however the propensity for membrane biofouling in FOMBRs is unknown. Here, FOMBRs were operated under high and low aeration and the membrane-associated biofilms were characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and rRNA gene-tagged pyrosequencing. CLSM images revealed that there was little biofilm formed under high aeration, while thick biofilms were observed on the membranes operated under low aeration. The diversity and richness of bacterial and archaeal communities as assessed by pyrosequencing varied under high and low aeration. The composition of the bacterial suspended sludge communities and the sessile biomass on the membrane surface, as assessed by non-metric multidimensional scaling, was significantly different under high aeration, but was more similar under low aeration. SIMPER analysis indicated that Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Fluviicola preferentially attached to the membrane. The results presented here provide a comprehensive understanding of membrane biofouling in FOMBRs, which is essential for the development of effective control strategies.

  12. Review of feedstock pretreatment strategies for improved anaerobic digestion: From lab-scale research to full-scale application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrere, Hélène; Antonopoulou, Georgia; Affes, Rim; Passos, Fabiana; Battimelli, Audrey; Lyberatos, Gerasimos; Ferrer, Ivet

    2016-01-01

    When properly designed, pretreatments may enhance the methane potential and/or anaerobic digestion rate, improving digester performance. This paper aims at providing some guidelines on the most appropriate pretreatments for the main feedstocks of biogas plants. Waste activated sludge was firstly investigated and implemented at full-scale, its thermal pretreatment with steam explosion being most recommended as it increases the methane potential and digestion rate, ensures sludge sanitation and the heat needed is produced on-site. Regarding fatty residues, saponification is preferred for enhancing their solubilisation and bioavailability. In the case of animal by-products, this pretreatment can be optimised to ensure sterilisation, solubilisation and to reduce inhibition linked to long chain fatty acids. With regards to lignocellulosic biomass, the first goal should be delignification, followed by hemicellulose and cellulose hydrolysis, alkali or biological (fungi) pretreatments being most promising. As far as microalgae are concerned, thermal pretreatment seems the most promising technique so far.

  13. Lab scale testing of novel natural analog in situ stabilization agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, P. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes the laboratory-scale test results on several novel in situ treatment and stabilization agents for buried hazardous and radioactive waste. Paraffin, hematite and phosphate materials were examined when combined with soil and other wastes representative of what might be present at buried waste DOE sites. Hematite was made from the reaction of agricultural iron and lime slurries to form gypsum and iron oxide/hydroxide. Common household paraffin was melted, both with and without a zeolitic additive, waste added and then cooled. Magnesium phosphate was made from the reaction of magnesium oxide and phosphoric acid or potassium biphosphate to form, magnesium phosphate. All were tested with soil and some with additional waste sumulants such as ash, machine oil and nitrate salts. The following laboratory-generated data indicate that all waste encapsulation materials tested are appropriate materials, for field in situ testing. Compressive strengths of treated Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory (INEEL) soil and the waste encapsulation material were sufficient to prevent collapse of the void space in waste, i.e., greater than the NRC 60 psi minimum. The mineralogy and microstructure of hematite was amorphous but should progress to an interlocking crystalline solid. Phosphate was crystalline with characteristics of higher temperature ceramics. Paraffin is non crystalline but encapsulates even very fine grained INEEL soils. Each agent appears to be chemically and physically inert to possible waste materials such as, nitrates and machine cutting oil. Two of the agents hematite and phosphate react favorably with ash increasing the metals retention at higher waste loadings than Portland cement. Hematite, phosphate and zeolite decrease leaching of most hazardous metals from waste when compared to untreated waste and soil. Solution pH, time for reaction initiation, and viscosity values are conducive to jet-grouting application.

  14. CO2 Energy Reactor - Integrated Mineral Carbonation: Perspectives on Lab-Scale Investigation and Products Valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael M Santos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the challenges of mineral CO2 sequestration, Innovation Concepts B.V. is developing a unique proprietary Gravity Pressure Vessel (GPV reactor technology, and has focussed on generating reaction products of high economic value. The GPV provides intense process conditions through hydrostatic pressurization and heat exchange integration that harvests exothermic reaction energy, thereby reducing energy demand of conventional reactor designs, in addition to offering other benefits. In this paper, a perspective on the status of this technology and outlook for the future is provided. To date, laboratory-scale tests of the envisioned process have been performed in a tubular rocking autoclave reactor. The mineral of choice has been olivine (~Mg1.6Fe2+0.4(SiO4 + ppm Ni/Cr, although asbestos, steel slags and oil shale residues are also under investigation. The effect of several process parameters on reaction extent and product properties have been tested: CO2 pressure, temperature, residence time, additives (buffers, lixiviants, chelators, oxidizers, solids loading, and mixing rate. The products (carbonates, amorphous silica and chromite have been physically separated (based on size, density and magnetic properties, characterized (for chemistry, mineralogy and morphology and tested in intended applications (as pozzolanic carbon-negative building material. Economically, it is found that product value is the main driver for mineral carbonation, rather than, or in addition to, the sequestered CO2. The approach of using a GPV and focusing on valuable reaction products could thus make CO2 mineralization a feasible and sustainable industrial process.

  15. High Speed Friction Microscopy and Nanoscale Friction Coefficient Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, James L.; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for Friction Coefficient Mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true...

  16. Clogging processes caused by biofilms growth and organic particles accumulation in lab-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lianfang; ZHU Wei; TONG Wei

    2009-01-01

    The accumulation of organic matter in substratum pores is regarded as an important factor causing clogging in the subsurface flow constructed wetlands.In this study,the developing process of clogging separately caused by biofilm growth and organic particles accumulation instead of total organic matter accumulation was investigated in two groups of lab-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) fed with glucose (dissolved organic matter) and starch (particulate organic matter) influent.Results showed that the growth of biofilms within the substratum pores certainly caused remarkable reduction of effective porosity,especially for the strong organic wastewater,whereas its influence on infiltration rate was negligible.It was implied that the most important contribution of biofilm growth to clogging is accelerating the occurrence of clogging.In comparison with biofilm growth,particles accumulation within pores could rapidly reduce infiltration rate besides effective porosity and the clogging occurred in the upper 0-15 cm layer.With approximately equal amount of accumulated organic matter,the effective porosity of the clogged layer in starch-fed systems was far less than that of glucose-fed systems,which indicated that composition and accumulation mode of the accumulated organic matter played an important role in causing clogging besides the amount.According to the results,some related methods to prevent and recover the clogging phenomenon were suggested.

  17. Factors impacting biotransformation kinetics of trace organic compounds in lab-scale activated sludge systems performing nitrification and denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Lijuan; Aga, Diana [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Chandran, Kartik [Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Khunjar, Wendell O., E-mail: wkhunjar@hazenandsawyer.com [Hazen and Sawyer P.C., Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2015-01-23

    Highlights: • We examined TOrC biotransformation kinetics in nitrifying and denitrifying reators. • TOrC biotransformation was linked to heterotrophic and autotrophic activity. • TOrC biotransformation rates were not sensitive to the initial TOrC concentration. • Readily biodegradable organic matter suppressed TOrC biotransformation rates. - Abstract: To predict TOrC fate in biological activated sludge systems, there is a need to accurately determine TOrC biodegradation kinetics in mixed microbial cultures. Short-term batch tests with salicylic acid, 17α-ethinylestradiol, nonylphenol, trimethoprim and carbamazepine were conducted with lab-scale activated sludge cultures in which the initial TOrC concentration (1 mg/L and 0.0005 mg/L) and readily biodegradable substrate concentrations were varied. The results indicate that pseudo-first order kinetic estimates of TOrC are not sensitive (p > 0.05) to the initial TOrC concentration as long as the initial TOrC concentration (S{sub 0}) to biomass (X{sub 0}) ratio (on COD basis) is below 2 × 10{sup −3}. The presence of readily biodegradable organic matter suppresses TOrC biotransformation rates under nitrifying and denitrifying conditions, and this impact can be adequately described using a reversible non-competitive inhibition equation. These results demonstrate the importance of closely mimicking parent reactor conditions in batch testing because biotransformation parameters are impacted by in-situ carbon loading and redox conditions.

  18. Effect of lake water on algal biomass and microbial community structure in municipal wastewater-based lab-scale photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustok, I; Truu, J; Odlare, M; Truu, M; Ligi, T; Tiirik, K; Nehrenheim, E

    2015-08-01

    Photobioreactors are a novel environmental technology that can produce biofuels with the simultaneous removal of nutrients and pollutants from wastewaters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lake water inoculation on the production of algal biomass and phylogenetic and functional structure of the algal and bacterial communities in municipal wastewater-treating lab-scale photobioreactors. Inoculating the reactors with lake water had a significant benefit to the overall algal biomass growth and nutrient reduction in the reactors with wastewater and lake water (ratio 70/30 v/v). The metagenome-based survey showed that the most abundant algal phylum in these reactors was Chlorophyta with Scenedesmus being the most prominent genus. The most abundant bacterial phyla were Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes with most dominant families being Sphingobacteriaceae, Cytophagaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Comamonadaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Nocardiaceae and Nostocaceae. These photobioreactors were also effective in reducing the overall amount of pathogens in wastewater compared to reactors with wastewater/tap water mixture. Functional analysis of the photobioreactor metagenomes revealed an increase in relative abundance genes related to photosynthesis, synthesis of vitamins important for auxotrophic algae and decrease in virulence and nitrogen metabolism subsystems in lake water reactors. The results of the study indicate that adding lake water to the wastewater-based photobioreactor leads to an altered bacterial community phylogenetic and functional structure that could be linked to higher algal biomass production, as well as to enhanced nutrient and pathogen reduction in these reactors.

  19. Use of naturalized coagulants in removing laundry waste surfactant using various unit processes in lab-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S Mariraj

    2014-04-01

    This lab-scale experiment is aimed at demonstrating a treatment system for purification and reuse of laundry rinsing water generated from households. The main objective of the study is to compare the efficiencies of various natural coagulants in removing laundry waste surfactants and other major pollutants from the laundry rinsing water. The treatment system consists of Coagulation-Flocculation, Sand filtration and Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) adsorption. Four experiments were conducted in batch process by varying the coagulants (Nirmali seed and Pectin extracted from pith of Orange peel). Coagulants have been selected due to their local availability at affordable cost and technical feasibility. From the study it is concluded that laundry rinsing water polluted with high turbidity and anionic surfactant treated with Nirmali seeds as coagulant at a retention time of 24 h gives the best results. The treatment system where Orange peel pectin is used as coagulant at a retention time of 24 h is found to be the most efficient one based on the weighted factor. Hence the treatment of laundry rinsing water by aforesaid combination results in better water quality.

  20. Effects of granular activated carbon on methane removal performance and methanotrophic community of a lab-scale bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Choi, Sun-Ah; Yi, Taewoo; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Two identical lab-scale bioreactor systems were operated to examine the effects of granular activated carbon (GAC) on methane removal performance and methanotrophic community. Both bioreactor systems removed methane completely at a CH4 loading rate of 71.2 g-CH4·d(-1) for 17 days. However, the methane removal efficiency declined to 88% in the bioreactor without GAC, while the bioreactor amended with GAC showed greater methane removal efficiency of 97% at a CH4 loading rate of 107.5 g-CH4·d(-1). Although quantitative real-time PCR showed that methanotrophic populations were similar levels of 5-10 × 10(8) pmoA gene copy number·VSS(-1) in both systems, GAC addition changed the methanotrophic community composition of the bioreactor systems. Microarray assay revealed that GAC enhanced the type I methanotrophic genera including Methylobacter, Methylomicrobium, and Methylomonas of the system, which suggests that GAC probably provided a favorable environment for type I methanotrophs. These results indicated that GAC is a promising support material in bioreactor systems for CH4 mitigation.

  1. Retention of Silica Nanoparticles in a Lab-Scale Membrane Bioreactor: Implications for Process Performance and Membrane Fouling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Larracas Sibag

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In conventional activated sludge (CAS involving aerobic biological processes, the retention of silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs has no detrimental effect on chemical oxygen demand (COD and ammonia nitrogen (NH3–N removal. However, for the membrane bioreactor (MBR system, which is also based on the activated sludge process in addition to the membrane separation process, it has implications not only on the process performance but also on membrane fouling. To investigate these two implications in lab-scale experiments, we continuously operated a control MBR and two experimental MBRs, in which the 28 nm SiO2 NPs and 144 nm SiO2 NPs were added separately to the influent at a final concentration of 100 mg/L. Although the retention of SiO2 NPs in the MBR, as confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS analysis, did not compromise the COD and NH3–N removal, it resulted in substantial increases in the transmembrane pressure (TMP suggesting the onset of membrane fouling. Analyses by batch-dead end filtration revealed the same fouling trend as observed during the continuous MBR experiments; membrane fouling is aggravated in the presence of SiO2 NPs. This was evident from permeate flux decline of between 30% and 74% at very low TMP (5 kPa and the further increases in the total resistance.

  2. Investigating and modelling the development of septic sewage in filled sewers under static conditions: a lab-scale feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Robert T; Saul, Adrian J; Edyvean, Robert G J

    2007-12-15

    This paper describes a lab-scale study of the physical and bio-chemical processes associated with the development of septic conditions in sewer pipes filled with static sewage. The study has concentrated on the uptake of oxygen (OUR) and the subsequent changes in chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulphate, sulphide and nitrate concentration and the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). OUR of raw sewage ranged from 2 to 13 mg L(-1) h(-1). Apparent nitrate uptake and sulphide generation rates in static sewage varied between 0.2-0.7 mgNO(3) L(-1) h(-1) and 0.02-0.05 mgH(2)S-S L(-1) h(-1), respectively. A logistic function was used to simulate the sulphide generation process in static sewage. It was found that total COD (COD(total)) influenced the apparent sulphide generation rate while nitrate concentrations greater than 4 mg L(-1) controlled the onset of sulphide production in experiments without added sediment phase. Introducing a sediment phase appeared to accelerate hydrolysis and fermentation processes as evidenced by 5-14 times greater dissolved COD generation rates in the bulk water phase.

  3. Effect of amended soil and hydraulic load on enhanced biological nitrogen removal in lab-scale SWIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, J L; Dai, Y; Sun, T H; Li, Y H; Li, G B; Li, Q Y

    2009-04-30

    To characterize the effect of amended soil on nitrogen removal in subsurface wastewater infiltration system (SWIS), culture, grass carbon, and zeolite were mixed to produce microbial inoculums, and then the optimal microbial inoculums, nutrient substance, cinder, and original soil were mixed to produce the soils through bioaugmentation. Results indicate that the microbial inoculums (culture+50% grass carbon+50% zeolite) and the amended soil (12.5% microbial inoculums+25% nutrient substrate+12.5% cinder+50% original soil) have the optimal biogenic stimulating properties, and the adsorption capacity of the amended soil are 1.216 mg-Pg(-1) and 0.495 mg-Ng(-1). The laboratory soil column experiment indicates that the efficient mode of nitrogen removal in lab-scale SWIS is adsorption-nitrification-denitrification and the nitrification/denitrification can be enhanced by the application of the amended soil. On average, the SWIS filled with amended soil converts 85% of ammonia nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N) to NO(x)(-)-N and removes 49.8-60.6% of total nitrogen (TN), while the system filled with original soil removes 80% of NH(4)(+)-N and 31.3-43.2% of TN at 4-8 cm day(-1). Two systems are overloads at 10 cm day(-1). It is concluded that the microbial activities and nitrogen removal efficiencies are improved in SWIS after bioaugmentation.

  4. A microphysical model explains rate-and-state friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianye; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2015-04-01

    The rate-and-state friction (RSF) laws were originally developed as a phenomenological description of the frictional behavior observed in lab experiments. In previous studies, the empirical RSF laws have been extensively and quite successfully applied to fault mechanisms. However, these laws can not readily be envisioned in terms of the underlying physics. There are several critical discrepancies between seismological constraints on RSF behavior associated with earthquakes and lab-derived RSF parameters, in particular regarding the static stress drop and characteristic slip distance associated with seismic events. Moreover, lab friction studies can address only limited fault topographies, displacements, experimental durations and P-T conditions, which means that scale issues, and especially processes like dilatation and fluid-rock interaction, cannot be fully taken into account. Without a physical basis accounting for such effects, extrapolation of lab-derived RSF data to nature involves significant, often unknown uncertainties. In order to more reliably apply experimental results to natural fault zones, and notably to extrapolate lab data beyond laboratory pressure, temperature and velocity conditions, an understanding of the microphysical mechanisms governing fault frictional behavior is required. Here, following some pioneering efforts (e.g. Niemeijer and Spiers, 2007; Den Hartog and Spiers, 2014), a mechanism-based microphysical model is developed for describing the frictional behavior of carbonate fault gouge, assuming that the frictional behavior seen in lab experiments is controlled by competing processes of intergranular slip versus contact creep by pressure solution. The model basically consists of two governing equations derived from energy/entropy balance considerations and the kinematic relations that apply to a granular fault gouge undergoing shear and dilation/compaction. These two equations can be written as ˙τ/K = Vimp- Lt[λ˙γsbps +(1-

  5. Multiscale friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Felder, Eric; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The most often used friction model for sheet metal forming simulations is the relative simple Coulomb friction model. This paper presents a more advanced friction model for large scale forming simulations based on the surface change on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when

  6. Financial Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Jensen, Mads

    frictions, a call option should never be exercised early, but only at expiration or just before the underlying stock pays a dividend. Chapter one of this thesis shows that suffciently severe frictions can make early exercise optimal. Short-sale costs especially represent an important driver of early...

  7. Lab-scale demonstration of recuperative thickening technology for enhanced biogas production and dewaterability in anaerobic digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbledick, Jeffrey; Aubry, Nicholas; Zhang, Victor; Rollings-Scattergood, Sasha; Latulippe, David R

    2016-05-15

    There is growing interest in the use of high performance anaerobic digestion (AD) processes for the production of biogas at wastewater treatment facilities to offset the energy demands associated with wastewater treatment. Recuperative thickening (RT) is a promising technique which involves recycling a portion of the digested solids back to the incoming feed. In general there exists a significant number of knowledge gaps in the field of RT because the studies that have been conducted to date have almost exclusively occurred in pilot plant or full scale trials; this approach greatly limits the amount of process optimization that can be done in a given trial. In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study of RT was conducted at the lab scale; two custom designed digesters (capacity = 1.5 L) were operated in parallel with one acting as a 'control' digester and the other operating under a semi-batch RT mode. There was no significant change in biogas methane composition for the two digesters, however the RT digester had an average biogas productivity over two times higher than the control one. It was found that the recycling of the polymer flocculant back into the RT digester resulted in a significant improvement in dewatering performance. At the highest polymer concentration tested, the capillary suction time (CST) values for flocculated samples for the RT digester were over 6 times lower than the corresponding values for the control digester. Thus, there exists an opportunity to decrease the overall consumption of polymer flocculants through judicious selection of the dose of polymer flocculant that is used both for the thickening and end-stage dewatering steps in RT processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diffusion in Altered Tonalite Sample Using Time Domain Diffusion Simulations in Tomographic Images Combined with Lab-scale Diffusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, M.; Sardini, P.; Togneri, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Timonen, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work an effect of rock heterogeneity on diffusion was investigated. Time domain diffusion simulations were used to compare behavior of diffusion in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D media. Tomographic images were used as heterogeneous rock media. One altered tonalite sample from Sievi, Finland, was chosen as test case for introduced analysis procedure. Effective diffusion coefficient of tonalite sample was determined with lab-scale experiments and the same coefficient was used also for homogeneous media. Somewhat technically complicated mathematical solution for analysis of through diffusion experiment is shortly described. Computed tomography (CT) is already quite widely used in many geological, petrological, and paleontological applications when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the material is of interest, and is an excellent method for gaining information especially about its heterogeneity, grain size, or porosity. In addition to offering means for quantitative characterization, CT provides a lot of qualitative information [1]. A through -diffusion laboratory experiment using radioactive tracer was fitted using the Time Domain Diffusion (TDD) method. This rapid particle tracking method allows simulation of the heterogeneous diffusion based on pore-scale images and local values of diffusivities [2]. As a result we found out that heterogeneity has only a small effect to diffusion coefficient and in-diffusion profile for used geometry. Also direction dependency was tested and was found to be negligible. Whereas significant difference between generally accepted value and value obtained from simulations for constant m in Archie’s law was found. [1] Voutilainen, M., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Sardini, P., and Timonen, J., (2010). On pore-space characterization of an altered tonalite by X-ray µCT and the 14C-PMMA method (in progress). [2] Sardini, P., Robinet, J., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Delay, F., and Hellmuth, K-H, (2007). On direct simulation of heterogeneous

  9. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  10. Replication of engine block cylinder bridge microstructure and mechanical properties with lab scale 319 Al alloy billet castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, A., E-mail: a2lombar@ryerson.ca [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5B2K3 (Canada); D' Elia, F.; Ravindran, C. [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5B2K3 (Canada); MacKay, R. [Nemak of Canada Corporation, 4600 G.N. Booth Drive, Windsor, Ontario N9C4G8 (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    In recent years, aluminum alloy gasoline engine blocks have in large part successfully replaced nodular cast iron engine blocks, resulting in improved vehicle fuel efficiency. However, because of the inadequate wear resistance properties of hypoeutectic Al–Si alloys, gray iron cylinder liners are required. These liners cause the development of large tensile residual stress along the cylinder bores and necessitate the maximization of mechanical properties in this region to prevent premature engine failure. The aim of this study was to replicate the engine cylinder bridge microstructure and mechanical properties following TSR treatment (which removes the sand binder to enable easy casting retrieval) using lab scale billet castings of the same alloy composition with varying cooling rates. Comparisons in microstructure between the engine block and the billet castings were carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy, while mechanical properties were assessed using tensile testing. The results suggest that the microstructure at the top and middle of the engine block cylinder bridge was successfully replicated by the billet castings. However, the microstructure at the bottom of the cylinder was not completely replicated due to variations in secondary phase morphology and distribution. The successful replication of engine block microstructure will enable the future optimization of heat treatment parameters. - Highlights: • A method to replicate engine block microstructure was developed. • Billet castings will allow cost effective optimization of heat treatment process. • The replication of microstructure in the cylinder region was mostly successful. • Porosity was more clustered in the billet castings compared to the engine block. • Mechanical properties were lower in billet castings due to porosity and inclusions.

  11. Reduction by sonication of excess sludge production in a conventional activated sludge system: continuous flow and lab-scale reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaxelaire, S; Gonze, E; Merlin, G; Gonthier, Y

    2008-12-01

    Conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plants currently produce a large quantity of excess sludge. To reduce this sludge production and to improve sludge characteristics in view of their subsequent elimination, an ultrasonic cell disintegration process was studied. In a lab-scale continuous flow pilot plant, part of the return sludge was sonicated by low-frequency and high-powered ultrasound and then recycled to the aeration tank. Two parallel lines were used: one as a control and the other as an assay with ultrasonic treatment. The reactors were continuously fed with synthetic domestic wastewater with a COD (chemical oxygen demand) of approximately 0.5 g l(-) corresponding to a daily load of 0.35-0.50 kg COD kg(-1) TS d(-1). Removal efficiencies (carbon, particles), excess sludge production and sludge characteristics (particle size distribution, mineralization, respiration rate, biological component) were measured every day during the 56-day experiment. This study showed that whilst organic removal efficiency did not deteriorate, excess sludge production was decreased by about 25-30% by an ultrasonic treatment. Several hypotheses are advanced: (i) the treatment made a part of the organic matter soluble as a consequence of the floc disintegration, and optimised the conversion of the carbonaceous pollutants into carbon dioxide and (ii) the treatment modified the physical characteristics of sludge by a mechanical effect: floc size was reduced, increasing the exchange surface and sludge activity. The originality of this study is that experiments were conducted in a continuous-flow activated sludge reactor rather than in a batch reactor.

  12. Performance of a lab-scale bio-electrochemical assisted septic tank for the anaerobic treatment of black water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamalloa, Carlos; Arends, Jan B A; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2013-06-25

    Septic tanks are used for the removal of organic particulates in wastewaters by physical accumulation instead of through the biological production of biogas. Improved biogas production in septic tanks is crucial to increase the potential of this system for both energy generation and organic matter removal. In this study, the effect on the biogas production and biogas quality of coupling a 20 L lab-scale septic tank with a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated and compared with a standard septic tank. Both reactors were operated at a volumetric organic loading rate of 0.5gCOD/Ld and a hydraulic retention time between 20 and 40 days using black water as an input under mesophilic conditions for a period of 3 months. The MEC-septic tank was operated at an applied voltage of 2.0±0.1V and the current experienced ranged from 40 mA (0.9A/m(2) projected electrode area) to 180 mA (5A/m(2) projected electrode area). The COD removal was of the order of 85% and the concentration of residual COD was not different between both reactors. Yet, the total phosphorous in the output was on average 39% lower in the MEC-septic tank. Moreover, the biogas production rate in the MEC-septic tank was a factor of 5 higher than in the control reactor and the H2S concentration in the biogas was a factor of 2.5 lower. The extra electricity supplied to the MEC-septic tank was recovered as extra biogas produced. Overall, it appears that the combination of MEC and a septic tank offers perspectives in terms of lower discharge of phosphorus and H2S, nutrient recuperation and a more reliable supply of biogas.

  13. Simultaneous Microwave Extraction and Separation of Volatile and Non-Volatile Organic Compounds of Boldo Leaves. From Lab to Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Petigny

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microwave extraction and separation has been used to increase the concentration of the extract compared to the conventional method with the same solid/liquid ratio, reducing extraction time and separate at the same time Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC from non-Volatile Organic Compounds (NVOC of boldo leaves. As preliminary study, a response surface method has been used to optimize the extraction of soluble material and the separation of VOC from the plant in laboratory scale. The results from the statistical analysis revealed that the optimized conditions were: microwave power 200 W, extraction time 56 min and solid liquid ratio of 7.5% of plants in water. Lab scale optimized microwave method is compared to conventional distillation, and requires a power/mass ratio of 0.4 W/g of water engaged. This power/mass ratio is kept in order to upscale from lab to pilot plant.

  14. Friction laws for lubricated nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzio, R.; Boragno, C.; Valbusa, U.

    2006-09-01

    We have used friction force microscopy to probe friction laws for nanoasperities sliding on atomically flat substrates under controlled atmosphere and liquid environment, respectively. A power law relates friction force and normal load in dry air, whereas a linear relationship, i.e., Amontons' law, is observed for junctions fully immersed in model lubricants, namely, octamethylciclotetrasiloxane and squalane. Lubricated contacts display a remarkable friction reduction, with liquid and substrate specific friction coefficients. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulations suggests that load-bearing boundary layers at junction entrance cause the appearance of Amontons' law and impart atomic-scale character to the sliding process; continuum friction models are on the contrary of limited predictive power when applied to lubrication effects. An attempt is done to define general working conditions leading to the manifestation of nanoscale lubricity due to adsorbed boundary layers.

  15. Solid friction between soft filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  16. Nano-scale stick-slip friction model for the chatter scratch generated by chemical mechanical polishing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Jin; Yang, Ji Chul; Yoon, Bo Un; Lee, Hyeon-Deok; Kim, Taesung

    2012-07-01

    Although Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) process is a still promising technology for the fabrication of the next generation devices, CMP-induced defects tackle further development of CMP process. In particular, even nano-sized scratches generated by CMP process kill the device directly. However mechanism of scratch formation was not clearly understood yet. CMP-induced scratches are classified as razor, chatter mark and skipping scratch. Among them, chatter mark scratch (or chatter scratch) is the most critical defect for the device yield loss. Chatter scratch has a periodic pattern of scars, which is reminiscent of a stick-slip friction pattern. Based on that similarity, stick-slip model was proposed in this paper in order to explain how chatter scratch is formed. And controlling parameters for chatter scratch are defined. During stick period the friction force that exceeds the yield strength of wafer surface makes chatter scratch and the distance between chatter marks is determined by slip period.

  17. Scaling of permeabilities and friction factors of homogeneously expanding gas-solids fluidized beds: Geldart’s A powders and magnetically stabilized beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Jordan Y.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a variable friction factor of fluid-driven de form able powder beds undergoing fluidization is discussed. The special problem discussed addresses the friction factor and bed permeability relationships of Geldart’s A powders and magnetically stabilized beds in axial fields. Governing equations and scaling relation ships are developed through three approaches (1 Minimization of the pressure drop with respect to the fluid velocity employing the Darcy-Forchheimer equation together with the Richardson-Zaki scaling law, (2 Minimization of the pres sure drop across an equivalent-channel replacing the actual packed beds by a straight pipe with bed-equivalent obstacle of a simple geometry, and (3 Entropy minimization method applied in cases of the Darcy-Forchheimer equation and the equivalent-channel model. Bed-to-surface heat transfer coefficients are commented in the context of the porosity/length scale relationships developed. Both the pressure drop curves developments and phase diagram de signs are illustrated by applications of the intersection of asymptotes technique to beds exhibiting certain degree of cohesion.

  18. Atomic Scale Interface Manipulation, Structural Engineering, and Their Impact on Ultrathin Carbon Films in Controlling Wear, Friction, and Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Yak, Leonard J K; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Dhand, Chetna; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Bhatia, Charanjit S

    2016-07-13

    Reducing friction, wear, and corrosion of diverse materials/devices using manipulation to engineer and control the friction, wear, corrosion, and structural characteristics of 0.7-1.7 nm carbon-based films on CoCrPt:oxide-based magnetic media. We demonstrate that when an atomically thin (∼0.5 nm) chromium nitride (CrNx) layer is sandwiched between the magnetic media and an ultrathin carbon overlayer (1.2 nm), it modifies the film-substrate interface, creates various types of interfacial bonding, increases the interfacial adhesion, and tunes the structure of carbon in terms of its sp(3) bonding. These contribute to its remarkable functional properties, such as stable and lowest coefficient of friction (∼0.15-0.2), highest wear resistance and better corrosion resistance despite being only ∼1.7 nm thick, surpassing those of ∼2.7 nm thick current commercial carbon overcoat (COC) and other overcoats in this work. While this approach has direct implications for advancing current magnetic storage technology with its ultralow thickness, it can also be applied to advance the protective and barrier capabilities of other ultrathin materials for associated technologies.

  19. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  20. Insights into solar photo-Fenton reaction parameters in the oxidation of a sanitary landfill leachate at lab-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia F C V; Ferreira, Rui; Soares, Petrick A; Manenti, Diego R; Fonseca, Amélia; Saraiva, Isabel; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-12-01

    This work evaluates the effect of the main photo-Fenton (PF) reaction variables on the treatment of a sanitary landfill leachate collected at the outlet of a leachate treatment plant, which includes aerated lagooning followed by aerated activated sludge and a final coagulation-flocculation step. The PF experiments were performed in a lab-scale compound parabolic collector (CPC) photoreactor using artificial solar radiation. The photocatalytic reaction rate was determined while varying the total dissolved iron concentration (20-100 mg Fe(2+)/L), solution pH (2.0-3.6), operating temperature (10-50 °C), type of acid used for acidification (H2SO4, HCl and H2SO4 + HCl) and UV irradiance (22-68 W/m(2)). This work also tries to elucidate the role of ferric hydroxides, ferric sulphate and ferric chloride species, by taking advantage of ferric speciation diagrams, in the efficiency of the PF reaction when applied to leachate oxidation. The molar fraction of the most photoactive ferric species, FeOH(2+), was linearly correlated with the PF pseudo-first order kinetic constants obtained at different solution pH and temperature values. Ferric ion speciation diagrams also showed that the presence of high amounts of chloride ions negatively affected the PF reaction, due to the decrease of ferric ions solubility and scavenging of hydroxyl radicals for chlorine radical formation. The increment of the PF reaction rates with temperature was mainly associated with the increase of the molar fraction of FeOH(2+). The optimal parameters for the photo-Fenton reaction were: pH = 2.8 (acidification agent: H2SO4); T = 30 °C; [Fe(2+)] = 60 mg/L and UV irradiance = 44 WUV/m(2), achieving 72% mineralization after 25 kJUV/L of accumulated UV energy and 149 mM of H2O2 consumed.

  1. PD Lab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilow, Marcel; Entrop, Alexis Gerardus; Lichtenberg, Jos; Stoutjesdijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    PD Lab explores the applications of building sector related product development. PD lab investigates and tests digital production technologies like CNC milled wood connections. It will also act as a platform in its wider meaning to investigate the effects and influences of file to factory

  2. Fundamental Study of Nano-Scale Adhesion and Friction Properties of Graphene in Ambient Air and Liquid Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramayanam, Sai Suvineeth

    The aim of this study is to understand the fundamental tribological interactions of model contacts developed between a 'single' asperity silicon tip and a few layer graphene surface in ambient air, ionic liquid, and lubricating oil environments. The motivation to investigate such fundamental interactions stems from the need to gain an understanding of the tribological properties, morphology and defects of few layer graphene with respect to different synthesis methods including both bottom-up and top-down approaches. In particular, the surface properties of atomically thin sheets of graphene synthesized by three methods; (i) liquid phase exfoliation of graphene, (ii) chemical reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide, on a silicon oxide substrate, and (iii) graphene synthesis by halogen based plasma etching on a silicon carbide substrate are studied using atomic force microscopy, lateral force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Friction of Si 'single' asperities sliding against a few layer graphene surface in ambient air, ionic liquid, and lubricating oil environments is reported. It is found that oxygen based defects play a major role in controlling the friction and adhesion properties of few layer graphene surfaces. The role of substrate and its bonding with the few layer graphene is also an important parameter. In liquids, we report a newly observed Stribeck like behavior in the nanoscale. This work can lead to important device applications with reduced friction such as contact-based microelectromechanical systems. It also sheds light on liquid-graphene interfacial characteristics which can be proved vital in applications spanning from electrochemical energy devices to nanolubricants.

  3. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Complex Curvature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Randy J.; Martin, W.; Schneider, J.; Hartley, P. J.; Russell, Carolyn; Lawless, Kirby; Jones, Chip

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation provides an overview of sucessful research conducted by Lockheed Martin and NASA to develop an advanced self-reacting friction stir technology for complex curvature aluminum alloys. The research included weld process development for 0.320 inch Al 2219, sucessful transfer from the 'lab' scale to the production scale tool and weld quality exceeding strenght goals. This process will enable development and implementation of large scale complex geometry hardware fabrication. Topics covered include: weld process development, weld process transfer, and intermediate hardware fabrication.

  4. Comparison between lab- and full-scale applications of in situ aeration of an old landfill and assessment of long-term emission development after completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrad, Marlies; Gamperling, Oliver; Huber-Humer, Marion

    2013-10-01

    Sustainable landfilling has become a fundamental objective in many modern waste management concepts. In this context, the in situ aeration of landfills has been recognised for its potential to convert conventional anaerobic landfills into biological stabilised state, whereby both current and potential (long-term) emissions of the landfilled waste are mitigated. In recent years, different in situ aeration concepts have been successfully applied in Europe, North America and Asia, all pursuing different objectives and strategies. In Austria, the first full-scale application of in situ landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection and simultaneous off-gas collection and treatment was implemented on an old, small municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill (2.6ha) in autumn 2007. Complementary laboratory investigations were conducted with waste samples taken from the landfill site in order to provide more information on the transferability of the results from lab- to full-scale aeration measures. In addition, long-term emission development of the stabilised waste after aeration completion was assessed in an ongoing laboratory experiment. Although the initial waste material was described as mostly stable in terms of the biological parameters gas generation potential over 21days (GP21) and respiration activity over 4days (RA4), the lab-scale experiments indicated that aeration, which led to a significant improvement of leachate quality, was accompanied by further measurable changes in the solid waste material under optimised conditions. Even 75weeks after aeration completion the leachate, as well as gaseous emissions from the stabilised waste material, remained low and stayed below the authorised Austrian discharge limits. However, the application of in situ aeration at the investigated landfill is a factor 10 behind the lab-based predictions after 3years of operation, mainly due to technical limitations in the full-scale operation (e.g. high air flow resistivity due

  5. PD Lab

    OpenAIRE

    Bilow, Marcel; Entrop, Bram; Lichtenberg, Jos; Stoutjesdijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    PD Lab explores the applications of building sector related product development. PD lab investigates and tests digital production technologies like CNC milled wood connections. It will also act as a platform in its wider meaning to investigate the effects and influences of file to factory production, to explore the potential in the field of sustainability, material use, logistics and the interaction of stakeholders within the chain of the building process.

  6. Benchmarking of direct and indirect friction tests in micro forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rasmus Solmer; Calaon, Matteo; Arentoft, M.

    2012-01-01

    The sizeable increase in metal forming friction at micro scale, due to the existence of size effects, constitutes a barrier to the realization of industrial micro forming processes. In the quest for improved frictional conditions in micro scale forming operations, friction tests are applied...... to qualify the tribological performance of the particular forming scenario. In this work the application of a simulative sliding friction test at micro scale is studied. The test setup makes it possible to measure the coefficient of friction as a function of the sliding motion. The results confirm a sizeable...... increase in the coefficient of friction when the work piece size is scaled down. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications....

  7. Solar photocatalitycal treatment of carbofuran at lab and pilot scale: effect of classical parameters, evaluation of the toxicity and analysis of organic by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Alvarez, Blady; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2011-07-15

    In this work the TiO(2) solar-photocatalytical degradation of the pesticide carbofuran (CBF) in water, at lab and pilot scale, was studied. At lab scale the evaluation of CBF concentration (14-282 μmol L(-1)) showed that the system followed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics type. TiO(2) concentration (0.05-2 g L(-1)) and initial pH (3-9) were also evaluated and optimized using the surface response methodology and the Pareto diagram. In the range of variables studied, initial pH 7.60 and 1.43 g L(-1) of TiO(2) favoured the efficiency of the process. Under optimal conditions the evolution of substrate, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon, toxicity and organics by-products were evaluated. In the pilot scale tests, using direct sunlight, 55 mg L(-1) of CBF in a commercial formulation was eliminated after 420 min; while after 900 min of treatment 80% of toxicity (1/E(50) on Vibrium Fischeri), 80% of chemical oxygen demand and 60% of dissolved organic carbon were removed. The analysis and evolution of five CBF by-products, as well the evaluation of the treatment in the presence of isopropanol or using acetonitrile as a solvent suggest that the degradation is mainly carried out by OH radical attack. Finally, a schema depicting the main degradation pathway is proposed.

  8. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  9. Lab-scale periphyton-based system for fish culture Sistema laboratorial baseado em perifíton para piscicultura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi de Holanda Cavalcante

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed to assess a lab-scale model to study periphyton-based systems for fish culture. Twenty-five liters plastic aquaria were stocked with three Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, juveniles (0.77±0.09g; 12 fish m-2 for 6 weeks in a 2x2 factorial design. Small plastic bottles were placed in some aquaria for periphyton development. Two feeding regimes were employed: "full-fed" (standard feeding rates were fully adopted and "half-fed" (50% of standard feeding rates. Growth performance and limnological variables were observed in each aquarium. There werefive replicates per treatment. Fish have fed actively on periphyton, especially in the half-fed aquaria. The placement of periphyton bottles had no significant effects on the water quality variables, except by the gross primary productivity which became lower. Half-fed aquaria presented lower concentrations of ammonia (0.28-0.29mg L-1, nitrite (0.33-0.37mg L-1 and phosphorus (0.42-0.43mg L-1 than full-fed aquaria (0.57-0.60mg L-1; 0.75-0.77mg L-1; 0.67-0.70mg L-1, respectively. The final body weight of fish in half-fed aquaria with periphyton bottles (6.22±0.64g was significantly higher than in aquaria without bottles (4.65±0.36g. Although the growth rate of fish was lower in the half-fed aquaria (4.27-4.72 vs. 5.29-5.61% BW day-1, survival was significantly higher when compared to the full-fed aquaria (93.3-100.0 vs. 80.0-83.4%. Only in the aquaria with periphyton the feed conversation ratio was improved by the feeding restriction regime.O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar um modelo laboratorial para estudo de sistemas de cultivo de peixes baseados em perifíton. Aquários de 25L foram estocados com três juvenis de tilápia do Nilo, Oreochromis niloticus (0,77±0,09g; 12 peixes m-2 por seis semanas, em arranjo fatorial 2x2. Pequenas garrafas plásticas foram colocadas em determinados aquários para o desenvolvimento de perifíton. Dois regimes alimentares foram

  10. Peak mass and dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A

    1995-01-01

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock \\& Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  11. TELECOM LAB

    CERN Multimedia

    IT-CS-TEL Section

    2001-01-01

    The Telecom Lab is moving from Building 104 to Building 31 S-026, with its entrance via the ramp on the side facing Restaurant n°2. The help desk will thus be closed to users on Tuesday 8 May. On May 9, the Lab will only be able to deal with problems of a technical nature at the new address and it will not be able to process any new subscription requests throughout the week from 7 to 11 May. We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause and thank you for your understanding.

  12. Development of Lab-to-Fab Production Equipment Across Several Length Scales for Printed Energy Technologies, Including Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hösel, Markus; Dam, Henrik Friis; Krebs, Frederik C

    2015-01-01

    We describe and review how the scaling of printed energy technologies not only requires scaling of the input materials but also the machinery used in the processes. The general consensus that ultrafast processing of technologies with large energy capacity can only be realized using roll-to-roll m......We describe and review how the scaling of printed energy technologies not only requires scaling of the input materials but also the machinery used in the processes. The general consensus that ultrafast processing of technologies with large energy capacity can only be realized using roll...

  13. Friction material composites copper-metal-free material design perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2015-01-01

    This book examines material composites used in connection with brake friction, their design and safety. To aid in understanding, the essentials of friction are explained. This second edition was extended to include friction material composites without copper, as they offer an environmentally friendlier option. The second edition is intended to support beginners by offering insights into the essentials of friction material composites, helping them to develop a broader understanding of brake friction materials. Friction materials find wide-ranging applications in household and industrial appliances, brake pads for automotive applications, rail brake friction pads and composition brake blocks. This second edition is an introductory volume to a set of related books, and is based on the author’s experience and expertise with various material manufacturers, brake manufacturers, vehicle manufacturers, researchers and testing labs around the world with which the author has been associated for the past 28 years.

  14. Lab architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-04-01

    There are few more dramatic illustrations of the vicissitudes of laboratory architecturethan the contrast between Building 20 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its replacement, the Ray and Maria Stata Center. Building 20 was built hurriedly in 1943 as temporary housing for MIT's famous Rad Lab, the site of wartime radar research, and it remained a productive laboratory space for over half a century. A decade ago it was demolished to make way for the Stata Center, an architecturally striking building designed by Frank Gehry to house MIT's computer science and artificial intelligence labs (above). But in 2004 - just two years after the Stata Center officially opened - the building was criticized for being unsuitable for research and became the subject of still ongoing lawsuits alleging design and construction failures.

  15. Workspace: LAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Lundsgaard, Christina; Nørskov, Eva-Carina

    2007-01-01

    På mange arbejdspladser viger man tilbage fra at inddrage medarbejderne når der igangsættes større forandringer. Workspace:lab er et bud på en inddragende udviklingsproces hvor dialog og eksperimenter står i centrum. Ved at samle såvel medarbejdere som ledelse og rådgivere på et mindre antal...

  16. Comparative analysis of the bacterial diversity in a lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) applied to treat urban wastewater under different operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Kadiya; Martín-Pascual, Jaime; Poyatos, José Manuel; Rodelas, Belén; González-Martínez, Alejandro; González-López, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    Different types of carriers were tested as support material in a lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) used to treat urban wastewater under three different conditions of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and carrier filling ratios (FR). The bacterial diversity developed on the biofilms responsible of the treatment was studied using a cultivation-independent approach based on the polymerase chain reaction-temperature gradient gel electrophoresis technique (PCR-TGGE). Cluster analysis of TGGE fingerprints showed significant differences of community structure dependent upon the different operational conditions applied. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was used to determine the relationship between the operational conditions (type of carrier, HRT, FR) and bacterial biofilm diversity, demonstrating a significant effect of FR=50%. Phylogenetic analysis of PCR-reamplified and sequenced TGGE bands revealed that the prevalent Bacteria populations in the biofilm were related to Betaproteobacteria (46%), Firmicutes (34%),Alphaproteobacteria (14%) and Gammaproteobacteria (9%).

  17. Complete genome sequence of the novel Porphyromonadaceae bacterium strain ING2-E5B isolated from a mesophilic lab-scale biogas reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnke, Sarah; Maus, Irena; Wibberg, Daniel; Tomazetto, Geizecler; Pühler, Alfred; Klocke, Michael; Schlüter, Andreas

    2015-01-10

    In this study, the whole genome sequence of the mesophilic, anaerobic Porphyromonadaceae bacterium strain ING2-E5B (LMG 28429, DSM 28696) is reported. The new isolate belongs to the phylum Bacteroidetes and was obtained from a biogas-producing lab-scale completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) optimized for anaerobic digestion of maize silage in co-fermentation with pig and cattle manure. The genome of strain ING2-E5B contains numerous genes encoding proteins and enzymes involved in the degradation of complex carbohydrates and proteinaceous compounds. Moreover, it possesses genes catalyzing the production of volatile fatty acids. Hence, this bacterium was predicted to be involved in hydrolysis and acidogenesis during anaerobic digestion and biomethanation.

  18. Investigating biofilm structure developing on carriers from lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactors based on light microscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Felz, Simon; Wagner, Michael; Lackner, Susanne; Horn, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on characterizing the structure of biofilms developed on carriers used in lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactors. Both light microscopy (2D) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were employed to track the biofilm development on carriers of different geometry and under different aeration rates. Biofilm structure was further characterized with respect to average biofilm thickness, biofilm growth velocity, biomass volume, compartment filling degree, surface area, etc. The results showed that carriers with a smaller compartment size stimulated a quick establishment of biofilms. Low aeration rates favored fast development of biofilms. Comparison between the results derived from 2D and 3D images revealed comparable results with respect to average biofilm thickness and compartment filling degree before the carrier compartments were fully willed with biomass. However, 3D imaging with OCT was capable of visualizing and quantifying the heterogeneous structure of biofilms, which cannot be achieved using 2D imaging.

  19. Reduction of methane emission from landfills using bio-mitigation systems – from lab tests to full scale implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    , or open or closed bed biofilter systems. The objective of this paper is to describe the relationship between research on process understanding of the oxidation of landfill gas contained methane and the up-scale to full bio-mitigation systems implemented at landfills. The oxidation of methane is controlled...... due to self-heating processes. Bio-mitigation can be used as a stand-alone technology or combined with active or passive gas collection. When implementing bio-mitigation systems focus should be on additional fugitive methane emissions or the presence of uncontrolled point releases. A protocol...... for implementing a bio-mitigation system is presented, and the reported landfill-implemented bio-mitigation systems either established as full-scale or pilot-scale systems are reviewed. It is concluded that bio-mitigation systems have a large potential for providing cost-efficient mitigation options for reducing...

  20. Analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria dominating in lab-scale bioreactors with high ammonium bicarbonate loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vejmelkova, D.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Abbas, B.; Kovaleva, O.L.; Kleerebezem, R.; Kampschreur, M.J.; Muyzer, G.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community (AOB) was investigated in two types of laboratory-scale bioreactors performing partial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite or nitrate at high (80 mM) to extremely high (428 mM) concentrations of ammonium bicarbonate. At all conditions, the dominant AOB was affil

  1. Analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria dominating in lab-scale bioreactors with high ammonium bicarbonate loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Vejmelkova; D.Y. Sorokin; B. Abbas; O.L. Kovaleva; R. Kleerebezem; M.J. Kampschreur; G. Muyzer; M.C.M. van Loosdrecht

    2012-01-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community (AOB) was investigated in two types of laboratory-scale bioreactors performing partial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite or nitrate at high (80 mM) to extremely high (428 mM) concentrations of ammonium bicarbonate. At all conditions, the dominant AOB was affil

  2. A review of the processes and lab-scale techniques for the treatment of spent rechargeable NiMH batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Valentina; Ippolito, Nicolò Maria; De Michelis, Ida; Prisciandaro, Marina; Medici, Franco; Vegliò, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to describe and review the current status of the recycling technologies of spent NiMH batteries. In the first part of the work, the structure and characterization of NiMH accumulators are introduced followed by the description of the main scientific studies and the industrial processes. Various recycling routes including physical, pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical ones are discussed. The hydrometallurgical methods for the recovery of base metals and rare earths are mainly developed on the laboratory and pilot scale. The operating industrial methods are pyrometallurgical ones and are efficient only on the recovery of certain components of spent batteries. In particular fraction rich in nickel and other materials are recovered; instead the rare earths are lost in the slag and must be further refined by hydrometallurgical process to recover them. Considering the actual legislation regarding the disposal of spent batteries and the preservation of raw materials issues, implementations on laboratory scale and plant optimization studies should be conducted in order to overcome the industrial problems of the scale up for the hydrometallurgical processes.

  3. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  4. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, R.; Menanteau, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>105 K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  5. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, R., E-mail: romain.lemaire@mines-douai.fr; Menanteau, S. [Mines Douai, EI, F-59508 Douai (France)

    2016-01-15

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>10{sup 5} K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  6. Up-scaling aquaculture wastewater treatment by microalgal bacterial flocs: from lab reactors to an outdoor raceway pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Hende, Sofie; Beelen, Veerle; Bore, Gaëlle; Boon, Nico; Vervaeren, Han

    2014-05-01

    Sequencing batch reactors with microalgal bacterial flocs (MaB-floc SBRs) are a novel approach for photosynthetic aerated wastewater treatment based on bioflocculation. To assess their technical potential for aquaculture wastewater treatment in Northwest Europe, MaB-floc SBRs were up-scaled from indoor photobioreactors of 4 L over 40 and 400 L to a 12 m(3) outdoor raceway pond. Scale-up decreased the nutrient removal efficiencies with a factor 1-3 and the volumetric biomass productivities with a factor 10-13. Effluents met current discharge norms, except for nitrite and nitrate. Flue gas sparging was needed to decrease the effluent pH. Outdoor MaB-flocs showed enhanced settling properties and an increased ash and chlorophyll a content. Bioflocculation enabled successful harvesting by gravity settling and dewatering by filtering at 150-250 μm. Optimisation of nitrogen removal and biomass valorisation are future challenges towards industrial implementation of MaB-floc SBRs for aquaculture wastewater treatment.

  7. The use of microalgae as method for phosphorus removal from a human derived waste stream. From a lab scale to a household scale cultivation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veele, Willemien

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In this research the possibility of two different microalgae species to remove phosphorus (P) from anaerobically digested human excreta has been investigated. This research was performed on two different levels of scale. First research was perfor

  8. The use of microalgae as method for phosphorus removal from a human derived waste stream. From a lab scale to a household scale cultivation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veele, Willemien

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In this research the possibility of two different microalgae species to remove phosphorus (P) from anaerobically digested human excreta has been investigated. This research was performed on two different levels of scale. First research was perfor

  9. Industrial lab-on-a-chip: design, applications and scale-up for drug discovery and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladisavljević, Goran T; Khalid, Nauman; Neves, Marcos A; Kuroiwa, Takashi; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Uemura, Kunihiko; Ichikawa, Sosaku; Kobayashi, Isao

    2013-11-01

    Microfluidics is an emerging and promising interdisciplinary technology which offers powerful platforms for precise production of novel functional materials (e.g., emulsion droplets, microcapsules, and nanoparticles as drug delivery vehicles- and drug molecules) as well as high-throughput analyses (e.g., bioassays, detection, and diagnostics). In particular, multiphase microfluidics is a rapidly growing technology and has beneficial applications in various fields including biomedicals, chemicals, and foods. In this review, we first describe the fundamentals and latest developments in multiphase microfluidics for producing biocompatible materials that are precisely controlled in size, shape, internal morphology and composition. We next describe some microfluidic applications that synthesize drug molecules, handle biological substances and biological units, and imitate biological organs. We also highlight and discuss design, applications and scale up of droplet- and flow-based microfluidic devices used for drug discovery and delivery. © 2013.

  10. Lab-scale impact test to investigate the pipe-soil interaction and comparative study to evaluate structural responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Dong-Man

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the dynamic response of a subsea pipeline under an impact load to determine the effect of the seabed soil. A laboratory-scale soil-based pipeline impact test was carried out to investigate the pipeline deformation/strain as well as the interaction with the soil-pipeline. In addition, an impact test was simulated using the finite element technique, and the calculated strain was compared with the experimental results. During the simulation, the pipeline was described based on an elasto-plastic analysis, and the soil was modeled using the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The results obtained were compared with ASME D31.8, and the differences between the analysis results and the rules were specifically investigated. Modified ASME formulae were proposed to calculate the precise structural behavior of a subsea pipeline under an impact load when considering sand- and clay-based seabed soils.

  11. Lab-scale impact test to investigate the pipe-soil interaction and comparative study to evaluate structural responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Man Ryu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the dynamic response of a subsea pipeline under an impact load to determine the effect of the seabed soil. A laboratory-scale soil-based pipeline impact test was carried out to investigate the pipeline deformation/strain as well as the interaction with the soil-pipeline. In addition, an impact test was simulated using the finite element technique, and the calculated strain was compared with the experimental results. During the simulation, the pipeline was described based on an elasto-plastic analysis, and the soil was modeled using the Mohr-Coulomb fail-ure criterion. The results obtained were compared with ASME D31.8, and the differences between the analysis results and the rules were specifically investigated. Modified ASME formulae were proposed to calculate the precise structural behavior of a subsea pipeline under an impact load when considering sand- and clay-based seabed soils.

  12. Innovations in STEM education: the Go-Lab federation of online labs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Ton; Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Gillet, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The Go-Lab federation of online labs opens up virtual laboratories (simulation), remote laboratories (real equipment accessible at distance) and data sets from physical laboratory experiments (together called “online labs”) for large-scale use in education. In this way, Go-Lab enables inquiry-based

  13. Numerical investigation of pyrolysis of a Loy Yang coal in a lab-scale furnace at elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, James; Al-Abbas, Audai Hussein; Naser, Jamal

    2013-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the pyrolysis of a Loy Yang low-rank coal in a pressurised drop tube furnace (pdtf) was undertaken evaluating Arrhenius reaction rate constants. The paper also presents predictions of an isothermal flow through the drop tube furnace. In this study, a pdtf reactor operated at pressures up to 15 bar and at a temperature of 1,173 K with particle heating rates of approximately 105 K s-1 was used. The CFD model consists of two geometrical sections; flow straightner and injector. The single reaction and two competing reaction models were employed for this numerical investigation of the pyrolysis process. The results are validated against the available experimental data in terms of velocity profiles for the drop tube furnace and the particle mass loss versus particle residence times. The isothermal flow results showed reasonable agreement with the available experimental data at different locations from the injector tip. The predicted results of both the single reaction and competing reaction modes showed slightly different results. In addition, several reaction rate constants were tested and validated against the available experimental data. The most accurate results were being Badzioch and Hawksley (Ind Eng Chem Process Des Dev 9:521-530, 1970) with a single reaction model and Ubhayakar et al. (Symp (Int) Combust 16:427-436, 1977) for two competing reactions. These numerical results can provide useful information towards future modelling of the behaviour of Loy Yang coal in a full scale tangentially-fired furnace.

  14. Evaporation suppression from reservoirs using floating covers: Lab scale wind-tunnel observations and mechanistic model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Dani; Lehmann, Peter; Aminzadeh, Milad; Sommer, Martina; Wey, Hannah; Krentscher, Christiane; Wunderli, Hans; Breitenstein, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The competition over dwindling fresh water resources is expected to intensify with projected increase in human population in arid regions, expansion of irrigated land and changes in climate and drought patterns. The volume of water stored in reservoirs would also increase to mitigate seasonal shortages due to rainfall variability and to meet irrigation water needs. By some estimates up to half of the stored water is lost to evaporation, thereby exacerbating the water scarcity problem. Recently, there is an upsurge in the use of self-assembling floating covers to suppress evaporation, yet the design and implementation remain largely empirical. We report a systematic experimental evaluation of different cover types and external drivers (radiation, wind, wind plus radiation) on evaporation suppression and energy balance of a 1.4 m2 basin placed in a wind-tunnel. Surprisingly, evaporation suppression by black and white floating covers (balls and plates) were similar despite significantly different energy balance regimes over the cover surfaces. Moreover, the evaporation suppression efficiency was a simple function of the uncovered area (square root of the uncovered fraction) with linear relations with the covered area in some cases. The thermally decoupled floating covers offer an efficient solution to the evaporation suppression with limited influence of the surface energy balance (water temperature for black and white covers was similar and remained nearly constant). The results will be linked with a predictive evaporation-energy balance model and issues of spatial scales and long exposure times will be studied.

  15. Lab scale experiments using a submerged MBR under thermophilic aerobic conditions for the treatment of paper mill deinking wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simstich, Benjamin; Beimfohr, Claudia; Horn, Harald

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes the results of laboratory experiments using a thermophilic aerobic MBR (TMBR) at 50 °C. An innovative use of submerged flat-sheet MBR modules to treat circuit wastewater from the paper industry was studied. Two experiments were conducted with a flux of 8-13 L/m(2)/h without chemical membrane cleaning. COD and BOD(5) elimination rates were 83% and 99%, respectively. Calcium was reduced from 110 to 180 mg/L in the inflow to 35-60 mg/L in the permeate. However, only negligible membrane scaling occurred. The observed sludge yield was very low and amounted to 0.07-0.29 g MLSS/g COD(eliminated). Consequently, the nutrient supply of ammonia and phosphate can be lower compared to a mesophilic process. Molecular-biological FISH analysis revealed a likewise high diversity of microorganisms in the TMBR compared to the mesophilic sludge used for start-up. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidising bacteria were detected at thermophilic operation.

  16. Fate of the herbicide 14C-atrazine during sewage treatment on a lab-scale bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime L. M. Oliveira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine (2-chloro-4-(ethylamino-6-(isopropylamino-s-triazine is a persistent herbicide used on some crops and it has been found both in ground and surface water and drainage systems. This work studied the behaviour of atrazine during a sewage treatment process by activated sludge. The process was conducted on a laboratory scale using an under fed-batch system with a hydraulic retention time of 24 hours. After this period, the raw sewage (with atrazine was changed and another batch was begun (the sludge age was 7 days old. Radiolabel molecules (14C-atrazine were used for to trace their fate and to measure to the 14C-CO2 and the residues of atrazine were analysed by HPLC/UV. Initially about 50% of radioactivity was sorbed by the settled sludge but it was desorbed with successive additions of raw sewage without atrazine. The final balance of radioactivity showed that 98% of the atrazine was released into the treated effluent, probably without any biodegradation. Therefore, other organic micropollutants with similar characteristics to atrazine may behave a similar way.

  17. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  18. Transpiration Demand in Southern California Oak Woodlands: Making the Leap from Lab and Individual Tree to Watershed Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, J. L.; Quinlan, P. T.; Martin, J.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Watershed scale estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) have proven difficult to quantify in areas of native vegetation with uncertain or unknown crop coefficients. In this study, we evaluate the water use in Quercus engelmanni and Quercus agrifolia, two species of oak native to Southern California. Thermal dissipation probes (TDPs) were installed at four locations within a 14,500 acre watershed, comprising 770 acres of Q. agrifolia woodland and 2440 acres of Q. engelmanni woodland. Installation duration ranged from 6 weeks to 14 months. The TDPs were calibrated to each species in the laboratory using limbs ranging from 2 to 5 inches in diameter. Dye was run through each limb at the end of the calibration test in order to establish a relationship between active sapwood area and limb diameter. ET measured in the field for each species was 0.15 to 0.3 times that of the reference evapotranspiration (ETo) derived from the Penman-Monteith equation, with the primary variability in the demand related to measured incident solar radiation. The total water demand for each species is estimated using the laboratory determined relationship between the active sapwood area and the diameter of the limb, and a survey of the tree diameter breast height (DBH) of each tree in the watershed. This study provides new insight into the actual water demand of two native tree species in Southern California and has serious implications for conservation plans, which are often developed using watershed models that apply ETo to all vegetation communities, regardless of actual water demand.

  19. Fault frictional parameters and material properties revealed by slow slip events at Kilauea volcano, Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, James H.; Lowry, Anthony R.; Brooks, Benjamin A.

    2013-12-01

    categorize slow slip events at Kilauea Volcano into two distinct families based on GPS measurements of the surface displacement patterns. An event correlation filter confirms that "eastern" and "western" families are statistically distinguishable, with the western family notably self-similar. The western family exhibits quasi-periodicity with regular repeat times, while eastern family events are aperiodic or have complicated periodicity. If the decollement is the source fault for both families of events, it must have varying frictional properties at the ~10 km scale of separation. The temporal slip and spatial scaling behavior are consistent with a simplistic rate- and state-dependent frictional formalism provided that the characteristic slip distance for state evolution, Dc, is of the order of millimeters rather than the 10-100 µm typically found in lab studies, and the shear rigidity is around 2 GPa, consistent with fault gouge material.

  20. Design and Testing of Lab-scale Red Fuming Nitric Acid/Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene Hybrid Rocket Motor for Studying Regression Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaran Venugopal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a hybrid rocket motor and the experiments carried out for investigation of hybrid combustion and regression rates for a combination of liquid oxidiser red fuming nitric acid with solid fuel hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene. The regression rate is enhanced with the addition of small quantity of solid oxidiser ammonium perchlorate in the fuel. The characteristics of the combustion products were calculated using the NASA CEA Code and were used in a ballistic code developed for predicting the performance of the hybrid rocket motor. A lab-scale motor was designed and the oxidiser mass flow requirements of the hybrid motor for the above combination of fuel and oxidiser have been calculated using the developed ballistic code. A static rocket motor testing facility has been realised for conducting the hybrid experiments. A series of tests were conducted and proper ignition with stable combustion in the hybrid mode has been established. The regression rate correlations were obtained as a function of the oxidiser mass flux and chamber pressure from the experiments for the various combinations.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(6, pp.515-522, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.873

  1. Lab-scale co-digestion of kitchen waste and brown water for a preliminary performance evaluation of a decentralized waste and wastewater management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Girotto, Francesca; Hirata, Osamu; Cossu, Raffaello

    2017-08-01

    An overall interaction is manifested between wastewater and solid waste management schemes. At the Laboratory of Environmental Engineering (LISA) of the University of Padova, Italy, the scientific and technical implications of putting into practice a decentralized waste and wastewater treatment based on the separation of grey water, brown water (BW - faecal matter) and yellow water (YW - urine) are currently undergoing investigation in the Aquanova Project. An additional aim of this concept is the source segregation of kitchen waste (KW) for subsequent anaerobic co-digestion with BW. To determine an optimal mixing ratio and temperature for use in the treatment of KW, BW, and eventually YW, by means of anaerobic digestion, a series of lab-scale batch tests were performed. Organic mixtures of KW and BW performed much better (max. 520mlCH4/gVS) in terms of methane yields than the individual substrates alone (max. 220mlCH4/gVS). A small concentration of urine proved to have a positive effect on anaerobic digestion performance, possibly due to the presence of micronutrients in YW. When considering high YW concentrations in the anaerobically digested mixtures, no ammonia inhibition was observed until a 30% and 10% YW content was added under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipid metabolism in mixtures of red clover (Trifolium repens) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in lab scale silages and in vitro rumen incubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ranst, G; Vandewalle, M; Gadeyne, F; De Riek, J; Fievez, V

    2013-09-01

    Most often, farmers consider red clover an unattractive forage because of its low ensilability. Nevertheless, several in vivo and in vitro experiments also showed advantages of red clover silages such as decreased rumen biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. This has been attributed to a possible protective role of protein-bound phenols, with polyphenol oxidase playing a key role in their formation. This enzyme is active in red clover, but not in other green forages, such as, for example, perennial ryegrass. Therefore, the aim was to study the lipid metabolism within red clover/ryegrass mixtures in lab scale silages and during in vitro rumen batch incubations. Ensilability of red clover increased with higher proportions of ryegrass in the silage mixture. However, the lipid-protecting mechanism of red clover does not seem to occur in the co-ensiled ryegrass as lipolysis of polar lipids linearly increased with increasing proportions of ryegrass (86.0%, 91.6%, 89.9%, 93.1% and 95.6% in 60-day-old silages with 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75 and 0/100 red clover/ryegrass, respectively). Rumen lipolysis and biohydrogenation of C18:3n-3 and C18:2n-6 were negatively related to red clover proportions in the silage mixtures. The lipid-protective mechanism in red clover silages is confirmed, but it seems not to be transferred to lipids in co-ensiled forages.

  3. Development and testing of a novel lab-scale direct steam-injection apparatus to hydrolyse model and saline crop slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Guglielmo; Guglielmo, Santi; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Alessandro, D'Annibale; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Maurizio, Petruccioli; Crognale, Silvia; Silvia, Crognale; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Maurizio, Ruzzi; Valentini, Riccardo; Riccardo, Valentini; Moresi, Mauro; Moresi, Mauro

    2012-02-20

    In this work, a novel laboratory-scale direct steam-injection apparatus (DSIA) was developed to overcome the main drawback of the conventional batch-driven lab rigs, namely the long time needed to heat fiber slurry from room to reaction temperatures greater than 150 °C. The novel apparatus mainly consisted of three units: (i) a mechanically-stirred bioreactor where saturated steam at 5-30 bar can be injected; (ii) an automatic on-off valve to flash suddenly the reaction medium after a prefixed reaction time; (iii) a cyclone separator to recover the reacted slurry. This system was tested using 0.75 dm³ of an aqueous solution of H₂SO₄ (0.5%, v/v) enriched with 50 kg m⁻³ of either commercial particles of Avicel® and Larch xylan or 0.5 mm sieved particles of Tamarix jordanis. Each slurry was heated to about 200 °C by injecting steam at 28 bar for 90 s. The process efficiency was assessed by comparing the dissolution degree of suspended solid (Y(S)), as well as xylose (Y(X)), glucose (Y(G)), and furfural (Y(F)) yields, with those obtained in a conventional steam autoclave at 130 °C for 30 or 60 min. Treatment of T. jordanis particles in DSIA resulted in Y(S) and Y(G) values quite similar to those obtained in the steam autoclave at 130 °C for 60 min, but in a less efficient hemicellulose solubilization. A limited occurrence of pentose degradation products was observed in both equipments, suggesting that hydrolysis predominated over degradation reactions. The susceptibility of the residual solid fractions from DSIA treatment to a conventional 120 h long cellulolytic treatment using an enzyme loading of 5.4 FPU g⁻¹ was markedly higher than that of samples hydrolysed in the steam autoclave, their corresponding glucose yields being equal to 0.94 and 0.22 g per gram of initial cellulose, respectively. Thus, T. jordanis resulted to be a valuable source of sugars for bioethanol production as proved by preliminary tests in the novel lab rig developed here.

  4. Earthquake sequence simulation of a multi-scale asperity model following rate and state friction - occurrence of large earthquakes by cascade up vs. own nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H.; Nakatani, M.; Hori, T.

    2012-12-01

    Seismological observations [e.g., Abercrombie and Rice, 2005] suggest that a larger earthquake has larger fracture energy Gc. One way to realize such scaling is to assume a hierarchical patchy distribution of Gc on a fault; there are patches of different sizes with different Gc so that a larger patch has larger Gc. Ide and Aochi [2005] conducted dynamic rupture simulations with such a distribution of weakening distance Dc in a linear slip-weakening law, initiating ruptures on the smallest patch which sometimes grow up by cascading into a larger scale. They suggested that the initial phase of a large earthquake is indistinguishable from that of a small earthquake. In the present study we simulate a similar multi-scale asperity model but following rate and state friction (RSF), where stress and strength distribution resulting from the history of coseismic and aseismic slip influences the way of rupture initiation, growth, and arrest of a forthcoming earthquake. Multi-scale asperities were represented by a distribution of the state evolution distance dc in the aging version of RSF evolution law. Numerical scheme adopted [Noda and Lapsuta, 2010] is fully dynamic and 3D. We have modeled a circular rate-weakening patch, Patch L (radius R), which has a smaller patch, Patch S (radius r), in it by the rim. The ratio of the radii α = R/r is the amount of the gap between two scales. Patch L and Patch S respectively have nucleation sizes Rc and rc. The same brittleness β = R/Rc = r/rc is assumed for simplicity. We shall call an earthquake which ruptures only Patch S as an S-event, and one which ruptures Patch L, an L-event. We have conducted a series of simulations with α from 2 to 5 while keeping β = 3 until the end of the 20th L-event. If the patch S was relatively large (α = 2 and 2.5), only L-events occurred and they always dynamically cascaded up from a patch S rupture following small quasi-static nucleation there. If the patch S was small enough (α = 5), in

  5. Quality of mixing in a stired bioreactor used for animal cells culture: heterogeneities in a lab scale bioreactor and evolution of mixing time with scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collignon, ML.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal cells are industrially cultivated inside stirred bioreactors to produce proteinic compounds. Due to the use of mild agitation conditions in order to limit mechanical constraints, the homogeneity of the culture medium can be far from perfect. This study has therefore two objectives: the global characterization of the mixing via the mixing time and the local description of concentration fields. The mixing time is measured by conductimetry inside 20 l, 80 l, 600 l tanks. The Grenville correlation is adjusted on these experimental measurements to improve the prediction of the mixing time during the scale-up of the process. The concentration fields are visualized by the Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (P.L.I.F. technique in the 20 l tank. This part of the study is focused on the time evolution of the maximum value of the tracer concentration inside measurement planes and of the numerical distribution of theses concentration fields.

  6. Lab scale study on electrocoagulation defluoridation process optimization along with aluminium leaching in the process and comparison with full scale plant operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwala, Poonam; Andey, Subhash; Mhaisalkar, Vasant; Labhasetwar, Pawan; Pimpalkar, Sarika; Kshirsagar, Chetan

    2011-01-01

    An excess or lack of fluoride in drinking water is harmful to human health. Desirable and permissible standards of fluoride in drinking water are 1.0 and 1.5 mg/L, respectively, as per Indian drinking water quality standards i.e., BIS 10500, 1991. In this paper, the performance of an electro-coagulation defluoridation batch process with aluminium electrodes was investigated. Different operational conditions such as fluoride concentration in water, pH and current density were varied and performance of the process was examined. Influence of operational conditions on (i) electrode polarization phenomena, (ii) pH evolution during electrolysis and (iii) the amount of aluminium released (coagulant) was investigated. Removal by electrodes is primarily responsible for the high defluoridation efficiency and the adsorption by hydroxide aluminium floc provides secondary effect. Experimental data obtained at optimum conditions that favored simultaneous mixing and flotation confirmed that concentrations lower than 1 mg/L could be achieved when initial concentrations were between 2 and 20 mg/L. pH value was found to be an important parameter that affected fluoride removal significantly. The optimal initial pH range is between 6 and 7 at which effective defluoridation and removal efficiencies over 98% were achieved. Furthermore, experimental results prominently displayed that an increase in current density substantially reduces the treatment duration, but with increased residual aluminium level. The paper focuses on pilot scale defluoridation process optimization along with aluminium leaching and experimental results were compared with a full-scale plant having capacity of 600 liter per batch.

  7. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  8. Effects of photoperiod on nutrient removal, biomass production, and algal-bacterial population dynamics in lab-scale photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Sang-Ah; Ko, So-Ra; Oh, Hee-Mock; Ahn, Chi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Effects of photoperiod were investigated in lab-scale photobioreactors containing algal-bacterial consortia to reduce organic nutrients from municipal wastewater. Under three photoperiod conditions (12 h:12 h, 36 h:12 h, and 60 h:12 h dark–light cycles), nutrient removals and biomass productions were measured along with monitoring microbial population dynamics. After a batch operation for 12 days, 59–80% carbon, 35–88% nitrogen, and 43–89% phosphorus were removed from influents, respectively. In this study, carbon removal was related positively to the length of dark cycles, while nitrogen and phosphorus removals inversely. On the contrast, the highest microbial biomass in terms of chlorophyll a, dry cell weight, and algal/bacterial rRNA gene markers was produced under the 12 h:12 h dark–light cycle among the three photoperiods. The results showed 1) simultaneous growths between algae and bacteria in the microbial consortia and 2) efficient nitrogen and phosphorus removals along with high microbial biomass production under prolonged light conditions. Statistical analyses indicated that carbon removal was significantly related to the ratio of bacteria to algae in the microbial consortia along with prolonged dark conditions (p < 0.05). In addition, the ratio of nitrogen removal to phosphorus removal decreased significantly under prolonged dark conditions (p < 0.001). These results indicated that the photoperiod condition has remarkable impacts on adjusting nutrient removal, producing microbial biomass, and altering algal-bacterial population dynamics. Therefore, the control of photoperiod was suggested as an important operating parameter in the algal wastewater treatment.

  9. Transient effects in friction fractal asperity creep

    CERN Document Server

    Goedecke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Transient friction effects determine the behavior of a wide class of mechatronic systems. Classic examples are squealing brakes, stiction in robotic arms, or stick-slip in linear drives. To properly design and understand mechatronic systems of this type, good quantitative models of transient friction effects are of primary interest. The theory developed in this book approaches this problem bottom-up, by deriving the behavior of macroscopic friction surfaces from the microscopic surface physics. The model is based on two assumptions: First, rough surfaces are inherently fractal, exhibiting roughness on a wide range of scales. Second, transient friction effects are caused by creep enlargement of the real area of contact between two bodies. This work demonstrates the results of extensive Finite Element analyses of the creep behavior of surface asperities, and proposes a generalized multi-scale area iteration for calculating the time-dependent real contact between two bodies. The toolset is then demonstrated both...

  10. Anomalous friction of graphene nanoribbons on waved graphenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Friction plays a critical role in the function and maintenance of small-scale structures, where the conventional Coulomb friction law often fails. To probe the friction at small scales, here we present a molecular dynamics study on the process of dragging graphene nanoribbons on waved graphene substrates. The simulation shows that the induced friction on graphene with zero waviness is ultra-low and closely related to the surface energy barrier. On waved graphenes, the friction generally increases with the amplitude of the wave at a fixed period, but anomalously increases and then decreases with the period at a fixed amplitude. These findings provide insights into the ultra-low friction at small scales, as well as some guidelines into the fabrication of graphene-based nano-composites with high performance.

  11. Torsional friction damper optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shaochun; Williams, Keith A.

    2006-06-01

    A new approach for the analysis of friction dampers is presented in this work. The exact form of the steady-state solution for a friction damper implemented on a primary system is developed and numerical solutions are used to determine the optimum friction in a friction damper applied to a specific primary system. When compared to classical results presented by earlier authors, the new approach provides a more optimal solution. In addition, viscous damping in the primary system may be included with the new analysis approach. The ability to optimize a friction damper when viscous damping is included in the primary system is a significant improvement over earlier methods and shows potential for serving as a guide to realizing a more accurate estimate of the optimal damping for friction dampers.

  12. Comparison of Surfactant Distributions in Pressure-Sensitive Adhesive Films Dried from Dispersion under Lab-Scale and Industrial Drying Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesch, S; Siebel, D; Schmidt-Hansberg, B; Eichholz, C; Gerst, M; Scharfer, P; Schabel, W

    2016-03-01

    to control the surfactant distribution. Results obtained under lab-scale drying conditions cannot be transferred directly to the industrial application. The results were similar for both tested adhesive material systems, despite their different properties. This indicates that other properties, such as the particle size distribution and glass transition temperature, have surprisingly little effect on the development of the surfactant distribution.

  13. Upgrade of a LabVIEW Based Data Acquisition System for Wind Tunnel Test of a 1/10 Scale OH-6A Helicopter Fuselage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    advice and assistance in creation of the LabVIEW© program. To Doug McKinney, Lou Silverthorn from the Boeing Co., and Bill Warmbrodt from NASA Ames...Astronautics Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 5. Mr. Louis Silverthorn The Boeing Company Mesa, Arizona 6. ENS Philipp Lines Virginia Beach, Virginia

  14. Turning a Common Lab Exercise into a Challenging Lab Experiment: Revisiting the Cart on an Inclined Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Joseph C.; Williams, Roger E.

    2010-01-01

    A common lab exercise in the introductory college physics course employs a low-friction cart and associated track to study the validity of Newton's second law. Yet for college students, especially those who have already encountered a good high school physics course, the exercise must seem a little pointless. These students have already learned to…

  15. Network-Configurations of Dynamic Friction Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2012-01-01

    The complex configurations of dynamic friction patterns-regarding real time contact areas- are transformed into appropriate networks. With this transformation of a system to network space, many properties can be inferred about the structure and dynamics of the system. Here, we analyze the dynamics of static friction, i.e. nucleation processes, with respect to "friction networks". We show that networks can successfully capture the crack-like shear ruptures and possible corresponding acoustic features. We found that the fraction of triangles remarkably scales with the detachment fronts. There is a universal power law between nodes' degree and motifs frequency (for triangles, it reads T(k)\\proptok{\\beta} ({\\beta} \\approx2\\pm0.4)). We confirmed the obtained universality in aperture-based friction networks. Based on the achieved results, we extracted a possible friction law in terms of network parameters and compared it with the rate and state friction laws. In particular, the evolutions of loops are scaled with p...

  16. PREFACE: The International Conference on Science of Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kouji; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    The first international conference on the science of friction in Japan was held at Irago, Aichi on 9-13 September 2007. The conference focused on the elementary process of friction phenomena from the atomic and molecular scale view. Topics covered in the conference are shown below.: Superlubricity and friction Electronic and phononic contributions to friction Friction on the atomic and molecular scales van der Waals friction and Casimir force Molecular motor and friction Friction and adhesion in soft matter systems Wear and crack on the nanoscale Theoretical studies on the atomic scale friction and energy dissipation Friction and chaos Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts Friction of powder The number of participants in the conference was approximately 100, registered from 11 countries. 48 oral and 29 poster talks were presented at the conference. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 23 papers devoted to the above topics of friction. The successful organization of the conference was made possible by the contribution of the members of the Organizing Committee and International Advisory Committee. The conference was made possible thanks to the financial support from Aichi University of Education and the Taihokogyo Tribology Research Foundation (TTRF), and moreover thanks to the approval societies of The Physical Society of Japan, The Surface Science Society of Japan, The Japanese Society of Tribologists and Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute. The details of the conference are available at http://www.science-of-friction.com . Finally we want to thank the speakers for the high quality of their talks and all participants for coming to Irago, Japan and actively contributing to the conference. Kouji Miura and Hiroshi Matsukawa Editors

  17. Frictional Sliding without Geometrical Reflection Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldam, Michael; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A.; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces plays an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism, and rupture directionality. In contrast, it is traditionally assumed that interfaces separating identical materials do not feature such a coupling because of symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces that separate bodies made of macroscopically identical materials but lack geometrical reflection symmetry generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct, and previously unexplained, experimentally observed weakening effect in frictional cracks. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding, which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applications in a broad range of systems.

  18. Frictional sliding with geometrically broken reflection symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Aldam, Michael; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces play an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well-known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism and rupture directionality. In contrast, interfaces separating identical materials are traditionally assumed not to feature such a coupling due to symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces which separate bodies made of identical materials, but lack geometric reflection symmetry, generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct and previously unexplained weakening effect in frictional cracks observed experimentally. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applicatio...

  19. Frictional characteristics of nano-scale mesoporous SiO2 thin film formed by sol-gel and self-assembly method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyu-Sun; Shin, Yun-Ha; Kim, Ji-Man; Kim, Tae-Sung; Lee, Young-Ze

    2009-12-01

    The pores on the surface function as an outlet for wear particles and enhance the storage of lubricants, which improves lubrication effectiveness. Mesoporous SiO2 thin films were formed by the sol-gel and self-assembly methods to have a porous structure. One of the important issues in the manufacturing of the films involves the control of the porous structure to ensure proper mechanical properties. Mesoporous materials were manufactured with two surfactants, Pluronid Polyol (F127) and Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide (CTABr). The pores were then exposed on the surface by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) and plasma-etching. Ball-on-disk tests with mesoporous SiO2 thin films on glass specimens were conducted. The results show that the friction coefficient and wear volume of a specimen with F127, which has a 8 nm pore size, are far lower than those of CTABr, which has a 3 nm pore size at both the dry condition and at boundary lubricated condition. This proves a significant dependency of friction and wear on pore size of mesoporous SiO2 thin films.

  20. Friction in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  1. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  2. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  3. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  4. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the main...

  5. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  6. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  7. The Virtual Lab System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A virtual lab system is the simulation of real devices and experiments using computer and network tech-nology. It can make users do experiments easily, observe experiment phenomena and results through the remote termi-nal. Consequently, users can get final results to verify relative theory. The article analyses the features of virtual labsystems. A real virtual lab system named "Multimedia Virtual Lab for Digital Circuit Logic Design (MVLDCLD) "which has been developed by the authors and their group is also presented.

  8. USNA DIGITAL FORENSICS LAB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To enable Digital Forensics and Computer Security research and educational opportunities across majors and departments. Lab MissionEstablish and maintain a Digital...

  9. Magnetic Media Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This lab specializes in tape certification and performance characterization of high density digital tape and isprepared to support the certification of standard size...

  10. USNA DIGITAL FORENSICS LAB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To enable Digital Forensics and Computer Security research and educational opportunities across majors and departments. Lab Mission Establish and maintain a Digital...

  11. Fabrication and Prototyping Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Fabrication and Prototyping Lab for composite structures provides a wide variety of fabrication capabilities critical to enabling hands-on research and...

  12. Crystallization Formulation Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Crystallization Formulation Lab fills a critical need in the process development and optimization of current and new explosives and energetic formulations. The...

  13. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  14. Effect of friction on the motion of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Odd Erik; Madsen, Jens; Naulin, Volker

    is influenced by the collisional friction with the neutral gas fluid. In magnetically confined plasmas, the motion of filamentary structures in the edge region can be influenced by parallel dynamics in a manner that resembles an effective friction. In the presence of strong ballooning, such a frictional...... response may take place in both the electrostatic and the electromagnetic regimes. Results are presented from two-dimensional numerical simulations of an isolated blob structure in a non-uniform magnetic field [1,2]. The effect of a linear damping term in the vorticity equation, which describes...... an effective friction, is investigated. In the inertial regime the radial filament velocity scales as the square root of its size. In the limit of strong friction regime the velocity scales as the inverse of the structure size. A discussion of these results will be given in the context of irregularities...

  15. Physics Labs with Flavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  16. Making Real Virtual Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Harry E.; Keller, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Francis Bacon began defining scientific methodology in the early 17th century, and secondary school science classes began to implement science labs in the mid-19th century. By the early 20th century, leading educators were suggesting that science labs be used to develop scientific thinking habits in young students, and at the beginning of the 21st…

  17. Role of interparticle friction and particle-scale elasticity in the shear-strength mechanism of three-dimensional granular media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antony, S.J.; Kruyt, N.P.

    2009-01-01

    The interlink between particle-scale properties and macroscopic behavior of three-dimensional granular media subjected to mechanical loading is studied intensively by scientists and engineers, but not yet well understood. Here we study the role of key particle-scale properties, such as interparticle

  18. High fidelity frictional models for MEMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpick, Robert W. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Bitsie, Fernando; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corwin, Alex David; Ashurst, William Robert (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Jones, Reese E.; Subhash, Ghatu S. (Michigan Technological Institute, Houghton, MI); Street, Mark D. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Sumali, Anton Hartono; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Starr, Michael James; Redmond, James Michael; Flater, Erin E. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

    2004-10-01

    The primary goals of the present study are to: (1) determine how and why MEMS-scale friction differs from friction on the macro-scale, and (2) to begin to develop a capability to perform finite element simulations of MEMS materials and components that accurately predicts response in the presence of adhesion and friction. Regarding the first goal, a newly developed nanotractor actuator was used to measure friction between molecular monolayer-coated, polysilicon surfaces. Amontons law does indeed apply over a wide range of forces. However, at low loads, which are of relevance to MEMS, there is an important adhesive contribution to the normal load that cannot be neglected. More importantly, we found that at short sliding distances, the concept of a coefficient of friction is not relevant; rather, one must invoke the notion of 'pre-sliding tangential deflections' (PSTD). Results of a simple 2-D model suggests that PSTD is a cascade of small-scale slips with a roughly constant number of contacts equilibrating the applied normal load. Regarding the second goal, an Adhesion Model and a Junction Model have been implemented in PRESTO, Sandia's transient dynamics, finite element code to enable asperity-level simulations. The Junction Model includes a tangential shear traction that opposes the relative tangential motion of contacting surfaces. An atomic force microscope (AFM)-based method was used to measure nano-scale, single asperity friction forces as a function of normal force. This data is used to determine Junction Model parameters. An illustrative simulation demonstrates the use of the Junction Model in conjunction with a mesh generated directly from an atomic force microscope (AFM) image to directly predict frictional response of a sliding asperity. Also with regards to the second goal, grid-level, homogenized models were studied. One would like to perform a finite element analysis of a MEMS component assuming nominally flat surfaces and to include the

  19. Friction enhancement in concertina locomotion of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Hu, David L

    2012-11-07

    Narrow crevices are challenging terrain for most organisms and biomimetic robots. Snakes move through crevices using sequential folding and unfolding of their bodies in the manner of an accordion or concertina. In this combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate this effective means of moving through channels. We measure the frictional properties of corn snakes, their body kinematics and the transverse forces they apply to channels of varying width and inclination. To climb channels inclined at 60°, we find snakes use a combination of ingenious friction-enhancing techniques, including digging their ventral scales to double their frictional coefficient and pushing channel walls transversely with up to nine times body weight. Theoretical modelling of a one-dimensional n-linked crawler is used to calculate the transverse force factor of safety: we find snakes push up to four times more than required to prevent sliding backwards, presumably trading metabolic energy for an assurance of wall stability.

  20. Friction enhancement in concertina locomotion of snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Hu, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Narrow crevices are challenging terrain for most organisms and biomimetic robots. Snakes move through crevices using sequential folding and unfolding of their bodies in the manner of an accordion or concertina. In this combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate this effective means of moving through channels. We measure the frictional properties of corn snakes, their body kinematics and the transverse forces they apply to channels of varying width and inclination. To climb channels inclined at 60°, we find snakes use a combination of ingenious friction-enhancing techniques, including digging their ventral scales to double their frictional coefficient and pushing channel walls transversely with up to nine times body weight. Theoretical modelling of a one-dimensional n-linked crawler is used to calculate the transverse force factor of safety: we find snakes push up to four times more than required to prevent sliding backwards, presumably trading metabolic energy for an assurance of wall stability. PMID:22728386

  1. Wet Friction-Elements Boundary Friction Mechanism and Friction Coefficient Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yanzhong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The friction mechanism for the boundary friction course of friction elements engagement was explicitly expressed. The boundary friction model was built up by the surface topography. The model contained the effect of boundary film, adhesion, plough and lubrication. Based on the model, a coefficient for weakening plough for the lubrication was proposed. The modified model could fit for the working condition of wet friction elements. The friction coefficient as a function curve of rotating speed could be finally obtained by the data k and s/sm. The method provides a well interpretation of friction condition and friction coefficient prediction and the agreement between theoretical and experimental friction coefficients is reasonably good.

  2. Energy Balance of Friction and Friction Coefficient in Energetical Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Fedorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction energy model is proposed. In this model, generalized mechanism of transformation and dissipation of energy under friction the model of elastic-plastic deformation and fracture contact volumes is considered. Energy model of the process of plastic deformation and destruction of solid bodies is based on the concept of ergodynamic of deformable bodies. Equations of energy balance of friction within the structural and energetic interpretation of deformation are proposed. The energy interpretation of the coefficient of friction is showed. From this position the friction coefficient is the most informative characteristic of the process. Experimental friction curves have been generalized. As a result of the energy analysis of friction, the energy diagram of the structural evolution of the friction surfaces is suggested.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Peptoniphilus sp. strain ING2-D1G isolated from a mesophilic lab-scale completely stirred tank reactor utilizing maize silage in co-digestion with pig and cattle manure for biomethanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazetto, Geizecler; Hahnke, Sarah; Maus, Irena; Wibberg, Daniel; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas; Klocke, Michael

    2014-12-20

    The bacterium Peptoniphilus sp. strain ING2-D1G (DSM 28672), a mesophilic and obligate anaerobic bacterium belonging to the order Clostridiales was isolated from a biogas-producing lab-scale completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) optimized for anaerobic digestion of maize silage in co-fermentation with pig and cattle manure. In this study, the whole genome sequence of Peptoniphilus sp. strain ING2-D1G, a new isolate potentially involved in protein breakdown and acidogenesis during biomass degradation, is reported. The chromosome of this strain is 1.6Mb in size and encodes genes predicted to be involved in the production of acetate, lactate and butyrate specifying the acidogenic metabolism of the isolate.

  4. 一种基于声-地震耦合的室内声波探雷实验系统%An Acoustic-to-Seismic Coupling Based Landmines Detection System in Lab-Scale Experimental Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王驰; 于瀛洁; 李醒飞

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of acoustic landmines detection, an acoustic-to-seismic coupling based lab-scale experimental system for mines detection was developed.Firstly, the principle of acoustic mines detection technology was reviewed.Then the equipment and experimental design of the proposed system were described in detail.Finally, experiments were conducted with an antitank plastic coach mine and the system's repeatability was especially discussed.Experimental results show that the three measured curves of surface vibration appear identical under the same experimental conditions, which proves that the system has good repeatability and meets the test requirements, and can be used to further lab-scale study of the acoustic iandmines detection mechanism.%为了研究声波探雷机理,设计了一个基于声-地震耦合原理的室内声波探雷实验系统.首先,简述声波探雷技术的基本原理;然后,详细介绍室内声波探雷实验系统的硬件组成及实验方案;最后,用一种反坦克塑料教练地雷进行实验,重点讨论实验系统的可重复性.实验结果显示,在相同实验条件下,测得的3条地表振动曲线基本重合,表明所设计的实验系统的可重复性良好,满足测试要求,可用于实验室条件下声波探雷机理的研究.

  5. Laser Research Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Research lab is thecenter for the development of new laser sources, nonlinear optical materials, frequency conversion processes and laser-based sensors for...

  6. Secure Processing Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Secure Processing Lab is the center of excellence for new and novel processing techniques for the formation, calibration and analysis of radar. In addition, this...

  7. The Udall Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Udall lab is interested in genome evolution and cotton genomics.The cotton genus ( Gossypium) is an extraordinarily diverse group with approximately 50 species...

  8. Deciphering Your Lab Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities ...

  9. Clothing Systems Design Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Clothing Systems Design Lab houses facilities for the design and rapid prototyping of military protective apparel.Other focuses include: creation of patterns and...

  10. LIDAR Research & Development Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The LIDAR Research and Development labs are used to investigate and improve LIDAR components such as laser sources, optical signal detectors and optical filters. The...

  11. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der E.; Zeng, X.; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is fre

  12. Gravitomagnetic dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Cashen, Benjamin; Kesden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A supermassive black hole moving through a field of stars will gravitationally scatter the stars, inducing a backreaction force on the black hole known as dynamical friction. In Newtonian gravity, the axisymmetry of the system about the black hole's velocity $\\mathbf{v}$ implies that the dynamical friction must be anti-parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$. However, in general relativity the black hole's spin $\\mathbf{S}$ need not be parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$, breaking the axisymmetry of the system and generating a new component of dynamical friction similar to the Lorentz force $\\mathbf{F} = q\\mathbf{v} \\times \\mathbf{B}$ experienced by a particle with charge $q$ moving in a magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$. We call this new force gravitomagnetic dynamical friction and calculate its magnitude for a spinning black hole moving through a field of stars with Maxwellian velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, assuming that both $v$ and $\\sigma$ are much less than the speed of light $c$. We use post-Newtonian equations of motion accurate to $...

  13. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yi; Dubé, Martin; Grant, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We study the dependence of friction on surface roughness, sliding velocity, and temperature. Expanding on the classic treatment of Greenwood and Williamson, we show that the fractal nature of a surface has little influence on the real area of contact and the static friction coefficient. A simple scaling argument shows that the static friction exhibits a weak anomaly mu ~ A(0)(-chi/4), where A0 is the apparent area and chi is the roughness exponent of the surface. We then develop a method to calculate atomic-scale friction between a microscopic asperity, such as the tip of a friction force microscope (FFM) and a solid substrate. This method, based on the thermal activation of the FFM tip, allows a quantitative extraction of all the relevant microscopic parameters and reveals a universal scaling behavior of atomic friction on velocity and temperature. This method is extended to include a soft atomic substrate in order to simulate FFM scans more realistically. The tip is connected with the support of the cantilever by an ideal spring and the substrate is simulated with a ball-spring model. The tip and substrate are coupled with repulsive potentials. Simulations are done at different temperatures and scanning velocities on substrates with different elastic moduli. Stick-slip motion of the tip is observed, and the numerical results of the friction force and distribution of force maxima match the theoretical framework.

  14. Friction Properties of Bio-mimetic Nano-fibrillar Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shao-Hua; MI Chun-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibrillar arrays are fabricated using polystyrene materials. The average diameter of each fiber is about 300 nm.Experiments show that such a fibrillar surface possesses a relatively hydrophobic feature with a water contact angle of 142°.Nanoscale friction properties are mainly focused on.It is found that the friction force of polystyrene nano-fibrillar surfaces is obviously enhanced in contrast to polystyrene smooth surfaces.The apparent coefficient of friction increases with the applied load, but is independent of the scanning speed.An interesting observation is that the friction force increases almost linearly with the real contact area, which abides by the fundamental Bowden-Tabor law of nano-scale friction.

  15. Preliminary Test of Friction disk type turbine for S-CO{sub 2} cycle application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Seungjoon; Kim, Hyeon Tae; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Due to the relatively mild sodium-CO{sub 2} interaction, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle can reduce the accident consequence compared to the steam Rankine cycle. Also the S-CO{sub 2} power conversion cycle can achieve high efficiency for SFR core thermal condition. Moreover, the S-CO{sub 2} power cycle can reduce the total cycle footprint due to high density of the working fluid. However, the high pressure operating condition and low viscosity of the fluid cause difficulties in designing appropriate seals and multi-stage turbo machineries. To solve the problem for designing turbo machineries in a creative way, KAIST research team tested a friction disk type turbine concept for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle application. In this paper, the investigation of the Tesla turbine and preliminary test results with compressed air are covered. The KAIST research team investigated a friction disk type turbine, named as Tesla turbine, for the S-CO{sub 2} power cycle applications. Due to the robust design of the fiction disk type, the Tesla turbine technology can be utilized not only for S-CO{sub 2} turbo machinery but also for the multi-phase or sludge flow turbo machinery. The preliminary test of lab-scale Tesla turbine with compressed air was conducted. The high pressure vessel was manufactured for the S-CO{sub 2} operating condition. The test will be concentrated on the turbine efficiency measurement under various conditions and development of the design methodology.

  16. The retrieval of fingerprint friction ridge detail from elephant ivory using reduced-scale magnetic and non-magnetic powdering materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston-Ford, Kelly A; Moseley, Mark L; Hall, Lisa J; Marsh, Nicholas P; Morgan, Ruth M; Barron, Leon P

    2016-01-01

    An evaluation of reduced-size particle powdering methods for the recovery of usable fingermark ridge detail from elephant ivory is presented herein for the first time as a practical and cost-effective tool in forensic analysis. Of two reduced-size powder material types tested, powders with particle sizes ≤ 40 μm offered better chances of recovering ridge detail from unpolished ivory in comparison to a conventional powder material. The quality of developed ridge detail of these powders was also assessed for comparison and automated search suitability. Powder materials and the enhanced ridge detail on ivory were analysed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and interactions between their constituents and the ivory discussed. The effect of ageing on the quality of ridge detail recovered showed that the best quality was obtained within 1 week. However, some ridge detail could still be developed up to 28 days after deposition. Cyanoacrylate and fluorescently-labelled cyanoacrylate fuming of ridge detail on ivory was explored and was less effective than reduced-scale powdering in general. This research contributes to the understanding and potential application of smaller scale powdering materials for the development of ridge detail on hard, semi-porous biological material typically seized in wildlife-related crimes.

  17. Dynamical Friction on extended perturbers

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2008-01-01

    Following a wave-mechanical treatment we calculate the drag force exerted by an infinite homogeneous background of stars on a perturber as this makes its way through the system. We recover Chandrasekhar's classical dynamical friction (DF) law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. We take into account a range of models that encompasses all plausible density distributions for satellite galaxies by considering the DF exerted on a Plummer sphere and a perturber having a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

  18. ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION SUMMARY OF PRIOR LAB-SCALE TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

    2011-01-27

    Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

  19. A Review of Sub-Scale Test Methods to Evaluate the Friction and Wear of Ring and Liner Materials for Spark- and Compression Ignition Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    2002-01-22

    A review was conducted of past laboratory-scale test methods and to assess their validity for ranking materials and lubricants for use as piston and liner materials in compression-ignition (CI) and spark-ignition (SI) engines. Most of the previous work was aimed at simulating SI engine environments. This report begins with a discussion of the numerous factors that can affect the validity of an approach to simulating engine conditions in a laboratory. These include not only mechanical, chemical and thermal factors, but also human factors as regards how the vehicle is operated and maintained. The next section provides an annotated review of open literature publications that address the issues of laboratory simulation of engine components. A comparison of these studies indicates a lack of sufficient standardization in procedures to enable a systematic comparison of one publication to another. There were just a few studies that compared several laboratory test methods to engine test results, and these indicated that some test methods correlate, at least qualitatively, better than others. The last section provides a series of recommendations for improving the accuracy and validity of laboratory-scale simulations of engine behavior. It became clear that much of the engine wear damage occurs during start-up when the engine is cold, and this calls into the question the usefulness of test methods that attempt to simulate steady-state running conditions. It is recommended that a new standard test method, perhaps developed with the help of the ASTM wear and erosion committee, be developed. It would use cold start-up conditions in the presence of degraded oil, or simulated degraded oil.

  20. Variable enstrophy flux and energy spectrum in two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2012-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations reveal that in the forward cascade regime, the energy spectrum of two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction deviates from Kraichnan's prediction of $k^{-3}$ power spectrum. In this letter we explain this observation using an analytic model based on variable enstrophy flux arising due to Ekman friction. We derive an expression for the enstrophy flux which exhibits a logarithmic dependence in the inertial range for the Ekman-friction dominated flows. The energy spectrum obtained using this enstrophy flux shows a power law scaling for large Reynolds number and small Ekman friction, but has an exponential behaviour for large Ekman friction and relatively small Reynolds number.

  1. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  2. Friction in rail guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of friction is included in the present equations describing the performance of an inductively driven rail gun. These equations, which have their basis in an empirical formulation, are applied to results from two different experiments. Only an approximate physical description of the problem is attempted, in view of the complexity of details in the interaction among forces of this magnitude over time periods of the order of milisecs.

  3. Interfacial Friction and Adhesion of Polymer Brushes

    KAUST Repository

    Landherr, Lucas J. T.

    2011-08-02

    A bead-probe lateral force microscopy (LFM) technique is used to characterize the interfacial friction and adhesion properties of polymer brushes. Our measurements attempt to relate the physical structure and chemical characteristics of the brush to their properties as thin-film, tethered lubricants. Brushes are synthesized at several chain lengths and surface coverages from polymer chains of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polystyrene (PS), and a poly(propylene glycol)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer (PPG/PEG). At high surface coverage, PDMS brushes manifest friction coefficients (COFs) that are among the lowest recorded for a dry lubricant film (μ ≈ 0.0024) and close to 1 order of magnitude lower than the COF of a bare silicon surface. Brushes synthesized from higher molar mass chains exhibit higher friction forces than those created using lower molar mass polymers. Increased grafting density of chains in the brush significantly reduces the COF by creating a uniform surface of stretched chains with a decreased surface viscosity. Brushes with lower surface tension and interfacial shear stresses manifest the lowest COF. In particular, PDMS chains exhibit COFs lower than PS by a factor of 3.7 and lower than PPG/PEG by a factor of 4.7. A scaling analysis conducted on the surface coverage (δ) in relation to the fraction (ε) of the friction force developing from adhesion predicts a universal relation ε ∼ δ4/3, which is supported by our experimental data. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  4. Sensitivity to friction for primary explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Robert, E-mail: robert.matyas@upce.cz [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Pardubice 532 10 (Czech Republic); Selesovsky, Jakub; Musil, Tomas [Institute of Energetic Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Pardubice 532 10 (Czech Republic)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The friction sensitivity of 14 samples of primary explosives was determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The same apparatus (small scale BAM) and the same method (probit analysis) was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal shapes and sizes were documented with microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost all samples are less sensitive than lead azide, which is commercially used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The organic peroxides (TATP, DADP, HMTD) are not as sensitive as often reported. - Abstract: The sensitivity to friction for a selection of primary explosives has been studied using a small BAM friction apparatus. The probit analysis was used for the construction of a sensitivity curve for each primary explosive tested. Two groups of primary explosives were chosen for measurement (a) the most commonly used industrially produced primary explosives (e.g. lead azide, tetrazene, dinol, lead styphnate) and (b) the most produced improvised primary explosives (e.g. triacetone triperoxide, hexamethylenetriperoxide diamine, mercury fulminate, acetylides of heavy metals). A knowledge of friction sensitivity is very important for determining manipulation safety for primary explosives. All the primary explosives tested were carefully characterised (synthesis procedure, shape and size of crystals). The sensitivity curves obtained represent a unique set of data, which cannot be found anywhere else in the available literature.

  5. CDC Lab Values

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-02

    More than fifteen hundred scientists fill the lab benches at CDC, logging more than four million hours each year. CDC’s laboratories play a critical role in the agency’s ability to find, stop, and prevent disease outbreaks. This podcast provides a brief overview of what goes on inside CDC’s labs, and why this work makes a difference in American’s health.  Created: 2/2/2015 by Office of the Associate Director for Communication (OADC).   Date Released: 2/2/2015.

  6. OpenLabNotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also......LabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively Closes the gap between research documentation and sample management...

  7. SmallSat Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-05

    CubeSat. Mr. Alvarez worked with four students on the PCB layout for the solar panels and the construction of the 6U CubeSat mockup . Support for Mr...Hull and Mr. Alvarez was $49k including fringe benefits. !! Purchases: During this time period a license for MatLab software and the Princeton...Satellite ToolBox was purchased using funds from this award. This software adds tremendous capability to the SmallSat Lab by enabling students to analyze

  8. The NOAO Data Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Olsen, K.; Stobie, E. B.; Mighell, K. J.; Norris, P.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the NOAO Data Lab to help community users take advantage of current large surveys and prepare them even larger surveys in the era of LSST. The Data Lab will allow users to efficiently utilize catalogs of billions of objects, combine traditional telescope image and spectral data with external archives, share custom results with collaborators, publish data products to other users, and experiment with analysis toolkits. Specific science cases will be used to develop a prototype framework and tools, allowing us to work directly with scientists from survey teams to ensure development remains focused on scientifically productive tasks.

  9. Stream piracy in the Black Hills: A geomorphology lab exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaprowski, B.J.; Evenson, E.B.; Epstein, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    The Black Hills of South Dakota exhibits many fine examples of stream piracy that are very suitable for teaching geomorphology lab exercises. This lab goes beyond standard topographic map interpretation by using geologic maps, well logs, gravel provenance and other types of data to teach students about stream piracy. Using a step-by-step method in which the lab exercises ramp up in difficulty, students hone their skills in deductive reasoning and data assimilation. The first exercises deal with the identification of stream piracy at a variety of spatial scales and the lab culminates with an exercise on landscape evolution and drainage rearrangement.

  10. Characterization of oxygen transfer in miniature and lab-scale bubble column bioreactors and comparison of microbial growth performance based on constant k(L)a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Steven D; Ortiz-Ochoa, Kenny; Ward, John M; Baganz, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This work describes the engineering characterization of miniature (2 mL) and laboratory-scale (100 mL) bubble column bioreactors useful for the cultivation of microbial cells. These bioreactors were constructed of glass and used a range of sintered glass gas diffusers with differently sized pores to disperse humidified air within the liquid biomedium. The effect of the pressure of this supplied air on the breakthrough point for gas diffusers with different pore sizes was examined and could be predicted using the Laplace-Young equation. The influence of the superficial gas velocity (u(g)) on the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) was determined, and values of up to 0.09 s(-1) were observed in this work. Two modeling approaches were considered in order to predict and provide comparison criteria. The first related the volumetric power consumption (P/V) to the k(L)a and a good correlation was obtained for differently sized reactors with a given pore size, but this correlation was not satisfactory for bubble columns with different gas diffusers. Values for P/V ranged from about 10 to 400 W.m(-3). Second, a model was developed predicting bubble size (d(b)), bubble rising velocity (u(b)), gas hold-up (phi), liquid side mass transfer coefficient (k(L)), and thus the k(L)a using established theory and empirical correlations. Good agreement was found with our experimental data at different scales and pore sizes. Values for d(b) varied from 0.1 to 0.6 mm, and k(L) values between 1.7 and 9.8 x 10(-4) m.s(-1) were determined. Several E. coli cultivations were performed in the miniature bubble column at low and high k(L)a values, and the results were compared to those from a conventional stirred tank operated under identical k(L)a values. Results from the two systems were similar in terms of biomass growth rate and carbon source utilization.

  11. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  12. Relating triggering processes in lab experiments with earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baro Urbea, J.; Davidsen, J.; Kwiatek, G.; Charalampidou, E. M.; Goebel, T.; Stanchits, S. A.; Vives, E.; Dresen, G.

    2016-12-01

    Statistical relations such as Gutenberg-Richter's, Omori-Utsu's and the productivity of aftershocks were first observed in seismology, but are also common to other physical phenomena exhibiting avalanche dynamics such as solar flares, rock fracture, structural phase transitions and even stock market transactions. All these examples exhibit spatio-temporal correlations that can be explained as triggering processes: Instead of being activated as a response to external driving or fluctuations, some events are consequence of previous activity. Although different plausible explanations have been suggested in each system, the ubiquity of such statistical laws remains unknown. However, the case of rock fracture may exhibit a physical connection with seismology. It has been suggested that some features of seismology have a microscopic origin and are reproducible over a vast range of scales. This hypothesis has motivated mechanical experiments to generate artificial catalogues of earthquakes at a laboratory scale -so called labquakes- and under controlled conditions. Microscopic fractures in lab tests release elastic waves that are recorded as ultrasonic (kHz-MHz) acoustic emission (AE) events by means of piezoelectric transducers. Here, we analyse the statistics of labquakes recorded during the failure of small samples of natural rocks and artificial porous materials under different controlled compression regimes. Temporal and spatio-temporal correlations are identified in certain cases. Specifically, we distinguish between the background and triggered events, revealing some differences in the statistical properties. We fit the data to statistical models of seismicity. As a particular case, we explore the branching process approach simplified in the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. We evaluate the empirical spatio-temporal kernel of the model and investigate the physical origins of triggering. Our analysis of the focal mechanisms implies that the occurrence

  13. Lab-scale development of a high temperature aerosol particle sampling probe system for field measurements in thermochemical conversion of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindskog, M.; Malik, A.; Pagels, J.; Sanati, M. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology

    2010-07-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass requires both combustion in an oxygen rich environment and gasification in an oxygen deficient environment. Therefore, the mass concentration of fly ash from combustion processes is dominated by inorganic compounds, and the particulate matter obtained from gasification is dominated by carbonaceous compounds. The fine fly ash particles can initiate corrosion and fouling and also increases emissions of fine particulates to the atmosphere. This study involved the design of a laboratory scale setup consisting of a high temperature sampling probe and an aerosol generation system to study the formation of fine particle from biomass gasification processes. An aerosol model system using potassium chloride (KCl) as the ash compound and Di Octyl Sebacate oil (DOS) as the volatile organic part was used to test the high temperature sampling probe. Tests conducted at 200 degrees C showed good reproducibility of the aerosol generator. The tests also demonstrated suitable dilution ratios which enabled the denuder to absorb all of the gaseous organic compounds in the set up, thus enabling measurement of only the particle phase. Condensable organic concentrations of 1-68 mg/m{sup 3} were easily handled by the high temperature sampling probe system, indicating that the denuder worked well. Additional tests will be performed using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMST) to verify that the denuder can capture all of the gaseous organic compounds also when condensed onto agglomerated soot particles. 6 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  14. A Big Bang Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  15. Lab on paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Weian; van den Berg, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, which are suited to portable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and on-site detection, hold great promise for improving global health, and other applications.1–8 While their importance and utility are widely acknowledged and extensive research has been conducted in the

  16. The Crime Lab Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Crime Lab Project, which takes an economical, hands-on, interdisciplinary approach to studying the career of forensics in the middle or high school classroom. Includes step-by-step student requirements for the investigative procedure, a sample evidence request form, and an assessment rubric. (KHR)

  17. Lab with Dad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havers, Brenda; Delmotte, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Family science nights are fantastic, but planning one can be overwhelming, especially when one considers the already overloaded schedule of a classroom teacher. To overcome this challenge, the authors--colleagues with a mutual love of science--developed a much simpler annual event called "Lab With Dad." The purpose was for one target age group of…

  18. Physics lab in spin

    CERN Multimedia

    Hawkes, N

    1999-01-01

    RAL is fostering commerical exploitation of its research and facilities in two main ways : spin-out companies exploit work done at the lab, spin-in companies work on site taking advantage of the facilities and the expertise available (1/2 page).

  19. Elemental Chem Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    This educative material uses the symbols of 45 elements to spell the names of 32 types of laboratory equipment usually found in chemical labs. This teaching material has been divided into three puzzles according to the type of the laboratory equipment: (i) glassware as reaction vessels or containers; (ii) glassware for measuring, addition or…

  20. Lab on paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Weian; van den Berg, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, which are suited to portable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and on-site detection, hold great promise for improving global health, and other applications.1–8 While their importance and utility are widely acknowledged and extensive research has been conducted in the labo

  1. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Rothenburg, L.; Gutkowski, Witold; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle fri

  2. The Research on Friction Characteristics of Non Smooth Bionic Mesoscopic Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Chunjian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of using friction to transmit power and prevent slippage is very widely used, many animals have very strong adhesion climbing ability, and it has important theoretical significance and wide application prospect to research and the prepare bionic surface to increase transmission friction using the bionic technology. In recent years, the research of foot structure of climbing animals shows that their surface morphology has both macro and micro scale features, and only study from the macro to the micro scale surface structure can be better elucidate the mechanism of increasing-friction of climbing animal. This paper will study bionic surface structure on mesoscopic scale from micron to millimeter level, research the influence of foot structure of climbing animal under mesoscopic scale on characteristics of increasing friction using bionic technology, prepare the bionic non-smooth surface of convex or concave using bionic manufacturing technology, establish the friction model of non-smooth surface, investigate the increasing-friction mechanism of the bionic surface morphology on mesoscopic scales, reveals the influence of surface morphology, layout, size and material properties on the friction characteristics, provide the design of bionic friction surface and calculation method of friction coefficient and provide reliable theoretical basis for engineering application.

  3. Estimating time series phytoplankton carbon biomass: Inter-lab comparison of species identification and comparison of volume-to-carbon scaling ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Carstensen, Jacob; Harrison, Paul J.; Zingone, Adriana

    2015-09-01

    An inter-calibration exercise was conducted to assess the performance of six phytoplankton taxonomists working within the Danish National Aquatic Monitoring and Assessment Program (DNAMAP). For species abundance and cell volume, a 2-fold difference was found among different estimates for subsamples from the same sample, which in turn cascaded into large differences in the species-specific carbon biomass contribution. The mean total carbon biomass estimated showed high variability (CV 43%) among the six taxonomists, but large variations were present within results produced by individual taxonomists (CV 8-50%), and one of the taxonomists produced significantly lower estimates than the others. Using data from phytoplankton time series samples, we also assessed the effect using a table of species-specific cell volumes versus cell volume measurements from a sample on carbon biomass values. For an example, the older cell-volume-to-carbon conversion method with fixed carbon-conversion constants was compared to the more recent approach of scaling biovolume to carbon biomass based on established regressions. We found that the regression between community biomass estimated by the old method versus the more recent equation yielded a slope close to 1, thus indicating general similar community biomass estimated between the methods. Type II regression suggested a high degree of variability in the estimates (17%). The highest degree of uncertainty was found by type II linear regression, when we compared the community biomass of diatoms estimated by cell sizes measured by sample to diatom community biomass estimated from cell sizes from a table of fixed cell sizes. In this analysis variation among methods for carbon estimation of individual samples was as high as 114%. Therefore, we recommend that, particularly for diatoms, cell volumes should be determined from the sample, or that table values be based on monthly estimates for at least the dominant diatom species for each study

  4. Interpreting hydrodynamic behaviour by the model of stirred tanks in series with exchanged zones: preliminary study in lab-scale trickling filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Soric, Audrey; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In trickling filters for wastewater treatment, hydrodynamic behaviour is affected by the growth of biofilm on the porous medium. Therefore, modelling hydrodynamic behaviour is necessary and efficient to predict the biodegradation of pollutants. In this study, laboratory-scale trickling filters were filled with two different porous media (glass beads and plastic rings) and were fed by a synthetic substrate in batch mode. Total organic carbon (TOC) of the effluent was measured and retention time distribution (RTD) was determined by injecting NaCl. Results showed that medium had no significant effect on TOC removal rate (around 80% and 60% respectively for batch time of seven and two days). However, regarding the hydrodynamic behaviour, the effective volume ratio and hydraulic efficiency in the glass beads bed increased remarkably from 28% and 18% to 80% and 70%, respectively, with the reduction of dispersion coefficient (from 4.55 to 1.53). Moreover, the short batch time accelerated this change. Conversely, no variation of hydrodynamic behaviour in plastic rings bed was evident. Along with the feeding of synthetic substrate, biofilm concentration ranged from 1.5 to 10.1 g/L in the glass beads reactor and it achieved around 2.8 g/L in the plastic rings reactor. Hydrodynamic modelling indicated that the model of stirred tanks in series with exchanged zones fitted the experimental results well. These gave values of mobile and immobile volumes of 51 mL and 17 mL, respectively, in the glass beads filter and 25 mL and 15 mL, respectively, in the plastic rings filter.

  5. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  6. Calculating frictional force with considering material microstructure and potential on contact surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhongming; HUANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    A method based on the energy dissipation mechanism of an Independent Oscillator model is used to calculate the frictional force and the friction coefficient of interfacial friction. The friction work is calculated with considering the potential change of contact surfaces during sliding. The potential change can be gained by a universal adhesive energy function. The relationships between frictional force and parameters of a tribo-system, such as surface energy and microstructure of interfacial material, are set up. The calculation results of the known experimental data denote that the frictional force is nearly proportional to the surface energy of the material, nearly inversely proportional to the scaling length, and independent of the lattice constant. The results agree with that of adhesion friction equations. They also agree with the experimental results performed with an atomic-force microscope under the ultra high vacuum condition.

  7. Gaseous Dynamical Friction in Presence of Black Hole Radiative Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, KwangHo; Bogdanović, Tamara

    2017-04-01

    Dynamical friction is thought to be a principal mechanism responsible for orbital evolution of massive black holes (MBHs) in the aftermath of galactic mergers and an important channel for formation of gravitationally bound MBH binaries. We use 2D radiative hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the efficiency of dynamical friction in the presence of radiative feedback from an MBH moving through a uniform density gas. We find that ionizing radiation that emerges from the innermost parts of the MBH’s accretion flow strongly affects the dynamical friction wake and renders dynamical friction inefficient for a range of physical scenarios. MBHs in this regime tend to experience positive net acceleration, meaning that they speed up, contrary to the expectations for gaseous dynamical friction in absence of radiative feedback. The magnitude of this acceleration is however negligibly small and should not significantly alter the velocity of MBHs over relevant physical timescales. Our results suggest that suppression of dynamical friction is more severe at the lower mass end of the MBH spectrum which, compounded with inefficiency of the gas drag for lower mass objects in general, implies that <107 {M}ȯ MBHs have fewer means to reach the centers of merged galaxies. These findings provide formulation for a sub-resolution model of dynamical friction in presence of MBH radiative feedback that can be easily implemented in large scale simulations.

  8. Friction or Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundahl, Mikela

    2014-01-01

    . The anthropologist Anna Tsing has developed the concept-metaphor friction as a way to discuss the energy created when various actors narrate “the same” event(s) in different ways, and see the other participants’ accounts as fantasies or even fabrications. I will use my position as researcher and my relations...... is Stone Town in Zanzibar and the de-velopment and dissolution going on under the shadow of the UNESCO World Heritage flag; a growing tourism; a global and local increase in islamisation; and the political tension within the Tanzanian union. My main focus is narratives of the identity of Zanzibar since...

  9. LAB-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF PLUTONIUM PURIFICATION BY ANION EXCHANGE, PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION, AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.

    2012-08-22

    H-Canyon and HB-Line are tasked with the production of PuO{sub 2} from a feed of plutonium metal. The PuO{sub 2} will provide feed material for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility. After dissolution of the Pu metal in H-Canyon, the solution will be transferred to HB-Line for purification by anion exchange. Subsequent unit operations include Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination to form PuO{sub 2}. This report details the results from SRNL anion exchange, precipitation, filtration, calcination, and characterization tests, as requested by HB-Line1 and described in the task plan. This study involved an 80-g batch of Pu and employed test conditions prototypical of HB-Line conditions, wherever feasible. In addition, this study integrated lessons learned from earlier anion exchange and precipitation and calcination studies. H-Area Engineering selected direct strike Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation to produce a more dense PuO{sub 2} product than expected from Pu(III) oxalate precipitation. One benefit of the Pu(IV) approach is that it eliminates the need for reduction by ascorbic acid. The proposed HB-Line precipitation process involves a digestion time of 5 minutes after the time (44 min) required for oxalic acid addition. These were the conditions during HB-line production of neptunium oxide (NpO{sub 2}). In addition, a series of small Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation tests with different digestion times were conducted to better understand the effect of digestion time on particle size, filtration efficiency and other factors. To test the recommended process conditions, researchers performed two nearly-identical larger-scale precipitation and calcination tests. The calcined batches of PuO{sub 2} were characterized for density, specific surface area (SSA), particle size, moisture content, and impurities. Because the 3013 Standard requires that the calcination (or stabilization) process eliminate organics, characterization of PuO{sub 2} batches monitored the

  10. Nanoscale friction as a function of activation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, W. W. F.; Rahnejat, H.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the scale-dependence of friction is increasingly viewed as a critical quest. With progressively thinner films, mixed and boundary regimes of lubrication have become commonplace. Therefore, at the micro-scale a greater need for mitigating friction is desired in order to improve operational efficiency of many machines and mechanisms. Furthermore, there is a growing tendency to use low friction hard wear-resistant advanced coatings to guard against wear. In parallel, there has been much attention paid to lubricant rheology and formulation. However, only in recent times there has been an emerging view of lubricant-surface combination as a system. In this perspective it is essential to relate the observed and measured friction at component level to the underlying interactions in micro/nano-scales. This is the approach in this paper. Observed phenomenon at micro-scale are related back to the activation energies of lubricant-surface system, providing in particular results for surface modified Ni-SiC coated specimen in combination with formulated lubricants, the combination of which represent the lubricant-surface system of choice in cylinders of high performance race engine. The nano-scale conjunction of an AFM tip with lubricated surface-engineered specimen, subjected to various conjunctional loading and sliding kinematics is investigated. It is shown that the measured frictional characteristics can be adequately described in terms of activation energies in line with the Eyring’s thermal activation model for cases of fairly smooth asperity tip contact conjunctions.

  11. Skills Labs: workshop EMERGO toolkit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurvers, Hub; Slootmaker, Aad

    2009-01-01

    Kurvers, H. J., & Slootmaker, A. (2009). Skills Labs: workshop EMERGO toolkit. Presentation given at project members of Skills Labs. March, 31, 2009 and April, 24, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands.

  12. ERLN Lab Compendium Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Compendium is an online database of environmental testing laboratories nationwide. It enables labs to create profiles of their capabilities, so emergency responders can quickly identify a lab that will meet their support needs.

  13. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  14. FRICTION ANALYSIS OF KINETIC SCHEMES - THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOLKEMA, JS

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  15. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  16. Measuring Search Frictions Using Japanese Microdata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, Masaru; Kohara, Miki; Machikita, Tomohiro

    This paper estimates matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labor market and presents determinants of search duration to explain the effect of unemployment benefits on a job seeker’s behavior. We employ administrative micro data that track the job search process...... unemployment benefits lengthen (shorten) the duration of job search for job seekers who voluntarily (involuntarily) leave employment....... of individuals who left or lost their job in August 2005 and subsequently registered at their local public employment service. Our finding is that the matching function would exhibit decreasing returns-to-scale for job seekers and vacancies, rather than constant return-to-scale. We also find that generous...

  17. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  18. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  19. Friction Experiments for Dynamical Coefficient Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Arnoux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study, including three experimental devices, is presented in order to investigate dry friction phenomena in a wide range of sliding speeds for the steel on steel contact. A ballistic setup, with an air gun launch, allows to estimate the friction coefficient between 20 m/s and 80 m/s. Tests are completed by an adaptation of the sensor on a hydraulic tensile machine (0.01 m/s to 3 m/s and a pin-on-disk tribometer mounted on a CNC lathe (1 to 30 m/s. The interactions at the asperity scale are characterized by a white light interferometer surface analysis.

  20. PREFACE The International Conference on Science of Friction 2010 (ICSF2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kouji; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    The second international conference on science of friction in Japan was held at Ise-Shima, Mie on 13-18 September 2010. The conference focused on the elementary process of friction phenomena from atomic and molecular scale view. Topics covered at the conference were: Superlubricity and friction Electronic and phononic contributions to friction Friction on the atomic and molecular scales van der Waals friction and Casimir force Molecular motor and friction Friction and adhesion in soft matter system Wear and crack on the nanocsale Theoretical studies on the atomic scale friction and energy dissipatin Friction and Chaos Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts Friction of powder The number of participants in the conference was approximately 85, registered from 8 countries. 40 oral and 16 poster talks were presented at the conference. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 19 papers devoted to the topics of friction. The successful organization of the conference was made possible by the contribution of the members of the organizing Committee. The conference was made possible thanks to the financial support from Aichi University of Education, and moreover thanks to the approval societies of The Physical Society of Japan, The surface Science Society of Japan and The Japanese Society of Tribologists. The details of the conference are available on http://www.science-of-friction.com/2010/. Finally we would like to thank the speakers for the high quality of their talks and all participants for coming to Ise-Shima, Japan and actively contributing to the conference. Kouji Miura and Hiroshi Matsukawa Editors

  1. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  2. Elastic model of dry friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E., E-mail: dekl2@cam.ac.uk [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  3. Friction in surface micromachined microengines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; LaVigne, G.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding the frictional properties of advanced Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is essential in order to develop optimized designs and fabrication processes, as well as to qualify devices for commercial applications. We develop and demonstrate a method to experimentally measure the forces associated with sliding friction of devices rotating on a hub. The method is demonstrated on the rotating output gear of the microengine recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In-situ measurements of an engine running at 18300 rpm give a coefficient of friction of 0.5 for radial (normal) forces less than 4 {mu}N. For larger forces the effective coefficient of friction abruptly increases, suggesting a fundamental change in the basic nature of the interaction between the gear and hub. The experimental approach we have developed to measure the frictional forces associated with the microengine is generically applicable to other MEMS devices.

  4. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Student figures in friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

      This thesis analyses how ‘the student', as a contested figure, is negotiated and enacted in a period of extensive university reform in Denmark. Through a combination of historical and anthropological research, it focuses on students' changing participation in the shaping of Danish society......, students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures......, the university and their own education. Detailed studies explore, first, politically active students' various attempts to influence national educational policies; second, student participation in the development of the university, especially regarding debates over consumer conduct versus co-ownership; and third...

  6. Influence of high gas production during thermophilic anaerobic digestion in pilot-scale and lab-scale reactors on survival of the thermotolerant pathogens Clostridium perfringens and Campylobacter jejuni in piggery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, L C; Bajsa, O; Ho, L; Santhanam, B; Kumar, M; Ho, G

    2009-07-01

    Safe reuse of animal wastes to capture energy and nutrients, through anaerobic digestion processes, is becoming an increasingly desirable solution to environmental pollution. Pathogen decay is the most important safety consideration and is in general, improved at elevated temperatures and longer hydraulic residence times. During routine sampling to assess pathogen decay in thermophilic digestion, an inversely proportional relationship between levels of Clostridium perfringens and gas production was observed. Further samples were collected from pilot-scale, bench-scale thermophilic reactors and batch scale vials to assess whether gas production (predominantly methane) could be a useful indicator of decay of the thermotolerant pathogens C. perfringens and Campylobacter jejuni. Pathogen levels did appear to be lower where gas production and levels of methanogens were higher. This was evident at each operating temperature (50, 57, 65 degrees C) in the pilot-scale thermophilic digesters, although higher temperatures also reduced the numbers of pathogens detected. When methane production was higher, either when feed rate was increased, or pH was lowered from 8.2 (piggery wastewater) to 6.5, lower numbers of pathogens were detected. Although a number of related factors are known to influence the amount and rate of methane production, it may be a useful indicator of the removal of the pathogens C. perfringens and C. jejuni.

  7. Archimedes Remote Lab for Secondary Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Zubia, J.; Angulo Martinez, I.; Martinez Pieper, G.; Lopez de Ipina Gonzalez de Artaza, D.; Hernandez Jayo, U.; Orduna Fernandez, P.; Dziabenko, O.; Rodriguez Gil, L.; Riesen, van S.A.N.; Anjewierden, A.A.; Kamp, E.; Jong, de A.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a remote lab designed for teaching the Archimedes’ principle to secondary school students, as well as an online virtual lab on the general domain of buoyancy. The Archimedes remote lab is integrated into WebLab-Deusto. Both labs are promoted for usage in frame of the Go-Lab Europ

  8. Archimedes Remote Lab for Secondary Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Zubia, J.; Angulo Martinez, I.; Martinez Pieper, G.; Lopez de Ipina Gonzalez de Artaza, D.; Hernandez Jayo, U.; Orduna Fernandez, P.; Dziabenko, O.; Rodriguez Gil, L.; van Riesen, Siswa; Anjewierden, Anjo Allert; Kamp, Ellen; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a remote lab designed for teaching the Archimedes’ principle to secondary school students, as well as an online virtual lab on the general domain of buoyancy. The Archimedes remote lab is integrated into WebLab-Deusto. Both labs are promoted for usage in frame of the Go-Lab

  9. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. e-Learning - Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohottala, Hashini

    2014-03-01

    The general student population enrolled in any college level class is highly diverse. An increasing number of ``nontraditional'' students return to college and most of these students follow distance learning degree programs while engaging in their other commitments, work and family. However, those students tend to avoid taking science courses with labs, mostly because of the incapability of remotely completing the lab components in such courses. In order to address this issue, we have come across a method where introductory level physics labs can be taught remotely. In this process a lab kit with the critical lab components that can be easily accessible are conveniently packed into a box and distributed among students at the beginning of the semester. Once the students are given the apparatus they perform the experiments at home and gather data All communications with reference to the lab was done through an interactive user-friendly webpage - Wikispaces (WikiS). Students who create pages on WikiS can submit their lab write-ups, embed videos of the experiments they perform, post pictures and direct questions to the lab instructor. The students who are enrolled in the same lab can interact with each other through WikiS to discuss labs and even get assistance.

  12. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  13. Frictional properties of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N; Persson, Bo N J

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force...

  14. Skin Friction Gage for Measurements in Hypersonic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francois Falempin; Marat Goldfeld; Roman Nestoulia

    2003-01-01

    A description and results of tests of a new small-scale gage for direct measurement of skin friction force are presented in the paper. The gage design provides separated measurement of longitudinal and transversal component of friction force. Application of this scheme provides high sensitivity and necessary high-frequency response of the gage. The tests of the gage were carried out in a blow down wind tunnel at Mach numbers of 2 and 4 within the range of Reynolds numbers Rex from 0.8 to 5 million and in the hot-shot wind tunnel at Mach number 6 and Reynolds numbers Rex= 2.5-10 million. The measurements of skin friction were carried out on a flat plate and on a ramp beyond the shock wave. Simultaneously with the direct measurement of friction in the blow down wind tunnel, the measurements of profiles of average velocities and mass flow rate pulsations were realised. Analysis of measurement errors has shown that the friction gage permits to measure skin friction coefficient on a flat plate with mistake not more than 10%.

  15. Theory of noncontact friction for atom-surface interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D; DeKieviet, M

    2016-01-01

    The noncontact (van der Waals) friction is an interesting physical effect which has been the subject of controversial scientific discussion. The "direct" friction term due to the thermal fluctuations of the electromagnetic field leads to a friction force proportional to 1/Z^5 where Z is the atom-wall distance). The "backaction" friction term takes into account the feedback of thermal fluctuations of the atomic dipole moment onto the motion of the atom and scales as 1/Z^8. We investigate noncontact friction effects for the interactions of hydrogen, ground-state helium and metastable helium atoms with alpha-quartz (SiO_2), gold (Au) and calcium difluorite (CaF_2). We find that the backaction term dominates over the direct term induced by the thermal electromagnetic fluctuations inside the material, over wide distance ranges. The friction coefficients obtained for gold are smaller than those for SiO_2 and CaF_2 by several orders of magnitude.

  16. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hules, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  17. A study on the frictional response of reptilian shed skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; Vargiolu, R.; Zahouani, H.; El Mansori, M.

    2011-08-01

    Deterministic surfaces are constructs of which profile, topography and textures are integral to the function of the system they enclose. They are designed to yield a predetermined tribological response. Developing such entities relies on controlling the structure of the rubbing interface so that, not only the surface is of optimized topography, but also is able to self-adjust its tribological behaviour according to the evolution of sliding conditions. In seeking inspirations for such designs, many engineers are turning toward the biological world to study the construction and behaviour of bio-analogues, and to probe the role surface topography assumes in conditioning of frictional response. That is how a bio-analogue can self-adjust its tribological response to adapt to habitat constraints. From a tribological point of view, Squamate Reptiles, offer diverse examples where surface texturing, submicron and nano-scale features, achieves frictional regulation. In this paper, we study the frictional response of shed skin obtained from a snake (Python regius). The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakes. The coefficient of friction depends on the direction of sliding: the value in forward motion is lower than that in the backward direction. Diagonal and side winding motion induces a different value of the friction coefficient. We discuss the origin of such a phenomenon in relation to surface texturing and study the energy constraints, implied by anisotropic friction, on the motion of the reptile.

  18. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  19. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Pickett, Galen T

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  20. Inexpensive DAQ based physics labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Clark, Shane

    2015-11-01

    Quality Data Acquisition (DAQ) based physics labs can be designed using microcontrollers and very low cost sensors with minimal lab equipment. A prototype device with several sensors and documentation for a number of DAQ-based labs is showcased. The device connects to a computer through Bluetooth and uses a simple interface to control the DAQ and display real time graphs, storing the data in .txt and .xls formats. A full device including a larger number of sensors combined with software interface and detailed documentation would provide a high quality physics lab education for minimal cost, for instance in high schools lacking lab equipment or students taking online classes. An entire semester’s lab course could be conducted using a single device with a manufacturing cost of under $20.

  1. Measuring Search Frictions Using Japanese Microdata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, Masaru; Kohara, Miki; Machikita, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    This paper estimates individual-level matching functions to measure search frictions in the Japanese labour market and presents the determinants of search duration. We employ administrative microdata that track the job search process of job seekers who left or lost their job in August 2005...... and subsequently registered at their local public employment service. Our finding is that the matching function exhibits decreasing rather than constant returns-to-scale for job seekers and vacancies. We also find that after controlling for the benefits period, job seekers who lost their job involuntarily were...

  2. Kinetic Friction Coefficient of Ice,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    For the hardest ice tested (xi = 0.33 described by Rabinowicz (1965), where To is inter- mm, H, = 1525 kPa), the calculated values of a preted as...material with a low elastic pressures. The frictional force was measured at modulus ( Rabinowicz 1965). It has been observed the application point of...tion 10, pp. 8-16. Barnes, P. and D. Tabor (1966) Plastic flow and Rabinowicz , E. (1965) Friction and Wear of Mate- pressure melting in the deformation

  3. Tire/runway friction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  4. Labor Supply and Optimization Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Jakob Egholt

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I investigate the nature of optimization frictions by studying the labor market of Danish students. This particular labor market is an interesting case study as it features a range of special institutional settings that affect students’ incentive to earn income and comparing outcomes...... theory. More concretely I find the dominate optimization friction to be individuals’ inattention about their earnings during the year, while real adjustment cost and gradual learning appears to be of less importance....

  5. Bottom friction optimization for a better barotropic tide modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Martial; Lathuilière, Cyril; Son Hoang, Hong; Baraille, Rémy

    2015-04-01

    At a regional scale, barotropic tides are the dominant source of variability of currents and water heights. A precise representation of these processes is essential because of their great impacts on human activities (submersion risks, marine renewable energies, ...). Identified sources of error for tide modelling at a regional scale are the followings: bathymetry, boundary forcing and dissipation due to bottom friction. Nevertheless, bathymetric databases are nowadays known with a good accuracy, especially over shelves, and global tide models performances are better than ever. The most promising improvement is thus the bottom friction representation. The method used to estimate bottom friction is the simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation (SPSA) which consists in the approximation of the gradient based on a fixed number of cost function measurements, regardless of the dimension of the vector to be estimated. Indeed, each cost function measurement is obtained by randomly perturbing every component of the parameter vector. An important feature of SPSA is its relative ease of implementation. In particular, the method does not require the development of tangent linear and adjoint version of the circulation model. Experiments are carried out to estimate bottom friction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) in barotropic mode (one isopycnal layer). The study area is the Northeastern Atlantic margin which is characterized by strong currents and an intense dissipation. Bottom friction is parameterized with a quadratic term and friction coefficient is computed with the water height and the bottom roughness. The latter parameter is the one to be estimated. Assimilated data are the available tide gauge observations. First, the bottom roughness is estimated taking into account bottom sediment natures and bathymetric ranges. Then, it is estimated with geographical degrees of freedom. Finally, the impact of the estimation of a mixed quadratic/linear friction

  6. ERLN Technical Support for Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Response Laboratory Network provides policies and guidance on lab and data requirements, Standardized Analytical Methods, and technical support for water and radiological sampling and analysis

  7. Aircraft Lighting and Transparency Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Lighting and Transparencies with Night Combat Lab performs radiometric and photometric measurements of cockpit lighting and displays. Evaluates the day,...

  8. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li; Ken Mao

    2013-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented us...

  9. Design, modeling, and optimization of compliant tensegrity fabrics for the reduction of turbulent skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Bewley, Thomas R.

    2003-07-01

    In this project, we have designed a new type of flexible surface, which we call a tensegrity fabric, and simulated the interaction of this flexible surface with a near-wall turbulent flow. The fabric is constructed by weaving together both members in tension (tendons) and members in compression (bars) to form a plate-class tensegrity structure, then covering this discrete flexible structure with a continuous flexible membrane. We have modeled the flow/structure interaction by coupling a spectral Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) code resolving the (continuous) turbulent flow system and an efficient structural dynamics code which simulates direclty the motion of the (discrete) extensive, small-scale, and interconnected tensegrity structure. The structural dynamics code used was developed by Prof. Robert Skelton's lab at UC San Diego. An immersed boundary method is used to capture the effect of the moving boundary in the DNS, and a simple tessellation strategy is used to lump the distributed fluid forces (skin friction and pressure) acting on the membrane onto the nearby nodes of the tensegrity structure. Our ultimate goal is to use this new simulation tool to optimize the design of the tensegrity structure (specifically, the orientation, stiffness, mass, and damping of each of the individual tendons and bars in the unit cell upon which the tensegrity structure is based). Our objective in this optimization is to tune the compliance properties of the fabric in such a way as to reduce the skin-friction drag induced at teh flow/structure interface by weakening the vortices near the wall in the overlying turbulent flow.

  10. The Jefferson Lab Program

    CERN Document Server

    James-Boyce, M

    2003-01-01

    The kW-class infrared (IR) free electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) had the capability of producing intra-cavity Thomson scattering of the IR off the electron beam thus producing high average flux, sub-picosecond x-rays. We have measured these x-rays and demonstrated the energy tunability range from 3.5 keV to 18 keV. The corresponding flux and brightness have been estimated and will be discussed. In 2002, the FEL was disassembled and has been reconfigured to produce 10 kW average power IR. We present the estimated x-ray capabilities for the new FEL and discuss potential applications.

  11. The lab of fame

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    For a third time, CERN is organising the Swiss heat of Famelab, the world’s leading science communication competition that has already gathered over 5,000 young and talented scientists and engineers from all across the planet.   Besides their degrees, the scientists who participate in Famelab have another thing in common: their passion for communicating science. Coming from a variety of scientific fields, from medicine to particle physics and microbiology, the contestants have three minutes to present a science, technology, mathematics or engineering-based talk using only the props he or she can carry onto the stage; PowerPoint presentations are not permitted. The contestants are then judged by a panel of three judges who evaluate the content, clarity and charisma of their talks. What's unique about FameLab is the fact that content is an important aspect of the performance. At the end of their presentation, contestants are often questioned about the scientific relevance of...

  12. Friction and diffusion dynamics of adsorbates at surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusco, C.

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical study of the motion of adsorbates (e. g. atoms, molecules or clusters) on solid surfaces is presented, with a focus on surface diffusion and atomic-scale friction. These two phenomena are inextricably linked, because when an atomic or molecular adsorbate diffuses, or is pulled, it unav

  13. Physics Labs with Flavor II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the numerous requests from "TPT" readers to expand the number of examples of "recurrent study" lab exercises described in my previous paper "Physics Labs with Flavor." I recommend that readers examine it first in order to better understand this one as my attempt here is to be brief. In that paper, one can find details…

  14. Physics Labs with Flavor II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the numerous requests from "TPT" readers to expand the number of examples of "recurrent study" lab exercises described in my previous paper "Physics Labs with Flavor." I recommend that readers examine it first in order to better understand this one as my attempt here is to be brief. In that paper, one can find details…

  15. GitLab repository management

    CERN Document Server

    Hethey, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A simple, easy to understand tutorial guide on how to build teams and efficiently use version control, using GitLab.If you are a system administrator in a company that writes software or are in charge of an infrastructure, this book will show you the most important features of GitLab, including how to speed up the overall process

  16. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  17. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  18. Dynamical friction for supersonic motion in a homogeneous gaseous medium

    CERN Document Server

    Thun, Daniel; Schmidt, Franziska; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    The supersonic motion of gravitating objects through a gaseous medium constitutes a classical problem in theoretical astrophysics. Its application covers a broad range of objects and scales from planets up to galaxies. Especially the dynamical friction, caused by the forming wake behind the object, plays an important role for the dynamics of the system. To calculate the dynamical friction, standard formulae, based on linear theory are often used. It is our goal to check the general validity of these formulae and provide suitable expressions for the dynamical friction acting on the moving object, based on the basic physical parameters of the problem. We perform sequences of high resolution numerical studies of rigid bodies moving supersonically through a homogeneous medium, and calculate the total drag acting on the object, which is the sum of gravitational and hydro drag. We study cases without gravity with purely hydrodynamical drag, as well as gravitating objects. From the final equilibrium state of the sim...

  19. High-resolution friction force microscopy under electrochemical control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Paul, William; Pietrobon, Brendan; Lennox, R. Bruce; Grütter, Peter H.; Bennewitz, Roland

    2010-08-01

    We report the design and development of a friction force microscope for high-resolution studies in electrochemical environments. The design choices are motivated by the experimental requirements of atomic-scale friction measurements in liquids. The noise of the system is analyzed based on a methodology for the quantification of all the noise sources. The quantitative contribution of each noise source is analyzed in a series of lateral force measurements. Normal force detection is demonstrated in a study of the solvation potential in a confined liquid, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane. The limitations of the timing resolution of the instrument are discussed in the context of an atomic stick-slip measurement. The instrument is capable of studying the atomic friction contrast between a bare Au(111) surface and a copper monolayer deposited at underpotential conditions in perchloric acid.

  20. Functional-Friction Networks: New Insights on the Laboratory Earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2013-01-01

    We formulate the universality of regular precursor rupture fronts in functional network parameter space, in light of recent analysis of acoustics emissions-coupled friction experimental results. Furthermore, using a phenomenological approach based on friction networks, we propose that the energy of the ruptures can be extended in terms of networks motifs and the transition from regular rupture to slow deformation can have a third production from the critical rupture class, comparable with the direct observations of this phenomena in the transparent samples . Based on this model, the transition from slow ruptures (i.e., creep pulse) to the critical speeds of ruptures is possible. In addition, the evolution of arrested rupture fronts is inspected through a statistical-network modelling which sheds light on the communities evolution. We propose a phase diagram for the friction networks which depends on the scaling coefficients of scalar parameters and can show a transition towards the capturing of the links by a...

  1. Sound Absorption and Friction Properties of Nano-Lotus Leaf Coated Concrete for Rigid Pavement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GONZALEZ, Marcelo; SAFIUDDIN, Md; CAO, Jingwen; TIGHE, Susan

    2016-01-01

    ... for application in rigid pavements. The study involved an evaluation of nanomaterials at the laboratory scale to analyze the effects of microtexture modification on the friction and sound absorption of concrete pavement...

  2. What's your lab's strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Important strategic choices cascade throughout a laboratory. Senior management should create a document that answers each of the five key questions explained on page 60. Once this has been detailed in writing, it remains important to disseminate the basics to all employees so they are singing the same tune. A useful way to accomplish this is through a coherent strategy statement that specifies three components: 1) objectives; 2) scope; and 3) advantages. Commercial and hospital outreach labs should be in business to win. It all starts with a definition of what winning looks like. To "participate" in your market contributes to mediocrity-and it's self-defeating. With no clear strategic direction of where-to-play and how-to-win choices that associate with the aspiration, a mission or vision statement can be frustrating rather than inspiring for employees. Articulate it plainly and concisely for everybody. With a care-fully prepared and designed strategy, you will be on your way to winning in the zero-sum game!

  3. Thinking Outside the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colter, Tabitha

    2017-01-01

    As an undergraduate physics major who spent 2015 deep in a quantum optics lab at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, I knew my 2016 experience with the House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee would be a completely new challenge. I have long had a passion for the bridge of communication between the technical and non-technical worlds but it was only through my AIP Mather internship this summer that I was able to see that passion come to life in the realm of science policy. Suddenly, I went from squeezing political philosophy classes into my packed schedule to witnessing the political process first-hand. I was thrilled to find that the skills of critical thinking and communicating complex issues I have developed throughout my training as a physicist were directly applicable to my work in Congress. Overall, my experience this summer has given me insight into the inner workings of the federal policy process, deepened my appreciation for the work of government employees to keep Congressional members informed on the pressing current issues, and exposed me to a whole range of alternative careers within science. AIP and SPS

  4. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum electromagnetic fluctuations, which break time-reversal symmetry. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Partly because of the lack of contact with observations, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here, we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  5. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, K A; Brevik, I

    2015-01-01

    For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum fluctuations. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Because of the lack of contact with phenomena, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  6. A phase-plane analysis of localized frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putelat, T.; Dawes, J. H. P.; Champneys, A. R.

    2017-07-01

    Sliding frictional interfaces at a range of length scales are observed to generate travelling waves; these are considered relevant, for example, to both earthquake ground surface movements and the performance of mechanical brakes and dampers. We propose an explanation of the origins of these waves through the study of an idealized mechanical model: a thin elastic plate subject to uniform shear stress held in frictional contact with a rigid flat surface. We construct a nonlinear wave equation for the deformation of the plate, and couple it to a spinodal rate-and-state friction law which leads to a mathematically well-posed problem that is capable of capturing many effects not accessible in a Coulomb friction model. Our model sustains a rich variety of solutions, including periodic stick-slip wave trains, isolated slip and stick pulses, and detachment and attachment fronts. Analytical and numerical bifurcation analysis is used to show how these states are organized in a two-parameter state diagram. We discuss briefly the possible physical interpretation of each of these states, and remark also that our spinodal friction law, though more complicated than other classical rate-and-state laws, is required in order to capture the full richness of wave types.

  7. Granular self-organization by autotuning of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Nitsure, Nitin; Bhattacharya, S; Ghosh, Shankar

    2015-09-15

    A monolayer of granular spheres in a cylindrical vial, driven continuously by an orbital shaker and subjected to a symmetric confining centrifugal potential, self-organizes to form a distinctively asymmetric structure which occupies only the rear half-space. It is marked by a sharp leading edge at the potential minimum and a curved rear. The area of the structure obeys a power-law scaling with the number of spheres. Imaging shows that the regulation of motion of individual spheres occurs via toggling between two types of motion, namely, rolling and sliding. A low density of weakly frictional rollers congregates near the sharp leading edge whereas a denser rear comprises highly frictional sliders. Experiments further suggest that because the rolling and sliding friction coefficients differ substantially, the spheres acquire a local time-averaged coefficient of friction within a large range of intermediate values in the system. The various sets of spatial and temporal configurations of the rollers and sliders constitute the internal states of the system. Experiments demonstrate and simulations confirm that the global features of the structure are maintained robustly by autotuning of friction through these internal states, providing a previously unidentified route to self-organization of a many-body system.

  8. Real Scale test and analysis of the skin friction on a pile in rock; Ensayo a escala real e interpretacion del comportamiento de un pilote por fuest en roca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmo, D. del; Melentijevic, S.; Prieto, L.; Olalla, C.

    2011-07-01

    The skin friction behaviour of a pile in a flysch rock in San Sebastian (Guipuzcoa) has been studied. The static load test was performed on a pile of 1 meter diameter, on the 5 meter length segment of the pile between 12 and 17 meters depth- Two Osterberg cells were embedded into the pile segment to apply the load on the pile-rock system. The mechanism of the load transfer between the pile and the rock has been analyzed by laboratory tests on rock samples, load test results and a finite element method calculus. the results have also been compared to the existing formations of world wide published standards. (Author) 16 refs.

  9. The microphysics of phyllosilicate friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Sabine A. M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-04-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts most of the experimentally observed trends in frictional behaviour and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  10. Low temperature friction force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunckle, Christopher Gregory

    The application of friction force techniques within atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for direct measurements of friction forces at a sliding, single-asperity interface. The temperature dependence of such single-asperity contacts provides key insight into the comparative importance of dissipative mechanisms that result in dry sliding friction. A variable temperature (VT), ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) AFM was used with an interface consisting of a diamond coated AFM tip and diamond-like carbon sample in a nominal sample temperature range of 90 to 275K. The results show that the coefficient of kinetic friction, mu k, has a linear dependence that is monotonically increasing with temperature varying from 0.28 to 0.38. To analyze this data it is necessary to correlate the sample temperature to the interface temperature. A detailed thermal model shows that the sample temperature measured by a macroscopic device can be very different from the temperature at the contact point. Temperature gradients intrinsic to the design of VT, UHV AFMs result in extreme, non-equilibrium conditions with heat fluxes on the order of gigawatts per squared meter through the interface, which produce a discontinuous step in the temperature profile due to thermal boundary impedance. The conclusion from this model is that measurements acquired by VT, UHV AFM, including those presented in this thesis, do not provide meaningful data on the temperature dependence of friction for single-asperities. Plans for future work developing an isothermal AFM capable of the same measurements without the introduction of temperature gradients are described. The experimental results and thermal analysis described in this thesis have been published in the Journal of Applied Physics, "Temperature dependence of single-asperity friction for a diamond on diamondlike carbon interface", J. App. Phys., 107(11):114903, 2010.

  11. City Labs as Vehicles for Innovation in Urban Planning Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Scholl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the role of urban experiments for local planning processes through a case-based analysis of the city lab of Maastricht. In conjunction with this, the article offers three contributions, as additional elements. Firstly, the paper develops a set of defining characteristics of city labs as an analytical concept which is relevant for discussions about (collaborative planning. Secondly, it refines the literature on collaborative planning by drawing attention to experimentation and innovation. Thirdly, the paper assesses the potential of city labs to contribute to the innovation of urban governance. The work draws from the literature on experimentation and learning as well as the literature on collaborative urban planning. In the conclusions, we discuss the potential of city labs as vehicles for learning about new urban planning approaches and their limitations as spaces for small-scale experimentation. The paper is based on research for the URB@Exp research project funded by JPI Urban Europe.

  12. City Labs as Vehicles for Innovation in Urban Planning Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Scholl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the role of urban experiments for local planning processes through a case-based analysis of the city lab of Maastricht. In conjunction with this, the article offers three contributions, as additional elements. Firstly, the paper develops a set of defining characteristics of city labs as an analytical concept which is relevant for discussions about (collaborative planning. Secondly, it refines the literature on collaborative planning by drawing attention to experimentation and innovation. Thirdly, the paper assesses the potential of city labs to contribute to the innovation of urban governance. The work draws from the literature on experimentation and learning as well as the literature on collaborative urban planning. In the conclusions, we discuss the potential of city labs as vehicles for learning about new urban planning approaches and their limitations as spaces for small-scale experimentation. The paper is based on research for the URB@Exp research project funded by JPI Urban Europe.

  13. Micro Robotics Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our research is focused on the challenges of engineering robotic systems down to sub-millimeter size scales. We work both on small mobile robots (robotic insects for...

  14. Living Labs – From scientific labs to the smart city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred

    time is part of the Doll Living Lab setup placed in the area. Lyngby Smart City is a living lab approach facilitated by the City of Knowledge. Together with the labs presented above, we find a direct chain from scientific research labs at DTU over the campus lab, out into the real world living labs...... near Lyngby and from there into the big smart city of Copenhagen to be promoted to the world markets. This way the value chain “from research to invoice” is instantiated into not only an innovation and business strategy, but rather a research strategy that aims at elevating DTU’s research to an even......, but also partners from outside. This proposition can be found under the term “Smart Campus” with it’s own homepage. Here you find the example from the library above, the Smart Avenue that enables communication and IT solutions on the campus, enabled through intelligent street lightning that in the same...

  15. SURFACE DYNAMIC FRICTION OF POLYMER GELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.P.Gong; G.Kagata; Y.Iwasaki; Y.Osada

    2000-01-01

    The sliding friction of various kinds of hydrogels has been studied and it was found that the frictional behaviors of the hydrogels do not conform to Amonton's law F =μW which well describes the friction of solids. The frictional force and its dependence on the load are quite different depending on the chemical structures of the gels, surface properties of the opposing substrates, and the measurement condition. The gel friction is explained in terms of interfacial interaction, either attractive or repulsive, between the polymer chain and the solid surface. According to this model, the friction is ascribed to the viscous flow of solvent at the interface in the repulsive case. In the attractive case, the force to detach the adsorbing chain from the substrate appears as friction. The surface adhesion between glass particles and gels measured by AFM showed a good correlation with the friction, which supported the repulsion-adsorption model proposed by the authors.

  16. The Friction of Saline Ice on Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wallen-Russell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction of ice on other materials controls loading on offshore structures and vessels in the Arctic. However, ice friction is complicated, because ice in nature exists near to its melting point. Frictional heating can cause local softening and perhaps melting and lubrication, thus affecting the friction and creating a feedback loop. Ice friction is therefore likely to depend on sliding speed and sliding history, as well as bulk temperature. The roughness of the sliding materials may also affect the friction. Here we present results of a series of laboratory experiments, sliding saline ice on aluminium, and controlling for roughness and temperature. We find that the friction of saline ice on aluminium μice-al=0.1 typically, but that this value varies with sliding conditions. We propose physical models which explain the variations in sliding friction.

  17. Charge-Discharge Behaviors and Properties of a Lab-Scale All-Vanadium Redox-Flow Single Cell Research Notes%全钒液流单电池充放电行为及特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵平; 张华民; 文越华; 衣宝廉

    2007-01-01

    建立具有外置双饱和甘汞参比电极及双液流电池的实验装置系统.使用该装置可在同一时刻同时测定小型液流单电池充放电时的电池电压、电池正负极电位及正负极开路电位,进而计算充放电过程电池的欧姆内阻降(iR)及其正负极过电位.以石墨毡为电极、Nafion 117作隔膜的全钒液流单电池,在60 mA·cm-2电流密度下,每一充放电循环的平均iR降约占总电压损耗的74%,表明该电池的电压效率受制于电池的欧姆内阻.充放电曲线显示,电池放电终点之所以出现主要是由于电池负极电位在放电末期的快速上升而引起的.本文设计的全钒单电池于60 mA·cm-2下工作时,其电压及能量效率分别达89%和85%,表明该电池结构合理,且石墨毡是钒电池合适的电极材料.%An experimental setup with two external saturated calomel reference electrodes(SCE)and two flow cells was established for flow battery research application. By using this setup, the cell voltage, potentials and open circuit potentials of the positive and negative electrodes for a lab-scale flow battery single cell, could be determined simultaneously during charge-discharge (C-D) cycle test. Then, the ohmic internal resistance drop (iR drop), overpotentials at the negative and positive electrodes of the cell during C-D process, were calculated. The average iR drop accounts for about 74% of the total voltage losses during the C-D cycle at current density of 60 mA·cm-2, suggesting the voltage efficiency (VE) of vanadium redox-flow battery (VRB) single cell with graphite felt as electrodes and Nafion 117 as battery separator, was limited by the cell ohmic internal resistance. The C-D curves show that the appearance of the end-point of discharge is mainly due to the zoom of negative electrode over potential. The VRB single cell designed in this work achieves an excellent performance,with voltage and energy efficiency up to ca. 89% and 85

  18. Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)supports the PMA-209 Air Combat Electronics Program Office. CSIL also supports development, test, integration and life cycle...

  19. Where Lab Tests Are Performed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities ...

  20. Hospital labs go under microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Geri

    2014-05-01

    Financial pressures are hitting hospital clinical labs on both the inpatient and outpatient sides. To control expenses, hospitals are teaming up to buy supplies, centralizing services and improving blood management.

  1. Pollution hazard closes neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    Jones, Nicola

    2003-01-01

    "A leading astrophysics laboratory in Italy has closed down all but one of its experiments over concerns that toxic polluants could leak form the underground lab into the local water supply" (0.5 page)

  2. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  3. Jefferson Lab Phenomenology: an Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2004-03-01

    Experiments at Jefferson Lab are pushing the frontiers of our knowledge about the structure and dynamics of nucleons and nuclei. I will review a selection of recent results and discuss their impact on our understanding of hadron structure.

  4. Metallurgical Laboratory (MET-LAB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MET-LAB can perform materials characterization for all types of metallic components and systems to any industry-specific or military standard. Capabilities: The...

  5. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  6. Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)supports the PMA-209 Air Combat Electronics Program Office. CSIL also supports development, test, integration and life cycle...

  7. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...

  8. Frictional heating of tribological contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Johannes

    1995-01-01

    Wherever friction occurs, mechanical energy is transformed into heat. The tem­ perature rise associated with this heating can have an important influence on the tribological behaviour of the contacting components. Apart from determining per­ formance, thermal phenomena affect reliability and may cau

  9. Friction Sensitivity of Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan none tetrazene 407913 tetrazene 7902454 The mixes which were tested are: NOL 130 (basic lead styphnate , barium nitrate, lead...azide, tetrazene, and antimony sulfide); PA 100 (normal lead styphnate , barium nitrate, tetrazene, lead dioxide, calcium silicide, and antimony...styuhnate, basic lead styphnate , potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan, and tetrazene were tested to determine the- 10% and 50% probability of friction

  10. Slip versus Friction : Modifying the Navier condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsalis, Evangelos; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-03-01

    The modeling of fluid-solid interfaces remains one of the key challenges in fluid mechanics. The prevailing model, attributed to Navier, defines the fluid ``slip'' velocity as proportional to the wall shear and a parameter defined as the slip length. Several works have in turn proposed models for this slip length but no universal model for the slip velocity has been accepted. We present results from large scale molecular dynamics simulations of canonical flow problems, indicating, that the inadequacy of this classic model, stems from not properly accounting for the pressure field. We propose and validate a new model, based on the fundamental observation that the finite ``slip'' velocity is a result of an imbalance between fluid and solid intermolecular forces. An excess force on the fluid elements will lead to their acceleration which in turn may result in a slip velocity at the interface. We formulate the slip velocity in terms of fluid-solid friction Ff and propose a generalized boundary condition: Ff= Fs+ Fp= λuus+ λpp where p denotes the pressure, and λuand λp the viscous and static friction coefficients, for which universal constants are presented. We demonstrate that the present model can overcome difficulties encountered by the classical slip model in canonical flow configurations.

  11. Thermomechanical Modelling of Friction Stir Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2009-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat ...... together with selected modelling results including prediction of material flow during welding, prediction of heat generation with the thermal-pseudo mechanical model as well as residual stress and deformation analysis combined with in-service loads.......Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a fully coupled thermomechanical process and should in general be modelled as such. Basically, there are two major application areas of thermomechanical models in the investigation of the FSW process: i) Analysis of the thermomechanical conditions such as e.g. heat......, typically on a local scale, the latter will very often be based on a semi-coupled, global procedure where the transient temperatures drive the stresses but not vice-versa. However, in the latter, prior knowledge about the heat generation must be obtained somehow, and if experimental data are not available...

  12. Rotary Engine Friction Test Rig Development Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    5  4.  Friction Rig Development 7  5.  AutoCAD ...Figure 4. Engine friction test rig AutoCAD model. ........................................................................8  Figure 5. Engine...top dead center. 8 5. AutoCAD Model Development A model of the rotary engine friction test rig was developed to determine the optimal

  13. Asbestos free friction composition for brake linings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Ganguly; Raji George

    2008-02-01

    An asbestos free friction material composite for brake linings is synthesized containing fibrous reinforcing constituents, friction imparting and controlling additives, elastomeric additives, fire retarding components and a thermosetting resin. The composite shows exemplary friction characteristics and has great resistance to wear and shows good temperature stability.

  14. A thermodynamic model of sliding friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Makkonen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A first principles thermodynamic model of sliding friction is derived. The model predictions are in agreement with the observed friction laws both in macro- and nanoscale. When applied to calculating the friction coefficient the model provides a quantitative agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements on a number of materials.

  15. The history of Rhoton's Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Toshio; Richard Lister, J; Matsushima, Ken; de Oliveira, Evandro; Timurkaynak, Erdener; Peace, David A; Kobayashi, Shigeaki

    2017-09-06

    The work performed in Dr. Rhoton's Lab, represented by over 500 publications on microneurosurgical anatomy, greatly contributed to improving the level of neurosurgical treatment throughout the world. The authors reviewed the development and activities of the Lab over 40 years. Dr. Albert L. Rhoton Jr., the founder of, and leader in, this field, displayed great creativity and ingenuity during his life. He devoted himself to perfecting his study methodology, employing high-definition photos and slides to enhance the quality of his published papers. He dedicated his life to the education of neurosurgeons. His "lab team," which included microneuroanatomy research fellows, medical illustrators, lab directors, and secretaries, worked together under his leadership to develop the methods and techniques of anatomical study to complete over 160 microneurosurgical anatomy projects. The medical illustrators adapted computer technologies and integrated art and science in the field of microneurosurgical anatomy. Dr. Rhoton's fellows established methods of injecting colors and pursued a series of projects to innovate surgical approaches and instruments over a 40-year period. They also continued to help Dr. Rhoton to conduct international educational activities after returning to their home countries. Rhoton's Lab became a world-renowned anatomical lab as well as a microsurgical training center and generated the knowledge necessary to perform accurate, gentle, and safe surgery for the sake of patients.

  16. Analysis of the moment caused by friction of cardan joint. Cardan joint no friction kishinryoku kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Yagi, Shida, T. (Atsugi Unisia Corp., Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    Analyzing the vibromotive force, generated by the friction, in generation morphology, level, dynamical characteristics, etc., through measurement of joint unit friction simulation of frictional vibromotive force and on-platform measurement of propeller shaft in vibromotive force, the present report investigated the influence of friction on the vehicle in sound vibration performance. By a vibromotive force measurement system, internally equipped with a piezoelectric type force meter, frictional vibromotive force could be quantitatively grasped. The friction must be appropriately controlled, because the moment, generated by it, is expected to be put in the vehicle by intermediation of a supporting point and adversely influence the sound vibration performance. Apart from the above, elucidation was made of relation between the ordinal number components of rotation of vibromotive force and friction, calculation of reaction force at the supporting point by the frictional measurement, relation between the joint angle and frictional vibromotive force, second couple force due to the friction, etc. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Dependence of sea-surface microwave emissivity on friction velocity as derived from SMMR/SASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, F. J.; Christensen, E. J.; Richardson, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The sea-surface microwave emissivity is derived using SMMR brightness temperatures and SASS inferred friction velocities for three North Pacific Seasat passes. The results show the emissivity increasing linearly with friction velocity with no obvious break between the foam-free and foam regimes up to a friction velocity of about 70 cm/sec (15 m/sec wind speed). For horizontal polarization the sensitivity of emissivity to friction velocity greatly increases with frequency, while for vertical polarization the sensitivity is much less and is independent of frequency. This behavior is consistent with two-scale scattering theory. A limited amount of high friction velocity data above 70 cm/sec suggests an additional increase in emissivity due to whitecapping.

  18. Friction and lubrication modeling in sheet metal forming simulations of a Volvo XC90 inner door

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvant, M.; Pilthammar, J.; Hol, J.; Wiebenga, J. H.; Chezan, T.; Carleer, B.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2016-11-01

    The quality of sheet metal formed parts is strongly dependent on the tribology, friction and lubrication conditions that are acting in the actual production process. Although friction is of key importance, it is currently not considered in detail in stamping simulations. This paper presents a selection of results considering friction and lubrication modeling in sheet metal forming simulations of the Volvo XC90 right rear door inner. For this purpose, the TriboForm software is used in combination with the AutoForm software. Validation of the simulation results is performed using door inner parts taken from the press line in a full-scale production run. The results demonstrate the improved prediction accuracy of stamping simulations by accounting for accurate friction and lubrication conditions, and the strong influence of friction conditions on both the part quality and the overall production stability.

  19. Concerted dihedral rotations give rise to internal friction in unfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Ignacia; Makarov, Dmitrii E; Papoian, Garegin A

    2014-06-18

    Protein chains undergo conformational diffusion during folding and dynamics, experiencing both thermal kicks and viscous drag. Recent experiments have shown that the corresponding friction can be separated into wet friction, which is determined by the solvent viscosity, and dry friction, where frictional effects arise due to the interactions within the protein chain. Despite important advances, the molecular origins underlying dry friction in proteins have remained unclear. To address this problem, we studied the dynamics of the unfolded cold-shock protein at different solvent viscosities and denaturant concentrations. Using extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations we estimated the internal friction time scales and found them to agree well with the corresponding experimental measurements (Soranno et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2012, 109, 17800-17806). Analysis of the reconfiguration dynamics of the unfolded chain further revealed that hops in the dihedral space provide the dominant mechanism of internal friction. Furthermore, the increased number of concerted dihedral moves at physiological conditions suggest that, in such conditions, the concerted motions result in higher frictional forces. These findings have important implications for understanding the folding kinetics of proteins as well as the dynamics of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  20. Dynamical friction for supersonic motion in a homogeneous gaseous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Daniel; Kuiper, Rolf; Schmidt, Franziska; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-05-01

    Context. The supersonic motion of gravitating objects through a gaseous ambient medium constitutes a classical problem in theoretical astrophysics. Its application covers a broad range of objects and scales from planetesimals, planets, and all kind of stars up to galaxies and black holes. In particular, the dynamical friction caused by the wake that forms behind the object plays an important role for the dynamics of the system. To calculate the dynamical friction for a particular system, standard formulae based on linear theory are often used. Aims: It is our goal to check the general validity of these formulae and provide suitable expressions for the dynamical friction acting on the moving object, based on the basic physical parameters of the problem: first, the mass, radius, and velocity of the perturber; second, the gas mass density, soundspeed, and adiabatic index of the gaseous medium; and finally, the size of the forming wake. Methods: We perform dedicated sequences of high-resolution numerical studies of rigid bodies moving supersonically through a homogeneous ambient medium and calculate the total drag acting on the object, which is the sum of gravitational and hydrodynamical drag. We study cases without gravity with purely hydrodynamical drag, as well as gravitating objects. In various numerical experiments, we determine the drag force acting on the moving body and its dependence on the basic physical parameters of the problem, as given above. From the final equilibrium state of the simulations, for gravitating objects we compute the dynamical friction by direct numerical integration of the gravitational pull acting on the embedded object. Results: The numerical experiments confirm the known scaling laws for the dependence of the dynamical friction on the basic physical parameters as derived in earlier semi-analytical studies. As a new important result we find that the shock's stand-off distance is revealed as the minimum spatial interaction scale of

  1. Status of chemistry lab safety in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Krishna Prasad; Neupane, Bhanu Bhakta; Giri, Basant

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry labs can become a dangerous environment for students as the lab exercises involve hazardous chemicals, glassware, and equipment. Approximately one hundred thousand students take chemistry laboratory classes annually in Nepal. We conducted a survey on chemical lab safety issues across Nepal. In this paper, we assess the safety policy and equipment, protocols and procedures followed, and waste disposal in chemistry teaching labs. Significant population of the respondents believed that there is no monitoring of the lab safety in their lab (p<0.001). Even though many labs do not allow food and beverages inside lab and have first aid kits, they lack some basic safety equipment. There is no institutional mechanism to dispose lab waste and chemical waste is disposed haphazardly. Majority of the respondents believed that the safety training should be a part of educational training (p = 0.001) and they would benefit from short course and/or workshop on lab safety (p<0.001).

  2. Frictional granular mechanics: A variational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzman, R.; Silin, D.B.; Patzek, T.W.

    2009-10-16

    The mechanical properties of a cohesionless granular material are evaluated from grain-scale simulations. Intergranular interactions, including friction and sliding, are modeled by a set of contact rules based on the theories of Hertz, Mindlin, and Deresiewicz. A computer generated, three-dimensional, irregular pack of spherical grains is loaded by incremental displacement of its boundaries. Deformation is described by a sequence of static equilibrium configurations of the pack. A variational approach is employed to find the equilibrium configurations by minimizing the total work against the intergranular loads. Effective elastic moduli are evaluated from the intergranular forces and the deformation of the pack. Good agreement between the computed and measured moduli, achieved with no adjustment of material parameters, establishes the physical soundness of the proposed model.

  3. Advanced adhesion and friction measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2017-03-01

    An advanced micro-force tester for investigating the micromechanical behavior of various patterned surfaces in dry and wet conditions is presented in this paper. The parallel slice-beam configuration of the tester not only eliminates the large load-dependent slope and tangential displacement at the free end that is found in a single beam system, but also performs a trans-scale deflection with high sensitivity and linearity for force sensing. Meanwhile, the simple structure is characterized by low cost, high efficiency, and ease of fabrication. An integrated nano- and micro-stage comprise the mobile table to produce a large stroke with high resolution, which is specifically required in wet adhesion testing because of the formation of a long liquid bridge. Preliminary experiments of adhesion and friction conducted using PDMS pillars with a plano-convex lens validated the feasibility of this setup.

  4. Dynamical friction force exerted on spherical bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2007-01-01

    We present a rigorous calculation of the dynamical friction force exerted on a spherical massive perturber moving through an infinite homogenous system of field stars. By calculating the shape and mass of the polarization cloud induced by the perturber in the background system, which decelerates the motion of the perturber, we recover Chandrasekhar's drag force law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. As concrete examples we calculate the drag force exerted on a Plummer sphere or a sphere with the density distribution of a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

  5. Frictional granular mechanics: A variational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzman, R.; Silin, D.B.; Patzek, T.W.

    2009-10-16

    The mechanical properties of a cohesionless granular material are evaluated from grain-scale simulations. Intergranular interactions, including friction and sliding, are modeled by a set of contact rules based on the theories of Hertz, Mindlin, and Deresiewicz. A computer generated, three-dimensional, irregular pack of spherical grains is loaded by incremental displacement of its boundaries. Deformation is described by a sequence of static equilibrium configurations of the pack. A variational approach is employed to find the equilibrium configurations by minimizing the total work against the intergranular loads. Effective elastic moduli are evaluated from the intergranular forces and the deformation of the pack. Good agreement between the computed and measured moduli, achieved with no adjustment of material parameters, establishes the physical soundness of the proposed model.

  6. High temperature skin friction measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheng, Ping; Holmes, Harlan K.; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Skin friction measurement in the NASA Langley hypersonic propulsion facility is described. The sensor configuration utilized an existing balance, modified to provide thermal isolation and an increased standoff distance. For test run times of about 20 sec and ambient-air cooling of the test section and balance, the modified balance performed satisfactorily, even when it was subjected to acoustic and structural vibration. The balance is an inertially balanced closed-loop servo system where the current to a moving-coil motor needed to restore or null the output from the position sensor is a measure of the force or skin friction tending to displace the moving element. The accuracy of the sensor is directly affected by the position sensor in the feedback loop, in this case a linear-variable differential transformer which has proven to be influenced by temperature gradients.

  7. Thermodynamic aspects of rock friction

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsui, Noa

    2013-01-01

    Rate- and state-dependent friction law for velocity-step tests is analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A simple macroscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic model with a single internal variable reproduces instantaneous jump and relaxation. Velocity weakening appears as a consequence of a plasticity related nonlinear coefficient. Permanent part of displacement corresponds to plastic strain, and relaxation effects are analogous to creep in thermodynamic rheology.

  8. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  9. Advanced Physics Lab at TCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The one semester, one credit hour Modern Physics Lab is viewed as a transition between the structured Physics 1 and 2 labs and junior/senior research. The labs focus on a variety of experiments built around a multichannel analyzer, various alpha, beta and gamma ray detectors and weak radioactive sources. Experiments include radiation safety and detection with a Geiger counter and NaI detector, gamma ray spectroscopy with a germanium detector, beta spectrum, alpha energy loss, gamma ray absorption, Compton effect, nuclear and positron annihilation lifetime, speed of gamma rays. Other experiments include using the analog oscilloscope, x-ray diffraction of diamond and using an SEM/EDX. Error analysis is emphasized throughout. The semester ends with an individual project, often an extension of one of the earlier experiments, and students present their results as a paper and an APS style presentation to the department.

  10. Intrinsic structure and friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets studied by scanning probe microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan-Huai Ding; Hu-Ming Ren; Fei-Hu Chang; Ping Zhang; Yong Jiang

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, atomic structure of single-layered graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) nanosheets was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelingmicroscopy (AFM and STM). Furthermore, friction properties of the graphene and GO nanosheets were studied by frictional force microscopy (FFM). STM imaging provided direct evidence and the morphology was influenced by oxygen-containing groups and defects. The atomic scale structural disorder in a hexagonal two-dimensional network of carbon atoms changes the surface condition, which also caused the frictional property variations of the samples.

  11. Departure of microscopic friction from macroscopic drag in molecular fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Fujiwara, Daiki; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Friction coefficient of the Langevin equation and drag of spherical macroscopic objects in steady flow at low Reynolds numbers are usually regarded as equivalent. We show that the microscopic friction can be different from the macroscopic drag when the mass is taken into account for particles with comparable scale to the surrounding fluid molecules. We illustrate it numerically by molecular dynamics simulation of chloride ion in water. Friction variation by the atomistic mass effect beyond the Langevin regime can be of use in the drag reduction technology as well as the electro or thermophoresis.

  12. Friction characteristics of floppy disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This note presents the principle and structure of a tribological measure for floppy disks.The precision of the force measuring system is 1 mN in loading and 3×10-6 N in friction.The resolution of the film thickness between head and floppy disk is 0.5 nm in the vertical and 1.5 nm in the horizontal direction.In order to investigate the tribological characteristics of floppy disks,six types of floppy disks have been tested and the floating properties of these disks are also studied with film measuring system.The experimental results of the surface morphology and friction coefficient of these floppy disks using the atomic force microscope/friction force mcroscope (AFM/FFM) are in accordance with the conclusion made by our own measuring system.The experimental results show that the air film thickness between head and disk is of the same order as the surface roughness of floppy disks.

  13. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Flow lab.: flow visualization and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chung Kyun; Cho, Won Jin; Hahn, Pil Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    The experimental setups for flow visualization and processes identification in laboratory scale (so called Flow Lab.) has developed to get ideas and answer fundamental questions of flow and migration in geologic media. The setup was made of a granite block of 50x50cm scale and a transparent acrylate plate. The tracers used in this experiments were tritiated water, anions, and sorbing cations as well as an organic dye, eosine, to visualize migration paths. The migration plumes were taken with a digital camera as a function of time and stored as digital images. A migration model was also developed to describe and identify the transport processes. Computer simulation was carried out not only for the hydraulic behavior such as distributions of pressure and flow vectors in the fracture but also for the migration plume and the elution curves.

  15. Lab-on-fiber technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cusano, Andrea; Crescitelli, Alessio; Ricciardi, Armando

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on a research field that is rapidly emerging as one of the most promising ones for the global optics and photonics community: the "lab-on-fiber" technology. Inspired by the well-established 'lab on-a-chip' concept, this new technology essentially envisages novel and highly functionalized devices completely integrated into a single optical fiber for both communication and sensing applications.Based on the R&D experience of some of the world's leading authorities in the fields of optics, photonics, nanotechnology, and material science, this book provides a broad and accurate de

  16. Ntal/Lab/Lat2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaki, Shoko; Jensen, Bettina M; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2007-01-01

    Non-T cell activation linker (NTAL)/linker for activation of B cells (LAB), now officially termed LAT2 (linker for activation of T cells 2) is a 25-30kDa transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP) associated with glycolipid-enriched membrane fractions (GEMs; lipid rafts) in specific cell types of hemat......Non-T cell activation linker (NTAL)/linker for activation of B cells (LAB), now officially termed LAT2 (linker for activation of T cells 2) is a 25-30kDa transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP) associated with glycolipid-enriched membrane fractions (GEMs; lipid rafts) in specific cell types...

  17. Friction factor of annular Poiseuille flow in a transitional regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ishida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Annular Poiseuille flows in a transitional regime were investigated by direct numerical simulations with an emphasis on turbulent statistics including the friction factor that are affected by the presence of large-scale transitional structures. Five different radius ratios in the range of 0.1–0.8 and several friction Reynolds numbers in the range of 48–150 were analyzed to consider various flow states accompanied by characteristic transitional structures. Three characteristic structures, namely, turbulent–laminar coexistence referred to as “(straight puff,”“helical puff,” and “helical turbulence” were observed. The selection of the structures depends on both the radius ratio and the Reynolds number. The findings indicated that despite the transitional state with a turbulent–laminar coexistence, the helical turbulence resulted in a friction factor that was as high as the fully turbulent value. In contrast, with respect to the occurrence of streamwise-finite transitional structures, such as straight/helical puffs, the friction factor decreased in a stepwise manner toward a laminar level. The turbulent statistics revealed asymmetric distributions with respect to the wall-normal direction wherein the profiles and magnitudes were significantly influenced by the occurrence of transitional structures.

  18. Friction of Human Skin against Different Fabrics for Medical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Vilhena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the tribology of human skin is essential to improve and optimize surfaces and materials in contact with the skin. Besides that, friction between the human skin and textiles is a critical factor in the formation of skin injuries, which are caused if the loads and shear forces are high enough and/or over long periods of time. This factor is of particular importance in bedridden patients, since they are not moving about or are confined to wheelchairs. Decubitus ulcers are one of the most frequently-reported iatrogenic injuries in developed countries. The risk of developing decubitus ulcers can be predicted by using the “Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Ulcer Risk” that was developed in 1987 and contains six areas of risk (cognitive-perceptual, immobility, inactivity, moisture, nutrition, friction/shear, although there are limitations to the use of such tools. The coefficient of friction of textiles against skin is mainly influenced by: the nature of the textile, skin moisture content and ambient humidity. This study will investigate how skin friction (different anatomical regions varies, rubbing against different types of contacting materials (i.e., fabrics for medical use under different contact conditions and their relationship in the formation and prevention of decubitus ulcers.

  19. Recent developments in Micro Friction Stir Welding: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithole, Keydon; Vasudeva Rao, Veeredhi

    2016-02-01

    The advent of friction stir welding (FSW) in 1991 has been evolutionary in the joining of metals and related materials. Friction stir welding has enabled the joining of metals that could not be joined by other welding processes. Research has shown that dissimilar materials with very different properties, plastics, composites and even wood can be joined by FSW. Recent activities in the application of FSW has seen the development of micro friction stir welding (μFSW), which is the FSW of very thin sections of thickness 1000 μm (1 mm) or less. Micro friction stir welding further extends the applications of FSW to areas such as copper electrical contacts, tailor-welded blanks, wood. Though μFSW is relatively new development significant work has been done to date with interesting research findings being reported. This paper aims to review developments in μFSW to date. The focus of the paper will be on problems peculiar to μFSW due to downscaling to the micro scale and other practical considerations.

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Stiffness, Friction and Adhesion in Mechanical Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    displacements in the plane is performed. Forces can then be calculated by multiplying by a precalculated Greens function for each wave vector q and...that contacts could advance through propagation of dislocations across the interface rather than uniform sliding. The Burgers vector of the...College London, Dec. 9, 2010 13) "Friction forces from atomic to macroscopic scales," XXXIV Encontro Nacional de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Iguassu

  1. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2005-09-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Low friction ring designs have already been recommended in a previous phase, with full-scale engine validation partially completed. Current accomplishments include the addition of several additional power cylinder design areas to the overall system analysis. These include analyses of lubricant and cylinder surface finish and a parametric study of piston design. The Waukesha engine was found to be already well optimized in the areas of lubricant, surface skewness and honing cross-hatch angle, where friction reductions of 12% for lubricant, and 5% for surface characteristics, are projected. For the piston, a friction reduction of up to 50% may be possible by controlling waviness alone, while additional friction reductions are expected when other parameters are optimized. A total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% efficiency. Key elements of the continuing work include further analysis and optimization of the engine piston design, in-engine testing of recommended lubricant and surface designs, design iteration and optimization of previously recommended technologies, and full-engine testing of a complete, optimized, low-friction power cylinder system.

  2. AFM friction and adhesion mapping of the substructures of human hair cuticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James R., E-mail: james.smith@port.ac.uk [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Tsibouklis, John; Nevell, Thomas G. [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Breakspear, Steven [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Global R and D–Hair Beauty Laboratory, Kao Corporation, 2-1-3, Bunka Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 131-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Using atomic force microscopy, values of the microscale friction coefficient, the tip (silicon nitride) - surface adhesion force and the corresponding adhesion energy, for the substructures that constitute the surface of human hair (European brown hair) have been determined from Amonton plots. The values, mapped for comparison with surface topography, corresponded qualitatively with the substructures’ plane surface characteristics. Localised maps and values of the frictional coefficient, extracted avoiding scale edge effects, are likely to inform the formulation of hair-care products and treatments.

  3. The Establishment of a New Friction Stir Welding Process Development Facility at NASA/MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Timothy P.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of full scale development is to mitigate scale-up issues before the vehicle ever reaches production and verify assembly design models. Only at full scale can the true challenges associated with production be identified and dealt with. Also, only at full scale can the delta shift between lab and subscale hardware manufacture and assembly be assessed.

  4. Measuring Coefficients of Friction for Materials Commonly Used in Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Robert; Martell, Eric

    2008-04-01

    While designing a stage setup for a theatrical presentation, designers must consider equipment, materials, cost and manpower, and we can use physics to simplify and enhance the process. Unfortunately, there is a lack of information about the properties of materials commonly used in theatre. The objective of this research was to determine the coefficients of static and kinetic friction for several materials commonly used in theatrical scene construction and the coefficients of rolling friction for a series of commonly used casters. Materials of known coefficients were tested to confirm the accuracy of the experimental process. Data was collected using a sled style apparatus and LabVIEW software. Data was analyzed in mass volumes using Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and macros. This research was performed as a part of the Physics of Theatre project, a joint collaboration between Millikin University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and was supported in part by Millikin, UIUC, and the United States Institute for Theatre Technology.

  5. E-Labs - Learning with Authentic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, Marjorie G. [Fermilab; Wayne, Mitchell [Notre Dame U.

    2016-01-01

    the success teachers have had providing an opportunity for students to: • Organize and conduct authentic research. • Experience the environment of scientific collaborations. • Possibly make real contributions to a burgeoning scientific field. We've created projects that are problem-based, student driven and technology dependent. Students reach beyond classroom walls to explore data with other students and experts and share results, publishing original work to a worldwide audience. Students can discover and extend the research of other students, modeling the processes of modern, large-scale research projects. From start to finish e-Labs are student-led, teacher-guided projects. Students need only a Web browser to access computing techniques employed by professional researchers. A Project Map with milestones allows students to set the research plan rather than follow a step-by-step process common in other online projects. Most importantly, e-Labs build the learning experience around the students' own questions and let them use the very tools that scientists use. Students contribute to and access shared data, most derived from professional research databases. They use common analysis tools, store their work and use metadata to discover, replicate and confirm the research of others. This is where real scientific collaboration begins. Using online tools, students correspond with other research groups, post comments and questions, prepare summary reports, and in general participate in the part of scientific research that is often left out of classroom experiments. Teaching tools such as student and teacher logbooks, pre- and post-tests and an assessment rubric aligned with learner outcomes help teachers guide student work. Constraints on interface designs and administrative tools such as registration databases give teachers the "one-stop-shopping" they seek for multiple e-Labs. Teaching and administrative tools also allow us to track usage and assess the

  6. Carrier Analysis Lab (CAL) – Aircraft/Weapons/Ship Compatibility Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Carrier Analysis Lab (CAL) - Aircraft/Weapons/Ship Compatibility Lab located at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, NJ provides...

  7. A Simple, Successful Capacitor Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, William

    2011-01-01

    Capacitors are a fundamental component of modern electronics. They appear in myriad devices and in an enormous range of sizes. Although our students are taught the function and analysis of capacitors, few have the opportunity to use them in our labs.

  8. The Telecom Lab is moving

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    As of 2nd March 2009, the Telecom Lab will move to Building 58 R-017. The Telecom Lab is the central point for all support questions regarding CERN mobile phone services (provision of SIM cards, requests for modifications of subscriptions, diagnostics for mobile phone problems, etc.). The opening hours as well as the contact details for the Telecom Lab remain unchanged: New location: Building 58 R-017 Opening hours: Every week day, from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. Phone number: 72480 Email address: labo.telecom@cern.ch This change has no impact on support requests for mobile services. Users can still submit their requests concerning mobile phone subscriptions using the usual EDH form (https://edh.cern.ch/Document/GSM). The automatic message sent to inform users of their SIM card availability will be updated to indicate the new Telecom Lab location. You can find all information related to CERN mobile phone services at the following link: http://cern.ch/gsm CS Section - IT/CS group

  9. Friction and Wear in Timing Belt Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Timing belt tooth goes into contact with a drive pulley, stretched to the maximum, because of the previous tension. When the contact begins the peak of the belt tooth makes the contact with the outer surface of the pulley teeth. The process of the teeth entering into the contact zone is accompanied with the relative sliding of their side surfaces and appropriate friction force. The normal force value is changing with the parabolic function, which also leads to the changes of the friction force. The biggest value of the normal force and of the friction force is at the tooth root. Hollow between teeth and the tip of the pulley teeth are also in contact. Occasionally, the face surface of the belt and the flange are also in contact. The friction occurs in those tribomechanical systems, also. Values of these friction forces are lower compared with the friction force, which occurs at the teeth root.

  10. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  11. Friction tensor concept for textured surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Y Simha; Anirudhan Pottirayil; Pradeep L Menezes; Satish V Kailas

    2008-06-01

    Directionality of grinding marks influences the coefficient of friction during sliding. Depending on the sliding direction the coefficient of friction varies between maximum and minimum for textured surfaces. For random surfaces without any texture the friction coefficient becomes independent of the sliding direction. This paper proposes the concept of a friction tensor analogous to the heat conduction tensor in anisotropic media. This implies that there exists two principal friction coefficients $\\mu_{1,2}$ analogous to the principal conductivities $k_{1,2}$. For symmetrically textured surfaces the principal directions are orthogonal with atleast one plane of symmetry. However, in the case of polished single crystalline solids in relative sliding motion, crystallographic texture controls the friction tensor.

  12. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mofidi, M; Prakash, B [Division of Machine Elements, Luleaa University of Technology, Luleaa SE-97187 (Sweden); Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Albohr, O [Pirelli Deutschland AG, 64733 Hoechst/Odenwald, Postfach 1120 (Germany)

    2008-02-27

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  13. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  14. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi, M.; Prakash, B.; Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.

    2008-02-01

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  15. Modelling cohesive, frictional and viscoplastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehossein, Habib; Qin, Zongyi

    2016-06-01

    Most materials in mining and civil engineering construction are not only viscoplastic, but also cohesive frictional. Fresh concrete, fly ash and mining slurries are all granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids, although solid concrete is normally considered as a cohesive frictional material. Presented here is both a formulation of the pipe and disc flow rates as a function of pressure and pressure gradient and the CFD application to fresh concrete flow in L-Box tests.

  16. The role of friction in orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Ribeiro Pacheco; Wellington Corrêa Jansen; Dauro Douglas de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sliding mechanics is widely used during orthodontic treatment. One of the disadvantages of this mechanics is the friction generated at the bracket/archwire interface, which may reduce the amount of desired orthodontic movement obtained. Due to the application and great acceptance of this type of mechanics, the role of friction in Orthodontics has been of interest for both clinicians and scientists. OBJECTIVE: Therefore, this article discussed how friction affects orthodontic too...

  17. Friction and wear behaviour of self lubricating bearing liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Russell

    The thesis describes a numerical model for evaluating the variation of friction and wear of a self lubricating bearing liner over its useful wear life. Self-lubricating bearings have been in widespread use since the mid-1950s, particularly in the aerospace industry where they have the advantage of being low maintenance components. They are commonly used in relatively low speed, reciprocating applications such as control surface actuators, and usually consist of a spherical bearing with the inner and outer elements separated by a composite textile resin-bonded liner. A finite element model has been developed to predict the local stiffness of a particular liner at different states of wear. Results obtained using the model were used to predict the overall friction coefficient as it evolves due to wear, which is a novel approach. Experimental testing was performed on a bespoke flat-on-flat wear test rig with a reciprocating motion to validate the results of the friction model.. These tests were carried out on a commercially-available bearing liner, predominantly at a high contact pressure and an average sliding speed of 0.2 ms-1. Good agreement between predicted and experimentally measured wear was obtained when appropriate coefficients of friction were used in the friction model, and when the reciprocating sliding distance was above a critical value. A numerical wear model was also developed to predict the trend of backlash development in real bearing geometries using a novel approach. Results from the wear model were validated against full-scale bearing tests carried out elsewhere by the sponsoring company. Good agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the experimental results for the first 80% of the bearing wear life, and explanations for the discrepancy during the last 20% of the wear life have been proposed..

  18. How to teach friction: Experiments and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Borghi, Lidia; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    Students generally have difficulty understanding friction and its associated phenomena. High school and introductory college-level physics courses usually do not give the topic the attention it deserves. We have designed a sequence for teaching about friction between solids based on a didactic reconstruction of the relevant physics, as well as research findings about student conceptions. The sequence begins with demonstrations that illustrate different types of friction. Experiments are subsequently performed to motivate students to obtain quantitative relations in the form of phenomenological laws. To help students understand the mechanisms producing friction, models illustrating the processes taking place on the surface of bodies in contact are proposed.

  19. Noise and vibration in friction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sergienko, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The book analyzes the basic problems of oscillation processes and theoretical aspects of noise and vibration in friction systems. It presents generalized information available in literature data and results of the authors in vibroacoustics of friction joints, including car brakes and transmissions. The authors consider the main approaches to abatement of noise and vibration in non-stationary friction processes. Special attention is paid to materials science aspects, in particular to advanced composite materials used to improve the vibroacoustic characteristics of tribopairs The book is intended for researchers and technicians, students and post-graduates specializing in mechanical engineering, maintenance of machines and transport means, production certification, problems of friction and vibroacoustics.

  20. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented using finite element method. Nonlinear finite element model for gear tooth contact with rolling/sliding is then developed. The contact zones for multiple tooth pairs are identified and the associated integration situation is derived. The illustrated bending stress and transmission error results with static and dynamic boundary conditions indicate the significant effects due to the sliding friction between the surfaces of contacted gear teeth, and the friction effect can not be ignored. To understand the particular static and dynamic frictional effects on gear tooth contact analysis, some significant phenomena of gained results will also be discussed. The potentially significant contribution of tooth frictional shear stress is presented, particularly in the case of gear tooth contact analysis with both static and dynamic boundary conditions.

  1. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  2. Job Heterogeneity and Coordination Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Daniel

    the job ladder, how the identification of assortative matching is fundamentally different in directed and undirected search models, how our theory accounts for business cycle facts related to inter-temporal changes in job offer distributions, and how our model could also be used to identify......We develop a new directed search model of a frictional labor market with a continuum of heterogenous workers and firms. We estimate two versions of the model - auction and price posting - using Danish data on wages and productivities. Assuming heterogenous workers with no comparative advantage, we...

  3. Friction of Plastic Rotating Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    for speeds eve ., the rdnge: 10 - 300 cm/s. Overwhelming evidence was presented to support a melt phenomena. Melt depth of: polymer, pins on a glass disk...Polymers," Proc. Roy. Soc., (London),. A291 (1966), p. 186. 24. Rabinowicz , S., et al., "The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on the Shear Yield Behavior of...34 Proc. Roy.,Soc., (London), A269. (19620 p. 368. 51. Carignan, F. J., and Rabinowicz , E., "Friction and Wear at ligh Sliding Speeds," ASLE Trans., 24

  4. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  5. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  6. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  7. GeoLab Sample Handling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop  a robotic sample handling/ manipulator system for the GeoLab glovebox. This work leverages from earlier GeoLab work and a 2012 collaboration with a...

  8. Updated version of an interim connection space LabPQR for spectral color reproduction: LabLab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Junfeng; Liang, Jingxing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interim connection space (ICS) called LabLab, which is an updated version of LabPQR, to overcome the drawback that the last three dimensions of LabPQR have no definite colorimetric meanings. We extended and improved the method by which the first three dimensions of LabPQR are deduced to obtain an ICS consisting of two sets of CIELAB values under different illuminants, and the reconstructed spectra from LabLab were obtained by minimizing colorimetric errors by means of the computational formula of the CIE-XYZ tristimulus values combined with least-squares best fit. The improvement obtained from the proposed method was tested to compress and reconstruct the reflectance spectra of the 1950 Natural Color System color chips and more than 50,000 ISO SOCS color patches as well as six multispectral images acquired by multispectral image acquisition systems using 1600 glossy Munsell color chips as training samples. The performance was evaluated by the mean values of color differences between the original and reconstructed spectra under the CIE 1931 standard colorimetric observer and the CIE standard illuminants D50, D55, D65, D75, F2, F7, F11, and A as well as five multichip white LED light sources. The mean and maximum values of the root mean square errors between the original and reconstructed spectra were also calculated. The experimental results show that the proposed three LabLab interim connection spaces significantly outperform principal component analysis, LabPQR, XYZLMS, Fairman-Brill, and LabRGB in colorimetric reconstruction accuracy at the cost of slight reduction of spectral reconstruction accuracy and illuminant independence of color differences of the suggested LabLab interim connection spaces outperform other interim connection spaces. In addition, the presented LabLab interim connection spaces could be quite compatible with the extensively used colorimetric management system since each dimension has definite colorimetric

  9. Single-molecule manipulation experiments to explore friction and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, R.; Kawai, S.; Meier, T.; Glatzel, T.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.

    2017-03-01

    Friction forces, which arise when two bodies that are in contact are moved with respect to one another, are ubiquitous phenomena. Although various measurement tools have been developed to study these phenomena at all length scales, such investigations are highly challenging when tackling the scale of single molecules in motion on a surface. This work reviews the recent advances in single-molecule manipulation experiments performed at low temperature with the aim of understanding the fundamental frictional response of single molecules. Following the advent of ‘nanotribology’ in the field based on the atomic force microscopy technique, we will show the technical requirements to direct those studies at the single-molecule level. We will also discuss the experimental prerequisites needed to obtain and interpret the phenomena, such as the implementation of single-molecule manipulation techniques, the processing of the experimental data or their comparison with appropriate numerical models. Finally, we will report examples of the controlled vertical and lateral manipulation of long polymeric chains, graphene nanoribbons or single porphyrin molecules that systematically reveal friction-like characteristics while sliding over atomically clean surfaces.

  10. The Development of MSFC Usability Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the development of the usability lab at Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of the lab was to integrate a fully functioning usability laboratory to provide a resource for future human factor assessments. and to implement preliminary usability testing on a MSFC website to validate the functionality of the lab.

  11. NI新款LabVIEW工具包

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    美国国家仪器有限公司(National Instruments,NI)近日推出新的LabVIEW图形化开发环境的软件工程工具——LabVIEW单元测试工具包和LabVIEW桌面执行追踪工具包。

  12. Comparison of Frictional Heating Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Nicholas R [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

  13. Exclusive processes at Jefferson Lab

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haiyan Gao

    2003-11-01

    Mapping the transition from strongly interacting, non-perturbative quantum chromodynamics, where nucleon–meson degrees of freedom are effective to perturbative QCD of quark and gluon degrees of freedom, is one of the most fundamental, challenging tasks in nuclear and particle physics. Exclusive processes such as proton–proton elastic scattering, meson photoproduction, and deuteron photodisintegration have been pursued extensively at many laboratories over the years in the search for such a transition, particularly at Jefferson Lab in recent years, taking the advantage of the high luminosity capability of the CEBAF facility. In this talk, I review recent results from Jefferson Lab on deuteron photodisintegration and photopion production processes and the future 12 GeV program.

  14. Learning from Local Wisdom: Friction Damper in Traditional Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudjisuryadi P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is situated in the so called “Ring of Fire” where earthquake are very frequent. Despite of all the engineering effort, due to the March 28, 2005 strong earthquake (8.7 on Richter scale a lot of modern buildings in Nias collapsed, while the traditional Northern Nias house (omohada survived without any damage. Undoubtedly many other traditional buildings in other area in Indonesia have survived similar earthquake. Something in common of the traditional building are the columns which usually are not fixed on the ground, but rest on top of flat stones. In this paper some traditional building are subjected to non linear time history analysis to artificial earthquake equivalent to 500 years return period earthquake. This study shows that apparently the columns which rest on top of flat stone acts as friction damper or base isolation. The presence of sliding at the friction type support significantly reduces the internal forces in the structure.

  15. Contact mechanics and friction physical principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Valentin L

    2017-01-01

    This application-oriented book introduces readers to the associations and relationships between contact mechanics and friction, providing them with a deeper understanding of tribology. It addresses the related phenomena of contacts, adhesion, capillary forces, friction, lubrication, and wear from a consistent point of view. The author presents (1) methods for rough estimates of tribological quantities, (2) simple and general methods for analytical calculations, and (3) the crossover into numerical simulation methods, the goal being to convey a consistent view of tribological processes at various scales of magnitude (from nanotribology to earthquake research). The book also explores the system dynamic aspects of tribological systems, such as squeal and its suppression, as well as other types of instabilities and spatial patterns. It includes problems and worked-out solutions for the respective chapters, giving readers ample opportunity to apply the theory to practical situations and to deepen their understandi...

  16. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  17. Characterization of the Frictional Response of Squamata Shed Skin in Comparison to Human skin

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aal, H A

    2010-01-01

    Deterministic surfaces are constructs of which profile, topography and textures are integral to the function of the system they enclose. They are designed to yield a predetermined rubbing response. Developing such entities relies on controlling the structure of the rubbing interface so that, not only the surface is of optimized topography, but also is able to self-adjust its behavior according to the evolution of sliding conditions. Inspirations for such designs are frequently encountered in natural species. In particular, and from a tribological point of view, Squamate Reptiles, offer diverse examples where surface texturing, submicron and nano-scale features, achieves frictional regulation. In this paper, we study the frictional response of shed skin obtained from a Python regius snake. The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional re...

  18. Numerical Studies of Friction Between Metallic Surfaces and of its Dependence on Electric Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintanis, Evangelos; Marder, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We will present molecular dynamics simulations that explore the frictional mechanisms between clean metallic surfaces. We employ the HOLA molecular dynamics code to run slider-on-block experiments. Both objects are allowed to evolve freely. We recover realistic coefficients of friction and verify the importance of cold-welding and plastic deformations in dry sliding friction. We also find that plastic deformations can significantly affect both objects, despite a difference in hardness. Metallic contacts have significant technological applications in the transmission of electric currents. To explore the effects of the latter to sliding, we had to integrate an electrodynamics solver into the molecular dynamics code. The disparate time scales involved posed a challenge, but we have developed an efficient scheme for such an integration. A limited electrodynamic solver has been implemented and we are currently exploring the effects of currents in the friction and wear of metallic contacts.

  19. Passive control experiment of building with spacious first story by magnet-friction energy dissipation device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qing-xiang; WANG Wei

    2005-01-01

    Based on the former performance capacity experiments of the magnet-friction energy dissipation devices, including the permanent magnet-friction energy dissipation device (PMF) and electromagnet-friction energy dissipation devices ( EMF), a 5-story steel frame model with spacious first story is designed and made according to a scale of 1/4. The magnet-friction energy dissipation devices can realize continuously varied controlling force, with rapid response and reverse recognition. Therefore, they overcome shortcomings usually found in energy dissipation devices whose force models are invariable. The two kinds of devices were fixed on the flexible first story of the structure model, and the shaking table tests have been carried out, respectively. In these tests,the performance of the devices and their effectiveness in structural control were confirmed. In this paper, the test results and analysis are discussed.

  20. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of…

  1. On the Blasius correlation for friction factors

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Khanh Tuoc

    2010-01-01

    The Blasius empirical correlation for turbulent pipe friction factors is derived from first principles and extended to non-Newtonian power law fluids. Two alternative formulations are obtained that both correlate well with the experimental measurements of Dodge, Bogue and Yoo. Key words: Blasius, turbulent friction factor, power law fluids

  2. FACTORS INFLUENCING FRICTION OF PHOSPHATE COATINGS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    surface roughness, crystalline structure , and velocity. The coefficients of friction for manganese phosphate coatings did not differ to any practical...The coefficient of friction was independent of the applied load. Velocity during dynamic testing, surface finish, and crystalline structure influenced

  3. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  4. The Gulf Stream: Inertia and friction

    OpenAIRE

    ASSAF, GAD

    2011-01-01

    The inertial theory of the Gulf Stream (Charney, 1955) is extended to include vertical friction in the cyclonic shear zone (the western side) of the stream. The vertical friction is assumed to be controlled by local Froude conditions.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1977.tb00717.x

  5. Graphite friction coefficient for various conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The friction coefficient the graphite used in the Tsinghua University 10MW High Tem-perature Gas-Cooled Reactor was analyzed for various conditions. The variation of the graphitefriction coefficient was measured for various sliding velocities, sliding distances, normal loads, en-vironments and temperatures. A scanning elector microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the fric-tion surfaces.

  6. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  7. Trial manufacture of rotary friction tester and frictional force measurement of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Kanari, M; Tanzawa, S

    2002-01-01

    In the plasma confinement type fusion reactor, in-vessel structures such as a blanket module slide at the joints each other when plasma disruption occurs, and then frictional heat is generated there. Therefore, for the selection of material and the use as the design data, it is important to understand the frictional characteristics of metals and ceramic films in the vacuum. In the present study, we have manufactured a prototype of rotary friction tester and examined the performances of the tester. The frictional characteristics of metals in the room air was measured using the friction tester, and the results obtained are as follows. A drifting friction force for a constant time and a friction force during the idling were 98 mN and 225 mN, respectively. These values were sufficiently small as compared to pressing load (9.8 - 57.8 N) used in the friction test. In a friction force measurement of stainless steel, dynamic friction force obeyed Amontons' law which indicated that dynamic friction force is not depend...

  8. Pyrometamorphism of Fault Zone Rocks Induced by Frictional Heating in High-velocity Friction Tests: Reliable Records of Seismic Slip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, J.; Ando, J.; Kim, J.; Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-12-01

    Recognition of seismic slip zone is important for a better understanding of earthquake generation processes in fault zones and paleoseismology. However, there has been no reliable record of ancient seismic slip except pseudotachylyte. Recently, it has been suggested that decomposition (dehydration or decarbonation) products due to frictional heating can be used as a seismic slip record. The decomposition products, however, can be easily rehydrated or recarbonated with pervasive fluid migration in the fault zone after seismic slip, raising some question about their stability as a seismic slip record. Here, we review microstructural and mineralogical changes of the simulated fault zones induced by frictional heating (pyrometamorphism) from high-velocity friction tests (HVFT) on siltstone, sandstone and carbonates at seismic slip rates, and discuss on their stability after seismic slip. HVFT on siltstone generates pseuodotachylyte in the principal slip zone (0.30-0.75 mm thick) with 'damage' layer (0.1-0.2 mm thick) along its margins. Chlorite in the damage layer suffers an incipient dehydration with many voids (0.2-1.0 μm in diameter) in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), appearing as dark tiny spots both in plane-polarized light and back-scattered electron (BSE) photomicrographs. HVFT on brown sandstone induces a color change of wall rocks adjacent to the principal slip zone (brown to red) due to the dehydration of iron hydroxides with frictional heating. These dehydration products in siltstone and sandstone due to frictional heating may be unstable since they would be easily rehydrated with fluid infiltration after a seismic slip. HVFT on carbonates including Carrara marble and siderite-bearing gouges produces decarbonation products of nano-scale lime (CaO) and magnetite (Fe3O4), respectively. Lime is a very unstable phase whereas magnetite is a stable and thus may be used as an indicator of seismic slip. The simulated fault zones of Carrara marble contain

  9. Effects of friction on forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackbourn, Luke A. K.; Tran, Chuong V.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale dissipation mechanisms have been routinely employed in numerical simulations of two-dimensional turbulence to absorb energy at large scales, presumably mimicking the quasisteady picture of Kraichnan in an unbounded fluid. Here, “side effects” of such a mechanism—mechanical friction—on the small-scale dynamics of forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence are elaborated by both theoretical and numerical analysis. Given a positive friction coefficient α, viscous dissipation of enstrophy has been known to vanish in the inviscid limit ν→0. This effectively renders the scale-neutral friction the only mechanism responsible for enstrophy dissipation in that limit. The resulting dynamical picture is that the classical enstrophy inertial range becomes a dissipation range in which the dissipation of enstrophy by friction mainly occurs. For each α>0, there exists a critical viscosity νc, which depends on physical parameters, separating the regimes of predominant viscous and frictional dissipation of enstrophy. It is found that νc=[η'1/3/(Ckf2)]exp[-η'1/3/(Cα)], where η' is half the enstrophy injection rate, kf is the forcing wave number, and C is a nondimensional constant (the Kraichnan-Batchelor constant). The present results have important theoretical and practical implications. Apparently, mechanical friction is a poor choice in numerical attempts to address fundamental issues concerning the direct enstrophy transfer in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence. Furthermore, as relatively strong friction naturally occurs on the surfaces and at lateral boundaries of experimental fluids as well as at the interfaces of shallow layers in geophysical fluid models, the frictional effects discussed in this study are crucial in understanding the dynamics of these systems.

  10. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional...... cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant...... shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity....

  11. Anomalous Velocity Dependence of the Friction Coefficient of an Air Supported Pulley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crismani, Matteo; Nauenberg, Michael

    2009-11-01

    A standard undergraduate lab exercise to verify Newton's law, F = ma, is to measure the acceleration a of a glider of mass m suspended on an air track. In our experiment the glider is accelerated by a thin tape attached to the glider at one end, and to a weight of mass M at the other end. The weight hangs vertically via a pulley over which the tape is suspended by air pressure. In the absence of friction, the force pulling the glider is F = (M m/(M + m)g, where g is the acceleration of gravity. To the accuracy provided by the fast electronic timers (accurate to 1/10000 second) used in our experiment to measure the velocity and the acceleration of the glider, we verified that the friction due to the air track can be neglected. But we found that this is not the case for the friction due to the air pulley which adds a component -v/T to the force F on the glider, where T is the friction coefficient. We have measured the dependence of this coefficient on v, and found an excellent analytic fit to our data. This fit deviates considerable from the conventional assumption that 1/T is a constant and/or depends linearly on v.

  12. FRICTION-BOON OR BANE IN ORTHODONTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Most fixed appliance techniques involve some degree of sliding between brackets and arch wires. A sound knowledge of the various factors affecting the magnitude of friction is of paramount importance to the clinician. The present study was performed to evaluate and compare the frictional resistance and characteristics between self-ligating brackets and pre-adjusted edgewise brackets with different types of ligation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tidy's frictional test design was used to simulate retraction of tooth along with artificial saliva to simulate wet conditions in oral cavity. The jig with this assembly was mounted on the Instron machine with the cross head moving upwards at a speed of 5mm/min. The movable bracket was suspended from the load cell of the testing machine, while the jig was mounted on cross head of machine and the load cell readings were recorded on digital display. Following wires are used 0.016 HANT, 0.019X 0.025HANT, 0.019X 0.025 SS, 0.021X 0.025 SS wires are used. The brackets used were 0.022 slot Damon, 0.022 Smart clip and 0.022 slot MBT system. RESULTS: Self ligating brackets were shown to produce lesser friction when compared to the conventional brackets used with modules, and stainless steel ligatures. Damon self-ligating brackets produce a least friction of all the brackets used in the study. Stainless steel ligatures produced the least friction compared to elastomeric. CONCLUSION: Self ligation brackets produce lesser friction than the conventional brackets ligated with elastomeric modules and stainless steel ligature. Damon self-ligating brackets produce a least friction of all the brackets used in the study width of the bracket was also found to be directly proportional to the friction produced 0.0016HANT with elastomeric modules produce more friction due increase in flexibility of wire.

  13. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wentuo, E-mail: hanwentuo@hotmail.com [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tsuda, Naoto [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Serizawa, Hisashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Chen, Dongsheng [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ha, Yoosung [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Noto, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  14. The Defining Characteristics of Urban Living Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Steen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The organization of supported and sustainable urban interventions is challenging, with multiple actors involved, fragmented decision-making powers, and multiple values at stake. Globally, urban living labs have become a fashionable phenomenon to tackle this challenge, fostering the development and implementation of innovation, experimentation, and knowledge in urban, real-life settings while emphasizing the important role of participation and co-creation. However, although urban living labs could in this way help cities to speed up the sustainable transition, urban living lab experts agree that, in order to truly succeed in these ambitious tasks, the way urban living labs are being shaped and steered needs further research. Yet, they also confirm the existing variation and opaqueness in the definition of the concept. This article contributes to conceptual clarity by developing an operationalized definition of urban living labs, which has been used to assess 90 sustainable urban innovation projects in the city of Amsterdam. The assessment shows that the majority of the projects that are labelled as living labs do not include one or more of the defining elements of a living lab. In particular, the defining co-creation and development activities were found to be absent in many of the projects. This article makes it possible to categorize alleged living lab projects and distill the “true” living labs from the many improperly labelled or unlabelled living labs, allowing more specific analyses and, ultimately, better targeted methodological recommendations for urban living labs.

  15. LabVIEW 8 student edition

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    For courses in Measurement and Instrumentation, Electrical Engineering lab, and Physics and Chemistry lab. This revised printing has been updated to include new LabVIEW 8.2 Student Edition. National Instruments' LabVIEW is the defacto industry standard for test, measurement, and automation software solutions. With the Student Edition of LabVIEW, students can design graphical programming solutions to their classroom problems and laboratory experiments with software that delivers the graphical programming capabilites of the LabVIEW professional version. . The Student Edition is also compatible with all National Instruments data acquisition and instrument control hardware. Note: The LabVIEW Student Edition is available to students, faculty, and staff for personal educational use only. It is not intended for research, institutional, or commercial use. For more information about these licensing options, please visit the National Instruments website at (http:www.ni.com/academic/)

  16. Spectroscopic signatures of quantum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Juliane; Bennett, Robert; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a formula for the spectroscopically accessible level shifts and decay rates of an atom moving at an arbitrary angle relative to a surface. Our Markov formulation leads to an intuitive analytic description whereby the shifts and rates are obtained from the coefficients of the Heisenberg equation of motion for the atomic flip operators but with complex Doppler-shifted (velocity-dependent) transition frequencies. Our results conclusively demonstrate that for the limiting case of parallel motion the shifts and rates are quadratic or higher in the atomic velocity. We show that a stronger, linear velocity dependence is exhibited by the rates and shifts for perpendicular motion, thus opening the prospect of experimentally probing the Markovian approach to the phenomenon of quantum friction.

  17. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  18. Mapping Instabilities in Polymer Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Charles; Crosby, Alfred

    2005-03-01

    Schallamach waves are instabilities that occur as interfaces between a soft elastomer and rigid surface slide past each other.(1) The presence of Schallamach waves can lead to drastic changes in frictional properties. Although the occurrence of Schallamach waves has been studied for the past several decades, a general map relating fundamental material properties, geometry, and operating conditions (i.e. speed and temperature) has not been established. Using a combinatorial approach, we illustrate the role of modulus, testing velocity and surface energetics of crosslinked poly(dimethyl siloxane) on the generation Schallamach waves. This knowledge will be used with polymer patterning processes to fabricate responsive coatings for applications such as anti-fouling coatings. (1)Schallamach, A.;Wear 1971,17, 301-312.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of metallic friction and of its dependence on electric currents - development and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintanis, Evangelos Anastasios

    We have extended the HOLA molecular dynamics (MD) code to run slider-on-block friction experiments for Al and Cu. Both objects are allowed to evolve freely and show marked deformation despite the hardness difference. We recover realistic coefficients of friction and verify the importance of cold-welding and plastic deformations in dry sliding friction. Our first data also show a mechanism for decoupling between load and friction at high velocities. Such a mechanism can explain an increase in the coefficient of friction of metals with velocity. The study of the effects of currents on our system required the development of a suitable electrodynamic (ED) solver, as the disparity of MD and ED time scales threatened the efficiency of our code. Our first simulations combining ED and MD are presented.

  20. Temperature dependent effective friction coefficient estimation in friction stir welding with the bobbin tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction coefficient in many friction stir welding researches is generally used as an effective, constant value without concern on the adaptable and changeable nature of the friction during welding sequence. This is understandable because the main problem in analyzing friction in friction stir welding are complex nature of the friction processes, case-dependent and time dependent contact between the bodies, influence of the temperature, sliding velocity, etc. This paper is presenting a complex experimental-numerical-analytical model for estimating the effective friction coefficient on contact of the bobbin tool and welding plates during welding, considering the temperature at the contact as the most influencing parameter on friction. The estimation criterion is the correspondence of the experimental temperature and temperature from the numerical model. The estimation procedure is iterative and parametric - the heat transport parameters and friction coefficient are adapted during the estimation procedure in a realistic manner to achieve relative difference between experimental and model’s temperature lower than 3%. The results show that friction coefficient varies from 0.01 to 0.21 for steel-aluminium alloy contact and temperature range from 406°C to 22°C.

  1. Thermal activation in boundary lubricated friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, P.C. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rabinowicz, E. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Iwasa, Y. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The friction coefficients for copper pairs lubricated with fatty acids and fluorinated fatty acids have been measured over a wide range of sliding speeds and temperatures. Sliding speeds in the range 10{sup -7}-10{sup -2} m s{sup -1} and temperatures in the range 4.2-300 K were used. The friction coefficients near 300 K are generally low and increase with sliding speed, while the friction coefficients at low temperatures are markedly higher and relatively independent of velocity. Each lubricant`s friction vs. velocity behavior over the temperature range 150-300 K can be described by a friction-velocity master curve derived from a thermal activation model for the lubricant`s shear strength. The activation energies deduced from this friction model are identical to those obtained in the same temperature range for a vibrational mode associated with low temperature mechanical relaxations in similarly structured polymers. These results suggest that thermally activated interfacial shear is responsible for the fatty acids` positive-sloped friction vs. velocity characteristics at low sliding speeds near room temperature. (orig.)

  2. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading.

  3. Assessment of semi-active friction dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Braga; Coelho, Humberto Tronconi; Lepore Neto, Francisco Paulo; Mafhoud, Jarir

    2017-09-01

    The use of friction dampers has been widely proposed for a variety of mechanical systems for which applying viscoelastic materials, fluid based dampers or other viscous dampers is impossible. An important example is the application of friction dampers in aircraft engines to reduce the blades' vibration amplitudes. In most cases, friction dampers have been studied in a passive manner, but significant improvements can be achieved by controlling the normal force in the contact region. The aim of this paper is to present and study five control strategies for friction dampers based on three different hysteresis cycles by using the Harmonic Balance Method (HBM), a numerical and experimental analysis. The first control strategy uses the friction force as a resistance when the system is deviating from its equilibrium position. The second control strategy maximizes the energy removal in each harmonic oscillation cycle by calculating the optimal normal force based on the last displacement peak. The third control strategy combines the first strategy with the homogenous modulation of the friction force. Finally, the last two strategies attempt to predict the system's movement based on its velocity and acceleration and our knowledge of its physical properties. Numerical and experimental studies are performed with these five strategies, which define the performance metrics. The experimental testing rig is fully identified and its parameters are used for numerical simulations. The obtained results show the satisfactory performance of the friction damper and selected strategy and the suitable agreement between the numerical and experimental results.

  4. Digital media labs in libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Amanda L

    2014-01-01

    Families share stories with each other and veterans reconnect with their comrades, while teens edit music videos and then upload them to the web: all this and more can happen in the digital media lab (DML), a gathering of equipment with which people create digital content or convert content that is in analog formats. Enabling community members to create digital content was identified by The Edge Initiative, a national coalition of leading library and local government organizations, as a library technology benchmark. Surveying academic and public libraries in a variety of settings and sharing a

  5. Double success for neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    "The Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy is celebrating two key developments in the field of neutrino physics. Number one is the first ever detection, by the OPERA experiement, of possible tau neutrino that has switched its identity from a muon neutrino as it travelled form its origins at CERN in Switzerland to the Italian lab. Number two is the successful start-up of the ICARUS detector, which, like OPERA, is designed to study neutrinos that "oscillate" between types" (0.5 pages)

  6. Laser safety in the lab

    CERN Document Server

    Barat, Ken L

    2012-01-01

    There is no more challenging setting for laser use than a research environment. In almost every other setting the laser controls count on engineering controls, and human exposure is kept to a minimum. In research, however, the user often manipulates the optical layout and thereby places him or herself in peril, but this does not mean that accidents and injury are unavoidable. On the contrary, laser accidents can be avoided by following a number of simple approaches. [i]Laser Safety in the Lab[/i] provides the laser user and laser safety officer with practical guidelines from housekeeping to ey

  7. Tripping Effects on the Friction Factor in Turbulent Pipe Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salaymeh, A.; Bayoumi, O. A.; Durst, F.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2004-11-01

    Tripping devices are usually installed at the entrance of laboratory-scale pipe test sections to obtain a fully developed turbulent flow sooner. The tripping of laminar flow to induce turbulence can be carried out in different ways, such as using cylindrical wires, sand papers, well-organized tape letters, fences, etc. Claims of tripping effects have been made periodically since the classical experiments of Nikuradse (1932), which covered a significant range of Reynolds numbers. NikuradseÂ's data have become the metric by which theories are established, and have also been the subject of intense scrutiny. Several subsequent experiments reported friction factors as much as 5% lower than those measured by Nikuradse, and the authors of those reports attributed the difference to tripping effects. In the present study, measurements with and without ring tripping devices of different blocking areas of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% have been carried out to determine the effect of entrance condition on the developing flow field in pipes. Along with pressure drop measurements to compute the skin friction, both Pitot tube and hot-wire anemometry measurements have been used to accurately determine the mean velocity profile over the working test section at different Reynolds numbers in the range of 1× 10^5--4.5 × 10^5. The results we obtained suggest that the tripping technique has an insignificant effect on the wall friction factor, in agreement with Nikuradse's original data.

  8. Unconventional Behavior of Friction at the Nanoscale beyond Amontons' Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingrun; Gao, Wang

    2017-08-05

    By means of a many-body van der Waals (vdW)-corrected density functional theory approach, the atomic-scale friction of a prototypical tip-substrate system consisting of an Si tip and a graphene substrate is studied. In a loading-sliding process, the tip-substrate distance is found to be essential for nanofrictional behavior, through determining the competition between vdW contributions and electronic contributions. As the tip approaches the substrate, this competition results in a smooth transition of normal forces from attraction to repulsion, and the friction coefficient in turn undergoes a sign change from negative to positive with possible giant magnitude and strong anisotropy. The loading-sliding process does not introduce any chemical modification of the underlying system. These findings reveal the boundary of validity of Amontons' law, unify negative and giant friction coefficients, rationalize the experimentally observed anisotropy of nanofriction, and are universal when vdW interactions are crucial, all of which are helpful to establish a comprehensive picture of nanofriction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  10. An inquiry-based laboratory on friction

    CERN Document Server

    Montalbano, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Sliding friction is usually introduced in high school, but rarely through activities in laboratory. A qualitative introduction to friction is presented by proposing exploration of different kind of materials in order to suggest which aspects can be relevant and which interaction is involved. Different quantitative experiments are proposed for studying Leonardo's laws for friction. The learning path was tested with two high school classes during an instruction trip at department. Students were engaged in the inquiry-based introductory activity and seemed to realize with care the measurements. However, the analysis of their reports shows some learning difficulties.

  11. Methods and Devices used to Measure Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, Jack; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2004-01-01

    The physical condition at the work-piece/die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals, yet it remains the least understood. Hence the need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms....... To gain a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure friction-stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods, which have...

  12. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander M.; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    Ionic liquids, salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions, are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition.

  13. Forming of aluminium alloy friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating, through analytical models, numerical models and experiments, the effect of the warm deformation phase, realised with an in temperature upsetting, on the weld previously performed by friction stir lap welding on aluminium alloy blanks. The investigation allows to show the deformation zones after upsetting that determine the homogenisation of the weld section. The analytical model allows to relate the friction factor with the upsetting load. The presence on the weld of not elevated friction factor values determines the deformation and localisation levels very useful for the weld. Such methodology allows to improve the weld itself with the forming phase.

  14. Study on the Friction Coefficient in Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The friction between the abrasive grains and workpi ec e is a crutial factor determining the main grinding output. Few studies have bee n carried out investigating the values of the friction coefficient in grinding, due to the difficulty of direct measurement. In this paper, a mathematical model of the friction coefficient in grinding has been established with the aid of a new grinding parameter C ge, which has close relations to wheel wear rate Z s, metal removal rate Z w, specific energy u and gr...

  15. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander M; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    2013-10-07

    Ionic liquids - salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions - are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition.

  16. Historical Scientific Models and Theories as Resources for Learning and Teaching: The Case of Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a history of research and theories on sliding friction between solids. This history is divided into four phases: from Leonardo da Vinci to Coulomb and the establishment of classical laws of friction; the theories of lubrication and the Tomlinson's theory of friction (1850-1930); the theories of wear, the Bowden and Tabor's synthesis and the birth of Tribology (1930-1980); nanotribology, friction at the atomic scale, and new fields of research (after 1980). Attention is given to recent research, so giving the sense of a topic that is still alive and currently an object of interest, with interpretative controversies. The development of explanatory and visual models is especially stressed, in connection with students' common ideas and with didactic purposes. The history shows that many models proposed in the past have been modified but not abandoned, so that here the scientific evolution has worked more by adding than by eliminating. The last sections discuss problems and proposals on teaching friction and the possible uses in teaching of models, images and theories found in history. Concerning the role of the history in science teaching, the case of friction has particular features, because some recent developments are unknown to most teachers and many results, also not very recent, contrast with the laws usually proposed in textbooks. Here history can supply a number of models, examples and experiments which can constitute useful resources to improve student understanding, joining together objectives of cultural value and of better scientific knowledge.

  17. High friction and low wear properties of laser-textured ceramic surface under dry friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Youqiang; Deng, Jianxin; Wu, Ze; Wu, Fengfang

    2017-08-01

    Two kinds of grooved textures with different spacing were fabricated on Al2O3/TiC ceramic surface by an Nd:YAG laser. The dry tribological properties of the textured samples were investigated by carrying out unidirectional rotary sliding friction and wear tests using a ball-on-disk tribometer. Results show that the laser textured samples exhibit higher friction coefficient and excellent wear resistance compared with the smooth sample under dry friction conditions. Furthermore, the texture morphology and spacing have a significant influence on the tribological properties. The sample with small texture spacing may be beneficial to increasing the friction coefficient, and the wavy-grooved sample exhibits the highest friction coefficient and shallowest wear depth. The increasing friction coefficient and anti-wear properties are attributed to the combined effects of the increased surface roughness, reduced real contact area, micro-cutting effect by the texture edges and entrapment of wear debris.

  18. Frictional torque numbers for ball cup and journal bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Plastic bearing material wears in ball cup and journal bearings. Contact areas in the ball cup and the journal bearing increase. The frictional torque needed to rotate the ball or journal also increases. When the coefficient of friction is assumed to be constant during wearing out, the frictional torque increases to a maximum of 1.273 times the frictional torque at zero wear.

  19. Surface defects and temperature on atomic friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, O Y; Mazo, J J, E-mail: yovany@unizar.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-09-07

    We present a theoretical study of the effect of surface defects on atomic friction in the stick-slip dynamical regime of a minimalistic model. We focus on how the presence of defects and temperature change the average properties of the system. We have identified two main mechanisms which modify the mean friction force of the system when defects are considered. As expected, defects change the potential profile locally and thus affect the friction force. But the presence of defects also changes the probability distribution function of the tip slip length and thus the mean friction force. We corroborated both effects for different values of temperature, external load, dragging velocity and damping. We also show a comparison of the effects of surface defects and surface disorder on the dynamics of the system. (paper)

  20. Shell Galaxies, Dynamical Friction, and Dwarf Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrova, Ivana; Canalizo, Gabriela; Bennert, Nicola; Jilkova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    Using N-body simulations of shell galaxies created in nearly radial minor mergers, we investigate the error of collision dating, resulting from the neglect of dynamical friction and of gradual disruption of the cannibalized dwarf.

  1. Permeability equipment for porous friction surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standiford, D. L.; Graul, R. A.; Lenke, L. R.

    1985-04-01

    Hydroplaning is the loss of traction between tires and pavement due to the presence of a layer of water. This loss of traction can result in loss of vehicle control. A porous friction surface (PFS) applied over an existing pavement permits the water to drain laterally and vertically away from the tire path, effectively lowering hydroplaning potential. Equipment used to measure pavement drainage (permeability) is discussed with respect to usage on porous friction surface. Background information on hydroplaning, flow theory, and PFS field performance as they are affected by permeability are also presented. Two dynamic test devices and four static devices are considered for measuring PFS permeability. Permeability tests are recommended to measure PFS permeability for maintenance purposes and construction control. Dynamic devices cited could possibly estimate hydroplaning potential; further research must be done to determine this. Permeability devices cannot be used to accurately estimate friction of a pavement surface, however, decreased permeability of a pavement infers a decrease in friction.

  2. Torque Control of Friction Stir Welding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC and Vanderbilt University propose the innovation of torque control of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement to force control of...

  3. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  4. Composites materials for friction and braking application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciun, A. L.; Pinca-Bretotean, C.; Birtok-Băneasă, C.; Josan, A.

    2017-05-01

    The brake pads are an important component in the braking system of automotive. Materials used for brake pads should have stable and reliable frictional and wear properties under varying conditions of load, velocity, temperature and high durability. These factors must be satisfied simultaneously which makes it difficult to select effective brake pads material. The paper presents the results of the study for characterisation of the friction product used for automotive brake pads. In the study it was developed four frictional composites by using different percentages of coconut fibres (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%) reinforcement in aluminium matrix. The new composites tested in the laboratory, modelling appropriate percentage ratio between matrix and reinforcement volume and can be obtained with low density, high hardness properties, good thermal stability, higher ability to hold the compressive force and have a stable friction coefficient. These characteristics make them useful in automotive industry.

  5. Friction and friction-generated temperature at a polymer-metal interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Burks, H. D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of friction and thermal tests of molded polyimide and pyrrone polymers are presented. The coefficient of sliding friction up to surface velocities of 2 m/sec and the coefficient of thermal expansion from 300 to 500 K were measured. An apparatus was constructed to measure simultaneously the coefficient of sliding friction and the friction-generated temperature. Measurements were made at a nominal pressure-velocity product of 0.25 MN/msec and at temperatures between 300 and 500 K.

  6. Sliding without slipping under Coulomb friction: opening waves and inversion of frictional force

    CERN Document Server

    Yastrebov, Vladislav A

    2015-01-01

    An elastic layer slides on a rigid flat governed by Coulomb's friction law. We demonstrate that if the coefficient of friction is high enough, the sliding localizes within stick-slip pulses, which transform into opening waves propagating at intersonic speed in the direction of sliding or, for high Poisson's ratios, at supersonic speed in the opposite one. This sliding mode, characterized by small frictional dissipation, rapidly relaxes the shear elastic energy via stress waves and enables the contact surface slide ahead of the top one, resulting in inversion of the frictional force direction.

  7. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  8. Curricular Adaptations in Introductory Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Ewell, Mary; Moore, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    When curricular materials are disseminated to new sites, there can be a tension between fidelity to the original intent of the developers and adaptation to local needs. In this case study we look at a lab activity that was initially developed for an introductory physics for the life sciences (IPLS) course at the University of Maryland, then implemented at George Mason University with significant adaptations. The goals of the two implementations were overlapping, but also differed in ways that are reflected in the two versions of the lab. We compare student lab report data from the two sites to examine the impacts of the adaptation on how students engaged with the lab.

  9. Learning from an Ambient Assisted Living Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents methodological lessons learned from an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) lab exploring the use of intelligent beds in a nursing home. The living lab study was conducted over a period of three month. 20 intelligent beds were installed. Data was collected via self-registration, diar......This paper presents methodological lessons learned from an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) lab exploring the use of intelligent beds in a nursing home. The living lab study was conducted over a period of three month. 20 intelligent beds were installed. Data was collected via self...

  10. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  11. Improved LabVIEW Code Generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evita Vavilina; Gatis Gaigals

    2016-01-01

    .... LabVIEW provides highly convenient environment for simulation development and also tools for generation of simulation environment that can include simulation itself and collection of simulation data...

  12. Flexible Friction Stir Joining Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lim, Yong Chae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mahoney, Murray [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Larsen, Steve [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Steel, Russel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fleck, Dale [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Babb, Jon [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Higgins, Paul [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States)

    2015-07-23

    Reported herein is the final report on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) project with industry cost-share that was jointly carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (ExxonMobil), and MegaStir Technologies (MegaStir). The project was aimed to advance the state of the art of friction stir welding (FSW) technology, a highly energy-efficient solid-state joining process, for field deployable, on-site fabrications of large, complex and thick-sectioned structures of high-performance and high-temperature materials. The technology innovations developed herein attempted to address two fundamental shortcomings of FSW: 1) the inability for on-site welding and 2) the inability to weld thick section steels, both of which have impeded widespread use of FSW in manufacturing. Through this work, major advance has been made toward transforming FSW technology from a “specialty” process to a mainstream materials joining technology to realize its pervasive energy, environmental, and economic benefits across industry.

  13. Linearization of friction effects in vibration of two rotating blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of friction effects in blade shrouding which are realized by means of friction elements placed between blades. In order to develop a methodology of modelling, two blades with one friction element in between are considered only. Flexible blades fixed to a rotating disc are discretized by FEM using 1D Rayleigh beam elements derived in rotating space as well as the friction element modelled as a rigid body. The blades and the friction element are connected through two concurrent friction planes, where the friction forces arise on the basis of centrifugal force acting on the friction element. The linearization of friction is performed using the harmonic balance method to determine equivalent damping coefficients in dependence on the amplitudes of relative slip motion between the blades and the friction element. The methodology is applied to a model of two real blades and will be extended for the whole bladed disc with shrouding.

  14. Comparisons of friction models in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    A friction model is one of the key input boundary conditions in finite element simulations. It is said that the friction model plays an important role in controlling the accuracy of necessary output results predicted. Among the various friction models, which one is of higher accuracy is still...... unknown and controversial. In this paper, finite element analyses applying five different friction models to experiments of upsetting of AA 6082 lubricated with four lubricants are presented. Frictional parameter values are determined by fitness of data of friction area ratio from finite element analysis...... to experimental results. It is found that calibration curves of the friction area ratio for all of the five chosen friction models used in the finite element simulation do fit the experimental results. Usually, calbration curves of the friction area ratio are more sensitive to friction at the tool...

  15. Comparing numerically exact and modelled static friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krengel Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there exists no mechanically consistent “numerically exact” implementation of static and dynamic Coulomb friction for general soft particle simulations with arbitrary contact situations in two or three dimension, but only along one dimension. We outline a differential-algebraic equation approach for a “numerically exact” computation of friction in two dimensions and compare its application to the Cundall-Strack model in some test cases.

  16. THE FRICTION OF QUARTZ IN HIGH VACUUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    the effects of surface cleanliness . Ultra-high vacuums (to 10 to the minus 10th power torr) and high temperatures (to 350 deg C) were combined with...chemical cleaning and careful handling techniques to produce the maximum surface cleanliness . The coefficient of static friction under varying...on 30-40 mesh glass balls. The coefficient of friction of smooth quartz was found to vary from 0.1 to 1.0 depending on the surface cleanliness . The

  17. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies

  18. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies

  19. Role of Friction in Cold Ring Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He YANG; Lianggang GUO; Mei ZHAN

    2005-01-01

    Cold ring rolling is an advanced but complex metal forming process under coupled effects with multi-factors, such as geometry sizes of rolls and ring blank, material, forming process parameters and friction, etc. Among these factors,friction between rolls and ring blank plays animportant role in keeping the stable forming of cold ring rolling. An analytical method was firstly presented for proximately determining the critical friction coefficient of stable forming and then a method was proposed to determine thecritical friction coefficient by combining analytical method with numerical simulation. And the influence of friction coefficient on the quality of end-plane and side spread of ring,rolling force, rolling moment and metal flow characteristic in the cold ring rolling process have been explored using the three dimensional (3D) numerical simulation based on the elastic-plastic dynamic finite element method (FEM)under the ABAQUS software environment, and the results show that increasing the friction on the contact surfaces between rolls and ring blank is useful not only for improving the stability of cold ring rolling but also for improving the geometry and dimension precision of deformed ring.

  20. Methods and devices used to measure friction in rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, J.; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure frictional stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods that have been used...... to measure friction in rolling in the past and discusses some of the recent sensor designs that can now be used to measure friction both in production situations and for research purposes....