WorldWideScience

Sample records for friction ignition tester

  1. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  2. Design of Piston Ring Friction Tester Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder

    2006-01-01

    the frictional behavior of a piston ring correctly is knowledge about the amount of lubricant present. For piston rings the external load may be established by measuring the pressure distribution, i.e. the pressure drop in the piston ring package. Speed and temperature may also be established. The amount...... and forces on piston rod. Since the frictional forces are small compared to the rest of the acting forces the main design idea is to fix the piston, while the cylinder liner moves. This approach makes it simple to measure the parameters mentioned above by putting the instrumentation in the piston....

  3. Trial manufacture of rotary friction tester and frictional force measurement of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Kanari, M; Tanzawa, S

    2002-01-01

    In the plasma confinement type fusion reactor, in-vessel structures such as a blanket module slide at the joints each other when plasma disruption occurs, and then frictional heat is generated there. Therefore, for the selection of material and the use as the design data, it is important to understand the frictional characteristics of metals and ceramic films in the vacuum. In the present study, we have manufactured a prototype of rotary friction tester and examined the performances of the tester. The frictional characteristics of metals in the room air was measured using the friction tester, and the results obtained are as follows. A drifting friction force for a constant time and a friction force during the idling were 98 mN and 225 mN, respectively. These values were sufficiently small as compared to pressing load (9.8 - 57.8 N) used in the friction test. In a friction force measurement of stainless steel, dynamic friction force obeyed Amontons' law which indicated that dynamic friction force is not depend...

  4. Investigation of Physical and Chemical Delay Periods of Different Fuels in the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-03

    F-T SPK Fischer-Tropsch Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene HMN Hepta- methyl -nonane ID Ignition Delay IQT Ignition Quality Tester JP-8 Jet...opening pressure is 10.3±0.34 MPa. By definition, normal cetane (hexadecane C16H34) is assigned a CN of 100, whereas hepta- methyl -nonane (HMN) is

  5. Relating the octane numbers of fuels to ignition delay times measured in an ignition quality tester (IQT)

    KAUST Repository

    Naser, Nimal

    2016-09-21

    A methodology for estimating the octane index (OI), the research octane number (RON) and the motor octane number (MON) using ignition delay times from a constant volume combustion chamber with liquid fuel injection is proposed by adopting an ignition quality tester. A baseline data of ignition delay times were determined using an ignition quality tester at a charge pressure of 21.3 bar between 770 and 850 K and an equivalence ratio of 0.7 for various primary reference fuels (PRFs, mixtures of isooctane and n-heptane). Our methodology was developed using ignition delay times for toluene reference fuels (mixtures of toluene and n-heptane). A correlation between the OI and the ignition delay time at the initial charge temperature enabled the OI of non-PRFs to be predicted at specified temperatures. The methodology was validated using ignition delay times for toluene primary reference fuels (ternary mixtures of toluene, iso-octane, and n-heptane), fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) gasolines, and certification gasolines. Using this methodology, the RON, the MON, and the octane sensitivity were estimated in agreement with values obtained from standard test methods. A correlation between derived cetane number and RON is also provided. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Two-stage Lagrangian modeling of ignition processes in ignition quality tester and constant volume combustion chambers

    KAUST Repository

    Alfazazi, Adamu

    2016-08-10

    The ignition characteristics of isooctane and n-heptane in an ignition quality tester (IQT) were simulated using a two-stage Lagrangian (TSL) model, which is a zero-dimensional (0-D) reactor network method. The TSL model was also used to simulate the ignition delay of n-dodecane and n-heptane in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC), which is archived in the engine combustion network (ECN) library (http://www.ca.sandia.gov/ecn). A detailed chemical kinetic model for gasoline surrogates from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was utilized for the simulation of n-heptane and isooctane. Additional simulations were performed using an optimized gasoline surrogate mechanism from RWTH Aachen University. Validations of the simulated data were also performed with experimental results from an IQT at KAUST. For simulation of n-dodecane in the CVCC, two n-dodecane kinetic models from the literature were utilized. The primary aim of this study is to test the ability of TSL to replicate ignition timings in the IQT and the CVCC. The agreement between the model and the experiment is acceptable except for isooctane in the IQT and n-heptane and n-dodecane in the CVCC. The ability of the simulations to replicate observable trends in ignition delay times with regard to changes in ambient temperature and pressure allows the model to provide insights into the reactions contributing towards ignition. Thus, the TSL model was further employed to investigate the physical and chemical processes responsible for controlling the overall ignition under various conditions. The effects of exothermicity, ambient pressure, and ambient oxygen concentration on first stage ignition were also studied. Increasing ambient pressure and oxygen concentration was found to shorten the overall ignition delay time, but does not affect the timing of the first stage ignition. Additionally, the temperature at the end of the first stage ignition was found to increase at higher ambient pressure

  7. Frictorq, fabric friction tester : a comparartive study eith kes

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Coeficiente of friction is one of the factors involved in the so-called parameter fabric hand its importance justifies the number of contributions give in the past to this problem. more recently, a new laboratory instrument was proposed by the authors for the assessment of tis property. A comparative study with another widely respected instruments, the Kes-friction, is the main purpose of this research.

  8. A portable wheel tester for tyre-road friction and rolling resistance determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytka, J.; Budzyński, P.; Tarkowski, P.; Piaskowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes theory of operation, design and construction as well as results from primarily experiments with a portable wheel tester that has been developed by the authors as a device for on-site determination of tyre-road braking/driving friction and rolling resistance. The paper includes schematics, drawings, descriptions as well as graphical results form early tests with the presented device. It is expected that the tester can be useful in road accident reconstruction applications as well as in vehicle dynamics research.

  9. Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

  10. Portable Tester Friction (PFT). Mesures du coefficient de frottement dynamique de revêtements de sol

    OpenAIRE

    Marchal, P.; Jacques, M.

    2014-01-01

    Le Portable Tester Friction (PFT) est un appareil destiné à mesurer le coefficient de frottement dynamique d’un revêtement de sol en laboratoire et sur site. Ce document décrit le protocole de mesure avec le PFT et les résultats de mesures effectuées sur un panel de quinze revêtements de sol de caractéristiques différentes (matériaux, états de surface) réalisées en présence de deux polluants (huile et solution d’eau). Le PFT présente une très bonne sensibilité et une très bonne répétabilité. ...

  11. Improvement of Swing Friction Sensitivity Tester%摆式摩擦感度仪的改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐莉; 杜云峰; 黄茶香; 柳继昌

    2011-01-01

    对含能材料测定摩擦感度的意义、摆式摩擦仪感度仪工作原理做了详细介绍,对20世纪40年代原苏联K-44-Ⅲ型摆式摩擦仪的结构、加压方式、检定方法等进行了改进.改进后的MGY-1型摩擦感度仪在结构上用限位槽取代分离钩,用电动油泵取代手动油泵加压.对改进后的MGY-1型摩擦感度仪做了对比试验:不同表压和摆角条件下滑移距离测试,手动油泵加压与电动油泵加压滑移距离测试,列举了几种火工药剂摩擦感度的测试数据.改进后的MGY-1型摩擦感度仪提高了工作效率和测试精度,得到了广泛应用和推广.%In this paper, we introduce the significance of testing friction sensitivity for energetic materials, describe the working principle of swing friction sensitivity tester in detail, and improve K-44-Ⅲ type swing friction tester of Soviet by the structure, compression method and verification method. The improved type-MGY-1 friction sensitivity tester substitutes the disengaging hook in structure with the spacing trough, and substitutes the manual oil pump with the motor driven oil pump. We made the contrast test with the improved tester:sliding distance test in different gauge pressure and different swing angle conditions,and sliding distance test in manual oil pump and motor driven oil pump conditions. The test data of some explosive friction sensitivity are listed,and the results show that the test efficiency and accuracy of the improved tester are improved, and the instrument has obtained widely application and promotion.

  12. Effects of Iso-Octane/Ethanol Blend Ratios on the Observance of Negative Temperature Coefficient Behavior within the Ignition Quality Tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogin, Gregory E., Jr.; Luecke, Jon; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Osecky, Eric; Zigler, Bradley T.

    2016-12-15

    An ignition delay study investigating the reduction in low temperature heat release (LTHR) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) region with increasing ethanol concentration in binary blends of ethanol/isooctane was conducted in the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT). The IQT is advantageous for studying multi-component fuels such as iso-octane/ethanol which are difficult to study at lower temperatures covering the NTC region in traditional systems (e.g., shock tubes, rapid compression machines, etc.). The high octane numbers and concomitant long ignition delay times of ethanol and iso-octane are ideal for study in the IQT allowing the system to reach a quasi-homogeneous mixture; allowing the effect of fuel chemistry on ignition delay to be investigated with minimal impact from the fuel spray due to the relatively long ignition times. NTC behavior from iso-octane/ethanol blends was observed for the first time using an IQT. Temperature sweeps of iso-octane/ethanol volumetric blends (100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 50/50, and 0/100) were conducted from 623 to 993 K at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 MPa and global equivalence ratios ranging from 0.7 to 1.0. Ignition of the iso-octane/ethanol blends in the IQT was also modeled using a 0-D homogeneous batch reactor model. Significant observations include: (1) NTC behavior was observed for ethanol/iso-octane fuel blends up to 20% ethanol. (2) Ethanol produced shorter ignition delay times than iso-octane in the high temperature region. (3) The initial increase in ethanol from 0% to 10% had a lesser impact on ignition delay than increasing ethanol from 10% to 20%. (4) The 0-D model predicts that at 0.5 and 1.0 MPa ethanol produces the shortest ignition time in the high-temperature regime, as seen experimentally.

  13. Friction-induced ignition of metals in high-pressure oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenman, Len; Stoltzfus, Joel; Kazaroff, John

    1988-01-01

    Data are presented on friction-induced metal ignition (such as occurring as a result of the possible rubbing of oxygen-pressurized hydrostatic bearings and turbine blade tips) in a high-presure oxygen environment. Friction heating tests were carried out at oxygen pressures from 1 to 300 atm and surface speeds from 10 to 33 m/sec, using the NASA/White Sands Test Facility. Test results are presented on the rubbing of like material pairs spanning a wide range of burn factors and on that of dissimilar metal pairs having significantly different burn factors, indicating that the burn factor is a suitable index for rank ordering in ignition resistance for the most, but not all, materials.

  14. Explosives tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jeffrey S [San Ramon, CA; Howard, Douglas E [Livermore, CA; Eckels, Joel D [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA

    2011-01-11

    An explosives tester that can be used anywhere as a screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are provided. A heater is provided for receiving the first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers.

  15. Establish the current status of research development and operational experience of wet head cutting drums for the prevention of frictional ignitions.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phillips, HR

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that one of the most effective methods of preventing the frictional ignition of methane/air mixtures at the coal face is to spray water directly behind the cutting picks and parallel to their direction of travel. However, not all...

  16. Develop information and training aids to assist all employees to recognize frictional ignition hazards

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholzer, JW

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the process followed in establishing training aids to make employees aware of the dangers of frictional hazards. The actual outputs of the project are training aids that will be used by trainers to transfer the knowledge...

  17. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  18. UW VLSI chip tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Neil

    1989-12-01

    We present a design for a low-cost, functional VLSI chip tester. It is based on the Apple MacIntosh II personal computer. It tests chips that have up to 128 pins. All pin drivers of the tester are bidirectional; each pin is programmed independently as an input or an output. The tester can test both static and dynamic chips. Rudimentary speed testing is provided. Chips are tested by executing C programs written by the user. A software library is provided for program development. Tests run under both the Mac Operating System and A/UX. The design is implemented using Xilinx Logic Cell Arrays. Price/performance tradeoffs are discussed.

  19. Explosives tester with heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Eckels, Joel [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA; Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Whipple, Richard E [Livermore, CA; Carter, J Chance [Livermore, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2010-08-10

    An inspection tester system for testing for explosives. The tester includes a body and a swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body. At least one reagent holder and dispenser is operatively connected to the body. The reagent holder and dispenser contains an explosives detecting reagent and is positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagent to the swab unit. A heater is operatively connected to the body and the swab unit is adapted to be operatively connected to the heater.

  20. Common tester platform concept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, Michael James

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a case study on the doctrine of a common tester platform, a concept of a standardized platform that can be applicable across the broad spectrum of testing requirements throughout the various stages of a weapons program, as well as across the various weapons programs. The common tester concept strives to define an affordable, next-generation design that will meet testing requirements with the flexibility to grow and expand; supporting the initial development stages of a weapons program through to the final production and surveillance stages. This report discusses a concept investing key leveraging technologies and operational concepts combined with prototype tester-development experiences and practical lessons learned gleaned from past weapons programs.

  1. Cable Tester Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Cables are very important electrical devices that carry power and signals across multiple instruments. Any fault in a cable can easily result in a catastrophic outcome. Therefore, verifying that all cables are built to spec is a very important part of Electrical Integration Procedures. Currently, there are two methods used in lab for verifying cable connectivity. (1) Using a Break-Out Box and an ohmmeter this method is time-consuming but effective for custom cables and (2) Commercial Automated Cable Tester Boxes this method is fast, but to test custom cables often requires pre-programmed configuration files, and cables used on spacecraft are often uniquely designed for specific purposes. The idea is to develop a semi-automatic continuity tester that reduces human effort in cable testing, speeds up the electrical integration process, and ensures system safety. The JPL-Cable Tester Box is developed to check every single possible electrical connection in a cable in parallel. This system indicates connectivity through LED (light emitting diode) circuits. Users can choose to test any pin/shell (test node) with a single push of a button, and any other nodes that are shorted to the test node, even if they are in the same connector, will light up with the test node. The JPL-Cable Tester Boxes offers the following advantages: 1. Easy to use: The architecture is simple enough that it only takes 5 minutes for anyone to learn how operate the Cable Tester Box. No pre-programming and calibration are required, since this box only checks continuity. 2. Fast: The cable tester box checks all the possible electrical connections in parallel at a push of a button. If a cable normally takes half an hour to test, using the Cable Tester Box will improve the speed to as little as 60 seconds to complete. 3. Versatile: Multiple cable tester boxes can be used together. As long as all the boxes share the same electrical potential, any number of connectors can be tested together.

  2. Four Sided Seal Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The Center for Advanced Food Technology School of Enviromental and Biological Sciences New Brunswick, NJ 08903 FTR 216 Defense Logistics Agency...specification for four sided seal tester as function of confinement plate distance” The following modifications were issued :  Jul 18, 2007 0013/01

  3. Transformer and Meter Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoms, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Numerically-controlled 5-axis machine tool uses transformer and meter to determine and indicate whether tool is in home position, but lacks built-in test mode to check them. Tester makes possible test, and repair of components at machine rather then replace them when operation seems suspect.

  4. Inspection tester for explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Simpson, Randall L.; Satcher, Joe H.

    2007-11-13

    An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

  5. A High Temperature Hermetic Primer and a Variable Spring Tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begeal, D.R.

    1994-05-01

    Percussion primers are used at Sandia to ignite energetic components such as pyrotechnic actuators and thermal batteries. This report describes a High Temperature Hermetic Primer (HTHP) that was developed to replace a previous G16 Percussion Primer Subassembly (Gl6PPS). The ignition mix in these primers is the same as in the discontinued Remington 44G16 (KC1O{sub 3}, SbS{sub 3}, and Ca{sub 2}Si). The HTHP has nearly the same sensitivity as the 44G16 and a significantly lower sensitivity than the G16PPS. In parallel with the HTHP development, we also designed a Variable Spring Tester (VST) to determine percussion primer ignition sensitivity with firing pins that have the same mass as those used in field applications. The tester is capable of accelerating firing pins over a velocity range of 100 to 600 inches per second for pins weighing up to 6 grams. The desired impulse can be preselected with an accuracy of better than {plus_minus}1%. The actual impulse is measured on every shot. The VST was characterized using the WW42Cl primer, as well as with the G16PPS and the HTHP. Compared to data from conventional ball drop testers, we found that ignition sensitivities were lower and there was less scatter in the sensitivity data. Our experiments indicate that ignition sensitivity is not strictly energy dependent, but also depends on the rate of deposition, or firing pin velocity in this case. Development results for the HTHP and Variable Spring Tester are discussed and design details are shown.

  6. Research and development of dry pneumatic friction clutch-brake tester%组合式气动干式摩擦离合制动器试验台研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骏; 吴迅; 蒋兆军; 韦国上

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the data gain from the performance of the versatile clutch-brake performance tester,which provides not only a performance testing platform for optimization design of clutch-brake,but also the experimental basis for the formulation of industry standards in the relevant product data.The tester is an integrated system including clutch torque testing,brake torque testing,sensitivity testing,temperature testing and balance testing.Detecting and collecting data by its sensors,the tester can display and compare the results for research after centralized computer processing,with the characteristics of high integration and versatility.%为了研究离合制动器的性能指标、给离合制动器的优化设计提供性能测试平台,同时也为该产品的行业标准制订中的相关数据提供试验依据,研制了这款多功能离合制动器综合性能试验台。该试验台的机械平台集中了离合、制动扭矩检测、灵敏度检测、温升检测、平衡检测等性能测试模块,通过传感器进行检测并采集数据,经计算机集中处理后,显示结果以供研究和比较。该试验台具有集成度高、通用性强等特点。

  7. Single wheel testers, single track testers, and instrumented tractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single wheel testers and single track testers are used for determining tractive performance characteristics of tires and tracks. Instrumented tractors are useful in determining the tractive performance of tractors. These machines are also used for determining soil-tire and soil-track interactions,...

  8. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  9. Penetration Tester's Open Source Toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Faircloth, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Great commercial penetration testing tools can be very expensive and sometimes hard to use or of questionable accuracy. This book helps solve both of these problems. The open source, no-cost penetration testing tools presented do a great job and can be modified by the user for each situation. Many tools, even ones that cost thousands of dollars, do not come with any type of instruction on how and in which situations the penetration tester can best use them. Penetration Tester's Open Source Toolkit, Third Edition, expands upon existing instructions so that a professional can get the most accura

  10. Microcontroller based Integrated Circuit Tester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif Taha Yousif Elamin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The digital integrated circuit (IC tester is implemented by using the ATmega32 microcontroller . The microcontroller processes the inputs and outputs and displays the results on a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD. The basic function of the digital IC tester is to test a digital IC for correct logical functioning as described in the truth table and/or function table. The designed model can test digital ICs having 14 pins. Since it is programmable, any number of ICs can be tested . This model applies the necessary signals to the inputs of the IC, monitoring the outputs at each stage and comparing them with the outputs in the truth table. Any discrepancy in the functioning of the IC results in a fail indication, displays the faulty and good gates on the LCD. The testing procedure is accomplished with the help of keypad keys present on the main board design. The test has been accomplished with most commonly used digital IC's, mainly belonging to the 74 series. Digital IC tester tests three samples of IC's ( NAND, NOT, NOR. The design is flexible . We can add extra IC bases and subroutines to test any other IC in the 74 series.

  11. A Review of Sub-Scale Test Methods to Evaluate the Friction and Wear of Ring and Liner Materials for Spark- and Compression Ignition Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    2002-01-22

    A review was conducted of past laboratory-scale test methods and to assess their validity for ranking materials and lubricants for use as piston and liner materials in compression-ignition (CI) and spark-ignition (SI) engines. Most of the previous work was aimed at simulating SI engine environments. This report begins with a discussion of the numerous factors that can affect the validity of an approach to simulating engine conditions in a laboratory. These include not only mechanical, chemical and thermal factors, but also human factors as regards how the vehicle is operated and maintained. The next section provides an annotated review of open literature publications that address the issues of laboratory simulation of engine components. A comparison of these studies indicates a lack of sufficient standardization in procedures to enable a systematic comparison of one publication to another. There were just a few studies that compared several laboratory test methods to engine test results, and these indicated that some test methods correlate, at least qualitatively, better than others. The last section provides a series of recommendations for improving the accuracy and validity of laboratory-scale simulations of engine behavior. It became clear that much of the engine wear damage occurs during start-up when the engine is cold, and this calls into the question the usefulness of test methods that attempt to simulate steady-state running conditions. It is recommended that a new standard test method, perhaps developed with the help of the ASTM wear and erosion committee, be developed. It would use cold start-up conditions in the presence of degraded oil, or simulated degraded oil.

  12. Enhanced Master Controller Unit Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Patricia; Johnson, Yvette; Johnson, Brian; Williams, Philip; Burton, Geoffrey; McCoy, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The Enhanced Master Controller Unit Tester (EMUT) software is a tool for development and testing of software for a master controller (MC) flight computer. The primary function of the EMUT software is to simulate interfaces between the MC computer and external analog and digital circuitry (including other computers) in a rack of equipment to be used in scientific experiments. The simulations span the range of nominal, off-nominal, and erroneous operational conditions, enabling the testing of MC software before all the equipment becomes available.

  13. The ATLAS RunTimeTester

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS RunTimeTester is a job based software test system. The RunTimeTester runs jobs, and optional tests on the job outputs. Job and test results are reported via a web site. The system currently runs $\\approx$ 8000 jobs daily, and the web site receives $\\approx$ 25K hits a week. This note provides an overview of the system.

  14. Flying Probe Tester: Architecture, Principle and Implementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu,Xu; Fang,Kangling; Chen,Guoqing

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the flying probe tester, which is a testing device for PCB. The architecture and principle of flying probe tester are firstly introduced. Then the implementation of hardware and software is illuminated briefly. Finally, the optimizing method for the probe's moving path is researched based on the traveling salesman problem.

  15. Environmental tester development. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tressler, R.E.

    1998-08-01

    The primary objective is to further develop the environmental tensometer toward commercialization by making key technical refinements, improving the controlling and data-logging software, and testing the system in a potential customer`s laboratory. Progress has been made in Tasks 1 (completed), Task 2 (one half completed), Task 4 (one half completed) of the original work plan. In this report a detailed description of the work completed on the second prototype is explained in detail. A second prototype of the Environmental Tester, a device capable of tensile tests of fibers in controlled environments and at high temperatures, has been designed and is currently being fabricated. The first prototype includes six integrated systems; the testing system, the furnace system, the vacuum system, the mass flow control system, and the computer data acquisition and control (CDAC) system.

  16. Small Volume Fuel Testers Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoegl, I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNenly, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Killingsworth, N. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-31

    Micro-liter fuel ignition testing (μ-FIT) is based on the premise that characteristics FREI (Flames with Repetitive Extinction and Ignition, i.e. cyclically occurring combustion events within heated capillaries), are linked to fuel properties. In early FY16, proof-of-concept measurements with primary reference fuel (PRF) mixtures, i.e. blends of n-heptane and iso-octane, yielded clear evidence for the feasibility of the approach. Our experiments showed that it is critical to accurately link observed flame positions to local temperatures, which provides information on ignition, extinction and flame propagation, all of which are known to be impacted by fuel properties. In FY16, one major hurdle was uncertainty of temperature calibration, which required significant efforts for corrective action that were not included in the original scope of work. Temperature calibrations are obtained by translating a thermocouple within the capillary in absence of a flame. While measurements have good repeatability when accounting for transient and insertion effects, results from nominally identical thermocouples reveal unacceptable uncertainty (up to ±50K), which is attributed to variations in thermocouple placement and manufacturing tolerances. This issue is currently being resolved by switching to non-intrusive optical temperature measurements. Updates are expected to yield uncertainties of less than ±10K, while also eliminating transient and insertion effects. The experimental work was complemented by computational efforts where it was shown that a simplified Lagrangian zero-D model with detailed kinetics yields fuelspecific differentiation of ignition temperatures for simple fuels that are consistent with experiments. Further, a 2D transient model was implemented in OpenFOAM to investigate combustion behavior of simple fuels at elevated pressure. In an upcoming visit to LLNL, more advanced simulations using LLNL’s computational tools (e.g. zero-RK) are planned, which will

  17. A study on spontaneous ignition of bituminous coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin-Rui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal properties of four bituminous coals were studied using isothermal and temperature-programmed calorimeters, such as a differential thermal analysis, a heat flux calorimeter C80 and an thermal activity monitor (TAM-III. The corresponding spontaneous ignition was measured in an adiabatic spontaneous ignition tester. It was found that there were weak exothermic activities in bituminous coal at 50-100°C and meanwhile carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide was generated. These thermal behaviors are responsible for the self heating from 50°C and spontaneous ignition at 80°C.

  18. A study on spontaneous ignition of bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin-Rui Li; Hiroshi Koseki; Yusaku Iwata [National Research Institute of Fire and Disaster, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    The thermal properties of four bituminous coals were studied using isothermal and temperature-programmed calorimeters, such as a differential thermal analysis, a heat flux calorimeter C80 and an thermal activity monitor (TAM-III). The corresponding spontaneous ignition was measured in an adiabatic spontaneous ignition tester. It was found that there were weak exothermic activities in bituminous coal at 50-100 {sup o}C and meanwhile carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide was generated. These thermal behaviors are responsible for the self heating from 50{sup o}C and spontaneous ignition at 80{sup o}C. 15 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Design and development of seal components fatigue tester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Czop

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the paper is research and development concerning a fatigue tester of shock absorber seal systems.Design/methodology/approach: Analytical approach has been applied to get an understanding of a heat exchange process. The mathematical model has been formulated and validated based on the available measurements. Numerical simulation has been carried out to illustrate a heat exchange process performance.Findings: It is possible to control a seal temperature and mechanical friction related to the rod movement into the seal at the specified velocity. The model accuracy is sufficient to perform sensitivity analysis and optimize the design.Research limitations/implications: The components of a fatigue tester have to withstand the significant temperature differences in the range 30; +140˚C, e.g. hydraulic hoses, fittings, and pumps.Practical implications: We combine the analytical and experimental approach to provide customized and reliable engineering solution in the area of damper component seal development. A typical seal has a lip-like design protecting the moving parts against the leakage. It can be tested in a shock absorber or externally with use of a customized test rigs. Seal tests inside a shock absorber have numerous disadvantages. A shock absorber temperature rises during longer tests and cooling phase is required. This dramatically increases tests duration performed with the use of an expensive general-purpose hydraulic testing machinery. A compressed air or water jacket is used to accelerate the cooling process. Nevertheless, there are limitations related to the physics behind the cooling process. A seal component fatigue tester allows to perform the seal component tests out of the shock absorber.Originality/value: A new testing method provides possibility to quantify the main contributors of seal usage.

  20. Tester status report: October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draut, C.F.

    1979-02-09

    This report details the status of the testers which provide the testing support of timers, actuators, detonators, firing sets, transducers, isolators, and pyrospacers during the time period of October through December 1978.

  1. Tester status report: April-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draut, C.F.

    1979-08-31

    This report details tester status and activities in support of testing of timers, actuators, detonators, firing sets, transducers, isolators, and pyrospacers for the period of April through June 1979.

  2. Dynamic Hardness Tester and Cure Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigosky, Walter M.; Fiorito, Ralph B.

    1993-01-01

    The Shore hardness tester is used extensively throughout industry to determine the static modulus of materials. The new apparatus described here extends the capability of an indentor-type tester into the dynamic regime, and provides a measurement of the dynamic shear or Young's modulus and loss factor as a function of frequency. The instrument, model and data of typical rubber samples are given and compared to other dynamic measurements.

  3. Armstrong Laboratory Space Visual Function Tester Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneal, Melvin R.; Task, H. Lee; Gleason, Gerald A.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on space visual function tester program are presented. Many astronauts and cosmonauts have commented on apparent changes in their vision while on-orbit. Comments have included descriptions of earth features and objects that would suggest enhanced distance visual acuity. In contrast, some cosmonaut observations suggest a slight loss in their object discrimination during initial space flight. Astronauts have also mentioned a decreased near vision capability that did not recover to normal until return to earth. Duntley space vision experiment, USSR space vision experiments, and visual function testers are described.

  4. Comparative investigations of tablet crushing force testers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn; Jensen, C.G.; Poulsen, L.

    2005-01-01

    The performance of 16 tablet breaking force testers was evaluated in terms of accuracy, reproducibility and repeatability. Three tablet formulations with different plastic or brittle deformation mechanisms and with target breaking forces of 50, 100 and 150 N were tested. Statistically significant...... by the concept of components of variance was 5-7 % depending on the model tablet excipient. The standard deviation within testers (repeatability) was affected by the type of model formulation showing increasing variability with increasing brittleness of the compressed material. No specific effect of altering...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720 Pacemaker electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which is...

  7. Bipolar Transistor Tester for Physics Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Baddi, Raju

    2012-01-01

    A very simple low cost bipolar transistor tester for physics lab is given. The proposed circuit not only indicates the type of transistor(NPN/PNP) but also indicates the terminals(emitter, base and collector) using simple dual colored(Red/Green) LEDs. Color diagrams of testing procedure have been given for easy following. This article describes the construction of this apparatus in all detail with schematic circuit diagram, circuit layout and constructional illustration.

  8. A Tester for Carbon Nanotube Mode Lockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a tester for laser pulsating operation of carbon nanotubes employing a circulator with the extra degree of freedom of the second port to access diversified nanotube samples. The nanotubes are deposited onto the end facet of a dummy optical fiber by spray method that guarantees simple sample loading along with the minimized perturbation of optimized laser cavity condition. Resultant optical spectra, autocorrelation traces and pulse train of the laser outputs with qualified samples are presented.

  9. Financial Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Jensen, Mads

    frictions, a call option should never be exercised early, but only at expiration or just before the underlying stock pays a dividend. Chapter one of this thesis shows that suffciently severe frictions can make early exercise optimal. Short-sale costs especially represent an important driver of early...

  10. Friction Model for FEM Simulation of Sheet Metal Forming Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Y. T.; Wagoner, R. H.; Lee, J. K.

    2004-06-01

    In order to find the effect of frictional characteristics, lubricant viscosity, tool geometry, and forming speed on the sheet metal forming, a friction tester was designed and manufactured. Friction tests were performed using drawing oils, various tool radii and forming speeds for aluminum alloy sheets, galvanized steels sheets and cold rolled steel sheets. From the experimental observation, the mathematical friction model considering lubricant viscosity, sheet surface roughness and hardness, punch corner radii, and punch speed is developed. By comparing the punch load found by FEM using the proposed friction model with that of experimental measurement when the steel sheets are formed in 2-D geometry in dry and lubricating conditions, the validity and accuracy of the mathematical friction model are demonstrated.

  11. 40 CFR 265.17 - General requirements for ignitable, reactive, or incompatible wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... heat or pressure, fire or explosion, or violent reaction; (2) Produce uncontrolled toxic mists, fumes..., smoking, cutting and welding, hot surfaces, frictional heat, sparks (static, electrical, or mechanical), spontaneous ignition (e.g., from heat-producing chemical reactions), and radiant heat. While ignitable...

  12. Uniform Design of Optimizing Formulation of Friction Materials with Composite Mineral Fiber (CMF) and Their Friction and Wear Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yazhou; Jiang, Man; Xu, Jie; Ma, Yunhai; Tong, Jin

    2012-04-01

    In this work, the uniform design method was applied to arrange the experimental scheme for optimizing formulation of friction materials. The friction and wear of the friction materials based on the optimized formulation was carried out on a constant speed friction tester (JF150D-II), using pad-on-disc contact mode against gray cast iron disc. The worn surfaces of the friction materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (JSM5310) and the friction mechanism was discussed. The results showed that the uniform design method was appropriate for finding the optimum formulation of the friction materials with better properties. Compared with two conventional friction materials, the friction materials based on the optimized formulation possessed higher and stable friction coefficient and higher wear resistance, even at the disc temperature of 350°C. The adhesion, strain fatigue and abrasive wear were the main wear mechanisms of the friction materials. Tribo-chemical phenomenon and plastic deformation existed on the worn surface layer.

  13. Advanced adhesion and friction measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2017-03-01

    An advanced micro-force tester for investigating the micromechanical behavior of various patterned surfaces in dry and wet conditions is presented in this paper. The parallel slice-beam configuration of the tester not only eliminates the large load-dependent slope and tangential displacement at the free end that is found in a single beam system, but also performs a trans-scale deflection with high sensitivity and linearity for force sensing. Meanwhile, the simple structure is characterized by low cost, high efficiency, and ease of fabrication. An integrated nano- and micro-stage comprise the mobile table to produce a large stroke with high resolution, which is specifically required in wet adhesion testing because of the formation of a long liquid bridge. Preliminary experiments of adhesion and friction conducted using PDMS pillars with a plano-convex lens validated the feasibility of this setup.

  14. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  15. Development of transmission error tester for face gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhao-yao; Lu, Xiao-ning; Chen, Chang-he; Lin, Jia-chun

    2013-10-01

    A tester for measuring face gears' transmission error was developed based on single-flank rolling principle. The mechanical host was of hybrid configuration of the vertical and horizontal structures. The tester is mainly constituted by base, precision spindle, grating measurement system and control unit. The structure of precision spindles was designed, and rotation accuracy of the spindleswas improved. The key techniques, such as clamping, positioning and adjustment of the gears were researched. In order to collect the data of transmission error, high-frequency clock pulse subdivision count method with higher measurement resolution was proposed. The developed tester can inspect the following errors, such as transmission error of the pair, tangential composite deviation for the measured face gear, pitch deviation, eccentricity error, and so on. The results of measurement can be analyzed by the tester; The tester can meet face gear quality testing requirements for accuracy of grade 5.

  16. Design of a LOW Cost IC Tester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liakot Ali

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Low cost Integrated Circuit (IC testing is now a burning issue in semiconductor technology. Conventional IC tester, Automatic Test Equipment (ATE, cannot cope with the today’s continuously increasing complexities in IC technology. Deterministic algorithm, which is an idea of 1960’s, is adopted in the ATE. Recently pseudo-random testing approach of IC testing has been emerged as an economically viable alternative to the expensive deterministic testing approach. This study introduces the design of a System-on-a-chip (Soc implementing pseudo-random test technique for low cost IC testing with reliable performance. It is capable of testing combinational circuits as well as sequential circuits with scan-port facilities efficiently. It can also be used for testing Printed Circuit Board (PCB interconnection faults.

  17. Sixty-four-Channel Inline Cable Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Faults in wiring are a serious concern for the aerospace and aeronautics (commercial, military, and civil) industries. A number of accidents have occurred because faulty wiring created shorts or opens that resulted in the loss of control of the aircraft or because arcing led to fires and explosions. Some of these accidents have resulted in the massive loss of lives (such as in the TWA Flight 800 accident). Circuits on the Space Shuttle have also failed because of faulty insulation on wiring. STS-93 lost power when a primary power circuit in one engine failed and a second engine had a backup power circuit fault. Cables are usually tested on the ground after the crew reports a fault encountered during flight. Often such failures result from vibration and cannot be replicated while the aircraft is stationary. It is therefore important to monitor faults while the aircraft is in operation, when cables are more likely to fail. Work is in progress to develop a cable fault tester capable of monitoring up to 64 individual wires simultaneously. Faults can be monitored either inline or offline. In the inline mode of operation, the monitoring is performed without disturbing the normal operation of the wires under test. That is, the operations are performed unintrusively and are essentially undetectable for the test signal levels are below the noise floor. A cable can be monitored several times per second in the offline mode and once a second in the inline mode. The 64-channel inline cable tester not only detects the occurrence of a fault, but also determines the type of fault (short/open) and the location of the fault. This will enable the detection of intermittent faults that can be repaired before they become serious problems.

  18. Stability of Ignition Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.E. Zarko

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of ignition stability arises in the case of the action of intense external heat stimuli when, resulting from the cut-off of solid substance heating, momentary ignition is followed by extinction. Physical pattern of solid propellant ignition is considered and ignition criteria available in the literature are discussed. It is shown that the above mentioned problem amounts to transient burning at a given arbitrary temperature distribution in the condensed phase. A brief survey of published data on experimental and theoretical studies on ignition stability is offered. The comparison between theory and experiment is shown to prove qualitatively the efficiency of the phenomenological approach in the theory. However, the methods of mathematical simulation as well as those of experimental studying of ignition phenomenon, especially at high fluxes, need to be improved.

  19. The frictional coefficient of the temporomandibular joint and its dependency on the magnitude and duration of joint loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, E; Kawai, N; Tanaka, M; Todoh, M; van Eijden, T; Hanaoka, K; Dalla-Bona, D A; Takata, T; Tanne, K

    2004-05-01

    In synovial joints, friction between articular surfaces leads to shear stress within the cartilaginous tissue, which might result in tissue rupture and failure. Joint friction depends on synovial lubrication of the articular surfaces, which can be altered due to compressive loading. Therefore, we hypothesized that the frictional coefficient of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is affected by the magnitude and duration of loading. We tested this by measuring the frictional coefficient in 20 intact porcine TMJs using a pendulum-type friction tester. The mean frictional coefficient was 0.0145 (SD 0.0027) after a constant loading of 50 N during 5 sec. The frictional coefficient increased with the length of the preceding loading duration and exceeded 0.0220 (SD 0.0014) after 1 hr. Application of larger loading (80 N) resulted in significantly larger frictional coefficients. In conclusion, the frictional coefficient in the TMJ was proportional to the magnitude and duration of joint loading.

  20. Skin friction related behaviour of artificial turf systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Sock Peng; Fleming, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Forrester, Steph

    2017-08-01

    The occurrence of skin friction related injuries is an issue for artificial turf sports pitches and remains a barrier to their acceptance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current industry standard Securisport® Sports Surface Tester that measures skin surface related frictional behaviour of artificial turf. Little research has been published about the device and its efficacy, despite its widespread use as a standard FIFA test instrument. To achieve a range of frictional behaviours, several "third generation" (3G) carpet and infill combinations were investigated; friction time profiles throughout the Securisport rotations were assessed in combination with independent measurements of skin roughness before and after friction testing via 3D surface scanning. The results indicated that carpets without infill had greatest friction (coefficients of friction 0.97-1.20) while those completely filled with sand or rubber had similar and lower values independent of carpet type (coefficient of friction (COF) ≈0.57). Surface roughness of a silicone skin (s-skin) decreased after friction testing, with the largest change on sand infilled surfaces, indicating an "abrasive" polishing effect. The combined data show that the s-skin is damaged in a surface-specific manner, thus the Securisport COF values appear to be a poor measure of the potential for skin abrasion. It is proposed that the change in s-skin roughness improves assessment of the potential for skin damage when players slide on artificial turf.

  1. Dry friction and wear properties of intermetallics MoSi2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张厚安; 刘心宇; 陈平; 唐果宁

    2001-01-01

    The dry friction and wear properties of intermetallics MoSi2 against 45 steel under different loads were investigated with M-2 type friction and wear tester. Scanning electric microscope (SEM) equipment with microprobe was employed to analyze the morphology of the friction surface. Results show that the dry friction and wear properties are deeply affected by load. The wear rate of MoSi2 at the load of 80 N is the maximum which is 36.1 μg/m. On the condition of the load of 150 N, MoSi2 material has the better friction and wear properties: friction coefficient is 0.28 and wear rate is 10.6μg/m. With the load increasing, the main friction mechanisms change from microslip and plastic deformation to adhesive effect, and the main wear mechanisms change from plough-groove wear and oxidation-fatigue wear to adhesive wear.

  2. Logic Tester for the Classification of Cyberterrorism Attacks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Veerasamy, N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available for cyberterrorism. This proposed definition is founded on the definition for traditional terrorism and incorporates elements of the international understanding of cyberterrorism. The research future presents a Logic Tester that uses Boolean logic to test...

  3. State of the art of impact testers for spot welds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Fuan; Ma Mingtu; Li Jianping; Wang Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Impact testing is a primary method to evaluate the impact property of resistance spot welding,which is an important quality index in automotive industry. For testing impact properties of spot welds,many custo-mized testers have been developed. This paper summarized some of the impact testers reported in open litera-tures and the emphasis was placed on the equipment structures,functions,technical parameters,advantages and disadvantage,etc. Some key issues about the development of the testers such as kinematic energy input mode,fixture design,combined load testing,sensor and data acquisition were discussed. Finally,the prob-lems and prospects in the research and development of impact testers for spot welds were pointed out.

  4. Friction reduction using discrete surface textures: principle and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Stephen M.; Jing, Yang; Hua, Diann; Zhang, Huan

    2014-08-01

    There have been many reports on the use of dimples, grooves, and other surface textures to control friction in sliding interfaces. The effectiveness of surface textures in friction reduction has been demonstrated in conformal contacts under high speed low load applications such as mechanical seals and automotive water pump seals, etc., resulting in reduced friction and longer durability. For sliding components with higher contact pressures or lower speeds, conflicting results were reported. Reasons for the inconsistency may be due to the differences in texture fabrication techniques, lack of dimple size and shape uniformity, and different tester used. This paper examines the basic principles on which surface textural patterns influence friction under the three principle lubrication regimes: hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary lubrication regimes. Our findings suggest that each regime requires specific dimple size, shape, depth, and areal density to achieve friction reduction. Control experiments were also conducted to explore mechanisms of friction reduction. The dimple geometric shape and the dimple's orientation with respect to the sliding direction influence friction significantly. The underlying mechanisms for friction control via textures are discussed.

  5. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  6. Design of High-speed Wear Lifetime Tester of the Instrument Ball Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.; Gu, J. M.; Sun, Y.; Chen, X. Y.

    2006-10-01

    The instrument ball bearings are the key components of movable components for various kinds of measuring and control instruments; they often operate in the environmental condition of high-speed and light preload. In general, the non metal, disposable oilimpregnated retainer material has been used for these kinds of high precision miniature bearing. The engineering practice shows that the common failure mode of them is the wear which appears under the condition of insufficient lubrication condition. As the results, the vibration and noise will be enlarged, so does the frictional torque, which makes the ball bearings to lose its original working accuracy. It is the lifetime test of bearings that can enable the designers and manufacturers to chose the material of the bearing properly, optimize the product structure, mend the manufacturing technique process, and to enhance the technical level of the bearing products significantly. In this paper, the wear lifetime tester has been designed according to the requirements of the life test for the instrument ball bearings, which consists of the main body of tester, electric system, drive unit and computer measure and control system, etc. The motor spindle has been selected to drive the device which is supported by the aerostatic bearing; frequency conversion speed adjustment mode, its scope of rotating speed is between 0 and 10,000 rpm. A pair of bearings can be tested under the pure axial preload condition, the maximum load is up to 50N, the control accuracy is ±2% the scope of temperature control is up to 200°C. The variation of frictional torque on the bearing couple will be measured by an online torque transducer. The variation of power dissipation can be monitored under arbitrary speed by use of an on-line high-precision power meter. The wear and quality situation of the contact surface of the bearings will be reflected on these two parameters. Meanwhile, the values of temperature and vibration will also be monitored

  7. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  8. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  9. The Influence of Normal Load and Sliding Speed on Frictional Properties of Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Shi-rong Ge; Hua Zhu; Xi-chuan Cao; Ning Li

    2008-01-01

    The study of frictional properties of human skin is important for medical research, skin care products and textile exploitation. In order to investigate the influence of normal load and sliding speed on the frictional properties of skin and its possible mechanism, tests were carried out on a multi-specimen friction tester. When the normal load increases from 0.1 N to 0.9 N,normal displacement and the friction coefficient of skin increase. The friction coefficient is dependent on the load, indicating that both adhesion and deformation contribute to the friction behaviour. The deformation friction was interpreted using the plough model of fiiction. When sliding speed increases from 0.5 mm·s-1 to 4 mm·s-1,the friction coefficient increases and "stick-slip" phenomena increase, indicating that hysteretic friction contributes to the friction. The hysteretic friction was interpreted using schematic of energy translation during the rigid spherical probe sliding on the soft skin surface, which provides an explanation for the influence of the sliding speed on the frictional characteristics of the skin.

  10. Fusion ignition via a magnetically-assisted fast ignition approach

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, W -M; Sheng, Z -M; Li, Y T; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made towards laser-driven fusion ignition via different schemes, including direct and indirect central ignition, fast ignition, shock ignition, and impact ignition schemes. However, to reach ignition conditions, there are still various technical and physical challenges to be solved for all these schemes. Here, our multi-dimensional integrated simulation shows that the fast-ignition conditions could be achieved when two 2.8 petawatt heating laser pulses counter-propagate along a 3.5 kilotesla external magnetic field. Within a period of 5 picoseconds, the laser pulses heat a nuclear fuel to reach the ignition conditions. Furthermore, we present the parameter windows of lasers and magnetic fields required for ignition for experimental test.

  11. Friction and Wear Behaviors of Nano-Silicates in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Boshui; Lou Fang; Fang Jianhua; Wang Jiu; Li Jia

    2009-01-01

    Nano-metric magnesium silicate and zinc silicate with particle size of about 50--70nm were prepared in water by the method of chemical deposition. The antiwear and friction reducing abilities of the nano-silicates, as well as their compos-ites with oleie acid tri-ethanolamine (OATEA), were evaluated on a four-ball friction tester. The topographies and tribochemical features of the worn surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS). Results show that nano-silicates alone provide poor antiwear and friction reducing abilities in water, but exhibits excellent synergism with OATEA in reducing friction and wear. The synergism in reducing friction and wear between naao-silicates and OATEA does exist almost regardless of particle sizes and species, and may be attributed, on one hand, to the formation of an adsorption film of OATEA, and, on the other hand, to the formation oftdbochemical species of silicon dioxide and iron oxides on the friction surfaces. Tribo-reactions and tribo-adsorptions of nano-silicates and OATEA would produce hereby an effective composite boondary lubrication film, which could efficiently enhance the anti-wear and friction-reducing abilities of water.

  12. Development of a Drop Tester for Portable Electronic Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Portable electronic products are susceptible to accidental drop impact which can cause various functional and physical damage. This paper first presents a patent pending drop tester which allows portable electronic products free drop at any orientation and drop height, and then introduces the drop tester experiment setup and its design principle. Using a cellular phone as an experiment object, we obtain some data such as the impact forces, the impact accelerations, and the strain of an interested spot. By analyzing experiment data the influence of impact to products in various states is investigated with the aim to provide help for the design of products and improvement of reliability.

  13. Influence of loading and rotation speed on Friction and Wear properties of CuAlBi Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Rongchang; Dong Litao; Li Xingyuan; Chen Xiuhong

    2007-01-01

    The variation of the friction coefficient of the CuAlBi alloy at different connecting loading and friction speed were investigated by using MMU-5G sliding friction-wear tester, besides, the wear mass loss of the CuAlBi alloy was measured, and the influence of loading and rotation speed on friction and wear properties of CuAlBi alloy was also discussed. The results show that the friction coefficient increase then decrease with increase of connecting loading as well as decreases with increase of friction speed, and the wear loss mass increases with increase of connecting loading and friction speed. As a result, the wear failure form of CuAlBi alloy is mainly ploughing.

  14. Wear and Friction Behavior of Metal Impregnated Microporous Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goller, Gultekin; Koty, D. P.; Tewari, S. N.; Singh, M.; Tekin, A.

    1996-01-01

    Metal-matrix composites have been prepared by pressure-infiltration casting of copper-base alloy melts into microporous carbon preforms. The carbon preforms contained varying proportions of amorphous carbon and graphite. Load dependence of the wear and friction behavior of the composite pins has been examined under ambient conditions against cast-iron plates, using a pin-on-plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance of the composite is significantly improved, as compared with the base alloy. Contrary to the normally expected behavior, the addition of graphite to the amorphous carbon does not reduce the friction coefficient, especially at high loads. The wear and friction behavior of the composites is very sensitive to the size and distribution of the microstructural constituents.

  15. Acoustics of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  16. Software testing an ISTQB-BCS certified tester foundation guide

    CERN Document Server

    Hambling, Brian; Samaroo, Angelina; Thompson, Geoff; Williams, Peter; Hambling, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This practical guide provides insight into software testing, explaining the basics of the testing process and how to perform effective tests. It provides an overview of different techniques and how to apply them. It is the best-selling official textbook of the ISTQB-BCS Certified Tester Foundation Level.

  17. Colour of Tester Effects on Children's Expressed Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K. C.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses a study of student attitudes, preferences, and stereotyping among White Britons and West Indian students in an English secondary school. Findings indicated that factors such as the race of the tester influenced the test situation. For journal availability, see SO 506 785. (DB)

  18. Ignition Studies on Aluminised Propellant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Bhaskaran

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation on the ignition of metallised propellants (APIHTPB/AI has been carried out 10 determine the ignition delay, minimum ignition energy and corresponding heat flux,threshold heat flux for ignition and minimum ignition temperature, Ignition experiments were conductedusing a shock tube under convectiveheating conditions similar to those prevailingin a rocket motor. Heat flux at propellant location was measured by thin film heat flux gauge and also calculated from a ribbon thermocouple output under similar test conditions. The igntion delay was measured as the time lag between the arrival of hot gas at the propellant and the light emission due to actual ignition of the propellant. The experimental results indicate that the ignition delay characteristics are independent of pressure. The minimum energy for ignition obtained for the propellant is 1100J/m2 corresponding to the heat flux range of 80·120 WIcm2 for a gas velocity of 110 mls. The threshold heat flux required to ignite the propellant was 40 W/cm2 at a velocity of 110 mls. Heat flux corresponding to minimum ignition energy and the threshold heat flux increase with gas velocity. The threshold ignition temperature of the propellant was found to be 600 ± 20 K.

  19. Friction and wear performances of borates and lanthanum chloride in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Boshui; FANG Jianhua; WANG Jiu; LI Jia; LOU Fang

    2008-01-01

    The antiwear and friction-reducing performances of sodium borate, potassium borate and lanthanum chloride in water were evaluated on a four-ball friction tester. The topographies, element distribution and chemical characteristics of the worn surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersion of X-ray (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS). The results indicated that sodium borate, potassium borate and lanthanum chloride increased extreme pressure, antiwear and friction-reducing capacities of water to a certain extent, of which potassium borate was the best candidate. Combination of lanthanum chloride with sodium borate and potassium borate respectively further improved antiwear and friction-reducing capacities. Scratches of worn surfaces lubricated with water containing borates and lanthanum chloride were less severe than those lubricated with water containing borates alone. A tribochemical film mainly composed of oxides of lanthanum, boron and iron reduced friction and wear for water lubricant formulated with both borates and lanthanum chloride.

  20. Scale effects in sliding friction: An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1991-07-24

    Solid friction is considered by some to be a fundamental property of two contacting materials, while others consider it to be a property of the larger tribosystem in which the materials are contained. A set of sliding friction experiments were designed to investigate the hypothesis that the unlubricated sliding friction between two materials is indeed a tribosystems-related property and that the relative influence of the materials properties or those of the machine on friction varies from one situation to another. Three tribometers were used: a friction microprobe (FMP), a typical laboratory-scale reciprocating pin-on-flat device, and a heavy-duty commercial wear tester. The slider material was stainless steel (AISI 440C) and the flat specimen material was an ordered alloy of Ni{sub 3}Al (IC-50). Sphere-on-flat geometry was used at ambient conditions and at normal forces ranging from 0.01 N to 100 N and average sliding velocities of 0.01 to 100.0 mm/s. The nominal, steady-state sliding friction coefficient tended to decrease with increases in normal force for each of the three tribometers, and the steady state value of sliding friction tended to increase as the mass of the machine increased. The variation of the friction force during sliding was also a characteristic of the test system. These studies provide further support to the idea that the friction of both laboratory-scale and engineering tribosystems should be treated as a parameter which may take on a range of characteristic values and not conceived as having a single, unique value for each material pair.

  1. PETN ignition experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Michael L; Wente, William B; Kaneshige, Michael J

    2010-04-29

    Ignition experiments from various sources, including our own laboratory, have been used to develop a simple ignition model for pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The experiments consist of differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, beaker tests, one-dimensional time to explosion tests, Sandia's instrumented thermal ignition tests (SITI), and thermal ignition of nonelectrical detonators. The model developed using this data consists of a one-step, first-order, pressure-independent mechanism used to predict pressure, temperature, and time to ignition for various configurations. The model was used to assess the state of the degraded PETN at the onset of ignition. We propose that cookoff violence for PETN can be correlated with the extent of reaction at the onset of ignition. This hypothesis was tested by evaluating metal deformation produced from detonators encased in copper as well as comparing postignition photos of the SITI experiments.

  2. Dynamic characterization of a new accelerated heart valve tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzler, F; Haubold, A D; Hwang, N H

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new accelerated prosthetic heart valve tester prototype that incorporates a camshaft and poppet valves. A three element Windkessel system is used to mimic the afterload of the human systemic circulation. The device is capable of testing eight valves simultaneously at a rate up to 1,250 cycles/min, while the flow rate, the pressure, and the valve loading can be monitored and adjusted individually. The tester was characterized and calibrated using a set of eight Carpentier-Edwards bioprostheses at a flow rate varying between 3 and 5 L/min. The experiment was carried out with the pressure difference across the closed heart valve maintained between 140 and 190 mmHg. Smooth and complete opening and closing of the valve leaflets was achieved at all cycling rates. This confirms that the velocity profiles approaching the test valves were uniform, an important factor that allows the test valves to open and close synchronously each time.

  3. Two-dimensional field model for single-sheet tester

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanyi, A

    2003-01-01

    The investigation of the magnetic field in a circular-shaped single-sheet tester is developed under circular polarised field intensity as well as flux density. The non-linear anisotropy of the material is represented by a vector realisation of the Jiles-Atherton hysteresis operator. The monitored data of the components in the field vectors are simulated with the averaged values of the field resulted by the numerical analysis of the non-linear eddy current problem.

  4. In-Place Filter Tester Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Austin D; Moore, Murray E; Runnels, Joel T; Reeves, Kirk

    2016-05-01

    A portable instrument was developed to determine filter clogging and container leakage of in-place nuclear material storage canisters. This paper describes the development of an in-place filter tester for determining the "as found" condition of unopened canisters. The U.S. Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for nuclear material storage, and air filters in the canister lids allow gases to escape while maintaining an equilibrated pressure without release of radioactive contamination. Diagnosing the filter condition and canister integrity is important for ensuring worker and public safety. Customized canister interfaces were developed for suction clamping (during tests) to two of the canister types in use at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Experimental leakage scenarios included: O-rings fouled with dust, cracked O-rings, and loose canister lids. The prototype tester has a measurement range for air leakage rates from 8.2 × 10 mL s up to 3.0 × 10 mL s. This is sufficient to measure a leak rate of 3.4 × 10 mL s, which is the Los Alamos helium leak criterion for post-drop tested canisters. The In-Place-Filter-Tester cannot measure to the lower value of the helium leak criterion for pre-drop tested canisters (1.0 × 10 mL s). However, helium leak testing requires canister disassembly, while the new in-place filter tester is able to assess the assembled condition of as-found and in-situ canisters.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of the Venturi Dustiness Tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Prahit; Ghia, Urmila; Turkevich, Leonid A

    2017-05-01

    Dustiness quantifies the propensity of a finely divided solid to be aerosolized by a prescribed mechanical stimulus. Dustiness is relevant wherever powders are mixed, transferred or handled, and is important in the control of hazardous exposures and the prevention of dust explosions and product loss. Limited quantities of active pharmaceutical powders available for testing led to the development (at University of North Carolina) of a Venturi-driven dustiness tester. The powder is turbulently injected at high speed (Re ~ 2 × 10(4)) into a glass chamber; the aerosol is then gently sampled (Re ~ 2 × 10(3)) through two filters located at the top of the chamber; the dustiness index is the ratio of sampled to injected mass of powder. Injection is activated by suction at an Extraction Port at the top of the chamber; loss of powder during injection compromises the sampled dustiness. The present work analyzes the flow inside the Venturi Dustiness Tester, using an Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes formulation with the k-ω Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. The simulation considers single-phase flow, valid for small particles (Stokes number Stk <1). Results show that ~ 24% of fluid-tracers escape the tester before the Sampling Phase begins. Dispersion of the powder during the Injection Phase results in a uniform aerosol inside the tester, even for inhomogeneous injections, satisfying a necessary condition for the accurate evaluation of dustiness. Simulations are also performed under the conditions of reduced Extraction-Port flow; results confirm the importance of high Extraction-Port flow rate (standard operation) for uniform distribution of fluid tracers. Simulations are also performed under the conditions of delayed powder injection; results show that a uniform aerosol is still achieved provided 0.5 s elapses between powder injection and sampling.

  6. Burner ignition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Forest J.

    1986-01-21

    An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

  7. Shock Tube Ignition Delay Data Affected by Localized Ignition Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-12-29

    Shock tubes have conventionally been used for measuring high-temperature ignition delay times ~ O(1 ms). In the last decade or so, the operating regime of shock tubes has been extended to lower temperatures by accessing longer observation times. Such measurements may potentially be affected by some non-ideal phenomena. The purpose of this work is to measure long ignition delay times for fuels exhibiting negative temperature coefficient (NTC) and to assess the impact of shock tube non-idealities on ignition delay data. Ignition delay times of n-heptane and n-hexane were measured over the temperature range of 650 – 1250 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Driver gas tailoring and long length of shock tube driver section were utilized to measure ignition delay times as long as 32 ms. Measured ignition delay times agree with chemical kinetic models at high (> 1100 K) and low (< 700 K) temperatures. In the intermediate temperature range (700 – 1100 K), however, significant discrepancies are observed between the measurements and homogeneous ignition delay simulations. It is postulated, based on experimental observations, that localized ignition kernels could affect the ignition delay times at the intermediate temperatures, which lead to compression (and heating) of the bulk gas and result in expediting the overall ignition event. The postulate is validated through simple representative computational fluid dynamic simulations of post-shock gas mixtures which exhibit ignition advancement via a hot spot. The results of the current work show that ignition delay times measured by shock tubes may be affected by non-ideal phenomena for certain conditions of temperature, pressure and fuel reactivity. Care must, therefore, be exercised in using such data for chemical kinetic model development and validation.

  8. Experimental Investigation on the Ignition Delay Time of Plasma-Assisted Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Yu, Jin-Lu; He, Li-Ming; Jiang, Yong-Jian; Wu, Yong

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the ignition performances of plasma-assisted ignition in propane/air mixture. The results show that a shorter ignition delay time is obtained for the plasma ignition than the spark ignition and the average ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition can be reduced at least by 50%. The influence of air flow rate of combustor, the arc current and argon flow rate of plasma igniter on ignition delay time are also investigated. The ignition delay time of plasma-assisted ignition increases with increasing air flow rate in the combustor. By increasing the arc current, the plasma ignition will gain more ignition energy to ignite the mixture more easily. The influence of plasma ignition argon flow rates on the ignition delay time is quite minor.

  9. Ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The goal of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to produce significant thermonuclear burn from a target driven with a laser or ion beam. To achieve that goal, the national ICF Program has proposed a laser capable of producing ignition and intermediate gain. The facility is called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This article describes ignition targets designed for the NIF and their modeling. Although the baseline NIF target design, described herein, is indirect drive, the facility will also be capable of doing direct-drive ignition targets - currently being developed at the University of Rochester.

  10. Ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity of MTBE blended diesel fuel

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Seung Yeon

    2014-04-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was added to diesel fuel to investigate the effect on ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity. An ignition quality tester (IQT) was used to study the ignition propensity of MTBE blended diesel fuels in a reactive spray environment. The IQT data showed that ignition delay increases linearly as the MTBE fraction increases in the fuel. A four-stroke single cylinder diesel engine was used to generate soot samples for a soot oxidation study. Soot samples were pre-treated using a tube furnace in a nitrogen environment to remove any soluble organic fractions and moisture content. Non-isothermal oxidation of soot samples was conducted using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was observed that oxidation of \\'MTBE soot\\' started began at a lower temperature and had higher reaction rate than \\'diesel soot\\' across a range of temperatures. Several kinetic analyses including an isoconversional method and a combined model fitting method were carried out to evaluate kinetic parameters. The results showed that Diesel and MTBE soot samples had similar activation energy but the pre-exponential factor of MTBE soot was much higher than that of the Diesel soot. This may explain why MTBE soot was more reactive than Diesel soot. It is suggested that adding MTBE to diesel fuel is better for DPF regeneration since an MTBE blend can significantly influence the ignition characteristics and, consequently, the oxidative reactivity of soot. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  11. Effect of Tension on Friction Coefficient Between Lining and Wire Rope with Low Speed Sliding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yu-xing; ZHU Zhen-cai; CHEN Guo-an; CAO Guo-hua

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain the exact friction coefficient between lining and wire rope, the tension of wire rope is studied as a factor which affects this coefficient. A mechanical model of a wire rope subjected to axial load was established to determine the torque of the wire rope. The contact motion between lining and wire rope was regarded as a screw rotation and the axial force of the lining resulting from the torque of the wire rope was analyzed. Theoretical formulas relating tension of the wire rope and the friction coefficient was obtained. Experiments between lining and wire rope with low sliding speed were carried out with friction tester made by us. Experimental results show that increment of the friction coefficient is proportional to that of the tension of the wire rope with a low sliding speed. The experimental results agree with the theoretical calculation; the errors are less than 6%, which proves the validity of the theoretical model.

  12. National Ignition Facility under fire over ignition failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The 3.5bn National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California is no nearer to igniting a sustainable nuclear fusion burn - four years after its initial target date - according to a report by the US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  13. Measuring powder flowability with a modified Warren Spring cohesion tester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salam A. Mohammed; Ezzat C. Abdullah; Derek Geldart; Abdul Aziz A. Raman

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of powder fiowability is a major concern for most industrial processes that deal with the handling of bulk solids as raw materials, intermediates, or products. The development of devices that measure the flowability of non-aerated powders has not progressed as rapidly as might have been hoped since most research activities have been based on various types of shear testers intended to aid the design of hoppers. A new flowability indicator named as weighted cohesion (WS) is established using newly improved version of direct cohesion texture. A cornerstone of the proposed technique is that the procedure is automated, using a digital Warren Spring tester called Warren Spring-University of Malaya cohesion tester (WSUMCT), thus making results operator-insensitive. Besides being a practical tool to diagnose the cohesion of experimental powders, the ratio between measured cohesion (using WSUMCT) and aerated density (using Hosokawa PT-S) provides us with a powerful technique to research fundamental particle internal cohesion forces directly and use these data to indicate the flowability. In this work, a series of fine (9.4 .μm) and coarse (60 μm) porous silica gel particle mixtures, and mixtures of fine (28 μm) and coarse (72 μm) glass ballotini as well, were used as test powders. The results from these tests agree well with relative flowability determined on our newly driven indicator using WSUMCT. The validation of aerated weighted cohesion (WSA) as a flowability indicator was authenticated by comparing the conducted parameter with established measured Hausner ratio (HR) and angle of repose (AoR).

  14. Temperature control strategy for a seal fatigue tester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Związek

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the paper is optimization of a control strategy used in a seal fatigue tester.Design/methodology/approach: Analytical approach has been applied to get an understanding of a heat exchange process. It is required to optimize the control process algorithm.Findings: The initial control algorithm has been improved regarding numerous tests under different operating conditions. The final version of the control program allows to maintain the temperature according to the on-off strategy minimizing the temperature oscillations and potential overshoots.Research limitations/implications: It should be considered a new control strategy based on PID controller.Practical implications: The major component of the tester is the heat exchanger. It consists of a tube and embedded pipe circuit feeding with the external heating or cooling medium. The tube is a cylindrical housing where the seals are assembled at both sides. Two main pumps circulate the medium at a specified flow rate and pressure. The temperature is maintained to hold it almost constant during heating and cooling phases. Two thermocouples are placed close to the seals, and the one in the middle of the heat exchanger tube. The tester is equipped with a control system consisting of a PLC controller and LabView data acquisition application. It is possible to control the device remotely through LAN/WAN networks. The LabView application communicates with the controller via software with the use of PPI (Point-To-Point Interface protocol. A new control algorithm has allowed to perform tests according to testing specification without significant overshoots.Originality/value: On-off control algorithm has been proposed for a combined heating-cooling installation rarely using in the industrial solutions.

  15. Plastic ablator ignition capsule design for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Salmonson, J D; Callahan, D A; Town, R P

    2009-12-01

    The National Ignition Campaign, tasked with designing and fielding targets for fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), has carried forward three complementary target designs for the past several years: a beryllium ablator design, a plastic ablator design, and a high-density carbon or synthetic diamond design. This paper describes current simulations and design optimization to develop the plastic ablator capsule design as a candidate for the first ignition attempt on NIF. The trade-offs in capsule scale and laser energy that must be made to achieve a comparable ignition probability to that with beryllium are emphasized. Large numbers of 1-D simulations, meant to assess the statistical behavior of the target design, as well as 2-D simulations to assess the target's susceptibility to Rayleigh-Taylor growth are presented.

  16. Torsional friction damper optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shaochun; Williams, Keith A.

    2006-06-01

    A new approach for the analysis of friction dampers is presented in this work. The exact form of the steady-state solution for a friction damper implemented on a primary system is developed and numerical solutions are used to determine the optimum friction in a friction damper applied to a specific primary system. When compared to classical results presented by earlier authors, the new approach provides a more optimal solution. In addition, viscous damping in the primary system may be included with the new analysis approach. The ability to optimize a friction damper when viscous damping is included in the primary system is a significant improvement over earlier methods and shows potential for serving as a guide to realizing a more accurate estimate of the optimal damping for friction dampers.

  17. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Edward I.

    2016-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear bum in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm3-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIP's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY20l0 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  18. Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    times only for high concentrations (of order 1% fuel or greater). The requirements of engine (IC, HCCI , CI and SI) modelers also present a different...Paper 03F-61 Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data D. F. Davidson and R. K. Hanson Mechanical Engineering ... Engineering Department Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 Abstract Chemical kinetic modelers make extensive use of shock tube ignition data

  19. Inter-tester and intra-tester reliability of ultrasound imaging measurements of abdominal muscles in adolescents with and without idiopathic scoliosis: a case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hoe S; Yoo, Ji W; Lee, Bo A; Choi, Chang K; You, Joshua H

    2014-01-01

    The present study established inter-tester and intra-tester reliabilities of ultrasound imaging and diagnostically differentiated muscle imbalances in lateral abdominal muscle sizes between normal adolescents and adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Fifteen adolescents with AIS were age- and gender-matched with 15 normal adolescents. There was no significant difference between bilateral abdominal muscles in normal adolescents, but there was a significant difference between bilateral abdominal muscles in adolescents with AIS (Pabdominal muscle thickness is: (1) highly reliable between and within the testers; and (2) capable of distinguishing between subjects with and without pathological muscle morphology due to AIS.

  20. Test strategies for industrial testers for converter controls equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleniuk, P.; Di Cosmo, M.; Kasampalis, V.; Nisbet, D.; Todd, B.; Uznański, S.

    2017-04-01

    Power converters and their controls electronics are key elements for the operation of the CERN accelerator complex, having a direct impact on its availability. To prevent early-life failures and provide means to verify electronics, a set of industrial testers is used throughout the converters controls electronics' life cycle. The roles of the testers are to validate mass production during the manufacturing phase and to provide means to diagnose and repair failed modules that are brought back from operation. In the converter controls electronics section of the power converters group in the technology department of CERN (TE/EPC/CCE), two main test platforms have been adopted: a PXI platform for mixed analogue-digital functional tests and a JTAG Boundary-Scan platform for digital interconnection and functional tests. Depending on the functionality of the device under test, the appropriate test platforms are chosen. This paper is a follow-up to results presented at the TWEPP 2015 conference, adding the boundary scan test platform and the first results from exploitation of the test system. This paper reports on the test software, hardware design and test strategy applied for a number of devices that has resulted in maximizing test coverage and minimizing test design effort.

  1. submitter Test strategies for industrial testers for converter controls equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Oleniuk, P; Kasampalis, V; Nisbet, D; Todd, B; Uznański, S

    2017-01-01

    Power converters and their controls electronics are key elements for the operation of the CERN accelerator complex, having a direct impact on its availability. To prevent early-life failures and provide means to verify electronics, a set of industrial testers is used throughout the converters controls electronics' life cycle. The roles of the testers are to validate mass production during the manufacturing phase and to provide means to diagnose and repair failed modules that are brought back from operation. In the converter controls electronics section of the power converters group in the technology department of CERN (TE/EPC/CCE), two main test platforms have been adopted: a PXI platform for mixed analogue-digital functional tests and a JTAG Boundary-Scan platform for digital interconnection and functional tests. Depending on the functionality of the device under test, the appropriate test platforms are chosen. This paper is a follow-up to results presented at the TWEPP 2015 conference, adding the boundary s...

  2. Friction in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  3. Evaluation of ring surfaces with several coatings for friction,wear and scuffing life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dae-Hyun CHO; Young-Ze LEE

    2009-01-01

    Friction and wear of the sliding components in an automobile cause an increase in both fuel consumption and emission. Many engine components involved with sliding contact are all susceptible to scuffing failure at some points during their operating period. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the effects of various surface coatings on the tribological characteristics of the piston ring and cylinder block surface of a diesel engine. Wear and scuffing tests were conducted using a friction and wear measurement of the piston ring and cylinder block in a low friction diesel engine. The frictional forces, wear amounts and cycles to scuffing in the boundary lubricated sliding condition were measured using the reciprocating wear tester. The tester used a piece of the cylinder block as the reciprocating specimen and a segment of the piston ring material as the fixed pin. Several coatings on the ring specimen were used, such as DLC, TiN, Cr-ceramic and TiAlN, in order to improve the tribological characteristics of the ring. The coefficients of friction were monitored during the tests, and the wear volumes of the piston ring surfaces with various coatings were compared. Test results show that the DLC coating exhibits better tribological properties than the other coatings. The graphite structure of this coating is responsible for the low friction and wear of the DLC film. The TiN and DLC coatings show better scuffing resistance than the other coatings. The TiN and Cr-ceramic coated rings show good wear resistance and high friction.

  4. LINE X TESTER ANALYSIS IN COMBINING ABILITIES ESTIMATION OF SUNFLOWER OIL CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Liović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of line x tester analysis for 15 sunflower genotypes of the Agricultural Institute Osijek are presented in this paper. Three A lines (cms and three Rf testers with different oil content level (low, medium, high in all combinations (nine crosses were crossed in 2010. In 2011, the lines, testers and their crosses were sown in field trials at two locations (Karanac and Osijek. The oil content was determined after harvesting, whereas line x tester analysis was conducted based on the obtained results. Variance of lines and testers, which refers to the general combining ability (GCA was much higher than the variance of line x tester, related to specific combining ability (SCA. It showed on dominant role of the additive component of genetic variance in the inheritance of oil content. Statistically significant differences were not determined between the GCA and SCA effects. The highest values of GCA for oil content had line 2 (medium oil content and tester 6 (high oil content at both locations. The largest contribution for oil content had lines (57.81 and 51.28 % followed by testers (28.88 and 26.27 % and the lowest accounts for interaction (13.31 and 22.45 % at both locations (Karanac and Osijek.

  5. High inter-tester reliability of the new mobility score in patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M.T.; Bandholm, T.; Foss, N.B.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the inter-tester reliability of the New Mobility Score in patients with acute hip fracture. DESIGN: An inter-tester reliability study. SUBJECTS: Forty-eight consecutive patients with acute hip fracture at a median age of 84 (interquartile range, 76-89) years; 40 admitted from...

  6. Hand-Drawn Resistors and a Simple Tester Using a Light-Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Abe, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    A thick line drawn on a sheet of paper with a 6B pencil is electrically conductive and its resistance can be roughly estimated using a simple tester made of a light-emitting diode (LED) and a lithium coin-type cell. Using this hand-drawn resistor and the LED tester, we developed teaching materials that help students to understand how electrical…

  7. Hand-Drawn Resistors and a Simple Tester Using a Light-Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Abe, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    A thick line drawn on a sheet of paper with a 6B pencil is electrically conductive and its resistance can be roughly estimated using a simple tester made of a light-emitting diode (LED) and a lithium coin-type cell. Using this hand-drawn resistor and the LED tester, we developed teaching materials that help students to understand how electrical…

  8. Self-ignition and ignition of aluminum powders in shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, V. M.; Poplavski, S. V.

    Ignition of fine aluminum powders in reflected shock waves has been studied. Two ignition regimes are found: self-ignition observed at temperatures higher than 1800 K and ``low-temperature'' ignition at temperatures of 1000-1800 K. The possibility of initiating the ignition of aluminum powders in air using combustible liquids has been studied too.

  9. DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A LOW SPEED IMPACT TESTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Navarrete

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact response of sandwich panels with an improved structure to increase their impact resistance isinvestigated. In order to compare the impact performance of sandwich structures, a specific and instrumenteddrop-weight impact tester was designed and developed. The experimental part of this work is an evaluation oncomposite sandwich panels behavior used in the manufacturing of the UNAM Electrobús chassis. Two differentsandwich structures are analyzed: the first type is a structure composed by a glass fiber-polyester matrix compositefacesheets and a polyethylene honeycomb core. The second one consists of facesheets made from a glass fiberepoxymatrix composite laminate and core formed by internal phenolic honeycomb structure. The first structurewas specifically designed to improve crashworthiness for transport applications. The main results of this study areevaluated from the absorbed energy performance of the sandwich structures subjected to a single impact, and thedevelopment of useful criteria for materials selection.

  10. Microprocessor tester for the treat upgrade reactor trip system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Bucher, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The upgrading of the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility at ANL-Idaho has been designed to provide additional experimental capabilities for the study of core disruptive accident (CDA) phenomena. In addition, a programmable Automated Reactor Control System (ARCS) will permit high-power transients up to 11,000 MW having a controlled reactor period of from 15 to 0.1 sec. These modifications to the core neutronics will improve simulation of LMFBR accident conditions. Finally, a sophisticated, multiply-redundant safety system, the Reactor Trip System (RTS), will provide safe operation for both steady state and transient production operating modes. To insure that this complex safety system is functioning properly, a Dedicated Microprocessor Tester (DMT) has been implemented to perform a thorough checkout of the RTS prior to all TREAT operations.

  11. Initial Development of an Electronic Testis Rigidity Tester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Mirilas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to develop our previously presented mechanical device, the Testis Rigidity Tester (TRT, into an electronic system (Electronic Testis Rigidity Tester, ETRT by applying tactile imaging, which has been used successfully with other solid organs. A measuring device, located at the front end of the ETRT incorporates a tactile sensor comprising an array of microsensors. By application of a predetermined deformation of 2 mm, increased pressure alters linearly the resistance of each microsensor, producing changes of voltage. These signals were amplified, filtered, and digitized, and then processed by an electronic collector system, which presented them as a color-filled contour plot of the area of the testis coming into contact with the sensor. Testis models of different rigidity served for initial evaluation of ETRT; their evacuated central spaces contained different, increasing glue masses. An independent method of rigidity measurement, using an electric weight scale and a micrometer, showed that the more the glue injected, the greater the force needed for a 2-mm deformation. In a preliminary test, a single sensor connected to a multimeter showed similar force measurement for the same deformation in these phantoms. For each of the testis models compressed in the same manner, the ETRT system offered a map of pressures, represented by a color scale within the contour plot of the contact area with the sensor. ETRT found certain differences in rigidity between models that had escaped detection by a blind observer. ETRT is easy to use and provides a color-coded “insight“ of the testis internal structure. After experimental testing, it could be valuable in intraoperative evaluation of testes, so that the surgeon can decide about orchectomy or orcheopexy.

  12. Dry friction and wear characteristics of MoSi2 against ahoy steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ping; ZHANG Hou'an; TANG Guoning; LI Songwen

    2005-01-01

    The dry friction and wear characteristics of three kinds of friction couples under different loads, MoSi2/45 tempered steel, MoSi2/45 quenched steel, and MoSi2/CrWMn steel, were investigated by using a friction and wear tester. SEM and X-ray diffraction were employed to analyze the microphotograph of the worn surface and the phase of worn pieces in order to reveal the wear mechanisms of MoSi2 material. The results show that MoSi2/CrWMn steel friction pair has good dry friction and wear properties under the load of 80 N, where the friction coefficient is 0.255 and the wear rate of MoSi2 is only 14.72 mg.km-1. But under the load of 150 N, it is MoSi2/45 tempered steel friction pair that has good tribological properties,MoSi2 under low loads is brittle fracture. With the increase of load, the main wear mechanism of MoSi2 against 45 quenched steel or CrWMn steel is adhesive wear. However, the wear mechanism of MoSi2 against 45 tempered steel is changed from oxidation-fatigue wear to adhesive wear.

  13. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  14. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  15. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  16. The National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-06-03

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that, when completed in 2008, will contain a 192-beam, 1.8- Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system and will provide a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5- ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  17. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  18. Diethyl Ether as an Ignition Enhancer for Naphtha Creating a Drop in Fuel for Diesel

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2016-12-01

    Direct use of naphtha in compression ignition (CI) engines is not advisable because its lower cetane number negatively impacts the auto ignition process. However, engine or fuel modifications can be made to operate naphtha in CI engines. Enhancing a fuel’s auto ignition characteristics presents an opportunity to use low cetane fuel, naphtha, in CI engines. In this research, Di-ethyl ether (DEE) derived from ethanol is used as an ignition enhancer for light naphtha. With this fuel modification, a “drop-in” fuel that is interchangeable with existing diesel fuel has been created. The ignition characteristics of DEE blended naphtha were studied in an ignition quality tester (IQT); the measured ignition delay time (IDT) for pure naphtha was 6.9 ms. When DEE was added to naphtha, IDT decreased and D30 (30% DEE + 70% naphtha) showed comparable IDT with US NO.2 diesel. The derived cetane number (DCN) of naphtha, D10 (10% DEE + 90% naphtha), D20% DEE + 80% naphtha) and D30 were measured to be 31, 37, 40 and 49, respectively. The addition of 30% DEE in naphtha achieved a DCN equivalent to US NO.2 diesel. Subsequent experiments in a CI engine exhibited longer ignition delay for naphtha compared to diesel. The peak in-cylinder pressure is higher for naphtha than diesel and other tested fuels. When DEE was added to naphtha, the ignition delay shortened and peak in-cylinder pressure is reduced. A 3.7% increase in peak in-cylinder pressure was observed for naphtha compared to US NO.2 diesel, while D30 showed comparable results with diesel. The pressure rise rate dropped with the addition of DEE to naphtha, thereby reducing the ringing intensity. Naphtha exhibited a peak heat release rate of 280 kJ/m3deg, while D30 showed a comparable peak heat release rate to US NO.2 diesel. The amount of energy released during the premixed combustion phase decreased with the increase of DEE in naphtha. Thus, this study demonstrates the suitability of DEE blended naphtha mixtures as a

  19. IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility

  20. ICF Ignition, the Lawson Criterion, and Comparison with MFE Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, R.

    2009-11-01

    The Lawson criterion, which determines the onset of thermonuclear ignition, is usually expressed through the product pτ > 10 atm . s, where p is the plasma pressure in atm and τ is the energy confinement time in seconds. In magnetic fusion devices, both the pressure and confinement time are routinely measured and the performance of each discharge can be assessed by comparing the value of pτ with respect to the ignition value (10 atm . s). In inertial confinement fusion, both p and τ cannot be directly measured and the performance of surrogate and/or subignited ICF implosions cannot be assessed with respect to the ignition condition. This makes it difficult to compare the performance of ICF implosions with that of magnetic fusion energy (MFE) discharges. Here, we define the meaning of ignition in ICF implosions and compare it to MFE ignition. We then show that a multidimensional ignition condition for inertial confinement fusion can be cast in a form that depends on three measurable parameters of the compressed-fuel assembly: the hot-spot ion temperature T, the neutron yield normalized to the 1-D prediction (yield over clean or YOC) and the total areal density ρR, which includes the cold shell's contribution. A family of marginal-ignition curves are derived in the ρR--T plane.footnotetext C. D. Zhou and R. Betti, Phys. Plasmas 15, 102707 (2008). On this plane, hydrodynamic-equivalent curves show how a given implosion would perform with respect to the ignition condition when the laser-driver energy is varied. Such a criterion can be used to measure the ignition marginfootnotetext D. S. Clark, S. W. Haan, and J. D. Salmonson, Phys. Plasmas 15, 056305 (2008). of NIF targets and to predict the performance of OMEGA targets when scaled up to NIF energies. This work has been supported by the US Department of Energy under Cooperative Agreement Nos. DE-FC02-ER54789 and DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  1. Determination of the relative resistance to ignition of selected turbopump materials in high-pressure, high-temperature, oxygen environments, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Benz, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    Data is presented from frictional heating tests on pairs of different materials. Materials tested include: Hastelloy X, Inconel 600, Invar 36, Monel K-500, Monel 400, nickel 200, silicon carbide, stainless steels 316, and zirconium copper. In tests where pairs of different materials were rubbed together, the material rated less resistant to ignition in previous tests appeared to control the resistance to ignition of the pair.

  2. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  3. Tester Board for testing mass-produced SMB modules for CMS Preshower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikzhanin, Y. S.; Chou, C. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Lee, Y. J.; Shiu, J. G.; Sun, C. D.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2007-09-01

    We have developed a Tester Board to test the electrical characteristics of the System Motherboard (SMB) for the CMS Preshower detector at CERN. The board is designed to test input resistances, output resistances, connections, interconnections and possible short- circuits of a module having up to 640 connector pins. The Tester Board is general-purpose in nature: it could be used to test any electronic module or cable by using dedicated cable sets. The module can detect a variety of problems not detected by either functional tests or the "flying probes" technique. The design, algorithms and results of using the Tester Board during mass production of CMS Preshower SMBs are presented.

  4. Tester Board for testing mass-produced SMB modules for CMS Preshower

    CERN Document Server

    Velikzhanin, Yu S; Hsiung, Y B; Lee, Y J; Shiu, J G; Sun, C D; Wang, Y Z

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a Tester Board to test the electrical characteristics of the System Motherboard (SMB) for the CMS Preshower detector at CERN. The board is designed to test input resistances, output resistances, connections, interconnections and possible short- circuits of a module having up to 640 connector pins. The Tester Board is general-purpose in nature: it could be used to test any electronic module or cable by using dedicated cable sets. The module can detect a variety of problems not detected by either functional tests or the "flying probes" technique. The design, algorithms and results of using the Tester Board during mass production of CMS Preshower SMBs are presented.

  5. Reflections on Friction in Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Rezek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distinctly quantum friction effects of three types are surveyed: internalfriction, measurement-induced friction, and quantum-fluctuation-induced friction. We demonstrate that external driving will lead to quantum internal friction, and critique the measurement-based interpretation of friction. We conclude that in general systems will experience internal and external quantum friction over and beyond the classical frictional contributions.

  6. Single and multiple impact ignition of new and aged high explosives in the Steven Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidester, S K; DePiero, A H; Garza, R G; Tarver, C M

    1999-06-01

    Threshold impact velocities for ignition of exothermic reaction were determined for several new and aged HMX-based solid high explosives using three types of projectiles in the Steven Test. Multiple impact threshold velocities were found to be approximately 10% lower in damaged charges that did not react in one or more prior impacts. Projectiles with protrusions that concentrate the friction work in a small volume of explosive reduced the threshold velocities by approximately 30%. Flat projectiles required nearly twice as high velocities for ignition as rounded projectiles. Blast overpressure gauges were used for both pristine and damaged charges to quantitatively measure reaction violence. Reactive flow calculations of single and multiple impacts with various projectiles suggest that the ignition rates double in damaged charges.

  7. Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Rodney J. [Research Applications Corporation, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-10-12

    Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nation's energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, "implicitness and fluid modeling," can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

  8. Friction properties of fluorinated compounds. Fusso kagobutsu no masatsu tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hironaka, S. (Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Sekiya, A. (National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    In these years, fluorinated oils such as perfluoropolyalkyl ester and so on are developed as lubricating oil with better thermal stability as well as acid stability compared with hydrocarbon oil or ester. The results of the examination prosecuted by the present authors with a pendulum type friction tester on the friction properties in steel/steel system with perfluorooctanoic acid, n-C7F15COOH, and the synthesized compounds thereof like 1,1-dihydroperfluorooctanol, n-C7F15CH2OH, 1-hydroperfluorooctane-1,1-diol and n-C7F15CH(OH)2 as the additives clarify that they are respectively superior to the oleic acid and lauryl alcohol and expectable as the new oil agents. In the present study, 1,1-dihydroperfluorooctylamine, n-C7F15CH2NH2 are further synthesized, and the examination on the friction properties in the steel/steel system and steel/aluminium system reveals the effects thereof as the additives. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Visual Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT) Uncertainty Analysis (Milestone Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, A.; Lewandowski, A.; Wendelin, T.

    2010-10-01

    In 1997, an uncertainty analysis was conducted of the Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT). In 2010, we have completed a new analysis, based primarily on the geometric optics of the system, and it shows sensitivities to various design and operational parameters. We discuss sources of error with measuring devices, instrument calibrations, and operator measurements for a parabolic trough mirror panel test. These help to guide the operator in proper setup, and help end-users to understand the data they are provided. We include both the systematic (bias) and random (precision) errors for VSHOT testing and their contributions to the uncertainty. The contributing factors we considered in this study are: target tilt; target face to laser output distance; instrument vertical offset; laser output angle; distance between the tool and the test piece; camera calibration; and laser scanner. These contributing factors were applied to the calculated slope error, focal length, and test article tilt that are generated by the VSHOT data processing. Results show the estimated 2-sigma uncertainty in slope error for a parabolic trough line scan test to be +/-0.2 milliradians; uncertainty in the focal length is +/- 0.1 mm, and the uncertainty in test article tilt is +/- 0.04 milliradians.

  10. Screening of stabilized crosslinked polyethylene using a novel wear tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M; Gonzalez-Mora, V; Chiesa, R; Cigada, A; Stroosnijder, M F

    2002-01-01

    A novel pin-on-disk type wear tester is described allowing a rapid screening of different types of polyethylene under both unidirectional and multidirectional sliding motion. The wear of four polyethylene materials sliding against a roughened CoCrMo alloy was evaluated: a non-irradiated UHMWPE, a UHMWPE irradiated with a dose of 25 kGy in air, and two types of crosslinked UHMWPE (100 kGy, air), which were subjected to a stabilization heat treatment in nitrogen at 155 degrees C for 72 hours (XLPE I) and in water at 130 degrees C for 72 hours (XLPE II), respectively.Under multidirectional sliding conditions both types of XLPE exhibited significantly less wear with respect to the 25 kGy irradiated UHMWPE and the non-irradiated UHMWPE, even under the rough counterface conditions applied. Under unidirectional sliding motion both types of XLPE exhibited the highest wear of all materials tested, because the orientation hardening effect acting under linear lubricated condition is less pronounced for crosslinked polyethylene.

  11. Options for an ignited tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.

    1984-02-01

    It is expected that the next phase of the fusion program will involve a tokamak with the goals of providing an ignited plasma for pulses of hundreds of seconds. A simple model is described in this memorandum which establishes the physics conditions for such a self-sustaining plasma, for given ion and electron thermal diffusivities, in terms of R/a, b/a, I, B/q, epsilon ..beta../sub p/, anti T/sub i/, and anti T/sub e//anti T/sub i/. The model is used to produce plots showing the wide range of tokamaks that may ignite or have a given ignition margin. The constraints that limit this range are discussed.

  12. Pulse shaping techniques for a high-g shock tester based on collision principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhengyong; Tang, Chuansheng; Li, Yang; Han, Junliang; Wu, Guoxiong

    2016-09-01

    Pulse shaping techniques are discussed in this paper for the practicability of a developed high-g shock tester. The tester is based on collision principle where there is a one-level velocity amplifier. A theoretical and experimental study of pulse shaping techniques is presented. A model was built and theoretical formulae were deduced for the shock peak acceleration and its duration. Then theoretical analysis and some experiments were conducted. The test results verify the validity of theoretical model and show that the shock tester can generate the expected high-g shock pulses by integrated usage of different impact velocities and pulse shapers made from different materials. This is important in practical applications where the items under test can be shown to excite specific resonances at predetermined acceleration levels using the shock tester.

  13. Precision, comfort and mechanical performance of the Quadriso-tester, a quadriceps force measuring device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerke, GJ; Lemmink, KAPM; Slagers, AJ; Westhoff, MH; van Riet, GAJ; Rakhorst, G

    The mechanical performance, repeatability and comfort of the Quadriso-tester, which assesses isometric knee extensor muscle strength, were examined. Twenty healthy subjects and 20 patients treated for unilateral anterior ligamenta cruciata insufficiency were tested. Intra-rater repeatability was

  14. Bamboo Fibre-reinforced Semi-Metallic Brake Friction Materials for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talib R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three friction material formulations composed of bamboo fiber along with binder, friction modifiers and filler have been prepared through powder metallurgy process. Sample F1 and F2 are composed of 10 wt. % of copper and barium, respectively, while the other ingredients in both formulations have the same wt. %. The wt. % of bamboo fiber in sample F3 is, however, increased by 100%, while the compositions of the other ingredients are proportionally decreased. The samples were examined for their porosity, hardness, and friction and wear properties using hot bath, Rockwell hardness tester, and CHASE friction dynamometer, respectively. The test results are compared with those of a commercial sample as the benchmark. Normal and hot frictions of all the three samples developed comply with the requirements specified by Automotive Manufacturer Equipment Companies Agency (AMECA. However, sample F3 which is composed of 20 wt. % of bamboo fiber does not comply with the minimum requirement of friction coefficient. Whereas, sample F2, which is composed of 10 wt. % of bamboo fiber and 10 wt. % of barium, has lower friction coefficient than the commercial sample, and has a sudden drop in friction coefficient at a temperature of 500°F. Out of three developed samples, sample F1, which is composed of 10 wt. % of bamboo fiber and 10 wt. % of copper, complies with all the requirements and has higher friction coefficient than the commercial sample, and has higher fade resistance. Thus, it could be postulated that bamboo fiber could be used as a reinforcing fiber with composition of 10 wt. %.

  15. Isochoric implosions for fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2006-06-05

    Fast Ignition (FI) exploits the ignition of a dense, uniform fuel assembly by an external energy source to achieve high gain. In conventional ICF implosions, however, the fuel assembles as a dense shell surrounding a low density, high-pressure hotspot. Such configurations are far from optimal for FI. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942).] may be employed to implode a dense, quasi-uniform fuel assembly with minimal energy wastage in forming a hotspot. A scheme for realizing these specialized implosions in a practical ICF target is also described.

  16. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection.

  17. Wet Friction-Elements Boundary Friction Mechanism and Friction Coefficient Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yanzhong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The friction mechanism for the boundary friction course of friction elements engagement was explicitly expressed. The boundary friction model was built up by the surface topography. The model contained the effect of boundary film, adhesion, plough and lubrication. Based on the model, a coefficient for weakening plough for the lubrication was proposed. The modified model could fit for the working condition of wet friction elements. The friction coefficient as a function curve of rotating speed could be finally obtained by the data k and s/sm. The method provides a well interpretation of friction condition and friction coefficient prediction and the agreement between theoretical and experimental friction coefficients is reasonably good.

  18. Energy Balance of Friction and Friction Coefficient in Energetical Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Fedorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sliding friction energy model is proposed. In this model, generalized mechanism of transformation and dissipation of energy under friction the model of elastic-plastic deformation and fracture contact volumes is considered. Energy model of the process of plastic deformation and destruction of solid bodies is based on the concept of ergodynamic of deformable bodies. Equations of energy balance of friction within the structural and energetic interpretation of deformation are proposed. The energy interpretation of the coefficient of friction is showed. From this position the friction coefficient is the most informative characteristic of the process. Experimental friction curves have been generalized. As a result of the energy analysis of friction, the energy diagram of the structural evolution of the friction surfaces is suggested.

  19. Büroo Ignite = Ignite office / Priit Põldme, Reet Sepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Põldme, Priit, 1971-

    2013-01-01

    Büroo Ignite (Tatari 25, Tallinn) sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Priit Põldme ja Reet Sepp (SAB Joonprojekt). Arhitektid Heiki Taras ja Ahti Luhaäär (Arhitektibüroo Pilter ja Taras). Sisearhitekti ja ESLi aastapreemiate žürii esimehe Kaido Kivi arvamus

  20. Büroo Ignite = Ignite office / Priit Põldme, Reet Sepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Põldme, Priit, 1971-

    2013-01-01

    Büroo Ignite (Tatari 25, Tallinn) sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Priit Põldme ja Reet Sepp (SAB Joonprojekt). Arhitektid Heiki Taras ja Ahti Luhaäär (Arhitektibüroo Pilter ja Taras). Sisearhitekti ja ESLi aastapreemiate žürii esimehe Kaido Kivi arvamus

  1. Sliding wear and friction behaviour of zircaloy-4 in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Garima; Limaye, P. K.; Jadhav, D. T.

    2009-11-01

    In water cooled nuclear reactors, the sliding of fuel bundles in fuel channel handling system can lead to severe wear and it is an important topic to study. In the present study, sliding wear behaviour of zircaloy-4 was investigated in water (pH ˜ 10.5) using ball-on-plate sliding wear tester. Sliding wear resistance zircaloy-4 against SS 316 was examined at room temperature. Sliding wear tests were carried out at different load and sliding frequencies. The coefficient of friction of zircaloy-4 was also measured during each tests and it was found to decrease slightly with the increase in applied load. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zircaloy-4 were identified to be microcutting, micropitting and microcracking of deformed subsurface zones in water.

  2. Etiske utfordringer med non-invasive prenatale tester (NIPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Hofmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Analyser av cellefritt DNA fra foster i gravide kvinners blod gir nye muligheter innen fosterdiagnostikk: Testene er bedre enn eksisterende tester, de reduserer risikoen og er billigere. Flere land har tatt i bruk disse testene, og Helsedirektoratet i Norge har mottatt søknad om å ta i bruk en test som erstatter tidlig ultralyd og blodprøver. Likevel nøler norske myndigheter. Hvorfor gjør de det? Ett av svarene er at non-invasive prenatale tester fører med seg en rekke faglige og moralske spørsmål og gir flere grunnleggende etiske utfordringer. Denne artikkelen gjennomgår et bredt knippe av de utfordringene som NIPT reiser. Hensikten er å synliggjøre hvorfor NIPT påkaller etisk refleksjon og å bidra til en åpen debatt og en transparent beslutningsprosess. Artikkelen identifiserer fem sentrale og konkrete spørsmål for vurderingen av NIPT.Nøkkelord: non-invasiv prenatal diagnostikk, testing, fravalg, foster, blodprøve, ekspressivisme, statsliberalt dilemma, dilemma, abort, retten til ikke å viteEnglish summary: Ethical challenges with non-invasive prenatal tests (NIPTNon-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT performed with the use of massively parallel sequencing of cell-free DNA (cfDNA testing in maternal plasma gives extended possibilities in prenatal screening. The tests are claimed to be better than existing alternative tests, they reduce the risk, and it is claimed they are cheaper. They have been used in several countries since 2012, and the University Hospital of North Norway has applied to the Directorate of Health to replace first trimester ultrasound and plasma screening with NIPT. The Directorate of Health is reluctant to reply. Why is this? One of the answers may be that NIPT raises a series of professional and moral questions, and poses profound ethical challenges. This article reviews a series of the challenges with NIPT. The aim is to highlight why NIPT calls for ethical reflection and to contribute to an open debate

  3. Plasma ignition of LOVA propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Boluijt, A.G.; Schilt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition experiments were performed using a gun simulator which is equipped with a burst disk. This equipment facilitates the application of propellant loading densities which are comparable to those applied in regular ammunitions. For this study the gun simulator was equipped with a plasma jet igni

  4. Plasma ignition of LOVA propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Boluijt, A.G.; Schilt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition experiments were performed using a gun simulator which is equipped with a burst disk. This equipment facilitates the application of propellant loading densities which are comparable to those applied in regular ammunitions. For this study the gun simulator was equipped with a plasma jet

  5. Application of a four-step HMX kinetic model to an impact-induced fraction ignition problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, William L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gunderson, Jake A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dickson, Peter M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    There has been a long history of interest in the decomposition kinetics of HMX and HMX-based formulations due to the widespread use of this explosive in high performance systems. The kinetics allow us to predict, or attempt to predict, the behavior of the explosive when subjected to thermal hazard scenarios that lead to ignition via impact, spark, friction or external heat. The latter, commonly referred to as 'cook off', has been widely studied and contemporary kinetic and transport models accurately predict time and location of ignition for simple geometries. However, there has been relatively little attention given to the problem of localized ignition that results from the first three ignition sources of impact, spark and friction. The use of a zero-order single-rate expression describing the exothermic decomposition of explosives dates to the early work of Frank-Kamanetskii in the late 1930s and continued through the 60's and 70's. This expression provides very general qualitative insight, but cannot provide accurate spatial or timing details of slow cook off ignition. In the 70s, Catalano, et al., noted that single step kinetics would not accurately predict time to ignition in the one-dimensional time to explosion apparatus (ODTX). In the early 80s, Tarver and McGuire published their well-known three step kinetic expression that included an endothermic decomposition step. This scheme significantly improved the accuracy of ignition time prediction for the ODTX. However, the Tarver/McGuire model could not produce the internal temperature profiles observed in the small-scale radial experiments nor could it accurately predict the location of ignition. Those factors are suspected to significantly affect the post-ignition behavior and better models were needed. Brill, et al. noted that the enthalpy change due to the beta-delta crystal phase transition was similar to the assumed endothermic decomposition step in the Tarver/McGuire model. Henson, et

  6. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  7. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der E.; Zeng, X.; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is fre

  8. Gravitomagnetic dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Cashen, Benjamin; Kesden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A supermassive black hole moving through a field of stars will gravitationally scatter the stars, inducing a backreaction force on the black hole known as dynamical friction. In Newtonian gravity, the axisymmetry of the system about the black hole's velocity $\\mathbf{v}$ implies that the dynamical friction must be anti-parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$. However, in general relativity the black hole's spin $\\mathbf{S}$ need not be parallel to $\\mathbf{v}$, breaking the axisymmetry of the system and generating a new component of dynamical friction similar to the Lorentz force $\\mathbf{F} = q\\mathbf{v} \\times \\mathbf{B}$ experienced by a particle with charge $q$ moving in a magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}$. We call this new force gravitomagnetic dynamical friction and calculate its magnitude for a spinning black hole moving through a field of stars with Maxwellian velocity dispersion $\\sigma$, assuming that both $v$ and $\\sigma$ are much less than the speed of light $c$. We use post-Newtonian equations of motion accurate to $...

  9. Desensitizing nano powders to electrostatic discharge ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steelman, Ryan [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Clark, Billy [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Pantoya, Michelle L. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Heaps, Ronald J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daniels, Michael A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is a main cause for ignition in powder media ranging from grain silos to fireworks. Nanoscale particles are orders of magnitude more ESD ignition sensitive than their micron scale counterparts. This study shows that at least 13 vol. % carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to nano-aluminum and nano-copper oxide particles (nAl + CuO) eliminates ESD ignition sensitivity. The CNT act as a conduit for electric energy and directs electric charge through the powder to desensitize the reactive mixture to ignition. For nanoparticles, the required CNT concentration for desensitizing ESD ignition acts as a diluent to quench energy propagation.

  10. Friction and Wear Reduction of Eccentric Journal Bearing Made of Sn-Based Babbitt for Ore Cone Crusher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auezhan Amanov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An anti-friction Babbitt alloy-coated bearing made by a casting process is a journal bearing, which is used in an ore cone crusher eccentric. The main purpose of the Babbitt coated eccentric is to provide a low friction to support and guide a rotating shaft. Despite the fact that the Babbitt-coated eccentric offers a low friction coefficient and can be operated without a continuous supply of lubricant, it suffers from mining environments and short service life. In this study, an ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM technique was used to further reduce the friction coefficient, to increase the wear resistance, and to extend the service life of the Sn-based Babbitt metal. The friction and wear behavior of the Sn-based Babbitt metal was investigated using a block-on-ring tester under both dry and oil-lubricated conditions. The results of the experiments revealed that the friction and wear behavior of Sn-based Babbitt metal could be improved by the application of the UNSM technique. The friction and wear mechanisms of the specimens were explained and discussed in terms of changes in surface properties—microstructure, surface hardness, surface roughness, etc.

  11. Friction Properties of Polished Cvd Diamond Films Sliding against Different Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zichao; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties, like the well-known extreme hardness, low coefficient of friction and high chemical inertness, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have found applications as a hard coating for drawing dies. The surface roughness of the diamond films is one of the most important attributes to the drawing dies. In this paper, the effects of different surface roughnesses on the friction properties of diamond films have been experimentally studied. Diamond films were fabricated using hot filament CVD. The WC-Co (Co 6wt.%) drawing dies were used as substrates. A gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen gas was used as the feedstock gas. The CVD diamond films were polished using mechanical polishing. Polished diamond films with three different surface roughnesses, as well as the unpolished diamond film, were fabricated in order to study the tribological performance between the CVD diamond films and different metals with oil lubrication. The unpolished and polished CVD diamond films are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface profilometer, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The friction examinations were carried out by using a ball-on-plate type reciprocating friction tester. Low carbide steel, stainless steel, copper and aluminum materials were used as counterpart balls. Based on this study, the results presented the friction coefficients between the polished CVD films and different metals. The friction tests demonstrate that the smooth surface finish of CVD diamond films is beneficial for reducing their friction coefficients. The diamond films exhibit low friction coefficients when slid against the stainless steel balls and low carbide steel ball, lower than that slid against copper ball and aluminum ball, attributed to the higher ductility of copper and aluminum causing larger amount of wear debris adhering to the sliding interface and higher adhesive

  12. The effect of kerosene injection on ignition probability of local ignition in a scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Heng; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu

    2017-03-01

    The spark ignition of kerosene is investigated in a scramjet combustor with a flight condition of Ma 4, 17 km. Based plentiful of experimental data, the ignition probabilities of the local ignition have been acquired for different injection setups. The ignition probability distributions show that the injection pressure and injection location have a distinct effect on spark ignition. The injection pressure has both upper and lower limit for local ignition. Generally, the larger mass flow rate will reduce the ignition probability. The ignition position also affects the ignition near the lower pressure limit. The reason is supposed to be the cavity swallow effect on upstream jet spray near the leading edge, which will make the cavity fuel rich. The corner recirculation zone near the front wall of the cavity plays a significant role in the stabilization of local flame.

  13. Tritium and ignition target management at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draggoo, Vaughn

    2013-06-01

    Isotopic mixtures of hydrogen constitute the basic fuel for fusion targets of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A typical NIF fusion target shot requires approximately 0.5 mmoles of hydrogen gas and as much as 750 GBq (20 Ci) of 3H. Isotopic mix ratios are specified according to the experimental shot/test plan and the associated test objectives. The hydrogen isotopic concentrations, absolute amounts, gas purity, configuration of the target, and the physical configuration of the NIF facility are all parameters and conditions that must be managed to ensure the quality and safety of operations. An essential and key step in the preparation of an ignition target is the formation of a ~60 μm thick hydrogen "ice" layer on the inner surface of the target capsule. The Cryogenic Target Positioning System (Cryo-Tarpos) provides gas handling, cyro-cooling, x-ray imaging systems, and related instrumentation to control the volumes and temperatures of the multiphase (solid, liquid, and gas) hydrogen as the gas is condensed to liquid, admitted to the capsule, and frozen as a single spherical crystal of hydrogen in the capsule. The hydrogen fuel gas is prepared in discrete 1.7 cc aliquots in the LLNL Tritium Facility for each ignition shot. Post-shot hydrogen gas is recovered in the NIF Tritium Processing System (TPS). Gas handling systems, instrumentation and analytic equipment, material accounting information systems, and the shot planning systems must work together to ensure that operational and safety requirements are met.

  14. Comparing Variability of Parameters between Roller Bed Brakes Testers and Dynamometric Platform of Ministry Of Transport Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senabre C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study gives a comparison between which parameters may vary when braking on two different Ministry of Transport (MOT brake testers, such as roller bed brake tester and dynamometric platform. A comparative study between both types of brake testers have been carried out by the mechanical engineering staffs at the mechanical laboratory at the Miguel Hernández University in Elche to determinate which parameters can vary the result of the test.

  15. High-speed friction and wear behaviors of bulk Ti3SiC2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhen-ying; ZHAI Hong-xiang; ZHOU Wei; ZHOU Yang; AI Ming-xin; ZHANG Zhi-li; LI Shi-bo

    2005-01-01

    High-speed friction and wear behaviors of bulk Ti3 SiC2 sliding drily against low carbon steel were investigated. Tests were carried out using a block-on-disk type tester with normal pressures ranging from 0.1 to 0.8 MPa and several sliding speeds from 20 to 60 m/s. The results show that, in the case of sliding speeds of 20 - 40 m/s, the friction coefficient exhibits a decreasing tendency with increasing the normal pressure after an increment in the smaller pressure range, and the worn quantity of Ti3SiC2 exhibits a nearly linear increase with increasing the normal pressure. However, when the sliding speed is up to 60 m/s, the friction coefficient exhibits a monotonous increase and the worn quantity exhibits a quadric increase with increasing the normal pressure. These speed-dependent and pressure-dependent behaviors are attributed to the antifriction effects of a frictionally generated oxide film covering the friction surface of Ti3SiC2, and a balance between the generating rate and the removing (wearing) rate of the film.

  16. Frictional Performance and Temperature Rise of a Mining Nonasbestos Brake Material during Emergency Braking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiusheng Bao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By simulating emergency braking conditions of mine hoisters, tribological experiments of a mining nonasbestos brake material sliding on E355CC steel friction disc investigated a pad-on-disc friction tester. It is shown that, under combined influence of braking velocity and pressure, the lubricating film and micro-convex-apices on wear surface would have complex physicochemical reactions which make the instant friction coefficient rise gradually while the instant surface temperature rises first and then falls. With the antifriction effect from lubricating film and the desquamating of composite materials, the mean friction coefficient decreases first, then rises, and decreases again with the increasing of initial braking velocity. And with the existence of micro-convex-apices and variation from increment ratio of load and actual contacting area, it rises first and then falls with the increasing of braking pressure. However, the mean surface temperature rises obviously with the increasing of both initial braking velocity and braking pressure for growth of transformed kinetic energy. It is considered that the friction coefficient cannot be considered as a constant when designing brake devices for mine hoisters. And special attention should be paid to the serious influence of surface temperature on tribological performance of brake material during emergency braking.

  17. Preparation and frictional investigation of the two-components silanes deposited on alumina surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kośla, K.; Grobelny, J.; Cichomski, M., E-mail: mcichom@uni.lodz.pl

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The two-component silane films on the alumina surface were obtained by a combination of soft lithography and vapor phase deposition method. • The effectiveness of modification procedure was monitored by AFM topography images. • By using gas phase deposition method succeeded in obtaining a good reproduction of pattern. • Silane films with low surface free energy and coefficient of friction values were obtained. • The frictional performance in milli-Newton load range of one- and two-component films was investigated by microtribometry. - Abstract: Functionalization and pattering technique that permits two-component pattern-specific modification of alumina surface with silanes molecules are reported. The method relies on a two-component molecular system that simultaneously decreases coefficient of friction of the alumina surface and provides uniform chemical functionality suitable for further elaboration. Pattern/two-component modification is achieved via gas-phase deposition of the silanes using polydimethylsiloxane stamp. The frictional behaviors of the two-component films of the silane molecules with different chain length covalently absorbed on alumina surfaces, were characterized by the ball-disk (microtribometer) tester. The surfaces of the substrate modified by two-component molecular films were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The measured tribological results showed that the mixing of the fluoroalkylsilane and alkylsilane enhance the lubrication and decrease the friction compared to the one-component thin films.

  18. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  19. Intra- and inter-tester reliability of sensibility testing in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brakel, W H; Khawas, I B; Gurung, K S; Kets, C M; van Leerdam, M E; Drever, W

    1996-09-01

    We conducted an intra- and inter-tester agreement study of three sensory screening tests used in nerve function assessment of leprosy patients: the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM) test, moving 2-point discrimination (M2PD), and the pin prick test. The weighted kappa (Kw) statistic was used as the reliability coefficient. The SWM had intra-observer Kws ranging from 0.83 to 0.92 and inter-observer Kws ranging from 0.76 to 0.89. The M2PD had intra- and inter-tester Kws ranging from 0.75 to 0.82 and 0.54 to 0.82, respectively. Inter-tester agreement for the pin prick test ranged from 0.45 to 0.85. There was evidence that the main source of variability between testers was testing skill and experience. Among the experienced physiotechnicians there was no significant difference between intra- and inter-tester reliability. We conclude that reliability of the SWM test was very good, closely followed by the M2PD test. Reliability of the pin prick test was less good than that of the SWM and M2PD, making it less suitable for serial testing.

  20. Friction in rail guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of friction is included in the present equations describing the performance of an inductively driven rail gun. These equations, which have their basis in an empirical formulation, are applied to results from two different experiments. Only an approximate physical description of the problem is attempted, in view of the complexity of details in the interaction among forces of this magnitude over time periods of the order of milisecs.

  1. Self-ignition of diesel spray combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuchakallaya, Isares; Watkins, A. P.

    2009-10-01

    This work presents the development and implementation of auto-ignition modelling for DI diesel engines by using the probability density function-eddy break-up (PDF-EBU) model. The key concept of this approach is to combine the chemical reaction rate dealing with low-temperature mode, and the turbulence reaction rate governing the high-temperature part by a reaction progress variable coupling function which represents the level of reaction. The average reaction rate here is evaluated by a PDF averaging approach. In order to assess the potential of this developed model, the well-known Shell ignition model is chosen to compare in auto-ignition analysis. In comparison, the PDF-EBU ignition model yields the ignition delay time in good agreement with the Shell ignition model prediction. However, the ignition kernel location predicted by the Shell model is slightly nearer injector than that by the PDF-EBU model leading to shorter lift-off length. As a result, the PDF-EBU ignition model developed here are fairly satisfactory in predicting the auto-ignition of diesel engines with the Shell ignition model.

  2. Ignition behavior of an aluminum-bonded explosive (ABX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D. Barrett; Zhou, Min; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    We report the results of a study on the ignition behavior of a novel concept and design of a heterogeneous energetic material system called ABX, or aluminum-bonded explosives. The idea is to replace the polymeric binder in polymer-bonded explosives (PBX) with aluminum. The motivation of this study is that a new design may have several desirable attributes, including, among others, electrical conductivity, higher mechanical strength, enhanced integrity, higher energy content, and enhanced thermal stability at elevated temperatures. The analysis carried out concerns the replacement of the Estane binder in a HMX/Estane PBX by aluminum. The HMX volume fraction in the PBX and HMX is approximately 81%. 2D mesoscale simulations are carried out, accounting for elasticity, viscoelasticity, elasto-viscoplasticity, fracture, internal friction, and thermal conduction. Results show that, relative to the PBX, the aluminum bonded explosives (ABX) show significantly less heating and lower ignition sensitivity under the same loading conditions. The findings appear to confirm the expected promise of ABX as a next-generation heterogeneous energetic material system with more desirable attributes.

  3. Sliding Wear and Friction Behavior of Fuel Rod Material in Water and Dry State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Moo; Kim, Jae Hoon; Jeon, Kyeong Lak; Park, Jun Kyu

    In water cooled reactors, the friction between spacer grid and fuel rod can lead to severe wear and it is an important topic to study. In the present study, sliding wear behavior of zirconium alloy was investigated in water and dry state using the pin-on-disc sliding wear tester. Sliding wear resistance of zirconium alloy against heat treated inconel alloy was examined at room temperature. The parameters in this study were sliding velocity, axial load and sliding distance. The wear characteristics of zirconium alloy was evaluated by friction coefficient, specific wear rate and wear volume. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zirconium alloy were identified to be micro-cutting, micro-pitting, delamination and micro-cracking of deformed surface zone.

  4. Effect of Lubricant Viscosity and Surface Roughness on Coefficient of Friction in Rolling Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Ghalme

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of surface roughness and lubricant viscosity on coefficient of friction in silicon nitride- steel rolling contact. Two samples of silicon nitride with two different values of surface roughness were tested against steel counter face. The test was performed on four ball tester in presence of lubricant with two different values of viscosity. Taguchi technique a methodology in design of experiment implemented to plan the experimentation and same is utilized to evaluate the interacting effect of surface roughness and lubricant viscosity. Analysis of experimental results presents a strong interaction between surface roughness and lubricant viscosity on coefficient of friction in rolling contact.

  5. Effect of amide type modified rapeseed oil as lubricating additive on friction and wear behavior of steel-steel and steel-aluminum alloy systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jian-hua; CHEN Bo-shui; LIU Wei-min; DONG Lin; WANG Jiu

    2004-01-01

    A new type of environmentally friendly lube additive-amide type modified rapeseed oil was synthesized and characterized by infrared spectrum. Its effect on the friction and wear behavior of steel-steel and steel-aluminum alloy systems were investigated with a four-ball machine and an Optimol SRV friction and wear tester respectively.The morphographies of the worn surfaces were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy(SEM). The worn surfaces of the 2024Al alloy block were analyzed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS). The results show that the modified rapeseed oil as additives can obviously decrease the wear rate and friction coefficient of steel pair and steel-aluminum frictional pair. Its lubrication mechanism is inferred that a high strength complex protection films form on the worn surface of the Al alloy due to the adsorption or tribochemistry reaction of a long chain additive molecule and high reaction activity of N element.

  6. High Speed Friction Microscopy and Nanoscale Friction Coefficient Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, James L.; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for Friction Coefficient Mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true...

  7. Friction laws for lubricated nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzio, R.; Boragno, C.; Valbusa, U.

    2006-09-01

    We have used friction force microscopy to probe friction laws for nanoasperities sliding on atomically flat substrates under controlled atmosphere and liquid environment, respectively. A power law relates friction force and normal load in dry air, whereas a linear relationship, i.e., Amontons' law, is observed for junctions fully immersed in model lubricants, namely, octamethylciclotetrasiloxane and squalane. Lubricated contacts display a remarkable friction reduction, with liquid and substrate specific friction coefficients. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulations suggests that load-bearing boundary layers at junction entrance cause the appearance of Amontons' law and impart atomic-scale character to the sliding process; continuum friction models are on the contrary of limited predictive power when applied to lubrication effects. An attempt is done to define general working conditions leading to the manifestation of nanoscale lubricity due to adsorbed boundary layers.

  8. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  9. Solid friction between soft filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  10. Indirect drive ignition at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meezan, N. B.; Edwards, M. J.; Hurricane, O. A.; Patel, P. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Hsing, W. W.; Town, R. P. J.; Albert, F.; Amendt, P. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hall, G. N.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ho, D. D.; Hohenberger, M.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Masse, L.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Spears, B. K.; Stadermann, M.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Turnbull, D. P.; Weber, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews scientific results from the pursuit of indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and describes the program’s forward looking research directions. In indirect drive on the NIF, laser beams heat an x-ray enclosure called a hohlraum that surrounds a spherical pellet. X-ray radiation ablates the surface of the pellet, imploding a thin shell of deuterium/tritium (DT) that must accelerate to high velocity (v  >  350 km s-1) and compress by a factor of several thousand. Since 2009, substantial progress has been made in understanding the major challenges to ignition: Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability seeded by target imperfections; and low-mode asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray drive, exacerbated by laser-plasma instabilities (LPI). Requirements on velocity, symmetry, and compression have been demonstrated separately on the NIF but have not been achieved simultaneously. We now know that the RT instability, seeded mainly by the capsule support tent, severely degraded DT implosions from 2009-2012. Experiments using a ‘high-foot’ drive with demonstrated lower RT growth improved the thermonuclear yield by a factor of 10, resulting in yield amplification due to alpha particle heating by more than a factor of 2. However, large time dependent drive asymmetry in the LPI-dominated hohlraums remains unchanged, preventing further improvements. High fidelity 3D hydrodynamic calculations explain these results. Future research efforts focus on improved capsule mounting techniques and on hohlraums with little LPI and controllable symmetry. In parallel, we are pursuing improvements to the basic physics models used in the design codes through focused physics experiments.

  11. Lateral Ignition and Flame Spread Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: This apparatus, developed at EL, determines material properties related to piloted ignition of a vertically oriented sample under constant and uniform...

  12. Understanding Biomass Ignition in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Converting existing coal fired power plants to biomass is a readily implemented strategy to increase the share of renewable energy. However, changing from one fuel to another is not straightforward: Experience shows that wood pellets ignite more readily than coal in power plant mills or storages....... This is not very well explained by apply-ing conventional thermal ignition theory. An experimental study at lab scale, using pinewood as an example fuel, was conducted to examine self-heating and self-ignition. Supplemental experiments were performed with bituminous coal. Instead of characterizing ignition...

  13. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  14. Micromechanical study of macroscopic friction and dissipation in idealised granular materials: the effect of interparticle friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Rothenburg, L.; Gutkowski, Witold; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    2004-01-01

    Using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations with varying interparticle friction coefficient, the relation between interparticle friction coefficient and macroscopic continuum friction and dissipation is investigated. As expected, macroscopic friction and dilatancy increase with interparticle fri

  15. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  16. Friction or Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundahl, Mikela

    2014-01-01

    . The anthropologist Anna Tsing has developed the concept-metaphor friction as a way to discuss the energy created when various actors narrate “the same” event(s) in different ways, and see the other participants’ accounts as fantasies or even fabrications. I will use my position as researcher and my relations...... is Stone Town in Zanzibar and the de-velopment and dissolution going on under the shadow of the UNESCO World Heritage flag; a growing tourism; a global and local increase in islamisation; and the political tension within the Tanzanian union. My main focus is narratives of the identity of Zanzibar since...

  17. Local Ignition in Carbon/Oxygen White Dwarfs -- I: One-zone Ignition and Spherical Shock Ignition of Detonations

    CERN Document Server

    Dursi, L J

    2006-01-01

    The details of ignition of Type Ia supernovae remain fuzzy, despite the importance of this input for any large-scale model of the final explosion. Here, we begin a process of understanding the ignition of these hotspots by examining the burning of one zone of material, and then investigate the ignition of a detonation due to rapid heating at single point. We numerically measure the ignition delay time for onset of burning in mixtures of degenerate material and provide fitting formula for conditions of relevance in the Type Ia problem. Using the neon abundance as a proxy for the white dwarf metallicity, we then find that ignition times can decrease by ~20% with addition of even 5% of neon by mass. When temperature fluctuations that successfully kindle a region are very rare, such a reduction in ignition time can increase the probability of ignition by orders of magnitude. We then consider the ignition of a detonation by an explosive energy input in one localized zone, eg a Sedov blast wave leading to a shock-i...

  18. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  19. FRICTION ANALYSIS OF KINETIC SCHEMES - THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOLKEMA, JS

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  20. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free ener

  1. Ignition Prediction of Pressed HMX based on Hotspot Analysis Under Shock Pulse Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seokpum; Miller, Christopher; Horie, Yasuyuki; Molek, Christopher; Welle, Eric; Zhou, Min

    The ignition behavior of pressed HMX under shock pulse loading with a flyer is analyzed using a cohesive finite element method (CFEM) which accounts for large deformation, microcracking, frictional heating, and thermal conduction. The simulations account for the controlled loading of thin-flyer shock experiments with flyer velocities between 1.7 and 4.0 km/s. The study focuses on the computational prediction of ignition threshold using James criterion which involves loading intensity and energy imparted to the material. The predicted thresholds are in good agreement with measurements from shock experiments. In particular, it is found that grain size significantly affects the ignition sensitivity of the materials, with smaller sizes leading to lower energy thresholds required for ignition. In addition, significant stress attenuation is observed in high intensity pulse loading as compared to low intensity pulse loading, which affects density of hotspot distribution. The microstructure-performance relations obtained can be used to design explosives with tailored attributes and safety envelopes.

  2. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  3. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  4. A model for random cyclic pressure variations in spark-ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrashekar, T.K. [Sri Siddhartha Inst. of Technology, Karnataka (India); Antony, A.J. [Sahyadri Inst. of Technology, Mangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2009-07-01

    Cycle-by-cycle (CBC) variation of mean effective pressure in spark ignition engines is always greater than in compression ignition engines and needs to be reduced for better drivability, reduced emissions and increased power output. This study examined the parameters affecting CBC fluctuation and how to reduce the fluctuations. The paper presented two newly developed models designed to simulate the engine combustion process and CBC fluctuation. The mathematical model was outlined in detail with particular reference to model development; the statistical model for CBC fluctuation; and experimental setup. The model was found to be physically realistic and correctly predicted the cyclic variation of pressure to provide fundamental insight into the processes. The combustion model also took the effects of heat transfer and friction into consideration. 7 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs., 1 appendix.

  5. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt...

  6. An innovative tester system for measuring mechanical property of foundry molding sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuxi XIE

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A new intelligent tester system for measuring multiple mechanical properties of foundry molding sand is introduced and has been patented for the invention in China. The testing process can be simutaneosly controlled wth a build-in chip microcomputer communicating with a PC through a serial port. The testing system pplies dynamic testing technology. During the measurement for compression, relaxation, shearing and tensile processes of sand specimens, the corresponding characteristic curves and eight mechanical property parameters can be obtained in a short time, simply by consecutively testing on four sand specimens. The properties and parameters to be measurable by the tester include compressive strength, elastic modulus, plastic deformation threshold, springback potential, shear strength, shear deformation limit, toughness and tensile strength. These properties and parameters for sand specimens can be defined as the corresponding characteristic curves with precise physical meanings, carried out by the tester. Two of them, namely plastic deformation threshold and springback potential, as well as their testing methods, have been invented for the first time. The testing system applying advanced data measurement technology as well as performing excellent functions is an important breakthrough and creativity in foundry molding sand property testing field. The parameters acquired by the testing system are stable, accurate and reliable. The test data can be instantly diaplayed or printed out or stored in the PC. As evidence, many experimental data obtained by the tester practically from bth laboratory and foundry floor tests indicate that the testr system can be widely applied in foundry industry.

  7. Direct Labeling, Tester Expectancy and Delay Maintenance Behavior in Scottish Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Fiona K.; Toner, Ignatius J.

    1984-01-01

    Investigates the influence on Scottish preschool children's self-control of labels regarding patience given directly to the children themselves, and of the expectations regarding the children's patience provided to adult testers. Childrens self-control was assessed in a task in which each child's possession of accumulating candy rewards was made…

  8. Testers for combining ability and selection of papaya hybrids resistant to fungal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Pessanha da Silva Terra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic resistance represents a sustainable alternative to disease control in papaya crop. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the use of testers to estimate combining ability and select hybrids resistant to black spot, phoma spot and chocolatespot. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design with two replications and 20 plants per plot. The severity ofphoma spot and black spot on leaves and the lesion area of black spot and chocolate spot on fruits were evaluated in twoseasons. The combining ability of the following crosses is negative for all traits: tester ‘JS 12’ with ‘Sunrise Solo’ and ‘Kaphoro SoloPV’; tester ‘Americano’ with ‘Caliman M5’, ‘Sunrise Solo’, ’Baixinho de Santa Amália’ and ‘Waimanalo’; and tester ‘Maradol’with ‘Caliman G’, ‘Caliman AM’ and ‘Sunrise Solo PT’. These results may be useful in breeding for disease resistance byhybridization.

  9. Advanced ignition and propulsion technology program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenborg, R.; Early, J.; Lester, C.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Reliable engine re-ignition plays a crucial role in enabling commercial and military aircraft to fly safely at high altitudes. This project addressed research elements critical to the optimization of laser-based igniter. The effort initially involved a collaborative research and development agreement with B.F. Goodrich Aerospace and Laser Fare, Inc. The work involved integrated experiments with theoretical modeling to provide a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics controlling the laser-induced ignition of fuel aerosols produced by turbojet engine injectors. In addition, the authors defined advanced laser igniter configurations that minimize laser packaging size, weight, complexity and power consumption. These innovative ignition concepts were shown to reliably ignite jet fuel aerosols over a broad range of fuel/air mixture and a t fuel temperatures as low as -40 deg F. The demonstrated fuel ignition performance was highly superior to that obtained by the state-of-the-art, laser-spark ignition method utilizing comparable laser energy. The authors also developed a laser-based method that effectively removes optically opaque deposits of fuel hydrocarbon combustion residues from laser window surfaces. Seven patents have been either issued or are pending that resulted from the technology developments within this project.

  10. Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijderveen, M. van; Bramer, E.A.; Brem, G.

    2012-01-01

    To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The inco

  11. Heat transfer characteristics of igniter output plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, N. A.; Durand, N. A.

    Seven types of pyrotechnic igniters were each mounted at one end of a closed cylindrical bore hole representative of the center hole in a thermal battery. Measurements of local bore wall temperature, T(sub w), using commercially available, fast response (10 microsec) sheathed chromel-constantan thermocouples allowed calculation of local heat transfer rates, q, and wall heat flows, Q. The principal charge constituents of all these igniters were titanium and potassium perchlorate, while three types also contained barium styphnate as an ignition sensitizer. Igniter closure disc materials included glass-ceramic, glass, metal (plain, scored, with and without capture cone), and kapton/RTV. All igniters produced the lowest values of T(sub w) and q at the beginning of the bore, and, except for the igniter with the kapton/RTV closure disc, these quantities increased with distance along the bore. For igniters containing only titanium/potassium perchlorate, the rates of increase of Q along the bore length, compared with those for T(sub w) and q, were generally lower and more variable. The inclusion of barium styphnate produced rates of change in Q that were essentially constant to the end of the bore. The highest overall average wall temperatures were achieved by two igniter types with metal closure discs and no capture cone. No clear correlation was established between peak bore pressure and maximum wall temperature.

  12. Heat transfer characteristics of igniter output plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, N.A.; Durand, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    Seven types of pyrotechnic igniters were each mounted at one end of a closed cylindrical bore hole representative of the center hole in a thermal battery. Measurements of local bore wall temperature, T/sub w/, using commercially available, fast response (10 /mu/sec) sheathed chromel-constantan thermocouples allowed calculation of local heat transfer rates, q, and wall heat flows, Q. The principal charge constituents of all these igniters were titanium and potassium perchlorate, while three types also contained barium styphnate as an ignition sensitizer. Igniter closure disc materials included glass-ceramic, glass, metal (plain, scored, with and without capture cone), and kapton/RTV. All igniters produced the lowest values of T/sub w/ and q at the beginning of the bore, and, except for the igniter with the kapton/RTV closure disc, these quantities increased with distance along the bore. For igniters containing only titanium/potassium perchlorate, the rates of increase of Q along the bore length, compared with those for T/sub w/ and q, were generally lower and more variable. The inclusion of barium styphnate produced rates of change in Q that were essentially constant to the end of the bore. The highest overall average wall temperatures were achieved by two igniter types with metal closure discs and no capture cone. No clear correlation was established between peak bore pressure and maximum wall temperature. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  14. Elastic model of dry friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E., E-mail: dekl2@cam.ac.uk [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  15. Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2007-04-04

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of Fast Ignition (FI) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) over its conventional hot spot ignition counterpart [e.g., S. Atzeni, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3316 (1999); M. Tabak et al., Fusion Sci. & Technology 49, 254 (2006)]. These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform-density fuel assemblies. In contrast, conventional ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hot spot. Hence, to realize fully the advantages of FI, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hot spots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942)] may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters and at the scales and energies of interest in ICF. A direct-drive implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements and reaches a nearly isochoric assembled density of 300 g=cm{sup 3} and areal density of 2.4 g=cm{sup 2} using 485 kJ of laser energy.

  16. Influence of roughness parameters on coefficient of friction under lubricated conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradeep L Menezes; Kishore; Satish V Kailas

    2008-06-01

    Surface texture and thus roughness parameters influence coefficient of friction during sliding. In the present investigation, four kinds of surface textures with varying roughness were attained on the steel plate surfaces. The surface textures of the steel plates were characterized in terms of roughness parameter using optical profilometer. Then the pins made of various materials, such as Al-4Mg alloy, Al-8Mg alloy, Cu, Pb, Al, Mg, Zn and Sn were slid against the prepared steel plates using an inclined pin-on-plate sliding tester under lubricated conditions. It was observed that the surface roughness parameter, namely, $R_{a}$, for different textured surfaces was comparable to one another although they were prepared by different machining techniques. It was also observed that for a given kind of surface texture the coefficient of friction did not vary with $R_a$. However, the coefficient of friction changes considerably with surface textures for similar $R_a$ values for all the materials investigated. Thus, attempts were made to study other surface roughness parameters of the steel plates and correlate them with coefficient of friction. It was observed that among the surface roughness parameters, the mean slope of the profile, $Del\\ a(\\Delta _a)$, was found to explain the variations best.

  17. Dry Friction and Wear Characteristics of Rare-Earth/MoSi2 Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张厚安; 龙春光; 陈平; 刘心宇

    2003-01-01

    The dry friction and wear characteristics of rare earth/MoSi2 composite against 45 steel under different loads were investigated by using an M-200 type friction and wear tester. SEM and XRD were used to analyze the morphology of the friction surface and the phase of worn piece in order to reveal the wear mechanism of rare-earth/MoSi2 composite. Results show that the relationships of friction coefficient, μ, or wear rate, W, of MoSi2 and RE/MoSi2 composite to loads, p, can be fitted well with the following function: μ(or W)= a+bp+cp2+dp3+ep4, where a, b, c, d and e are fitting constants depending on materials and confidence. MoSi2 and rare-earth/MoSi2 composite have excellent wear resistance. When load is in the range of 80~120 N, the wear rate of RE/MoSi2 composite is lower than that of MoSi2 material by about 65%. The main wear mechanism of rare-earth/MoSi2 composite is adhesive wear.

  18. Theoretical study on ignition compensating temperature sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfang Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature sensitivity of the propellant has significant influence on the interior ballistic performance of guns. Many physical and chemical approaches are employed to decrease this temperature sensitivity of the propellant. In this article, it is proposed that the temperature sensitivity of the propellant is changed by altering the factors required to ignition. A one-dimensional two-phase flow interior ballistic model is established to analyze the relation between ignition factors and temperature sensitivity. The simulation results show that the propellant temperature sensitivity is changed by altering the ignition factors. That is, the interior ballistic performance is affected by altering the size of fire hole, breaking liner pressure, and ignition location. Based on the simulation results, the temperature sensitivity can be controlled by matching of charges and intelligent control ignition system.

  19. Friction in surface micromachined microengines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; LaVigne, G.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding the frictional properties of advanced Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is essential in order to develop optimized designs and fabrication processes, as well as to qualify devices for commercial applications. We develop and demonstrate a method to experimentally measure the forces associated with sliding friction of devices rotating on a hub. The method is demonstrated on the rotating output gear of the microengine recently developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In-situ measurements of an engine running at 18300 rpm give a coefficient of friction of 0.5 for radial (normal) forces less than 4 {mu}N. For larger forces the effective coefficient of friction abruptly increases, suggesting a fundamental change in the basic nature of the interaction between the gear and hub. The experimental approach we have developed to measure the frictional forces associated with the microengine is generically applicable to other MEMS devices.

  20. Tactile friction of topical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedung, L; Buraczewska-Norin, I; Dawood, N; Rutland, M W; Ringstad, L

    2016-02-01

    The tactile perception is essential for all types of topical formulations (cosmetic, pharmaceutical, medical device) and the possibility to predict the sensorial response by using instrumental methods instead of sensory testing would save time and cost at an early stage product development. Here, we report on an instrumental evaluation method using tactile friction measurements to estimate perceptual attributes of topical formulations. Friction was measured between an index finger and an artificial skin substrate after application of formulations using a force sensor. Both model formulations of liquid crystalline phase structures with significantly different tactile properties, as well as commercial pharmaceutical moisturizing creams being more tactile-similar, were investigated. Friction coefficients were calculated as the ratio of the friction force to the applied load. The structures of the model formulations and phase transitions as a result of water evaporation were identified using optical microscopy. The friction device could distinguish friction coefficients between the phase structures, as well as the commercial creams after spreading and absorption into the substrate. In addition, phase transitions resulting in alterations in the feel of the formulations could be detected. A correlation was established between skin hydration and friction coefficient, where hydrated skin gave rise to higher friction. Also a link between skin smoothening and finger friction was established for the commercial moisturizing creams, although further investigations are needed to analyse this and correlations with other sensorial attributes in more detail. The present investigation shows that tactile friction measurements have potential as an alternative or complement in the evaluation of perception of topical formulations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Development of a Low-Cost and High-speed Single Event Effects Testers based on Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J. W.; Kim, H.; Berg, M.; LaBel, K. A.; Stansberry, S.; Friendlich, M.; Irwin, T.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of a low cost, high speed tester reconfigurable Field Programmable Gata Array (FPGA) is shown. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) Objectives; 3) Tester Descriptions; 4) Tester Validations and Demonstrations; 5) Future Work; and 6) Summary.

  2. Student figures in friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gritt B.

      This thesis analyses how ‘the student', as a contested figure, is negotiated and enacted in a period of extensive university reform in Denmark. Through a combination of historical and anthropological research, it focuses on students' changing participation in the shaping of Danish society......, students' room for participation in their own learning, influenced by demands for efficiency, flexibility and student-centred education. The thesis recasts the anthropological endeavour as one of ‘figuration work'. That is, ‘frictional events' are explored as moments when conflicting figures......, the university and their own education. Detailed studies explore, first, politically active students' various attempts to influence national educational policies; second, student participation in the development of the university, especially regarding debates over consumer conduct versus co-ownership; and third...

  3. Friction and Wear Performance of Boron Doped, Undoped Microcrystalline and Fine Grained Composite Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinchang; WANG Liang; SHEN Bin; SUN Fanghong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have attracted more attentions due to their excellent mechanical properties. Whereas as-fabricated traditional diamond films in the previous studies don’t have enough adhesion or surface smoothness, which seriously impact their friction and wear performance, and thus limit their applications under extremely harsh conditions. A boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond (BD-UM-FGCD) film is fabricated by a three-step method adopting hot filament CVD (HFCVD) method in the present study, presenting outstanding comprehensive performance, including the good adhesion between the substrate and the underlying boron doped diamond (BDD) layer, the extremely high hardness of the middle undoped microcrystalline diamond (UMCD) layer, as well as the low surface roughness and favorable polished convenience of the surface fine grained diamond (FGD) layer. The friction and wear behavior of this composite film sliding against low-carbon steel and silicon nitride balls are studied on a ball-on-plate rotational friction tester. Besides, its wear rate is further evaluated under a severer condition using an inner-hole polishing apparatus, with low-carbon steel wire as the counterpart. The test results show that the BD-UM-FGCD film performs very small friction coefficient and great friction behavior owing to its high surface smoothness, and meanwhile it also has excellent wear resistance because of the relatively high hardness of the surface FGD film and the extremely high hardness of the middle UMCD film. Moreover, under the industrial conditions for producing low-carbon steel wires, this composite film can sufficiently prolong the working lifetime of the drawing dies and improve their application effects. This research develops a novel composite diamond films owning great comprehensive properties, which have great potentials as protecting coatings on working surfaces of the wear-resistant and anti-frictional

  4. Friction and wear performance of boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinchang; Wang, Liang; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have attracted more attentions due to their excellent mechanical properties. Whereas as-fabricated traditional diamond films in the previous studies don't have enough adhesion or surface smoothness, which seriously impact their friction and wear performance, and thus limit their applications under extremely harsh conditions. A boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond (BD-UM-FGCD) film is fabricated by a three-step method adopting hot filament CVD (HFCVD) method in the present study, presenting outstanding comprehensive performance, including the good adhesion between the substrate and the underlying boron doped diamond (BDD) layer, the extremely high hardness of the middle undoped microcrystalline diamond (UMCD) layer, as well as the low surface roughness and favorable polished convenience of the surface fine grained diamond (FGD) layer. The friction and wear behavior of this composite film sliding against low-carbon steel and silicon nitride balls are studied on a ball-on-plate rotational friction tester. Besides, its wear rate is further evaluated under a severer condition using an inner-hole polishing apparatus, with low-carbon steel wire as the counterpart. The test results show that the BD-UM-FGCD film performs very small friction coefficient and great friction behavior owing to its high surface smoothness, and meanwhile it also has excellent wear resistance because of the relatively high hardness of the surface FGD film and the extremely high hardness of the middle UMCD film. Moreover, under the industrial conditions for producing low-carbon steel wires, this composite film can sufficiently prolong the working lifetime of the drawing dies and improve their application effects. This research develops a novel composite diamond films owning great comprehensive properties, which have great potentials as protecting coatings on working surfaces of the wear-resistant and anti-frictional

  5. National Ignition Facility site requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Site Requirements (SR) provide bases for identification of candidate host sites for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and for the generation of data regarding potential actual locations for the facilities. The SR supplements the NIF Functional Requirements (FR) with information needed for preparation of responses to queries for input to HQ DOE site evaluation. The queries are to include both documents and explicit requirements for the potential host site responses. The Sr includes information extracted from the NIF FR (for convenience), data based on design approaches, and needs for physical and organization infrastructure for a fully operational NIF. The FR and SR describe requirements that may require new construction or may be met by use or modification of existing facilities. The SR do not establish requirements for NIF design or construction project planning. The SR document does not constitute an element of the NIF technical baseline.

  6. Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Blijderveen, Maarten; Bramer, Eddy A; Brem, Gerrit

    2012-09-01

    To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The incoming radiative heat flux, sample thickness and moisture content are some of the used variables. Not only the ignition time can be calculated with the model, but also the mass flux and surface temperature at ignition. The ignition times for softwoods and PMMA are mainly under-predicted. For hardwoods and PVC the predicted ignition times agree well with experimental results. Due to a significant scatter in the experimental data the mass flux and surface temperature calculated with the model are hard to validate. The model is applied on the startup of a municipal waste incineration plant. For this process a maximum allowable primary air flow is derived. When the primary air flow is above this maximum air flow, no ignition can be obtained.

  7. The National Ignition Facility project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisner, J.A.; Boyes, J.D.; Kumpan, S.A.; Sorem, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KD0), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 {mu}m) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, the authors completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program`s site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. This article presents an overview of the NIF project.

  8. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  9. Frictional properties of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N; Persson, Bo N J

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force...

  10. A fundamental investigation into the relationship between lubricant composition and fuel ignition quality

    KAUST Repository

    Kuti, Olawole Abiola

    2015-11-01

    A fundamental experiment involving the use of an ignition quality tester (IQT) was carried out to elucidate the effects of lubricant oil composition which could lead to low speed pre-ignition (LSPI) processes in direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engines. Prior to the IQT tests, lubricant base oils were analyzed using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry to reveal their molecular composition. High molecular-weight hydrocarbons such as nC16H34, nC17H36, and nC18H38 were selected as surrogates of lubricant base oil constituents, and then mixed with iso-octane (iC8H18-gasoline surrogate) in proportions of 1 vol.% (iC8H18 = 99 vol.%) and 10 vol.% (iC8H18 = 90 vol.%) for the IQT experiments. In addition, lubricant base oils such as SN100 (Group I) and HC4 and HC6 (Group III) and a fully formulated lubricant (SAE 20W50) were mixed with iso-octane in the same proportions. The IQT results were conducted at an ambient pressure of 15 bar and a temperature range of 680-873 K. In the temperature range of 710-850 K, the addition of 10 vol.% base oils surrogates, base oils, and lubricating oil to the 90 vol.% iC8H18 reduces the average total ignition delay time by up to 54% for all mixtures, while the addition of 1 vol.% to 99 vol.% iC8H18 yielded a 7% reduction within the same temperature range. The shorter total ignition delay was attributed to the higher reactivity of the lubricant base oil constituents in the fuel mixtures. A correlation between reactivity of base oils and their molecular composition was tentatively established. These results suggest that the lubricants have the propensity of initiating LSPI in DISI engines. Furthermore, similar results for n-alkanes, lubricant base oils, and fully formulated commercial lubricants suggest that it is the hydrocarbon fraction that contributes

  11. Ignitable solids having an arrayed structure and methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, David P.; Reeves, Robert V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Henry, Michael David

    2017-08-08

    The present invention relates to the design and manufacture of an ignitable solid, where the solid is composed of an array of ignitable regions. In some examples, the array provides a three-dimensional periodic arrangement of such ignitable regions. The ignitable region can have any useful geometry and geometric arrangement within the solid, and methods of making such regions are also described herein.

  12. Development status of the ignition system for Vinci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenken, G.; Vermeulen, E.; Bouquet, F.; Sanders, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    The development status of ignition system for the new cryogenic upper stage engine Vinci is presented. The concept differs from existing upper stage ignition systems as its functioning is engine independent. The system consists of a spark torch igniter, a highpressure igniter feed system and an exci

  13. A Pedagogical Model of Static Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Pickett, Galen T

    2015-01-01

    While dry Coulombic friction is an elementary topic in any standard introductory course in mechanics, the critical distinction between the kinetic and static friction forces is something that is both hard to teach and to learn. In this paper, I describe a geometric model of static friction that may help introductory students to both understand and apply the Coulomb static friction approximation.

  14. Auto-Ignition of Iso-Stoichiometric Blends of Gasoline-Ethanol-Methanol (GEM) in SI, HCCI and CI Combustion Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad

    2017-03-28

    Gasoline-ethanol-methanol (GEM) blends, with constant stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratio (iso-stoichiometric blending rule) and equivalent to binary gasoline-ethanol blends (E2, E5, E10 and E15 in % vol.), were defined to investigate the effect of methanol and combined mixtures of ethanol and methanol when blended with three FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) Gasolines, I, J and A corresponding to RON 70.2, 73.8 and 83.9, respectively, and their corresponding Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs). A Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine was used under Spark Ignition and Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignited modes. An ignition quality tester was utilized in the Compression Ignition mode. One of the promising properties of GEM blends, which are derived using the iso-stoichiometric blending rule, is that they maintain a constant octane number, which has led to the introduction of methanol as a drop-in fuel to supplement bio-derived ethanol. A constant RON/HCCI fuel number/derived Research octane number property was observed in all three combustion modes for high RON fuels, but for low RON fuels, the iso-stoichiometric blending rule for constant octane number did not appear to be valid. The chemical composition and octane number of the base fuel also influenced the behavior of the GEM blends under different conditions.

  15. An Exploratory Investigation of the Influence of Igniter Chemistry on Ignition in Porous Bed Gun Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    NIAOR Dae intldj UNCLASSIFIED SECURIT 4 LAS S1FICATION OF THIS PAGE(WIh.n D.. E rI.,.d) 20. investigate the ignitibility of NACO propellants when sub...4080 2g 0 24P-NO -007 BP-4080 4g 0 24P-NO Increased Igniter Mass to 4g . -008 BP-4080AV 2g 0 24P-YES Added Center Vent to Igniter. lOg of NACO

  16. Friction Material Composites Materials Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sundarkrishnaa, K L

    2012-01-01

    Friction Material Composites is the first of the five volumes which strongly educates and updates engineers and other professionals in braking industries, research and test labs. It explains besides the formulation of design processes and its complete manufacturing input. This book gives an idea of mechanisms of friction and how to control them by designing .The book is  useful for designers  of automotive, rail and aero industries for designing the brake systems effectively with the integration of friction material composite design which is critical. It clearly  emphasizes the driving  safety and how serious designers should  select the design input. The significance of friction material component like brake pad or a liner as an integral part of the brake system of vehicles is explained. AFM pictures at nanolevel illustrate broadly the explanations given.

  17. Proficiency testing of skin prick testers as part of a quality assurance system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Hans-Jørgen; Allesen-Holm, Pernille; Karved, Lisbeth Sys

    2016-01-01

    of variation (CV 0.85) based on blinded octuplicate histamine testing using histamine 3, 10, 30 and 100 mg/ml. RESULTS: Fourteen trained allergy nurses participated in the proficiency testing. More than 95 % of the nurses, generated coefficient of variation...... less than 40 %, and for around 35 % of testers the CV were below 20 % based on wheal area. Regarding the linearity (coefficient of regression), only two nurses produced tests with a value below 0.85. On the contrary, 79 % of testers demonstrated a coefficient of regression >0.95. Depending...... on the gentleness of the prick procedure, the inter-nurse variability in wheal area varied more than twofold corresponding to a 10-doubling of histamine concentration. This would never have been detected without using a proficiency testing system. CONCLUSION: The described histamine testing provides an objective...

  18. Assessment of laboratory-aged insulating materials using the mini-static tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J.; Finnan, E. [Doble Engineering Co., Watertown, MA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    A better understanding of the electrostatic charging tendency of aged materials is required as there have been failures of {open_quotes}middle-aged{close_quotes} transformers from the effects of static electrification. The mini-static tester was used as a means to evaluate the effects on the electrostatic charging tendency (ECT) of aging both oil and paper under accelerated conditions. Two mineral oils presently manufactured in the US were aged with various mixtures of Kraft, thermally-upgraded Kraft, paper filters used in the mini-static tester, and benzotriazole (BTA), a static suppressant. A copper catalyst and elevated temperature (120{degrees}C) were the primary factors in accelerating the aging of materials in a low oxygen environment. Results showed that aging of both insulating materials affected their electrostatic charging tendency. There were some indications that BTA altered the ECT of the insulating materials after a period of time.

  19. Different testers influence genetic correlational response in narrow-based maize population NSA15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisavljević Dušan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine correlations between grain yield and other morphological and agronomical traits in two groups of maize half-sib (HS progenies. Progenies were obtained by crossing every S1 family with two unrelated inbred lines as testers, NS732 and NS27. Field trials with incomplete block design, with replicates within set were conducted in 2008 and 2009 at four locations. The following traits were observed: grain yield, ear length, kernel row number, kernel number per row, 1000-kernel weight, plant height, ear height, number of leaves above ear and grain moisture. Significant moderate strong negative correlation between grain yield and ear length was determined in HS1 progeny. High significant correlations occurred among plant and ear height in both HS and between plant height and number of leaves. Observed differences in levels of correlation imply significant influence of tester in each group on HS progeny.

  20. Head position control on quasi-static read/write tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumi, Takayuki; Yamakawa, Kiyoshi; Ouchi, Kazuhiro

    2005-02-01

    To develop high-density magnetic recording systems, a simple feedback system without servo writing was applied to a quasi-static read/write tester in which a medium reciprocates against a stand-still head. The head position signal in cross-track direction during the scanning is fed back to the high-precision piezoelectric actuator of the media stage. The stage is controlled so as to make the head/medium alignment error zero. A contact head slider assembled on a parallel-link suspension was used to evaluate the feedback system. The tester shows an accuracy of 1.5 nm in cross-track direction which is preferable for the read/write tests at future high recording densities.

  1. Kinetic Friction Coefficient of Ice,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    For the hardest ice tested (xi = 0.33 described by Rabinowicz (1965), where To is inter- mm, H, = 1525 kPa), the calculated values of a preted as...material with a low elastic pressures. The frictional force was measured at modulus ( Rabinowicz 1965). It has been observed the application point of...tion 10, pp. 8-16. Barnes, P. and D. Tabor (1966) Plastic flow and Rabinowicz , E. (1965) Friction and Wear of Mate- pressure melting in the deformation

  2. Peak mass and dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A

    1995-01-01

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock \\& Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  3. Tire/runway friction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  4. Labor Supply and Optimization Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Jakob Egholt

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I investigate the nature of optimization frictions by studying the labor market of Danish students. This particular labor market is an interesting case study as it features a range of special institutional settings that affect students’ incentive to earn income and comparing outcomes...... theory. More concretely I find the dominate optimization friction to be individuals’ inattention about their earnings during the year, while real adjustment cost and gradual learning appears to be of less importance....

  5. Shock Ignition: A New Approach to High Gain Targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. John; Lafortune, Kai; Divol, Laurent; Betti, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    Shock-ignition is being studied as a future option for achieving high target gains on NIF, offering the potential for testing high yield (200MJ), reactor-relevant targets for inertial fusion energy and targets with appreciable gains at drive energies much less than 1MJ. In contrast to conventional hotspot ignition, the assembly and ignition phases are separated by imploding a high mass shell at low velocity. The assembled fuel is then separately ignited by a strong, spherical shock driven by a high intensity spike at the end of the pulse and timed to reach the center as the main fuel is stagnating. Because the implosion velocity is significantly less than that required for hotspot ignition, considerably more fuel mass can be assembled and burned for the same kinetic energy in the shell. Like fast ignition, shock ignition could achieve high gains at low drive energy, but has the advantages of requiring only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. We will discuss gain curves for shock-ignited NIF targets in both UV and green light and examine the feasibility of designs that employ indirect drive fuel assembly with direct drive shock ignition

  6. Experiments and simulations on non-plasma ignition of semiconductor bridge igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weiqiang; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Jupeng; Li, Yong; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Since semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter has been invented, it is commonly considered as a plasma generator. However, the plasma ignition mechanism may be affected by the hotspot ignition temperature of the primary explosives that is lower than the melting point of SCB in the igniter. In an effort to investigate the non-plasma ignition performance of SCB igniter, a one-dimensional model was established for temperature distribution analysis under constant current and capacitor discharge excitation. The simulation results featured the progress of heat transfer and the energy level required by non-plasma ignition of SCB was estimated. Furthermore, sensitivity experiments were carried out to test simulation results and to obtain the firing current range of SCB igniter with lead styphnate (LTNR). Experiment results indicated that safety conditions are 1.953 A constant current input lasting 1 ms under constant current excitation and 7.072 V voltage input using 47 µF storage capacitor under capacitor discharge excitation. All-firing conditions of non-plasma ignition are 2.035 A constant current input lasting 1 ms under constant current excitation and 7.647 V voltage input using 47 µF storage capacitor under capacitor discharge excitation.

  7. Initial Testing of a Prototype Laser Ignition Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    investigated for the ignition of many energetic materials, including igniter materials such as black powder, nitrocellulose , M44 propellant (44...nitroglycerin, 52% nitrocellulose ), and numerous other propellants (11–34). Lasers used for these studies included Nd:glass lasers (up to 30 J at 1.054...It was observed that some propellants which do not ignite in air with certain lasers were effectively ignited when enclosed in a laser ignition

  8. Evaluation of bearing configurations using the single bearing tester in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, T.; Hall, P.; Thom, R.

    1991-01-01

    Various bearing configurations were tested using the Marshall Space Flight Center single bearing tester with LN2 as the cryogenic coolant. The baseline was one Rocketdyne phase one high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) pump end 45-mm bore bearing. The bearing configurations that were tested included a Salox/M cage configuration, a silicon nitride ball configuration, an elongated cage configuration, and a Bray 601 grease configuration.

  9. Intelligent Tester for Geotextiles Products-Determination of Water Flow Capacity in their Plane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yu-sheng; SONG Bai-ping

    2004-01-01

    Geotextiles and geotextile-related products Determination of water flowcapacity in their plane has just National standard. But has not a formal instrument at present. There are many kinds of geotextile and also lots of factors influential to the penetration coefficient thereof. The intelligent tester may be involved in testing penetration coefficient under different pressures/gradients resulted in fine repeatability controlled intelligently by microcomputer system.

  10. The Influence of Indenter Rotation Angle on The Quality of Vicker Tester Calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Jozef Petrík

    2011-01-01

    The object of submitted work is to analyze the influence of the rotation of the indenter (diamond pyramid) and test force on the result of Vickers hardness tester calibration using uncertainty analysis, Measurement systems analysis (MSA), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Z-score.  The rotation anmgle of  indenter affects the values of hardness, repeatability rrel, maximal error Erel and relative expanded uncertainty Urel. The significance of the angle of indenter on the hardness and observed ...

  11. MECHANISM ON DISTRIBUTION OF PILOT FUEL SPRAY AND COMPRESSING IGNITION IN PREMIXED NATURAL GAS ENGINE IGNITED BY PILOT DIESEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Chunde; Yao Guangtao; Song Jinou; Wang Yinshan

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of pilot fuel spray and compressing ignition for pre-mixed natural gas ignited by pilot diesel are described. By means of these modeling, the dual fuel and diesel fuel ignition mechanism of some phenomena investigated on an optional engine by technology of high-speed CCD is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the longer delay of ignition in dual fuel engine is not mainly caused by change of the mixture thermodynamics parameters. The analysis results illustrate that the ignition of pre-mixed natural gas ignited by pilot diesel taking place in dual fuel engine is a process of homogenous charge compression ignition.

  12. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Li; Ken Mao

    2013-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented us...

  13. The design and analysis of single flank transmission error tester for loaded gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Duane E.; Houser, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    To strengthen the understanding of gear transmission error and to verify mathematical models which predict them, a test stand that will measure the transmission error of gear pairs under design loads has been investigated. While most transmission error testers have been used to test gear pairs under unloaded conditions, the goal of this report was to design and perform dynamic analysis of a unique tester with the capability of measuring the transmission error of gears under load. This test stand will have the capability to continuously load a gear pair at torques up to 16,000 in-lb at shaft speeds from 0 to 5 rpm. Error measurement will be accomplished with high resolution optical encoders and the accompanying signal processing unit from an existing unloaded transmission error tester. Input power to the test gear box will be supplied by a dc torque motor while the load will be applied with a similar torque motor. A dual input, dual output control system will regulate the speed and torque of the system. This control system's accuracy and dynamic response were analyzed and it was determined that proportional plus derivative speed control is needed in order to provide the precisely constant torque necessary for error-free measurement.

  14. Erosion-corrosion investigation of high chromium cast irons using newly designed jet type tester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Xiao-hui; LIU Jun-quan; LI Wei; ZHANG Feng-hua; SU Jun-yi

    2004-01-01

    A jet type erosion-corrosion tester was developed for the erosion-corrosion investigation of high-chromium cast irons. During tests the size and the shape of particles in the slurry can be maintained stable. The jet velocity and attack angle can be accurately controlled. The repeatability and ranking consistency of the test results are satisfactory. The test parameters can be adjusted in a wide range, so that the tester can simulate various practical working conditions. Electrochemical test data can be automatically collected and processed. Dynamic polarization curves can be obtained during erosion-corrosion test, which can be used to study the dynamic corrosion characteristics.Two high chromium cast irons were studied in hot concentrated alkaline slurry. The results show that the erosioncorrosion mass loss rate and dynamic corrosion rate of 295Cr26 iron is lower than that of 185Cr13 under the conditions similar to alumyte processing. The mechanism of erosion-corrosion of 295Cr26 and 185Cr13 was studied by using the tester. The interaction between erosion and corrosion was also quantitatively evaluated.

  15. Effect of pulp tester probe placement site on the response of maxillary anterior teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Modaresi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Electric pulp testing is used for diagnosis of the pulp status. This test is technique sensitive and hence may elicit positive or negative false response in case of inaccurate use. The optimal site for placement of the probe tip has not been determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pulp tester probe placement site on the response of maxillary teeth.Materials and Methods: A total of 378 teeth (126 central incisors, 126 lateral incisors and 126 canines in 67 voluntary 20-35 year-old patients were selected. Three sites on each tooth (incisal edge, labial and lingual surfaces were tested with an electrical pulp tester and responses were recorded. Data were analyzed by Repeated Measure ANOVA test.Results: The central teeth showed significantly lower sensation threshold than lateral and canine teeth (P<0.001. The incisal edge of tooth were significantly more sensitive compared to labial and lingual surfaces (P=0.008.Conclusion: This study showed that the optimum site for placement of pulp tester probe was incisal edge.

  16. Tester og testtilbakemeldinger som direkte bidragsytere til dypere læring blant studenter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Herrebrøden

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Denne artikkelen diskuterer forskning som tilsier at tester og testtilbakemeldinger kan bidra til dypere læring blant studenter. Testing har vist seg å forbedre langtidshukommelsen av innlært kunnskap sammenlignet med repetert lesing, noe som kalles for testeffekten. For at testeffekten skal optimaliseres, bør tester utformes med mål om å bidra til dyp prosessering av innlært kunnskap. Testtilbakemeldingers rolle i utdanning kan være å bidra til økt metakognitiv selvregulering blant studenter. For at selvregulering skal promoteres best mulig, bør testtilbakemeldinger inneholde utdypende informasjon. Samlet ser tester og testtilbakemeldinger ut til å være nyttige læringsverktøy og potensielle bidragsytere til dypere læring blant studenter.AbstractThis article discusses research supporting that tests and test feedback are learning tools that may promote deeper learning among students. Testing improves long-term retention of knowledge compared to repeated study, a phenomenon known as the testing effect. In order to promote the testing effect, tests should facilitate deep processing of knowledge among students. Test feedback has the potential to increase students’ metacognitive self-regulation. For this type of metacognition to be enhanced, feedback should contain elaborate information. Conclusively, tests and test feedback appear to be valuable learning tools and potential promoters of deeper learning.

  17. A dynamic tester to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbin; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal and moisture behaviour of the microclimate of textiles is crucial in determining the physiological comfort of apparel, but it has not been investigated sufficiently due to the lack of particular evaluation techniques. Based on sensing, temperature controlling and wireless communicating technology, a specially designed tester has been developed in this study to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles in moving status. A temperature acquisition system and a temperature controllable hotplate have been established to test temperature and simulate the heat of human body, respectively. Relative humidity of the surface of fabric in the dynamic process has been successfully tested through sensing. Meanwhile, wireless communication technology was applied to transport the acquired data of temperature and humidity to computer for further processing. Continuous power supply was achieved by intensive contact between an elastic copper plate and copper ring on the rotating shaft. This tester provides the platform to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of textiles. It enables users to conduct a dynamic analysis on the temperature and humidity together with the thermal and moisture transport behaviour of the surface of fabric in moving condition. Development of this tester opens the door of investigation on the micro-climate of textiles in real time service, and eventually benefits the understanding of the sensation comfort and wellbeing of apparel wearers.

  18. Design of a Pneumatic Robotic Arm for Solar Cell Tester System By using PLC controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif I. Al Mashhadany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar cell testers sort photovoltaic cells according to their electrical performance, tested under simulated sunlight. A variety of testers exist, but they all face a common challenge of handling cells that are very small and thin, which makes it difficult to transport the cells from the conveyer to the storage box. This paper presents a new design for a handling robot with vacuum end-effectors, which uses a PLC controller to govern the movement of the cells and the testing process. The design applies to solar cell testers for monocrystalline, polycrystalline, cadmium telluride (CdTe, and copper indium diselenide (CIS cells. Each cell is tested for efficiency and categorized accordingly into four groups (A to D. A Virtual Reality (VR model was built to simulate the system, keeping in mind real world constraints. Two photoelectric sensors were used to make detections for both the testing process and the robot movement. The PLC controller guides the trajectory of the robot according to the results of the efficiency testing. It was seen that the system worked very well, with the testing process and the robot movement interacting smoothly. The robot trajectory was seen to be highly accurate, and the pick and place operations were done with great precision.

  19. Ignition of Propellants Through Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    case gaseous O2 was introduced in a coaxial flow at a rate of 7 Lit/min with a swirl motion in order to produce an effective fuel and oxidizer mixing...system should be robust, efficient , reliable, simple, low cost, and flexible. Also, an ignition system should initiate combustion under a broad range...discovered that the SWCNT material does not ignite well if wet, so we encapsulated the material to protect it from the fuel spray. To improve the

  20. Dynamic Regime of Ignition of Solid Propellant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolotorev Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a dynamic regime of exposure of the radiant flux on the sample of gun-cotton. Obtained time the ignition of gun-cotton in the heating conditions of increasing heat flux in the range from 0.2 W/cm2 to 22 W/cm2. A comparison of the delay times of the ignition when heated variable and constant heat flux.

  1. IGNITION ACTIVATION ENERGY OF MATERIALS BASED

    OpenAIRE

    Peter RANTUCH; Igor WACHTER; Ivan HRUŠOVSKÝ; Balog, Karol

    2016-01-01

    This contribution is aimed to compare the values of the ignition activation energies of two types of polyamide – Slovamid 6 FRB and Slovamid GF 50 LTS. Samples were isothermally stressed at five different temperatures between 500 °C a 550 °C, while the time to initiation of the flame combustion was monitored. Subsequently from the measured times were compiled Arrhenius plots under which activation energy of ignition of both polymers were calculated. The values of activation energies were 106 ...

  2. Spark Ignition of Monodisperse Fuel Sprays. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Allen M.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Namer, Izak

    1987-01-01

    A study of spark ignition energy requirements was conducted with a monodisperse spray system allowing independent control of droplet size, equivalent ratio, and fuel type. Minimum ignition energies were measured for n-heptane and methanol sprays characterized at the spark gap in terms of droplet diameter, equivalence ratio (number density) and extent of prevaporization. In addition to sprays, minimum ignition energies were measured for completely prevaporized mixtures of the same fuels over a range of equivalence ratios to provide data at the lower limit of droplet size. Results showed that spray ignition was enhanced with decreasing droplet size and increasing equivalence ratio over the ranges of the parameters studied. By comparing spray and prevaporized ignition results, the existence of an optimum droplet size for ignition was indicated for both fuels. Fuel volatility was seen to be a critical factor in spray ignition. The spray ignition results were analyzed using two different empirical ignition models for quiescent mixtures. Both models accurately predicted the experimental ignition energies for the majority of the spray conditions. Spray ignition was observed to be probabilistic in nature, and ignition was quantified in terms of an ignition frequency for a given spark energy. A model was developed to predict ignition frequencies based on the variation in spark energy and equivalence ratio in the spark gap. The resulting ignition frequency simulations were nearly identical to the experimentally observed values.

  3. Friction and Wear Properties of Cold Gas Dynamic Sprayed α-Al2O3-Al Composite Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Different proportions of α-Al2O3 and pure Al powders were coated onto AZ91D magnesium alloy substrates by cold gas dynamic spray. The microstructure and morphologies of the coatings were observed by scanning electron microscope. The friction and wear properties were tested by a ball-on-disk wear tester. It was found that the interfaces between grains and substrates formed close boundaries. It is revealed that the composite coatings could increase the friction or wear properties of the coatings. It was observed that the wear of coatings was converted from adhesive wear into abrasive wear with α-Al2O3 particles increasing and that the adhesive wear accompanied with abrasive wear would increase the wear rate of coatings.

  4. Ignition Delay Studies on Hypergolic Fuel Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Jain

    1988-07-01

    Full Text Available The ignition delays of several solid hypergolic fuel compositions, casted using various polymeric binders, or as melts, have been determined with fuming nitric acid as oxidizer. The ignition delays of various hypergolic fuel compositions increase drasticaliy on casting with binders like. carboxyl or hydroxyl termninated polybutadiene. Fuel grains cast using some newly syhthesised epoxy  resins with other ingrcdients, such as curing agent, magnesium powder and fuel, have short ignition delays of the order of 200 ms, and also good mechanical strength. Increasing the amount of binder in the composition retards the hypergolicity of the rain. Similar studies have been made on melt-cast systems using low melting hypergolic fuels for casting fuel powders. The ignition delays of the melt-cast grains, are longer than those determined taking the composition in the powder form. The effect of highly hypergolic additives, and metal powders, on the ignition delay of the cast compositions has been determined. Grains having good mechanical strength and short ignition delays have been obtained by optimising the fuel grain composition.

  5. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MINIMUM IGNITION TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor WACHTER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific paper is an analysis of the minimum ignition temperature of dust layer and the minimum ignition temperatures of dust clouds. It could be used to identify the threats in industrial production and civil engineering, on which a layer of combustible dust could occure. Research was performed on spent coffee grounds. Tests were performed according to EN 50281-2-1:2002 Methods for determining the minimum ignition temperatures of dust (Method A. Objective of method A is to determine the minimum temperature at which ignition or decomposition of dust occurs during thermal straining on a hot plate at a constant temperature. The highest minimum smouldering and carbonating temperature of spent coffee grounds for 5 mm high layer was determined at the interval from 280 °C to 310 °C during 600 seconds. Method B is used to determine the minimum ignition temperature of a dust cloud. Minimum ignition temperature of studied dust was determined to 470 °C (air pressure – 50 kPa, sample weight 0.3 g.

  6. Hip strength assessment using handheld dynamometry is subject to intertester bias when testers are of different sex and strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, K; Bandholm, T; Schick, M

    2013-01-01

    of this study was to examine the intertester reliability concerning strength assessments of hip abduction, adduction, external and internal rotation, flexion and extension using HHD, and to test whether systematic differences in test values exist between testers of different upper-extremity strength. Fifty...... reliability, and ranged from 0.82 to 0.91 for the six strength test. The female tester systematically measured lower strength values for all isometric strength tests (P ...

  7. The influence of surface topography on the forming friction of automotive aluminum sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Pamela Ann [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1998-05-01

    Interest in utilizing aluminum alloys in automobiles has increased in recent years as a result of the desire to lower automobile weight and, consequently, increase fuel economy. While aluminum alloy use in cast parts has increased, outer body panel applications are still being investigated. The industry is interested in improving the formability of these sheet alloys by a combination of alloy design and processing. A different avenue of improving the formability of these alloys may be through patterning of the sheet surface. Surface patterns hold the lubricant during the forming process, with a resulting decrease in the sheet-die surface contact. While it has been speculated that an optimum surface pattern would consist of discrete cavities, detailed investigation into the reduction of forming friction by utilizing discrete patterns is lacking. A series of discrete patterns were investigated to determine the dependence of the forming friction of automotive aluminum alloys on pattern lubricant carrying capacity and on material strength. Automotive aluminum alloys used in outer body panel applications were rolled on experimental rolls that had been prepared with a variety of discrete patterns. All patterns for each alloy were characterized before and after testing both optically and, to determine pattern lubricant capacity, using three dimensional laser profilometry. A draw bead simulation (DBS) friction tester was designed and fabricated to determine the forming friction of the patterned sheets. Tensile testing and frictionless DBS testing were performed to ascertain the material properties of each sheet. The most striking result of this work was the inversely linear dependence of forming friction on the lubricant carrying capacity of the discrete patterns.

  8. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  9. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  10. Shock ignition: an alternative scheme for HiPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.; Lafon, M.; Galera, S.; Weber, S.

    2009-01-01

    Two main paths are now under investigation that aim at thermonuclear ignition of hydrogen isotopes using lasers: central hot spot self-ignition and externally driven fast ignition of preassembled fuel. A third, intermediate, scheme is shock ignition, which combines the simplicity of self-ignition capsules to the hydrodynamic robustness of the fast ignition fuel assembly. This study addresses the potential of shock ignition for the HiPER project and provides a preliminary assessment of possible detrimental effects. Monodimensional simulations are performed to study the robustness of the ignition scheme in terms of shock launching time and laser power. Bidimensional simulations address the sensitivity of shock ignition to irradiation nonuniformity and to low mode asymmetries of the fuel assembly.

  11. Shock-Ignited High Gain/Yield Targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; Bedrosiian, P.; Tabak, M.; Miles, A.; Dixit, S.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K.; Zhou, C.

    2006-10-01

    Shock-ignition, a new concept for ICF ignition [C.Zhou, R.Betti Bull APS, v50, 2005], is being studied as a future option for efficiently achieving high gains in large laser facilities such as NIF. Accordingly, this offers the potential for testing: (1)High yield (up to 200MJ), reactor-relevant targets for inertial fusion energy (2)High fusion yield targets for DOE NNSA stockpile application (3)Targets with appreciable gain at low laser drive energies (gains of 10's at 150kJ) (4)Ignition of simple, non-cryo (room temperature) single shell gas targets at (unity gain). By contrast to conventional hotspot ignition, we separate the assembly and ignition phases by initially imploding a massive cryogenic shell on a low adiabat (alpha 0.7) at low velocity (less than 2e7cm/s) using a direct drive pulse of modest total energy. The assembled fuel is then separately ignited by a strong, spherically convergent shock driven by a high intensity spike at the end of the pulse and timed to reach the center as the main fuel is stagnating and starting to rebound. Like fast ignition, shock ignition can achieve high gains with low drive energy, but has the advantages of requiring only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements.

  12. Minitature electro-pyrotechnic igniter, and ignition head for the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, L.D. van; Schuurbiers, C.A.H.; Tata Nardini, F.

    2014-01-01

    An electric non-pyrotechnic ignition head (100) suitable for use in an electro- pyrotechnic igniter (1), comprising: a housing (102) defining a front opening (106); - an electrically insulative, thermally conductive bridge filament support body (130) that is at least partly disposed in said front

  13. Computational prediction of probabilistic ignition threshold of pressed granular Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) under shock loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seokpum; Miller, Christopher; Horie, Yasuyuki; Molek, Christopher; Welle, Eric; Zhou, Min

    2016-09-01

    The probabilistic ignition thresholds of pressed granular Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine explosives with average grain sizes between 70 μm and 220 μm are computationally predicted. The prediction uses material microstructure and basic constituent properties and does not involve curve fitting with respect to or prior knowledge of the attributes being predicted. The specific thresholds predicted are James-type relations between the energy flux and energy fluence for given probabilities of ignition. Statistically similar microstructure sample sets are computationally generated and used based on the features of micrographs of materials used in actual experiments. The predicted thresholds are in general agreement with measurements from shock experiments in terms of trends. In particular, it is found that grain size significantly affects the ignition sensitivity of the materials, with smaller sizes leading to lower energy thresholds required for ignition. For example, 50% ignition threshold of the material with an average grain size of 220 μm is approximately 1.4-1.6 times that of the material with an average grain size of 70 μm in terms of energy fluence. The simulations account for the controlled loading of thin-flyer shock experiments with flyer velocities between 1.5 and 4.0 km/s, constituent elasto-viscoplasticity, fracture, post-fracture contact and friction along interfaces, bulk inelastic heating, interfacial frictional heating, and heat conduction. The constitutive behavior of the materials is described using a finite deformation elasto-viscoplastic formulation and the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The ignition thresholds are determined via an explicit analysis of the size and temperature states of hotspots in the materials and a hotspot-based ignition criterion. The overall ignition threshold analysis and the microstructure-level hotspot analysis also lead to the definition of a macroscopic ignition parameter (J) and a microscopic

  14. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  15. Spontaneously Igniting Hybrid Fuel-Oxidiser Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Jain

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available After briefly outlining the recent developments in hybrid rockets, the work carried out by the author on self-igniting (hypergolic solid fuel-liquid oxidiser systems has been reviewed. A major aspect relates to the solid derivatives of hydrazines, which have been conceived as fuels for hybrid rockets. Many of these N-N bonded compounds ignite readily, with very short ignition delays, on coming into contact with liquid oxidisers, like HNO/sub 3/ and N/sub 2/ O/sub 4/. The ignition characteristics have been examined as a function of the nature of the functional group in the fuel molecule, in an attempt to establish a basis for the hypergolic ignition in terms of chemical reactivity of the fuel-oxidiser combination. Important chemical reactions occurring in the pre-ignition stage have been identified by examining the quenched reaction products. Hybrid systems exhibiting synergistic hypergolicity in the presence of metal powders have investigated. An estimation of the rocket performance parameters, experimental determination of the heats of combustion in HNO/sub 3/, thermal decomposition characteristics, temperature profile by thin film thermometry and product identification by the rapid scan FT-IR, are among the other relevant studies made on these systems. A significant recent development has been the synthesis of new N-N bonded viscous binders, capable of rataining the hypergolicity of the fuel powders embedded therein as well as providing the required mechanical strength to the grain. Several of these resins have been characterised. Metallised fuel composites of these resins having high loading of magnesium are found to have short ignition delays and high performance parameters.

  16. 3rd Conference on Ignition Systems for Gasoline Engines

    CERN Document Server

    Sens, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The volume includes selected and reviewed papers from the 3rd Conference on Ignition Systems for Gasoline Engines in Berlin in November 2016. Experts from industry and universities discuss in their papers the challenges to ignition systems in providing reliable, precise ignition in the light of a wide spread in mixture quality, high exhaust gas recirculation rates and high cylinder pressures. Classic spark plug ignition as well as alternative ignition systems are assessed, the ignition system being one of the key technologies to further optimizing the gasoline engine.

  17. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum electromagnetic fluctuations, which break time-reversal symmetry. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Partly because of the lack of contact with observations, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here, we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  18. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, K A; Brevik, I

    2015-01-01

    For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum fluctuations. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Because of the lack of contact with phenomena, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  19. The microphysics of phyllosilicate friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Sabine A. M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-04-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts most of the experimentally observed trends in frictional behaviour and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  20. Low temperature friction force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunckle, Christopher Gregory

    The application of friction force techniques within atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for direct measurements of friction forces at a sliding, single-asperity interface. The temperature dependence of such single-asperity contacts provides key insight into the comparative importance of dissipative mechanisms that result in dry sliding friction. A variable temperature (VT), ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) AFM was used with an interface consisting of a diamond coated AFM tip and diamond-like carbon sample in a nominal sample temperature range of 90 to 275K. The results show that the coefficient of kinetic friction, mu k, has a linear dependence that is monotonically increasing with temperature varying from 0.28 to 0.38. To analyze this data it is necessary to correlate the sample temperature to the interface temperature. A detailed thermal model shows that the sample temperature measured by a macroscopic device can be very different from the temperature at the contact point. Temperature gradients intrinsic to the design of VT, UHV AFMs result in extreme, non-equilibrium conditions with heat fluxes on the order of gigawatts per squared meter through the interface, which produce a discontinuous step in the temperature profile due to thermal boundary impedance. The conclusion from this model is that measurements acquired by VT, UHV AFM, including those presented in this thesis, do not provide meaningful data on the temperature dependence of friction for single-asperities. Plans for future work developing an isothermal AFM capable of the same measurements without the introduction of temperature gradients are described. The experimental results and thermal analysis described in this thesis have been published in the Journal of Applied Physics, "Temperature dependence of single-asperity friction for a diamond on diamondlike carbon interface", J. App. Phys., 107(11):114903, 2010.

  1. Dark Matter Ignition of Type Ia Supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-10-02

    Recent studies of low redshift type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) indicate that half explode from less than Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs, implying ignition must proceed from something besides the canonical criticality of Chandrasekhar mass SN Ia progenitors. We show that 1-100 PeV mass asymmetric dark matter, with imminently detectable nucleon scattering interactions, can accumulate to the point of self-gravitation in a white dwarf and collapse, shedding gravitational potential energy by scattering off nuclei, thereby heating the white dwarf and igniting the flame front that precedes SN Ia. We combine data on SN Ia masses with data on the ages of SN Ia-adjacent stars. This combination reveals a 2.8σ inverse correlation between SN Ia masses and ignition ages, which could result from increased capture of dark matter in 1.4 vs 1.1 solar mass white dwarfs. Future studies of SN Ia in galactic centers will provide additional tests of dark-matter-induced type Ia ignition. Remarkably, both bosonic and fermionic SN Ia-igniting dark matter also resolve the missing pulsar problem by forming black holes in ≳10  Myr old pulsars at the center of the Milky Way.

  2. Sliding wear and friction behavior of zirconium alloy with heat-treated Inconel718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H., E-mail: kimjhoon@cnu.ac.kr [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.M. [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.K.; Jeon, K.L. [Nuclear Fuel Technology Department, Korea Nuclear Fuel, 1047 Daedukdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    In water-cooled nuclear reactors, the sliding of fuel rod can lead to severe wear and it is an important issue to sustain the structural integrity of nuclear reactor. In the present study, sliding wear behavior of zirconium alloy in dry and water environment using Pin-On-Disk sliding wear tester was investigated. Wear resistance of zirconium alloy against heat-treated Inconel718 pin was examined at room temperature. Sliding wear tests were carried out at different sliding distance, axial load and sliding speed based on ASTM (G99-05). The results of these experiments were verified with specific wear rate and coefficient of friction. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zirconium alloy were identified to be microcutting and microcracking in dry environment. Moreover, micropitting and delamination were observed in water environment.

  3. Antiwear and reducing friction performance of (2-sulphurone-benzothiazole)-3-methyl dodecanoate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A heterocyclic derivative of (2-sulphurone-benzothiazole)-3-methyl dodecanoate was synthesized. Its tribological performance when added to liquid paraffin was evaluated on a four-ball tester and a ring-on-block machine. Results indicate that compared with the base oil the wear resistance and load-carrying capacities of the oil with novel additive are improved, and the friction coefficient is decreased. There is an optimal content of the novel compound, at which the corresponding oil gives the highest maximum non-seizure load. Above the content, the load carrying capacity of the oil is not increased but decreased. The nature of the film formed on the rubbed surface was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, and the action mechanism of the novel compound was discussed.

  4. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-07-07

    Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another.

  5. MorphoTester: An Open Source Application for Morphological Topographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    The increased prevalence and affordability of 3D scanning technology is beginning to have significant effects on the research questions and approaches available for studies of morphology. As the current trend of larger and more precise 3D datasets is unlikely to slow in the future, there is a need for efficient and capable tools for high-throughput quantitative analysis of biological shape. The promise and the challenge of implementing relatively automated methods for characterizing surface shape can be seen in the example of dental topographic analysis. Dental topographic analysis comprises a suite of techniques for quantifying tooth surfaces and component features. Topographic techniques have provided insight on mammalian molar form-function relationships and these methods could be applied to address other topics and questions. At the same time implementing multiple complementary topographic methods can have high time and labor costs, and comparability of data formats and approaches is difficult to predict. To address these challenges I present MorphoTester, an open source application for visualizing and quantifying topography from 3D triangulated polygon meshes. This application is Python-based and is free to use. MorphoTester implements three commonly used dental topographic metrics-Dirichlet normal energy, relief index, and orientation patch count rotated (OPCR). Previous OPCR algorithms have used raster-based grid data, which is not directly interchangeable with vector-based triangulated polygon meshes. A 3D-OPCR algorithm is provided here for quantifying complexity from polygon meshes. The efficacy of this metric is tested in a sample of mandibular second molars belonging to four species of cercopithecoid primates. Results suggest that 3D-OPCR is at least as effective for quantifying complexity as previous approaches, and may be more effective due to finer resolution of surface data considered here. MorphoTester represents an advancement in the automated

  6. SURFACE DYNAMIC FRICTION OF POLYMER GELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.P.Gong; G.Kagata; Y.Iwasaki; Y.Osada

    2000-01-01

    The sliding friction of various kinds of hydrogels has been studied and it was found that the frictional behaviors of the hydrogels do not conform to Amonton's law F =μW which well describes the friction of solids. The frictional force and its dependence on the load are quite different depending on the chemical structures of the gels, surface properties of the opposing substrates, and the measurement condition. The gel friction is explained in terms of interfacial interaction, either attractive or repulsive, between the polymer chain and the solid surface. According to this model, the friction is ascribed to the viscous flow of solvent at the interface in the repulsive case. In the attractive case, the force to detach the adsorbing chain from the substrate appears as friction. The surface adhesion between glass particles and gels measured by AFM showed a good correlation with the friction, which supported the repulsion-adsorption model proposed by the authors.

  7. The Friction of Saline Ice on Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wallen-Russell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction of ice on other materials controls loading on offshore structures and vessels in the Arctic. However, ice friction is complicated, because ice in nature exists near to its melting point. Frictional heating can cause local softening and perhaps melting and lubrication, thus affecting the friction and creating a feedback loop. Ice friction is therefore likely to depend on sliding speed and sliding history, as well as bulk temperature. The roughness of the sliding materials may also affect the friction. Here we present results of a series of laboratory experiments, sliding saline ice on aluminium, and controlling for roughness and temperature. We find that the friction of saline ice on aluminium μice-al=0.1 typically, but that this value varies with sliding conditions. We propose physical models which explain the variations in sliding friction.

  8. Ignition threshold for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    An optically thin $p$-$^{11}$B plasma loses more energy to bremsstrahlung than it gains from fusion reactions, unless the ion temperature can be elevated above the electron temperature. In thermal plasmas, the temperature differences required are possible in small Coulomb logarithm regimes, characterized by high density and low temperature. The minimum Lawson criterion for thermal $p$-$^{11}$B plasmas and the minimum $\\rho R$ required for ICF volume ignition are calculated. Ignition could be reached more easily if the fusion reactivity can be improved with nonthermal ion distributions. To establish an upper bound for this utility, we consider a monoenergetic beam with particle energy selected to maximize the beam- thermal reactivity. Channeling fusion alpha energy to maintain such a beam facilitates ignition at lower densities and $\\rho R$, improves reactivity at constant pressure, and could be used to remove helium ash. The gains realized with a beam thus establish an upper bound for the reductions in igniti...

  9. Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Daniel Abraham [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.

  10. Progress on LMJ targets for ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherfils-Clerouin, C; Boniface, C; Bonnefille, M; Fremerye, P; Galmiche, D; Gauthier, P; Giorla, J; Lambert, F; Laffite, S; Liberatore, S; Loiseau, P; Malinie, G; Masse, L; Masson-Laborde, P E; Monteil, M C; Poggi, F; Seytor, P; Wagon, F; Willien, J L, E-mail: catherine.cherfils@cea.f [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2010-08-01

    Targets designed to produce ignition on the Laser MegaJoule are presented. The LMJ experimental plans include the attempt of ignition and burn of an ICF capsule with 160 laser beams, delivering up to 1.4MJ and 380TW. New targets needing reduced laser energy with only a small decrease in robustness have then been designed for this purpose. Working specifically on the coupling efficiency parameter, i.e. the ratio of the energy absorbed by the capsule to the laser energy, has led to the design of a rugby-shaped cocktail hohlraum. 1D and 2D robustness evaluations of these different targets shed light on critical points for ignition, that can be traded off by tightening some specifications or by preliminary experimental and numerical tuning experiments.

  11. Progress on LMJ targets for ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherfils-Clerouin, C; Boniface, C; Bonnefille, M; Dattolo, E; Galmiche, D; Gauthier, P; Giorla, J; Laffite, S; Liberatore, S; Loiseau, P; Malinie, G; Masse, L; Masson-Laborde, P E; Monteil, M C; Poggi, F; Seytor, P; Wagon, F; Willien, J L, E-mail: catherine.cherfils@cea.f [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2009-12-15

    Targets designed to produce ignition on the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) are being simulated in order to set specifications for target fabrication. The LMJ experimental plans include the attempt of ignition and burn of an ICF capsule with 160 laser beams, delivering up to 1.4 MJ and 380 TW. New targets needing reduced laser energy with only a small decrease in robustness have then been designed for this purpose. Working specifically on the coupling efficiency parameter, i.e. the ratio of the energy absorbed by the capsule to the laser energy, has led to the design of a rugby-ball shaped cocktail hohlraum; with these improvements, a target based on the 240-beam A1040 capsule can be included in the 160-beam laser energy-power space. Robustness evaluations of these different targets shed light on critical points for ignition, which can trade off by tightening some specifications or by preliminary experimental and numerical tuning experiments.

  12. Improving the ignition quality of fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2017-06-08

    Provided herein are compounds and methods of producing compounds for improving ignition quality and combustion efficiency of fuels, for example fossil fuels. In various aspects we generate highly oxygenated compounds from hydrocarbon feedstocks. The feedstock can be a branched alkane or n-alkane having a chain length greater than or equal to 6, a cycloalkane with a 5 or 6 membered ring structure, or a alkylated cycloalkane with 5 or more carbon atoms. The reactant can be fed in the gas- phase to a partial oxidation reactor (with or without a catalyst), and at a fixed temperature, mixture composition, and residence time. The reactant can be converted to a mixture of products including keto hydroperoxides, diketo hydroperoxides, keto dihydroperoxides, hydroperoxyl cyclic ethers, and alkenyl hydroperoxides. The compounds are inherently unstable and can quickly decompose to highly reactive radical species that can be used to improve the ignition quality of a fuel and advance ignition in an engine.

  13. Ignition of THKP and TKP pyrotechnic powders :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Erikson, William W; Highley, Aaron M.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille; Kay, Jeffrey J

    2014-03-01

    We have conducted Simultaneous Thermogravimetric Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometry (STMBMS) experiments on igniter/actuator pyrotechnic powders to characterize the reactive processes controlling the ignition and combustion behavior of these materials. The experiments showed a complex, interactive reaction manifold involving over ten reaction pathways. A reduced dimensionality reaction manifold was developed from the detailed 10-step manifold and is being incorporated into existing predictive modeling codes to simulate the performance of pyrotechnic powders for NW component development. The results from development of the detailed reaction manifold and reduced manifold are presented. The reduced reaction manifold has been successfully used by SNL/NM modelers to predict thermal ignition events in small-scale testing, validating our approach and improving the capability of predictive models.

  14. Ignition delay of dual fuel engine operating with methanol ignited by pilot diesel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo ZOU; Lijun WANG; Shenghua LIU; Yu LI

    2008-01-01

    An investigation on the ignition delay of a dual fuel engine operating with methanol ignited by pilot diesel was conducted on a TY1100 direct-injection diesel engine equipped with an electronic controlled methanol low-pressure injection system. The experimental results show that the polytropic index of compression process of the dual fuel engine decreases linearly while the ignition delay increases with the increase in methanol mass fraction. Compared with the conventional diesel engine, the igni-tion delay increment of the dual fuel engine is about 1.5° at a methanol mass fraction of 62%, an engine speed of 1600 r/min, and full engine load. With the elevation of the intake charge temperature from 20℃ to 40℃ and then to 60℃, the ignition delay of the dual fuel engine decreases and is more obvious at high temperature. Moreover, with the increase in engine speed, the ignition delay of the dual fuel engine by time scale (ms) decreases clearly under all engine operating conditions. However, the ignition delay of the dual fuel engine increases remark-ably by advancing the delivery timing of pilot diesel, espe-cially at light engine loads.

  15. Simple Rheological Analysis Method of Spinnable-Polymer Flow Properties Using MFI Tester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basel Younes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheological characterization of polymers explains the flow behaviour and viscoelastic properties and tests fibre-forming ability. The current method investigates the viscoelastic properties and morphology of polymers and finds the rheological data and the right polymer viscosity, which is determining the best processing temperature. The right processing temperature saves the power, the material, and the time needed for production. After calculating polymers viscosity by using MFI tester, the method investigates rheological properties and surface shape at different temperatures and loads. The method could apply to other polymers to find the viscosity-temperature change and to set the best processing temperature.

  16. The Influence of Indenter Rotation Angle on The Quality of Vicker Tester Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Petrík

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of submitted work is to analyze the influence of the rotation of the indenter (diamond pyramid and test force on the result of Vickers hardness tester calibration using uncertainty analysis, Measurement systems analysis (MSA, analysis of variance (ANOVA and Z-score. The rotation anmgle of indenter affects the values of hardness, repeatability rrel, maximal error Erel and relative expanded uncertainty Urel. The significance of the angle of indenter on the hardness and observed parameters of calibration no such as it of test force, but not negligible.

  17. The Influence of Indenter Rotation Angle on The Quality of Vicker Tester Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Petrík

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of submitted work is to analyze the influence of the rotation of the indenter (diamond pyramid and test force on the result of Vickers hardness tester calibration using uncertainty analysis, Measurement systems analysis (MSA, analysis of variance (ANOVA and Z-score.  The rotation anmgle of  indenter affects the values of hardness, repeatability rrel, maximal error Erel and relative expanded uncertainty Urel. The significance of the angle of indenter on the hardness and observed parameters of calibration no such as it of test force, but not negligible.

  18. STS-44 Pilot Henricks uses Visual Function Tester (VFT) on OV-104's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 Pilot Terence T. Henricks tests his visual acuity with the Visual Function Tester 1 (VFT-1) on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. VFT-1 measures changes in the vision of an astronaut in microgravity. It is a hand-held, battery-powered device with a binocular eyepiece that uses controlled illumination to present a variety of visual targets for testing primarily visual acuity and eye interaction effects, such as stereopsis and eye dominance. This experiment is being conducted in conjunction with the Military Man in Space activities.

  19. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  20. Robustness studies of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility in two dimensionsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel S.; Haan, Steven W.; Salmonson, Jay D.

    2008-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsules are critically dependent on the integrity of their hot spots to ignite. At the time of ignition, only a certain fractional perturbation of the nominally spherical hot spot boundary can be tolerated and the capsule still achieve ignition. The degree to which the expected hot spot perturbation in any given capsule design is less than this maximum tolerable perturbation is a measure of the ignition margin or robustness of that design. Moreover, since there will inevitably be uncertainties in the initial character and implosion dynamics of any given capsule, all of which can contribute to the eventual hot spot perturbation, quantifying the robustness of that capsule against a range of parameter variations is an important consideration in the capsule design. Here, the robustness of the 300eV indirect drive target design for the National Ignition Facility [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] is studied in the parameter space of inner ice roughness, implosion velocity, and capsule scale. A suite of 2000 two-dimensional simulations, run with the radiation hydrodynamics code LASNEX, is used as the data base for the study. For each scale, an ignition region in the two remaining variables is identified and the ignition cliff is mapped. In accordance with the theoretical arguments of Levedahl and Lindl [Nucl. Fusion 37, 165 (1997)] and Kishony and Shvarts [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4925 (2001)], the location of this cliff is fitted to a power law of the capsule implosion velocity and scale. It is found that the cliff can be quite well represented in this power law form, and, using this scaling law, an assessment of the overall (one- and two-dimensional) ignition margin of the design can be made. The effect on the ignition margin of an increase or decrease in the density of the target fill gas is also assessed.

  1. Highly Durable Catalysts for Ignition of Advanced Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monopropellants are readily ignited or decomposed over a bed of solid catalyst. A serious limitation of existing catalysts in the ignition of advanced...

  2. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clobes, A.R.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility M Project. It was prepared for the NIP Prood Office by the NIF Procurement Manager.

  3. Low Energy Electronic Ignition System for NOFBX Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a miniature, low RF noise ignition module for NOFBX propulsion systems. This ignition module is designed utilizing unique properties of the...

  4. Radiation Driven Capsules for Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, M; Slutz, S A

    2001-06-08

    The energy required to ignite compressed deuterium-tritium fuel is a strong function of the fuel density. Through a series of detailed numerical simulations, peak fuel densities have been calculated as a function of the peak radiation drive temperature. Note that the time dependence of the radiation temperature (pulse shaping) has been optimized to obtain maximum density for each scaling point. A simple analytic scaling is developed, which agrees well with the numerical results. These scaling results are then used to obtain the required ignition energy as a function of peak drive temperature.

  5. IGNITION ACTIVATION ENERGY OF MATERIALS BASED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter RANTUCH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is aimed to compare the values of the ignition activation energies of two types of polyamide – Slovamid 6 FRB and Slovamid GF 50 LTS. Samples were isothermally stressed at five different temperatures between 500 °C a 550 °C, while the time to initiation of the flame combustion was monitored. Subsequently from the measured times were compiled Arrhenius plots under which activation energy of ignition of both polymers were calculated. The values of activation energies were 106 kJ.mol-1 and 158.0 kJ.mol-1 for Slovamid 6 FRB 4 and Slovamid 6 GF 50 LTS.

  6. Igniters for Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Robin J.; Elam, Sandra K.; Peschel, William P.

    2008-01-01

    As part of NASA's technology development of liquid methane / liquid oxygen engines for future exploration missions, two different igniters were recently studied at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The first igniter tested was an impinging injection, spark-initiated torch igniter, and the second was a microwave-generated plasma igniter. The purpose of the ignition tests was to define the ignition limits under vacuum conditions and characterize the transient start-up performance as a function of propellant mixture ratio (MR), mass flow rates, inlet temperatures, and pre-ignition chamber pressure. In addition, for the impinging igniter two different spark plugs were tested, and for the microwave igniter the magnetron filament warm-up time and the magnetron input power were both varied. The results gathered from these tests indicated that the impinging igniter is capable of operating over an MR range of 2 - 27, with methane and oxygen inlet temperatures as low as -161 F and -233 F, respectively. The microwave igniter was tested over an MR range of 2 - 9, with methane and oxygen inlet temperatures as low as -90 F and -200 F, respectively. The microwave igniter achieved ignition over this range, although an upper ignition limit was determined for the oxidizer mass flow rate. In general, the torch exhaust temperatures for the microwave igniter were not as high as those attained with the impinging igniter. The microwave igniter, however, was hot-fired 17 times and was still operational, whereas the impinging igniter spark plugs experienced thermal shock and erosion over nine hot-fire tests. It was concluded that for the microwave igniter better mixing of the propellants might be required in order to both raise the torch exhaust temperature and decrease the required magnetron input power, and for the impinging igniter the spark plug position within the igniter chamber should be varied in future tests to identify a more optimal location. All of the igniter tests were

  7. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...

  8. Frictional heating of tribological contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Johannes

    1995-01-01

    Wherever friction occurs, mechanical energy is transformed into heat. The tem­ perature rise associated with this heating can have an important influence on the tribological behaviour of the contacting components. Apart from determining per­ formance, thermal phenomena affect reliability and may cau

  9. Friction Sensitivity of Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan none tetrazene 407913 tetrazene 7902454 The mixes which were tested are: NOL 130 (basic lead styphnate , barium nitrate, lead...azide, tetrazene, and antimony sulfide); PA 100 (normal lead styphnate , barium nitrate, tetrazene, lead dioxide, calcium silicide, and antimony...styuhnate, basic lead styphnate , potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan, and tetrazene were tested to determine the- 10% and 50% probability of friction

  10. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  11. Rotary Engine Friction Test Rig Development Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    5  4.  Friction Rig Development 7  5.  AutoCAD ...Figure 4. Engine friction test rig AutoCAD model. ........................................................................8  Figure 5. Engine...top dead center. 8 5. AutoCAD Model Development A model of the rotary engine friction test rig was developed to determine the optimal

  12. Asbestos free friction composition for brake linings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Ganguly; Raji George

    2008-02-01

    An asbestos free friction material composite for brake linings is synthesized containing fibrous reinforcing constituents, friction imparting and controlling additives, elastomeric additives, fire retarding components and a thermosetting resin. The composite shows exemplary friction characteristics and has great resistance to wear and shows good temperature stability.

  13. Multiscale friction modeling for sheet metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.; Cid Alfaro, M.V.; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Felder, Eric; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The most often used friction model for sheet metal forming simulations is the relative simple Coulomb friction model. This paper presents a more advanced friction model for large scale forming simulations based on the surface change on the micro-scale. The surface texture of a material changes when

  14. A thermodynamic model of sliding friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Makkonen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A first principles thermodynamic model of sliding friction is derived. The model predictions are in agreement with the observed friction laws both in macro- and nanoscale. When applied to calculating the friction coefficient the model provides a quantitative agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements on a number of materials.

  15. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Matt; Bossard, John; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of laser ignition technology for bipropellant rocket engines applications. The objectives of this project include: (1) the selection test chambers and flows; (2) definition of the laser ignition setup; (3) pulse format optimization; (4) fiber optic coupled laser ignition system analysis; and (5) chamber integration issues definition. The testing concludes that rocket combustion chamber laser ignition is imminent. Support technologies (multiplexing, window durability/cleaning, and fiber optic durability) are feasible.

  16. Analysis of the moment caused by friction of cardan joint. Cardan joint no friction kishinryoku kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Yagi, Shida, T. (Atsugi Unisia Corp., Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    Analyzing the vibromotive force, generated by the friction, in generation morphology, level, dynamical characteristics, etc., through measurement of joint unit friction simulation of frictional vibromotive force and on-platform measurement of propeller shaft in vibromotive force, the present report investigated the influence of friction on the vehicle in sound vibration performance. By a vibromotive force measurement system, internally equipped with a piezoelectric type force meter, frictional vibromotive force could be quantitatively grasped. The friction must be appropriately controlled, because the moment, generated by it, is expected to be put in the vehicle by intermediation of a supporting point and adversely influence the sound vibration performance. Apart from the above, elucidation was made of relation between the ordinal number components of rotation of vibromotive force and friction, calculation of reaction force at the supporting point by the frictional measurement, relation between the joint angle and frictional vibromotive force, second couple force due to the friction, etc. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Bio-inspired enhancement of friction and adhesion at the polydimethylsiloxane-intestine interface and biocompatibility characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Wang, Yi; Vasilescu, Steven; Gu, Zhibin; Sun, Tao

    2017-05-01

    An active navigation of self-propelled miniaturized robot along the intestinal tract without injuring the soft tissue remains a challenge as yet. Particularly in this case an effective control of the interfacial friction and adhesion between the material used and the soft tissue is crucial. In the present study, we investigated the frictional and adhesive properties between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, microscopically patterned with micro-pillar arrays and non-patterned with a flat surface) and rabbit small intestinal tract using a universal material tester. The friction coefficient-time plot and adhesive force-time plot were recorded during the friction test (sliding speed: 0.25mm/s; normal loading: 0.4N) and adhesion test (preloading: 0.5N; hoisting speed: 2.5×10(-3)mm/s). In addition, biocompatibility of the PDMS samples was characterized in terms of cell morphology (scanning electron microscope) and cell cytotoxicity (alamarBlue assay) using human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results demonstrated that the interfacial friction (0.27 vs 0.19) and adhesion (34.9mN vs 26.7mN) were greatly increased using microscopically patterned PDMS, in comparison with non-patterned PDMS. HUVECs adhered to and proliferated on non-patterned/microscopically patterned PDMS very well, with a relative cell viability of about 90% following seeding at 1d, 3d, and 5d. The favorable enhancement of the frictional and adhesive properties, along with the excellent biocompatibility of the microscopically patterned PDMS, makes it a propitious choice for clinical application of self-propelled miniaturized robots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tribological Properties of AlSi17Cu5Mg Alloy Modified with CuP Master Alloy with Various Speeds of Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Piątkowski J.; Wieszała R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the influence of modification with phosphorus (CuP10) on the tribological properties of the alloy AlSi17Cu5Mg coupled abrasively with cast-iron EN GJL-350. Tests of coefficient of friction and wear of mass were conducted on tribological tester T-01. An important aspect in the assessment of the tribological properties is the analysis of initial material microstructure in reference to silumin which underwent modification with phosphorus. It was found that the difference in st...

  19. 14 CFR 25.981 - Fuel tank ignition prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank ignition prevention. 25.981 Section 25.981 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... ignition prevention. (a) No ignition source may be present at each point in the fuel tank or fuel...

  20. [Design of the psychology tester based on ZigBee technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Tianping; Tang, Liming

    2012-09-01

    To design a psychological state tester based on ZigBee wireless technology. Through analog circuit preprocessing, the heartbeat collected by the pulse sensor will be transformed into digital signal from analog signal, and then can be processed and displayed after transported to the personal computer through the Zigbee wireless communicate units. The data will be retrieval and playback for the measurement of psychology. The experiments show that the device is able to acquire the pulse wave of the human body in real-time, at the same time, through the ZigBee wireless network, it can accomplish real-time, secure and reliable communications, and it also can be used in the research of testing the mental state of the individual. Through the application of the ZigBee communicate technology; the psychology tester can collect the pulse signal to reflect the individual's mental state in different conditions. So it will be applicable to a wide range of psychology measurement and other areas.

  1. Combining Ability in Wheat for Seedling Traits by Line X Tester Analysis Under Saline Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Osaf

    Full Text Available A line × tester analysis involving five varieties SQ-26, SQ-77, GH-10, 8670, PARC-N2 (lines and three varieties 8721, SARC-5 and DN-4 (testers were crossed to study some hydroponics growing characters. In controlled conditions SQ-26 exhibited the highest positive GCA effects on Shoot length, Shoot fresh weight, Na+ and K+ concentrations, while SQ-77 showed maximum GCA effects on Root length, Root fresh weight and Shoot dry weight in females and in males and both DN-4 and SARC-5 showed the highest GCA effects. Under high saline concentration female SQ-77 showed the maximum positive effects on all characters but on shoot length and Na concentration while male SARC-5 exhibited the highest positive GCA effects on all characters. Under high saline level, the cross combination SQ-26 × 8721 showed SCA effects for shoot length, whereas 8670 x 8721 showed the same effects for shoot fresh weight, root fresh weight and root dry weight. For Na+ and K+ concentrations, the cross combination GH-10 × DN-4 showed then highest SCA effects, whereas for shoot dry weight and root length, the cross combinations GH-10 × SARC-5 and PARC-N2 × 8721 showed the highest SCA effects, respectively.

  2. Self-adaptive surface texture design for friction reduction across the lubrication regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Stephen M.; Jing, Yang; Zhao, Fei

    2016-03-01

    Surface texturing has been shown to reduce friction and improve durability in mechanical face seals and metal forming operations, and lightly loaded thrust bearings. However, the success has been limited to conformal contacts and low load high speed operating conditions, i.e. hydrodynamic lubrication dominated regime. Both experiments and numerical simulations have shown that textural patterns, under higher loading and/or slower speeds may increase friction and even cause the lubrication film collapse. Specific designs of surface texture pattern, as its shape, depth and density, are required for different lubrication regimes. Our own study has shown (Hsu et al 2014 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47 335307) that large/shallow dimple reduces friction in hydrodynamic lubrication regime, whereas small/deep dimple shows benefit in mixed/boundary lubrication regimes (if the textural designs can provides hydrodynamic/hydrostatic lift forces to reduce the machine loading). In considering an engine component typically experiences duty cycles that may cross various lubrication regimes, a multiscale surface texture design appears attractive. This type of mixed shape texturing combines textures designed for low load, high speed operating conditions and the textures that are designed for high load, low speed operations. In this paper, two types of multiscale surface texture designs are presented. Ball-on-three-flats (BOTF) wear tester (under high loading conditions) is used to evaluate the performance of these multiscale texture designs along with the baselines of un-textured surfaces under the same surface preparation procedures. Two texture designs with only a single shape dimples are included in the study. Results suggest that multiscale surface texture design not only further reduces friction in comparison to the textures with single shape dimples, but also shows the effectiveness across hydrodynamic regimes to the mixed lubrication regimes.

  3. Autoignition characterization of primary reference fuels and n-heptane/n-butanol mixtures in a constant volume combustion device and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, Marc E.

    2013-12-19

    In this study, the autoignition behavior of primary reference fuels (PRF) and blends of n-heptane/n-butanol were examined in a Waukesha Fuel Ignition Tester (FIT) and a Homogeneous Charge Compression Engine (HCCI). Fourteen different blends of iso-octane, n-heptane, and n-butanol were tested in the FIT - 28 test runs with 25 ignition measurements for each test run, totaling 350 individual tests in all. These experimental results supported previous findings that fuel blends with high alcohol content can exhibit very different ignition delay periods than similarly blended reference fuels. The experiments further showed that n-butanol blends behaved unlike PRF blends when comparing the autoignition behavior as a function of the percentage of low reactivity component. The HCCI and FIT experimental results favorably compared against single and multizone models with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms - both an existing mechanism as well as one developed during this study were used. The experimental and modeling results suggest that that the FIT instrument is a valuable tool for analysis of high pressure, low temperature chemistry, and autoignition for future fuels in advanced combustion engines. Additionally, in both the FIT and engine experiments the fraction of low temperature heat release (fLTHR) was found to correlate very well with the crank angle of maximum heat release and shows promise as a useful metric for fuel reactivity in advanced combustion applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. Design of simplified RLC Bridge Tester%简易RLC电桥测试仪的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱赣; 徐云龙; 李伟明

    2012-01-01

    RLC测试是电子专业高素质技能型人才培养的一项内容。以AT89S51单片机作为核心控制器件,将电桥电路中的RLC电压参数经过运算放大器放大后进行模数转换,再由单片机处理数据后,RLC测量值液晶显示。%RLC testing is a part of highly skilled electronic professional training. The paper introduces the de- sign of a simplified RLC bridge tester which uses the AT89S51 microcontroller as the core control device. The tester amplifies the bridge voltage of the RLC circuit parameters through the operational amplifier then does the analog - digital conversion, then after the data processing by the mierocontroller; RLC tester liquid crystal screen can display the results.

  5. Effects of nano-LaF3 on the friction and wear behaviors of PTFE-based bonded solid lubricating coatings under different lubrication conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yulong; Wan, Hongqi; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-09-01

    Influence of nanometer lanthanum fluoride (nano-LaF3) on the tribological behaviors of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bonded solid lubricating coatings were investigated using a ring-on-block friction-wear tester under dry friction and RP-3 jet fuel lubrication conditions. The worn surfaces and transfer films formed on the counterpart steel rings were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope (OM), respectively. The microstructures of the nano-LaF3 modified coatings and the distribution states of nano-LaF3 were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The results show that incorporation of nano-LaF3 improves the microhardness and the friction-reduced and anti-wear abilities of PTFE bonded solid lubricating coatings. The wear life of the modified coating is about 6 times longer than that of the coating without nano-LaF3 filler at a relatively low applied load (200 N) and rotary speed (1000 rev/min) under dry friction condition. The friction coefficient and wear life of the modified coating decrease with increase of applied load under dry friction, but the friction coefficient has hardly any variation and wear life decreases under RP-3 jet fuel lubrication condition. In addition, the friction coefficient of the modified coating reduces with the rotary speed increasing under dry sliding but has little change under RP-3 lubrication, the wear life increases firstly and then decreases. The results indicated that the wear failure mechanism is dominated by applied load, which plays an important role in guidance of application of nano-LaF3 modified PTFE bonded coating under different working environment.

  6. Deep Dive Topic: Approach to ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kline, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meezan, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mackinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The current high-foot and related implosions have adequate CR and implosion velocity to ignite, but require improved finesse particularly in, but not limited to, implosion symmetry. This is being pursued. The challenge of controlling drive symmetry is also motivating lower convergence ratio designs. These require higher velocity implosions and are also being pursued.

  7. Plasma ignition for medium calibre ammunition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Schilt, A.; Simor, M.; Schaffers, P.; Weise, T.

    2012-01-01

    Gun performance is usually affected by the operating temperature of the ammunition or weapon. This is caused by several factors, amongst which the temperature dependency of the propellant ignition and combustion processes. Compensation of temperature effects on weapon or ammunition performance is po

  8. Impacts assessment for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay Area Economics

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the economic and other impacts that will be created by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction and ongoing operation, as well as the impacts that may be created by new technologies that may be developed as a result of NIF development and operation.

  9. Dark matter ignition of type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of low redshift type Ia supernovae (SNIa) indicate that half explode from less than Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs, implying ignition must proceed from something besides the canonical criticality of Chandrasekhar mass SNIa progenitors. We show that $0.1-10$ PeV mass asymmetric dark matter, with imminently detectable nucleon scattering interactions, can accumulate to the point of self-gravitation in a white dwarf and collapse, shedding gravitational potential energy by scattering off nuclei, thereby heating the white dwarf and igniting the flame front that precedes SNIa. We combine data on SNIa masses with data on the ages of SNIa-adjacent stars. This combination reveals a $ 3 \\sigma$ inverse correlation between SNIa masses and ignition ages, which could result from increased capture of dark matter in 1.4 versus 1.1 solar mass white dwarfs. Future studies of SNIa in galactic centers will provide additional tests of dark-matter-induced type Ia ignition. Remarkably, both bosonic and fermionic SNI...

  10. Implosion Hydrodynamics of Fast Ignition Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, R. B.

    2004-11-01

    The fast ignition (FI) concept requires the generation of a compact, dense, pure fuel mass accessible to an external ignition source. The current baseline FI target is a shell fitted with a reentrant cone extending to near its center. Conventional direct or indirect drive collapses the shell near the tip of the cone and then an ultra-intense laser pulse focused to the inside cone tip generates high-energy electrons to ignite the dense fuel. We have theoretically and experimentally investigated the collapse of such targets, validating modeling and exploring the tradeoffs available, in such an asymmetric geometry, to optimize compaction of the fuel and maintain the integrity of the cone. The collapse is complex. Away from the cone, the shell collapses much as does a conventional implosion, generating a hot, low-density inner core. But because of the open side this hot plasma exhausts out toward the tip of the cone. This hot plasma is advantageous for implosion diagnostics; it can provide protons for angular dependent measurements of the shell wall, neutrons for temperature measurements, and self-emission for contamination measurements. But the hot spot must be controlled; for FI it is a liability. The hot, low-density inner core simply impedes the collapse of the cold fuel, lowering the implosion/burn efficiency and the gain while making ignition more difficult. We discuss approaches to minimizing this effect and experimental tests.

  11. Ignition and Thermonuclear Burn on the National Ignition Facility with Imposed Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. John; Logan, B. G.; Rhodes, M. A.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Ho, D. D.; Blackfield, D. T.; Hawkins, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    We are studying the impact of highly compressed magnetic fields on enhancing the prospects for ignition and burn on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Both magnetized room-temperature DT gas targets and cryo-ignition capsules are under study. Applied seed fields of 20-70T that compress to greater than 10000T (100MG) under implosion can reduce hotspot conditions required for ignition and propagating burn through range reduction and magnetic mirror trapping of fusion alpha particles, suppression of electron heat conduction and potential stabilization of hydrodynamic instabilities. The applied field may also reduce hohlraum laser-plasma instabilities and suppress the transport of hot electron preheat to the capsule. These combined B-field attributes may permit recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in capsules that are otherwise submarginal through adverse hydrodynamic or hohlraum-drive conditions. Simulations indicate that optimum initial fields of 50T may produce multi-MJ-yields when applied to our present best experimental capsules. Proof-of-principle experiments for magnetized ignition capsules and hohlraum physics on NIF are now being designed. This work performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Fundamental Studies of Ignition Process in Large Natural Gas Engines Using Laser Spark Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azer Yalin; Bryan Willson

    2008-06-30

    Past research has shown that laser ignition provides a potential means to reduce emissions and improve engine efficiency of gas-fired engines to meet longer-term DOE ARES (Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems) targets. Despite the potential advantages of laser ignition, the technology is not seeing practical or commercial use. A major impediment in this regard has been the 'open-path' beam delivery used in much of the past research. This mode of delivery is not considered industrially practical owing to safety factors, as well as susceptibility to vibrations, thermal effects etc. The overall goal of our project has been to develop technologies and approaches for practical laser ignition systems. To this end, we are pursuing fiber optically coupled laser ignition system and multiplexing methods for multiple cylinder engine operation. This report summarizes our progress in this regard. A partial summary of our progress includes: development of a figure of merit to guide fiber selection, identification of hollow-core fibers as a potential means of fiber delivery, demonstration of bench-top sparking through hollow-core fibers, single-cylinder engine operation with fiber delivered laser ignition, demonstration of bench-top multiplexing, dual-cylinder engine operation via multiplexed fiber delivered laser ignition, and sparking with fiber lasers. To the best of our knowledge, each of these accomplishments was a first.

  13. Ignition and timing a guide to rebuilding, repair and replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Beever, Colin

    2015-01-01

    An essential guide to ignition and timing, for classic car owners and restorers. Aimed at both keen amateurs and professionals alike, Ignition and Timing covers the history and evolution of the automotive ignition system, and how to fit, modify and maintain your system for optimum timing and maximum performance. Topics covered include understanding and fault-testing the coil ignition system; post-war distributors and aftermarket systems; how to fit electronic ignitions and modify the distributor, including twin-point distributors; rebuilding and maintenance; Lucas, Delco and Bosch systems

  14. Ignition of organic explosives by an electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Georgy A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical simulation of the ignition of organic explosives (PETN, HMX, RDX, TATB with an electron beam was performed. A criterion for the ignition of energetic materials with a melting point below the temperature of ignition is obtained. The results of numerical calculations of the critical energy density of the electron beam are consistent with the criterion of ignition. Calculations of the critical energy density of PETN ignition in good agreement with the experiment. The most sensitive is PETN and the most heat-resistant is TATB.

  15. High temperature skin friction measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheng, Ping; Holmes, Harlan K.; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Skin friction measurement in the NASA Langley hypersonic propulsion facility is described. The sensor configuration utilized an existing balance, modified to provide thermal isolation and an increased standoff distance. For test run times of about 20 sec and ambient-air cooling of the test section and balance, the modified balance performed satisfactorily, even when it was subjected to acoustic and structural vibration. The balance is an inertially balanced closed-loop servo system where the current to a moving-coil motor needed to restore or null the output from the position sensor is a measure of the force or skin friction tending to displace the moving element. The accuracy of the sensor is directly affected by the position sensor in the feedback loop, in this case a linear-variable differential transformer which has proven to be influenced by temperature gradients.

  16. Off-site ignition probability of flammable gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rew, P J; Spencer, H; Daycock, J

    2000-01-07

    A key step in the assessment of risk for installations where flammable liquids or gases are stored is the estimation of ignition probability. A review of current modelling and data confirmed that ignition probability values used in risk analyses tend to be based on extrapolation of limited incident data or, in many cases, on the judgement of those conducting the safety assessment. Existing models tend to assume that ignition probability is a function of release rate (or flammable gas cloud size) alone and they do not consider location, density or type of ignition source. An alternative mathematical framework for calculating ignition probability is outlined in which the approach used is to model the distribution of likely ignition sources and to calculate ignition probability by considering whether the flammable gas cloud will reach these sources. Data are collated on the properties of ignition sources within three generic land-use types: industrial, urban and rural. These data are then incorporated into a working model for ignition probability in a form capable of being implemented within risk analysis models. The sensitivity of the model results to assumptions made in deriving the ignition source properties is discussed and the model is compared with other available ignition probability methods.

  17. Comprehensive study of ignition and combustion of single wooden particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momenikouchaksaraei, Maryam; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    How quickly large biomass particles can ignite and burn out when transported into a pulverized-fuel (pf) furnace and suddenly exposed to a hot gas flow containing oxygen is very important in biomass co-firing design and optimization. In this paper, the ignition and burnout of the largest possible...... for all the test conditions. As the particle is further heated up and the volume-weighted average temperature reaches the onset of rapid decomposition of hemicellulose and cellulose, a secondary homogeneous ignition occurs. The model-predicted ignition delays and burnout times show a good agreement...... with the experimental results. Homogeneous ignition delays are found to scale with specific surface areas while heterogeneous ignition delays show less dependency on the areas. The ignition and burnout are also affected by the process conditions, in which the oxygen concentration is found to have a more pronounced...

  18. Thermodynamic aspects of rock friction

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsui, Noa

    2013-01-01

    Rate- and state-dependent friction law for velocity-step tests is analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A simple macroscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic model with a single internal variable reproduces instantaneous jump and relaxation. Velocity weakening appears as a consequence of a plasticity related nonlinear coefficient. Permanent part of displacement corresponds to plastic strain, and relaxation effects are analogous to creep in thermodynamic rheology.

  19. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  20. Friction characteristics of floppy disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This note presents the principle and structure of a tribological measure for floppy disks.The precision of the force measuring system is 1 mN in loading and 3×10-6 N in friction.The resolution of the film thickness between head and floppy disk is 0.5 nm in the vertical and 1.5 nm in the horizontal direction.In order to investigate the tribological characteristics of floppy disks,six types of floppy disks have been tested and the floating properties of these disks are also studied with film measuring system.The experimental results of the surface morphology and friction coefficient of these floppy disks using the atomic force microscope/friction force mcroscope (AFM/FFM) are in accordance with the conclusion made by our own measuring system.The experimental results show that the air film thickness between head and disk is of the same order as the surface roughness of floppy disks.

  1. Combustion characteristics of spark-ignition and pilot flame ignition systems in a model Wankel stratified charge engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muroki, T. [Kanagawa Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kanagawa (Japan); Moriyoshi, Y. [Chiba Univ., Dept. of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    In a stratified charge engine, a glow plug pilot flame ignition system has been compared with a spark-ignition system for a model stratified charge Wankel combustion chamber. A motored two-stroke diesel engine was operated as a rapid compression and expansion machine with the cylinder head replaced by a model Wankel combustion chamber designed to simulate the temporal changes of air flow and pressure fields inside the chamber of an actual engine. It was found that the pilot flame ignition system had better ignitability and improved combustion characteristics, especially in the lean mixture range, relative to the spark-ignition system. (Author)

  2. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2009-09-17

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will

  3. Fast Ignition Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akli, Kramer Ugerthen [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We are becoming dependent on energy more today than we were a century ago, and with increasing world population and booming economies, sooner or later our energy sources will be exhausted. Moreover, our economy and welfare strongly depends on foreign oil and in the shadow of political uncertainties, there is an urgent need for a reliable, safe, and cheap energy source. Thermonuclear fusion, if achieved, is that source of energy which not only will satisfy our demand for today but also for centuries to come. Today, there are two major approaches to achieve fusion: magnetic confinement fusion (MFE) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This dissertation explores the inertial confinement fusion using the fast ignition concept. Unlike the conventional approach where the same laser is used for compression and ignition, in fast ignition separate laser beams are used. This dissertation addresses three very important topics to fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. These are laser-to-electron coupling efficiency, laser-generated electron beam transport, and the associated isochoric heating. First, an integrated fast ignition experiment is carried out with 0.9 kJ of energy in the compression beam and 70 J in the ignition beam. Measurements of absolute Kα yield from the imploded core revealed that about 17% of the laser energy is coupled to the suprathermal electrons. Modeling of the transport of these electrons and the associated isochoric heating, with the previously determined laser-to-electron conversion efficiency, showed a maximum target temperature of 166 eV at the front where the electron flux is higher and the density is lower. The contribution of the potential, induced by charge separation, in opposing the motion of the electrons was moderate. Second, temperature sensitivity of Cu Kα imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal is investigated. It was found that due to the shifting and broadening of the K

  4. How to Ignite an Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Plasma Torch without Any Additional Igniters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leins, Martina; Gaiser, Sandra; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Matthias; Schumacher, Uwe; Hirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This movie shows how an atmospheric pressure plasma torch can be ignited by microwave power with no additional igniters. After ignition of the plasma, a stable and continuous operation of the plasma is possible and the plasma torch can be used for many different applications. On one hand, the hot (3,600 K gas temperature) plasma can be used for chemical processes and on the other hand the cold afterglow (temperatures down to almost RT) can be applied for surface processes. For example chemical syntheses are interesting volume processes. Here the microwave plasma torch can be used for the decomposition of waste gases which are harmful and contribute to the global warming but are needed as etching gases in growing industry sectors like the semiconductor branch. Another application is the dissociation of CO2. Surplus electrical energy from renewable energy sources can be used to dissociate CO2 to CO and O2. The CO can be further processed to gaseous or liquid higher hydrocarbons thereby providing chemical storage of the energy, synthetic fuels or platform chemicals for the chemical industry. Applications of the afterglow of the plasma torch are the treatment of surfaces to increase the adhesion of lacquer, glue or paint, and the sterilization or decontamination of different kind of surfaces. The movie will explain how to ignite the plasma solely by microwave power without any additional igniters, e.g., electric sparks. The microwave plasma torch is based on a combination of two resonators — a coaxial one which provides the ignition of the plasma and a cylindrical one which guarantees a continuous and stable operation of the plasma after ignition. The plasma can be operated in a long microwave transparent tube for volume processes or shaped by orifices for surface treatment purposes. PMID:25938699

  5. Numerical Simulation of a Spark Ignited Two-Stroke Free-Piston Engine Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jin-long; ZUO Zheng-xing; LIU Dong

    2009-01-01

    A numerical program is built to simulate the performance of a spark ignited two-stroke free-piston engine coupled with a linear generator. The computational model combines a series of dynamic and thermodynamic equations that are solved simultaneously to predict the performances of the engines. The dynamic analysis performed consists of an evaluation of the frictional force and load force introduced by the generator. The thermodynamic analysis used a single zone model to describe the engine's working cycle which includes intake, scavenging, compression, combustion and expansion, and to evaluate the effect of heat transfer based on the first law of thermodynamics and the ideal gas state equation. Because there is no crankshaft, a time based Wiebe equation was used to express the fraction of fuel burned in the combustion. The calculated results were validated by using the experimental data from another research group. The results indicate that the free-piston generator has some advantages over conventional engines.

  6. Test Resource Partitioning Based on Efficient Response Compaction for Test Time and Tester Channels Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-He Han; Xiao-Wei Li; Hua-Wei Li; Anshuman Chandra

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a test resource partitioning technique based on an efficient response compaction design called quotient compactor(q-Compactor). Because q-Compactor is a single-output compactor, high compaction ratios can be obtained even for chips with a small number of outputs. Some theorems for the design of q-Compactor are presented to achieve full diagnostic ability, minimize error cancellation and handle unknown bits in the outputs of the circuit under test (CUT). The q-Compactor can also be moved to the load-board, so as to compact the output response of the CUT even during functional testing. Therefore, the number of tester channels required to test the chip is significantly reduced. The experimental results on the ISCAS '89 benchmark circuits and an MPEG 2 decoder SoC show that the proposed compaction scheme is very efficient.

  7. Analyzing VLSI component test results of a GenRad GR125 tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulaica, D.; Lee, C.-H.

    1995-06-01

    The GenRad GR125 VLSI chip tester provides tools for testing the functionality of entire chips. Test operation results, such as timing sensitivity or propagation delay, can be compared to published values of other manufacturers' chips. The tool options allow for many input vector situations to be tested, leaving the possibility that a certain test result has no meaning. Thus, the test operations are also analyzed for intent. Automating the analysis of test results can speed up the testing process and prepare results for processing by other tools. The procedure used GR125 test results of a 7404 Hex Inverter in a sample VHDL performance modeler on a Unix workstation. The VHDL code is simulated using the Mentor Graphics Corporation's Idea Station software, but should be portable to any VHDL simulator.

  8. Magnetic properties measurement of soft magnetic composite material (SOMALOY 700) by using 3-D tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Ashraf; Guo, Youguang; Zhu, Jianguo

    2017-08-01

    Core losses of rotating electrical machine can be predicted by identifying the magnetic properties of the magnetic material. The magnetic properties should be properly measured since there are some variations of vector flux density in the rotating machine. In this paper, the SOMALOY 700 material has been measured under x, y and z- axes flux density penetration by using the 3-D tester. The calibrated sensing coils are used in detecting the flux densities which have been generated by the Labview software. The measured sensing voltages are used in obtaining the magnetic properties of the sample such as magnetic flux density B, magnetic field strength H, hysteresis loop which can be used to calculate the total core loss of the sample. The results of the measurement are analyzed by using the Mathcad software before being compared to another material.

  9. Design of versatile ASIC and protocol tester for CBM readout system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabołotny, W. M.; Byszuk, A. P.; Emschermann, D.; Gumiński, M.; Juszczyk, B.; Kasiński, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Lehnert, J.; Müller, W. F. J.; Poźniak, K.; Romaniuk, R.; Szczygieł, R.

    2017-02-01

    Silicon Tracking System (STS), Muon Chamber (MUCH) and Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) subdetectors in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) detector system at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) use the same innovative protocol ensuring reliable synchronization of the communication link between the controller and the front-end ASIC, transmission of time-deterministic commands to the ASIC and efficient readout of data. The paper describes the FPGA-based tester platform which can be used both for the verification of the protocol implementation in a front-end ASIC at the design stage, and for testing of the produced ASICs. Due to its modularity, the platform can be easily adapted for different integrated circuits and readout systems.

  10. Anti-wear and friction performance of ZrO2 nanoparticles as lubricant additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiyu Ma; Shaohua Zheng; Duxia Cao; Hongna Guo

    2010-01-01

    The surface of ZrO2 nanoparticles was modified with silane coupling agent KH-560 by dispersing the nanoparticles in 20# machine oil.The tribological performance of the 20# machine oil with ZrO2 nanoparticles was evaluated by a four-ball tester and a thrust-ring machine.The loss of the thrust-ring weight was measured by an electronic balance with a precision of 0.0001 g.The worn surface was examined under a metallographic microscope with 400-times magnification.The results showed that the average friction coefficient decreased by 27.34%,and that the weight loss of the thrust-ring indicated no wear or nega-tive wear,the wear loss after six loads tests being-0.0163 g.The anti-wear(AW)and reducing friction(RF)abilities of the oil with ZrO2 nanoparticles addition were considerably improved,maximizing at an additive concentration of 0.5 wt%.

  11. Preparation of Ni-CNT composite coatings on aluminum substrate and its friction and wear behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂江平; 朱丽萍; 陈卫祥; 赵新兵; 刘芙; 张孝彬

    2004-01-01

    Nickel-carbon nanotube(CNT) composite coatings with a Zn-Ni interlayer were prepared by electrodeposition technique on aluminum substrate. The effects of CNT concentration in plating bath on the volume fraction of CNTs in the deposits and the coating growth rate were investigated. The friction and wear behavior of the Ni-CNT composite coatings were examined using a pin-on-disk wear tester under dry sliding conditions at a sliding speed of 0. 062 3 m/s and load range from 12 N to 150 N. Because of the reinforcement of CNTs in the composite coatings, at lower applied loads, the wear resistance was improved with increasing volume fraction of CNTs. Since cracking and peeling occur on the worn surface, the wear rates of composite coatings with high volume fraction of CNTs increase rapidly at higher applied loads. The friction coefficient of the composite coatings decreases with the increasing volume fraction of CNTs due to the reinforcement and self-lubrication of CNTs.

  12. Analysis of self-repair films on friction surface lubricated with nano-Cu additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qian; XU Yi; SHI Pei-jing; YU He-long; XU Bin-shi

    2005-01-01

    The surface modified nanocopper particles were prepared with chemical reduction method. The wear test was carried out on a T-11 ball-on-plate friction and wear tester made in Poland. The material of the upper sample was GCr15 and the counterpart was AISI-1045 steel. The morphologies of the worn surfaces of the samples were observed by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope, while the element distributions on the worn surfaces were determined by means of electron microprobe analysis. As the results, a film mainly made of Cu is formed on the worn surface. The film on the surface of the still upper sample is thicker than that formed on the revolving coun terpart. At the edge of the groove of the worn surface made by the milling before test there is Cu element observed obviously, but there is not any Cu element in the bottom of the groove. A possible action mechanism of the film is suggested. The friction movement can induce reactivity of the metal and continuously produce activation surface. It benefits the film formed by nano-Cu in lubricant on the worn surface. Hardness and modulus of nano-Cu films were successfully measured and analyzed by the nanoindentation instrument. The results show that the hardness and modulus of the films are lower than those of the initial surface.

  13. Effect of Load on Friction-Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed WC-12Co Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifu, Jin; Weicheng, Kong; Tianyuan, Sheng; Ruihong, Zhang; Dejun, Kong

    2017-07-01

    A WC-12Co coating was sprayed on AISI H13 hot work mold steel using a high-velocity oxygen fuel. The morphologies, phase compositions, and distributions of chemical elements of the obtained coatings were analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS), respectively. The friction-wear behaviors under different loads were investigated using a reciprocating wear tester; the morphologies and distributions of the chemical elements of worn tracks were analyzed using a SEM and its configured EDS, respectively. The results show the reunited grains of WC are held together by the Co binder; the primary phases of the coating are WC, Co, and a small amount of W2C and W, owing to the oxidation and decarburization of WC. Inter-diffusion of Fe and W between the coating and the substrate is shown, which indicates a good coating adhesion. The values of the average coefficient of friction under the loads of 40, 80, and 120 N are 0.29, 0.31, and 0.49, respectively. The WC grains are pulled out of the coating during the sliding wear test, but the coating maintains its integrity, suggesting that the coating is intact and continuously protects the substrate from wearing.

  14. Novel in situ mechanical testers to enable integrated metal surface micro-machines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follstaedt, David Martin; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Hearne, Sean Joseph; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Dyck, Christopher William

    2005-10-01

    The ability to integrate metal and semiconductor micro-systems to perform highly complex functions, such as RF-MEMS, will depend on developing freestanding metal structures that offer improved conductivity, reflectivity, and mechanical properties. Three issues have prevented the proliferation of these systems: (1) warpage of active components due to through-thickness stress gradients, (2) limited component lifetimes due to fatigue, and (3) low yield strength. To address these issues, we focus on developing and implementing techniques to enable the direct study of the stress and microstructural evolution during electrodeposition and mechanical loading. The study of stress during electrodeposition of metal thin films is being accomplished by integrating a multi-beam optical stress sensor into an electrodeposition chamber. By coupling the in-situ stress information with ex-situ microstructural analysis, a scientific understanding of the sources of stress during electrodeposition will be obtained. These results are providing a foundation upon which to develop a stress-gradient-free thin film directly applicable to the production of freestanding metal structures. The issues of fatigue and yield strength are being addressed by developing novel surface micromachined tensile and bend testers, by interferometry, and by TEM analysis. The MEMS tensile tester has a ''Bosch'' etched hole to allow for direct viewing of the microstructure in a TEM before, during, and after loading. This approach allows for the quantitative measurements of stress-strain relations while imaging dislocation motion, and determination of fracture nucleation in samples with well-known fatigue/strain histories. This technique facilitates the determination of the limits for classical deformation mechanisms and helps to formulate a new understanding of the mechanical response as the grain sizes are refined to a nanometer scale. Together, these studies will result in a science

  15. 16 CFR Figure 4 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Panel Tester Schematic Low Flux End, Elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Panel Tester Schematic Low Flux End, Elevation 4 Figure 4 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The...

  16. Glitch Game Testers: The Design and Study of a Learning Environment for Computational Production with Young African American Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Elizabeth Betsy

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of a learning environment for young African American males, called the Glitch Game Testers, was launched in 2009. The development of this program was based on formative work that looked at the contrasting use of digital games between young African American males and individuals who chose to become computer science majors.…

  17. Bulk CMOS VLSI Technology Studies. Part 5. The Design and Implementation of a High Speed Integrated Circuit Functional Tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    169 7404 Inverter Test ...... ................ 171 7482 Binary Adder Test .... .............. .174 REFERENCES ......... ......................... 176...tests run on a 7404 HEX INVERTER and a 7482 2-BIT BINARY FULL ADDER , are presented in Appendix E, TEST RESULTS...RAM, a 7404 HEX INVERTER, and a 7482 2-BIT FULL ADDER . These results indicate that the functional tester operates according to the specifications

  18. Reliability of knee joint range of motion and circumference measurements after total knee arthroplasty: does tester experience matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Christensen, Malene; Christensen, Stine Sommer

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Two of the most utilized outcome measures to assess knee joint range of motion (ROM) and intra-articular effusion are goniometry and circumference, respectively. Neither goniometry nor circumference of the knee joint have been examined for both intra-tester and inter-teste...

  19. Rapid ignition of fluidized bed boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Liman D.

    1976-12-14

    A fluidized bed boiler is started up by directing into the static bed of inert and carbonaceous granules a downwardly angled burner so that the hot gases cause spouting. Air is introduced into the bed at a rate insufficient to fluidize the entire bed. Three regions are now formed in the bed, a region of lowest gas resistance, a fluidized region and a static region with a mobile region at the interface of the fluidized and static regions. Particles are transferred by the spouting action to form a conical heap with the carbonaceous granules concentrated at the top. The hot burner gases ignite the carbonaceous matter on the top of the bed which becomes distributed in the bed by the spouting action and bed movement. Thereafter the rate of air introduction is increased to fluidize the entire bed, the spouter/burner is shut off, and the entire fluidized bed is ignited.

  20. Integrated thermodynamic model for ignition target performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Springer P.T.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have derived a 3-dimensional synthetic model for NIF implosion conditions, by predicting and optimizing fits to a broad set of x-ray and nuclear diagnostics obtained on each shot. By matching x-ray images, burn width, neutron time-of-flight ion temperature, yield, and fuel ρr, we obtain nearly unique constraints on conditions in the hotspot and fuel in a model that is entirely consistent with the observables. This model allows us to determine hotspot density, pressure, areal density (ρr, total energy, and other ignition-relevant parameters not available from any single diagnostic. This article describes the model and its application to National Ignition Facility (NIF tritium–hydrogen–deuterium (THD and DT implosion data, and provides an explanation for the large yield and ρr degradation compared to numerical code predictions.

  1. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1991-01-01

    Measurement data on the performance of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor show wide variations in the head-end pressure changes and the total thrust build-up during the ignition transient periods. To analyze the flow and thermal behavior in the tested solid rocket motors, a 1-dimensional, ideal gas flow model via the SIMPLE algorithm was developed. Numerical results showed that burning patterns in the star-shaped head-end segment of the propellant and the erosive burning rate are two important factors controlling the ignition transients. The objective of this study is to extend the model to include the effects of aluminum particle commonly used in solid propellants. To treat the effects of aluminum-oxide particles in the combustion gas, conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the particles are added in the numerical formulation and integrated by an inter-phase-slip algorithm.

  2. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

    2013-01-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

  3. Ignitability and explosibility of gases and vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Tingguang

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a systematic view on flammability and a collection of solved engineering problems in the fields of dilution and purge, mine gas safety, clean burning safety and gas suppression modeling. For the first time, fundamental principles of energy conservation are used to develop theoretical flammability diagrams and are then explored to understand various safety-related mixing problems. This provides the basis for a fully-analytical solution to any flammability problem. Instead of the traditional view that flammability is a fundamental material property, here flammability is discovered to be a result of the explosibility of air and the ignitability of fuel, or a process property. By exploring the more fundamental concepts of explosibility and ignitability, the safety targets of dilution and purge can be better defined and utilized for guiding safe operations in process safety. This book provides various engineering approaches to mixture flammability, benefiting not only the safety students, but al...

  4. National Ignition Facility design, performance, and cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, W.J.; Paisner, J.A.; Lowdermilk, W.H. [and others

    1994-09-16

    A conceptual design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been completed and its cost has been estimated by a multilaboratory team. To maximize the performance/cost ratio a compact, segmented amplifier is used in a multipass architecture. Many recent optical and laser technology developments have been incorporated into the final design. The Beamlet project has successfully demonstrated the new concept. The mission of ICF Program using the NEF is to achieve ignition and gain in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects experiments, and for civilian applications such as inertial fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high energy density.

  5. Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R

    2012-04-05

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design

  6. Friction and Wear in Timing Belt Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Timing belt tooth goes into contact with a drive pulley, stretched to the maximum, because of the previous tension. When the contact begins the peak of the belt tooth makes the contact with the outer surface of the pulley teeth. The process of the teeth entering into the contact zone is accompanied with the relative sliding of their side surfaces and appropriate friction force. The normal force value is changing with the parabolic function, which also leads to the changes of the friction force. The biggest value of the normal force and of the friction force is at the tooth root. Hollow between teeth and the tip of the pulley teeth are also in contact. Occasionally, the face surface of the belt and the flange are also in contact. The friction occurs in those tribomechanical systems, also. Values of these friction forces are lower compared with the friction force, which occurs at the teeth root.

  7. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A H; Flores-Johnson, E A; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  8. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  9. Friction tensor concept for textured surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Y Simha; Anirudhan Pottirayil; Pradeep L Menezes; Satish V Kailas

    2008-06-01

    Directionality of grinding marks influences the coefficient of friction during sliding. Depending on the sliding direction the coefficient of friction varies between maximum and minimum for textured surfaces. For random surfaces without any texture the friction coefficient becomes independent of the sliding direction. This paper proposes the concept of a friction tensor analogous to the heat conduction tensor in anisotropic media. This implies that there exists two principal friction coefficients $\\mu_{1,2}$ analogous to the principal conductivities $k_{1,2}$. For symmetrically textured surfaces the principal directions are orthogonal with atleast one plane of symmetry. However, in the case of polished single crystalline solids in relative sliding motion, crystallographic texture controls the friction tensor.

  10. Control of Ignition and Combustion of Dimethyl Ether in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Azetsu, Akihiko; Oikawa, Chikashi

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is known to have high thermal efficiency and low nitrogen oxide emission. However, the control of ignition timing and its combustion period over a wide range of engine speeds and loads is one of the barriers to the realization of the engine. On the lean side of the equivalence ratio, control of ignition is difficult due to its long delay of ignition, and there is knocklike problem under high load. In both computations and experiments of HCCI engine operated on dimethyl ether, the operable range (the possible range of fuel input from just ignitable to knock-occurring state) shifted to the rich side with decreasing intake temperature and amount of mixing of carbon dioxide. The range of fuel input was reduced at low intake temperatures, because the hot flame onset angle advanced more quickly than it did at high intake temperatures. However, the mixing of CO2 caused the operable range to shift to the rich side while retaining the same range. The results of this study indicated the possibility of high-load operation or extension of the load range by exhaust gas recirculation.

  11. IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason M. Keith

    2005-02-01

    This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

  12. The Velocity Campaign for Ignition on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Debra

    2011-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires a high velocity implosion since the energy required for ignition scales like 1/v8. Beyond ignition, a higher velocity produces more robust performance, which will be useful for applications of ignition. In the velocity campaign, we will explore three methods for increasing implosion velocity: increased laser power and energy, optimized hohlraum and capsule materials, and optimized capsule thickness. The main issue with increasing the laser power and energy is the way in which LPI (laser plasma interactions) and hot electron preheat will change as we increase the laser power. Based on scalings from previous data and theory, we expect to couple 80-85% of 1.5 MJ at 475-500 TW. We can also increase the velocity by optimizing the hohlraum and capsule materials. In this campaign, we will explore depleted uranium hohlraums to reduce wall loss and optimize the capsule dopant by replacing the germanium dopant with silicon. Those two changes are expected to increase velocity by 6-7%. Finally, we will optimize the capsule thickness. The optimal capsule thickness is a trade-off between velocity and mix. A thinner capsule has higher velocity, but is more susceptible to mix of the ablator material into the hotspot due to hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by ablation surface imperfections. Once we have achieved adequate capsule areal density, we will optimize the velocity/mix trade off by varying the capsule thickness. We will also make direct measure of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth by backlighting the growth of engineered features on the surface of the capsule. This will allow us to benchmark our models of mix. In this paper, we will describe the designs and experimental results of the velocity campaign. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. The National Ignition Campaign: status and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E. I.; Collaborators, the NIC

    2013-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been operational since March 2009 and a variety of experiments have been completed and many more are planned in support of NIF's mission areas: national security, fundamental science, and fusion energy. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support all of its missions with nearly 60 x-ray, optical and nuclear diagnostic systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic targets and DT layered capsules. The NIF has also been qualified for the use of tritium and other special materials as well as to perform high-yield experiments and classified experiments. Implosions with record indirect-drive neutron yield of 7.5 × 1014 neutrons have been achieved. NIF, a Nd : Glass laser facility, is routinely operating at 1.6 MJ of ultraviolet (3ω) light on target with very high reliability. It recently reached its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort with the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory, is making steady progress towards achieving ignition. Other experiments have been completed in support of high-energy science, materials equation of state, and materials strength. In all cases, records of extreme temperatures and pressures, highest neutron yield and highest energy densities have been achieved. This paper describes the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path towards ignition.

  14. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mofidi, M; Prakash, B [Division of Machine Elements, Luleaa University of Technology, Luleaa SE-97187 (Sweden); Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Albohr, O [Pirelli Deutschland AG, 64733 Hoechst/Odenwald, Postfach 1120 (Germany)

    2008-02-27

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  15. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  16. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi, M.; Prakash, B.; Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.

    2008-02-01

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  17. Modelling cohesive, frictional and viscoplastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehossein, Habib; Qin, Zongyi

    2016-06-01

    Most materials in mining and civil engineering construction are not only viscoplastic, but also cohesive frictional. Fresh concrete, fly ash and mining slurries are all granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids, although solid concrete is normally considered as a cohesive frictional material. Presented here is both a formulation of the pipe and disc flow rates as a function of pressure and pressure gradient and the CFD application to fresh concrete flow in L-Box tests.

  18. The role of friction in orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Ribeiro Pacheco; Wellington Corrêa Jansen; Dauro Douglas de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sliding mechanics is widely used during orthodontic treatment. One of the disadvantages of this mechanics is the friction generated at the bracket/archwire interface, which may reduce the amount of desired orthodontic movement obtained. Due to the application and great acceptance of this type of mechanics, the role of friction in Orthodontics has been of interest for both clinicians and scientists. OBJECTIVE: Therefore, this article discussed how friction affects orthodontic too...

  19. Ignition threshold for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, Michael J., E-mail: hay@princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    An optically thin p-{sup 11}B plasma loses more energy to bremsstrahlung than it gains from fusion reactions, unless the ion temperature can be elevated above the electron temperature. In thermal plasmas, the temperature differences required are possible in small Coulomb logarithm regimes, characterized by high density and low temperature. Ignition could be reached more easily if the fusion reactivity can be improved with nonthermal ion distributions. To establish an upper bound for the potential utility of a nonthermal distribution, we consider a monoenergetic beam with particle energy selected to maximize the beam-thermal reactivity. Comparing deuterium-tritium (DT) and p-{sup 11}B, the minimum Lawson criteria and minimum ρR required for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) volume ignition are calculated with and without the nonthermal feature. It turns out that channeling fusion alpha energy to maintain such a beam facilitates ignition at lower densities and ρR, improves reactivity at constant pressure, and could be used to remove helium ash. On the other hand, the reactivity gains that could be realized in DT plasmas are significant, the excess electron density in p-{sup 11}B plasmas increases the recirculated power cost to maintain a nonthermal feature and thereby constrains its utility to ash removal.

  20. Fielding the NIF Cryogenic Ignition Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malsbury, T; Haid, B; Gibson, C; Atkinson, D; Skulina, K; Klingmann, J; Atherton, J; Mapoles, E; Kozioziemski, B; Dzenitis, E

    2008-02-28

    The United States Department of Energy has embarked on a campaign to conduct credible fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 2010. The target assembly specified for this campaign requires the formation of a deuterium/tritium (DT) fuel ice layer on the inside of a 2 millimeter diameter capsule positioned at the center of a 9 millimeter long by 5 millimeter diameter cylinder, called a hohlraum. The ice layer requires micrometer level accuracy and must be formed and maintained at temperatures below 19 K. At NIF shot time, the target must be positioned at the center of the NIF 10 meter diameter target chamber, aligned to the laser beam lines and held stable to less than 7 micrometers rms. We have completed the final design and are integrating the systems necessary to create, characterize and field the cryogenic target for ignition experiments. These designs, with emphasis on the challenges of fielding a precision cryogenic positioning system will be presented.

  1. Laser spark distribution and ignition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Steven; McIntyre, Dustin L.

    2008-09-02

    A laser spark distribution and ignition system that reduces the high power optical requirements for use in a laser ignition and distribution system allowing for the use of optical fibers for delivering the low peak energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. An optical distributor distributes and delivers optical pumping energy from an optical pumping source to multiple combustion chambers incorporating laser oscillators or laser amplifiers for inducing a laser spark within a combustion chamber. The optical distributor preferably includes a single rotating mirror or lens which deflects the optical pumping energy from the axis of rotation and into a plurality of distinct optical fibers each connected to a respective laser media or amplifier coupled to an associated combustion chamber. The laser spark generators preferably produce a high peak power laser spark, from a single low power pulse. The laser spark distribution and ignition system has application in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

  2. The National Ignition Facility Performance Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynam, C; Auerbach, J; Nicola, J D; Dixit, S; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Jancaitis, K; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mehta, N; Nostrand, M; Orth, C; Sacks, R; Shaw, M; Sutton, S; Wegner, P; Williams, W; Widmayer, C; White, R; Yang, S; Van Wonterghem, B

    2005-08-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has been designed to support high energy density science (HEDS), including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. NIF operated a single ''quad'' of 4 beams from December 2002 through October 2004 in order to gain laser operations experience, support target experiments, and demonstrate laser performance consistent with NIF's design requirement. During this two-year period, over 400 Main Laser shots were delivered at 1{omega} to calorimeters for diagnostic calibration purposes, at 3{omega} to the Target Chamber, and at 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} to the Precision Diagnostics System (PDS). The PDS includes its own independent single beam transport system, NIF design frequency conversion hardware and optics, and laser sampling optics that deliver light to a broad range of laser diagnostics. Highlights of NIF laser performance will be discussed including the results of high energy 2{omega} and 3{omega} experiments, the use of multiple focal spot beam conditioning techniques, the reproducibility of laser performance on multiple shots, the generation on a single beam of a 3{omega} temporally shaped ignition pulse at full energy and power, and recent results on full bundle (8 beamline) performance. NIF's first quad laser performance meets or exceeds NIF's design requirements.

  3. The national ignition facility performance status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynam, C.; Auerbach, J.; Bowers, M.; Di-Nicola, J.M.; Dixit, S.; Erbert, G.; Heestand, G.; Henesian, M.; Jancaitis, K.; Manes, K.; Marshall, C.; Mehta, N.; Nostrand, M.; Orth, C.; Sacks, R.; Shaw, M.; Sutton, S.; Wegner, P.; Williams, W.; Widmayer, C.; White, R.; Yang, S.; Van Wonterghem, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has been designed to support high energy density science, including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. NIF operated a single 'quad' of 4 beams from December 2002 through October 2004 in order to gain laser operations experience, support target experiments, and demonstrate laser performance consistent with NIF's design requirement. During this two-year period, over 400 Main Laser shots were delivered at 1{omega} to calorimeters for diagnostic calibration purposes, at 3{omega} to the Target Chamber, and at 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} to the precision diagnostic system (PDS). The PDS includes its own independent single beam transport system, NIF design frequency conversion hardware and optics, and laser sampling optics that deliver light to a broad range of laser diagnostics. Highlights of NIF laser performance will be discussed including the results of high energy 2{omega} and 3{omega} experiments, the use of multiple focal spot beam conditioning techniques, the reproducibility of laser performance on multiple shots, the generation on a single beam of a 3{omega} temporally shaped ignition pulse at full energy and power, and recent results on full bundle (8 beamline) performance. NIF's first quad laser performance meets or exceeds NIF's design requirements. (authors)

  4. Implosion hydrodynamics of fast ignition targetsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, R. B.; Hatchett, S. P.; Tabak, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Bonino, M.; Nikroo, A.; Petrasso, R.; Sangster, T. C.; Smith, J.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    The fast ignition (FI) concept requires the generation of a compact, dense, pure fuel mass accessible to an external ignition source. The current base line FI target is a shell fitted with a reentrant cone extending to near its center. Conventional direct- or indirect-drive collapses the shell near the tip of the cone and then an ultraintense laser pulse focused to the inside cone tip generates high-energy electrons to ignite the dense fuel. A theoretical and experimental investigation was undertaken of the collapse of such targets, validating modeling, and exploring the trade-offs available, in such an asymmetric geometry, to optimize compaction of the fuel and maintain the integrity of the cone. The collapse is complex. Away from the cone, the shell collapses much as does a conventional implosion, generating a hot, low-density inner core. But because of the open side, hot plasma exhausts out toward the tip of the cone. This hot plasma is advantageous for implosion diagnostics; it can provide protons for angular dependent measurements of the shell wall, neutrons for temperature measurements, and self-emission for contamination measurements. But for FI it is a liability; the hot, low-density inner core impedes the compaction of the cold fuel, lowering the implosion/burn efficiency and the gain. Approaches to optimizing this shell design are discussed.

  5. How to teach friction: Experiments and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Ugo; Borghi, Lidia; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    Students generally have difficulty understanding friction and its associated phenomena. High school and introductory college-level physics courses usually do not give the topic the attention it deserves. We have designed a sequence for teaching about friction between solids based on a didactic reconstruction of the relevant physics, as well as research findings about student conceptions. The sequence begins with demonstrations that illustrate different types of friction. Experiments are subsequently performed to motivate students to obtain quantitative relations in the form of phenomenological laws. To help students understand the mechanisms producing friction, models illustrating the processes taking place on the surface of bodies in contact are proposed.

  6. Noise and vibration in friction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sergienko, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The book analyzes the basic problems of oscillation processes and theoretical aspects of noise and vibration in friction systems. It presents generalized information available in literature data and results of the authors in vibroacoustics of friction joints, including car brakes and transmissions. The authors consider the main approaches to abatement of noise and vibration in non-stationary friction processes. Special attention is paid to materials science aspects, in particular to advanced composite materials used to improve the vibroacoustic characteristics of tribopairs The book is intended for researchers and technicians, students and post-graduates specializing in mechanical engineering, maintenance of machines and transport means, production certification, problems of friction and vibroacoustics.

  7. Frictional Effects on Gear Tooth Contact Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper concentrates on the investigations regarding the situations of frictional shear stress of gear teeth and the relevant frictional effects on bending stresses and transmission error in gear meshing. Sliding friction is one of the major reasons causing gear failure and vibration; the adequate consideration of frictional effects is essential for understanding gear contact behavior accurately. An analysis of tooth frictional effect on gear performance in spur gear is presented using finite element method. Nonlinear finite element model for gear tooth contact with rolling/sliding is then developed. The contact zones for multiple tooth pairs are identified and the associated integration situation is derived. The illustrated bending stress and transmission error results with static and dynamic boundary conditions indicate the significant effects due to the sliding friction between the surfaces of contacted gear teeth, and the friction effect can not be ignored. To understand the particular static and dynamic frictional effects on gear tooth contact analysis, some significant phenomena of gained results will also be discussed. The potentially significant contribution of tooth frictional shear stress is presented, particularly in the case of gear tooth contact analysis with both static and dynamic boundary conditions.

  8. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  9. Job Heterogeneity and Coordination Frictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Daniel

    the job ladder, how the identification of assortative matching is fundamentally different in directed and undirected search models, how our theory accounts for business cycle facts related to inter-temporal changes in job offer distributions, and how our model could also be used to identify......We develop a new directed search model of a frictional labor market with a continuum of heterogenous workers and firms. We estimate two versions of the model - auction and price posting - using Danish data on wages and productivities. Assuming heterogenous workers with no comparative advantage, we...

  10. Friction of Plastic Rotating Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    for speeds eve ., the rdnge: 10 - 300 cm/s. Overwhelming evidence was presented to support a melt phenomena. Melt depth of: polymer, pins on a glass disk...Polymers," Proc. Roy. Soc., (London),. A291 (1966), p. 186. 24. Rabinowicz , S., et al., "The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on the Shear Yield Behavior of...34 Proc. Roy.,Soc., (London), A269. (19620 p. 368. 51. Carignan, F. J., and Rabinowicz , E., "Friction and Wear at ligh Sliding Speeds," ASLE Trans., 24

  11. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  12. Localized flame extinction and re-ignition in turbulent jet ignition assisted combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad; Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Team

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent jet ignition (TJI)-assisted combustion of ultra-lean fuel-air is performed in a three-dimensional planar jet configuration. TJI is a novel ignition enhancement method which facilitates the combustion of lean and ultra-lean mixtures by rapidly exposing them to high temperature combustion products. Fully compressible gas dynamics and species equations are solved with high order finite difference methods. The hydrogen-air reaction is simulated with a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism consisting of 9 species and 38 elementary reactions. The interesting phenomena involved in TJI combustion including localized premixed flame extinction/re-ignition and simultaneous premixed/non-premixed flames are investigated by using the flame heat release, temperature, species concentrations, and a newly defined TJI progress variable.

  13. Ignitor with stable low-energy thermite igniting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael D.; Munger, Alan C.

    1991-02-05

    A stable compact low-energy igniting system in an ignitor utilizes two components, an initiating charge and an output charge. The initiating charge is a thermite in ultra-fine powder form compacted to 50-70% of theoretical maximum density and disposed in a cavity of a header of the ignitor adjacent to an electrical ignition device, or bridgewire, mounted in the header cavity. The initiating charge is ignitable by operation of the ignition device in a hot-wire mode. The output charge is a thermite in high-density consoladated form compacted to 90-99% of theoretical maximum density and disposed adjacent to the initiating charge on an opposite end thereof from the electrical ignition device and ignitable by the initiating charge. A sleeve is provided for mounting the output charge to the ignitor header with the initiating charge confined therebetween in the cavity.

  14. Experimental investigation to demonstrate Impact Fast Ignition scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, T; Azechi, H; Nakai, M; Hironaka, Y; Sakaiya, T; Nakamura, H; Shiraga, H; Shigemori, K; Hosoda, H; Arikawa, Y; Homma, H; Norimatsu, T; Murakami, M; Jhozaki, T [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka univ. (Japan); M, Karasik; J, Gardner; J, Bates; D, Colombant, E-mail: twatari@ile.osaka-u.ac.j [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC (United States)

    2010-08-01

    We have proposed a new ignition scheme of Fast Ignition, called 'Impact Fast Ignition (IFI)', in which a compressed fuel is ignited by impact collision of a fragment of separately imploded fuel. We performed integrated experiments on impact ignition, in which a portion of a deuterated polystyrene (CD) shell was accelerated to about 600 km/s and was collided with precompressed CD fuel. The shell was imploded using 9 beams and the impactor was accelerated using 3 beams of the GEKKO XII laser system. The laser energy was 350 J per beam. The kinetic energy of the impactor was efficiently converted into thermal energy generating a temperature of about 1.8 keV., Observed maximum neutron yield was 2x10{sup 6}. This yield was 80 times as large as that without impactor. We will present the experimental details and results, demonstrating the high potential of impact ignition for fusion energy production.

  15. Heat wave fast ignition in inertial confinement energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shalom; Eliezer; Shirly; Vinikman; Pinhasi

    2013-01-01

    An accelerated micro-foil is used to ignite a pre-compressed cylindrical shell containing deuterium–tritium fuel.The well-known shock wave ignition criterion and a novel criterion based on heat wave ignition are developed in this work.It is shown that for heat ignition very high impact velocities are required.It is suggested that a multi-petawatt laser can accelerate a micro-foil to relativistic velocities in a very short time duration(picosecond)of the laser pulse.The cylindrical geometry suggested here for the fast ignition approach has the advantage of geometrically separating the nanosecond lasers that compress the target from the picosecond laser that accelerates the foil.The present model suggests that nuclear fusion by micro-foil impact ignition could be attained with currently existing technology.

  16. Some Observations on the Ignition of Composite Solid Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat-up times derived from studies on the ignition characteristics of a few model composite solid propellants, containing polystyrene, carboxy-terminated polybutadiene, plasticised polyvinyl chloride and polyphenol formaldehyde as binders, show that they are directly proportional to the mass of the sample and inversely proportional to the heat flux. Propellant weight-loss prior to ignition and high pressure ignition temperature data on the propellants, ammonium per chlorate, and binders show that the ignition is governed by the gasification of the binder pyrolysis products. The activation energy for the gasification of the pyrolysed polymer products corresponds to their ignition behaviour suggesting that propellant ignition is controlled by the binder.

  17. Laser diode ignition activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, J. W.; Kass, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: ignition subsystems, enhanced safety, optical ordnance power densities, optical ignition factors, low energy optical ordnance program, absorptance of 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato) pentaaminecobalt(III) perchlorate (CP) near 800 nm, power dependence of doped CP, system operational electrical requirements, dopant concentration effects for different CP particle sizes, ZR/KCLO4 optical ignition thresholds, and electrostatic discharge testing.

  18. Comparison of Frictional Heating Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Nicholas R [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

  19. Hydrodynamic modeling and simulations of shock ignition thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafon M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Shock Ignition (SI scheme [1] offers to reduce the laser requirements by relaxing the implosion phase to sub-ignition velocities and later adding an intense laser spike. Depending on laser energy, target characteristics and implosion velocity, high gains are expected [2,3]. Relevant intensities for scaled targets imploded in the velocity range from 150 to 400 km/s are defined at ignition thresholds. A range of moderate implosion velocities is specified to match safe implosions. These conditions for target design are then inferred for relevant NIF and LMJ shock-ignited targets.

  20. EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS OF GAS ENGINES MONOSPARK AND MULTISPARK IGNITION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Abramchuk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of comparison analysis of gas engine monospark and multispark ignition systems indices are presented. The results of these systems experimental investigation are given.

  1. Review on performance of High energy ignition techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jubin V Jose

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ignition systems are the fundamental parts of spark ignition engines which determine the engine efficiency and pollutant emission. With the recent developments in engine technology significantly high spark energies are required. This paper reviews progress in alternative ignition systems that supply high energy sparks and more efficiently transfer energy to the gas mixture. The improvement in performance parameter of a spark plug such as net heat transfer rate, flame development time, exhaust gas emission rate are compared with conventional ignition systems. This paper also tries to identify critical research gap and also the advantages and limitations of advanced systems with reference to the advanced researches reported in this area.

  2. Status and Prospects of the Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, M H

    2006-11-15

    Fast ignition is an alternate concept in inertial confinement fusion, which has the potential for easier ignition and greater energy multiplication. If realized it could improve the prospects for inertial fusion energy. It poses stimulating challenges in science and technology and the research is approaching a key stage in which the feasibility of fast ignition will be determined. This review covers the concepts, the state of the science and technology, the near term prospects and the challenges and risks involved in demonstrating high gain fast ignition.

  3. Thermal-Catalytic Ignition Source for Ionic Liquid Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet recently demonstrated rapid, reliable, and repeated ignition of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN)-hydroxyethylhydrazinium nitrate (HEHN) monopropellant...

  4. Highly Durable Catalysts for Ignition of Advanced Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed SBIR Phase I addresses the development of catalysts and technology for the ignition of advanced monopropellants consisting of mixtures of...

  5. Review of the National Ignition Campaign 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindl, John; Landen, Otto; Edwards, John; Moses, Ed

    2014-02-01

    The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) was a multi-institution effort established under the National Nuclear Security Administration of DOE in 2005, prior to the completion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in 2009. The scope of the NIC was the planning and preparation for and the execution of the first 3 yr of ignition experiments (through the end of September 2012) as well as the development, fielding, qualification, and integration of the wide range of capabilities required for ignition. Besides the operation and optimization of the use of NIF, these capabilities included over 50 optical, x-ray, and nuclear diagnostic systems, target fabrication facilities, experimental platforms, and a wide range of NIF facility infrastructure. The goal of ignition experiments on the NIF is to achieve, for the first time, ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory via inertial confinement fusion and to develop a platform for ignition and high energy density applications on the NIF. The goal of the NIC was to develop and integrate all of the capabilities required for a precision ignition campaign and, if possible, to demonstrate ignition and gain by the end of FY12. The goal of achieving ignition can be divided into three main challenges. The first challenge is defining specifications for the target, laser, and diagnostics with the understanding that not all ignition physics is fully understood and not all material properties are known. The second challenge is designing experiments to systematically remove these uncertainties. The third challenge is translating these experimental results into metrics designed to determine how well the experimental implosions have performed relative to expectations and requirements and to advance those metrics toward the conditions required for ignition. This paper summarizes the approach taken to address these challenges, along with the progress achieved to date and the challenges that remain. At project completion in 2009, NIF lacked

  6. HIV prevalence and high-risk sexual behaviours among MSM repeat and first-time testers in China: implications for HIV prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Bai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about HIV testing, HIV infection and sexual behaviour among bathhouse patrons in China. This study aims to assess differences in HIV prevalence and high-risk sexual behaviours between repeat and first-time testers among men who have sex with men (MSM attending bathhouse in Tianjin, China. Methods: Between March 2011 and September 2012, a HIV voluntary counselling and testing station was established in a gay bathhouse, which provided HIV testing and conducted a survey among participants recruited through snowball sampling. Differences in demographic and high-risk sexual behaviours between repeat and first-time testers were assessed using the chi-square test. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors for HIV infection. Results: Of the 1642 respondents, 699 (42.6% were repeat testers and 943 (57.4% were first-time testers. Among repeat testers, a higher proportion were men aged 18 to 25, single, better educated, had a history of STIs and worked as male sex workers or “money boys” (MBs. Repeat testers were less likely to report having unprotected anal intercourse in the past six months. The overall HIV prevalence was 12.4% (203/1642. There was no difference in HIV prevalence between repeat (11.2%, 78/699 and first-time (13.3%, 125/943 testers. The HIV prevalence increased with age among first-time testers (χ 2 trend=9.816, p=0.002. First-time MB testers had the highest HIV prevalence of 34.5%. Conclusions: MSM attending bathhouse had an alarmingly high HIV infection rate, particularly in MB. Targeted interventions are urgently needed especially focusing on older MSM and MBs.

  7. A Systematic Study on Composition of Low Viscosity Automotive Lube Oils with an Emphasis on Wear and Frictional Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishan Singh,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work the performance of three commercial lube oils and two base oils of different viscosities, composition have been studied for their tribo performance using four ball tribo tester as per ASTM D 4172D and IP 239 and at the end of the test run the steel ball surfaces have been examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM to assess the wear deformities. The tribo-performance results have been co-related with the physico-chemical properties along with quantity and type of the molecules present in these oils by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR studies. It has been observed that the lubricant with higher viscosity, higher aromatic molecules containing CH₂ chains shows lower friction and wear behavior whereas the increasing napthenic type molecules have reverse effect which is evident from the results.

  8. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of…

  9. On the Blasius correlation for friction factors

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Khanh Tuoc

    2010-01-01

    The Blasius empirical correlation for turbulent pipe friction factors is derived from first principles and extended to non-Newtonian power law fluids. Two alternative formulations are obtained that both correlate well with the experimental measurements of Dodge, Bogue and Yoo. Key words: Blasius, turbulent friction factor, power law fluids

  10. FACTORS INFLUENCING FRICTION OF PHOSPHATE COATINGS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    surface roughness, crystalline structure , and velocity. The coefficients of friction for manganese phosphate coatings did not differ to any practical...The coefficient of friction was independent of the applied load. Velocity during dynamic testing, surface finish, and crystalline structure influenced

  11. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  12. The Gulf Stream: Inertia and friction

    OpenAIRE

    ASSAF, GAD

    2011-01-01

    The inertial theory of the Gulf Stream (Charney, 1955) is extended to include vertical friction in the cyclonic shear zone (the western side) of the stream. The vertical friction is assumed to be controlled by local Froude conditions.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1977.tb00717.x

  13. Graphite friction coefficient for various conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The friction coefficient the graphite used in the Tsinghua University 10MW High Tem-perature Gas-Cooled Reactor was analyzed for various conditions. The variation of the graphitefriction coefficient was measured for various sliding velocities, sliding distances, normal loads, en-vironments and temperatures. A scanning elector microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the fric-tion surfaces.

  14. Wiping Metal Transfer in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much evidence suggests that as the friction stir pin-tool moves along a weld seam the displacement of metal takes place by a wiping action at the surface of a plug of metal that rotates with the tool. The wiping model is explained and some consequences for the friction stir welding process are drawn.

  15. Friction-reducing and antiwear behavior of metal halide-stabilized linear phosphazene derivatives as lubricants for a steel-on-steel contact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Jiamei; LIU; Weimin; LIANG; Yongmin

    2005-01-01

    A series of novel metal halide-stabilized linear phosphazene derivatives were synthesized. The friction-reducing and antiwear abilities of the resulting products as the lubricants for a steel-on-steel contact were comparatively investigated on an Optimol SRV oscillating friction and wear tester. The morphology of the worn steel surface was observed on a scanning electron microscope, while the chemical states of some typical elements on the worn steel surface were examined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that both the side branch structures and central metals influenced the friction-reducing and antiwear behaviors of the synthetic derivatives as the lubricants, which was related to the different adsorption activities of the organic compounds composed of different organic ingredients and metallic ions on a nascent metal surface. All the synthetic lubricants except for the iron (III) derivative showed increased antiwear abilities with increasing metallic ionic radius. A protective layer originated from the tribochemical reaction together with the adsorbed boundary lubricating layer containing organic fluorine compounds, nitrogen oxide, and Fe3(PO4)2 plays an important role in improving the friction and wear behavior of the steel-on-steel system.

  16. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional...... cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant...... shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity....

  17. Development of a simulation model for compression ignition engine running with ignition improved blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshkumar Ponnusamy Moranahalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of Automobile Engineering, Anna University, Chennai, India. The present work describes the thermodynamic and heat transfer models used in a computer program which simulates the diesel fuel and ignition improver blend to predict the combustion and emission characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition engine fuelled with ignition improver blend using classical two zone approach. One zone consists of pure air called non burning zone and other zone consist of fuel and combustion products called burning zone. First law of thermodynamics and state equations are applied in each of the two zones to yield cylinder temperatures and cylinder pressure histories. Using the two zone combustion model the combustion parameters and the chemical equilibrium composition were determined. To validate the model an experimental investigation has been conducted on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fuelled with 12% by volume of 2- ethoxy ethanol blend with diesel fuel. Addition of ignition improver blend to diesel fuel decreases the exhaust smoke and increases the thermal efficiency for the power outputs. It was observed that there is a good agreement between simulated and experimental results and the proposed model requires low computational time for a complete run.

  18. FRICTION-BOON OR BANE IN ORTHODONTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Most fixed appliance techniques involve some degree of sliding between brackets and arch wires. A sound knowledge of the various factors affecting the magnitude of friction is of paramount importance to the clinician. The present study was performed to evaluate and compare the frictional resistance and characteristics between self-ligating brackets and pre-adjusted edgewise brackets with different types of ligation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tidy's frictional test design was used to simulate retraction of tooth along with artificial saliva to simulate wet conditions in oral cavity. The jig with this assembly was mounted on the Instron machine with the cross head moving upwards at a speed of 5mm/min. The movable bracket was suspended from the load cell of the testing machine, while the jig was mounted on cross head of machine and the load cell readings were recorded on digital display. Following wires are used 0.016 HANT, 0.019X 0.025HANT, 0.019X 0.025 SS, 0.021X 0.025 SS wires are used. The brackets used were 0.022 slot Damon, 0.022 Smart clip and 0.022 slot MBT system. RESULTS: Self ligating brackets were shown to produce lesser friction when compared to the conventional brackets used with modules, and stainless steel ligatures. Damon self-ligating brackets produce a least friction of all the brackets used in the study. Stainless steel ligatures produced the least friction compared to elastomeric. CONCLUSION: Self ligation brackets produce lesser friction than the conventional brackets ligated with elastomeric modules and stainless steel ligature. Damon self-ligating brackets produce a least friction of all the brackets used in the study width of the bracket was also found to be directly proportional to the friction produced 0.0016HANT with elastomeric modules produce more friction due increase in flexibility of wire.

  19. Sensitivity of Liquid Monopropellants to Compression Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    contains a Silicon Rubber Septum through which a Gas Ullage Syringe,i.e., hypodermic needle , passes to introduce a precise loading of air ullage (volume...dumbbell by use of a hypodermic needle during the pre-fill procedure. Both head and rear of the dumbbell are fitted with "O"-ring seals. Thus, should...ignition tests support this theory . Again, returning to Figure 29, the response of a rapid-load pre-pressurized NOS-365 liquid monopropellant nharge (p

  20. Ignition and combustion features of biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkov, A. F.; Silin, V. E.; Bogatova, T. F.; Nadir, S. M.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental investigations of the ignition and combustion of plant biofuels (wood particles, date stones) and products of their mechanical and thermal treatment (pellets, charcoal) at temperatures typical of the burning process in nonforced furnaces and fixed-bed and fluidized-bed gas producers. The influence of the furnace heat treatment of a fuel on its inflammation and combustion has been revealed. The results have been compared with the known data on the burning of pellets, brown coals, and anthracites and with the calculation by the classical diffusion-kinetic model.

  1. Low emissions compression ignited engine technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Gerald N.; Kilkenny, Jonathan P.; Fluga, Eric C.; Duffy, Kevin P.

    2007-04-03

    A method and apparatus for operating a compression ignition engine having a cylinder wall, a piston, and a head defining a combustion chamber. The method and apparatus includes delivering fuel substantially uniformly into the combustion chamber, the fuel being dispersed throughout the combustion chamber and spaced from the cylinder wall, delivering an oxidant into the combustion chamber sufficient to support combustion at a first predetermined combustion duration, and delivering a diluent into the combustion chamber sufficient to change the first predetermined combustion duration to a second predetermined combustion duration different from the first predetermined combustion duration.

  2. Ignition analysis of a porous energetic material. 2. Ignition at a closed heated end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander M. Telegentor; Stephen B. Margolis; Forman A. Williams

    1998-11-01

    A continuation of an ignition analysis for porous energetic materials subjected to a constant energy flux is presented. In the first part, the analysis was developed for the case of an open-end, semi-infinite material such that gas flow, generated by thermal expansion, flowed out of the porous solid, thereby removing energy from the system. In the present study, the case of a closed end is considered, and thus the thermally-induced gas flow is now directed into the solid. In these studies, an asymptotic perturbation analysis, based on the smallness of the gas-to-solid density ratio and the largeness of the activation energy, is utilized to describe the inert and transition stages leading to thermal runaway. In both cases it is found that the effects of porosity provide a leading-order reduction in the time to ignition relative to that for the nonporous problem, arising from the reduced amount of solid material that must be heated and the difference in thermal conductivities of the solid and gaseous phases. A correction to the leading-order ignition-delay time, however, is provided by the convective flow of gas through the solid, and the sign of this correction is shown to depend on the direction of the gas flow. Thus, gas flowing out of an open-end solid was previously shown to give a positive correction to the leading-order time to ignition. Here, however, it is demonstrated that when the flow of gas is directed into the porous solid, the relative transport effects associated with the gas flow serve to preheat the material, resulting in a negative correction and hence a decrease in the ignition-delay time.

  3. Spectroscopic signatures of quantum friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Juliane; Bennett, Robert; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a formula for the spectroscopically accessible level shifts and decay rates of an atom moving at an arbitrary angle relative to a surface. Our Markov formulation leads to an intuitive analytic description whereby the shifts and rates are obtained from the coefficients of the Heisenberg equation of motion for the atomic flip operators but with complex Doppler-shifted (velocity-dependent) transition frequencies. Our results conclusively demonstrate that for the limiting case of parallel motion the shifts and rates are quadratic or higher in the atomic velocity. We show that a stronger, linear velocity dependence is exhibited by the rates and shifts for perpendicular motion, thus opening the prospect of experimentally probing the Markovian approach to the phenomenon of quantum friction.

  4. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  5. Mapping Instabilities in Polymer Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Charles; Crosby, Alfred

    2005-03-01

    Schallamach waves are instabilities that occur as interfaces between a soft elastomer and rigid surface slide past each other.(1) The presence of Schallamach waves can lead to drastic changes in frictional properties. Although the occurrence of Schallamach waves has been studied for the past several decades, a general map relating fundamental material properties, geometry, and operating conditions (i.e. speed and temperature) has not been established. Using a combinatorial approach, we illustrate the role of modulus, testing velocity and surface energetics of crosslinked poly(dimethyl siloxane) on the generation Schallamach waves. This knowledge will be used with polymer patterning processes to fabricate responsive coatings for applications such as anti-fouling coatings. (1)Schallamach, A.;Wear 1971,17, 301-312.

  6. Dynamical Friction on extended perturbers

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2008-01-01

    Following a wave-mechanical treatment we calculate the drag force exerted by an infinite homogeneous background of stars on a perturber as this makes its way through the system. We recover Chandrasekhar's classical dynamical friction (DF) law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. We take into account a range of models that encompasses all plausible density distributions for satellite galaxies by considering the DF exerted on a Plummer sphere and a perturber having a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

  7. Design of Real-Time Gas Emission Tester for Diesel Power Plant Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An sar Suyuti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes design of real-time gas emission tester for diesel power plant applications. Several sensors are utilized in our design system, such as sensor of KE for O2 gas, MQ136 for SO2 gas, TGS 2201 for NOx gas, MQ7 for CO gas, MQ2 for smoke opacity including Modul DT-Sense SHT 11 sensor for temperature and humidity. All sensors basically produce analog output voltage; therefore the analog data is converted to 8 bit digital data for the further processing and controlling in the ADC pin of ATmega16 microcontroller. The real-time measurement results can be monitored through visualization in Liquid Crystal Display (LCD and computer monitor after data processing using microcontroller ATmega16 under programming environment of CodeVision AVR V2.03.4. The visualization itself is designed based on the combination between programming language of Microsoft Visual Basic ver. 6.0 and Borland C++. The experimental results show that the proposed design is working properly. The information related to the emitted gas from plant chimney can be collected, stored in real-time and accessed online through web based interface systems

  8. Appropriate electrode placement site of electric pulp tester for the premolars: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Dinesh Bargale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Electric pulp testers (EPTs are widely used as diagnostic aid in dentistry for dental pulp. This delivers enough current to overcome enamel and dentin resistance and to stimulate the myelinated sensory fibers at the junction of pulp and dentin. Such testing requires the electrode to be in contact with the surface of the tooth, with optimal positions identified for anterior teeth, premolars, and molars. Aims: To determine the best site position of EPT on premolars. The objective of electric pulp testing was to determine the sensibility of each premolar at the lowest sensory response threshold. Settings and Design: Clinical study Materials and Methods: The premolars of 20 patients between 13 and 15 years accompanied with parents, free of restorations, and caries were selected. Five sites on the crown were tested with EPT for minimum of four times. Statistical analysis used: One-way analysis of variance test and the Tukey′s honestly significant difference test. Results: The lowest threshold response was noted at the incisal edge of the tooth; the middle third had a higher threshold among all the different placement of electrode. Statistically significant difference was observed for occlusal surface in terms of region of placement of electrode. Conclusions: This experiment found the best electrode site for pulp testing in premolars. The appropriate EPT site was on the occlusal surface of maxillary and mandibular premolars.

  9. Inter-tester reliability of a new diagnostic classification system for patients with non-specific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tom Erik; Olsen, Steen; Laslett, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Most patients referred to physiotherapy with low back pain are without a precise medical diagnosis. Identification of subgroups of non-specific low back pain patients may improve clinical outcomes and research efficiency. A pathoanatomic classification system has been developed, classifying......% and the kappa coefficient was 0.62 for the mutually exclusive syndromes in the classification system. Agreement rates for each of the syndromes ranged from 74% to 100% and kappa coefficients ranged from 0.44 to 1.00. The findings suggest the inter-tester reliability of the system is acceptable. The relatively...... patients with non-specific low back pain into 12 different syndromes and three subcategories based on history and physical examination. The purpose of this study was to estimate the inter-tester reliability of clinical tests used as criteria for classifying patients. Ninety patients with chronic low back...

  10. MOTIONS STUDY OF A SINGLE CYLINDER HIGH SPEED SPARK IGNITION LINIER ENGINE WITH SPRING SYSTEM AS RETURN CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z.M. Fathallah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A single cylinder two stroke spark ignition conventional engine have been modified to linier engine with spring mechanism. Before develop the design of linear engine is necessary to analysis of motion. Although principle of combustion process in combustion chamber is the same in fact the oscillation movement is different. Simulation technique has been adopted to study both linear and conventional engine. 3D engines model have been simulate of the motion. Due to simulate both engines, three different tools have been used. Solid works has been used to design, assembly and motion analysis of engine models. However, pressure dynamics have been simulating by GT-Power. Spread sheet has been used to optimize geometry of spring. Spring force and friction force are including components of dynamic and gas dynamic models. Three results have been conducted such as comparison in basic motion (displacement, velocity and acceleration between conventional and linear engine, effect spring design on motion of piston movement and effect friction of piston ring and journal bearing on the motion characteristics of linear engine. The simulation shows clear different motion characteristics between conventional and linear engine. The effect of spring design on motion characteristics is very strong. The friction between ring piston with cylinder liner and journal bearing with rod influenced of piston movement. However, it need modified the design of spring mechanism.

  11. ON/OFF POWER SWITCH DAN REMOTE CONTROL BERBASIS MICROCONTROLLER ATMEGA8 SEBAGAI RELIABILITY TESTER CRT DANLCD TV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fina Supegina

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mikrokontroler sebagai suatu terobosan teknologi mikroprosesor dan mikrokomputer, hadir memenuhi kebutuhan pasar dan teknologi baru. Sebagai teknologi baru, yaitu teknologi semikonduktor dengan kandungan transistor yang lebih banyak namun hanya membutuhkan ruang yang lebih kecil serta dapat diproduksi secara masal sehingga harganya menjadi lebih murah (dibandingkan dengan mikroprosesor. Sebagai kebutuhan pasar, mikrokontroler hadir untuk memenuhi selera industri dan para konsumen akan kebutuhan dan keinginan alat-alat bantu yang lebih baik dan canggih. Quality Engineering merupakan bagian dari Departemen Quality Assurance yang melakukan proses studi dan menganalisa semua produk baru sebelum diproduksi secara masal (Mass production dan sebelum dijual ke pasaran lokal maupun ekspor, pada bagian ini dilakukan proses pembelajaran dan penganalisaan secara detail kemampuan komponen pada CRT TV dan LCD TV yang dapat mempengaruhi kinerja dari produk itu sendiri. Disamping itu juga dilakukanlah pengetesan terhadap reliability (ketahanan suatu produk baru ini salah satu dengan cara menghidupkan dan mematikan power switch dan juga melalui remote kontrolnya. Pada saat melakukan pengetesan reliability ini terasa sangat membosankan, melelahkan karena dilakukan secara manual, jadi dengan kondisi seperti ini cukup menyita waktu dan menghambat bagi seorang engineer dalam mempelajari dan menganalisa dari produk baru lebih lanjut. Solusi dari masalah yang ada dihadapi oleh engineer untuk menunjang dan mengetahui kemampuan komponen yang dipakai CRT TV dan LCD TV adalah dengan dibuatnya sebuah alat Reliability Tester Otomatic yang memanfaatkan sebuah IC Mikrokontroler ATmega8 sebagai otak pengendalinya. Dengan adanya sebuah Reliability Tester Otomatic tersebut, dapat mengetahui ketahanan dari produk televisi baik CRT TV juga LCD TV saat dihidupkan dan dimatikan secara berulang-ulang, sebelum dipergunakan oleh konsumen. Efektivitas kerja seorang engineer yang

  12. Application of SimpleTester in MIB Test%SimpleTester在MIB测试中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾定洲; 唐丽莉

    2013-01-01

      随着大家对网络设备易用性要求的提高,人们越来越倾向于完全使用图形化界面的网管系统来完成对设备的管理和维护。而MIB(Management Information Base)作为网管系统管理网络设备的“中间件”,其定义、设计的规范性和标准遵从性也变得越来越重要。传统的MIB测试工具效率低下,文中介绍了一种高效测试工具SimpleTester在MIB测试中的应用,详细介绍了SimpleTester的框架结构以及使用SimpleTester进行MIB测试的一般流程,并通过例子说明了SimpleTest-er能帮忙我们极大地提高测试效率和质量。%With the improved easy-using requirements of network equipment,there is more and more inclined to use graphical network management system to complete the management and maintenance of network element. MIB (Management Information Base) as the "middleware" between network management system and network element,its definition,design specifications and standards compliance is also becoming increasingly important. As the inefficiency of traditional MIB testing tools,introduce an efficient testing tool SimpleTester in MIB test,in detail the framework structure of SimpleTester and general process of how to use SimpleTester in MIB test. In the end,an example is given to illustrate greatly improve the test efficiency and quality with SimpleTester's help.

  13. High-pressure ignition plasma torch for aerospace testing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, D. I.; Kulikov, Yu M.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Son, E. E.

    2016-11-01

    The present paper discusses the issues of implementation of high-pressure ignition plasma torch in terms of discharge phenomena in compressed gases, dense nitrogen plasma properties and stable arcing power requirements. Contact ignition has been tested in a pressure range p = 1-25 bar and has proved to be a reliable solution for pilot arc burning.

  14. Estimating soil organic carbon through loss on ignition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteen, M.J.J.; Lantinga, E.A.; Bakker, E.J.; Groot, J.C.J.; Tittonell, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Loss on ignition (LOI) is one of the most widely used methods for measuring organic matter content in soils but does not have a universal standard protocol. A large number of factors may influence its accuracy, such as furnace type, sample mass, duration and temperature of ignition and clay conte

  15. Boron Particle Ignition in Secondary Chamber of Ducted Rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. X. Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the secondary chamber of ducted rocket, there exists a relative speed between boron particles and air stream. Hence, the ignition laws under static conditions cannot be simply applied to represent the actual ignition process of boron particles, and it is required to study the effect of forced convective on the ignition of boron particles. Preheating of boron particles in gas generator makes it possible to utilize the velocity difference between gas and particles in secondary chamber for removal of the liquid oxide layer with the aid of Stoke's forces. An ignition model of boron particles is formulated for the oxide layer removal by considering that it results from a boundary layer stripping mechanism. The shearing action exerted by the high-speed flow causes a boundary layer to be formed in the surface of the liquid oxide layer, and the stripping away of this layer accounts for the accelerated ignition of boron particles. Compared with the King model, as the ignition model of boron particles is formulated for the oxide layer removal by considering that it results from a boundary layer stripping mechanism, the oxide layer thickness thins at all times during the particle ignition and lower the ignition time.

  16. Hot-wire ignition of AN-based emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Richard; Goldthorp, Sandra; Badeen, Christopher M. [Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0G1 (Canada); Chan, Sek Kwan [Orica Canada Inc., Brownsburg-Chatham, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Emulsions based on ammonium nitrate (AN) and water locally ignited by a heat source do not undergo sustained combustion when the pressure is lower than some threshold value usually called the Minimum Burning Pressure (MBP). This concept is now being used by some manufacturers as a basis of safety. However, before a technique to reliably measure MBP values can be designed, one must have a better understanding of the ignition mechanism. Clearly, this is required to avoid under ignitions which could lead to the erroneous interpretation of failures to ignite as failures to propagate. In the present work, facilities to prepare and characterize emulsions were implemented at the Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory. A calibrated hot-wire ignition system operated in a high-pressure vessel was also built. The system was used to study the ignition characteristics of five emulsion formulations as a function of pressure and ignition source current. It was found that these mixtures exhibit complicated pre-ignition stages and that the appearance of endotherms when the pressure is lowered below some threshold value correlates with the MBP. Thermal conductivity measurements using this hot-wire system are also reported. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1610 - Igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Igniter 6 Figure 6 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1610—Igniter ER20OC08.001...

  18. 49 CFR 392.50 - Ignition of fuel; prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ignition of fuel; prevention. 392.50 Section 392.50 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Fueling Precautions § 392.50 Ignition of fuel; prevention. No driver or...

  19. The lean burn direct injection jet ignition gas engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boretti, Alberto A.; Watson, Harry C. [School of Science and Engineering, University of Ballarat, PO Box 663, Ballarat, Victoria 3353 (Australia)

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents a new in-cylinder mixture preparation and ignition system for various fuels including hydrogen, methane and propane. The system comprises a centrally located direct injection (DI) injector and a jet ignition (JI) device for combustion of the main chamber (MC) mixture. The fuel is injected in the MC with a new generation, fast actuating, high pressure, high flow rate DI injector capable of injection shaping and multiple events. This injector produces a bulk, lean stratified mixture. The JI system uses a second DI injector to inject a small amount of fuel in a small pre-chamber (PC). In the spark ignition (SI) version, a spark plug then ignites a slightly rich mixture. In the auto ignition version, a DI injector injects a small amount of higher pressure fuel in the small PC having a hot glow plug (GP) surface, and the fuel auto ignites in the hot air or when in contact with the hot surface. Either way the MC mixture is then bulk ignited through multiple jets of hot reacting gases. Bulk ignition of the lean, jet controlled, stratified MC mixture resulting from coupling DI with JI makes it possible to burn MC mixtures with fuel to air equivalence ratios reducing almost to zero for a throttle-less control of load diesel-like and high efficiencies over almost the full range of loads. (author)

  20. 33 CFR 159.129 - Safety: Ignition prevention test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety: Ignition prevention test... prevention test. (a) Components of a device that are a potential ignition source in an explosive atmosphere... locations (46 CFR 111.80-5(a)) need not be subjected to this testing....

  1. Study on the ignition process of a segmented plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiuquan; Yu, Deping; Xiang, Yong; Li, Chao; Jiang, Hui; Yao, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Direct current plasma torches have been applied to generate unique sources of thermal energy in many industrial applications. Nevertheless, the successful ignition of a plasma torch is the key process to generate the unique source (plasma jet). However, there has been little study on the underlying mechanism of this key process. A thorough understanding of the ignition process of a plasma torch will be helpful for optimizing the design of the plasma torch structure and selection of the ignition parameters to prolong the service life of the ignition module. Thus, in this paper, the ignition process of a segmented plasma torch (SPT) is theoretically and experimentally modeled and analyzed. Corresponding electrical models of different stages of the ignition process are set up and used to derive the electrical parameters, e.g. the variations of the arc voltage and arc current between the cathode and anode. In addition, the experiments with different ignition parameters on a home-made SPT have been conducted. At the same time, the variations of the arc voltage and arc current have been measured, and used to verify the ones derived in theory and to determine the optimal ignition parameters for a particular SPT.

  2. 33 CFR 183.440 - Secondary circuits of ignition systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Secondary circuits of ignition systems. 183.440 Section 183.440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Requirements § 183.440 Secondary circuits of ignition systems. (a) Each conductor in a secondary circuit of...

  3. Temperature dependent effective friction coefficient estimation in friction stir welding with the bobbin tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović Miroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The friction coefficient in many friction stir welding researches is generally used as an effective, constant value without concern on the adaptable and changeable nature of the friction during welding sequence. This is understandable because the main problem in analyzing friction in friction stir welding are complex nature of the friction processes, case-dependent and time dependent contact between the bodies, influence of the temperature, sliding velocity, etc. This paper is presenting a complex experimental-numerical-analytical model for estimating the effective friction coefficient on contact of the bobbin tool and welding plates during welding, considering the temperature at the contact as the most influencing parameter on friction. The estimation criterion is the correspondence of the experimental temperature and temperature from the numerical model. The estimation procedure is iterative and parametric - the heat transport parameters and friction coefficient are adapted during the estimation procedure in a realistic manner to achieve relative difference between experimental and model’s temperature lower than 3%. The results show that friction coefficient varies from 0.01 to 0.21 for steel-aluminium alloy contact and temperature range from 406°C to 22°C.

  4. PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

    2008-04-24

    The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

  5. Initial assessments of ignition spherical torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Borowski, S.K.; Bussell, G.T.; Dalton, G.R.; Gorker, G.E.; Haines, J.R.; Hamilton, W.R.; Kalsi, S.S.; Lee, V.D.; Miller, J.B.

    1985-12-01

    Initial assessments of ignition spherical tori suggest that they can be highly cost effective and exceptionally small in unit size. Assuming advanced methods of current drive to ramp up the plasma current (e.g., via lower hybrid wave at modest plasma densities and temperatures), the inductive solenoid can largely be eliminated. Given the uncertainties in plasma energy confinement times and the effects of strong paramagnetism on plasma pressure, and allowing for the possible use of high-strength copper alloys (e.g., C-17510, Cu-Ni-Be alloy), ignition spherical tori with a 50-s burn are estimated to have major radii ranging from 1.0 to 1.6 m, aspect ratios from 1.4 to 1.7, vacuum toroidal fields from 2 to 3 T, plasma currents from 10 to 19 MA, and fusion power from 50 to 300 MW. Because of its modest field strength and simple poloidal field coil configuration, only conventional engineering approaches are needed in the design. A free-standing toroidal field coil/vacuum vessel structure is assessed to be feasible and relatively independent of the shield structure and the poloidal field coils. This exceptionally simple configuration depends significantly, however, on practical fabrication approaches of the center conductor post, about which there is presently little experience. 19 refs.

  6. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

  7. Scheduling Semiconductor Multihead Testers Using Metaheuristic Techniques Embedded with Lot-Specific and Configuration-Specific Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Feng Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the semiconductor back-end manufacturing, the device test central processing unit (CPU is most costly and is typically the bottleneck machine at the test plant. A multihead tester contains a CPU and several test heads, each of which can be connected to a handler that processes one lot of the same device. The residence time of a lot is closely related to the product mix on test heads, which increases the complexity of this problem. It is critical for the test scheduling problem to reduce CPU's idle time and to increase tester utilization. In this paper, a multihead tester scheduling problem is formulated as an identical parallel machine scheduling problem with the objective of minimizing makespan. A heuristic grouping method is developed to obtain a good initial solution in a short time. Three metaheuristic techniques, using lot-specific and configuration-specific information, are proposed to receive a near-optimum and are compared to traditional approaches. Computational experiments show that a tabu search with lot-specific information outperforms all other competing approaches.

  8. Thermal activation in boundary lubricated friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, P.C. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rabinowicz, E. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Iwasa, Y. [Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab. and Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The friction coefficients for copper pairs lubricated with fatty acids and fluorinated fatty acids have been measured over a wide range of sliding speeds and temperatures. Sliding speeds in the range 10{sup -7}-10{sup -2} m s{sup -1} and temperatures in the range 4.2-300 K were used. The friction coefficients near 300 K are generally low and increase with sliding speed, while the friction coefficients at low temperatures are markedly higher and relatively independent of velocity. Each lubricant`s friction vs. velocity behavior over the temperature range 150-300 K can be described by a friction-velocity master curve derived from a thermal activation model for the lubricant`s shear strength. The activation energies deduced from this friction model are identical to those obtained in the same temperature range for a vibrational mode associated with low temperature mechanical relaxations in similarly structured polymers. These results suggest that thermally activated interfacial shear is responsible for the fatty acids` positive-sloped friction vs. velocity characteristics at low sliding speeds near room temperature. (orig.)

  9. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading.

  10. Assessment of semi-active friction dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Braga; Coelho, Humberto Tronconi; Lepore Neto, Francisco Paulo; Mafhoud, Jarir

    2017-09-01

    The use of friction dampers has been widely proposed for a variety of mechanical systems for which applying viscoelastic materials, fluid based dampers or other viscous dampers is impossible. An important example is the application of friction dampers in aircraft engines to reduce the blades' vibration amplitudes. In most cases, friction dampers have been studied in a passive manner, but significant improvements can be achieved by controlling the normal force in the contact region. The aim of this paper is to present and study five control strategies for friction dampers based on three different hysteresis cycles by using the Harmonic Balance Method (HBM), a numerical and experimental analysis. The first control strategy uses the friction force as a resistance when the system is deviating from its equilibrium position. The second control strategy maximizes the energy removal in each harmonic oscillation cycle by calculating the optimal normal force based on the last displacement peak. The third control strategy combines the first strategy with the homogenous modulation of the friction force. Finally, the last two strategies attempt to predict the system's movement based on its velocity and acceleration and our knowledge of its physical properties. Numerical and experimental studies are performed with these five strategies, which define the performance metrics. The experimental testing rig is fully identified and its parameters are used for numerical simulations. The obtained results show the satisfactory performance of the friction damper and selected strategy and the suitable agreement between the numerical and experimental results.

  11. Friction and wear characteristics of Al-Cu/C composites synthesized using partial liquid phase casting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, W.B.; Gupta, M.; Lim, S.C. [Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore (Singapore)

    1997-10-01

    During the sliding of aluminium alloys dispersed with graphite particulates, a layer of graphite is usually present at the sliding interface. This tribo-layer significantly reduces the amount of direct metal-to-metal contact, giving rise to low friction and a low rate of wear, making these composites useful candidate materials for anti-friction applications. Such self-lubricating composites are commonly fabricated via the squeeze casting, slurry casting or powder metallurgy route. These processes are expensive while the less-expensive conventional casting route is limited by the agglomeration of graphite particles in the composites, giving rise to poor mechanical properties. In this work, graphite particulate-reinforced Al-4.5 wt.% Cu composites with two effective graphite contents (Al-4.5 Cu/4.2 wt.% C and Al-4.5 Cu/6.8 wt.% C) were synthesized through an innovative partial liquid phase casting (rheocasting) technique, which is a modification of the conventional casting process. Unlubricated (without the use of conventional liquid lubrication) friction and wear performance of these composites as well as the un-reinforced aluminium alloy was determined using a pin-on-disk tester. The results revealed that the graphite-reinforced composites have a higher wear rate than the un-reinforced matrix alloy while their frictional characteristics are very similar within the range of testing conditions. Combining these with the information gathered from worn-surface examinations and wear-debris analysis, it is suggested that there exists a certain threshold for the amount and size of graphite particulates in these composites to enable them to have improved tribological properties. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, L. J.

    2008-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>108 K), pressures (10 GBar) and matter densities (>100 g/cm3). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. The targets for the NIC are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. The DT fuel is contained in a 2-millimeter-diameter graded copper/beryllium or CH shell. The 75-μm-thick cryogenic ice DT fuel layer is formed to sub-micron uniformity at a temperature of approximately 18 Kelvin. The capsule and its fuel layer sit at the center of a gold/depleted uranium 'cocktail' hohlraum. Researchers at LLNL have teamed with colleagues at General Atomics to lead the development of the technologies, engineering design and manufacturing infrastructure necessary to produce these demanding targets. We are also collaborating with colleagues at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester in DT layering, and at Fraunhofer in Germany in nano-crystalline diamond as an alternate ablator to Beryllium and CH. The Beryllium capsules and cocktail hohlraums are made by physical vapor deposition onto sacrificial mandrels. These coatings must have high density (low porosity), uniform microstructure, low oxygen content and low permeability. The ablator

  13. Ignition Dynamic Parameters for Coke in Cement Calciners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The mathematical ignition model was established and researches of ignition dynamic parameters for coke in some typical coal samples from cement plants was carried out according to circumstances of coal combusted in cement plants.In order to get the ignitioin temperature Tpi of carbon particles more accurately,the temperature rising experimental method was used and the actual heating circumstances for pulverized coal in calciners(in cement plants)were also considered.With this method,the accurate determination of the ignition temperature of coke in coal was achieved,so as to get some ignition dynamic parameters.These research results provide a theoretical basis for investigating coal ignition characteristics more scientifically and more accurately.

  14. Ignition of magnetic deflagration in Mn12 acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Sean; Jaafar, R.; Sarachik, M. P.; Myasoedov, Y.; Finkler, A.; Shtrikman, H.; Zeldov, E.; Bagai, R.; Christou, G.

    2008-03-01

    We study the conditions for the ignition of two types of magnetic avalanches in the molecular magnet Mn12-acetate corresponding to the major species and a fast-relaxing minor species. The minor component, which has a lower anisotropy barrier, exists in these crystals at the level of 5-7%. The ignition temperatures are measured using small (30 x30 μm^2) Ge thermometers. In addition, the magnetization dynamics are measured using an array of Hall sensors of comparable size. Various aspects of the ignition will be discussed, including: the reduction of the ignition threshold due to quantum tunneling, the catalytic effect of the minor species, and the shift of the ignition point as a function of external magnetic field. The work at City College was supported by NSF grant DMR-00451605. E. Z. acknowledges the support of the Israel Ministry of Science, Culture and Sports. Support for G. C. was provided by NSF grant CHE-0414555.

  15. Standard Molded Composite Rocket Pyrogen Igniter - A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy, M. H.

    1978-01-01

    The pyrogen igniter has the function to furnish a controlled, high temperature, high pressure gas to ignite solid propellant surfaces in a rocket motor. Present pyrogens consist of numerous inert components. The Standard Molded Pyrogen Igniter (SMPI) consists of three basic parts, a cap with several integrally molded features, an ignition pellet retainer plate, and a tube with additional integrally molded features. A description is presented of an investigation which indicates that the SMPI concept is a viable approach to the design and manufacture of pyrogen igniters for solid propellant rocket motors. For some applications, combining the structural and thermal properties of molded composites can result in the manufacture of lighter assemblies at considerable cost reduction. It is demonstrated that high strength, thin walled tubes with high length to diameter ratios can be fabricated from reinforced plastic molding compound using the displacement compression process.

  16. Assessment of Potential for Ion Driven Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, B. Grant; Bangerter, Roger O.; Callahan, Debra A.; Tabak,Max; Roth, Markus; Perkins, L. John; Caporaso, George

    2005-05-01

    Critical issues and ion beam requirements are explored for fast ignition using ion beams to provide fuel compression using indirect drive and to provide separate short pulse ignition heating using direct drive. Several ion species with different hohlraum geometries are considered for both accelerator-produced and laser-produced ion ignition beams. Ion-driven fast ignition targets are projected to have modestly higher gains than with conventional heavy-ion fusion, and may offer some other advantages for target fabrication and for use of advanced fuels. However, much more analysis and experiments are needed before conclusions can be drawn regarding the feasibility for meeting the ion beam transverse and longitudinal emittances, focal spots, pulse lengths, and target stand-off distances required for ion-driven fast ignition.

  17. Assessment of Potential for Ion Driven Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, B. Grant; Bangerter, Roger O.; Callahan, Debra A.; Tabak, Max; Roth, Markus; Perkins, L. John; Caporaso, George

    2004-12-01

    Critical issues and ion beam requirements are explored for fast ignition using ion beams to provide fuel compression using indirect drive and to provide separate short pulse ignition heating using direct drive. Several ion species with different hohlraum geometries are considered for both accelerator-produced and laser-produced ion ignition beams. Ion-driven fast ignition targets are projected to have modestly higher gains than with conventional heavy-ion fusion, and may offer some other advantages for target fabrication and for use of advanced fuels. However, much more analysis and experiments are needed before conclusions can be drawn regarding the feasibility for meeting the ion beam transverse and longitudinal emittances, focal spots, pulse lengths, and target standoff distances required for ion-driven fast ignition.

  18. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  19. An inquiry-based laboratory on friction

    CERN Document Server

    Montalbano, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Sliding friction is usually introduced in high school, but rarely through activities in laboratory. A qualitative introduction to friction is presented by proposing exploration of different kind of materials in order to suggest which aspects can be relevant and which interaction is involved. Different quantitative experiments are proposed for studying Leonardo's laws for friction. The learning path was tested with two high school classes during an instruction trip at department. Students were engaged in the inquiry-based introductory activity and seemed to realize with care the measurements. However, the analysis of their reports shows some learning difficulties.

  20. Methods and Devices used to Measure Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, Jack; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2004-01-01

    The physical condition at the work-piece/die boundary, in both bulk forming and sheet forming is, arguably, the single most important physical parameter influencing the processing of metals, yet it remains the least understood. Hence the need for basic research into metal-die interface mechanisms....... To gain a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure friction-stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods, which have...

  1. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander M.; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    Ionic liquids, salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions, are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition.

  2. Forming of aluminium alloy friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating, through analytical models, numerical models and experiments, the effect of the warm deformation phase, realised with an in temperature upsetting, on the weld previously performed by friction stir lap welding on aluminium alloy blanks. The investigation allows to show the deformation zones after upsetting that determine the homogenisation of the weld section. The analytical model allows to relate the friction factor with the upsetting load. The presence on the weld of not elevated friction factor values determines the deformation and localisation levels very useful for the weld. Such methodology allows to improve the weld itself with the forming phase.

  3. Study on the Friction Coefficient in Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The friction between the abrasive grains and workpi ec e is a crutial factor determining the main grinding output. Few studies have bee n carried out investigating the values of the friction coefficient in grinding, due to the difficulty of direct measurement. In this paper, a mathematical model of the friction coefficient in grinding has been established with the aid of a new grinding parameter C ge, which has close relations to wheel wear rate Z s, metal removal rate Z w, specific energy u and gr...

  4. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander M; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    2013-10-07

    Ionic liquids - salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions - are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition.

  5. Laser Ignition of pyrotechnics - effects of wavelength, composition and confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Sheikh Rafi; Russell, David Anthony [Department of Environmental and Ordnance Systems, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science, Shrivenham, Swindon, Wiltshire SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    Ignition tests were carried out using three different laser systems and three different pyrotechnic compositions. Pyrotechnic materials investigated are: sulfur/charcoal/potassium nitrate based composition (gunpowder, GP), Shellac binder-based boron/potassium nitrate composition (SR 44) and acaroid resin binder based magnesium/potassium nitrate composition (SR 371C). The laser sources were the multimode output from an Ar-ion laser ({lambda}=500 nm average), a high-power commercial diode laser ({lambda}=784 nm) and a small laser diode operating at around the same wavelength but controlled by a customized electronic circuitry. Lasers operating in the visible wavelength range provided more reproducible and quicker ignition than the infrared output from the diode lasers. It was found that unconfined gunpowder exhibits more reproducible ignition for both the visible and the infrared wavelengths compared to the other two compositions. The composition based on magnesium, SR 371C appeared to be very sensitive to laser intensity variations and gave erratic and therefore, irreproducible ignition delay times. The threshold laser energies to initiate reproducible ignition for the different wavelengths were measured and ignition maps were constructed. From these maps, the required laser power density for any value of the ignition delay time, i.e. laser energy density was determined. Tests were also conducted on gunpowder samples, partially confined in a modified pyrogen igniter capsule and a small laser diode. The diode was operated in single pulse mode using a current surge, which was much higher than the recommended value for CW operation. This provided 1 W pulses at the end of a 1 mm diameter fiber optic cable and caused reproducible ignition in the semi-confined pyrotechnic bed within the capsule. The threshold ignition energy under semi-confined conditions was found to be substantially less than that required in the unconfined environment under similar experimental

  6. Polar direct drive: Proof-of-principle experiments on OMEGA and prospects for ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craxton, R.S.; Marshall, F.J.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; McKenty, P.W.; Skupsky, S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.W.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.

    2005-04-15

    Polar direct drive (PDD) shows promise for achieving direct-drive ignition while the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is initially configured for indirect drive. Experiments have been carried out using 40 repointed beams of the 60-beam OMEGA laser system to approximate the NIF PDD configuration.

  7. Determination of the relative resistance to ignition of selected turbopump materials in high-pressure, high-temperature, oxygen environments, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Benz, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in the design of the liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen engines for the Space Transportation System call for the use of warm, high-pressure oxygen as the driving gas in the liquid oxygen turbopump. The NASA Lewis Research Center requested the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to design a test program to determine the relative resistance to ignition of nine selected turbopump materials: Hastelloy X, Inconel 600, Invar 36, Monel K-500, nickel 200, silicon carbide, stainless steel 316, and zirconium copper. The materials were subjected to particle impact and to frictional heating in high-pressure oxygen.

  8. High friction and low wear properties of laser-textured ceramic surface under dry friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Youqiang; Deng, Jianxin; Wu, Ze; Wu, Fengfang

    2017-08-01

    Two kinds of grooved textures with different spacing were fabricated on Al2O3/TiC ceramic surface by an Nd:YAG laser. The dry tribological properties of the textured samples were investigated by carrying out unidirectional rotary sliding friction and wear tests using a ball-on-disk tribometer. Results show that the laser textured samples exhibit higher friction coefficient and excellent wear resistance compared with the smooth sample under dry friction conditions. Furthermore, the texture morphology and spacing have a significant influence on the tribological properties. The sample with small texture spacing may be beneficial to increasing the friction coefficient, and the wavy-grooved sample exhibits the highest friction coefficient and shallowest wear depth. The increasing friction coefficient and anti-wear properties are attributed to the combined effects of the increased surface roughness, reduced real contact area, micro-cutting effect by the texture edges and entrapment of wear debris.

  9. Frictional torque numbers for ball cup and journal bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Plastic bearing material wears in ball cup and journal bearings. Contact areas in the ball cup and the journal bearing increase. The frictional torque needed to rotate the ball or journal also increases. When the coefficient of friction is assumed to be constant during wearing out, the frictional torque increases to a maximum of 1.273 times the frictional torque at zero wear.

  10. CFD Simulation of Gasoline Compression Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodavasal, Janardhan; Kolodziej, Christopher P.; Ciatti, Stephen A.; Som, Sibendu

    2015-05-01

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is a low temperature combustion (LTC) concept that has been gaining increasing interest over the recent years owing to its potential to achieve diesel-like thermal efficiencies with significantly reduced engine-out nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot emissions compared to diesel engines. In this work, closed-cycle computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are performed of this combustion mode using a sector mesh in an effort to understand effects of model settings on simulation results. One goal of this work is to provide recommendations for grid resolution, combustion model, chemical kinetic mechanism, and turbulence model to accurately capture experimental combustion characteristics. Grid resolutions ranging from 0.7 mm to 0.1 mm minimum cell sizes were evaluated in conjunction with both Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) based turbulence models. Solution of chemical kinetics using the multi-zone approach is evaluated against the detailed approach of solving chemistry in every cell. The relatively small primary reference fuel (PRF) mechanism (48 species) used in this study is also evaluated against a larger 312-species gasoline mechanism. Based on these studies the following model settings are chosen keeping in mind both accuracy and computation costs – 0.175 mm minimum cell size grid, RANS turbulence model, 48-species PRF mechanism, and multi-zone chemistry solution with bin limits of 5 K in temperature and 0.05 in equivalence ratio. With these settings, the performance of the CFD model is evaluated against experimental results corresponding to a low load start of injection (SOI) timing sweep. The model is then exercised to investigate the effect of SOI on combustion phasing with constant intake valve closing (IVC) conditions and fueling over a range of SOI timings to isolate the impact of SOI on charge preparation and ignition. Simulation results indicate that there is an optimum SOI

  11. Design and construction of a tensile tester for the testing of simple composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Mark A.; Spiegel, F. Xavier

    1994-01-01

    The following is a design for a tensile tester which will be used to test the tensile strength and anisotropic properties of simple composites. These simple composites are suspected to be anisotropic primarily in a single plane. When the composites undergo a tensile force, they will undergo deformation, causing movement either to the left or right. The composites are suspect due to their method of construction. Each sample has a single layer of unidirectional continuous fibers embedded in a rubbery resin. It has been well established that a serious limitation of unidirectional fiber composites is the very large in-plane anisotropy. The design presented here incorporates a single degree of freedom such that distortion (to the left or right) due to anisotropic tendencies may be measured. The device will spend the vast majority of its time in an undergraduate materials lab. As a result, ease of use and durability are valued more highly than research grade accuracy. Additional concerns focus on the fact that this machine will be built as a student project. Issues which are dealt with during this design include: specimen configuration or shape; a method of applying consistent, linear tension force; a method of gripping specimen without affecting its overall properties; a method of collecting data; repeatability of data; ease of use; ease of construction; and cost. After the device has been constructed, it will be used to test the simple composites which were fabricated in house. A comparison will be made between composites manufactured using aluminum screening as the strengthening fibers and those manufactured using fiberglass screening.

  12. Preparing for polar-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenty P.W.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of polar drive (PD at the National Ignition Facility (NIF will enable the execution of direct-drive implosions while the facility is configured for x-ray drive. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE, in collaboration with LLNL, LANL and GA, is implementing PD on the NIF. LLE has designed and participates in the use of PD implosions for diagnostic commissioning on the NIF. LLE has an active experimental campaign to develop PD in both warm and cryogenic target experiments on OMEGA. LLE and its partners are developing a Polar Drive Project Execution Plan, which will provide a detailed outline of the requirements, resources, and timetable leading to PD-ignition experiments on the NIF.

  13. Design and modeling of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D.; Suter, L.J.; Berger, R.L.; Powers, L.V.; Alley, W.E.; Amendt, P.A.; Futterman, J.A.; Levedahl, W.K.; Rosen, M.D.; Rowley, D.P.; Sacks, R.A.; Shestakov, A.I.; Strobel, G.L.; Tabak, M.; Weber, S.V.; Zimmerman, G.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Krauser, W.J.; Wilson, D.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Harris, D.B.; Hoffman, N.M.; Wilde, B.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Several targets are described that in simulations give yields of 1--30 MJ when indirectly driven by 0.9--2 MJ of 0.35 {mu}m laser light. The article describes the targets, the modeling that was used to design them, and the modeling done to set specifications for the laser system in the proposed National Ignition Facility. Capsules with beryllium or polystyrene ablators are enclosed in gold hohlraums. All the designs utilize a cryogenic fuel layer; it is very difficult to achieve ignition at this scale with a noncryogenic capsule. It is necessary to use multiple bands of illumination in the hohlraum to achieve sufficiently uniform x-ray irradiation, and to use a low-{ital Z} gas fill in the hohlraum to reduce filling of the hohlraum with gold plasma. Critical issues are hohlraum design and optimization, Rayleigh--Taylor instability modeling, and laser--plasma interactions.

  14. Surface defects and temperature on atomic friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, O Y; Mazo, J J, E-mail: yovany@unizar.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-09-07

    We present a theoretical study of the effect of surface defects on atomic friction in the stick-slip dynamical regime of a minimalistic model. We focus on how the presence of defects and temperature change the average properties of the system. We have identified two main mechanisms which modify the mean friction force of the system when defects are considered. As expected, defects change the potential profile locally and thus affect the friction force. But the presence of defects also changes the probability distribution function of the tip slip length and thus the mean friction force. We corroborated both effects for different values of temperature, external load, dragging velocity and damping. We also show a comparison of the effects of surface defects and surface disorder on the dynamics of the system. (paper)

  15. Shell Galaxies, Dynamical Friction, and Dwarf Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrova, Ivana; Canalizo, Gabriela; Bennert, Nicola; Jilkova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    Using N-body simulations of shell galaxies created in nearly radial minor mergers, we investigate the error of collision dating, resulting from the neglect of dynamical friction and of gradual disruption of the cannibalized dwarf.

  16. Frictional Sliding without Geometrical Reflection Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldam, Michael; Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A.; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces plays an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism, and rupture directionality. In contrast, it is traditionally assumed that interfaces separating identical materials do not feature such a coupling because of symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces that separate bodies made of macroscopically identical materials but lack geometrical reflection symmetry generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct, and previously unexplained, experimentally observed weakening effect in frictional cracks. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding, which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applications in a broad range of systems.

  17. Frictional sliding with geometrically broken reflection symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Aldam, Michael; Svetlizky, Ilya; Brener, Efim A; Fineberg, Jay; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of frictional interfaces play an important role in many physical systems spanning a broad range of scales. It is well-known that frictional interfaces separating two dissimilar materials couple interfacial slip and normal stress variations, a coupling that has major implications on their stability, failure mechanism and rupture directionality. In contrast, interfaces separating identical materials are traditionally assumed not to feature such a coupling due to symmetry considerations. We show, combining theory and experiments, that interfaces which separate bodies made of identical materials, but lack geometric reflection symmetry, generically feature such a coupling. We discuss two applications of this novel feature. First, we show that it accounts for a distinct and previously unexplained weakening effect in frictional cracks observed experimentally. Second, we demonstrate that it can destabilize frictional sliding which is otherwise stable. The emerging framework is expected to find applicatio...

  18. Permeability equipment for porous friction surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standiford, D. L.; Graul, R. A.; Lenke, L. R.

    1985-04-01

    Hydroplaning is the loss of traction between tires and pavement due to the presence of a layer of water. This loss of traction can result in loss of vehicle control. A porous friction surface (PFS) applied over an existing pavement permits the water to drain laterally and vertically away from the tire path, effectively lowering hydroplaning potential. Equipment used to measure pavement drainage (permeability) is discussed with respect to usage on porous friction surface. Background information on hydroplaning, flow theory, and PFS field performance as they are affected by permeability are also presented. Two dynamic test devices and four static devices are considered for measuring PFS permeability. Permeability tests are recommended to measure PFS permeability for maintenance purposes and construction control. Dynamic devices cited could possibly estimate hydroplaning potential; further research must be done to determine this. Permeability devices cannot be used to accurately estimate friction of a pavement surface, however, decreased permeability of a pavement infers a decrease in friction.

  19. Torque Control of Friction Stir Welding Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC and Vanderbilt University propose the innovation of torque control of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement to force control of...

  20. Transient effects in friction fractal asperity creep

    CERN Document Server

    Goedecke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Transient friction effects determine the behavior of a wide class of mechatronic systems. Classic examples are squealing brakes, stiction in robotic arms, or stick-slip in linear drives. To properly design and understand mechatronic systems of this type, good quantitative models of transient friction effects are of primary interest. The theory developed in this book approaches this problem bottom-up, by deriving the behavior of macroscopic friction surfaces from the microscopic surface physics. The model is based on two assumptions: First, rough surfaces are inherently fractal, exhibiting roughness on a wide range of scales. Second, transient friction effects are caused by creep enlargement of the real area of contact between two bodies. This work demonstrates the results of extensive Finite Element analyses of the creep behavior of surface asperities, and proposes a generalized multi-scale area iteration for calculating the time-dependent real contact between two bodies. The toolset is then demonstrated both...

  1. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  2. Composites materials for friction and braking application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciun, A. L.; Pinca-Bretotean, C.; Birtok-Băneasă, C.; Josan, A.

    2017-05-01

    The brake pads are an important component in the braking system of automotive. Materials used for brake pads should have stable and reliable frictional and wear properties under varying conditions of load, velocity, temperature and high durability. These factors must be satisfied simultaneously which makes it difficult to select effective brake pads material. The paper presents the results of the study for characterisation of the friction product used for automotive brake pads. In the study it was developed four frictional composites by using different percentages of coconut fibres (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%) reinforcement in aluminium matrix. The new composites tested in the laboratory, modelling appropriate percentage ratio between matrix and reinforcement volume and can be obtained with low density, high hardness properties, good thermal stability, higher ability to hold the compressive force and have a stable friction coefficient. These characteristics make them useful in automotive industry.

  3. Friction and friction-generated temperature at a polymer-metal interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Burks, H. D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of friction and thermal tests of molded polyimide and pyrrone polymers are presented. The coefficient of sliding friction up to surface velocities of 2 m/sec and the coefficient of thermal expansion from 300 to 500 K were measured. An apparatus was constructed to measure simultaneously the coefficient of sliding friction and the friction-generated temperature. Measurements were made at a nominal pressure-velocity product of 0.25 MN/msec and at temperatures between 300 and 500 K.

  4. Sliding without slipping under Coulomb friction: opening waves and inversion of frictional force

    CERN Document Server

    Yastrebov, Vladislav A

    2015-01-01

    An elastic layer slides on a rigid flat governed by Coulomb's friction law. We demonstrate that if the coefficient of friction is high enough, the sliding localizes within stick-slip pulses, which transform into opening waves propagating at intersonic speed in the direction of sliding or, for high Poisson's ratios, at supersonic speed in the opposite one. This sliding mode, characterized by small frictional dissipation, rapidly relaxes the shear elastic energy via stress waves and enables the contact surface slide ahead of the top one, resulting in inversion of the frictional force direction.

  5. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  6. Application of Alcohols to Dual - Fuel Feeding the Spark-Ignition and Self-Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelmasiak Zdzisław

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns analysis of possible use of alcohols for the feeding of self - ignition and spark-ignition engines operating in a dual- fuel mode, i.e. simultaneously combusting alcohol and diesel oil or alcohol and petrol. Issues associated with the requirements for application of bio-fuels were presented with taking into account National Index Targets, bio-ethanol production methods and dynamics of its production worldwide and in Poland. Te considerations are illustrated by results of the tests on spark- ignition and self- ignition engines fed with two fuels: petrol and methanol or diesel oil and methanol, respectively. Te tests were carried out on a 1100 MPI Fiat four- cylinder engine with multi-point injection and a prototype collector fitted with additional injectors in each cylinder. Te other tested engine was a SW 680 six- cylinder direct- injection diesel engine. Influence of a methanol addition on basic operational parameters of the engines and exhaust gas toxicity were analyzed. Te tests showed a favourable influence of methanol on combustion process of traditional fuels and on some operational parameters of engines. An addition of methanol resulted in a distinct rise of total efficiency of both types of engines at maintained output parameters (maximum power and torque. In the same time a radical drop in content of hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides in exhaust gas was observed at high shares of methanol in feeding dose of ZI (petrol engine, and 2-3 fold lower smokiness in case of ZS (diesel engine. Among unfavourable phenomena, a rather insignificant rise of CO and NOx content for ZI engine, and THC and NOx - for ZS engine, should be numbered. It requires to carry out further research on optimum control parameters of the engines. Conclusions drawn from this work may be used for implementation of bio-fuels to feeding the combustion engines.

  7. Flexible Friction Stir Joining Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lim, Yong Chae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mahoney, Murray [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Larsen, Steve [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Steel, Russel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fleck, Dale [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Babb, Jon [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Higgins, Paul [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States)

    2015-07-23

    Reported herein is the final report on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) project with industry cost-share that was jointly carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (ExxonMobil), and MegaStir Technologies (MegaStir). The project was aimed to advance the state of the art of friction stir welding (FSW) technology, a highly energy-efficient solid-state joining process, for field deployable, on-site fabrications of large, complex and thick-sectioned structures of high-performance and high-temperature materials. The technology innovations developed herein attempted to address two fundamental shortcomings of FSW: 1) the inability for on-site welding and 2) the inability to weld thick section steels, both of which have impeded widespread use of FSW in manufacturing. Through this work, major advance has been made toward transforming FSW technology from a “specialty” process to a mainstream materials joining technology to realize its pervasive energy, environmental, and economic benefits across industry.

  8. Linearization of friction effects in vibration of two rotating blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of friction effects in blade shrouding which are realized by means of friction elements placed between blades. In order to develop a methodology of modelling, two blades with one friction element in between are considered only. Flexible blades fixed to a rotating disc are discretized by FEM using 1D Rayleigh beam elements derived in rotating space as well as the friction element modelled as a rigid body. The blades and the friction element are connected through two concurrent friction planes, where the friction forces arise on the basis of centrifugal force acting on the friction element. The linearization of friction is performed using the harmonic balance method to determine equivalent damping coefficients in dependence on the amplitudes of relative slip motion between the blades and the friction element. The methodology is applied to a model of two real blades and will be extended for the whole bladed disc with shrouding.

  9. Comparisons of friction models in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    A friction model is one of the key input boundary conditions in finite element simulations. It is said that the friction model plays an important role in controlling the accuracy of necessary output results predicted. Among the various friction models, which one is of higher accuracy is still...... unknown and controversial. In this paper, finite element analyses applying five different friction models to experiments of upsetting of AA 6082 lubricated with four lubricants are presented. Frictional parameter values are determined by fitness of data of friction area ratio from finite element analysis...... to experimental results. It is found that calibration curves of the friction area ratio for all of the five chosen friction models used in the finite element simulation do fit the experimental results. Usually, calbration curves of the friction area ratio are more sensitive to friction at the tool...

  10. Comparing numerically exact and modelled static friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krengel Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there exists no mechanically consistent “numerically exact” implementation of static and dynamic Coulomb friction for general soft particle simulations with arbitrary contact situations in two or three dimension, but only along one dimension. We outline a differential-algebraic equation approach for a “numerically exact” computation of friction in two dimensions and compare its application to the Cundall-Strack model in some test cases.

  11. THE FRICTION OF QUARTZ IN HIGH VACUUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    the effects of surface cleanliness . Ultra-high vacuums (to 10 to the minus 10th power torr) and high temperatures (to 350 deg C) were combined with...chemical cleaning and careful handling techniques to produce the maximum surface cleanliness . The coefficient of static friction under varying...on 30-40 mesh glass balls. The coefficient of friction of smooth quartz was found to vary from 0.1 to 1.0 depending on the surface cleanliness . The

  12. Status Of The National Ignition Campaign And National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L; Brunton, G; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Fisher, J; Fishler, B; Ludwigsen, P; Marshall, C; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Townsend, S

    2011-03-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that will contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an object-oriented, CORBA-based system distributed among over 1800 frontend processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. In the fall of 2010, a set of experiments began with deuterium and tritium filled targets as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). At present, all 192 laser beams routinely fire to target chamber center to conduct fusion and high energy density experiments. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of cryogenic target system and over 20 diagnostic systems to support fusion experiments were deployed and utilized in experiments in the past year. This talk discusses the current status of the NIC and the plan for controls and information systems to support these experiments on the path to ignition.

  13. Auto-Ignition and Heat Release Correlations for Controlled Auto-Ignition Combustion in Gasoline Engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Auto-ignition and heat release correlations for controlled auto-ignition (CAI) combustion were derived from extensive in-cylinder pressure data of a four-stroke gasoline engine operating in CAI combustion mode. Abundant experiments were carried out under a wide range of air/fuel ratio,speed and residual gas fraction to ensure that the combustion correlations can be used in the entire CAI engine operation range. Furthermore, a more accurate method to compute the residual gas fraction was proposed by calculating the working fluid temperature at the exhaust valve close timing in the experiments. The heat release correlation was described in two parts, one is for the first slower heat release process at low temperature, and the other is for the second faster heat release process at high temperature. Finally the heat release correlation was evaluated on the single cylinder gasoline engine running with CAI combustion by comparing the experimental data with the 1-D engine simulation results obtained with the aid of the GT-Power simulation program. The results show that the predicted loads and ignition timings match closely with the measurements.

  14. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  15. Electrical Arc Ignition Testing of Spacesuit Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah; Gallus, Tim; Tapia, Susana; Ball, Elizabeth; Beeson, Harold

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on electrical arc ignition testing of spacesuit materials is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Test Objectives; 3) Test Sample Materials; 4) Test Methods; 5) Scratch Test Objectives; 6) Cotton Scratch Test Video; 7) Scratch Test Results; 8) Entire Date Plot; 9) Closeup Data Plot; 10) Scratch Test Problems; 11) Poke Test Objectives; 12) Poke Test Results; 13) Poke Test Problems; 14) Wire-break Test Objectives; 15) Cotton Wire-Break Test Video; 16) High Speed Cotton Wire-break Test Video; 17) Typical Data Plot; 18) Closeup Data Plot; 19) Wire-break Test Results; 20) Wire-break Tests vs. Scratch Tests; 21) Urethane-coated Nylon; and 22) Moleskin.

  16. Construction Safety for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predmore, R

    2000-09-01

    This Construction Safety Program (CSP) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and guidelines that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment. Appendix A, a separate companion document, includes further applicable environmental, safety, and health requirements for the NIF Project. Specifically this document: {sm_bullet} Defines the fundamental site safety philosophy, {sm_bullet} Identifies management roles and responsibilities, {sm_bullet} Defines core safety management processes, {sm_bullet} Identifies LLNL institutional requirements, and {sm_bullet} Defines the functional areas and facilities accrued by the program and the process for transition of facilities, functional areas, and/or systems from construction to activation. Anyone willfully or thoughtlessly disregarding standards will be subject to immediate removal from the site. Thorough job planning will help ensure that these standards are met.

  17. The Oxidation and Ignition of Jet Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    12 3.2.1 Three-Arrhenius model……………………………………………………. 12 3.2.2 Global reduced model……………………………………………… …….. 13 3.3. CO...oxidation. Species time- histories , on the other hand, can indicate the extent of reaction at all DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public...ignition delay times and CO time histories during fuel oxidation. The shock tube and mixing vessel can be heated up to 200 ̊ C to allow gas-phase

  18. National Ignition Facility Target Design and Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R C; Kozioziemski, B J; Nikroo, A; Wilkens, H L; Bhandarkar, S; Forsman, A C; Haan, S W; Hoppe, M L; Huang, H; Mapoles, E; Moody, J D; Sater, J D; Seugling, R M; Stephens, R B; Takagi, M; Xu, H W

    2007-12-10

    The current capsule target design for the first ignition experiments at the NIF Facility beginning in 2009 will be a copper-doped beryllium capsule, roughly 2 mm in diameter with 160-{micro}m walls. The capsule will have a 75-{micro}m layer of solid DT on the inside surface, and the capsule will driven with x-rays generated from a gold/uranium cocktail hohlraum. The design specifications are extremely rigorous, particularly with respect to interfaces, which must be very smooth to inhibit Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. This paper outlines the current design, and focuses on the challenges and advances in capsule fabrication and characterization; hohlraum fabrication, and D-T layering and characterization.

  19. Update on ignition studies at Cea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holstein, P.A.; Casanova, M.; Casner, A.; Cherfils, C.; Dattolo, E.; Disdier, L.; Galmiche, D.; Giorla, J.; Houry, M.; Jadaud, J.P.; Laffite, S.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Lours, L.; Masse, L.; Monteil, M.C.; Morice, O.; Naudy, M.; Philippe, F.; Poggi, F.; Renaud, F.; Riazuelo, G.; Saillard, Y.; Seytor, P.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Wagon, F. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2007-08-15

    This article sums up the theoretical and experimental studies about ignition. Three experiments are salient this year on the Omega laser in collaboration with DOE laboratories. First, 3 cones of beams have allowed to mimic the LMJ (laser MegaJoule) configuration and to get symmetry measurements. Secondly, we have measured perturbations due to hydro-instability in CHGe planar samples with face-on and side-on radiographs. And thirdly, we have improved our nuclear diagnostics, particularly the neutron image system tested on direct drive implosions. As far as LMJ target design is concerned, we have defined a preliminary domain corresponding to the possible operation at 2{omega}. At 3 {omega} we have studied the low mode instability effects on the DT deformation (due to the laser or to the target) and on the yield. The stability is clearly improved with graded doped CH for our nominal capsule L1215. (authors)

  20. Treatment of Gait Ignition Failure with Ropinirole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis N. Cohen-Oram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gait ignition failure (GIF is a syndrome characterized by hesitation or inability to initiate gait from a static position. It may occur in a variety of conditions, including normal pressure hydrocephalus, subcortical vascular disease, parkinsonian syndromes and a variety of focal lesions. Previous information on the treatment of GIF has been primarily anecdotal, but there have been a few reports of response to dopamine agonists. We report a 63-year-old man with anoxic encephalopathy who developed GIF nine years after the initial anoxic insult. The patient’s GIF responded robustly, albeit transiently, to ropinirole. MRI was unrevealing, but a positron emission tomography scan showed hypometabolism in the deep frontal ACA/MCA watershed area; this may have disconnected the basal ganglia from the motor cortex and/or interrupted dopaminergic mesocortical transmission. Our understanding of the pathophysiology and the treatment of GIF remains limited, but there may be at least a limited therapeutic role for dopamine agonists.

  1. Development and Testing of a Green Monopropellant Ignition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Merkley, Daniel P.; Eilers, Shannon D.; Judson, Michael I.; Taylor, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will detail the development and testing of a "green" monopropellant booster ignition system. The proposed booster ignition technology eliminates the need for a pre-heated catalyst bed, a high wattage power source, toxic pyrophoric ignition fluids, or a bi-propellant spark ignitor. The design offers the simplicity of a monopropellant feed system features non-hazardous gaseous oxygen (GOX) as the working fluid. The approach is fundamentally different from all other "green propellant" solutions in the aerospace in the industry. Although the proposed system is more correctly a "hybrid" rocket technology, since only a single propellant feed path is required, it retains all the simple features of a monopropellant system. The technology is based on the principle of seeding an oxidizing flow with a small amount of hydrocarbon.1 The ignition is initiated electrostatically with a low-wattage inductive spark. Combustion gas byproducts from the hydrocarbon-seeding ignition process can exceed 2400 C and the high exhaust temperature ensures reliable main propellant ignition. The system design is described in detail in the Hydrocarbon-Seeded Ignition System Design subsection.

  2. Network-Configurations of Dynamic Friction Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2012-01-01

    The complex configurations of dynamic friction patterns-regarding real time contact areas- are transformed into appropriate networks. With this transformation of a system to network space, many properties can be inferred about the structure and dynamics of the system. Here, we analyze the dynamics of static friction, i.e. nucleation processes, with respect to "friction networks". We show that networks can successfully capture the crack-like shear ruptures and possible corresponding acoustic features. We found that the fraction of triangles remarkably scales with the detachment fronts. There is a universal power law between nodes' degree and motifs frequency (for triangles, it reads T(k)\\proptok{\\beta} ({\\beta} \\approx2\\pm0.4)). We confirmed the obtained universality in aperture-based friction networks. Based on the achieved results, we extracted a possible friction law in terms of network parameters and compared it with the rate and state friction laws. In particular, the evolutions of loops are scaled with p...

  3. Role of Friction in Cold Ring Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He YANG; Lianggang GUO; Mei ZHAN

    2005-01-01

    Cold ring rolling is an advanced but complex metal forming process under coupled effects with multi-factors, such as geometry sizes of rolls and ring blank, material, forming process parameters and friction, etc. Among these factors,friction between rolls and ring blank plays animportant role in keeping the stable forming of cold ring rolling. An analytical method was firstly presented for proximately determining the critical friction coefficient of stable forming and then a method was proposed to determine thecritical friction coefficient by combining analytical method with numerical simulation. And the influence of friction coefficient on the quality of end-plane and side spread of ring,rolling force, rolling moment and metal flow characteristic in the cold ring rolling process have been explored using the three dimensional (3D) numerical simulation based on the elastic-plastic dynamic finite element method (FEM)under the ABAQUS software environment, and the results show that increasing the friction on the contact surfaces between rolls and ring blank is useful not only for improving the stability of cold ring rolling but also for improving the geometry and dimension precision of deformed ring.

  4. Methods and devices used to measure friction in rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeswiet, J.; Arentoft, Mogens; Henningsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    a good understanding of the mechanisms at the interface and to be able to verify the friction and tribology models that exist, friction sensors are needed. Designing sensors to measure frictional stress in metal working has been pursued by many researchers. This paper surveys methods that have been used...... to measure friction in rolling in the past and discusses some of the recent sensor designs that can now be used to measure friction both in production situations and for research purposes....

  5. Numerical implementation of a state variable model for friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzekwa, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Boyce, D.E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A general state variable model for friction has been incorporated into a finite element code for viscoplasticity. A contact area evolution model is used in a finite element model of a sheet forming friction test. The results show that a state variable model can be used to capture complex friction behavior in metal forming simulations. It is proposed that simulations can play an important role in the analysis of friction experiments and the development of friction models.

  6. Nano-Sized Grain Refinement Using Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure produced as a result of dynamic recrystallization. The friction stir ... Friction Stir Processing, Magnesium, Nano-size grains Abstract A key characteristic of a friction stir weld is a very fine grain microstructure...state process developed on the basis of the friction stir welding (FSW) technique invented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991 [2]. During

  7. Robustness studies of NIF ignition targets in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsules are critically dependent on the integrity of their hot spots to ignite. At the time of ignition, only a certain fractional perturbation of the nominally spherical hot spot boundary can be tolerated and the capsule still achieve ignition. The degree to which the expected hot spot perturbation in any given capsule design is less than this maximum tolerable perturbation is a measure of the ignition margin or robustness of that design. Moreover, since there will inevitably be uncertainties in the initial character and implosion dynamics of any given capsule, all of which can contribute to the eventual hot spot perturbation, quantifying the robustness of that capsule against a range of parameter variations is an important consideration in the capsule design. Here, the robustness of the 300 eV indirect drive target design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] is studied in the parameter space of inner ice roughness, implosion velocity, and capsule scale. A suite of two thousand two-dimensional simulations, run with the radiation hydrodynamics code Lasnex, is used as the data base for the study. For each scale, an ignition region in the two remaining variables is identified and the ``ignition cliff'' is mapped. In accordance with the theoretical arguments of W. K. Levedahl and J. D. Lindl [Nucl. Fusion 37, 165 (1997)] and R. Kishony and D. Shvarts [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4925 (2001)], the location of this cliff is fitted to a power law of the capsule implosion velocity and scale. It is found that the cliff can be quite well represented in this power law form, and, using this scaling law, an assessment of the overall (one- and two-dimensional) ignition margin of the design can be made. The effect on the ignition margin of an increase or decrease in the density of the target fill gas is also assessed.

  8. Study on Auto-ignition Temperature of Ferrous Sulfide%硫化亚铁自燃温度影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐伟; 张淑娟; 王振刚

    2015-01-01

    Self-ignition of ferrous sulfide is one of the most important hazards for fire and explosion in the petrochemical industry .In order to avoid such accidents ,the auto-ignition temperature of sulfide ferrous in different particle sizes and the mixture of sulfur and ferrous sulfide are measured by spontaneous combustion temperature tester .The results show that the ignition temperature firstly decreases and then increases with the increase of specific surface area of ferrous sulfide and after-wards with the continuing increase of particle size ,the auto-ignition temperature remains stable .The mixture of sulfur and ferrous sulfide affects cooperatively each other and the auto-ignition temperature of the mixture is lower 116 .3 ℃ than that of ferrous sulfide .This effect greatly increases the runaway risk of the spontaneous combustion of ferrous sulfide ,and brings a great deal of inconvenience to take security measures .%硫化亚铁自燃是引起石油化工行业火灾爆炸事故的重要原因之一.为了规避此类事故的发生 ,利用自燃温度测试仪测定了不同粒径硫化亚铁以及硫磺与硫化亚铁混合物的自燃温度.结果表明 :随着硫化亚铁粒径比表面积的增大 ,其自燃温度先减小后增大 ,之后随着粒径的继续增大 ,自燃温度基本保持平稳状态 ;硫磺与硫化亚铁混合物自燃温度彼此具有协同作用 ,其自燃温度比硫化亚铁自燃温度降低了116 .3 ℃ ,使硫化亚铁自燃失控危险性大大增加 ,为采取安防措施带来了极大的不便.

  9. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2011-03-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility

  10. Shock Timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Robey, H. F.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G. F.; Jackson, J. L.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-06-01

    Experiments are proceeding to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). The results of these measurements will be used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant

  12. Ignition time of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈森昌; 迟彦惠; 史玉升; 黄树槐

    2002-01-01

    The ignition of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) by a laser beam has very well application, but there is lack in study on the ignition process. In order to search the rule of ignition process with laser beam, ignition time of SHS was studied in detail. First one dimension ignition model was introduced: burning is the process in which one layer is ignited by next layer. Then according to Fourier conduction equation, an equation used to calculate the ignition time was deduced. Finally a series of tests were made to verify the equation. The results prove that the change of the parameters in test agrees well with the equation.

  13. Low friction and high strength of 316L stainless steel tubing for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanov, Auezhan; Lee, Soo-Wohn; Pyun, Young-Sik

    2017-02-01

    We propose herein a nondestructive surface modification technique called ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) to increase the strength and to improve the tribological performance of 316L stainless steel (SS) tubing. Nanocrystallization along nearly the complete tube thickness of 200μm was achieved by UNSM technique that was confirmed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Nano-hardness of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens was measured using a nanoindentation. Results revealed that a substantial increase in hardness was obtained for the UNSM-treated specimen that may be attributed to the nanocrystallization and refined grains. Stress-strain behavior of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens was assessed by a 3-point bending test. It was found that the UNSM-treated specimen exhibited a much higher strength than that of the untreated specimen. In addition, the tribological behavior of the untreated and UNSM-treated specimens with an outer diameter (OD) of 1.6mm and an inner diameter (ID) of 1.2mm was investigated using a cylinder-on-cylinder (crossed tubes of equal radius) tribo-tester against itself under dry conditions at ambient temperature. The friction coefficient and wear resistance of the UNSM-treated specimen were remarkably improved compared to that of the untreated specimen. The significant increase in hardness after UNSM treatment is responsible for the improved friction coefficient and wear resistance of the tubing. Thus, the UNSM technique was found to be beneficial to improving the mechanical and tribological properties of 316L SS tubing for various potential biomedical applications, in particular for coronary artery stents.

  14. Frictional transfer and the self-organization phenomenon in the friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, I. V.; Manturov, D. S.

    2017-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface structures formation in the process of metal-polymer frictional contact. IR spectroscopy methods have showed that the formation kinetics of a frictionally transferred film is determined by the adhesion of the composite components and the direction of the electric field at the contact.

  15. Frictional stability-permeability relationships for fractures in shales: Friction-Permeability Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Elsworth, Derek [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Department of Geosciences, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Wang, Chaoyi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Ishibashi, Takuya [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Fukushima Renewable Energy Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koriyama Japan; Fitts, Jeffrey P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey USA

    2017-01-01

    There is wide concern that fluid injection in the subsurface, such as for the stimulation of shale reservoirs or for geological CO2 sequestration (GCS), has the potential to induce seismicity that may change reservoir permeability due to fault slip. However, the impact of induced seismicity on fracture permeability evolution remains unclear due to the spectrum of modes of fault reactivation (e.g., stable versus unstable). As seismicity is controlled by the frictional response of fractures, we explore friction-stability-permeability relationships through the concurrent measurement of frictional and hydraulic properties of artificial fractures in Green River shale (GRS) and Opalinus shale (OPS). We observe that carbonate-rich GRS shows higher frictional strength but weak neutral frictional stability. The GRS fracture permeability declines during shearing while an increased sliding velocity reduces the rate of permeability decline. By comparison, the phyllosilicate-rich OPS has lower friction and strong stability while the fracture permeability is reduced due to the swelling behavior that dominates over the shearing induced permeability reduction. Hence, we conclude that the friction-stability-permeability relationship of a fracture is largely controlled by mineral composition and that shale mineral compositions with strong frictional stability may be particularly subject to permanent permeability reduction during fluid infiltration.

  16. Ultralow Friction in a Superconducting Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, Hans J.; Siegel, Michael; Zaitsev, Oleg; Bareiss, Martin; Laschuetza, Helmut

    1996-01-01

    Passive levitation by superconducting magnetic bearings can be utilized in flywheels for energy storage. Basic design criteria of such a bearing are high levitation force, sufficient vertical and horizontal stability and low friction. A test facility was built for the measurement and evaluation of friction in a superconducting magnetic bearing as a function of operating temperature and pressure in the vacuum vessel. The bearing consists of a commercial disk shaped magnet levitated above single grain, melt-textured YBCO high-temperature superconductor material. The superconductor was conduction cooled by an integrated AEG tactical cryocooler. The temperature could be varied from 50 K to 80 K. The pressure in the vacuum chamber was varied from 1 bar to 10(exp -5) mbar. At the lowest pressure setting, the drag torque shows a linear frequency dependence over the entire range investigated (0 less than f less than 40 Hz). Magnetic friction, the frequency independent contribution, is very low. The frequency dependent drag torque is generated by molecular friction from molecule-surface collisions and by eddy currents. Given the specific geometry of the set-up and gas pressure, the molecular drag torque can be estimated. At a speed of 40 Hz, the coefficient of friction (drag-to-lift ratio) was measured to be mu = 1.6 x 10(exp -7) at 10(exp -5) mbar and T = 60 K. This is equivalent to a drag torque of 7.6 x 10(exp -10) Nm. Magnetic friction causes approx. 1% of the total losses. Molecular friction accounts for about 13% of the frequency dependent drag torque, the remaining 87% being due to eddy currents and losses from rotor unbalance. The specific energy loss is only 0.3% per hour.

  17. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  18. [Dynamic and cinematic evaluation of the function of bioprosthesis in the aortic position: tester of cardiac valves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, J; Santamaría, J; Infante, O; Flores, P; Juárez, A

    1996-01-01

    Twenty four pericardial valvular prostheses were tested in a valvular tester device. The valves considered were: 12 valves of the model that has being already in clinical use, manufactured in the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología "Ignacio Chávez", (INC II) and 12 valves of a model in an experimental stage, (PRT I.) The inner diameter in the two group considered were: 17, 19 and 21 mm. All the valves were tested in the aortic position in the valvular tester device. Behavior of the valvular prostheses were examined at various rates of pulsation, 60, 77, 105 and 159 per minute, with an ejection volume of 70 and 80 ml (range of flows between 4200 and 12720 ml min1). The pressure of the ventricular and aortic cameras were registered continuously, by external transducers, and in the other hand, the kinetic of the valves and the degree of opening were evaluated for direct view trough an special window. The grade of incompetence was too evaluated and expressed in percent of the stroke volume. The transvalvular pressure gradient was lower in INC II model valves, specially at moderate and high flows, and at same time had a largest functional area. The degree of incompetence was higher in the 19 and 21 mm diameter valvular subgroups than the same subgroups in the PRT I model. In relation to the 17 mm subgroup, significant differences were not find. The use of the valvular tester showed a basic utility in the hydrodynamic evaluation of the news bioprostheses design, and so in the quality control of the valves than has being manufacturing.

  19. Ignition of Isomers of Pentane: An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-04

    diesel engines [26,27], and ignition under homogeneous charge compres- sion ignition ( HCCI ) conditions [26,28]. Kinetic modeling shows that the isomers of...Introduction Hydrocarbon ignition is important in many prac- tical combustion systems, including internal com- bustion engines , detonations, pulse combustors...tem- peratures are similar to those in automotive engines during diesel ignition and end-gas autoignition in spark-ignition engines . The RCM provides

  20. New design and the manufacturing techniques of the main friction pair of frictional dampers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander GOLUBENKO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of the main friction pair of the frictional oscillations damper of passenger car axle box stage suspension and its manufacturing techniques are described. The difference of the design of the main friction pair consists in replacement of a conicalcontact surface of the shpinton sleeve by a pyramidal surface as well as a cylindrical surface of the frictional slide block by a flat surface of the rectangular form. Technological ways of increase of strength and wear resistance were developed that allowed quantitatively to estimate a reserve of increase of strength and thermal wear resistance by methods of plastic deforming. With the purpose of increase of wear resistance and resource saving the new technology of producing the shpinton sleeve blank is offered by a method of cold die forging, and a frictional slide block – by hot dieforging.