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Sample records for freshwater luminescent bacteria

  1. Hormesis response of marine and freshwater luminescent bacteria to metal exposure

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    KAILI SHEN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The stimulatory effect of low concentrations of toxic chemicals on organismal metabolism, referred to as hormesis, has been found to be common in the widely used luminescence bioassay. This paper aims to study the hormesis phenomenon in both marine and freshwater luminescent bacteria, named Photobacterium phosphorem and Vibrio qinghaiensis. The effects of Cu (II, Zn (II, Cd (II and Cr (VI on luminescence of these two bacteria were studied for 0 to 75 minutes exposure by establishing dose- and time-response curves. A clear hormesis phenomenon was observed in all four testing metals at low concentrations under the condition of luminescence assays.

  2. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  3. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

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    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. [Synthesis of reserve polyhydroxyalkanoates by luminescent bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiandin, A N; Kalacheva, G S; Rodicheva, E K; Volova, T G

    2008-01-01

    The ability of marine luminescent bacteria to synthesize polyesters of hydroxycarboxylic acids (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) as reserve macromolecules was studied. Twenty strains from the collection of the luminescent bacteria CCIBSO (WDSM839) of the Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, assigned to different taxa (Photobacterium leiognathi, Ph. phosphoreum, Vibrio harveyi, and V. fischeri) were analyzed. The most productive strains were identified, and the conditions ensuring high polymer yields in batch culture (40-70% of the cell dry mass weight) were determined. The capacity of synthesizing two- and three-component polymers containing hydroxybutyric acid as the main monomer and hydroxyvaleric and hydroxyhexanoic acids was revealed in Ph. leiognathi and V. harveyi strains. The results allow luminescent microorganisms to be regarded as new producers of multicomponent polyhydroxyalkanoates.

  5. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with [ 14 C] acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree [ 14 C]fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with [ 14 C]acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition

  6. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

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    Wenyan Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v and 1.95% (v/v respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v. Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR, while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent.

  7. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria. [Vibrio harveyi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with (/sup 14/C) acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree (/sup 14/C)fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with (/sup 14/C)acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition.

  8. Tributyltin-resistant bacteria from estuarine and freshwater sediments.

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    Wuertz, S; Miller, C E; Pfister, R M; Cooney, J J

    1991-01-01

    Resistance to tributyltin (TBT) was examined in populations from TBT-polluted sediments and nonpolluted sediments from an estuary and from fresh water as well as in pure cultures isolated from those sediments. The 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) for populations were higher at a TBT-polluted freshwater site than at a site without TBT, suggesting that TBT selected for a TBT-resistant population. In contrast, EC50s were significantly lower for populations from a TBT-contaminated estuarine site than for those from a site without TBT, suggesting that other factors in addition to TBT determine whether populations become resistant. EC50s for populations from TBT-contaminated freshwater sediments were nearly 30 times higher than those for populations from TBT-contaminated estuarine sediments. We defined a TBT-resistant bacterium as one which grows on trypticase soy agar containing 8.4 microM TBT, a concentration which prevented the growth of 90% of the culturable bacteria from these sediments. The toxicity of TBT in laboratory media was influenced markedly by the composition of the medium and whether it was liquid or solid. Ten TBT-resistant isolates from estuarine sediments and 19 from freshwater sediments were identified to the genus level. Two isolates, each a Bacillus sp., may be the first gram-positive bacteria isolated from fresh water in the presence of a high concentration of TBT. There was a high incidence of resistance to heavy metals: metal resistance indices were 0.76 for estuarine isolates and 0.68 for freshwater isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1746939

  9. Tributyltin-resistant bacteria from estuarine and freshwater sediments.

    OpenAIRE

    Wuertz, S; Miller, C E; Pfister, R M; Cooney, J J

    1991-01-01

    Resistance to tributyltin (TBT) was examined in populations from TBT-polluted sediments and nonpolluted sediments from an estuary and from fresh water as well as in pure cultures isolated from those sediments. The 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) for populations were higher at a TBT-polluted freshwater site than at a site without TBT, suggesting that TBT selected for a TBT-resistant population. In contrast, EC50s were significantly lower for populations from a TBT-contaminated estuarine s...

  10. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from...... their roots and thereby stimulate nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification in their rhizosphere. However, oxygen release and inorganic nitrogen concentrations differ markedly between macrophyte species. We therefore propose (i) that the rhizosphere of freshwater macrophytes harbours a species......-specific microbial community distinct from that of unvegetated sediment and (ii) that aquatic macrophytes have an impact on abundance and activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in freshwater sediment. The goal of this study was to test these hypotheses for the key functional group for coupled nitrification...

  11. Competition and niche separation of pelagic bacteria in freshwater habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernthaler, Jakob

    2017-06-01

    Freshwater bacterioplankton assemblages are composed of sympatric populations that can be delineated, for example, by ribosomal RNA gene relatedness and that differ in key ecophysiological properties. They may be free-living or attached, specialized for particular concentrations or subsets of substrates, or invest a variable amount of their resources in defence traits against protistan predators and viruses. Some may be motile and tactic whereas others are not, with far-reaching implications for their respective life styles and niche partitioning. The co-occurrence of competitors with overlapping growth requirements has profound consequences for the stability of community functions; it can to some extent be explained by habitat factors such as the microscale complexity and spatiotemporal variability of the lacustrine environments. On the other hand, the composition and diversity of freshwater microbial assemblages also reflects non-equilibrium states, dispersal and the stochasticity of community assembly processes. This review synoptically discusses the competition and niche separation of heterotrophic bacterial populations (defined at various levels of phylogenetic resolution) in the pelagic zone of inland surface waters from a variety of angles, focusing on habitat heterogeneity and the resulting biogeographic distribution patterns, the ecophysiological adaptations to the substrate field and the interactions of prokaryotes with predators and viruses. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Managing the potential risks of using bacteria-laden water in mineral processing to protect freshwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenying; Moran, Chris J; Vink, Sue

    2013-06-18

    The minerals industry is being driven to access multiple water sources and increase water reuse to minimize freshwater withdrawal. Bacteria-laden water, such as treated effluent, has been increasingly used as an alternative to freshwater for mineral processing, in particular flotation, where conditions are favorable for bacterial growth. However, the risk posed by bacteria to flotation efficiency is poorly understood. This could be a barrier to the ongoing use of this water source. This study tested the potential of a previously published risk-based approach as a management tool to both assist mine sites in quantifying the risk from bacteria, and finding system-wide cost-effective solutions for risk mitigation. The result shows that the solution of adjusting the flotation chemical regime could only partly control the risk. The second solution of using tailings as an absorbent was shown to be effective in the laboratory in reducing bacterial concentration and thus removing the threat to flotation recovery. The best solution is likely to combine internal and external approaches, that is, inside and outside processing plants. Findings in this study contribute possible methods applicable to managing the risk from water-borne bacteria to plant operations that choose to use bacteria-containing water, when attempting to minimize freshwater use, and avoiding the undesirable consequences of increasing its use.

  13. Symbiotic bacteria contribute to increasing the population size of a freshwater crustacean, Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Tsukada, Koji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    The filter-feeding crustacean Daphnia is a key organism in freshwater ecosystems. Here, we report the effect of symbiotic bacteria on ecologically important life history traits, such as population dynamics and longevity, in Daphnia magna. By disinfection of the daphniid embryos with glutaraldehyde, aposymbiotic daphniids were prepared and cultured under bacteria-free conditions. Removal of bacteria from the daphniids was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The population of aposymbiotic daphniids was reduced 10-folds compared with that of the control daphniids. Importantly, re-infection with symbiotic bacteria caused daphniids to regain bacteria and increase their fecundity to the level of the control daphniids, suggesting that symbiotic bacteria regulate Daphnia fecundity. To identify the species of symbiotic bacteria, 16S rRNA genes of bacteria in daphniids were sequenced. This revealed that 50% of sequences belonged to the Limnohabitans sp. of the Betaproteobacteria class and that the diversity of bacterial taxa was relatively low. These results suggested that symbiotic bacteria have a beneficial effect on D. magna, and that aposymbiotic Daphnia are useful tools in understanding the role of symbiotic bacteria in the environmental responses and evolution of their hosts. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Increased production of outer membrane vesicles by cultured freshwater bacteria in response to ultraviolet radiation.

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    Gamalier, Juliana P; Silva, Thiago P; Zarantonello, Victor; Dias, Felipe F; Melo, Rossana C N

    2017-01-01

    Secretion of membrane vesicles is an important biological process of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This process has been characterized in pathogenic bacteria, but is less clear in non-pathogenic bacteria from aquatic ecosystems. Here, we investigated, for the first time, the process of formation of outer membranes vesicles (OMVs), nanoscale vesicles extruded from the outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria, in cultures of freshwater bacteria after exposure or not to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) as an environmental stressor. Non-axenic cultures of freshwater bacteria isolated from a Brazilian aquatic ecosystem (Funil reservoir) were exposed or not to UVR (UVA+UVB) over a 3h period, during which cell density, viability and ultrastructure were analyzed. First, we showed that UVR induce bacterial death. UVR triggered significant negative effect on cell density after 3h of UVR treatment. This decrease was directly associated with cell death as revealed by a cell viability fluorescent probe that enables the distinction of live/dead bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed changes indicative of cell death after 3h of UVR exposure, with significant increase of damaged cells compared to the control group. Second, we demonstrated that gram-negative bacteria release OMVs during normal growth and after UVR exposure. OMVs were clearly identified as round, membrane-bound vesicles budding off from the bacterial OM as isolated or clustered vesicles or free in the extracellular medium. Remarkably, quantitative TEM analyses showed that bacteria respond to UVR with increased formation of OMVs. Moreover, while OMVs numbers per intact or damaged cell did not differ in the untreated group, UVR led to a higher vesiculation by bacteria in process of death. This means that degenerating bacteria release OMVs before lysis and that this secretion might be an adaptive/protective response to rapid changes in environmental conditions such as UV radiation. Copyright

  15. Differential freshwater flagellate community response to bacterial food quality with a focus on Limnohabitans bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, Karel; Kasalický, Vojtěch; Jezbera, Jan; Horňák, Karel; Nedoma, Jiří; Hahn, M.W.; Bass, D.; Jost, S.; Boenigk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2013), s. 1519-1530 ISSN 1751-7362 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00243S; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : flagellate community composition * food quality of bacteria * Limnohabitans * 454 pyrosequencing * freshwater * flagellate growth Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 9.267, year: 2013

  16. Acute toxicity assessment of explosive-contaminated soil extracting solution by luminescent bacteria assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjie; Jiang, Zhenming; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Su, Hongping; Gao, Xuewen; Ye, Zhengfang

    2016-11-01

    Explosive-contaminated soil is harmful to people's health and the local ecosystem. The acute toxicity of its extracting solution was tested by bacterial luminescence assay using three kinds of luminescent bacteria to characterize the toxicity of the soil. An orthogonal test L 16 (4 5 ) was designed to optimize the soil extracting conditions. The optimum extracting conditions were obtained when the ultrasonic extraction time, ultrasonic extraction temperature, and the extraction repeat times were 6 h, 40 °C, and three, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed that the main components of the contaminated soil's extracting solution were 2,4-dinitrotoluene-3-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-3-SO 3 - ); 2,4-dinitrotoluene-5-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-5-SO 3 - ); and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT). Compared with Photobacterium phosphoreum and Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov. is more suitable for assessing the soil extracting solution's acute toxicity. Soil washing can remove most of the contaminants toxic to luminescent bacterium Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov., suggesting that it may be a potential effective remediation method for explosive-contaminated soil.

  17. Distribution and activity of anaerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria in natural freshwater wetland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-dong; Wu, Hong-sheng; Gao, Zhi-qiu; Cheng, Hai-xiang; Li, Ji; Liu, Xu; Ren, Qian-qi

    2016-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process plays a significant role in the marine nitrogen cycle. However, the quantitative importance of this process in nitrogen removal in wetland systems, particularly in natural freshwater wetlands, is still not determined. In the present study, we provided the evidence of the distribution and activity of anammox bacteria in a natural freshwater wetland, located in southeastern China, by using (15)N stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. The potential anammox rates measured in this wetland system ranged between 2.5 and 25.5 nmol N2 g(-1) soil day(-1), and up to 20% soil dinitrogen gas production could be attributed to the anammox process. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that anammox bacteria related to Candidatus Brocadia, Candidatus Kuenenia, Candidatus Anammoxoglobus and two novel anammox clusters coexisted in the collected soil cores, with Candidatus Brocadia and Candidatus Kuenenia being the dominant anammox genera. Quantitative PCR of hydrazine synthase genes showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria varied from 2.3 × 10(5) to 2.2 × 10(6) copies g(-1) soil in the examined soil cores. Correlation analyses suggested that the soil ammonium concentration had significant influence on the activity of anammox bacteria. On the basis of (15)N tracing technology, it is estimated that a total loss of 31.1 g N m(-2) per year could be linked the anammox process in the examined wetland.

  18. Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of Sediment Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Bacteria in Freshwater Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuyin; Dai, Yu; Li, Ningning; Li, Bingxin; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) process can play an important role in freshwater nitrogen cycle. However, the distribution of anammox bacteria in freshwater lake and the associated environmental factors remain essentially unclear. The present study investigated the temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment anammox bacterial populations in eutrotrophic Dianchi Lake and mesotrophic Erhai Lake on the Yunnan Plateau (southwestern China). The remarkable spatial change of anammox bacterial abundance was found in Dianchi Lake, while the relatively slight spatial shift occurred in Erhai Lake. Dianchi Lake had greater anammox bacterial abundance than Erhai Lake. In both Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, anammox bacteria were much more abundant in summer than in spring. Anammox bacterial community richness, diversity, and structure in these two freshwater lakes were subjected to temporal and spatial variations. Sediment anammox bacterial communities in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake were dominated by Candidatus Brocadia and a novel phylotype followed by Candidatus Kuenenia; however, these two lakes had distinct anammox bacterial community structure. In addition, trophic status determined sediment anammox bacterial community structure.

  19. Evaluating primers for profiling anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria within freshwater environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puntipar Sonthiphand

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox bacteria play an important role in transforming ammonium to nitrogen gas and contribute to fixed nitrogen losses in freshwater environments. Understanding the diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria requires reliable molecular tools, and these are not yet well established for these important Planctomycetes. To help validate PCR primers for the detection of anammox bacteria within freshwater ecosystems, we analyzed representative positive controls and selected samples from Grand River and groundwater sites, both from Ontario, Canada. The objectives of this study were to identify a suitable anammox denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprint method by using GC-clamp modifications to existing primers, and to verify the specificity of anammox-specific primers used for DGGE, cloning and qPCR methods. Six primer combinations were tested from four published primer sets (i.e. A438f/A684r, Amx368f/Amx820r, An7f/An1388r, and Pla46/1392r for both direct and nested PCR amplifications. All PCR products were run subsequently on DGGE gels to compare the resulting patterns. Two anammox-specific primer combinations were also used to generate clone libraries and quantify anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes with qPCR. The primer set A438f/A684r was highly specific to anammox bacteria, provided reliable DGGE fingerprints and generated a high proportion of anammox-related clones. A second primer set (Amx368f/Amx820r was anammox specific, based on clone library analysis, but PCR products from different candidate species of anammox bacteria resolved poorly using DGGE analysis. Both DGGE and cloning results revealed that Ca. Brocadia and an uncharacterized anammox bacterial cluster represented the majority of anammox bacteria found in Grand River sediment and groundwater samples, respectively. Together, our results demonstrate that although Amx368f/Amx820r was useful for anammox-specific qPCR and clone library

  20. Oil field and freshwater isolates of Shewanella putrefaciens have lipopolysaccharide polyacrylamide gel profiles characteristic of marine bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickard, C.; Foght, J.M.; Pickard, M.A.; Westlake, D.W.S.

    1993-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide structure of oil field and freshwater isolates of bacteria that reduce ferric iron, recently classified as strains of Shewanella putrefaciens, was analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a lipopolysaccharide-specific silver-staining procedure. The results demonstrate that all the oil field and freshwater isolates examined exhibited the more hydrophobic R-type lipopolysaccharide, which has been found to be characteristic of Gram-negative marine bacteria. This hydrophobic lipopolysaccharide would confer an advantage on bacteria involved in hydrocarbon degradation by assisting their association with the surface of oil droplets. 15 refs., 1 fig

  1. Diversity and characterization of mercury-resistant bacteria in snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine from the High Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Annette; Barkay, Tamar; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed

    2011-01-01

    It is well-established that atmospheric deposition transports mercury from lower latitudes to the Arctic. The role of bacteria in the dynamics of the deposited mercury, however, is unknown. We characterized mercury-resistant bacteria from High Arctic snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine. Bacterial...... densities were 9.4 × 10(5), 5 × 10(5) and 0.9-3.1 × 10(3) cells mL(-1) in freshwater, brine and snow, respectively. Highest cultivability was observed in snow (11.9%), followed by freshwater (0.3%) and brine (0.03%). In snow, the mercury-resistant bacteria accounted for up to 31% of the culturable bacteria, but...

  2. Freshwater bacteria are stoichiometrically flexible with a nutrient composition similar to seston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, James B.; Hall, Edward K.; Scott, J. Thad; Heldal, Mikal

    2010-01-01

    Although aquatic bacteria are assumed to be nutrient-rich, they out-compete other foodweb osmotrophs for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) an apparent contradiction to resource ratio theory. This paradox could be resolved if aquatic bacteria were demonstrated to be nutrient-poor relative other portions of the planktonic food web. In a survey of >120 lakes in the upper Midwest of the USA, the nutrient content of bacteria was lower than previously reported and very similar to the Redfield ratio, with a mean biomass composition of 102:12:1 (C:N:P). Individual freshwater bacterial isolates grown under P-limiting and P-replete conditions had even higher C:P and N:P ratios with a mean community biomass composition ratio of 875C:179N:1P suggesting that individual strains can be extremely nutrient-poor, especially with respect to P. Cell-specific measurements of individual cells from one lake confirmed that low P content could be observed at the community level in natural systems with a mean biomass composition of 259C:69N:1P. Variability in bacterial stoichiometry is typically not recognized in the literature as most studies assume constant and nutrient-rich bacterial biomass composition. We present evidence that bacteria can be extremely P-poor in individual systems and in culture, suggesting that bacteria in freshwater ecosystems can either play a role as regenerators or consumers of inorganic nutrients and that this role could switch depending on the relationship between bacterial biomass stoichiometry and resource stoichiometry. This ability to switch roles between nutrient retention and regeneration likely facilitates processing of terrestrial organic matter in lakes and rivers and has important implications for a wide range of bacterially mediated biogeochemical processes.

  3. The effect of radiation on bioluminescent bacteria: possible use of luminescent bacteria as a biological dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantel, J.; Freidin, M.; Perry, H.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the response of the bioluminescent Photobacterium phosphoreum to radiation, and the possible use of the bacteria as a biological radiation dosemeter, i.e. a water-equivalent biological system that will compare beams not merely on the basis of absorbed dose, but also have intrinsic RBE values for different radiation beams. Samples were irradiated by a 12 MeV electron beam at a dose rate of 3.0 Gy min -1 , by 60 Co gamma rays at 2.85 Gy min -1 , and by 100 kVsub(p) x-rays at a dose rate of 2.13 Gy min -1 . To study dose-rate dependence, the survival fraction was obtained for a 12 MeV electron beam at 0.50 and 12 Gy min -1 for 20.0 Gy. The survival fraction proved to be independent of dose rate in this range. The results presented in this work indicate that by using bioluminescent bacteria, RBE measurements can be markedly simplified and the results interpreted unequivocally. (U.K.)

  4. Spatial distribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria across eight freshwater lakes in sediments from Jiangsu of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizingarchaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB play an important role innitrogen transformation in freshwater sediments. However, it is still unclear towhat extent the distribution patterns of these microorganisms are affected bythe freshwater sediment across a large geographical scale. This study wasdesigned to gain insight into the heterogeneity distribution of AOA and AOB in32 freshwater sediments from a wide range of ecologic types. Real-time quantitative polymerasechain reaction PCR(qPCR combined with the terminal restrictionfragment length polymorphism(T-RFLP were employed to characterize the abundance, diversity, and communitystructure of the AOA and AOB in 32 freshwater sediments. AOA and AOB wereubiquitous in all sediments, and archaeal amoA far outnumbered bacterial amoA inmost sediments with lower organic matters. The abundance of AOA and AOB did notvary with the freshwater ecological type (macrophyte dominated region and algaedominated region. Based on  the T-RFLP of an amoA gene, this research found that organicmatters in pore water rather than other factors affect the AOA communitystructure in sediments, while the AOB were not significantly different in thefreshwater sediments. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all archaeal amoAsequences fell within either the Crenarchaeotal Group (CG I.1b or the CGI.1asubgroup, and all AOB clustered with genus Nitrosomonas or Nitrosospira. The data obtained inthis study elucidates the role of ammonia-oxidizing archaea andammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the nitrogen cycle of freshwater ecosystems.

  5. Influence of Dilution Rate on Enzymes of Intermediary Metabolism in Two Freshwater Bacteria Grown in Continuous Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matin, A.; Grootjans, A.; Hogenhuis, H.

    1976-01-01

    Two freshwater bacteria, a Pseudomonas sp. and a Spirillum sp., were grown in continuous culture under steady-state conditions in L-lactate-, succinate-, ammonium- or phosphate-limited media. In Pseudomonas sp., NAD-independent and NAD-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenases, aconitase, isocitrate

  6. Acute toxicity test of leachates from traditional and sustainable landfills using luminescent bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivato, Alberto; Gaspari, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    Landfilling is a fundamental step in any waste management strategy, but it can constitute a hazard for the environment for a long time. The need to protect the environment from potential landfill emissions makes risk assessment a decision tool of extreme necessity. The heterogeneity of wastes and the complexity of physical, chemical and biological processes that occur in the body of a landfill need specific procedures in order to evaluate the groundwater risk for the environment. Given the complexity of the composition of landfill leachates, the exact contribution of each potential toxic substance cannot be known precisely. Some reference contaminants that constitute the hazard (toxicity) of leachate have to be found to perform the risk assessment. A preliminary ecotoxicological investigation with luminescent bacteria has been carried out on different leachates from traditional and sustainable landfills in order to rank the chemicals that better characterize the leachate (heavy metals, ammonia and dissolved organic content). The attention has been focused on ammonia because it is present in high concentration and can last for centuries and can seriously contaminate the groundwater. The results showed that the toxicity of the leachate might reliably depend on the ammonia concentration and that the leachate toxicity is considerably lower in sustainable landfills where the ammonia had been degraded. This has an important consequence because if the containment system fails (as usually occur within 30-50 yr), the risk of groundwater contamination will be calculated easier only in terms of the probability that the ammonia concentration is higher than a reference concentration

  7. Diversity and characterization of mercury-resistant bacteria in snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine from the High Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Annette K; Barkay, Tamar; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren J; Skov, Henrik; Kroer, Niels

    2011-03-01

    It is well-established that atmospheric deposition transports mercury from lower latitudes to the Arctic. The role of bacteria in the dynamics of the deposited mercury, however, is unknown. We characterized mercury-resistant bacteria from High Arctic snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine. Bacterial densities were 9.4 × 10(5), 5 × 10(5) and 0.9-3.1 × 10(3) cells mL(-1) in freshwater, brine and snow, respectively. Highest cultivability was observed in snow (11.9%), followed by freshwater (0.3%) and brine (0.03%). In snow, the mercury-resistant bacteria accounted for up to 31% of the culturable bacteria, but levels of most isolates were not temperature dependent. Of the resistant isolates, 25% reduced Hg(II) to Hg(0). No relation between resistance level, ability to reduce Hg(II) and phylogenetic group was observed. An estimation of the potential bacterial reduction of Hg(II) in snow suggested that it was important in the deeper snow layers where light attenuation inhibited photoreduction. Thus, by reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), mercury-resistant bacteria may limit the supply of substrate for methylation processes and, hence, contribute to lowering the risk that methylmercury is being incorporated into the Arctic food chains. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Incorporation of [h]leucine and [h]valine into protein of freshwater bacteria: field applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, N O

    1992-11-01

    Incorporation of leucine and valine into proteins of freshwater bacteria as a measure of bacterial production was tested in two eutrophic Danish lakes and was related to bacterial production measured by thymidine incorporation. In a depth profile (0 to 8 m) in Frederiksborg Castle Lake, incorporation of 100 nM leucine and valine gave similar rates of protein production. In terms of carbon, this production was about 50% lower than incorporation of 10 nM thymidine. In another depth profile in the same lake, incorporations of 10 nM valine and 100 nM leucine were identical, but differed from incorporations of 10 nM leucine and 100 nM valine. Bacterial carbon production calculated from incorporations of 10 nM thymidine and 10 nM leucine was similar, whereas 10 nM valine and 100 nM leucine and valine indicated an up to 2.4-fold-higher rate of carbon production. In a diel study in Lake Bagsvaerd, incorporation of 100 nM leucine and valine indicated a similar protein production, but the calculated carbon production was about 1.9-fold higher than the production based on uptake of 10 nM thymidine. Different diel changes in incorporation of the two amino acids and in incorporation of thymidine were observed. In both lakes, concentrations of naturally occurring leucine and valine were activity of a H isotope added at a concentration of 100 nM usually was diluted a maximum of 5%. Net assimilation of natural free amino acids in the lakes sustained 8 to 69% of the net bacterial carbon requirement, estimated from incorporation of leucine, valine, or thymidine. The present results indicate that incorporation of leucine and valine permits realistic measurements of bacterial production in freshwater environments.

  9. The separated electric and magnetic field responses of luminescent bacteria exposed to pulsed microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Catrin F., E-mail: williamscf@cardiff.ac.uk [School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen' s Buildings, Newport Road, Cardiff, CF24 3AA Wales (United Kingdom); School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Main Building, Cathays Park, Cardiff, CF10 3AT Wales (United Kingdom); Geroni, Gilles M.; Pirog, Antoine; Lees, Jonathan; Porch, Adrian [School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen' s Buildings, Newport Road, Cardiff, CF24 3AA Wales (United Kingdom); Lloyd, David [School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Main Building, Cathays Park, Cardiff, CF10 3AT Wales (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-29

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are ubiquitous in the digital world we inhabit, with microwave and millimetre wave sources of non-ionizing radiation employed extensively in electronics and communications, e.g., in mobile phones and Wi-Fi. Indeed, the advent of 5G systems and the “internet of things” is likely to lead to massive densification of wireless networks. Whilst the thermal effects of EMFs on biological systems are well characterised, their putative non-thermal effects remain a controversial subject. Here, we use the bioluminescent marine bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, to monitor the effects of pulsed microwave electromagnetic fields, of nominal frequency 2.5 GHz, on light emission. Separated electric and magnetic field effects were investigated using a resonant microwave cavity, within which the maxima of each field are separated. For pulsed electric field exposure, the bacteria gave reproducible responses and recovery in light emission. At the lowest pulsed duty cycle (1.25%) and after short durations (100 ms) of exposure to the electric field at power levels of 4.5 W rms, we observed an initial stimulation of bioluminescence, whereas successive microwave pulses became inhibitory. Much of this behaviour is due to thermal effects, as the bacterial light output is very sensitive to the local temperature. Conversely, magnetic field exposure gave no measurable short-term responses even at the highest power levels of 32 W rms. Thus, we were able to detect, de-convolute, and evaluate independently the effects of separated electric and magnetic fields on exposure of a luminescent biological system to microwave irradiation.

  10. The separated electric and magnetic field responses of luminescent bacteria exposed to pulsed microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Catrin F.; Geroni, Gilles M.; Pirog, Antoine; Lloyd, David; Lees, Jonathan; Porch, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are ubiquitous in the digital world we inhabit, with microwave and millimetre wave sources of non-ionizing radiation employed extensively in electronics and communications, e.g., in mobile phones and Wi-Fi. Indeed, the advent of 5G systems and the "internet of things" is likely to lead to massive densification of wireless networks. Whilst the thermal effects of EMFs on biological systems are well characterised, their putative non-thermal effects remain a controversial subject. Here, we use the bioluminescent marine bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, to monitor the effects of pulsed microwave electromagnetic fields, of nominal frequency 2.5 GHz, on light emission. Separated electric and magnetic field effects were investigated using a resonant microwave cavity, within which the maxima of each field are separated. For pulsed electric field exposure, the bacteria gave reproducible responses and recovery in light emission. At the lowest pulsed duty cycle (1.25%) and after short durations (100 ms) of exposure to the electric field at power levels of 4.5 W rms, we observed an initial stimulation of bioluminescence, whereas successive microwave pulses became inhibitory. Much of this behaviour is due to thermal effects, as the bacterial light output is very sensitive to the local temperature. Conversely, magnetic field exposure gave no measurable short-term responses even at the highest power levels of 32 W rms. Thus, we were able to detect, de-convolute, and evaluate independently the effects of separated electric and magnetic fields on exposure of a luminescent biological system to microwave irradiation.

  11. The separated electric and magnetic field responses of luminescent bacteria exposed to pulsed microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Catrin F.; Geroni, Gilles M.; Pirog, Antoine; Lees, Jonathan; Porch, Adrian; Lloyd, David

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are ubiquitous in the digital world we inhabit, with microwave and millimetre wave sources of non-ionizing radiation employed extensively in electronics and communications, e.g., in mobile phones and Wi-Fi. Indeed, the advent of 5G systems and the “internet of things” is likely to lead to massive densification of wireless networks. Whilst the thermal effects of EMFs on biological systems are well characterised, their putative non-thermal effects remain a controversial subject. Here, we use the bioluminescent marine bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, to monitor the effects of pulsed microwave electromagnetic fields, of nominal frequency 2.5 GHz, on light emission. Separated electric and magnetic field effects were investigated using a resonant microwave cavity, within which the maxima of each field are separated. For pulsed electric field exposure, the bacteria gave reproducible responses and recovery in light emission. At the lowest pulsed duty cycle (1.25%) and after short durations (100 ms) of exposure to the electric field at power levels of 4.5 W rms, we observed an initial stimulation of bioluminescence, whereas successive microwave pulses became inhibitory. Much of this behaviour is due to thermal effects, as the bacterial light output is very sensitive to the local temperature. Conversely, magnetic field exposure gave no measurable short-term responses even at the highest power levels of 32 W rms. Thus, we were able to detect, de-convolute, and evaluate independently the effects of separated electric and magnetic fields on exposure of a luminescent biological system to microwave irradiation.

  12. Calculation of cell production from [3H]Thymidine incorporation with freshwater bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, J.D.; Riemann, B.

    1988-01-01

    The conversion factor for the calculation of bacterial production from rates of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation was examined with diluted batch cultures of freshwater bacteria. Natural bacterial assemblages were grown in aged, normal, and enriched media at 10 to 20 degree C. The generation time during 101 growth cycles covered a range from 4 to >200 h. The average conversion factor was 2.15 x 10 18 cells mol -1 of thymidine incorporated into the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitate, when the generation time exceeded 20 h. At generation times of 18 cells mol -1 of thymidine incorporated into TCA precipitate. The amount of radioactivity in purified DNA increased with decreasing generation time and increasing conversion factor (calculated from the TCA precipitate), corresponding to a decrease in the percentage in protein. The conversion factors calculated from purified DNA or from the TCA precipitate gave the same variability. Conversion factors did not change significantly with the medium, but were significantly higher at 20 degree C that at 15 and 10 degree C. Results suggests that incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA is probably limited by uptake during period with generation times of 18 cells mol -1 of thymidine incorporated is used

  13. The influence of the organophosphorus insecticides acephate and parathion upon the heterotrophic bacteria of two freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, L.J.; Geen, G.H.; Gasith, A.; Mozel, Y.; Perry, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of acephate and parathion on the heterotrophic bacteria of freshwater ecosystems was studied in a dystrophic west coast Canadian lake and in an eutrophic Israeli fish pond. The limnocorrals were treated with 1-25 ppm of acephate and 30-40 ppb of parathion respectively. Bacterial populations, glucose heterotrophic activities and bacterial and algal productivities were studied using 3 H and 14 C radioisotopes. It is concluded that the two ecosystems are not extensively affected by the pesticide concentrations used

  14. Impact of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on freshwater bacteria from three Swedish lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Julia, E-mail: julia.farkas@ntnu.no [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Høgskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Peter, Hannes [Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Ciesielski, Tomasz M. [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Høgskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Thomas, Kevin V. [Norwegian Institute of Water Research, Gaustadalléen 21, 0349 Oslo (Norway); Sommaruga, Ruben [Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Salvenmoser, Willi [Institute of Zoology, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Tranvik, Lars J. [Department of Ecology and Genetics/Limnology, Uppsala University, PO Box 573, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Jenssen, Bjørn M. [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Høgskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-12-01

    Due to the rapidly rising production and usage of nano-enabled products, aquatic environments are increasingly exposed to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), causing concerns about their potential negative effects. In this study we assessed the effects of uncoated titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2}NPs) on the growth and activity of bacterial communities of three Swedish lakes featuring different chemical characteristics such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, pH and elemental composition. TiO{sub 2}NP exposure concentrations were 15, 100, and 1000 μg L{sup −1}, and experiments were performed in situ under three light regimes: darkness, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and ambient sunlight including UV radiation (UVR). The nanoparticles were most stable in lake water with high DOC and low chemical element concentrations. At the highest exposure concentration (1000 μg L{sup −1} TiO{sub 2}NP) the bacterial abundance was significantly reduced in all lake waters. In the medium and high DOC lake waters, exposure concentrations of 100 μg L{sup −1} TiO{sub 2}NP caused significant reductions in bacterial abundance. The cell-specific bacterial activity was significantly enhanced at high TiO{sub 2}NP exposure concentrations, indicating the loss of nanoparticle-sensitive bacteria and a subsequent increased activity by tolerant ones. No UV-induced phototoxic effect of TiO{sub 2}NP was found in this study. We conclude that in freshwater lakes with high DOC and low chemical element concentrations, uncoated TiO{sub 2}NPs show an enhanced stability and can significantly reduce bacterial abundance at relatively low exposure concentrations. - Highlights: • Titanium dioxide nanoparticles reduced the abundance of lake water bacteria from 3 Swedish lakes. • The impact was most severe in the lake with high DOC content and low element concentration. • Particle stability influences impact on bacteria. • No phototoxic effects of TiO{sub 2}NP

  15. Incorporation of [3H]Leucine and [3H]Valine into Protein of Freshwater Bacteria: Field Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Niels O. G.

    1992-01-01

    Incorporation of leucine and valine into proteins of freshwater bacteria as a measure of bacterial production was tested in two eutrophic Danish lakes and was related to bacterial production measured by thymidine incorporation. In a depth profile (0 to 8 m) in Frederiksborg Castle Lake, incorporation of 100 nM leucine and valine gave similar rates of protein production. In terms of carbon, this production was about 50% lower than incorporation of 10 nM thymidine. In another depth profile in t...

  16. Physicochemical parameters influencing coaggregation between the freshwater bacteria Sphingomonas natatoria 2.1 and Micrococcus luteus 2.13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K R; Zimmer, M N; Rickard, A H

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the physicochemical parameters that influence coaggregation between the freshwater bacteria Sphingomonas natatoria 2.1 and Micrococcus luteus 2.13. Using visual coaggregation assays, the effect of different buffers, solutions of differing ionic strength, pH, temperature, and viscosity on the degree of coaggregation was assessed. Coaggregation occurred maximally in distilled water but was inhibited when coaggregates were suspended in a commonly-used oral bacterial coaggregation buffer, saline solutions, and Tris-Cl buffers. Coaggregation was weakly expressed in standard laboratory buffers. The ionic strength of inorganic salt solutions required to inhibit coaggregation depended upon the inorganic salt being tested. Coaggregation occurred at a pH of 3-10, between 5 and 80°C and was inhibited in solutions with a viscosity of 22.5 centipoises at 20°C. Inhibition of coaggregation with NaCl impaired biofilm development. When developing buffers to test for coaggregation, the natural liquid environment should be considered. Coaggregation between S. natatoria 2.1 and M. luteus 2.13 is only affected by physicochemical conditions beyond those typically found in natural freshwater ecosystems. Such a robust ability to coaggregate may enhance the ability of S. natatoria 2.1 and M. luteus 2.13 to develop a niche in freshwater biofilms.

  17. Ferric Iron Reduction by Bacteria Associated with the Roots of Freshwater and Marine Macrophytes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G. M.; Garey, Meredith A.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro assays of washed, excised roots revealed maximum potential ferric iron reduction rates of >100 μmol g (dry weight)−1 day−1 for three freshwater macrophytes and rates between 15 and 83 μmol (dry weight)−1 day−1 for two marine species. The rates varied with root morphology but not consistently (fine root activity exceeded smooth root activity in some but not all cases). Sodium molybdate added at final concentrations of 0.2 to 20 mM did not inhibit iron reduction by roots of marine macrophytes (Spartina alterniflora and Zostera marina). Roots of a freshwater macrophyte, Sparganium eurycarpum, that were incubated with an analog of humic acid precursors, anthroquinone disulfate (AQDS), reduced freshly precipitated iron oxyhydroxide contained in dialysis bags that excluded solutes with molecular weights of >1,000; no reduction occurred in the absence of AQDS. Bacterial enrichment cultures and isolates from freshwater and marine roots used a variety of carbon and energy sources (e.g., acetate, ethanol, succinate, toluene, and yeast extract) and ferric oxyhydroxide, ferric citrate, uranate, and AQDS as terminal electron acceptors. The temperature optima for a freshwater isolate and a marine isolate were equivalent (approximately 32°C). However, iron reduction by the freshwater isolate decreased with increasing salinity, while reduction by the marine isolate displayed a relatively broad optimum salinity between 20 and 35 ppt. Our results suggest that by participating in an active iron cycle and perhaps by reducing humic acids, iron reducers in the rhizoplane of aquatic macrophytes limit organic availability to other heterotrophs (including methanogens) in the rhizosphere and bulk sediments. PMID:10508065

  18. Relative feeding rates on free and particle-bound bacteria by freshwater macrozooplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, S.A.; Maccubbin, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Feeding suspensions of equivalent particle spectra were assembled with either free-living ( 3 H]thymidine. Clearance (ml ind -1 d -1 ) of attached bacteria was 3-29 x that of free bacteria for the cladocerans Acantholeberis, Chydorus, and Eubosmina. Pseudosida and Ceriodaphnia showed weaker discrimination or no selection, indicating a lower size threshold for filtration in these species. Feeding suspensions composed of isolated free bacteria yielded significantly higher or lower estimates of grazing than free bacteria with the full complement of particles, depending on species. Relative clearance (attached:free) tended to increase with body size within a species and varied for different particle environments. Bacteria associated with large particles may increase detrital energy flow to consumers in eutrophic environments

  19. Short Note Abundance of aerobic anoxygenic bacteria in freshwater lakes on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medová, Hana; Koblížek, Michal; Elster, Josef; Nedbalová, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2016), s. 101-102 ISSN 0954-1020 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00703S; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : aerobic anoxygenic bacteria * planktonic communities * bacteriochlorophyll Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (BU-J) Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  20. Effect of concentrating and exposing the bioluminescent bacteria to the non-luminescent allo-bacterial extracellular products on their luminescence

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, J.; Priya, G.G.; Kannapiran, E.

    of cell-cell physical contact will be high. In this study, the physical proximity was artificially enhanced between cells and the effect on luminescence in the concentrated cells in the normal culture medium and in the presence of other non-bacterial cell...

  1. Methanogenesis of carbohydrates and their fermentation products by syntrophic methane producing bacteria isolated from freshwater sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabassum, R; Ibrahim Rajoka, M [National Inst. for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faisalabad (Pakistan)

    2000-05-01

    Anaerobic conversion of substrates namely cellulose, cellobiose, glucose, volatile fatty acids, and methanol with a co-culture of fermentative, acidogenic, acetogenic, and methanogenic organisms isolated from freshwater sediments was performed. Maximum reduction of volatile solids (VS) was from cellulose, cellobiose and glucose followed by methanol and other compounds with a product yield coefficient (Y{sub p/s}) of 0.59 m{sup 3}/kg VS consumed with a volumetric productivity (Q{sub p}) of 15.7 mmol/l/d after 12 d fermentation of cellulose. Maximum methane content in the gas mixture was 86.1% with an average of 82.5 {+-} 3.6%. Batch culture methane production characteristics were analyzed and compared. The maximum values of Y{sub p/s}, from cellobiose, glucose, methanol, formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate were 4.0, 2.2, 0.71. 0.22, 0.90. 1.6 and 1.43 mmol/M substrate used and are higher than those values reported in the literature. (Author)

  2. Iron encrustations on filamentous algae colonized by Gallionella-related bacteria in a metal-polluted freshwater stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, J. F.; Neu, T. R.; Lu, S.; Händel, M.; Totsche, K. U.; Küsel, K.

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous macroscopic algae were observed in slightly acidic to circumneutral (pH 5.9-6.5), metal-rich stream water that leaked out from a former uranium mining district (Ronneburg, Germany). These algae differed in color and morphology and were encrusted with Fe-deposits. To elucidate their potential interaction with Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), we collected algal samples at three time points during summer 2013 and studied the algae-bacteria-mineral compositions via confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and a 16S and 18S rRNA gene-based bacterial and algae community analysis. Surprisingly, sequencing analysis of 18S rRNA gene regions of green and brown algae revealed high homologies with the freshwater algae Tribonema (99.9-100 %). CLSM imaging indicated a loss of active chloroplasts in the algae cells, which may be responsible for the change in color in oxidation under the putative oxygen-saturated conditions that occur in association with photosynthetic algae. Quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) revealed even higher Gallionella-related 16S rRNA gene copy numbers on the surface of green algae compared to the brown algae. The latter harbored a higher microbial diversity, including some putative predators of algae. A loss of chloroplasts in the brown algae could have led to lower photosynthetic activities and reduced EPS production, which is known to affect predator colonization. Collectively, our results suggest the coexistence of oxygen-generating algae Tribonema sp. and strictly microaerophilic neutrophilic FeOB in a heavy metal-rich environment.

  3. Evaluation of methods to sample fecal indicator bacteria in foreshore sand and pore water at freshwater beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Laura J; Edge, Thomas A; O'Carroll, Denis M; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Kushnir, Caitlin S E; Robinson, Clare E

    2017-09-15

    Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are known to accumulate in foreshore beach sand and pore water (referred to as foreshore reservoir) where they act as a non-point source for contaminating adjacent surface waters. While guidelines exist for sampling surface waters at recreational beaches, there is no widely-accepted method to collect sand/sediment or pore water samples for FIB enumeration. The effect of different sampling strategies in quantifying the abundance of FIB in the foreshore reservoir is unclear. Sampling was conducted at six freshwater beaches with different sand types to evaluate sampling methods for characterizing the abundance of E. coli in the foreshore reservoir as well as the partitioning of E. coli between different components in the foreshore reservoir (pore water, saturated sand, unsaturated sand). Methods were evaluated for collection of pore water (drive point, shovel, and careful excavation), unsaturated sand (top 1 cm, top 5 cm), and saturated sand (sediment core, shovel, and careful excavation). Ankle-depth surface water samples were also collected for comparison. Pore water sampled with a shovel resulted in the highest observed E. coli concentrations (only statistically significant at fine sand beaches) and lowest variability compared to other sampling methods. Collection of the top 1 cm of unsaturated sand resulted in higher and more variable concentrations than the top 5 cm of sand. There were no statistical differences in E. coli concentrations when using different methods to sample the saturated sand. Overall, the unsaturated sand had the highest amount of E. coli when compared to saturated sand and pore water (considered on a bulk volumetric basis). The findings presented will help determine the appropriate sampling strategy for characterizing FIB abundance in the foreshore reservoir as a means of predicting its potential impact on nearshore surface water quality and public health risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  4. Towards long-read metagenomics: complete assembly of three novel genomes from bacteria dependent on a diazotrophic cyanobacterium in a freshwater lake co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Connor B; Otten, Timothy G; Brown, Nathan M; Dreher, Theo W

    2017-01-01

    Here we report three complete bacterial genome assemblies from a PacBio shotgun metagenome of a co-culture from Upper Klamath Lake, OR. Genome annotations and culture conditions indicate these bacteria are dependent on carbon and nitrogen fixation from the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, whose genome was assembled to draft-quality . Due to their taxonomic novelty relative to previously sequenced bacteria, we have temporarily designated these bacteria as incertae sedis Hyphomonadaceae strain UKL13-1 (3,501,508 bp and 56.12% GC), incertae sedis Betaproteobacterium strain UKL13-2 (3,387,087 bp and 54.98% GC), and incertae sedis Bacteroidetes strain UKL13-3 (3,236,529 bp and 37.33% GC). Each genome consists of a single circular chromosome with no identified plasmids. When compared with binned Illumina assemblies of the same three genomes, there was ~7% discrepancy in total genome length. Gaps where Illumina assemblies broke were often due to repetitive elements. Within these missing sequences were essential genes and genes associated with a variety of functional categories. Annotated gene content reveals that both Proteobacteria are aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs, with Betaproteobacterium UKL13-2 potentially capable of phototrophic oxidation of sulfur compounds. Both proteobacterial genomes contain transporters suggesting they are scavenging fixed nitrogen from A. flos-aquae in the form of ammonium. Bacteroidetes UKL13-3 has few completely annotated biosynthetic pathways, and has a comparatively higher proportion of unannotated genes. The genomes were detected in only a few other freshwater metagenomes, suggesting that these bacteria are not ubiquitous in freshwater systems. Our results indicate that long-read sequencing is a viable method for sequencing dominant members from low-diversity microbial communities, and should be considered for environmental metagenomics when conditions meet these requirements.

  5. Seasonal and spatial variations in heterotrophic nanoflagellate and bacteria abundances in sediments of a freshwater littoral zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starink, Mathieu; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Cappenberg, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    We studied seasonal variation in heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNAN) and bacterial, densities at different depths in the sediment of two freshwater littoral stations. Station 1 was in a reed bed of Phragmites australis; station 2 was outside the reed zone in open water. Benthic HNAN abundances

  6. Ecological and laboratory studies on the role of luminous bacteria and their luminescence in coastal pollution surveillance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.

    the light to below 50% in the first 20 s. ZnCI 2, CdC12 and PPDDE decreased the luminescence to below 50% in 40 s. Hexane reduced it to 48.38% in 180 s. However, 200 or more seconds were required by decanol, penicillin, streptomycin and DDD (10 and 20...), decreased the light to less than 10% within 300 s (Fig. 4) and it dropped to 50% levels within the first 40 s, except for CdC12 which enhanced it in the first 60 s and, reduced sharply to 10% or less at the end of the experimental period (Fig. 5...

  7. Prey-specific growth responses of freshwater flagellate communities induced by morphologically distinct bacteria from the genus Limnohabitans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grujčič, Vesna; Kasalický, Vojtěch; Šimek, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 15 (2015), s. 4993-5002 ISSN 0099-2240 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00243S; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : freshwater reservoir * heterotrophic flagellate bacterivory * Limnohabitans * bacterial food quality * growth responses of flagellates Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.823, year: 2015

  8. Development and Validation of an On-Line Water Toxicity Sensor with Immobilized Luminescent Bacteria for On-Line Surface Water Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Marjolijn; van der Gaag, Bram; Abrafi Boakye, Afua; Mink, Jan; Marks, Robert S; Wagenvoort, Arco J; Ketelaars, Henk A M; Brouwer, Bram; Heringa, Minne B

    2017-11-22

    Surface water used for drinking water production is frequently monitored in The Netherlands using whole organism biomonitors, with for example Daphnia magna or Dreissena mussels, which respond to changes in the water quality. However, not all human-relevant toxic compounds can be detected by these biomonitors. Therefore, a new on-line biosensor has been developed, containing immobilized genetically modified bacteria, which respond to genotoxicity in the water by emitting luminescence. The performance of this sensor was tested under laboratory conditions, as well as under field conditions at a monitoring station along the river Meuse in The Netherlands. The sensor was robust and easy to clean, with inert materials, temperature control and nutrient feed for the reporter organisms. The bacteria were immobilized in sol-gel on either an optical fiber or a glass slide and then continuously exposed to water. Since the glass slide was more sensitive and robust, only this setup was used in the field. The sensor responded to spikes of genotoxic compounds in the water with a minimal detectable concentration of 0.01 mg/L mitomycin C in the laboratory and 0.1 mg/L mitomycin C in the field. With further optimization, which should include a reduction in daily maintenance, the sensor has the potential to become a useful addition to the currently available biomonitors.

  9. Development and Validation of an On-Line Water Toxicity Sensor with Immobilized Luminescent Bacteria for On-Line Surface Water Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolijn Woutersen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface water used for drinking water production is frequently monitored in The Netherlands using whole organism biomonitors, with for example Daphnia magna or Dreissena mussels, which respond to changes in the water quality. However, not all human-relevant toxic compounds can be detected by these biomonitors. Therefore, a new on-line biosensor has been developed, containing immobilized genetically modified bacteria, which respond to genotoxicity in the water by emitting luminescence. The performance of this sensor was tested under laboratory conditions, as well as under field conditions at a monitoring station along the river Meuse in The Netherlands. The sensor was robust and easy to clean, with inert materials, temperature control and nutrient feed for the reporter organisms. The bacteria were immobilized in sol-gel on either an optical fiber or a glass slide and then continuously exposed to water. Since the glass slide was more sensitive and robust, only this setup was used in the field. The sensor responded to spikes of genotoxic compounds in the water with a minimal detectable concentration of 0.01 mg/L mitomycin C in the laboratory and 0.1 mg/L mitomycin C in the field. With further optimization, which should include a reduction in daily maintenance, the sensor has the potential to become a useful addition to the currently available biomonitors.

  10. PHB-degrading bacteria isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of aquatic animals as protective actors against luminescent vibriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiying; De Schryver, Peter; Van Delsen, Bart; Maignien, Loïs; Boon, Nico; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Verstraete, Willy; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2010-10-01

    The use of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) was shown to be successful in increasing the resistance of brine shrimp against pathogenic infections. In this study, we isolated for the first time PHB-degrading bacteria from a gastrointestinal environment. Pure strains of PHB-degrading bacteria were isolated from Siberian sturgeon, European sea bass and giant river prawn. The capability of selected isolates to degrade PHB was confirmed in at least two of three setups: (1) growth in minimal medium containing PHB as the sole carbon (C) source, (2) production of clearing zones on minimal agar containing PHB as the sole C source and (3) degradation of PHB (as determined by HPLC analysis) in 10% Luria-Bertani medium containing PHB. Challenge tests showed that the PHB-degrading activity of the selected isolates increased the survival of brine shrimp larvae challenged to a pathogenic Vibrio campbellii strain by a factor 2-3. Finally, one of the PHB-degrading isolates from sturgeon showed a double biocontrol effect because it was also able to inactivate acylhomoserine lactones, a type of quorum-sensing molecule that regulates the virulence of different pathogenic bacteria. Thus, the combined supplementation of a PHB-degrading bacterium and PHB as a synbioticum provides perspectives for improving the gastrointestinal health of aquatic animals. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Do freshwater macrophytes influence the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria in the rhizospere?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    to unvegetated sediment, especially with respect to the availability of oxygen, organic carbon, and inorganic nitrogen. We hypothesize that macrophyte species create specific niches for ammonia oxidizing and nitrate-reducing bacteria in their rhizosphere, leading to plant-dependant differences in abundance...... dortmanna have been shown to release oxygen from their roots and to stimulate nitrification and coupled nitrification-denitrification in the rhizosphere. Together with the excretion of root exudates, this effect leads to strongly modified microenvironments at the root surface and in the rhizosphere compared......-denitrification using the 15N isotope pairing technique. Ammonia-oxidizing and nitrate-reducing populations are analyzed based on the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) and the nitrate reductase gene (narG) as functional markers. Preliminary data indicate that there in fact exist differences in the community composition...

  12. Chironomus plumosus larvae increase fluxes of denitrification products and diversity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in freshwater sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; W. V. Kofoed, Michael; H. Larsen, Lone

    2014-01-01

    , respectively, which was mostly due to stimulation of sedimentary denitrification; incomplete denitrification in the guts accounted for up to 20% of the N2O efflux. Phylotype richness of the nitrate reductase gene narG was significantly higher in sediment with than without larvae. In the gut, 47 narG phylotypes...... were found expressed, which may contribute to higher phylotype richness in colonized sediment. In contrast, phylotype richness of the nitrous oxide reductase gene nosZ was unaffected by the presence of larvae and very few nosZ phylotypes were expressed in the gut. Gene abundance of neither narG, nor...... nosZ wasdifferent in sediments with and without larvae. Hence, C. plumosus increases activity and diversity, but not overall abundance of nitrate-reducing bacteria, probably by providing additional ecological niches in its burrow and gut....

  13. Luminescence nanothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-07-01

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed. This work was supported by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Project S2009/MAT-1756), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (MAT2010-16161) and by Caja Madrid Foundation.

  14. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2008-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  16. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2012-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  18. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2013-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  19. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  20. luminescence properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, Bozok University, Yozgat 66900, Turkey. 2Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Erciyes ... synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction method, their crystal structures and luminescence properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) ...

  1. Luminescent screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.-I.

    1982-01-01

    Luminescent screens which are useful for such purposes as intensifying screens for radiographs are comprised of a support bearing a layer of finely divided particles of a phosphor dispersed in a cross-linked polymeric matrix formed by heat-curing of a coating composition comprising an unsaturated cross-linkable polymer, a polymerizable acrylic monomer, a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer, and a heat-activatable polymerization initiator. The phosphor layer includes voids formed by evaporation of an evaporable component which is present in the coating composition from which such layer is formed. (author)

  2. Turtles: Freshwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J. Whitfield; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Bowden, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    With their iconic shells, turtles are morphologically distinct in being the only extant or extinct vertebrate animals to have their shoulders and hips inside their rib cages. By the time an asteroid hit the earth 65.5 million years ago, causing the extinction of dinosaurs, turtles were already an ancient lineage that was 70% through their evolutionary history to date. The remarkable evolutionary success of turtles over 220 million years is due to a combination of both conservative and effective life history traits and an essentially unchanging morphology that withstood the test of time. However, the life history traits of many species make them particularly susceptible to overharvest and habitat destruction in the modern world, and a majority of the world’s species face serious conservation challenges with several extinctions documented in modern times. The global plight of turtles is underscored by the fact that the percentage of imperiled species exceeds that of even the critically endangered primates.Freshwater turtles, with over 260 recognized species, have become a focus on a worldwide scale for many conservation issues. This article is a synthesis of a diverse body of information on the general biology of freshwater turtles, with particular emphasis on the extensive research on ecology, life history, and behavior that has been accomplished in the last half century. Much of the research has been applicable to the aforementioned conservation challenges. The studies presented include a combination of laboratory and field experiments and observational studies on this intriguing group of animals.

  3. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  4. Luminescence and energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasse, G; Bleijenberg, K C; Powell, R C

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with the luminescence of uranate centres in solids. The luminescence properties are influenced by the coordination number of the hexavalent uranium ion and by the crystallographic surroundings of the uranate centre. Transitions playing a role in the luminescence processes within the octahedral UO/sub 6//sup 6 -/ group are discussed using the results from both theoretical and experimental studies on another octahedral uranium complex: UF/sub 6/. The luminescence of the octahedral uranate group in oxidic compounds is discussed. Attention is paid to the vibrational structure, which is observed in the luminescence spectra at low temperatures and to the temperature quenching of the luminescence. The temperature quenching of the uranate luminescence in uranium-doped tungstates with ordered perovskite structure can be described in terms of a three state single configurational coordinate diagram. The complicated luminescence spectra of uranium-activated sodium fluoride (NaF-U) crystals have been unraveled using chemical variation of the crystal compositions and using site selective laser excitation techniques. Four different luminescent uranate centres have been observed in NaF-U. A model for the configurations of the luminescent centres has been deduced using the results from ionic conductivity experiments.

  5. Luminescent beam stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Diane; Morton, Simon A.

    2017-10-25

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to beam stops. In one aspect, a device comprises a luminescent material, a beam stop plate, and an optical fiber. The luminescent material is a parallelepiped having a first side and a second side that are squares and having a third side that is a rectangle or a square. The first side and the second side are perpendicular to the third side. The beam stop plate is attached to the first side of the luminescent material. The optical fiber has a first end and a second end, with the first end of the optical fiber attached to the third side of the luminescent material.

  6. Luminescence detection of shellfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Carmichael, L.A.; Spencer, J.Q.; Naylor, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) has been active in the development and application of luminescence techniques in the detection of irradiated foods, in support of UK legislation. Thermoluminescence (TL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and photo-transfer luminescence (PTTL) are radiation-specific phenomena which arise due to energy stored by trapped charge carriers following irradiation. The energy released following stimulation is accompanied by detectable luminescence. The TL method involves preparation of pure silicate extracts from the sample and subsequent TL analysis, whereas PSL uses stimulation by electromagnetic radiation (visible, or near visible wavelengths) thus avoiding heating the sample. (author)

  7. Exploring Freshwater Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and long term studies on mapping freshwater biodiversity1. 1. R J Ranjit Daniels ... The hierarchical nature of stream organization offers opportunity to ecologists to ask .... threats, freshwater systems are losing their aesthetic value (Fig- ure 4).

  8. Freshwater Fish Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater fish are ecologically important in stream ecosystems, and they provide people with significant food, recreation, and conservation value as biological indicator of freshwater streams. Historically, the streams and rivers of southern New England supported moderately dive...

  9. Tropical Freshwater Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Freshwater Biology promotes the publication of scientific contributions in the field of freshwater biology in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. One issue is published annually but this number may be increased. Original research papers and short communications on any aspect of tropical freshwater ...

  10. Virulence of luminescent and non-luminescent isogenic vibrios towards gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana larvae and specific pathogen-free Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuoc, L H; Defoirdt, T; Sorgeloos, P; Bossier, P

    2009-04-01

    This study was conducted to test the virulence of luminescent (L) and non-luminescent (NL) isogenic strains of Vibrio campbellii LMG21363, Vibrio harveyi BB120 (wild type) and quorum-sensing mutant strains derived from the wild type such as Vibrio harveyi BB152, BB170, MM30 and BB886. The NL strains could be obtained by culturing rifampicin-resistant luminescent strains in the dark under static condition. The virulence of the L and NL strains was tested in gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana larvae challenged with 10(4) CFU ml(-1) of bacteria. All luminescent isogenic tested strains showed higher virulence compared to the NL strains. The virulence of L and NL V. campbellii and V. harveyi BB120 was also tested in specific pathogen-free juvenile shrimp upon intramuscular injection with 10(6) CFU of bacteria. In contrast with Artemia, there was no significant difference in mortality between the groups challenged with L and NL strains (P > 0.05). The non-luminescent strains were not able to revert back to the luminescent state and quorum sensing did not influence this phenotypic shift. Luminescent Vibrio strains can switch to a non-luminescent state by culturing them in static conditions. The NL strains become less virulent as verified in Artemia. The luminescent state of Vibrio cells in a culture needs to be verified in order to assure maintenance of virulence.

  11. Positron-Induced Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, E. V.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stoneking, M. R.; Pedersen, T. Sunn

    2018-04-01

    We report on the observation that low-energy positrons incident on a phosphor screen produce significantly more luminescence than electrons do. For two different wide-band-gap semiconductor phosphors (ZnS:Ag and ZnO:Zn), we compare the luminescent response to a positron beam with the response to an electron beam. For both phosphors, the positron response is significantly brighter than the electron response, by a factor that depends strongly on incident energy (0-5 keV). Positrons with just a few tens of electron-volts of energy (for ZnS:Ag) or less (for ZnO:Zn) produce as much luminescence as is produced by electrons with several kilo-electron-volts. We attribute this effect to valence band holes and excited electrons produced by positron annihilation and subsequent Auger processes. These results demonstrate a valuable approach for addressing long-standing questions about luminescent materials.

  12. Freshwater Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections as a result of freshwater exposure or trauma are fortunately rare. Etiologic agents are varied, but commonly include filamentous fungi and Candida. This narrative review describes various sources of potential freshwater fungal exposure and the diseases that may result, including fungal keratitis, acute otitis externa and tinea pedis, as well as rare deep soft tissue or bone infections and pulmonary or central nervous system infections following traumatic freshwater exposure during natural disasters or near-drowning episodes. Fungal etiology should be suspected in appropriate scenarios when bacterial cultures or molecular tests are normal or when the infection worsens or fails to resolve with appropriate antibacterial therapy.

  13. Luminescence study of spodumene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotani, S.; Fujii, A.T.; Antonini, R.; Pontuschka, W.M.; Rabani, S.R.; Furtado, W.W.

    1990-02-01

    A comparative study is made of the luminescence of five kinds of spodumene from Minas Gerais, Brazil, studied previously by optical absorption spectroscopy. Natural gemstones are used which, in the course of the experiments, were irradiated with X-rays. (L.C.) [pt

  14. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  15. Exploring Freshwater Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Freshwater ecosystems and associated habitats harbor incrediblebiodiversity. They offer various ecosystem services andsustain human livelihoods. However, due to increasing developmentalpressure and rising water demand, these systemsare under huge threat. As a result, many aquatic species arefeared to become ...

  16. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Brook I. Diseases caused by non-spore-forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  17. Magnetotactic bacteria at the geomagnetic equator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, R.B.; Blakemore, R.P.; Araujo, F.F.T. de; Esquivel, D.M.S.; Danon, J.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetotatic bacteria are observed in freshwater and marine sediments of Fortaleza, Brazil, situated close to the geomagnetic equator. Both South-seeking and North-seeking bacteria are present in roughly equal numbers in the same samples. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that the vertical component of the geomagnetic field selects the predominant polarity type among magnetotactic bacteria in natural environments. (Author) [pt

  18. Freshwater and fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxen, R.

    1997-01-01

    Severe radioactive contamination of the freshwater environment could have serious consequences for both drinking water and fish. Most of the Nordic countries have an abundance of freshwater lakes and rivers. Finland alone has about 56,000 lakes, each with a surface area of 1 hectare or more. Nearly 10% of Finland's surface is covered with lakes and rivers. In Sweden, about 9% of the surface area is freshwater, in Norway about 5%, and in Denmark only about 2%. Freshwater plays a minor role in Iceland, but even there numerous rivers discharge from the volcanic soils to the Ocean. Cs-137 and 90 Sr are likely to be the most important radionuclides with respect to long term radioactive contamination of freshwater. If radioactive deposition occurs in the absence of snow and ice radionuclides will contaminate the surface water directly and may rapidly enter the aquatic food chain. Fish which eat contaminated plankton become contaminated almost immediately. Deposition during summer increases the transfer for radionuclides to fish since fish metabolism is faster during the warm season. During the cold period, fish metabolism is slow and thus uptake and excretion of radiocaesium are also slow. (EG)

  19. Freshwater Megafauna: Flagships for Freshwater Biodiversity under Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizo, Savrina F; Jähnig, Sonja C; Bremerich, Vanessa; Freyhof, Jörg; Harrison, Ian; He, Fengzhi; Langhans, Simone D; Tockner, Klement; Zarfl, Christiane; Darwall, William

    2017-10-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is highly threatened and is decreasing more rapidly than its terrestrial or marine counterparts; however, freshwaters receive less attention and conservation investment than other ecosystems do. The diverse group of freshwater megafauna, including iconic species such as sturgeons, river dolphins, and turtles, could, if promoted, provide a valuable tool to raise awareness and funding for conservation. We found that freshwater megafauna inhabit every continent except Antarctica, with South America, Central Africa, and South and Southeast Asia being particularly species rich. Freshwater megafauna co-occur with up to 93% of mapped overall freshwater biodiversity. Fifty-eight percent of the 132 megafauna species included in the study are threatened, with 84% of their collective range falling outside of protected areas. Of all threatened freshwater species, 83% are found within the megafauna range, revealing the megafauna's capacity as flagship and umbrella species for fostering freshwater conservation.

  20. Luminescent solar concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugce Tosun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent solar concentrator (LSC is a device that has luminescent molecules embedding or topping polymeric or glass waveguide to generate electricity from sunlight with a photovoltaic cell attachment. LSCs can be employed both in small and large scale projects, independent on the direction or angle of the surface with respect to the sun, promising more freedom for integration in urban environments compared to the traditional PV systems. The aim of the SEB&C PDEng project is to investigate the applicability of this innovative technology in the built environment and to bridge the gap of knowledge linking societal, design and technological aspects. The final goal is to exhibit potential application concepts of LSC developed by co-creative methods at SPARK campus which is a hub for open innovation in built environment. Necessity of a paradigm shift towards sustainable and smart cities came into being due to the significant increase in energy demand of the buildings. The challenge is to increase renewable sources in the energy mix while designing aesthetic environments. Thus, building integrated renewable energy technologies represent a great opportunity to help overcome this current challenge. Smart energy, energy efficiency and use of renewable sources are key aspects to be considered nowadays and many innovative technologies need further exploitation to be commercially viable, such as luminescent solar concentrator.

  1. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  2. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes-Halldorson,Vânia da Silva; Duran,Norma Letícia

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  3. Luminescence dating of Netherland's sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we revity: 1) the development of the methodology, 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands' sediments;

  4. Luminescence from metals and insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, O.H.

    1985-01-01

    The term luminescence is normally applied to light emission that is not explainable by the mechanisms discussed by the other speakers in this meeting. Specifically, it is not transition radiation, surface plasmon radiation, or bremsstrahlung. One normally thinks of luminescence as arising from one-electron transitions within a medium. This talk consists of an overview of luminescence from condensed matter under irradiation by either energetic particles or photons. The author begins with organic molecules, where luminescence is best understood, and then discusses inorganic insulators and metals. Finally, the dependence of yield upon projectile species and velocity is discussed, and predictions are made concerning the relative effectiveness of electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms in exciting luminescence

  5. LUMINESCENCE DETERMINATION OF ETODOLAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Yegorova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, simple and rapid method for determination of non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug – etodolac (Et in washings from surfaces of pharmaceutical equipment have been proposed. The intensity of native luminescence of water-n-propanol solutions of etodolac (λex= 274 nm; λlum= 350 nm was used as the analytical signal. The calibration graph is linear in the concentration range 0.014-2.3 μg/ml, the limit of detection is 0.5 ng/ml.

  6. Luminescence dating in archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is routinely applied to burnt lithic material. Simple fires are capable of enabling stones weighing a few hundred grams to reach 450 o C, thus zeroing the TL signal. TL dates have been obtained for Upper and Lower Paleolithic sites in Europe and the Near East. TL dating continues to be used for dating pottery and for authentification of ceramic works of art. Some recent studies report the use of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) (also know as photoluminescence) for dating very small samples of quartz, e.g. from small pieces of pottery or frm metallurgical slag The major recent advance has been in the development of a reliable laboratory procedure for using the OSL signal from quartz to obtain the past radiation exposure. The quartz OSL signal is extremely sensitive to light and is reduced to a negligible level on exposure to direct sunlight for radionuclides during burial, signal to date san.sized quartz grains extracted from sediments, The OSL signal is stimulated by 470 nm light from emitting diodes and the detected using flirters centred on 340 nm A similar signal can be obtained from feldspar grain when are exposed to infrared wavelengths around 880 nm. The infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals is also rapidly depleted by exposure to sunlight, and dating of colluvial deposits from archaeological sites has been reported

  7. Delayed Luminescence and Biophotons from Biological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoesel, Ernst; Hann, Patrick; Garzon, Maria; Pfeiffer, Erik; Lofland, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the field of biophotonics, since it is a non-invasive technique. Many biological systems, such as yeast, bacteria, leaves, seeds, and algae display the unusual phenomenon of a weak, delayed luminescence on the timescale of seconds to minutes after transient illumination. It is also observed that the time decay of the biophotonic emission is not exponential, even after the delay, and that there can be oscillations in intensity with time, which depend on the duration of the illumination. Results from two types of yeast, i.e. bread yeast, and saccharomyces, as well as those from several types of algae are presented. Possible mechanisms for the source of the ultraweak photon emission are discussed.

  8. Thermo-luminescent dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reither, M; Schorn, B; Schneider, E

    1981-01-01

    The development of paediatric radiology which began in the late 195O's has been characterised by the need to limit the dose of ionising radiation to which the child is subjected. The aim has been to keep radiation exposure as low as possible by the introduction of suitable techniques and by the development of new methods. It is therefore surprising that studies in dosimetry in the paediaytric age range have only been carried out in recent years. One reason for this may have been the fact that a suitable technique of measurement was not available at the time. The introduction of solid state dosimetry based on thermo-luminescence, first into radiotherapy (1968) and subsequently into radiodiagnosis, has made it possible to abandon the previously widely used ionisation chamber. The purpose of the present paper is to indicate the suitability of this form of dose measurement for paediatric radiological purposes and to stimulate its application in this field.

  9. Persistent luminescence nanothermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Rodríguez, Emma; López-Peña, Gabriel; Montes, Eduardo; Lifante, Ginés; García Solé, José; Jaque, Daniel; Diaz-Torres, Luis Armando; Salas, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    Persistent phosphorescence nanoparticles emitting in the red and near-infrared spectral regions are strongly demanded as contrast nanoprobes for autofluorescence free bioimaging and biosensing. In this work, we have developed Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+, Cr3+, Nd3+ nanopowders that produce persistent red phosphorescence peaking at 694 nm generated by Cr3+ ions. This emission displays temperature sensitivity in the physiological temperature range (20-60 °C), which makes these nanoparticles potentially useful as fluorescence (contactless) nanothermometers operating without requiring optical excitation. Nd3+ ions, which act as shallow electron traps for the red Cr3+ persistent emission, also display infrared emission bands, extending the fluorescence imaging capability to the second biological window. This unique combination of properties makes these nanoparticles multifunctional luminescent probes with great potential applications in nanomedicine.

  10. Reflection measurements for luminescent powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    Luminescent materials are useful in applications varying from lighting and display technologies to document security features and medical research, amongst many others. Measurement of the excitation range is an important consideration, and absorption bands are often determined from a decrease in the measured diffuse reflectance of the material using a ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Such a system may provide questionable results when used to measure the reflectance of a luminescence material, which is demonstrated for a Tb doped silica phosphor, because the system cannot differentiate between the reflected light and luminescence. It is shown that more reliable results are achieved for this phosphor by measuring the reflectance using a synchronous zero-offset scan in a fluorescence spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere. This method is therefore recommended instead of traditional reflectance measurements using a UV-vis spectrophotometer for luminescent powders.

  11. Luminescence enhancement in irradiated polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.; Owen, G.P.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for the luminescence decay in polyethylene following irradiation at liquid nitrogen temperature and its enhancement on application of an electric field. It is found that both the luminescence enhancement and its subsequent decay may be described by a model involving electron tunnelling from a monoenergetic trap distribution to the parent positive ion. The possible nature of the trap is briefly discussed. (author)

  12. Successful enrichment of the ubiquitous freshwater acI Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sarahi L; McMahon, Katherine D; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Warnecke, Falk

    2014-02-01

    Actinobacteria of the acI lineage are often the numerically dominant bacterial phylum in surface freshwaters, where they can account for > 50% of total bacteria. Despite their abundance, there are no described isolates. In an effort to obtain enrichment of these ubiquitous freshwater Actinobacteria, diluted freshwater samples from Lake Grosse Fuchskuhle, Germany, were incubated in 96-well culture plates. With this method, a successful enrichment containing high abundances of a member of the lineage acI was established. Phylogenetic classification showed that the acI Actinobacteria of the enrichment belonged to the acI-B2 tribe, which seems to prefer acidic lakes. This enrichment grows to low cell densities and thus the oligotrophic nature of acI-B2 was confirmed. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Toxicology of freshwater cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, H M; Arachchi, D N Magana; Abeysekara, T; Guneratne, L

    2016-07-02

    Many chemical contaminants in drinking water have been shown to cause adverse health effects in humans after prolonged exposure. Cyanobacteria are one of the most potent and diverse groups of photosynthetic prokaryotes. One key component of cyanobacterial success in the environment is the production of potent toxins as secondary metabolites, which have been responsible for numerous adverse health impacts in humans. Anthropogenic activities have led to the increase of eutrophication in freshwater bodies' worldwide, causing cyanobacterial blooms to become more frequent. The present article will discuss about harmful cyanobacteria and their toxicology with special references to microcystin, nodularin, and cylindrospermopsin.

  14. Degradation of riverine dissolved organic matter by seawater bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochelle-Newall, E.J.; Pizay, M-D.; Middelburg, J.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Gattuso, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The functional response of a seawater bacterial community transplanted into freshwater dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated together with the response of natural populations of bacteria to size-fractioned natural source water. Seawater bacteria were incubated over a period of 8 d in

  15. Quorum Sensing Disruption in Vibrio harveyi Bacteria by Clay Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sajo P; Scholin, Jonathon; Ching, San; Chi, Fang; Herpfer, Marc

    2018-01-10

    This work describes the use of clay minerals as catalysts for the degradation of quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-dl-homoserine lactone. Certain clay minerals as a result of their surface properties and porosity can catalytically degrade the quorum sensing molecule into smaller fragments. The disruption of quorum sensing by clay in a growing Gram-negative Vibrio harveyi bacteria culture was also studied by monitoring luminescence and population density of the bacteria, wherein quenching of bacterial quorum sensing activity was observed by means of luminescence reduction. The results of this study show that food-grade clays can be used as biocatalysts in disrupting bacterial activity in various media.

  16. Marine and freshwater toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, James M

    2006-01-01

    In a very busy and exciting year, 2005 included First Action approval of a much needed official method for paralytic shellfish toxins and multiple international toxin symposia highlighted by groundbreaking research. These are the first-year milestones and activities of the Marine and Freshwater Toxins Task Force and Analytical Community. Inaugurated in 2004 and described in detail in last year's General Referee Report (1) this international toxins group has grown to 150 members from many regions and countries. Perhaps most important they are now making important and global contributions to food safety and to providing alternatives to animal-based assays. Official Method 2005.06 was first approved in late 2004 by the Task Force and subsequently Official First Action in 2005 (2) by the Methods Committee on Natural Toxins and Food Allergens and the Official Methods Board. This nonproprietary method (3) is a precolumn oxidation, liquid chromatographic method that makes good use of fluorescence detection to provide high sensitivity detection of the saxitoxins. It has also proven to be rugged enough for regulatory use and the highest level of validation. As pointed out in the report of method principle investigator and Study Director James Lawrence, approval of 2005.06 now provides the first official alternative to the mouse bioassay after many decades of shellfish monitoring. This past year in April 2005 the group also held their first international conference, "Marine and Freshwater Toxins Analysis: Ist Joint Symposium and AOAC Task Force Meeting," in Baiona, Spain. The 4-day conference consisted of research and stakeholder presentations and symposium-integrated subgroup sessions on ciguatoxins, saxitoxin assays and liquid chromatography (LC) methods for saxitoxins and domoic acids, okadaiates and azaspiracids, and yessotoxins. Many of these subgroups were recently formed in 2005 and are working towards their goals of producing officially validated analytical methods

  17. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oequist, M.

    1996-12-31

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 {mu}M. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 {mu}M h{sup -1} while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 {mu}M h{sup -1}, respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination

  18. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oequist, M.

    1996-01-01

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO 4 2- concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 μM. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 μM h -1 while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 μM h -1 , respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 μg d -1 g -1 ) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 μg d -1 g -1 ) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 μg d -1 g -1 ) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m -2 d -1 , while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m -2 d -1 , respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination paper. 67 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  19. The Zoogeography of North American freshwater fishes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hocutt, Charles H; Wiley, E. O

    1986-01-01

    ..., and Pleistoscene glaciation. The Zoogeography of North American Freshwater Fishes is a comprehensive treatment of the freshwater biogeography of North America, with implications for other disciplines...

  20. Goldenphilicity: Luminescent gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansores, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the solids and molecules different types of bonds are presented depending on the involved atoms, covalent bonds are common among elements of open shell, where more bond orbitals are filled than anti bond orbitals. It is expected that ionic bonds among closed shell atoms which have charges of opposite sign. Bonds type Van der Waals are presented among molecules which have a bipolar moment. It would not be expected bonds among zero charge species, or more generally with the same nominal charge and in any case the attractive forces would be very small. In fact it is expected that two metallic cations to be repelled each other. There recently is evidence that in organic or organometallic compounds could exist attractive interactions between two cations of the d 8 -d 10 -s 2 families. These bonds are weak but stronger than those of Van der Waals. They are compared with the hydrogen bonds. In this work it was reviewed some examples in which the goldenphilicity plays an important role in the luminescence that the gold complexes present. Examples of mono, bi and trinuclear and the structures that these organometallic compounds could take are examined. (Author)

  1. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Wintle, A G

    1999-01-01

    In the luminescence dating of sedimentary or heated quartz, some heat treatment is usually applied to the sample immediately prior to the measurement of the optically stimulated luminescence. In this paper we report experiments on a 30,000-year-old sedimentary quartz, in which we use the luminescence response to a test dose to monitor the changes in sensitivity that are caused by holding the quartz at temperatures from 160 to 280 deg. C for times from 10 s to 22 h. For an optically bleached sample, the monitoring is by both optically stimulated luminescence and the 110 deg. C TL peak; both luminescence signals are shown to have the same sensitisation (i.e. activation energy) characteristics. For natural or laboratory irradiated samples only the 110 deg. C TL peak can be used; sensitivity increases of up to a factor of 1.3 and 3 are observed for the natural and laboratory irradiated aliquots, respectively. Up to four exponential components are used to deconvolve the sensitivity change data; the dominant compon...

  2. Luminescence in medical image science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandarakis, I.S., E-mail: kandarakis@teiath.gr

    2016-01-15

    Radiation detection in Medical Imaging is mostly based on the use of luminescent materials (scintillators and phosphors) coupled to optical sensors. Materials are employed in the form of granular screens, structured (needle-like) crystals and single crystal transparent blocks. Storage phosphors are also incorporated in some x-ray imaging plates. Description of detector performance is currently based on quality metrics, such as the Luminescence efficiency, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) can be defined and evaluated. The aforementioned metrics are experimental evaluated for various materials in the form of screens. A software was designed (MINORE v1) to present image quality measurements in a graphical user interface (GUI) environment. Luminescence efficiency, signal and noise analysis are valuable tools for the evaluation of luminescent materials as candidates for medical imaging detectors. - Highlights: • Luminescence based medical imaging detectors. • Image science: MTF, NPS, DQE. • Phosphors screens light emission efficiency experimental evaluation. • Theoretical models for estimation of phosphor screen properties. • Software for medical image quality metrics.

  3. Luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.; Evans, O.R.; Foxman, B.M.; Lin, W.

    1999-12-13

    One-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with the formula Ln(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb; 1a-f) were synthesized by treating nitrate or perchlorate salts of Ln(III) with 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate that these lanthanide coordination polymers adopt two different structures. While Ce(III), Pr(III), and Nd(III) complexes adopt a chain structure with alternating Ln-(carboxylate){sub 2}-Ln and Ln-(carboxylate){sub 4}-Ln linkages, Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) complexes have a doubly carboxylate-bridged infinite-chain structure with one chelating carboxylate group on each metal center. In both structures, the lanthanide centers also bind to two water molecules to yield an eight-coordinate, square antiprismatic geometry. The pyridine nitrogen atoms of the isonicotinate groups do not coordinate to the metal centers in these lanthanide(III) complexes; instead, they direct the formation of Ln(III) coordination polymers via hydrogen bonding with coordinated water molecules. Photoluminescence measurements show that Tb(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} is highly emissive at room temperature with a quantum yield of {approximately}90%. These results indicate that highly luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers can be assembled using a combination of coordination and hydrogen bonds. Crystal data for 1a: monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 9.712(2) {angstrom}, b = 19.833(4) {angstrom}, c = 11.616(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 111.89(3){degree}, Z = 4. Crystal data for 1f: monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 20.253(4) {angstrom}, b = 11.584(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.839(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 115.64(3){degree}, Z = 8.

  4. Effect of americium-241 on luminous bacteria. Role of peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrova, M., E-mail: maka-alexandrova@rambler.r [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Rozhko, T. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Vydryakova, G. [Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Kudryasheva, N. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), an alpha-emitting radionuclide of high specific activity, on luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum was studied. Traces of {sup 241}Am in nutrient media (0.16-6.67 kBq/L) suppressed the growth of bacteria, but enhanced luminescence intensity and quantum yield at room temperature. Lower temperature (4 {sup o}C) increased the time of bacterial luminescence and revealed a stage of bioluminescence inhibition after 150 h of bioluminescence registration start. The role of conditions of exposure the bacterial cells to the {sup 241}Am is discussed. The effect of {sup 241}Am on luminous bacteria was attributed to peroxide compounds generated in water solutions as secondary products of radioactive decay. Increase of peroxide concentration in {sup 241}Am solutions was demonstrated; and the similarity of {sup 241}Am and hydrogen peroxide effects on bacterial luminescence was revealed. The study provides a scientific basis for elaboration of bioluminescence-based assay to monitor radiotoxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides in aquatic solutions. - Highlights: {yields} Am-241 in water solutions (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) suppresses bacterial growth.{yields} Am-241 (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) stimulate bacterial luminescence. {yields} Peroxides, secondary radiolysis products, cause increase of bacterial luminescence.

  5. On luminescence lifetimes in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Galloway, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present results of investigations concerning the time dependence of luminescence emission relative to the time of stimulation in quartz. Measurements of time-resolved spectra were performed on a new versatile pulsed light emitting diode system using 525 nm stimulation, an 11 μs duration pulse, a repetition rate of 11 kHz and a 64 μs dynamic range. Effects on luminescence lifetime resulting from sample treatments such as optical stimulation, irradiation, and preheating, are reported

  6. Luminescent materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2015-01-01

    It is pertinent to note that Luminescence phenomenon has once again occupied a central stage with the announcement of Nobel Prize in October 2014 to three Japanese scientists. The discovery of Galium Nitride proved to be a revolutionary step forward in creation of Blue LEDs. With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources. The Volume under reference consists of 9 Chapters, written by experts in the area of Luminescent Materials. First 5 Chapters are contributed as Review Papers and the last 4 are based on Research Papers.Chapter

  7. Advantages and disadvantages of luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olko, Pawel, E-mail: Pawel.Olko@ifj.edu.p [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Science (IFJ PAN), Krakow (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    Owing to their excellent dosimetric properties, luminescence detectors of ionizing radiation are now extensively applied in individual dosimetry services. The most frequently used personal dosemeters are based on Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), radiophotoluminescence (RPL) or thermoluminescence (TL). Luminescence detectors have also found several applications in clinical dosimetry, especially around new radiation modalities in radiotherapy, such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) or ion beam radiotherapy. Requirements of luminescence detectors applied in individual and clinical dosimetry and some recent developments in luminescence of detectors and techniques leading to significant improvements of the functionality and accuracy of dosimetry systems are reviewed and discussed.

  8. Extracellular DNA formation during biofilm development by freshwater bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    a transient peak at 6 hours, and in Rheinheimera the concentration peaked at 12 hours and remained high. Interestingly, the Rheinheimera biofilm dispersed immediately after the eDNA concentration peaked. The antimicrobial effect of eDNA was tested in growth experiments, and Rheinheimera was strongly affected...

  9. Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility, located at SANGB, has direct year-round access to water from Lake St. Clair and has a State of Michigan approved National...

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 4. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent properties of lanthanide-doped NaLaF 4 nanoparticles. JIGMET LADOL HEENA KHAJURIA SONIKA KHAJURIA ... Keywords. Citric acid; X-ray diffraction; down-conversion emission; energy transfer.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that nanoparticles have cylindrical shape and crystalline nature of nanoparticles was confirmed by SAED patterns. Down- conversion (DC) luminescent properties of doped NaLaF4 were also .... Figure 1 shows the XRPD patterns of undoped NaLaF4 and .... which can be assigned to the transitions from the 7F6 ground.

  12. A portable luminescence dating instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kook, M.H.; Murray, A.S.; Lapp, Torben

    2011-01-01

    We describe a portable luminescence reader suitable for use in remote localities in the field. The instrument weighs about 8kg and is based around a 30mm bialkali photomultiplier detecting signals through a glass filter centered on 340nm. Stimulation is by 470nm blue LEDs (24W in total) operating...

  13. Advances in luminescence instrument systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Bulur, E.; Duller, G.A.T.

    2000-01-01

    We report on recent advances in the development of luminescence measurement systems and techniques at Riso. These include: (1) optical stimulation units based on new-generation powerful blue light (470 nm) emitting diodes providing up to 28 mW/cm(2) for OSL measurements; (2) an infrared (830 nm...

  14. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  15. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria......, the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size...

  16. Magnetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  17. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  18. Desalination - an alternative freshwater resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakaib, M.

    2005-01-01

    Global water constitutes 94 percent salt water that is from the oceans and 6% is in the form of freshwater. Out of this 6% freshwater approximately 27% is trapped in glaciers and 72% is underground. The sea water is important for transportation, fisheries. Oceans regulate climate through air sea interaction. However direct consumption of sea water is too salty to sustain human life. Water with a dissolved solids (salt) content generally below about 1000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) is considered acceptable for human consumption. The application of desalting technologies over the past 50 years have been in many of the arid zone where freshwater is available. Pakistan lies in the Sun Belt. It is considered a wide margin coastal belt (990 km), having an Exclusive Economic Zone of 240,000 km/sup 2/, that strokes trillion cubic meters of sea water that can be made available as freshwater source to meet the shortfall in the supply of domestic water through desalination along the coastal belt of Pakistan. The freshwater obtained from the other desalination processes is slightly expensive, but the cost of desalination can be considerably reduced provided that the available inexpensive or free waste energy is utilized mainly. (author)

  19. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO 4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO 2 F 2 . Studies on the effect of added LiNO 3 or Na 2 WO 4 ·2H 2 O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF 6 content of WF 6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF 6

  20. Luminescence of LiH(D):Ru monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabirzyanov, A.A.; Oparin, D.V.; Pilipenko, G.I.; Gavrilov, F.F.

    1993-01-01

    Luminescence of lithium hydride (deuteride) activated by ruthenium is recorded for the first time. The features connected with the structure and oscillations of the basic lattice are detected in luminescence spectrum. The qualitative model of luminescence spectrum is suggested

  1. Luminescence centers in bismuth orthogermanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordun, O.M.

    2001-01-01

    The luminescence and photoexcitation spectra of single crystals,ceramics,and thin films of Bi 4 Ce 3 O 1 2 are studied.The decomposition of the luminescence spectra into elementary components by the Alentsev-Fock method showed that they consist of three bands with maxima at 2.7,2.4,and 2.05 eV.The bands with maxima at 2.7 and 2.4 eV are assigned to the emission of self-trapped Frenkel excitons describing the excited state of a (BiO 6 ) 9- molecular ion. Emission bands with maxima at 2.0 5 eV are assigned to recombination on traps caused by structural defects

  2. X-ray luminescent glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Yamada, O.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray luminescent glasses comprising a divalent cation such as an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cations such as pb, cd, or zn, and certain rare earth metaphosphates are suitable as vitreous, x-ray phosphors or x-ray luminescent glass fibers in an x-ray intensifying screen. The glasses have the composition n(Mo X p2o5)((1-y)tb2o3 X yce2o3 X 3p2o5) wherein N is greater than zero but less than or equal to 16, M is an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cation such as pb, cd, or zn, and Y is greater than or equal to zero but less than one

  3. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affleck, Rhett L. (Los Alamos, NM); Ambrose, W. Patrick (Los Alamos, NM); Demas, James N. (Charlottesville, VA); Goodwin, Peter M. (Jemez Springs, NM); Johnson, Mitchell E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Petty, Jeffrey T. (Los Alamos, NM); Schecker, Jay A. (Sante Fe, NM); Wu, Ming (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  4. Modern luminescence spectroscopy of minerals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gaft, Michael; Panczer, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence Spectroscopy of Minerals and Materials presents an overview of the general concepts in luminescence spectroscopy as well as experimental methods and their interpretation. Special emphasis is laid on the fluorescence lifetime and the determination of time-resolved spectra. This method enables the exposure of new luminescence in minerals previously hidden by more intensive centers. Specialists in the fields of solid state physics, chemistry and spectroscopy will find a wealth of new information in this unique book.

  5. Material for a luminescent solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A material for use in a luminescent solar concentrator, formed by ceramitizing the luminescent ion Cr/sup 3 +/ with a transparent ceramic glass containing mullite. The resultant material has tiny Cr/sup 3 +/-bearing crystallites dispersed uniformly through an amorphous glass. The invention combines the high luminescent efficiency of Cr/sup 3 +/ in the crystalline phase with the practical and economical advantages of glass technology.

  6. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  7. Electrostatic probes in luminescent discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Raposo, C. da.

    1980-01-01

    A system to produce luminescent type plasma by continuos discharge and ionization by high frequency was constructed. The ionization was done in the air and in the argon under pressures from 3 to 10 mmHg. The parameters of a non magnetized collisional plasma and the parameters of a magnetized plasma such as, density, eletron temperature and potential, using a Langmuir probe with plane geometry, were determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Luminescence studies on phosphor screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotakis, G.; Nomikos, C.; Bakas, A.; Proimos, B.

    1994-01-01

    We report our results on x-ray phosphor screens prepared of some new materials focusing attention on their efficiency under fluoroscopy conditions, on optimization conditions and on comparisons among the various materials. All data are presented in absolute values. A theoretical model is presented, that takes into account the granular structure of the screens, permitting the explanation and prediction of the luminescence properties of the screens. (authors)

  9. Luminescence studies on phosphor screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayiotakis, G; Nomikos, C; Bakas, A; Proimos, B [Medical Physics Department, University of Patras, 265 00 Patras, Greece (Greece)

    1994-12-31

    We report our results on x-ray phosphor screens prepared of some new materials focusing attention on their efficiency under fluoroscopy conditions, on optimization conditions and on comparisons among the various materials. All data are presented in absolute values. A theoretical model is presented, that takes into account the granular structure of the screens, permitting the explanation and prediction of the luminescence properties of the screens. (authors). 12 refs, 3 figs.

  10. Ammonium addition inhibits 13C-methane incorporation into methanotroph membrane lipids in a freshwater sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nold, s.c.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Pel, R.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the effect of ammonium addition on the species composition and activity of freshwater methane oxidizing bacteria, intact sediment cores were labeled with (CH4)-C-13 and incubated under ambient and elevated ammonium concentrations. After 7 days, methanotroph activity was assessed by

  11. Ammonium addition inhibits 13C-methane incorporation into methanotroph membrane lipids in a freshwater sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nold, S.C.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Pel, R.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the effect of ammonium addition on the species composition and activity of freshwater methane oxidizing bacteria, intact sediment cores were labeled with 13CH4 and incubated under ambient and elevated ammonium concentrations. After 7 days, methanotroph activity was assessed by

  12. Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneering work by Huntley et al. (1985), optical dating is being increasingly recognised as an important technique for establishing a time frame of deposition of sediments (Aitken, 1998). Optical dating differs from thermoluminescence (TL) dating in that visible/infrared light from lasers or LEDs (light-emitting-diodes) is used as a means of stimulation, in contrast to thermal stimulation. It has several advantages over TL dating: (i) the resetting of the OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) clock is more effective than that of TL clock; for sediments transported under water or in other situations where the sediment grains have undergone inhomogeneous bleaching, this property ensures that ages based on optical dating are generally more reliable than TL ages, (ii) the optical dating technique is non-destructive, and multiple readouts of the optical signal is possible; this feature has resulted in the development of single-aliquot and single-grain protocols (Murray and Wintle, 1999; Banerjee et al. 1999), (iii) the sample is not heated as in TL; thus, spurious luminescence is avoided and there is a significant reduction in blackbody radiation. Dating of materials which change phase on heating is also practical, and finally, (iv) thermal quenching of luminescence is negligible, allowing accurate estimation of kinetic parameters using standard techniques and providing access to deep OSL traps. This characteristic may be helpful in extending the limits of optical dating beyond the last 150 ka from a global point of view

  13. Methods of producing luminescent images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, P.; Newman, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for producing a luminescent image in a layer of a binding material in which is dispersed a thermoluminescent material. The layer is heated uniformly to a temperature of 80 to 300 0 C and is exposed to luminescence inducing radiation whilst so heated. The preferred exposing radiation is X-rays and preferably the thermoluminescent material is insensitive to electromagnetic radiation of wavelength longer than 300 mm. Information concerning preparation of the luminescent material is given in BP 1,347,672; this material has the advantage that at elevated temperatures it shows increased sensitivity compared with room temperature. At temperatures in the range 80 to 150 0 C the thermoluminescent material exhibits 'afterglow', allowing the image to persist for several seconds after the X-radiation has ceased, thus allowing the image to be retained for visual inspection in this temperature range. At higher temperatures, however, there is negligible 'afterglow'. The thermoluminescent layers so produced are particularly useful as fluoroscopic screens. The preferred method of heating the thermoluminescent material is described in BP 1,354,149. An example is given of the application of the method. (U.K.)

  14. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2018-01-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  15. Discuss on luminescence dose data analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinhua; Xiao Wuyun; Ai Xianyun; Shi Zhilan; Liu Ying

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology. General design planning of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology is put forward with the diverse demands. The emphasis is focused on dose data processing method, luminescence curve analysis method, using of network, mechanics of communication among computers, data base management system of individual dose in this paper. The main methods and skills used in this technology as well as their advantages are also discussed. And it offers general design references for development luminescence dose data processing software. (authors)

  16. Review: Freshwater conservation planning in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Freshwater conservation planning in South Africa: Milestones to ... Water SA. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search ... Since the 1970s, at approximately 10-year intervals, 4 national-scale freshwater conservation ...

  17. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for...

  18. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on Luminous Bacteria Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryasheva, N.; Rozhko, T.; Alexandrova, M.; Vasyunkina, E.; Arkhipova, V.

    2011-01-01

    Marine luminous bacteria were used to monitor toxicity of alpha- (Am-241, U-235+238) and beta- (tritium) radionuclide solutions. Increase or inhibition of bacterial luminescence was observed under exposure to radionuclides. Radiation toxicity of Am and chemical toxicity of U were demonstrated. Effects of U were similar to those of stable heavy metals: sensitivity was about 10-5 M. Sensitivity of the bacteria to Am-241 was 300 Bq/L (10 -11 M). Inhibition of bacterial growth was observed under exposure to Am-241 and tritium. Role of peroxides and electron transfer processes in the effects of radionuclides on luminous bacteria is discussed.

  19. Inhabitants of the Fresh-Water Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Joseph; Schroeder, Marlene

    This learner's guide is designed to assist middle school students in studying freshwater organisms. Following a brief introduction to freshwater ecology, simple line drawings facilitate the identification of plants and animals common to Florida's freshwater ecosystems. Emphasis of the short text which accompanies each illustration is upon the…

  20. Methods for preparing synthetic freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E J; Davison, W; Hamilton-Taylor, J

    2002-03-01

    Synthetic solutions that emulate the major ion compositions of natural waters are useful in experiments aimed at understanding biogeochemical processes. Standard recipes exist for preparing synthetic analogues of seawater, with its relatively constant composition, but, due to the diversity of freshwaters, a range of compositions and recipes is required. Generic protocols are developed for preparing synthetic freshwaters of any desired composition. The major problems encountered in preparing hard and soft waters include dissolving sparingly soluble calcium carbonate, ensuring that the ionic components of each concentrated stock solution cannot form an insoluble salt and dealing with the supersaturation of calcium carbonate in many hard waters. For acidic waters the poor solubility of aluminium salts requires attention. These problems are overcome by preparing concentrated stock solutions according to carefully designed reaction paths that were tested using a combination of experiment and equilibrium modeling. These stock solutions must then be added in a prescribed order to prepare a final solution that is brought into equilibrium with the atmosphere. The example calculations for preparing hard, soft and acidic freshwater surrogates with major ion compositions the same as published analyses, are presented in a generalized fashion that should allow preparation of any synthetic freshwater according to its known analysis.

  1. Luminescent converter of neodymium laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Golab, S.

    1992-01-01

    The new luminescent converter of neodymium laser radiation has been worked out. Activated inorganic compounds of ytterbium and erbium ions has been used as luminescent agent. The multi-component inorganic glass containing tellurium oxide as well as boron, sodium, magnesium and zinc oxides has been applied as a converter matrix

  2. Receptor-Targeted Luminescent Silver Bionanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Chin, Patrick T.K.; Buckle, Tessa; Linden, van der Marte; Barendregt, Arjan; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag-NC) provide the next generation in bionanoparticles, wherein the luminescence (650 nm) and large Stokes shift of these inorganic nanoclusters are favorable for biological imaging. By combining these characteristics with those of human serum albumin (HSA; a protein

  3. Kinetics of infrared stimulated luminescence from feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Sohbati, Reza; Guralnik, Benny

    2015-01-01

    thermal and optical, of the infrared stimulated luminescence signal from feldspar. Based on the application of this model, it is concluded that different infra-red stimulated luminescence emissions (UV, blue, yellow and far-red) follow the same kinetics, and, therefore, involve participation of the same...

  4. Application of luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescence signals measured from minerals within bricks or ceramic samples can provide information about the absorbed radiation dose. This feature has for several years been used in dating archaeological and geological samples and recently luminescence techniques have been intensively used far ...

  5. Time-resolved measurements of luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, Bradley B. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); McShane, Michael J., E-mail: mcshane@tamu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Luminescence sensing and imaging has become more widespread in recent years in a variety of industries including the biomedical and environmental fields. Measurements of luminescence lifetime hold inherent advantages over intensity-based response measurements, and advances in both technology and methods have enabled their use in a broader spectrum of applications including real-time medical diagnostics. This review will focus on recent advances in analytical methods, particularly calculation techniques, including time- and frequency-domain lifetime approaches as well as other time-resolved measurements of luminescence. -- Highlights: • Developments in technology have led to widespread use of luminescence lifetime. • Growing interest for sensing and imaging applications. • Recent advances in approaches to lifetime calculations are reviewed. • Advantages and disadvantages of various methods are weighed. • Other methods for measurement of luminescence lifetime also described.

  6. Time-resolved measurements of luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Bradley B.; McShane, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence sensing and imaging has become more widespread in recent years in a variety of industries including the biomedical and environmental fields. Measurements of luminescence lifetime hold inherent advantages over intensity-based response measurements, and advances in both technology and methods have enabled their use in a broader spectrum of applications including real-time medical diagnostics. This review will focus on recent advances in analytical methods, particularly calculation techniques, including time- and frequency-domain lifetime approaches as well as other time-resolved measurements of luminescence. -- Highlights: • Developments in technology have led to widespread use of luminescence lifetime. • Growing interest for sensing and imaging applications. • Recent advances in approaches to lifetime calculations are reviewed. • Advantages and disadvantages of various methods are weighed. • Other methods for measurement of luminescence lifetime also described

  7. Metal plasmon enhanced europium complex luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Feng; Aldea, Gabriela; Nunzi, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The plasmon enhanced luminescence of a rare-earth complex Tris(6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8-heptafluoro-2, 2-dimethyl-3, 5-octanedionato) europium (Eu(fod) 3 ) was investigated. A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) thin film was successfully adopted as a spacer to separate the Eu complex from the silver island film (SIF), and five-fold enhancement of the radiative decay rate of the Eu complex on SIF was demonstrated based on the luminescence intensity and lifetime measurement. Investigation of the distance dependent luminescence indicates that 7 nm is an optimal distance for SIF enhanced Eu luminescence. Plasmon enhanced rare-earth luminescence based on an organic film spacer would find potential applications in plasmon enhanced organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices.

  8. Isolation and characterization of the microbial community of a freshwater distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balamurugan, P.; Subba Rao, T.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation provides generic information on culturable and non-culturable microbial community of a freshwater distribution system. Culture based and culture independent (16S rRNA gene sequencing) techniques were used to identify the resident microbial community of the system. Selective isolation of the fouling bacteria such as biofilm formers and corrosion causing bacteria was also attempted. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was carried out and the bands were sequenced to obtain the diversity of the total bacterial types. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was predominantly observed in most of the samples. A variety of bacteria, related to groups such as Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were identified. The study highlights the relevance of the observed microbial diversity with respect to material deterioration in a freshwater distribution system, which can aid in designing effective control methods. (author)

  9. Luminescence detection of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The need for forensic tests to identify irradiated foods has been widely recognised at a time of growing international trade in such products and impending changes in UK and EEC legislation to control the process. This paper outlines the requirements for and of such tests, and discusses recent developments in luminescence approaches aimed at meeting the needs of public analysts, retailers and consumers. Detecting whether or not food has been irradiated, and if so to what dose, is one of the challenges which food irradiation poses to the scientist. (author)

  10. Rupture luminescence from natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Haneman, D.

    1999-12-01

    Fibers of cotton and wool, and samples of paper, have been ruptured in tension in vacuum and in air, and give detectable luminescence in the visible range. All have a common emission peak at around 2.0 eV, which is ascribed to the deexcitation of states excited by the rupture of organic chain molecule bonds. Rubber bands give stronger emission in air, but no emission in vacuum, suggesting the material breaks only at weak interchain bonds. Mohair, cat, and horse hair also give emission in air. The phenomena reveal effects that would occur widely in nature.

  11. Biofouling problems in freshwater cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, T.S.

    2007-01-01

    In aqueous environments, microorganisms (bacteria, algae, fungi etc.,) are attracted towards surfaces, which they readily colonise resulting in the formation of biofilms. The implications of biofouling are energy losses due to increased fluid frictional resistance and increased heat transfer resistance. The temperatures prevalent inside the condenser system provide a favorable environment for the rapid growth of microorganisms. This results in thick slime deposit, which is responsible for heat transfer losses, thereby enhancing aggregation of deposits on the material surface and induces localised corrosion. There have been instances of increased capital costs due to premature replacement of equipment caused by severe under deposit corrosion due to biofouling. Moreover, fouling of service water systems of nuclear power plants is of concern, because it reduces the heat transfer capacity during an emergency or an accident. The growth of microbial films (slimes) a few tens of microns thick, in a condenser tube is sufficient to induce microbiologically influenced corrosion and cause irreparable damage to the condenser tubes and other structural materials. The down time costs to power plant due to condenser fouling and corrosion are quite large. This paper presents the author's experience in biofouling and corrosion problems in various power plants cooled by freshwater. (author)

  12. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson-Smith, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provide information on recombination processes and material properties. The design and construction of a scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope is described in detail. Operating under ambient conditions, the microscope has several novel features, including a new type of miniature inertial slider-based approach motor, large solid-angle light collection optical arrangement and a tip-height regulation system which requires the minimum of operator input. (author)

  13. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes-Halldorson Vânia da Silva

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in environmental studies, with special emphasis on the Microtox toxicity bioassay. Also, the general ecological significance of bioluminescence will be addressed.

  14. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  15. Polymeric Luminescent Compositions Doped with Beta-Diketonates Boron Difluoride as Material for Luminescent Solar Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrebtov, A. A.; Fedorenko, E. V.; Reutov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we investigated polymeric luminescent compositions based on polystyrene doped with beta diketonates boron difluoride. Transparent films with effective absorption in the ultraviolet and blue regions of the spectrum were obtained. Polymeric luminescent compositions based on the mixture of dyes allow expanding the absorption region and increase the radiation shift. A luminescent solar concentrator consisting of a glass plate coated with such film can be used for photovoltaic window application.

  16. Rumen bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McSweeney, C.S.; Denman, S.E.; Mackie, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The rumen is the most extensively studied gut community and is characterized by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interactions. This complex, mixed microbial culture is comprised of prokaryote organisms including methane-producing archaebacteria, eukaryote organisms, such as ciliate and flagellate protozoa, anaerobic phycomycete fungi and bacteriophage. Bacteria are predominant (up to 10 11 viable cells per g comprising 200 species) but a variety of ciliate protozoa occur widely (10 4 -10 6 /g distributed over 25 genera). The anaerobic fungi are also widely distributed (zoospore population densities of 10 2 -10 4 /g distributed over 5 genera). The occurrence of bacteriophage is well documented (10 7 -10 9 particles/g). This section focuses primarily on the widely used methods for the cultivation and the enumeration of rumen microbes, especially bacteria, which grow under anaerobic conditions. Methods that can be used to measure hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases, xylanases, amylases and proteinases) are also described, along with cell harvesting and fractionation procedures. Brief reference is also made to fungi and protozoa, but detailed explanations for culturing and enumerating these microbes is presented in Chapters 2.4 and 2.5

  17. Novel anammox bacteria and nitrogen loss from Lake Superior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crowe, Sean A.; Treusch, Alexander H.; Forth, Michael

    2017-01-01

    and diversity of anammox bacteria in the world's largest freshwater lake - Lake Superior. We found that anammox performed by previously undiscovered bacteria is an important contributor to sediment N2 production. We observed striking differences in the anammox bacterial populations found at different locations...... within Lake Superior and those described from other locations. Our data thus reveal that novel anammox bacteria underpin N-loss from Lake Superior, and if more broadly distributed across inland waters would play an important role in continental N-cycling and mitigation of fixed nitrogen transfer from...

  18. Luminescence properties of uranyl-acetate species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Hannes; Moll, Henry [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) was applied to characterize uranium(VI)- acetate species based on their luminescence properties. In contrast to previous interpretations, no indications were detected for the existence of the 1: 3 complex.

  19. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  20. Towards Luminescence Dating Of Mosaic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, A.; Martini, M.; Sibila, E.; Villa, I.

    The possibility of dating archaeological glass by means of luminescent techniques has been investigated in recent years, despite the difficulties of this application, mainly linked to the amorphous structure of the material. We focused in particular on mosaic glass, after the encouraging results obtained on byzantine and medieval samples. Further studies were devoted to the comprehension of the luminescent mechanisms in silica glasses, and to the investigation of the relationships between luminescence, colouring or opacifier ions and crystalline phase of the vitreous matrix. The results of a study on the dosimetric characteristics of thermoluminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) of a few medieval blue-green mosaic glasses from the San Lorenzo church (Milan) are presented, and the experimental protocols established to identify their suitability for dating are discussed.

  1. Controlled fabrication of luminescent and magnetic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingxin; Zhong, Yucheng; Fan, Jing; Huang, Weiren

    2018-03-01

    Luminescent and magnetic multifunctional nanocomposite is in high demand and widely used in many scales, such as drug delivery, bioseparation, chemical/biosensors, and so on. Although lots of strategies have been successfully developed for the demand of multifunctional nanocomposites, it is not easy to prepare multifunctional nanocomposites by using a simple method, and satisfy all kinds of demands simultaneously. In this work, via a facile and versatile method, luminescent nanocrystals and magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through self-assembly under vigorous stirring and ultrasonic treatment. These multifunctional nanocomposites are not only water stable but also find wide application such as magnetic separation and concentration with a series of moderate speed, multicolor fluorescence at different emission wavelength, high efficiency of the excitation and emission, and so on. By changing different kinds of luminescent nanocrystals and controlling the amount of luminescent and magnetic nanoparticles, a train of multifunctional nanocomposites was successfully fabricated via a versatile and robust method.

  2. Synthesis, crystal structure, theoretical study and luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, P. R. China. cChina-Australia Joint ... School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, P. R. China e-mail: ..... The title complex is luminescent.

  3. Recent developments in luminescent solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sark, W. G. J. H. M.

    2014-10-01

    High efficiency photovoltaic devices combine full solar spectrum absorption and effective generation and collection of charge carriers, while commercial success depends on cost effectiveness in manufacturing. Spectrum modification using down shifting has been demonstrated in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) since the 1970s, as a cheap alternative for standard c-Si technology. LSCs consist of a highly transparent plastic plate, in which luminescent species are dispersed, which absorb incident light and emit light at a red-shifted wavelength, with high quantum efficiency. Material issues have hampered efficiency improvements, in particular re-absorption of light emitted by luminescent species and stability of these species. In this contribution, approaches are reviewed on minimizing re-absorption, which should allow surpassing the 10% luminescent solar concentrator efficiency barrier.

  4. Key Issues Concerning Biolog Use for Aerobic and Anaerobic Freshwater Bacterial Community-Level Physiological Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Bradley W.; Lind, Owen T.

    2006-06-01

    Bacterial heterotrophy in aquatic ecosystems is important in the overall carbon cycle. Biolog MicroPlates provide information into the metabolic potential of bacteria involved in carbon cycling. Specifically, Biolog EcoPlatesTM were developed with ecologically relevant carbon substrates to allow investigators to measure carbon substrate utilization patterns and develop community-level physiological profiles from natural bacterial assemblages. However, understanding of the functionality of these plates in freshwater research is limited. We explored several issues of EcoPlate use for freshwater bacterial assemblages including inoculum density, incubation temperature, non-bacterial color development, and substrate selectivity. Each of these has various effects on plate interpretation. We offer suggestions and techniques to resolve these interpretation issues. Lastly we propose a technique to allow EcoPlate use in anaerobic freshwater bacterial studies.

  5. Luminescence basic concepts, applications and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2014-01-01

    The word luminescence was first used by a German physicist, Eilhardt Wiedemann, in 1888. He also classified luminescence into six kinds according to the method of excitation. No better basis of classification is available today. He recognized photoluminescence, thermoluminescence, electroluminescence, crystalloluminescence, triboluminescence, and chemiluminescence. The designations are obvious, characterized by the prefix. This Volume consists of 9 Chapters, including 8 Review Papers and one Case Study. The first two papers are based on OLEDs. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been th

  6. Review of present trends in luminescence research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, F.; Delaware Univ., Newark

    1981-01-01

    The difficulties of a comprehensive review of the broad and diverse branches of molecular and solid-state luminescence research are noted. This review is thus limited to selective topics. Some general concepts and trends are then introduced, including: luminescence excitation as a collective excitation of a many-body problem, encompassing in some cases the source and probe in its formulation; continuing trends towards extremal conditions of experiments and towards inhomogeneous and structured materials, from man-made superlattices to biological materials; and increased attention to applications of luminescence research to lamps, displays, solar devices and biological research. Representative recent and new specific research areas include: site selection spectroscopy and 'hole burning'; picosecond delayed coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering; computer simulation of dynamical processes in luminescence; electron-hole expansion from the Fermi pressure of e-h plasmas; and hot electron phenomena and hot luminescence. Finally some pending problems in luminescence research, such as reconciling the configuration coordinate model and the electronic band theory and clarifying multi-phonon non-radiative processes, are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ramos, A. P., E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Quimica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  8. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O.; Ramos, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  9. Silica nanoparticles with a substrate switchable luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochkova, O D; Mustafina, A R; Fedorenko, S V; Konovalov, A I

    2011-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles with visible (Tb and Ru doped), near IR (Yb doped) and dual visible-near IR luminescence (Ru-Yb doped) were obtained by reverse w/o microemulsion procedure. Plenty of luminescent complexes (from 4900 to 10000) encapsulated into each nanoparticle ensures the intensive luminescence of nanoparticles and their applicability as biomarkers. The silica surface decoration by definite anchor groups is the required step for the gaining to these nanoparticles marking and sensing functions. Thus covalent and non-covalent surface modification of these nanoparticles was developed to provide the binding with biotargets and sensing of anions. The dicationic surfactant coating of negatively charged Tb(III)-TCAS doped silica nanoparticles was chosen as the basis for the anion responsible system. The reversible insertion of the quenching anions (namely phenol red) into the surfactant based layer at the surface of luminescent nanoparticles switches off the Tb-centered luminescence. In turn the reversible reestablishment of the luminescence results from the competitive insertion of the non-quenching anions into the surfactant layer at the silica/water interface. The hydrophobic anions exemplified by dodecylsulfates versus hydrophilic ones (hydrophosphates) are preferable in the competition with phenol red anions.

  10. The functional response of a freshwater benthic community to cadmium pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faupel, Michael; Ristau, Kai; Traunspurger, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Theory predicts that in freshwater communities under chemical stress secondary production will decrease while the rate of biomass turnover (P/B) will increase. However, this concept has never been tested on organisms of smaller size (bacteria, protozoans, small metazoans), although they form the basis of the heterotrophic food web. The present work describes the results of a 7-month microcosm study, in which the effects of low and high toxic stress on an entire sediment community were examined, with cadmium (Cd) as the model pollutant (50 and 400 mg Cd kg −1 dry sediment). While metazoans and protozoans generally followed the expected trend, in bacteria both production and P/B decreased under Cd stress. These observations provide new insights into the functioning of freshwater ecosystems and demonstrate the functional consequences of toxicants on biological systems. - Highlights: ► Secondary production of freshwater organisms was estimated under cadmium stress. ► Cadmium generally decreased the production of all taxa. ► The corresponding P/B ratio increased for some taxa. ► Secondary production provides insight into the functioning of polluted ecosystems. - Cadmium alters the biomass turnover rate of a freshwater community.

  11. Freshwater autotrophic picoplankton: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. STOCKNER

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic picoplankton (APP are distributed worldwide and are ubiquitous in all types of lakes of varying trophic state. APP are major players in carbon production in all aquatic ecosystems, including extreme environments such as cold ice-covered and/or warm tropical lakes and thermal springs. They often form the base of complex microbial food webs, becoming prey for a multitude of protozoan and micro-invertebrate grazers, that effectively channel APP carbon to higher trophic levels including fish. In this review we examine the existing literature on freshwater autotrophic picoplankton, setting recent findings and current ecological issues within an historic framework, and include a description of the occurrence and distribution of both single-cell and colonial APP (picocyanobacteria in different types of lakes. In this review we place considerable emphasis on methodology and ecology, including sampling, counting, preservation, molecular techniques, measurement of photosynthesis, and include extensive comment on their important role in microbial food webs. The model outlined by Stockner of an increase of APP abundance and biomass and a decrease of its relative importance with the increase of phosphorus concentration in lakes has been widely accepted, and only recently confirmed in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Nevertheless the relationship which drives the APP presence and importance in lakes of differing trophic status appears with considerable variation so we must conclude that the success of APP in oligotrophic lakes worldwide is not a certainty but highly probable.

  12. Luminescence studies of molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.F.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular materials have been widely studied for their potential uses in novel semiconductor devices. They occupy the intellectually interesting area between molecular and bulk descriptions of matter, and as such often have unique and useful characteristics. The design and engineering of these structures is inter-disciplinary in its nature, embracing the fields of physics, electrical engineering and both synthetic and physical chemistry. In this thesis luminescence studies of molecular materials will be presented that probe the nature of the excited states in two promising semiconductor systems. Luminescence techniques provide a powerful and sensitive tool in the investigation of kinetic pathways of radiative and non-radiative emission from these samples. This is particularly appropriate here, as the materials being studied are of potential use in electroluminescent devices. The suitability of photoluminescence techniques comes from both the electroluminescence and photoluminescence sharing the same emitting state. The first class of material studied here is an organic semiconducting polymer, cyano-substituted polyphenylenevinylene (CN-PPV). Conjugated polymers combine semiconducting electronic properties with favourable processing properties and offer the possibility of tuning their optical and electronic properties chemically. The cyanosubstitution increases the electron affinity of the polymer backbone, facilitating electron injection in light-emitting diodes. The polymers are soluble in solvents such as toluene and chloroform due the presence of alkoxy sidegroups. CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals are the other class of material characterised in this work. Semiconductor nanocrystals exhibit interesting size-tunable optical properties due to the confinement of the electronic wave functions. Characterisation of samples produced by different synthetic routes has been carried out to demonstrate the advantages of a novel synthetic method in terms of physical and

  13. Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokumsen, Alfred; Svendsen, Lars Moeslund

    Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark......Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark...

  14. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungs, W. A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) water quality; (2) pesticide pollutants; (3) chemical pollutants; (4) miscellaneous pollutants; and (5) physical factors of pollution on freshwater fish. A list of 338 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    of magnitude and degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants, and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 14C years can occur within one river. The freshwater reservoir effect has also implications......The freshwater reservoir effect can result in anomalously old radiocarbon ages of samples from lakes and rivers. This includes the bones of people whose subsistence was based on freshwater fish, and pottery in which fish was cooked. Water rich in dissolved ancient calcium carbonates, commonly known...... as hard water, is the most common reason for the freshwater reservoir effect. It is therefore also called hardwater effect. Although it has been known for more than 60 years, it is still less well-recognized by archaeologists than the marine reservoir effect. The aim of this study is to examine the order...

  16. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    case studies will show the degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 years can occur within one river. In the Limfjord, freshwater influence......The freshwater reservoir effect can result in too high radiocarbon ages of samples from lakes and rivers, including the bones of people whose subsistence was based on freshwater fish, and pottery in which fish was cooked. In my talk, I will explain the causes and consequences of this effect. Two...... caused reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. Finally, I will discuss the implications of the freshwater reservoir effect for radiocarbon dating of Mesolithic pottery from inland sites of the Ertebølle culture in Northern Germany....

  17. Luminescence dating at Rose cottage cave: a progress report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Woodborne, S

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Deal with infrared-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence dates from Rose Cottage Cave in South Africa. Discrepancy between luminescence and radiocarbon dates; Concentration of radioactive elements in sediments before and after leaching...

  18. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamchand, S.S., E-mail: syamchand.ss@gmail.com; Sony, G., E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  19. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syamchand, S.S.; Sony, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  20. Luminescent polymethyl methacrylate modified by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Guilherme F. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (FATEC-ZL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Forster, Pedro L.; Marchini, Leonardo G.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Parra, Duclerc F., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Thin films of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) doped with luminescent complexes have been studied and developed for applications in advanced technologies. The problem of stability of these films is focused in this study. Films stabilization by reaction with fluorinated monomers is a recent study that aims to increase its luminescence properties for long time. The films were prepared by dilution of PMMA in chloroform with addition of europium complex, at proportion of 5% by weight of polymer. The luminescent polymer films were obtained by casting. Thin layer slides of the film were separated in three parts. One was reacted with fluorinated monomers (C{sub 2}F{sub 4}) in closed reactor for 48 hours. A second part was reacted with C{sub 2}F{sub 4} after irradiation in gamma source at 5 kGy in simultaneous process. The last part was used as obtained. The luminescent polymer matrices were characterized using the techniques of infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA/DTG). Samples of the films were, in presence of fluorine monomers, exposed to ionizing radiation in dose of 5 kGy, for react with monomers in the doped polymer surface. In this case the effects of radiation were evaluated on the luminescent films. (author)

  1. Luminescent polymethyl methacrylate modified by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Guilherme F.; Forster, Pedro L.; Marchini, Leonardo G.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Parra, Duclerc F.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) doped with luminescent complexes have been studied and developed for applications in advanced technologies. The problem of stability of these films is focused in this study. Films stabilization by reaction with fluorinated monomers is a recent study that aims to increase its luminescence properties for long time. The films were prepared by dilution of PMMA in chloroform with addition of europium complex, at proportion of 5% by weight of polymer. The luminescent polymer films were obtained by casting. Thin layer slides of the film were separated in three parts. One was reacted with fluorinated monomers (C 2 F 4 ) in closed reactor for 48 hours. A second part was reacted with C 2 F 4 after irradiation in gamma source at 5 kGy in simultaneous process. The last part was used as obtained. The luminescent polymer matrices were characterized using the techniques of infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA/DTG). Samples of the films were, in presence of fluorine monomers, exposed to ionizing radiation in dose of 5 kGy, for react with monomers in the doped polymer surface. In this case the effects of radiation were evaluated on the luminescent films. (author)

  2. Effect of irradiation on detection of bacteria in dehydrated vegetables with ATP bioluminescence assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Huan; Luo Shishi; Wang Zegang; Feng Min; Zhu Jiating; Chen Xiulan; Zhai Jianqing

    2011-01-01

    ATP bioluminescence intensity of 4 kinds of irradiated dehydrated vegetables was inconsistent with the bacteria number, the reasons were investigated in this paper. Results showed that irradiation had little effect on background luminescence, and there was no effect on luciferase-luminous system. When irradiation killed the bacteria, the ATPase activity also decreased. As a result, the ATP content in bacteria didn't decreased with the killed of bacteria, which contributed to the increase of free ATP in ATP extract and finally led to the disagreement between the bioluminescence intensity and the actual number of bacteria. When the free ATP in the dehydrated vegetable was removed, the bioluminescence intensity of ATP extract was consistent with the actual number of bacteria in irradiated dehydrated vegetable and ATP bioluminescence technology could be used in bacteria detection of irradiated samples. (authors)

  3. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  4. Luminescence enhancement of uranyl ion by benzoic acid in acetonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satendra Kumar; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2014-01-01

    Uranyl ion is known for its characteristic green luminescence and therefore luminescence spectroscopy is a suitable technique for characterizing different uranyl species. In aqueous medium, luminescence of uranyl ion is generally weak due to its quenching by water molecules and therefore in order to enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in aqueous medium, luminescence enhancing reagents such as H 3 PO 4 , H 2 SO 4 , HCIO 4 have been widely used. The other method to enhance the uranyl luminescence is by ligand sensitized luminescence, a method well established for lanthanides. In this work, luminescence of uranyl ion is found to be enhanced by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium. In aqueous medium benzoic acid does not enhance the uranyl luminescence although it forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with uranyl ion. Luminescence spectra of uranyl benzoate revealed that enhancement is due to sensitization of uranyl luminescence by benzoate ions. UV-Vis spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize the specie formed in the in acetonitrile medium. UV-Vis spectroscopy along with luminescence spectra revealed that the specie to be tribenzoate complex of uranyl (UO 2 (C 6 H 5 COO) 3 ) - having D 3 h symmetry. (author)

  5. Study of the liquid water luminescence induced by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, Mircea; Stere, Oana; Haiduc, Maria; Caramete, Laurentiu

    2004-01-01

    Many observations suggested that liquid water (with impurities) could give a luminescence output when irradiated with charged particles. We investigate theoretical and practical possibility of detecting such luminescence. Preliminary results on this possibility are presented, and a layout of the device proposed for measuring luminescence is given. (authors)

  6. Cleavage Luminescence from Cleaved Indium Phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong-Guang, Li

    2008-01-01

    We outline the experiments performed to gain further information about the structure and properties of cleaved InP surfaces. The experiments involved detecting the luminescence produced after cleaving thin InP plates within a high vacuum, by a process of converting the luminescence to an electrical signal which could be amplified and measured accurately. The experimental results show that the detected luminescence durations from cleaved InP are usually only about 10μs. It is believed that this time represents the time of travel of the crack with the actual recombination time being much shorter. Strong signals could also be picked up from cleaved InP in air

  7. Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindi, R.; Robert, A.

    1984-01-01

    Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers, application to the production of devices provided with said layers and to the construction of photoscintillators. The process comprises projecting onto a support, by cathodic sputtering, the material of at least one target, each target including silica and at least one chemical compound able to give luminescent centers, such as a cerium oxide, so as to form at least one luminescent glass layer of the said support. The layer or layers formed preferably undergo a heat treatment such as annealing in order to increase the luminous efficiency thereof. It is in this way possible to form a scintillating glass layer on the previously frosted entrance window of a photomultiplier in order to obtain an integrated photoscintillator

  8. Cerium luminescence in nd0 perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlur, A.A.; Happek, U.

    2010-01-01

    The luminescence of Ce 3+ in perovskite (ABO 3 ) hosts with nd 0 B-site cations, specifically Ca(Hf,Zr)O 3 and (La,Gd)ScO 3 , is investigated in this report. The energy position of the Ce 3+ excitation and emission bands in these perovskites is compared to those of typical Al 3+ perovskites; we find a Ce 3+ 5d 1 centroid shift and Stokes shift that are larger versus the corresponding values for the Al 3+ perovskites. It is also shown that Ce 3+ luminescence quenching is due to Ce 3+ photoionization. The comparison between these perovskites shows reasonable correlations between Ce 3+ luminescence quenching, the energy position of the Ce 3+ 5d 1 excited state with respect to the host conduction band, and the host composition. - Graphical abstract: Ce 3+ decay times versus temperature for perovskites with nd 0 B-site cations.

  9. Microdiversification in genome-streamlined ubiquitous freshwater Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Stefan M; Ghai, Rohit; Pernthaler, Jakob; Salcher, Michaela M

    2018-01-01

    Actinobacteria of the acI lineage are the most abundant microbes in freshwater systems, but there are so far no pure living cultures of these organisms, possibly because of metabolic dependencies on other microbes. This, in turn, has hampered an in-depth assessment of the genomic basis for their success in the environment. Here we present genomes from 16 axenic cultures of acI Actinobacteria. The isolates were not only of minute cell size, but also among the most streamlined free-living microbes, with extremely small genome sizes (1.2-1.4 Mbp) and low genomic GC content. Genome reduction in these bacteria might have led to auxotrophy for various vitamins, amino acids and reduced sulphur sources, thus creating dependencies to co-occurring organisms (the 'Black Queen' hypothesis). Genome analyses, moreover, revealed a surprising degree of inter- and intraspecific diversity in metabolic pathways, especially of carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and mainly encoded in genomic islands. The striking genotype microdiversification of acI Actinobacteria might explain their global success in highly dynamic freshwater environments with complex seasonal patterns of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We propose a new order within Actinobacteria ('Candidatus Nanopelagicales') with two new genera ('Candidatus Nanopelagicus' and 'Candidatus Planktophila') and nine new species.

  10. Status and Impacts of Arctic Freshwater Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine, T. W. N.

    2017-12-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980-2000, with an extra ≈5000 km3—about 25%—being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and runoff have increased between these periods (most of the evidence comes from models). Despite flux increases from 2001 to 2011, it is uncertain if the marine freshwater source through Bering Strait for the 2000s has changed, as observations in the 1980s and 1990s are incomplete. The marine freshwater fluxes draining the Arctic through Fram and Davis straits are also insignificantly different. In this way, the balance of sources and sinks of freshwater to the Arctic, Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), and Baffin Bay shifted to about 1200±730 km3yr-1 freshening the region, on average, during the 2000s. The observed accumulation of liquid freshwater is consistent with this increased supply and the loss of freshwater from sea ice (Figure, right). Evidence exists that such discharges can impact the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, and hence Atlantic sector climate. Nevertheless, it appears that the observed AMOC variability since 2004, when high quality measurements began, is not attributable to anthropogenic influence. This work is based on, and updated from, Haine et al. (2015), Carmack et al. (2016), and Haine (2016). Haine, T. W. N. Ocean science: Vagaries of Atlantic overturning. Nature Geoscience, 9, 479-480, 10.1038/ngeo2748, 2016. T. W. N. Haine et al., Arctic Freshwater Export: Status, Mechanisms, and Prospects, Global Planetary Change, 125, 13-35, 10.1016/j.glopacha.2014.11.013, 2015. E. Carmack et al., Fresh water and its role in the Arctic Marine System: sources, disposition, storage, export, and physical and biogeochemical consequences in the Arctic and global oceans. J. G. Res. Biogeosciences, 10.1002/2015JG003140, 2016.

  11. Thermal quenching of luminescence processes in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    , which display very different behaviour. The first involves the internal transitions of common transition metal ions. The second is typical of centres not displaying excited states within the band gap that are likely to arise from direct recombination between the conduction band and the ground state......The technique of optically stimulated luminescence has important uses in the dose evaluation of irradiated feldspars. The luminescence process involves the eviction of electrons from donor traps, charge transfer through the conduction band, and recombination at acceptor sites; each...

  12. Assessing the antibiotic susceptibility of freshwater cyanobacteria spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa eDias

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater is a vehicle for the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in freshwater, where they are exposed to antibiotics and resistant organisms, but their role on water resistome was never evaluated. Data concerning the effects of antibiotics on cyanobacteria, obtained by distinct methodologies, is often contradictory. This emphasizes the importance of developing procedures to understand the trends of antibiotic susceptibility in cyanobacteria. In this study we aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of four cyanobacterial isolates from different genera (Microcystis aeruginosa, Aphanizomenon gracile, Chrisosporum bergii, Planktothix agradhii, and among them nine isolates from the same specie (M. aeruginosa to distinct antibiotics (amoxicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, kanamycine, gentamicine, tetracycline, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin. We used a method adapted from the bacteria standard broth microdilution. Cyanobacteria were exposed to serial dilution of each antibiotic (0.0015-1.6 mg/L in Z8 medium (20 ± 1 ºC; 14/10 h L/D cycle; light intensity 16 ± 4 µEm-2 s-1. Cell growth was followed overtime (OD450nm/microscopic examination and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs were calculated for each antibiotic/isolate. We found that -lactams exhibited the lower MICs, aminoglycosides, tetracycline and norfloxacine presented intermediate MICs; none of the isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim and nalidixic acid. The reduced susceptibility of all tested cyanobacteria to some antibiotics suggests that they might be naturally non-susceptible to these compounds, or that that they might became non-susceptible due to antibiotic contamination pressure, or to the transfer of genes from resistant bacteria present in the environment.

  13. Davis Pond freshwater prediversion biomonitoring study: freshwater fisheries and eagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  14. Magnetosome chain superstructure in uncultured magnetotactic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraçado, Leida G; Farina, Marcos; Abreu, Fernanda; Keim, Carolina N; Lins, Ulysses; Campos, Andrea P C

    2010-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetosomes, which are magnetic particles enveloped by biological membranes, in a highly controlled mineralization process. Magnetosomes are used to navigate in magnetic fields by a phenomenon called magnetotaxis. Two levels of organization and control are recognized in magnetosomes. First, magnetotactic bacteria create a spatially distinct environment within vesicles defined by their membranes. In the vesicles, the bacteria control the size, composition and purity of the mineral content of the magnetic particles. Unique crystal morphologies are produced in magnetosomes as a consequence of this bacterial control. Second, magnetotactic bacteria organize the magnetosomes in chains within the cell body. It has been shown in a particular case that the chains are positioned within the cell body in specific locations defined by filamentous cytoskeleton elements. Here, we describe an additional level of organization of the magnetosome chains in uncultured magnetotactic cocci found in marine and freshwater sediments. Electron microscopy analysis of the magnetosome chains using a goniometer showed that the magnetic crystals in both types of bacteria are not oriented at random along the crystal chain. Instead, the magnetosomes have specific orientations relative to the other magnetosomes in the chain. Each crystal is rotated either 60°, 180° or 300° relative to their neighbors along the chain axis, causing the overlapping of the (1 1 1) and (1-bar 1-bar 1-bar) capping faces of neighboring crystals. We suggest that genetic determinants that are not present or active in bacteria with magnetosomes randomly rotated within a chain must be present in bacteria that organize magnetosomes so precisely. This particular organization may also be used as an indicative biosignature of magnetosomes in the study of magnetofossils in the cases where this symmetry is observed

  15. Tape Cassette Bacteria Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of an automatic bacteria detection system with a zero-g capability and based on the filter-capsule approach is described. This system is intended for monitoring the sterility of regenerated water in a spacecraft. The principle of detection is based on measuring the increase in chemiluminescence produced by the action of bacterial porphyrins (i.e., catalase, cytochromes, etc.) on a luminol-hydrogen peroxide mixture. Since viable as well as nonviable organisms initiate this luminescence, viable organisms are detected by comparing the signal of an incubated water sample with an unincubated control. Higher signals for the former indicate the presence of viable organisms. System features include disposable sealed sterile capsules, each containing a filter membrane, for processing discrete water samples and a tape transport for moving these capsules through a processing sequence which involves sample concentration, nutrient addition, incubation, a 4 Molar Urea wash and reaction with luminol-hydrogen peroxide in front of a photomultiplier tube. Liquids are introduced by means of a syringe needle which pierces a rubber septum contained in the wall of the capsule. Detection thresholds obtained with this unit towards E. coli and S. marcescens assuming a 400 ml water sample are indicated.

  16. Exotic freshwater planarians currently known from Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluys, R.; Kawakatsu, M.; Yamamoto, K.

    2010-01-01

    Biogeographical and taxonomic information on the four non-indigenous freshwater planarians of Japan is reviewed, viz. Dugesia austroasiatica Kawakatsu, 1985, Girardia tigrina (Girard, 1850), G. dorotocephala (Woodworth, 1897), and Rhodax evelinae? Marcus, 1947. The occurrence of Girardia

  17. Identifying national freshwater ecosystem priority areas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nel, JL

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This presentation highlights the use of systematic conservation planning to identify priority areas for managing the health of freshwater ecosystems and their associated biodiversity and ecosystem services....

  18. Characterization of a Freshwater Crab Sudanonautes aubryi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... 2Faculty of Sciences and Techniques, University Marien Ngouabi - PoB 69 Congo Brazzaville ... to collect and realize a biometric characterization of this common freshwater ... information, which will be used by conservation.

  19. Effects of pollution on freshwater fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKim, J.M.; Anderson, R.L.; Benoit, D.A.; Spehar, R.L.; Stokes, G.N.

    1976-01-01

    Studies of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish are reviewed. Subjects include: inorganic industrial pollutants, man-made disturbances and radioactive pollutants. Topics include uptake distribution, retention, mortality, and lethal doses

  20. Persistent organochlorine pesticide residues in freshwater systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    determined in water and sediment samples of freshwater systems in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa that ... The organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in water and sediments ...... Test Methods For Evaluating Solid Waste (3rd edn.) ...

  1. Fabrication of luminescent porous silicon with stain etches and evidence that luminescence originates in amorphous layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Lin, T. L.; Pike, W. T.; Vasquez, R. P.; Wu, Z.-C.

    1992-01-01

    Simple immersion of Si in stain etches of HF:HNO3:H2O or NaNO2 in aqueous HF was used to produce films exhibiting luminescence in the visible similar to that of anodically-etched porous Si. All of the luminescent samples consist of amorphous porous Si in at least the near surface region. No evidence was found for small crystalline regions within these amorphous layers.

  2. Luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses with lead chalcogenides molecular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolobkova, E.V.; Kukushkin, D.S.; Nikonorov, N.V.; Shakhverdov, T.A.; Sidorov, A.I.; Vasiliev, V.N.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorophosphate glasses containing lead, selenium, and sulfur exhibit an intense luminescence in the 400–620 nm spectral region when excited by the 240–420 nm radiation. This luminescence is due to the presence of (PbSe) n and/or (PbS) n molecular clusters in the glasses, which appear in the as-prepared glasses before quantum dots formation. The thermal treatment at temperatures less than the glass transition temperature results in the red-shift of the luminescence bands and in an increase in the luminescence intensity. Heating the thermally treated glass samples leads to the reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence. - Highlights: • Fluorophosphate glasses with Pb, Se, and S ions contain (PbSe) n or (PbS) n molecular clusters. • (PbSe) n and (PbS) n molecular clusters possess luminescence in the visible with UV excitation. • Heating the glass leads to the reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence

  3. Enhancing and quenching luminescence with gold nanoparticle films: the influence of substrate on the luminescent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, Eder José; Baffa, Oswaldo; Ramos, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) films were sputtered over glass and aluminum substrates to enhance optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a luminescent technique employed for radiation detection, from x-ray irradiated NaCl nanocrystals. The AuNP films deposited over glass led to enhanced-OSL emission, whereas the AuNP films deposited on aluminum substrates quenched the OSL emission. The enhanced-OSL intensity is proportional to the optical density of the film's plasmon resonance band at the stimulation wavelength. For the case of the AuNP/aluminum films, the luminescence quenching diminishes, and OSL intensity partially recovers upon increasing the distance between the AuNPs and the aluminum substrates, and between the luminescent nanocrystals and the AuNP films. These results suggest that plasmonic interactions between the emitter nanocrystals, the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the AuNPs, and the substrate are responsible for the OSL enhancement and quenching. In this sense, the substrate dictates whether LSP relaxation occurs by radiative or non-radiative transisitions, leading to enhanced or quenched OSL, respectively. Therefore, besides showing that AuNP films can enhance and/or tune the sensitivity of luminescent radiation detectors, and demonstrating OSL as a new technique to investigate mechanisms of plasmon-enhanced luminescence, these results bring insights on how substrates strongly modify the optical properties of AuNP films. (paper)

  4. Multistate Luminescent Solar Concentrator "Smart" Windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol, Jeroen A.H.P.; Timmermans, Gilles H.; Breugel, van Abraham J.; Schenning, Albertus P.H.J.; Debije, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    A supertwist liquid crystalline luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) "smart" window is fabricated which can be switched electrically between three states: one designed for increased light absorption and electrical generation (the "dark" state), one for transparency (the "light" state), and one for

  5. Luminescent Solar Concentrators with Fibre Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelenbosch, O.Y.; Fisher, M.; Patrignani, L.; Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Chatten, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of a fibre luminescent solar concentrator has been explored by means of both analytical and ray-tracing techniques. Coated fibres have been found to be more efficient than homogeneously doped fibres, at low absorption. For practical fibres concentration is predicted to be linear

  6. Co-precipitation synthesis and upconversion luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Researches of rare-earth-doped upconversion (UC) materials as fluorescent labels, temperature-sensing probes, solid-state lasers and new generation television screens have recently started to be considered1,2 due to their enhanced luminescent properties induced by the small size. UC process is the gener-.

  7. Holographic patterning of luminescent photopolymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakhno, Oksana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana N.; Goldenberg, Leonid M.; Stumpe, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Volume phase gratings in the photopolymerisable composites, containing luminescent nanoparticles have been fabricated for the first time. Nanoparticles of LaPO 4 , doped by Ce 3+ and Tb 3+ ions (the trade name is REN-X-green) with high luminescence quantum yield were used as a luminescent inorganic additive. The holographic gratings in such materials are formed as a result of the diffusion distribution of the nanoparticles during exposure of photopolymerisable composites to interference pattern. The influence of the pre-polymer formulation and the holographic patterning parameters on the grating formation is comprehensively investigated. The use of the optimised pre-polymer syrup containing two monomers with sufficiently different polymerisation rates allows fabrication of gratings with diffraction efficiency up to 80% at low optical losses (< 5%) (20 μm film thickness). To obtain maximum diffraction efficiency the intensity and the period of the interference pattern were optimised for each formulation. In addition maximum diffraction efficiency was achieved with the nanocomposites containing 30-32 wt.% of nanoparticles. On the other hand the highest possible modulation of the nanoparticles' concentration was obtained for the concentration of about 20 wt.%. In this case maximum ordering of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix is achieved. The photoluminescence of the nanoparticles within the homogeneous polymer film and within the grating has been measured. The example application of the photopolymerisable composite containing luminescence inorganic nanoparticles in holographic security technology has been demonstrated

  8. Probing luminescence centers in Na rich feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Lapp, Torben; Kook, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    our understanding of the luminescence mechanisms and recombination sites, in a sample of Na rich plagioclase feldspar (oligoclase). Both the UV and violet–blue emissions show resonant excitations arising from a distribution of energy levels. We propose, contrary to the general understanding...

  9. Studies of positron induced luminescence from polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.; Tolk, N.H.

    1994-01-01

    Light emission from polymers (anthracene dissolved in polystryrene) induced by low-energy positrons and electrons has been studied. Results indicate a clear difference between optical emissions under positron and electron bombardment. The positron-induced luminescence spectrum is believed to be generated by both collisional and annihilation processes

  10. Combustion synthesis and preliminary luminescence studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The polycrystalline sample of LiBaPO4 : Tb3+ (LBPT) was successfully synthesized by solution combustion synthesis and studied for its luminescence characteristics. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve of LBPT material consists of two peaks at 204.54 and 251.21°C. The optimum concentration was 0.005 mol to ...

  11. Co-precipitation synthesis and upconversion luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... light: strong green (539 nm), weak red (670 nm) and near-infrared (760 nm). The upconversion luminescence is based on two-photon absorption by the energy transfer from the donor (Yb3+) to the acceptor (Ho3+). All the results indicate that ZrO2:Yb3+-Ho3+ phosphors could be a promising biological labelling material.

  12. Luminescence of porous silicon doped by erbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.P.; Vorozov, N.N.; Dolgij, L.N.; Dorofeev, A.M.; Kazyuchits, N.M.; Leshok, A.A.; Troyanova, G.N.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of the 1.54 μm intensive luminescence in the silicon dense porous layers, doped by erbium, with various structures is shown. Low-porous materials of both porous type on the p-type silicon and porous silicon with wood-like structure on the n + type silicon may be used for formation of light-emitting structures

  13. Sequence and function of LuxO, a negative regulator of luminescence in Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, B L; Wright, M; Silverman, M R

    1994-05-01

    Density-dependent expression of luminescence in Vibrio harveyi is regulated by the concentration of extracellular signal molecules (autoinducers) in the culture medium. A recombinant clone that restored function to one class of spontaneous dim mutants was found to encode a function required for the density-dependent response. Transposon Tn5 insertions in the recombinant clone were isolated, and the mutations were transferred to the genome of V. harveyi for examination of mutant phenotypes. Expression of luminescence in V. harveyi strains with transposon insertions in one locus, luxO, was independent of the density of the culture and was similar in intensity to the maximal level observed in wild-type bacteria. Sequence analysis of luxO revealed one open reading frame that encoded a protein, LuxO, similar in amino acid sequence to the response regulator domain of the family of two-component, signal transduction proteins. The constitutive phenotype of LuxO- mutants indicates that LuxO acts negatively to control expression of luminescence, and relief of repression by LuxO in the wild type could result from interactions with other components in the Lux signalling system.

  14. Meeting ecological and societal needs for freshwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jill S.; Poff, N.L.; Angermeier, P.L.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gleick, P.H.; Hairston, N.G.; Jackson, R.B.; Johnston, C.A.; Richter, B.D.; Steinman, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    Human society has used freshwater from rivers, lakes, groundwater, and wetlands for many different urban, agricultural, and industrial activities, but in doing so has overlooked its value in supporting ecosystems. Freshwater is vital to human life and societal well-being, and thus its utilization for consumption, irrigation, and transport has long taken precedence over other commodities and services provided by freshwater ecosystems. However, there is growing recognition that functionally intact and biologically complex aquatic ecosystems provide many economically valuable services and long-term benefits to society. The short-term benefits include ecosystem goods and services, such as food supply, flood control, purification of human and industrial wastes, and habitat for plant and animal life—and these are costly, if not impossible, to replace. Long-term benefits include the sustained provision of those goods and services, as well as the adaptive capacity of aquatic ecosystems to respond to future environmental alterations, such as climate change. Thus, maintenance of the processes and properties that support freshwater ecosystem integrity should be included in debates over sustainable water resource allocation.The purpose of this report is to explain how the integrity of freshwater ecosystems depends upon adequate quantity, quality, timing, and temporal variability of water flow. Defining these requirements in a comprehensive but general manner provides a better foundation for their inclusion in current and future debates about allocation of water resources. In this way the needs of freshwater ecosystems can be legitimately recognized and addressed. We also recommend ways in which freshwater ecosystems can be protected, maintained, and restored.Freshwater ecosystem structure and function are tightly linked to the watershed or catchment of which they are a part. Because riverine networks, lakes, wetlands, and their connecting groundwaters, are literally the

  15. Paper-based biodetection using luminescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Qiang; Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-05-10

    Point-of-care and in-field technologies for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of molecular biomarkers have attracted much interest. Rugged bioassay technology capable of fast detection of markers for pathogens and genetic diseases would in particular impact the quality of health care in the developing world, but would also make possible more extensive screening in developed countries to tackle problems such as those associated with water and food quality, and tracking of infectious organisms in hospitals and clinics. Literature trends indicate an increasing interest in the use of nanomaterials, and in particular luminescent nanoparticles, for assay development. These materials may offer attributes for development of assays and sensors that could achieve improvements in analytical figures of merit, and provide practical advantages in sensitivity and stability. There is opportunity for cost-efficiency and technical simplicity by implementation of luminescent nanomaterials as the basis for transduction technology, when combined with the use of paper substrates, and the ubiquitous availability of cell phone cameras and associated infrastructure for optical detection and transmission of results. Luminescent nanoparticles have been described for a broad range of bioanalytical targets including small molecules, oligonucleotides, peptides, proteins, saccharides and whole cells (e.g., cancer diagnostics). The luminescent nanomaterials that are described herein for paper-based bioassays include metal nanoparticles, quantum dots and lanthanide-doped nanocrystals. These nanomaterials often have broad and strong absorption and narrow emission bands that improve opportunity for multiplexed analysis, and can be designed to provide emission at wavelengths that are efficiently processed by conventional digital cameras. Luminescent nanoparticles can be embedded in paper substrates that are designed to direct fluid flow, and the resulting combination of technologies can offer

  16. Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hong [Los Alamos, NM; Goodwin, Peter M [Los Alamos, NM; Keller, Richard A [Los Alamos, NM; Nolan, Rhiannon L [Santa Fe, NM

    2007-04-10

    Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

  17. Phylogenetic comparisons of a coastal bacterioplankton community with its counterparts in open ocean and freshwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappé; Vergin; Giovannoni

    2000-09-01

    In order to extend previous comparisons between coastal marine bacterioplankton communities and their open ocean and freshwater counterparts, here we summarize and provide new data on a clone library of 105 SSU rRNA genes recovered from seawater collected over the western continental shelf of the USA in the Pacific Ocean. Comparisons to previously published data revealed that this coastal bacterioplankton clone library was dominated by SSU rRNA gene phylotypes originally described from surface waters of the open ocean, but also revealed unique SSU rRNA gene lineages of beta Proteobacteria related to those found in clone libraries from freshwater habitats. beta Proteobacteria lineages common to coastal and freshwater samples included members of a clade of obligately methylotrophic bacteria, SSU rRNA genes affiliated with Xylophilus ampelinus, and a clade related to the genus Duganella. In addition, SSU rRNA genes were recovered from such previously recognized marine bacterioplankton SSU rRNA gene clone clusters as the SAR86, SAR11, and SAR116 clusters within the class Proteobacteria, the Roseobacter clade of the alpha subclass of the Proteobacteria, the marine group A/SAR406 cluster, and the marine Actinobacteria clade. Overall, these results support and extend previous observations concerning the global distribution of several marine planktonic prokaryote SSU rRNA gene phylotypes, but also show that coastal bacterioplankton communities contain SSU rRNA gene lineages (and presumably bacterioplankton) shown previously to be prevalent in freshwater habitats.

  18. Biogeochemical cycling of lignocellulosic carbon in marine and freshwater ecosystems: relative contributions of procaryotes and eucaryotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, R.; Moran, M.A.; Hodson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The relative contributions of procaryotes and eucaryotes to the degradation of the lignin and polysaccharide components of lignocellulosic detritus in two marine and two freshwater wetland ecosystems were determined. Two independent methods - physical separation of bacteria from fungi and other eucaryotes by size fractionation, and antibiotic treatments - were used to estimate procaryotic and eucaryotic contributions to the degradation of [ 14 C-lignin]lignocelluloses and [ 13 C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses in samples of water and decaying plant material from each environment. Both methods yielded similar results; bacteria were the predominant degraders of lignocellulose in each of the aquatic ecosystems. These results indicate a basic difference between the microbial degradation of lignocellulosic material in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Fungi have long been considered the predominant degraders of lignocellulose in terrestrial systems; our results indicate that in aquatic systems bacteria are the predominant degraders of lignocellulose

  19. Unexpected photoreactivation of Vibrio harveyi bacteria living in ionization environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alifano, P.; Tala, A.; Tredici, S. M.; Nassisi, V.; Siciliano, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria undergoing environmental effects is extremely interesting for structural, mechanistic, and evolutionary implications. Luminescent bacteria that have evolved in a specific ambient have developed particular responses and their behavior can give us new suggestions on the task and production of luciferina proteins. To analyze the UV interaction under controlled laboratory conditions, we used photoluminescent bacterial strains belonging to a new species evolutionarily close to Vibrio harveyi sampled from a coastal cave with a high radon content that generates ionizing radiation. The survival of the bacterial strains was analyzed, in the light and in the dark, following a variety of genotoxic treatments including UV radiation exposure. The strains were irradiated by a germicide lamp. The results demonstrated that most of the strains exhibited a low rate of survival after the UV exposure. After irradiation by visible light following the UV exposure, all strains showed a high capability of photoreactivation when grown. This capability was quite unexpected because these bacteria were sampled from a dark ambient without UV radiation. This leads us to hypothesize that the photoreactivation in these bacteria might have been evolved to repair DNA lesions also induced by different radiation sources other than UV (e.g., x-ray) and that the luminescent bacteria might use their own light emission to carry out the photoreactivation. The high capability of photoreactivation of these bacteria was also justified by the results of deconvolution. The deconvolution was applied to the emission spectra and it was able to show evidence of different light peaks. The presence of the visible peak could control the photolysis enzyme.

  20. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  1. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  2. Diversity and distribution of planktonic anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the Dongjiang River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Xia, Chunyu; Xu, Meiying; Guo, Jun; Wang, Aijie; Sun, Guoping

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) process has recently been recognized as an important pathway for removing fixed nitrogen (N) from aquatic ecosystems. Anammox organisms are widely distributed in freshwater environments. However, little is known about their presence in the water column of riverine ecosystems. Here, the existence of a diverse anammox community was revealed in the water column of the Dongjiang River by analyzing 16S rRNA and hydrazine oxidation (hzo) genes of anammox bacteria. Phylogenetic analyses of hzo genes showed that Candidatus Jettenia related clades of anammox bacteria were dominant in the river, suggesting the ecological microniche distinction from freshwater/estuary and marine anammox bacteria with Ca. Brocadia and Kuenenia genera mainly detected in freshwater/estuary ecosystems, and Ca. Scalindua genus mainly detected in marine ecosystems. The abundance and diversity of anammox bacteria along the river were both significantly correlated with concentrations of NH4(+)-N based on Pearson and partial correlation analyses. Redundancy analyses showed the contents of NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N and the ratio of NH4(+)-N to NO2(-)-N significantly influenced the spatial distributions of anammox bacteria in the water column of the Dongjiang River. These results expanded our understanding of the distribution and potential roles of anammox bacteria in the water column of the river ecosystem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Luminescent amine sensor based on europium(III) chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochenkova, Nataliya V; Mirochnik, Anatolii G; Emelina, Tatyana B; Sergeev, Alexander A; Leonov, Andrei A; Voznesenskii, Sergey S

    2018-07-05

    The effect of methylamine vapor on luminescence of Eu(III) tris-benzoylacetonate (I) immobilized in thin-layer chromatography plates has been investigated. It has been revealed that interaction of I with analyte vapor results in increase of the intensity of Eu(III) luminescence. The mechanism of the effect of methylamine vapors on intensification of the Eu(III) luminescence has been suggested using the data of IR spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculations. The mechanism of luminescence sensitization consists in bonding of an analyte molecule with a water molecule into the coordination sphere of Eu(III). As a result, the bond of a water molecule with the luminescence centre weakens, rigid structural fragment including europium ion, water and methylamine molecules forms. The presence of such fragment must naturally promote decrease of influence of OH-vibrations on luminescence of the complex I. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.D.; Eschbach, P.A.

    1991-06-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron-induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well-known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years at Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) has produced a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique known as the Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) that offers, for the first time, the capability of performing extremely sensitive radiation dosimetry at low temperatures. In addition to its extreme sensitivity, the COSL technique offers multiple readout capability, limited fading in a one-year period, and the capability of analyzing single grains within a hydrogenous matrix. 4 refs., 10 figs

  5. New luminescence measurement facilities in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapp, Torben; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2012-01-01

    ), this facility has been used to measure natural doses in feldspar using the decaying NIR RL signal.Secondly, we present a method for mapping radiation field of the built-in 90Sr/90Y β-source and estimating grain-location specific dose-rates. This is important for the accuracy of single grain results, when......This paper gives a review of recent developments in luminescence measurement facilities on the Risø TL/OSL reader including radio-luminescence (RL), exo-electron and violet stimulation attachments, and a method for characterising and if necessary correcting for beta irradiation source non...... radiation field is spatially non-uniform across the sample area. We document the effect of this correction method and further investigate on the effect of lifting the source to achieve a better dose-rate uniformity.Finally we summarise two recently-developed novel facilities to help investigate (i) the time...

  6. The double luminescence of Color Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldacchini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    An experiment on the luminescence of Color Centers (CCs) carried out in 1987 at the ENEA Laboratories in Frascati had a negative result, but subsequent investigations showed that it was not a failure but rather a discovery of a new phenomenon. Since the coming of lasers, CCs in alkali halides have been successfully used as optically active materials, in particular FA Centers. One of these centers, well known for its medium infrared laser emission at 77 K, cooled further to 2 K emitted in the near infrared and without laser effect. Further investigations showed that the double luminescence was a fundamental property unknown until that time. This important discovery was achieved in Frascati because of the existence since 1973 of a solid and extensive expertise in the field of CCs, which continued over time and later on applied to the modern miniaturized photonic devices [it

  7. Anomalous enhancement of nanodiamond luminescence upon heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Dolenko, T. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Fisenko, A. V.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristic photoluminescence (PL) of nanodiamonds (ND) of different origin (detonation, HPHT, extracted from meteorite) was studied in situ at high temperatures in the range 20-450 °C. Luminescence was excited using 473 nm laser and recorded in the range 500-800 nm. In contrast to decrease of point defect PL in bulk diamond with temperature, we found that the ND luminescence related to ND surface defects increases almost an order of magnitude upon heating to 200-250 °C. The observed effect reveals that water adsorbed on ND surfaces efficiently quenches PL; water desorption on heating leads to dramatic increase of the radiative de-excitation.

  8. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Data on the production and fish catch according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the production and the catch in 1997 is presented. The surface area used for production of fish has decreased for 836 ha or 8.40%. The total fish amount was bigger for 477 tons, or 10,52%. The feeding coefficient is 2.6 kg decreased 35% for in comparison to the bigger compared to the previous year. The amount of the fertilizer used is bigger for 37.30%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 6.50% of the total fish pond surfaces, the young carp ponds 22.04/0, and the ponds with consumption fish 70.31%. The total amount in the carp ponds was 446 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 160.8 tons/ha. The most produced fish species is the carp with 79.32%, followed by the trout with 11.50%, the herbivorous fish with 4.25%, while all the other fish species make up 4.93% of the entire production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the grass carp is leading with 69,23%, followed by the big head carp with 29.74% and the silver carp with 1.03%. Compared to the previous year the production of the carp, grass carp and tench is increased. Fish catch in open waters has decreased by 5.53% in comparison to the previous year. In the production and catch of the total freshwater fish, carp made up 75.34%, herbivorous fish made up 3.89%, trout 10.66%, sheat fish, pike perch and pike 2.70% and all other fish species 7.41%. As far as the distribution of production and catch of fish is concerned, 52,80% were sold on the market, 37.94% were used for reproduction (stocking the fish farms, mortality was 1.43%, and for personal use (sports fishing 7.83%. The number of fisheries workers has decreased for 8.17%, and the production per worker is bigger for 22.25%, compared to the previous year. Average production per worker was 7.17% tons of fish.

  9. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1996.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Data on the production and fish catch according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the production and the catch in 1996 is presented. The surface area used for production of fish has decreased by 1357 ha or 11.99%. The total fish amount has decreased by 1,921.00 tons or 29.76%. The feeding coefficient is 4 kg (33.33% bigger compared to the previous year. The amount of the fertilizer used has decreased by 18.79%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 5.99% of the total fish pond surfaces, the young carp ponds 21.13%, and the ponds with consumption fish 71.53%. The total fish amount in the carp ponds was 376 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 146.6 tons/ha. The most produced fish species is the carp with 82.21 %, followed by the trout with 8.57%, the herbivorous fish with 4.78%, while all the other fish species make up 4.44% of the entire production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the grass carp is leading with 64,28%, followed by the big head carp with 26.02% and the silver carp with 9.70%. Compared to the previous year the production of the trout and tench has somewhat increased, while the production of all the other species of fish has decreased. Fish catch in open waters has increased by 19.23% in comparison to the previous year. In the production and catch of the total freshwater fish, carp made up 77.46%, the herbivorous fish made up 4.32%, trout 4.32%, sheat fish, pike perch and pike 2.99% and all other fish species 7.36%. As far as the distribution of production and catch is concerned, 46.91% were sold on the market, 39.19% were used for reproduction (stocking the fish farms, mortalities were 6.23%, and for personal use (sports fishing 7.67% was used. The number of fisheries workers has decreased by 17.75%, and the production per worker has also decreased by 26.62%, compared to the previous year. Average production per worker was 5.87 tons of fish.

  10. Uranyl(VI) luminescence spectroscopy at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steudtner, Robin; Franzen, Carola; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Surface Processes; Haubitz, Toni [Brandenburg Univ. of Technology, Cottbus-Senftenberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We studied the influence of temperature and ionic strength on the luminescence characteristics (band position, decay time and intensity) of the free uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in acidic aqueous solution. Under the chosen conditions an increasing temperature reduced both intensity and luminescence decay time of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} luminescence, but the individual U(VI) emission bands did not change.

  11. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affleck, Rhett L. (Los Alamos, NM); Ambrose, W. Patrick (Los Alamos, NM); Demas, James N. (Charlottesville, VA); Goodwin, Peter M. (Jemez Springs, NM); Johnson, Mitchell E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Petty, Jeffrey T. (Los Alamos, NM); Schecker, Jay A. (Santa Fe, NM); Wu, Ming (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  12. Ab initio calculations of cross luminescence materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanchana, V.

    2016-01-01

    Abintio calculations have been performed to study the structural, electronic, and optical properties of ABX 3 (A=alkali, B=alkaline-earth, and X=halide) compounds. The ground state properties are calculated using the pseudopotential method with the inclusion of van der Waals interaction, which we find inevitable in reproducing the experimental structure properties in alkali iodides because of its layered structure. All calculations were performed using the Full-Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave method. The band structures are plotted with various functionals and we find the newly developed Tran and Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential to improve the band gap significantly. The optical properties such as complex dielectric function, refractive index, and absorption spectra are calculated which clearly reveal the optically isotropic nature of these materials though being structurally anisotropic, which is the key requirement for ceramic scintillators. Cross luminescence materials are very interesting because of its fast decay. One of the major criteria for the cross luminescence to happen is the energy difference between valence band and next deeper core valence band being lesser when compared to energy gap of the compound, so that radiative electronic transition may occur between valence band and core valence band. We found this criteria to be satisfied in all the studied compounds leading to cross luminescence except for KSrI 3 , RbSrI 3 . The present study suggest that among the six compounds studied, CsSrI 3 , CsMgCl 3 , CsCaCl 3 , and CsSrCl 3 compounds are cross luminescence materials, which is well explained from the band structure, optical properties calculations. Chlorides are better scintillators that iodides and CsMgCl 3 is found to be promising one among the studied compounds. Apart from these materials we have also discussed electronic structure and optical properties of other scintillator compounds. (author)

  13. Thermally stimulated luminescence of KDP activated crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagaeva, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study of recombination luminescence pure and doped by the ions Tl, Se, Pb and Cu of crystals double potassium phosphates (KDP) at irradiation by X-rays. It is established that in the given crystals mechanisms for under-threshold defect formation are realize. The impurity ions results the basic crystal light sum redistribution in the TL peaks. Explanations for some phenomena are given. (author)

  14. Thermal History Using Microparticle Trap Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    the size and shape of bacterial or viral agents and dispersed in a burst vessel . After the test, luminescence from the microparticles is measured to...platinum resistor sputtered on 1 nm adhesion layer of chrome, in turn on a 200nm LPCVD nitride; silicon wet -etching makes this a platform suspended...increased to 500°C until combustion occurred (- 7 min). The remaining powder was collected, crushed in a agate mortar, and annealed (typically at 900

  15. Process for producing a self luminescent material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, E

    1962-01-28

    A self luminescent material is produced by a process comprising applying a hydroxide or fluoride of promethium-147 suspended in a medium of paraffinic acid to the surface of a fluorescent body. Promethium-147 decays with a half-life of 2.6 years and emits beta-rays but not alpha- and gamma-rays so that it is suitable for manufacturing self luminescent materials. A chloride of promethium-147 cannot be employed because its structure is destroyed by acids. Although fluorides and hydroxides of promethium-147 are difficult to mix with the fluorescent body material, they become mixable when paraffinic acids containing from 12 to 20 carbon atoms, (for example, steric acid, palmitic acid and margaric acid) are used as a medium. In embodiments, the self luminescent materials are prepared by either neutralization of a promethium-147 chloride solution having a specific radioactivity of 1.2 c/cc. with an ammonium hydroxide solution to form gelatinous hydroxide, or the reaction of a promethium-147 chloride solution with H/sub 2/SiF/sub 6/ by heating at 80/sup 0/C to form a fluoride of promethium-147. The products have a specific radioactivity of 8 to 12 mc/g. These products are suspended in vehicles of polystyrene and methacrylic resin to produce the self luminescent coating materials. Tests show that the initical brightness is comparatively high, the decreasing rate of brightness is small, no blackening effects by alpha-rays occur and costs are low. The brightness of the coating containing promethium-147 is 82-85 after 5 days, 100-105 after 100 days and 82-92 after 180 days. With respect to the coating containing radium the values are 31-70 after 5 days, 28-49 after 100 days and 19-31 after 180 days.

  16. Broadband luminescence in liquid-solid transition

    CERN Document Server

    Achilov, M F; Trunilina, O V

    2002-01-01

    Broadband luminescence (BBL) intensity behavior in liquid-solid transition in polyethyleneglycol-600 has been established. Oscillation of BBL intensity observed in liquid-polycrystal transition are not found to observed in liquid-amorphous solid transition. It is shown that application of the theory of electron state tails to interpretation of BBL spectral properties in liquids demands restriction. BBL spectroscopy may be applied for optimization of preparation of polymers with determined properties. (author)

  17. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis at a freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Vibeke Margrethe Nyvang; Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    The freshwater-seawater interface was studied in a ~9-m thick anaerobic aquifer located in marine sand and gravel with thin peat lenses. Very limited amounts of iron-oxides are present. Consequently, the dominating redox processes are sulfate reduction and methanogenesis, and the groundwater...... is enriched in dissolved sulfide, methane and bicarbonate. Under normal conditions the seawater-freshwater interface is found at a depth of 4 m at the coastline and reaches the bottom of the aquifer 40 m inland. However, occasional flooding of the area occurs, introducing sulfate to the aquifer. Groundwater...... chemistry was studied in a 120 m transect perpendicular to the coast. Cores were taken for radiotracer rate measurements of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. In the saline part of the aquifer 35 m inland, sulfate reduction was the dominant process with rates of 0.1-10 mM/year. In the freshwater part 100...

  18. Luminescent Metal Nanoclusters for Potential Chemosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthaiah Shellaiah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of metal nanocluster (M-NCs-based sensors for specific analyte detection have achieved significant progress in recent decades. Ultra-small-size (<2 nm M-NCs consist of several to a few hundred metal atoms and exhibit extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Similar to organic molecules, M-NCs display absorption and emission properties via electronic transitions between energy levels upon interaction with light. As such, researchers tend to apply M-NCs in diverse fields, such as in chemosensors, biological imaging, catalysis, and environmental and electronic devices. Chemo- and bio-sensory uses have been extensively explored with luminescent NCs of Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt as potential sensory materials. Luminescent bi-metallic NCs, such as Au-Ag, Au-Cu, Au-Pd, and Au-Pt have also been used as probes in chemosensory investigations. Both metallic and bi-metallic NCs have been utilized to detect various analytes, such as metal ions, anions, biomolecules, proteins, acidity or alkalinity of a solution (pH, and nucleic acids, at diverse detection ranges and limits. In this review, we have summarized the chemosensory applications of luminescent M-NCs and bi-metallic NCs.

  19. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and some other luminescence images from granite slices exposed with radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Notoya, S.; Ojima, T.; Hoteida, M.

    1995-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) images of some X- and γ-irradiated granite slices were obtained using photon detection through a 570 nm bandpass filter with diode-laser excitation of 910 nm. Alternative photo-induced phosphorescence (PIP) images, which were colour photographed immediately after the sunlight exposure of slice samples, were also found to be helpful in the observation of the luminescence properties and to filter selection for OSL measurements. These OSL and PIP images were compared with some other colour luminescence images, including thermoluminescence images (TLCI) and after-glow images (AGCI). It was obvious that there exists a variety of coloured emissions derived mainly from feldspar constituents and these were found to be dependent on the geological history or metamorphism of the granites. (Author)

  20. Near-Infrared Quantum Cutting Long Persistent Luminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Zehua; Feng, Lin; Cao, Cheng; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    By combining the unique features of the quantum cutting luminescence and long persistent luminescence, we design a new concept called ?near-infrared quantum cutting long persistent luminescence (NQPL)?, which makes it possible for us to obtain highly efficient (>100%) near-infrared long persistent luminescence in theory. Guided by the NQPL concept, we fabricate the first NQPL phosphor Ca2Ga2GeO7:Pr3+,Yb3+. It reveals that both the two-step energy transfer of model (I) and the one-step energy ...

  1. Diversity and Abundance of Ice Nucleating Strains of Pseudomonas syringae in a Freshwater Lake in Virginia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Renée B; Vinatzer, Boris A; Schmale, David G

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is found in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some strains of P. syringae express an ice nucleation protein (hereafter referred to as Ice+) allowing them to catalyze the heterogeneous freezing of water. Though P. syringae has been sampled intensively from freshwater sources in France, little is known about the genetic diversity of P. syringae in natural aquatic habitats in North America. We collected samples of freshwater from three different depths in Claytor Lake, Virginia, USA between November 2015 and June 2016. Samples were plated on non-selective medium (TSA) and on medium selective for Pseudomonas (KBC) and closely related species to estimate the total number of culturable bacteria and of Pseudomonas , respectively. A droplet freezing assay was used to screen colonies for the Ice+ phenotype. Ice+ colonies were then molecularly identified based on the cts (citrate synthase) gene and the 16S rDNA gene. Phylogenetic analysis of cts sequences showed a surprising diversity of phylogenetic subgroups of P. syringae . Frequencies of Ice+ isolates on P. syringae selective medium ranged from 0 to 15% per sample with the highest frequency being found in spring. Our work shows that freshwater lakes can be a significant reservoir of Ice+ P. syringae . Future work is needed to determine the contribution of P. syringae from freshwater lakes to the P. syringae populations present in the atmosphere and on plants and, in particular, if freshwater lakes could be an inoculum source of P. syringae -caused plant disease outbreaks.

  2. Freshwater exposure pathways in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1984-06-01

    The report relates to a subproject under a Nordic project called ''Large reactor accidents - consequences and mitigating actions''. The report summarizes information available, primarily in the Nordic countries, on freshwater exposure pathways. Experimental and theoretical data concerning the deposition and run-off of the nuclides *sp90*Sr and*Sp137*Cs is presented. Internal exposure via drinking water and freshwater fish is dealt with, as well as external exposure due to swimming, boating, contact with fishing utensils and use of beach areas. In addition is exposure via irrigated agricultural products considered. (RF)

  3. Threatened and Endangered Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all US listed Threatened and Endangered freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region....

  4. Predicting freshwater habitat integrity using land-use surrogates

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Amis, MA

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater biodiversity is globally threatened due to human disturbances, but freshwater ecosystems have been accorded less protection than their terrestrial and marine counterparts. Few criteria exist for assessing the habitat integrity of rivers...

  5. Luminescence of water or ice as a new detection method for magnetic monopoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollmann Anna Obertacke

    2017-01-01

    We present analysis techniques to use luminescence in neutrino telescopes and discuss experimental setups to measure the light yield of luminescence for the particular conditions in neutrino detectors.

  6. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERIES IN 1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Turk

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Data on the production and catch of fish according to species, on the surface of the fish ponds, on the means of fish catching and on the distribution of the product and catch in 1994 is presented. The surface area used for production of fish has decreased by 274 ha or 2,51%. The total amount of fish has decreased by 1.263 tons or 14,78%. The highest production of fish was reached by the fish farm Donji Miholjac with 1.231 kg/ha. The feeding coefficient is 3,10 kg. Only on one fish farm was the feeding coefficient less than 2.0 kg (1,40 and on two large farms this coefficient was greater than 5,00 kg. The main fish food is still wheat followed by corn. The amount of fertilizer used was decreased by 14,40%. The fry carp growing ponds make up 0,92% of the surface area of the entire fish farm, the young carp ponds 21,77% and the culturing ponds for consumption fish 76,55%. The total amount of fish in the carp ponds was 660 kg/ha, and in the trout ponds it was 123.4 tons/ha. The carp is the highest produced fish with 80, 35%, then the herbivorous fish with 5,65 and all other fish make up 14% of the total production. In the structure of herbivorous fish the grass carp is leading with 54, 70%, followed by the big head carp with 25,54% and the silver carp with 19,76%. In comparison with the previous year the production of "all other fish- has significantly increased (287%, and sheat fish 18,90%, while the production of trench has decreased (71%. Fish catch in open waters has increased by 20,57% in comparison to the previous year. Carp made up 78,07% of the total production and catch of freshwater fish, the herbivorous fish made up 5,40%, trout 4,38%, the sheat fish, pike perch and pike 2,86% and all other fish species 9,28%. As far as the distribution of production and catch, 51,60% were sold on the market, 37,54% were used for reproduction (stocking the fish farms , mortalities were 6,35% and for personal use (sports fishing 4,50% was used. The number

  7. Effect of exposure to sunlight and phosphorus-limitation on bacterial degradation of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Theis; Søndergaard, Morten; Tranvik, Lars

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the interacting effect of photochemical conditioning of dissolved organic matter and inorganic phosphorus on the metabolic activity of bacteria in freshwater. Batch cultures with lake-water bacteria and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) extracted from a humic boreal river were...... arranged in an experimental matrix of three levels of exposure to simulated sunlight and three levels of phosphorus concentration. We measured an increase in bacterial biomass, a decrease in DOC and bacterial respiration as CO(2) production and O(2) consumption over 450 h. These measurements were used...

  8. Freshwater crayfish invasions in South Africa: past, present and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Freshwater crayfish invasions have been studied around the world, but less so in Africa, a continent devoid of native freshwater crayfish. The present study reviews historical and current information on alien freshwater crayfish species introduced into South Africa and aims to indicate which areas are at risk from invasion.

  9. Field and model investigations of freshwater lenses in coastal aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    A major problem of sustaining freshwater supply from freshwater lens is the invasion of saline groundwater into a fresh groundwater body. In many coastal areas saltwater intrusion has led to well closure and reduced freshwater supply. Furthermore, in the future saltwater intrusion is expected to

  10. Scale-based freshwater conservation planning: towards protecting freshwater biodiversity in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rivers-Moore, NA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available River systems have strong linear linkages and require innovative solutions to capture these linkages from aquatic conservation planners. The authors applied an approach to freshwater conservation planning to freshwater ecosystems of Kwa...

  11. Determination of Silver Ions Toxicity in Short-Term and Long-Term Experiments Using a Luminescent Recombinant Strain of E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana P. Yudina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of silver ions on the luminescent recombinant strain of Escherichia coli carrying luxCDABE operon of Vibrio fischeri were investigated. The toxicity of silver ions was determined in 30 minutes and in chronic 24 hours experiments. Changes in the luminescence intensity and in the growth rate of bacteria were considered as a measure of silver ions toxicity within the range of concentrations applied. The effect of silver ions was demonstrated to be strongly dependent on the concentration of bacteria and on the medium composition. EC50 values were 0.018 mg/l after 30 min exposure and 0.014 mg/l after 10 hours of bacterial growth. Comparison of two modifications of the experiment showed that silver ions have a strong non-specific toxicity, as well as a specific effect on bacterial cells

  12. Sediment Biogeochemistry After the Entrance of Cable Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    fields which may strongly modify ionic transports. They form pH extremes, and accelerate the dissolution of iron sulfides, and carbonates in subsurface sediment. They further promote the formation of iron oxides and carbonates at the sediment surface and stimulate the removal of sulfides......, sulfide-rich coastal sediments, salt marshes seasonally hypoxic basins, subtidal coastal mud plains, as well as freshwater sediments and waterlogged soils. In this talk I will review our current knowledge on how cable bacteria influence the biogeochemistry of sediments. The cable bacteria form electric...... and the formation of sulfate[3] Field studies conducted in the marine environment indicate that some of these effects are expressed in a way that marine systems with active cable bacteria populations have elevated phosphorus-retention{Sulu-Gambari, 2016 #1501} and acts as strong buffers against adverse stage...

  13. Dactylobiotus luci , a new freshwater tardigrade (Eutardigrada ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new freshwater eutardigrade, Dactylobiotus luci sp. nov., is described from a permanent marsh pool (Zaphania's Pool) at 4225 m elevation in the Alpine zone of the Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda. The new species is most similar to D. dervizi Biserov, 1998 in the shape of the egg processes, absence of papillae and ...

  14. Effects of pollution on freshwater fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKim, J.M.; Christensen, G.M.; Tucker, J.H.; Benoit, D.A.; Lewis, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    Various aspects of pollution effects on fishes are reviewed under the following headings: methodology; water quality; pesticide pollutants; industrial pollutants; domestic pollutants; radioactive pollutants; and other pollutants. A table is presented to show acute and chronic toxicity of inorganic and organic pollutants to freshwater fish. (U.S.)

  15. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buikema, A. L., Jr.; Herricks, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) toxicant effects on invertebrates; (2) microcosm and community effects, and (3) biological control of aquatic life. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  16. 2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Teel

    2009-05-01

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

  17. Methane emission from tidal freshwater marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Nat, F.J.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    In two tidal freshwater marshes, methane emission, production and accumulation in the pore-water have been studied. The two sites differ in their dominant vegetation, i.e., reed and bulrush, and in their heights above sea level. The reed site was elevated in relation to the bulrush site and had

  18. Wnt signaling and polarity in freshwater sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor Reid, Pamela J; Matveev, Eugueni; McClymont, Alexandra; Posfai, Dora; Hill, April L; Leys, Sally P

    2018-02-02

    The Wnt signaling pathway is uniquely metazoan and used in many processes during development, including the formation of polarity and body axes. In sponges, one of the earliest diverging animal groups, Wnt pathway genes have diverse expression patterns in different groups including along the anterior-posterior axis of two sponge larvae, and in the osculum and ostia of others. We studied the function of Wnt signaling and body polarity formation through expression, knockdown, and larval manipulation in several freshwater sponge species. Sponge Wnts fall into sponge-specific and sponge-class specific subfamilies of Wnt proteins. Notably Wnt genes were not found in transcriptomes of the glass sponge Aphrocallistes vastus. Wnt and its signaling genes were expressed in archaeocytes of the mesohyl throughout developing freshwater sponges. Osculum formation was enhanced by GSK3 knockdown, and Wnt antagonists inhibited both osculum development and regeneration. Using dye tracking we found that the posterior poles of freshwater sponge larvae give rise to tissue that will form the osculum following metamorphosis. Together the data indicate that while components of canonical Wnt signaling may be used in development and maintenance of osculum tissue, it is likely that Wnt signaling itself occurs between individual cells rather than whole tissues or structures in freshwater sponges.

  19. Heliozoa from Nigeria | Wujek | Tropical Freshwater Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of seven scaled protistans were observed from four freshwater sites in Nigeria. They include the holiozoan genera Acanthocystis, Polyplacocystis, Pterocystis, and Raphidiophrys. All are new records for Africa. KEY WORDS: Heliozoa, Protozoa, Acanthocystis, Polyplacocystis, Pterocystis, Raphidiophrys Tropical ...

  20. Monitoring endangered freshwater biodiversity using environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Kielgast, Jos; Iversen, Lars Lønsmann

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are among the most endangered habitats on Earth, with thousands of animal species known to be threatened or already extinct. Reliable monitoring of threatened organisms is crucial for data-driven conservation actions but remains a challenge owing to nonstandardized methods t...

  1. Macrophytes: Freshwater Forests of Lakes and Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, Karla J.; Naiman, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological effects on macrophytes (aquatic plants) on the freshwater ecosystem are discussed. Research questions and issues related to these organisms are also discussed, including adaptations for survival in a wet environment, ecological consequences of large-scale macrophyte eradication, seasonal changes in plant…

  2. River and wetland classifications for freshwater conservation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    River and wetland classifications for freshwater conservation planning in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... regional- or provincial-scale conservation planning. The hierarchical structure of the classifications provides scope for finer resolution, by the addition of further levels, for application at a sub-regional or municipal scale.

  3. Novel Synechococcus genomes reconstructed from freshwater reservoirs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cabello-Yeves, P.J.; Haro-Moreno, J.M.; Martin-Cuadrado, A.B.; Ghai, Rohit; Picazo, A.; Camacho, A.; Rodriguez-Valera, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, June (2017), č. článku 1151. ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-04828S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Synechococcus * picocyanobacteria * freshwater reservoirs * metagenomics * abundance Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.076, year: 2016

  4. Microplastic effect thresholds for freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redondo Hasselerharm, P.E.; Dede Falahudin, Dede; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Now that microplastics have been detected in lakes, rivers and estuaries all over the globe, evaluating their effects on biota has become an urgent research priority. This is the first study that aims at determining the effect thresholds for a battery of six freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates

  5. Herbivory on freshwater and marine macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Wood, Kevin A.; Pagès, Jordi F.; Veen, G.F.; Christianen, Marjolijn J.A.; Santamaría, Luis; Nolet, Bart A.; Hilt, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Until the 1990s, herbivory on aquatic vascular plants was considered to be of minor importance, and the predominant view was that freshwater and marine macrophytes did not take part in the food web: their primary fate was the detritivorous pathway. In the last 25 years, a substantial body of

  6. Benthic freshwater nematode community dynamics under conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies of the influence of fish aquaculture on benthic freshwater nematode assemblages are scarce, but could provide a way of gauging environmental effects. The abundance and diversity of nematode assemblages in response to Oreochromis niloticus aquaculture were investigated in Kafr El-Sheikh Governorate, Egypt, ...

  7. Freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Mernild

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial inputs of freshwater flux to Sermilik Fjord, SE Greenland, were estimated, indicating ice discharge to be the dominant source of freshwater. A freshwater flux of 40.4 ± 4.9×109 m3 y−1 was found (1999–2008, with an 85% contribution originated from ice discharge (65% alone from Helheim Glacier, 11% from terrestrial surface runoff (from melt water and rain, 3% from precipitation at the fjord surface area, and 1% from subglacial geothermal and frictional melting due to basal ice motion. The results demonstrate the dominance of ice discharge as a primary mechanism for delivering freshwater to Sermilik Fjord. Time series of ice discharge for Helheim Glacier, Midgård Glacier, and Fenris Glacier were calculated from satellite-derived average surface velocity, glacier width, and estimated ice thickness, and fluctuations in terrestrial surface freshwater runoff were simulated based on observed meteorological data. These simulations were compared and bias corrected against independent glacier catchment runoff observations. Modeled runoff to Sermilik Fjord was variable, ranging from 2.9 ± 0.4×109 m3 y−1 in 1999 to 5.9 ± 0.9×109 m3 y−1 in 2005. The sub-catchment runoff of the Helheim Glacier region accounted for 25% of the total runoff to Sermilik Fjord. The runoff distribution from the different sub-catchments suggested a strong influence from the spatial variation in glacier coverage, indicating high runoff volumes, where glacier cover was present at low elevations.

  8. Bioaccumulation of pathogenic bacteria and amoeba by zebra mussels and their presence in watercourses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosteo, R; Goñi, P; Miguel, N; Abadías, J; Valero, P; Ormad, M P

    2016-01-01

    Dreissena polymorpha (the zebra mussel) has been invading freshwater bodies in Europe since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Filter-feeding organisms can accumulate and concentrate both chemical and biological contaminants in their tissues. Therefore, zebra mussels are recognized as indicators of freshwater quality. In this work, the capacity of the zebra mussel to accumulate human pathogenic bacteria and protozoa has been evaluated and the sanitary risk associated with their presence in surface water has also been assessed. The results show a good correlation between the pathogenic bacteria concentration in zebra mussels and in watercourses. Zebra mussels could therefore be used as an indicator of biological contamination. The bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Salmonella spp.) and parasites (Cryptosporidium oocysts and free-living amoebae) detected in these mussels reflect a potential sanitary risk in water.

  9. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  10. Luminescent properties of terbium complex with phenylanthranilic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alakaeva, L.A.; Kalazhokova, I.A.; Naurzhanova, F.Kh.

    1990-01-01

    Existence of terbium luminescence reaction in complex with phenanthranilic acid (FAA) is ascertained. The optimal conditions of terbium complexing with FAA are found. The ratio of components in the complex is 1:1. The influence of foreign rare earth in terbium luminescence intensity in complex with FAA is studied

  11. Luminescence properties of some food dye-stuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astanov, S.Kh.; Muminova, Z.A.; Urunov, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    The luminescence properties of the natural food dye-stuffs and vitamins in temperature range of 300-5.2 K are studied. On the basis of experimental data on quantum yields of the fluorescence, trans-cis-isomerization and luminescence of the molecular oxygen the main ways of the inactivation of electronic excitations in researching compounds have been defined. (author)

  12. Doped luminescent materials and particle discrimination using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, F. Patrick; Allendorf, Mark D; Feng, Patrick L

    2014-10-07

    Doped luminescent materials are provided for converting excited triplet states to radiative hybrid states. The doped materials may be used to conduct pulse shape discrimination (PSD) using luminescence generated by harvested excited triplet states. The doped materials may also be used to detect particles using spectral shape discrimination (SSD).

  13. Integrated light in direct excitation and energy transfer luminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Chimczak, Eugeniusz

    2007-01-01

    Integrated light in direct excitation and energy transfer luminescence has been investigated. In the investigations reported here, monomolecular centers were taken into account. It was found that the integrated light is equal to the product of generation rate and time of duration of excitation pulse for both direct excitation and energy transfer luminescence.

  14. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Il An, Gwang; Park, Se-Il; Oh, Jungmin; Kim, Hong Joo; Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung; Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Jaetae; Welch, Michael J.; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [ 32 P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy β + /β - particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [ 32 P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic β + or β - particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  15. Bacterial production and growth rate estimation from [3H]thymidine incorporation for attached and free-living bacteria in aquatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriberri, J.; Unanue, M.; Ayo, B.; Barcina, I.; Egea, L.

    1990-01-01

    Production and specific growth rates of attached and free-living bacteria were estimated in an oligotrophic marine system, La Salvaje Beach, Vizcaya, Spain, and in a freshwater system having a higher nutrient concentration, Butron River, Vizcaya, Spain. Production was calculated from [methyl- 3 H]thymidine incorporation by estimating specific conversion factors (cells or micrograms of C produced per mole of thymidine incorporated) for attached and free-living bacteria, respectively, in each system. Conversion factors were not statistically different between attached and free-living bacteria: 6.812 x 10 11 and 8.678 x 10 11 μg of C mol -1 for free-living and attached bacteria in the freshwater system, and 1.276 x 10 11 and 1.354 x 10 11 μg of C mol -1 for free-living and attached bacteria in the marine system. Therefore, use of a unique conversion factor for the mixed bacterial population is well founded. However, conversion factors were higher in the freshwater system than in the marine system. This could be due to the different tropic conditions of the two systems. Free-living bacteria contributed the most to production in the two systems (85% in the marine system and 67% in the freshwater system) because of their greater contribution to total biomass. Specific growth rates calculated from production data and biomass data were similar for attached and free-living bacteria

  16. Luminescence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation: History, highlights, future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerer, Georg

    2006-01-01

    Luminescence spectroscopy and the investigation of dynamical processes with synchrotron radiation (SR) started about 35 years ago in nearly all SR laboratories existing at that time. In the present paper, the pioneering experiments are particularly emphasized. The exciting development is illustrated presenting highlights for the whole period from the beginning to the present day. The highlights are taken from fields like exciton self-trapping, inelastic electron-electron scattering, optically stimulated desorption, cross luminescence, or probing of cluster properties with luminescence spectroscopic methods. More technological aspects play a role in present day's experiments, like quantum cutting in rare-earth-doped insulators. Promising two-photon excitation and light amplification experiments with SR will be included, as well as the first results obtained in a luminescence experiment with selective Vaccum ultraviolet-free electron laser excitation. Finally, a few ideas concerning the future development of luminescence spectroscopy with SR will be sketched

  17. Magnetic-luminescent spherical particles synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Norma L; Hirata, Gustavo A; Flores, Dora L

    2015-01-01

    The combination of magnetic and luminescent properties in a single particle system, opens-up a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. In this work, we performed the synthesis of magnetic-luminescent Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ @Fe 2 O 3 particles by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis performed in a tubular furnace. In order to achieve the composite formation, commercial superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were coated with a luminescent Eu 3+ -doped Gd 2 O 3 shell in a low-cost one-step process. The spray pyrolysis method yields deagglomerated spherical shape magneto/luminescent particles. The photoluminescence spectra under UV excitation (λ Exc = 265 nm) of the magnetic Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ @Fe 2 O 3 compound showed the characteristic red emission of Eu 3+ (λ Em = 612 nm). This magneto/luminescent system will find applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. (paper)

  18. Synthesis of high luminescent carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdyuk, Alina A.; Petrova, Polina S.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.

    2017-03-01

    In this article we report an effective and simple method for synthesis of high luminescent carbon nanodots (CDs). In our work as a carbon source sodium dextran sulfate (DS) was used because it is harmless, its analogs are used in medicine as antithrombotic compounds and blood substitutes after hemorrhage. was used as a substrate We investigated the influence of temperature parameters of hydrothermal synthesis on the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and position of emission maxima. We discovered that the PL intensity can be tuned by changing of synthesis temperature and CD concentration.

  19. Circularly polarized luminescence of syndiotactic polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Paola; Abbate, Sergio; Longhi, Giovanna; Guerra, Gaetano

    2017-11-01

    Syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS) films, when crystallized from the amorphous state by temporary sorption of non-racemic guest molecules (like carvone) not only exhibit unusually high optical activity, both in the UV-Visible and Infrared ranges, but also present circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) with high dissymmetry ratios (g = ΔI/I values in the range 0.02-0.03). Experimental evidences provide support, rather than to the usual molecular circular dichroism, to a supramolecular chiral optical response being extrinsic to the site of photon absorption and emission, possibly associated with a helical morphology of s-PS crystallites.

  20. Luminescent properties of praseodymium in some fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, A.S.; Rodnyj, P.A.; Mikhrin, S.B.; Magunov, I.R.

    2005-01-01

    Influence of diverse factors on efficiency of the Pr 3+ cascade emission in BaF 2 : Pr and SrAlF 5 : Pr. The effect of the environment of the luminescence center on the mutual position of the lowest 5d and the 4f level 1 S 0 of Pr 3+ ion is considered. PrF 3 clustering in BaF 2 is observed at a high praseodymium concentration. The promising potential of magnesium as a charge compensator for praseodymium in SrAlF 5 is demonstrated [ru

  1. Luminescent solar concentrators with fiber geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelenbosch, Oreane Y; Fisher, Martyn; Patrignani, Luca; van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Chatten, Amanda J

    2013-05-06

    The potential of a fibre luminescent solar concentrator has been explored by means of both analytical and ray-tracing techniques. Coated fibres have been found to be more efficient than homogeneously doped fibres, at low absorption. For practical fibres concentration is predicted to be linear with fibre length. A 1 m long, radius 1 mm, fibre LSC doped with Lumogen Red 305 is predicted to concentrate the AM1.5 g spectrum up to 1100 nm at normal incidence by ~35 x. The collection efficiency under diffuse and direct irradiance in London has been analysed showing that, even under clear sky conditions, in winter the diffuse contribution equals the direct.

  2. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Ram Srimath Kandada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  3. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... to include the effects of the environmental dose rate. By fitting the model to the dose-depth variation from a single clast, four events (two light exposures of different durations each followed by a burial period) in the history of a single cobble are identified and quantified. However, the use of model...

  4. Luminescence at the end of the tunnelling - Investigating charge transfer mechanisms and luminescence dating methods for feldspar minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis comprises analyses of mineral physics with an application in geology and archeology. The thesis contributes to the development of feldspar luminescence dating methods in order to extend the applicable age range of feldspar luminescence dating in the Quaternary (last 2.6 Ma). The research

  5. Composition, sources, and bioavailability of nitrogen in a longitudinal gradient from freshwater to estuarine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Jariani; Toor, Gurpal S

    2018-06-15

    Nitrogen (N) transport from land to water is a dominant contributor of N in estuarine waters leading to eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, and hypoxia. Our objectives were to (1) investigate the composition of inorganic and organic N forms, (2) distinguish the sources and biogeochemical mechanisms of nitrate-N (NO 3 -N) transport using stable isotopes of NO 3 - and Bayesian mixing model, and (3) determine the dissolved organic N (DON) bioavailability using bioassays in a longitudinal gradient from freshwater to estuarine ecosystem located in the Tampa Bay, Florida, United States. We found that DON was the most dominant N form (mean: 64%, range: 46-83%) followed by particulate organic N (PON, mean: 22%, range: 14-37%), whereas inorganic N forms (NO x -N: 7%, NH 4 -N: 7%) were 14% of total N in freshwater and estuarine waters. Stable isotope data of NO 3 - revealed that nitrification was the main contributor (36.4%), followed by soil and organic N sources (25.5%), NO 3 - fertilizers (22.4%), and NH 4 + fertilizers (15.7%). Bioassays showed that 14 to 65% of DON concentrations decreased after 5-days of incubation indicating utilization of DON by microbes in freshwater and estuarine waters. These results suggest that despite low proportion of inorganic N forms, the higher concentrations and bioavailability of DON can be a potential source of N for algae and bacteria leading to water quality degradation in the estuarine waters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. How honey kills bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; te Velde, Anje A.; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2010-01-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria

  7. Surgical hazards posed by marine and freshwater animals in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R J; Burgess, G H

    1993-11-01

    Marine and freshwater animals can cause injury to humans by biting, stinging, being poisonous to eat, and causing infections. Biting aquatic animals in Florida include sharks, barracudas, alligators, and moray eels. Devitalized tissue should be débrided, and vascular, neurologic, and tendinous injuries should be repaired. Radiographs should be obtained to examine the injury sit for fractures and retained foreign bodies (teeth). The spines of stingrays and marine catfish can cause soft tissue injury and infection. The spine has a recurved, serrated shape that may cause further injury and break if it is pulled out. The venom may cause local tissue necrosis requiring débridement. Soft tissue infections with marine Vibrio bacteria can occur after eating raw oysters or receiving even minor injuries from marine animals. Thirty-one individuals developed soft tissue infections, 49 developed sepsis, and 23 developed both sepsis and soft tissue infection with marine Vibrio species during a 12-year period. Sixteen patients developed necrotizing soft tissue infections. Treatment is with antibiotics and débridement when necrosis occurs.

  8. Terrestrial carbohydrates support freshwater zooplankton during phytoplankton deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Sami J; Galloway, Aaron W E; Aalto, Sanni L; Kahilainen, Kimmo K; Strandberg, Ursula; Kankaala, Paula

    2016-08-11

    Freshwater food webs can be partly supported by terrestrial primary production, often deriving from plant litter of surrounding catchment vegetation. Although consisting mainly of poorly bioavailable lignin, with low protein and lipid content, the carbohydrates from fallen tree leaves and shoreline vegetation may be utilized by aquatic consumers. Here we show that during phytoplankton deficiency, zooplankton (Daphnia magna) can benefit from terrestrial particulate organic matter by using terrestrial-origin carbohydrates for energy and sparing essential fatty acids and amino acids for somatic growth and reproduction. Assimilated terrestrial-origin fatty acids from shoreline reed particles exceeded available diet, indicating that Daphnia may convert a part of their dietary carbohydrates to saturated fatty acids. This conversion was not observed with birch leaf diets, which had lower carbohydrate content. Subsequent analysis of 21 boreal and subarctic lakes showed that diet of herbivorous zooplankton is mainly based on high-quality phytoplankton rich in essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. The proportion of low-quality diets (bacteria and terrestrial particulate organic matter) was <28% of the assimilated carbon. Taken collectively, the incorporation of terrestrial carbon into zooplankton was not directly related to the concentration of terrestrial organic matter in experiments or lakes, but rather to the low availability of phytoplankton.

  9. Practical aspects of sea and fresh-water algae utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyanishkene, V.B.; Zlobin, V.S.; Zheleznyakova, O.V.

    1988-01-01

    Regularities of sea and fresh-water microalgae cultivation, revealed during the operation of industrial plants, are presented in detail. The study of the Platymonas viridis cultivation mechanisms has shown the possibility of active intervention into the cycle of intense reproduction of the biomass. Among physical factors of the medium, which influence the reproduction of the industrial strain of Platymonas viridis, the effect of the red light, ultraviolet radiation, ultrahigh frequency fields and gamma radiation upon the cell division of these microalgae has been investigated. It has been shown that the effect of gamma radiation on the cell division of Platymonas viridis, other bacteria and protozoans is inhibiting. In the experiments using the radionuclides strontium-90 and cerium-144 as indicators of metabolism the dependence of the radionuclide accumulation factor on the quantity of stable lead as well as the effect of the temperature on the accumulation process have been studied. The coefficients of 90 Sr and 144 Ce accumulation by Nitellopsis obtusa cell compartments depending on stable lead and temperature are presented. 200 refs.; 21 figs.; 54 tabs

  10. Seismic Moment and Recurrence using Luminescence Dating Techniques: Characterizing brittle fault zone materials suitable for luminescence dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakalos, E.; Lin, A.; Bassiakos, Y.; Kazantzaki, M.; Filippaki, E.

    2017-12-01

    During a seismic-geodynamic process, frictional heating and pressure are generated on sediments fragments resulting in deformation and alteration of minerals contained in them. The luminescence signal enclosed in minerals crystal lattice can be affected and even zeroed during such an event. This has been breakthrough in geochronological studies as it could be utilized as a chronometer for the previous seismic activity of a tectonically active area. Although the employment of luminescence dating has in some cases been successfully described, a comprehensive study outlining and defining protocols for routine luminescence dating applied to neotectonic studies has not been forthcoming. This study is the experimental investigation, recording and parameterization of the effects of tectonic phenomena on minerals luminescence signal and the development of detailed protocols for the standardization of the luminescence methodology for directly dating deformed geological formations, so that the long-term temporal behaviour of seismically active faults could be reasonably understood and modeled. This will be achieved by: a) identifying and proposing brittle fault zone materials suitable for luminescence dating using petrological, mineralogical and chemical analyses and b) investigating the "zeroing" potential of the luminescence signal of minerals contained in fault zone materials by employing experimental simulations of tectonic processes in the laboratory, combined with luminescence measurements on samples collected from real fault zones. For this to be achieved, a number of samples collected from four faults of four different geographical regions will be used. This preliminary-first step of the study presents the microstructural, and mineralogical analyses for the characterization of brittle fault zone materials that contain suitable minerals for luminescence dating (e.g., quartz and feldspar). The results showed that the collected samples are seismically deformed fault

  11. Host-Specificity and Dynamics in Bacterial Communities Associated with Bloom-Forming Freshwater Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatini, Inessa Lacativa; Eiler, Alexander; Bertilsson, Stefan; Klaveness, Dag; Tessarolli, Letícia Piton; Vieira, Armando Augusto Henriques

    2014-01-01

    Many freshwater phytoplankton species have the potential to form transient nuisance blooms that affect water quality and other aquatic biota. Heterotrophic bacteria can influence such blooms via nutrient regeneration but also via antagonism and other biotic interactions. We studied the composition of bacterial communities associated with three bloom-forming freshwater phytoplankton species, the diatom Aulacoseira granulata and the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. Experimental cultures incubated with and without lake bacteria were sampled in three different growth phases and bacterial community composition was assessed by 454-Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Betaproteobacteria were dominant in all cultures inoculated with lake bacteria, but decreased during the experiment. In contrast, Alphaproteobacteria, which made up the second most abundant class of bacteria, increased overall during the course of the experiment. Other bacterial classes responded in contrasting ways to the experimental incubations causing significantly different bacterial communities to develop in response to host phytoplankton species, growth phase and between attached and free-living fractions. Differences in bacterial community composition between cyanobacteria and diatom cultures were greater than between the two cyanobacteria. Despite the significance, major differences between phytoplankton cultures were in the proportion of the OTUs rather than in the absence or presence of specific taxa. Different phytoplankton species favoring different bacterial communities may have important consequences for the fate of organic matter in systems where these bloom forming species occur. The dynamics and development of transient blooms may also be affected as bacterial communities seem to influence phytoplankton species growth in contrasting ways. PMID:24465807

  12. Luminescence optically stimulated: theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera M, T.; Azorin N, J.

    2002-01-01

    The thermally stimulated luminescence (Tl) has occupied an important place in the Solid state physics (FES) by the flexibility of the phenomena, mainly for its applications in the fields of Radiation Physics (FR) and Medical Physics (MF). The reason of this phenomena lies in the fact of the electrons release by the action of heat. Under that same reason, it can be used the action of another stimulant agent for releasing the trapped electrons in the metastable states (EM), this agent is the light which has the same effect that the heat, giving as result the production of light photons at using light in the visible spectra, of different wavelength that the excitation light. This phenomena is called Luminescence optically stimulated (LOE). The LOE has a great impact in the Solid State Physics (FES), dating and now in the use of the phenomena as a dosimetric method, alternate to the Tl, for its use in the ionizing and non-ionizing radiations fields. (Author)

  13. Nervous control of photophores in luminescent fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Giacomo; Abelli, Luigi; Salpietro, Lorenza; Zaccone, Daniele; Macrì, Battesimo; Marino, Fabio

    2011-07-01

    Functional studies of the autonomic innervation in the photophores of luminescent fishes are scarce. The majority of studies have involved either the stimulation of isolated photophores or the modulatory effects of adrenaline-induced light emission. The fish skin is a highly complex organ that performs a wide variety of physiological processes and receives extensive nervous innervations. The latter includes autonomic nerve fibers of spinal sympathetic origin having a secretomotor function. More recent evidence indicates that neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers, such as those that express tachykinin and its NK1 receptor, neuropeptide Y, or nitric oxide, may also play an important role in the nervous control of photophores. There is no anatomical evidence that shows that nNOS positive (nitrergic) neurons form a population distinct from the secretomotor neurons with perikarya in the sympathetic ganglia. The distribution and function of the nitrergic nerves in the luminous cells, however, is less clear. It is likely that the chemical properties of the sympathetic postganglionic neurons in the ganglia of luminescent fishes are target-specific, such as observed in mammals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Freshwater biodiversity and aquatic insect diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Klaas-Douwe B; Monaghan, Michael T; Pauls, Steffen U

    2014-01-01

    Inland waters cover less than 1% of Earth's surface but harbor more than 6% of all insect species: Nearly 100,000 species from 12 orders spend one or more life stages in freshwater. Little is known about how this remarkable diversity arose, although allopatric speciation and ecological adaptation are thought to be primary mechanisms. Freshwater habitats are highly susceptible to environmental change and exhibit marked ecological gradients. Standing waters appear to harbor more dispersive species than running waters, but there is little understanding of how this fundamental ecological difference has affected diversification. In contrast to the lack of evolutionary studies, the ecology and habitat preferences of aquatic insects have been intensively studied, in part because of their widespread use as bioindicators. The combination of phylogenetics with the extensive ecological data provides a promising avenue for future research, making aquatic insects highly suitable models for the study of ecological diversification.

  15. Freshwater fishes of Tsitsikamma National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fishes in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Fish assemblages in six river systems were sampled in 2001, with a total of 323 fish from eight species recorded. Indigenous fish collected included four freshwater species (Pseudobarbus afer, Pseudobarbus tenuis, Sandelia capensis, Anguilla mossambica, three estuarine species (Monodactylus falciformis, Caffrogobius gilchristi, Myxus capensis, and one alien (Micropterus salmoides. One additional indigenous species (Galaxias zebratus and two aliens (Salmo trutta, Oncorhynchus mykiss could potentially occur within the park. The topography and locality of the park presents a unique opportunity to meaningfully conserve the endangered P. tenuis as well as other fish characteristic of the eastern reaches of the Cape Floristic Region. Management action is required to minimise opportunities for further establishment and spread of alien fish species and to conserve indigenous fish assemblages within the park.

  16. The International Editorship of Freshwater Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Karl E. Havens

    2001-01-01

    It is my pleasure to announce that two distinguished internationalscientists have joined the editorship of the FreshwaterSystems domain of TheScientificWorldJOURNAL — Professor BrijGopal of Jawaharlal Nehru University (India) and Dr. Manual Gra柠of the Universityof Coimbra (Portugal). Professor Gopal is the Secretary General of the NationalInstitute of Ecology, Editor of the InternationalJournal of Ecology & Environmental Science,and Chairman of the SIL (International Association of Theoretica...

  17. Freshwater savings from marine protein consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, Jessica A; Pace, Michael L; D’Odorico, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Marine fisheries provide an essential source of protein for many people around the world. Unlike alternative terrestrial sources of protein, marine fish production requires little to no freshwater inputs. Consuming marine fish protein instead of terrestrial protein therefore represents freshwater savings (equivalent to an avoided water cost) and contributes to a low water footprint diet. These water savings are realized by the producers of alternative protein sources, rather than the consumers of marine protein. This study quantifies freshwater savings from marine fish consumption around the world by estimating the water footprint of replacing marine fish with terrestrial protein based on current consumption patterns. An estimated 7 600 km 3  yr −1 of water is used for human food production. Replacing marine protein with terrestrial protein would require an additional 350 km 3  yr −1 of water, meaning that marine protein provides current water savings of 4.6%. The importance of these freshwater savings is highly uneven around the globe, with savings ranging from as little as 0 to as much as 50%. The largest savings as a per cent of current water footprints occur in Asia, Oceania, and several coastal African nations. The greatest national water savings from marine fish protein occur in Southeast Asia and the United States. As the human population increases, future water savings from marine fish consumption will be increasingly important to food and water security and depend on sustainable harvest of capture fisheries and low water footprint growth of marine aquaculture. (paper)

  18. Simultaneous aptasensor for multiplex pathogenic bacteria detection based on multicolor upconversion nanoparticles labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Shi, Zhao; Fang, Congcong; Wang, Zhouping

    2014-03-18

    A highly sensitive and specific multiplex method for the simultaneous detection of three pathogenic bacteria was fabricated using multicolor upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as luminescence labels coupled with aptamers as the molecular recognition elements. Multicolor UCNPs were synthesized via doping with various rare-earth ions to obtain well-separated emission peaks. The aptamer sequences were selected using the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) strategy for Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Salmonella typhimurium. When applied in this method, aptamers can be used for the specific recognition of the bacteria from complex mixtures, including those found in real food matrixes. Aptamers and multicolor UCNPs were employed to selectively capture and simultaneously quantify the three target bacteria on the basis of the independent peaks. Under optimal conditions, the correlation between the concentration of three bacteria and the luminescence signal was found to be linear from 50-10(6) cfu mL(-1). Improved by the magnetic separation and concentration effect of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles, the limits of detection of the developed method were found to be 25, 10, and 15 cfu mL(-1) for S. aureus, V. parahemolyticus, and S. typhimurium, respectively. The capability of the bioassay in real food samples was also investigated, and the results were consistent with experimental results obtained from plate-counting methods. This proposed method for the detection of various pathogenic bacteria based on multicolor UCNPs has great potential in the application of food safety and multiplex nanosensors.

  19. Pesticides in Brazilian freshwaters: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, A F; Ribeiro, J S; Kummrow, F; Nogueira, A J A; Montagner, C C; Umbuzeiro, G A

    2016-07-13

    The widespread use of pesticides in agriculture can lead to water contamination and cause adverse effects on non-target organisms. Brazil has been the world's top pesticide market consumer since 2008, with 381 approved pesticides for crop use. This study provides a comprehensive literature review on the occurrence of pesticide residues in Brazilian freshwaters. We searched for information in official agency records and peer-reviewed scientific literature. Risk quotients were calculated to assess the potential risk posed to aquatic life by the individual pesticides based on their levels of water contamination. Studies about the occurrence of pesticides in freshwaters in Brazil are scarce and concentrated in few sampling sites in 5 of the 27 states. Herbicides (21) accounted for the majority of the substances investigated, followed by fungicides (11), insecticides (10) and plant growth regulators (1). Insecticides are the class of major concern. Brazil would benefit from the implementation of a nationwide pesticide freshwater monitoring program to support preventive, remediation and enforcement actions.

  20. Why are freshwater fish so threatened?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closs, Gerard P.; Angermeier, Paul; Darwall, William R.T.; Balcombe, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The huge diversity of freshwater fishes is concentrated into an area of habitat that covers only about 1% of the Earth's surface, and much of this limited area has already been extensively impacted and intensively managed to meet human needs (Dudgeon et al., 2006). As outlined in Chapter 1, the number and proportions of threatened species tend to rise wherever fish diversity coincides with dense human populations, intensive resource use and development pressure. Of particular concern is the substantial proportion of the global diversity of freshwater fishes concentrated within the Mekong and Amazon Basins and west-central Africa (Berra, 2001; Abell et al., 2008; Dudgeon, 2011; Chapter 1) with extensive exploitation of water resources planned to accelerate in future years (Dudgeon, 2011; Chapter 1). If current trends continue, and the social, political and economic models that have been used to develop industrialised regions of the world over the past two centuries prevail, then the future of a significant proportion of global diversity of freshwater fish species is clearly uncertain.

  1. Principal and secondary luminescence lifetime components in annealed natural quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Ogundare, F.O.; Feathers, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved luminescence spectra from quartz can be separated into components with distinct principal and secondary lifetimes depending on certain combinations of annealing and measurement temperature. The influence of annealing on properties of the lifetimes related to irradiation dose and temperature of measurement has been investigated in sedimentary quartz annealed at various temperatures up to 900 deg. C. Time-resolved luminescence for use in the analysis was pulse stimulated from samples at 470 nm between 20 and 200 deg. C. Luminescence lifetimes decrease with measurement temperature due to increasing thermal effect on the associated luminescence with an activation energy of thermal quenching equal to 0.68±0.01eV for the secondary lifetime but only qualitatively so for the principal lifetime component. Concerning the influence of annealing temperature, luminescence lifetimes measured at 20 deg. C are constant at about 33μs for annealing temperatures up to 600 0 C but decrease to about 29μs when the annealing temperature is increased to 900 deg. C. In addition, it was found that lifetime components in samples annealed at 800 deg. C are independent of radiation dose in the range 85-1340 Gy investigated. The dependence of lifetimes on both the annealing temperature and magnitude of radiation dose is described as being due to the increasing importance of a particular recombination centre in the luminescence emission process as a result of dynamic hole transfer between non-radiative and radiative luminescence centres

  2. Development of luminescent pH sensor films for monitoring bacterial growth through tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fenglin; Raval, Yash; Chen, Hongyu; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong J; DesJardins, John D; Anker, Jeffrey N

    2014-02-01

    Although implanted medical devices (IMDs) offer many benefits, they are susceptible to bacterial colonization and infections. Such infections are difficult to treat because bacteria could form biofilms on the implant surface, which reduce antibiotics penetration and generate local dormant regions with low pH and low oxygen. In addition, these infections are hard to detect early because biofilms are often localized on the surface. Herein, an optical sensor film is developed to detect local acidosis on an implanted surface. The film contains both upconverting particles (UCPs) that serve as a light source and a pH indicator that alters the luminescence spectrum. When irradiated with 980 nm light, the UCPs produce deeply penetrating red light emission, while generating negligible autofluorescence in the tissue. The basic form of the pH indicator absorbs more of upconversion luminescence at 661 nm than at 671 nm and consequently the spectral ratio indicates pH. Implanting this pH sensor film beneath 6-7 mm of porcine tissue does not substantially affect the calibration curve because the peaks are closely spaced. Furthermore, growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis on the sensor surface causes a local pH decrease that can be detected non-invasively through the tissue. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Variation pattern of terrestrial antibiotic resistances and bacterial communities in seawater/freshwater mixed microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Ying; Xin, Rui; Zhang, Yongpeng; Niu, Zhiguang

    2018-06-01

    The ocean is the final place where pollutants generated by human activities are deposited. As a result, the long-range transport of the ocean can facilitate the diffusion of terrestrial contaminants, including ARGs. However, to our knowledge, little research has been devoted to discussing the content change of terrestrial ARGs and the reason for the change in coastal area. This study established various microcosms, in which seawater and freshwater were mixed at different ratio to simulate the environmental conditions of different regions in coastal areas. Four ARGs were quantified, and 16S pyrosequencing was conducted. The results showed that the terrestrial ARGs influenced the concentration of the corresponding ARGs in coastal areas, and the content change pattern of each ARG was distinct. The influence of salinity on the ARG content was limited in most cases. Moreover, most dominant bacteria from freshwater had significant positive correlation (p prompt the growth of some bacteria (include potential hosts of ARGs) in coastal area. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of macrozoobenthic bioturbation and wind fluctuation interactions on net methylmercury in freshwater lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peifang; Yao, Yu; Wang, Chao; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Miao, Lingzhan

    2017-11-01

    The methylmercury (MeHg) as the toxic fractions has presented significant threats to biota in freshwater ecosystems. Hg methylation process is demonstrated to be manipulated by biota process (benthic disturbance and algae bloom existence) as well as the abiotic influence (wind fluctuation and illumination intensity) in freshwater ecosystems. However, the mechanisms influencing Hg methylation are still unclear, and the coupled influences of the biotic and abiotic process with the shifts in variation on methylmercury remain unexplored. Accordingly, an annular flume experiment which simulated the freshwater ecosystem, was conducted for 108 days to examine the influences of typical disturbance by chironomid larvae and wind fluctuations on MeHg variation in sediment profiles. The in-situ, passive sampler technique of revealing diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) encompassed the special resin, based on referenced extraction and coloration-computer imaging densitometry, were employed to obtain labile MeHg, Fe, and S concentrations at high resolution. The results indicate that larval bioturbation during the initial period of the experiment could diminish bioavailable MeHg concentrations and change the diffusion direction of MeHg fluxes. However, this inhibitive effect on MeHg concentrations ceased with larvae eclosion. Compared to bioturbation, wind fluctuation exerted slow but sustained inhibition on MeHg release. Furthermore, the eight parameters (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DO, labile Fe and S concentrations, pH, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) abundance in sediment, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and EC) could explain more of variation in MeHg concentrations which indicated by the canonical correspondence analysis. And these eight parameters manifest higher explanatory power for MeHg distributed in newly formed sediment. More notably, the comparison results of the multiple and simple regression directly demonstrated the DOC was the fundamental and robust

  5. Zinc and nitrogen ornamented bluish white luminescent carbon dots for engrossing bacteriostatic activity and Fenton based bio-sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Poushali; Ganguly, Sayan; Bose, Madhuparna; Mondal, Subhadip; Choudhary, Sumita; Gangopadhyay, Subhashis; Das, Amit Kumar; Banerjee, Susanta; Das, Narayan Chandra

    2018-07-01

    Carbon dots with heteroatom co-doping associated with consummate luminescence features are of acute interest in diverse applications such as biomolecule markers, chemical sensing, photovoltaic, and trace element detection. Herein, we demonstrate a straightforward, highly efficient hydrothermal dehydration technique to synthesize zinc and nitrogen co-doped multifunctional carbon dots (N, Zn-CDs) with superior quantum yield (50.8%). The luminescence property of the carbon dots can be tuned by regulating precursor ratio and surface oxidation states in the carbon dots. A unique attribution of the as-prepared carbon dots is the high monodispersity and robust excitation-independent emission behavior that is stable in enormously reactive environment and over a wide range of pH. These N, Zn-CDs unveils captivating bacteriostatic activity against gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the excellent luminescence properties of these carbon dots were applied as a platform of sensitive biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide. Under optimized conditions, these N, Zn-CDs reveals high sensitivity over a broad range of concentrations with an ultra-low limit of detection (LOD) indicating their pronounced prospective as a fluorescent probe for chemical sensing. Overall, the experimental outcomes propose that these zero-dimensional nano-dots could be developed as bacteriostatic agents to control and prevent the persistence and spreading of bacterial infections and as a fluorescent probe for hydrogen peroxide detection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Increasing lanthanide luminescence by use of the RETEL effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Robert C; Vallarino, Lidia M; Becker, Margie C; Yang, Sean

    2006-08-01

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes produce emissions with the narrowest-known width at half maximum; however, their significant use in cytometry required an increase in luminescence intensity. The companion review, Leif et al., Cytometry 2006;69A:767-778, described a new technique for the enhancement of lanthanide luminescence, the Resonance Energy Transfer Enhanced Luminescence (RETEL) effect, which increases luminescence and is compatible with standard slide microscopy. The luminescence of the europium ion macrocyclic complex, EuMac, was increased by employing the RETEL effect. After adding the nonluminescent gadolinium ion complex of the thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (TTFA) ligand or the sodium salt of TTFA in ethanol solution, the EuMac-labeled sample was allowed to dry. Both a conventional arc lamp and a time-gated UV LED served as light sources for microscopic imaging. The emission intensity was measured with a CCD camera. Multiple time-gated images were summed with special software to permit analysis and effective presentation of the final image. With the RETEL effect, the luminescence of the EuMac-streptavidin conjugate increased at least six-fold upon drying. Nuclei of apoptotic cells were stained with DAPI and tailed with 5BrdUrd to which a EuMac-anti-5BrdU conjugate was subsequently attached. Time-gated images showed the long-lived EuMac luminescence but did not show the short-lived DAPI fluorescence. Imaging of DNA-synthesizing cells with an arc lamp showed that both S phase and apoptotic cells were labeled, and that their labeling patterns were different. The images of the luminescent EuMac and fluorescent DAPI were combined to produce a color image on a white background. This combination of simple chemistry, instrumentation, and presentation should make possible the inexpensive use of the lanthanide macrocycles, Quantum Dyes, as molecular diagnostics for cytological and histopathological microscopic imaging. (c) 2006 International Society for Analytical

  7. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  8. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of {sup 241}Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  9. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  10. Oxide/polymer nanocomposites as new luminescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollath, D.; Szabó, D. V.; Schlabach, S.

    2004-06-01

    It is demonstrated that nanocomposites, consisting of an electrically insulating oxide core and PMMA coating exhibit strong luminescence. This luminescence is connected to the interface, where PMMA is bond via a carboxylate bonding to the surface. In this case, luminescence is originated at the carbonyl group of the coating polymer. With decreasing particle size, this emission shows a blue shift, following a law inversely the ones found for quantum confinement systems. For semi-conducting oxides, such as ZnO, this interface related emission is found additionally to quantum confinement phenomena.

  11. Splitting of the luminescent excited state of the uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, C.D.; Sharma, P.; Tanner, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The luminescence spectra of some uranyl compounds has been studied. It has been proposed that the splitting of the luminescent excited state of the uranyl ion is due to a descent in symmetry experienced by the uranyl ion when it is placed in a crystal field. In recent years there has been developed a highly successful model of the electronic structure of the uranyl ion. In this paper the authors use this model to interpret the luminescence spectra of a variety of uranyl compounds

  12. NaCl samples for optical luminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catli, S.

    2005-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) have been used broadly for luminescence dosimetry and dating. In many cases, it has been pointed out that the decay of the OSL do not generally behave according to a simple exponential function. In this study the Infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) intensity from NaCl samples were experimentally measured. The decay curves for this sample were fitted to some functions and it is in good agreement with the function y = α + b exp(-cx). The IRSL decay curves from NaCl using different β-doses have been obtained and investigated their dose response

  13. Chemisorptive luminescence on γ-irradiated magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breakspere, R.J.; Read, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The intensity of a chemisorptive luminescence produced on MgO by oxygen at room temperature is increased by prior γ-irradiation of the MgO, under vacuum, before adsorption. This enhancement of the luminescence increases with radiation dose up to 1.9 x 10 6 rad and is attributed to the interaction between the F + sub (s) centres produced by the radiation and oxygen molecules arriving at the surface from the gas phase. In this work, the spectrum of the emitted luminescence could not be measured. (author)

  14. A luminescence imaging system based on a CCD camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Markey, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    Stimulated luminescence arising from naturally occurring minerals is likely to be spatially heterogeneous. Standard luminescence detection systems are unable to resolve this variability. Several research groups have attempted to use imaging photon detectors, or image intensifiers linked...... to photographic systems, in order to obtain spatially resolved data. However, the former option is extremely expensive and it is difficult to obtain quantitative data from the latter. This paper describes the use of a CCD camera for imaging both thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The system...

  15. Determination of uranium by luminescent method (tablet variant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, A.N.; Yufa, B.Ya.

    1985-01-01

    A new tablet variant of luminescent determination of uranium in rocks is developed. The analytical process includes the following operations: sample decomposition, uranium separation from luminescence quencher impurities, preparation of luminescent sample (tablet), photometry of the tablet. The method has two variants developed: the first one is characterized by a more hard decomposition, sample mass being 0.2 g; the second variant has a better detection limit (5x10 -6 %), the sample mass being 0.2-1 g. Procedures of the sample preparation for both variants of analysis are described

  16. Luminescence from potassium feldspars stimulated by infrared and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments are reported which investigate stimulated luminescence from potassium feldspar. The aim is to provide a basic phenomenological description of the response of the material to stimulation by heat, infrared radiation (875 DELTA 80 nm) and a green light wavelength band from 5 15...... to 560 nm. Two conclusions are drawn: firstly it is suggested that the majority of the trapped charge responsible for the infrared stimulated luminescence signal does not give rise to a thermoluminescence signal, and secondly that a large traction of the two optically stimulated luminescence signals...

  17. Container Verification Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Jennifer E.; Miller, Steven D.; Conrady, Matthew M.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Tinker, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Containment verification is a high priority for safeguards containment and surveillance. Nuclear material containers, safeguards equipment cabinets, camera housings, and detector cable conduit are all vulnerable to tampering. Even with a high security seal on a lid or door, custom-built hinges and interfaces, and special colors and types of finishes, the surfaces of enclosures can be tampered with and any penetrations repaired and covered over. With today's technology, these repairs would not be detected during a simple visual inspection. Several suggested solutions have been to develop complicated networks of wires, fiber-optic cables, lasers or other sensors that line the inside of a container and alarm when the network is disturbed. This results in an active system with real time evidence of tampering but is probably not practical for most safeguards applications. A more practical solution would be to use a passive approach where an additional security feature was added to surfaces which would consist of a special coating or paint applied to the container or enclosure. One type of coating would incorporate optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) material. OSL materials are phosphors that luminesce in proportion to the ionizing radiation dose when stimulated with the appropriate optical wavelengths. The OSL fluoresces at a very specific wavelength when illuminated at another, very specific wavelength. The presence of the pre-irradiated OSL material in the coating is confirmed using a device that interrogates the surface of the enclosure using the appropriate optical wavelength and then reads the resulting luminescence. The presence of the OSL indicates that the integrity of the surface is intact. The coating itself could be transparent which would allow the appearance of the container to remain unchanged or the OSL material could be incorporated into certain paints or epoxies used on various types of containers. The coating could be applied during manufacturing

  18. Detection of food irradiation with luminescence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderle, H.

    1997-06-01

    Food irradiation is applied as method for the preservation of foods, the prevention of food spoilage and the inhibition of food-borne pathogens. Doses exceeding 10 kGy (10 kJ/kg) are not recommended by the WHO. The different legislation requires methods for the detection and the closimetry of irradiated foods. Among the physical methods based on the radiation-induced changes in inorganic, nonhygroscopic crystalline solids are thermoluminescence (TL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and lyoluminescence (LL) measurement. The luminescence methods were tested on natural minerals. Pure quartz, feldspars, calcite, aragonite and dolomite of known origin were irradiated, read out and analyzed to determine the influence of luminescence-activators and deactivators. Carbonate minerals show an orange-red TL easily detectable by blue-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. TIL-inactive carbonate samples may be identified by a lyoluminescence method using the reaction of trapped irradiation-generated charge carriers with the solvent during crystal-lattice breakup. The fine-ground mineral is dissolved in an alkaline complexing agent/chemiluminescence sensitizer/chemiluminescence catalyst (EDTA/luminol/hemin) reagent mixture. The TL and PSL of quartz is too weak to contribute a significant part for the corresponding signals in polymineral dust. Alkali and soda feldspar show intense TL and PSL. The temperature maxima in the TL glow curves allow a clear distinction. PSL does not give this additional information, it suffers from bleaching by ambient light and requires light-protection. Grain disinfestated with low irradiation doses (500 Gy) may not identified by both TL and PSL measurement. The natural TL of feldspar particles may be overlap with the irradiation-induced TL of other minerals. As a routine method, irradiated spices are identified with TL measurement. The dust particles have to be enriched by heavy-liquid flotation and centrifugation. The PSL method allows a clear

  19. Extracellular communication in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Philipp, B.; Eberl, L.

    2005-01-01

    molecules, in different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria they control pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production, biofilm differentiation, DNA transfer and bioluminescence. The development of biosensors for the detection of these signal molecules has greatly facilitated their subsequent chemical...

  20. Do Bacteria Age?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacteria are thought to be examples of organisms that do not age. They divide by .... carry genetic material to the next generation through the process of reproduction; they are also .... molecules, and modified proteins. This report revealed that ...

  1. Social Behaviour in Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    the recipient. • Social behaviours can be categorized according to the fitness ... is actually the flagella of symbiotic spirochete bacteria that helps it to swim around .... Normal population. Responsive switching. (Environmental stress). Stochastic.

  2. [Darwin and bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2009-02-01

    As in 2009 the scientific world celebrates two hundreds years from the birthday of Charles Darwin and one hundred and fifty from the publication of The Origin of Species, an analysis of his complete work is performed, looking for any mention of bacteria. But it seems that the great naturahst never took knowledge about its existence, something rather improbable in a time when the discovery of bacteria shook the medical world, or he deliberately ignored them, not finding a place for such microscopic beings into his theory of evolution. But the bacteria badly affected his familiar life, killing scarlet fever one of his children and worsening to death the evolution of tuberculosis of his favourite Annie. Darwin himself could suffer the sickness of Chagas, whose etiological agent has a similar level to bacteria in the scale of evolution.

  3. Luminescence and the light emitting diode the basics and technology of leds and the luminescence properties of the materials

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, E W; Pamplin, BR

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence and the Light Emitting Diode: The Basics and Technology of LEDS and the Luminescence Properties of the Materials focuses on the basic physics and technology of light emitting diodes (LEDS) and pn junction lasers as well as their luminescence properties. Optical processes in semiconductors and the useful devices which can be made are discussed. Comprised of 10 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the crystal structure and growth, as well as the optical and electrical properties of LED materials. The detailed fabrication of the LED is then considered, along with the lu

  4. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Serrato, Rodrigo V.

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are...

  5. Detection of irradiated food using photostimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malec-Czechowska, K.; Stachowicz, W.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of irradiated spices, dried mushrooms and flavour blends using photostimulated luminescence (PSL) is presented. PSL measurements were carried out as described in standard PN-EN 13751. A lower threshold (T 1 700 counts/60s) and an upper threshold (T 2 = 5000 counts/60s) were used to classify the sample. PSL intensities below the threshold were classified as from non-irradiated samples and PSL signals above the upper threshold were regarded from irradiated samples. Signal levels between the two thresholds were classified as intermediate, showing that further investigations are necessary. The PSL tests were carried out at Institute Nutritional Physiology, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition in Karlsruhe with a SURRAC PPSL Iradiated food screening system (SURRAC, Glasgow, UK). (author)

  6. Sono-luminescence and nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seife, Ch.; Hilgenfeldt, S.; Lohse, D.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents multi-bubble and single-bubble luminescence. Since long scientists have known that ultra-sound waves could trigger the formation of bubbles in water (phenomenon called cavitation) but in 1930, for the first time experiments showed that these bubbles could emit light in particular conditions. In 1989 F. Gaitan succeeded in trapping a single bubble by using stationary ultra-sound waves, this bubble was exploding 20.000 times per second according to the frequency of the wave while emitting a series of flashes of light. Some scientists thought that the gas inside the bubble could reach very high values of temperature and pressure, and proposed the possibility of nuclear fusion to explain the excess of neutrons that has been evidenced in a cavitation experiment with deuterated acetone. The last part of this article describes the controversy triggered by the article describing this experiment, that was published by 'Science' in march 2002. (A.C.)

  7. Metal luminescence in a bright disintegrated prominence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovkin, N.A.; Zel'dina, M.Yu.; Rakhubovskij, A.S.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Glavnaya Astronomicheskaya Observatoriya)

    1975-01-01

    It is found that Na, Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, Fe, Sr, and Ba contents in a protuberance relative to the hydrogen content is about the same as in photosphere and chromosphere (except for the Na abundance). The metals are in the state of single ionization with the exception of calcium [Ca ++ ] approximately [Ca + ], strontium [Sr ++ ] = 0.5 [Sr + ], and barium [Ba ++ ] = 6Ba + , whose secondary ionization occurs from metastable states by Lsub(α)-emission in the protuberance. The Lsub(α)-emission ionizes neutral iron as well. Primary ionization of remaining metals is performed by the solar near ultraviolet. Luminescence in metal lines is provided by the photosphere emission scattering, and only H and KCa + lines are excited by electron impacts

  8. Detection of irradiated prawns by photostimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Susu; Saito, Kimie; Hagiwara, Shoji; Todoriki, Setsuko; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how photostimulated luminescence (PSL) can be applied to verify whether prawns have been irradiated by analyzing their intestinal tracts. Prawns from five different locations which were irradiated at doses of 1 kGy of γ-radiations were analyzed using the Japanese model PSL system. The results showed that the integrated photon counts of all the irradiated samples exceeded the upper threshold value (T 2 =4000 counts/90 s), whereas those of the non-irradiated samples were blew than the lower threshold value (T 1 =1000 counts/90 s). Moreover, using the other parameters which were decrease of intensity after optically stimulation and increase of intensity by optically stimulation, a clear difference was observed between non-irradiated and 1 kGy irradiated samples. Therefore, the Japanese model PSL system can be used as a screening method for detecting irradiated prawns by analyzing their intestinal tracts. (author)

  9. Luminescence properties of lustre decorated majolica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, A.; Martini, M.; Sibilia, E.; Padeletti, G.; Fermo, P.

    Luminescence measurements have been performed on several Italian Renaissance ceramic shards produced in central Italy, as well as on some others from Hispano-Moresque and Fatimid periods. The aim of this study was the characterisation of the raw materials used to manufacture lustre decorated majolica. At first, the thermoluminescence (TL) dating of all ceramic bodies was performed, because the shards lacked sure chronological attribution, having been provided by private collectors, or found during emergency restoration works or archaeological surveys. To characterise the defects and the recombination centers of the different components of the ceramics (ceramic body, glaze, glaze, and lustre), radioluminescence (RL) measurements have been performed on samples representative of each historical period. The dating results are reported, as well as the preliminary RL results.

  10. Luminescent solar concentrators utilizing stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W; Schmidt, Timothy W; Argyros, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are an emerging technology that aims primarily to reduce the cost of solar energy, with great potential for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, realizing LSCs with commercially viable efficiency is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. Here, we introduce an approach to reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire area of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption to allow net gain in the system, and directed towards a small PV cell. A mathematical model, taking into account thermodynamic considerations, of such a system is presented which identifies key parameters and allows evaluation in terms of net effective output power.

  11. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  12. Distribution of luminous bacteria and bacterial luminescence in the equatorial region of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.

    to that of seawater, was noticed from the zooplankton samples. This may be due to the autoinduction of luciferase synthesis or the accumulation of autoinducer in the luminous microflora living in close association with zooplankton...

  13. Cadmium as toxicant in Freshwater Cyprinid, Labeo rohita

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sajo

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... urbanization, expansion of industrial activity, industrial wasteful effluents .... blood capillaries, and sinusoids were randomly distri- buted. ..... cholinesterase activity of freshwater fish, Oreochromis mossambicus. Peters. Asia.

  14. Intrinsic luminescence of un-doped borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindrat, I.I.; Padlyak, B.V.; Drzewiecki, A.

    2017-01-01

    The nature of intrinsic luminescence in the un-doped borate glasses of different compositions has been investigated using spectroscopic methods including photoluminescence, optical absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL). The un-doped borate glasses with Li 2 B 4 O 7 , LiKB 4 O 7 , CaB 4 O 7 , and LiCaBO 3 basic compositions were obtained from corresponding polycrystalline compounds in the air with usage the standard technology of glasses. Three different broad emission bands in the UV–Visible spectral range have been observed under different wavelength of photoexcitation. The luminescence kinetics of the observed emission bands have been registered and analysed. The nature and possible mechanisms of the intrinsic luminescence in the investigated borate glasses are considered and discussed based on the obtained results and referenced data.

  15. Thermo-optical properties of optically stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence processes in feldspars are subject to competing thermal enhancement and quenching processes: this article describes the thermal enhancement effects for orthoclase, albite and plagioclase feldspars. It is demonstrated that certain lattice vibrational modes can be ...

  16. Fabrication and Spectral Properties of Wood-Based Luminescent Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure impregnation pretreatment is a conventional method to fabricate wood-based nanocomposites. In this paper, the wood-based luminescent nanocomposites were fabricated with the method and its spectral properties were investigated. The results show that it is feasible to fabricate wood-based luminescent nanocomposites using microwave modified wood and nanophosphor powders. The luminescent strength is in positive correlation with the amount of phosphor powders dispersed in urea-formaldehyde resin. Phosphors absorb UV and blue light efficiently in the range of 400–470 nm and show a broad band of bluish-green emission centered at 500 nm, which makes them good candidates for potential blue-green luminescent materials.

  17. Examination of the picture properties of luminescence memory foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewert, U.; Heine, S.; Nockemann, C.; Stade, J.; Tillack, G.R.; Wessel, H.; Zscherpel, U.; Mattis, A.

    1995-01-01

    Luminescence memory foils are a new medium for radiography without films. They are known by the name of image plates or digital memory foils. The suitability of such systems for industrial radiography is examined. (orig.) [de

  18. Negative luminescence and devices based on this phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.; Matveev, B. A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent publications concerned with infrared emitters whose electrical modulation results in absorption of radiation detected as negative luminescence are reviewed. The main properties of the devices based on this phenomenon are analyzed

  19. Negative luminescence and devices based on this phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov-Omskii, V I; Matveev, B. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bmat@iropt3.ioffe.rssi.ru

    2007-03-15

    Recent publications concerned with infrared emitters whose electrical modulation results in absorption of radiation detected as negative luminescence are reviewed. The main properties of the devices based on this phenomenon are analyzed.

  20. Renewable energy : better luminescent solar panels in prospect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debije, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Devices known as luminescent solar concentrators could find use as renewable-energy generators, but have so far been plagued by a major light-reabsorption effect. A new study offers a promising route to tackling this problem

  1. Characterizing Virus Decay in Environmental Freshwater Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recreational water quality is typically assessed using fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), however, FIB are inadequate surrogates for the viral pathogens. Bacteriophage share similar morphologies to viral pathogens allowing closer representation of viral behavior, making their inclu...

  2. Influence of excitonic effects on luminescence quantum yield in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachenko, A.V.; Kostylyov, V.P.; Vlasiuk, V.M. [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, 41 prospect Nauky, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sokolovskyi, I.O., E-mail: isokolovskyi@mun.ca [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, 41 prospect Nauky, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL, A1B 3X7 Canada (Canada); Evstigneev, M. [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL, A1B 3X7 Canada (Canada)

    2017-03-15

    Nonradiative exciton lifetime in silicon is determined by comparison of the experimental and theoretical curves of bulk minority charge carriers lifetime on doping and excitation levels. This value is used to analyze the influence of excitonic effects on internal luminescence quantum yield at room temperature, taking into account both nonradiative and radiative exciton lifetimes. A range of Shockley-Hall-Reed lifetimes is found, where excitonic effects lead to an increase of internal luminescence quantum yield.

  3. Raman scattering and luminescence of high-Tc superconducting oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremenko, V.V.; Gnezdilov, V.P.; Fomin, V.I.; Fugol', I.Ya.; Samovarov, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Raman and luminescence spectra of high-T c superconducting oxides are summarized, mainly YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-σ and partly La 2-x Ba x CuO 4-σ . In raman spectra we succeeded to distinguish electron scattering to define the energy gap Δ in the superconducting state. The luminescence spectra are due to the emission of oxygen and interaction with conduction electrons. 70 refs.; 13 figs

  4. Optical and luminescent properties of the lead and barium molybdates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spassky, D.A. E-mail: dima@opts.phys.msu.ru; Ivanov, S.N.; Kolobanov, V.N.; Mikhailin, V.V.; Zemskov, V.N.; Zadneprovski, B.I.; Potkin, L.I

    2004-12-01

    Time-resolved luminescence as well as excitation and reflectivity spectra of the oriented lead and barium molybdate single crystals were studied using synchrotron radiation. Features in reflectivity spectra in the fundamental absorption region were analyzed. The contribution of electronic states of lead cation to the formation of the bandgap in PbMoO{sub 4} is supposed. The role of lead states in the intrinsic luminescence of PbMoO{sub 4} is discussed.

  5. Practical aids for freshwater spill response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, A.E.; Walker, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    The current research program at API is focused on the environmental and human health effects from oil spills in freshwater habitats. Components of the program include lessons learned from spill response, development of decision-making protocols for the use of chemicals during initial response operations, preparation of a manual for spill response and contingency planning, and a review of the literature on environmental and human health effects from inland spills. API has reviewed past inland spill responses to identify lessons learned. A survey questionnaire has been developed to collect information from freshwater spill responders on their successes and difficulties in response operations. The questionnaire is tailored to focus on the impact to the operations from the absence of technical/scientific data on environmental effects or operation effectiveness/efficiency as well as to identify situations in which the use of particular response or cleanup options is likely to be effective. The questionnaires will be available at the Conference. Published case studies also will be examined for lessons-learned information. The results will be used to identify and prioritize API research needs in freshwater spill response. General concerns about the effectiveness of the toxicity associated with chemicals in spill response has prevented their use in fresh water. API has begun a detailed survey and interview process with state and federal regulatory personnel to identify their concerns and decision criteria to evaluate the use of chemicals in initial spill response. Ten classes of chemicals were identified for consideration: dispersants, shoreline cleaners, shoreline protection agents, herding agents, solidifiers, demulsifiers, emulsion inhibitors, foaming agents, oxidizing agents, and burning agents

  6. Education Agendas and Resistance with the Teaching and Learning of Freshwater and Extreme Freshwater Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammel, Alison; McMartin, Dena; Arbuthnott, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Despite the essentiality of freshwater to all life on the planet, the populous has inadequate understandings of water. Formal education plays a key role in shaping how individuals and communities make sense of water, its accessibility, management, consumption, and hazards. This article seeks to bring attention to the infuence of cultural framings…

  7. Flight testing of a luminescent surface pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclachlan, B. G.; Bell, J. H.; Espina, J.; Gallery, J.; Gouterman, M.; Demandante, C. G. N.; Bjarke, L.

    1992-01-01

    NASA ARC has conducted flight tests of a new type of aerodynamic pressure sensor based on a luminescent surface coating. Flights were conducted at the NASA ARC-Dryden Flight Research Facility. The luminescent pressure sensor is based on a surface coating which, when illuminated with ultraviolet light, emits visible light with an intensity dependent on the local air pressure on the surface. This technique makes it possible to obtain pressure data over the entire surface of an aircraft, as opposed to conventional instrumentation, which can only make measurements at pre-selected points. The objective of the flight tests was to evaluate the effectiveness and practicality of a luminescent pressure sensor in the actual flight environment. A luminescent pressure sensor was installed on a fin, the Flight Test Fixture (FTF), that is attached to the underside of an F-104 aircraft. The response of one particular surface coating was evaluated at low supersonic Mach numbers (M = 1.0-1.6) in order to provide an initial estimate of the sensor's capabilities. This memo describes the test approach, the techniques used, and the pressure sensor's behavior under flight conditions. A direct comparison between data provided by the luminescent pressure sensor and that produced by conventional pressure instrumentation shows that the luminescent sensor can provide quantitative data under flight conditions. However, the test results also show that the sensor has a number of limitations which must be addressed if this technique is to prove useful in the flight environment.

  8. Luminescence from cavitation bubbles deformed in uniform pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Presented here are observations that demonstrate how the deformation of millimetric cavitation bubbles by a uniform pressure gradient quenches single-collapse luminescence. Our innovative measurement system captures a broad luminescence spectrum (wavelength range, 300-900 nm) from the individual collapses of laser-induced bubbles in water. By varying the bubble size, driving pressure, and perceived gravity level aboard parabolic flights, we probed the limit from aspherical to highly spherical bubble collapses. Luminescence was detected for bubbles of maximum radii within the previously uncovered range, R0=1.5 -6 mm, for laser-induced bubbles. The relative luminescence energy was found to rapidly decrease as a function of the bubble asymmetry quantified by the anisotropy parameter ζ , which is the dimensionless equivalent of the Kelvin impulse. As established previously, ζ also dictates the characteristic parameters of bubble-driven microjets. The threshold of ζ beyond which no luminescence is observed in our experiment closely coincides with the threshold where the microjets visibly pierce the bubble and drive a vapor jet during the rebound. The individual fitted blackbody temperatures range between Tlum=7000 and Tlum=11 500 K but do not show any clear trend as a function of ζ . Time-resolved measurements using a high-speed photodetector disclose multiple luminescence events at each bubble collapse. The averaged full width at half-maximum of the pulse is found to scale with R0 and to range between 10 and 20 ns.

  9. Freshwater reservoir effect variability in Northern Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, B.; Heinemeier, J.

    2013-01-01

    The freshwater reservoir effect is a potential problem when radiocarbon dating fish bones, shells, human bones, or food crusts on pottery from sites near rivers or lakes. The reservoir age in hardwater rivers can be up to several thousand years and may be highly variable. Accurate 14C dating of f...... that can also be expected for the past. This knowledge will be applied to the dating of food crusts on pottery from the Mesolithic sites Kayhude at the Alster River and Schlamersdorf at the Trave River, both in Schleswig-Holstein, northern Germany....

  10. MOLLUSKS IN RADIOECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Д. Гудков

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Species-specificity and dynamics of 90Sr, 137Cs and some transuraniс elements accumulation in bivalveand gastropod freshwater molluscs of the Chernobyl exclusion zone during 1998–2010 was analyzed. Theresults of radiation dose as well as chromosome aberration rate estimation and analysis of hemolymphcomposition of molluscs was produced. The radiation absorbed dose rate was registered in the range of 0.3–85.0 μGy h–1. In closed water bodies the heightened chromosome aberration rate (up to 27 % in embryotissues, and also change of haematological indexes for the adult individuals of snails was registered

  11. Cultured branchial epithelia from freshwater fish gills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood; PÄRt

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a method for the primary culture of gill epithelial cells from freshwater rainbow trout on permeable supports, polyethylene terephthalate membranes ('filter inserts'). Primary cultures of gill cells (6-9 days in Leibowitz L-15 culture medium plus foetal bovine serum and glutamine) are trypsinized and the cells seeded onto the inserts. After 6 days of growth with L-15 medium on both surfaces (approximately isotonic to trout plasma), the cells form a tight epithelium as judged from a progressive rise in transepithelial resistance which reaches a stable plateau for a further 6 days, as long as L-15 exposure is continued on both surfaces. The cultured epithelium (approximately 8 µm thick) typically consists of 2-4 overlapping cell layers organized as in the lamellae in vivo, with large intercellular spaces, multiple desmosomes and putative tight junctions. The cells appear to be exclusively pavement-type cells with an apical surface glycocalyx, an abundance of rough endoplasmic reticulum, no selective DASPEI staining and relatively few mitochondria. Transepithelial resistance (approximately 3.5 k cm2), permeability to a paracellular marker (polyethylene glycol-4000; 0.17x10(-6) cm s-1) and unidirectional flux of Na+ and Cl- (approximately 300 nmol cm-2 h-1) all appear realistic because they compare well with in vivo values; net fluxes of Na+ and Cl- are zero. The preparation acidifies the apical medium, which accumulates a greater concentration of ammonia. Upon exposure to apical freshwater, resistance increases six- to elevenfold and a basolateral-negative transepithelial potential (TEP) develops as in vivo. These responses occur even when mannitol is used to prevent changes in apical osmotic pressure. Net Na+ and Cl- loss rates are low over the first 12 h (-125 nmol cm-2 h-1) but increase substantially by 48 h. The elevated resistance and negative TEP gradually attenuate but remain significantly higher than pre-exposure values after 48 h of apical

  12. The fecal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  13. Helminthiasis and gram negative enteric bacteria in freshwater fish from selected lakes of Haramaya District, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbiological and helminthiasis examination of fish from Tinike and Adelle Lakes were conducted at Haramaya District, Ethiopia. The types of fish available in the lakes were also assessed. Adelle Lake has only Clarias gariepinus while the Tinike Lake has only Oreochromis niloticus fish species. Te...

  14. Summer abundance and activities of bacteria in the freshwater lakes of Schirmacher Oasis, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.

    stream_size 7 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Polar_Biol_15_547.pdf.txt stream_source_info Polar_Biol_15_547.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  15. Bacterial community structure in High-Arctic snow and freshwater as revealed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette K. Møller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial community structures in High-Arctic snow over sea ice and an ice-covered freshwater lake were examined by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of cultivated isolates. Both the pyrosequence and cultivation data indicated that the phylogenetic composition of the microbial assemblages was different within the snow layers and between snow and freshwater. The highest diversity was seen in snow. In the middle and top snow layers, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria dominated, although Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were relatively abundant also. High numbers of chloroplasts were also observed. In the deepest snow layer, large percentages of Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were seen. In freshwater, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia were the most abundant phyla while relatively few Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria were present. Possibly, light intensity controlled the distribution of the Cyanobacteria and algae in the snow while carbon and nitrogen fixed by these autotrophs in turn fed the heterotrophic bacteria. In the lake, a probable lower light input relative to snow resulted in low numbers of Cyanobacteria and chloroplasts and, hence, limited input of organic carbon and nitrogen to the heterotrophic bacteria. Thus, differences in the physicochemical conditions may play an important role in the processes leading to distinctive bacterial community structures in High-Arctic snow and freshwater.

  16. Patterns of Limnohabitans Microdiversity across a Large Set of Freshwater Habitats as Revealed by Reverse Line Blot Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezbera, Jan; Jezberová, Jitka; Kasalický, Vojtěch; Šimek, Karel; Hahn, Martin W.

    2013-01-01

    Among abundant freshwater Betaproteobacteria, only few groups are considered to be of central ecological importance. One of them is the well-studied genus Limnohabitans and mainly its R-BT subcluster, investigated previously mainly by fluorescence in situ hybridization methods. We designed, based on sequences from a large Limnohabitans culture collection, 18 RLBH (Reverse Line Blot Hybridization) probes specific for different groups within the genus Limnohabitans by targeting diagnostic sequences on their 16 S–23 S rRNA ITS regions. The developed probes covered in sum 92% of the available isolates. This set of probes was applied to environmental DNA originating from 161 different European standing freshwater habitats to reveal the microdiversity (intra-genus) patterns of the Limnohabitans genus along a pH gradient. Investigated habitats differed in various physicochemical parameters, and represented a very broad range of standing freshwater habitats. The Limnohabitans microdiversity, assessed as number of RLBH-defined groups detected, increased significantly along the gradient of rising pH of habitats. 14 out of 18 probes returned detection signals that allowed predictions on the distribution of distinct Limnohabitans groups. Most probe-defined Limnohabitans groups showed preferences for alkaline habitats, one for acidic, and some seemed to lack preferences. Complete niche-separation was indicated for some of the probe-targeted groups. Moreover, bimodal distributions observed for some groups of Limnohabitans, suggested further niche separation between genotypes within the same probe-defined group. Statistical analyses suggested that different environmental parameters such as pH, conductivity, oxygen and altitude influenced the distribution of distinct groups. The results of our study do not support the hypothesis that the wide ecological distribution of Limnohabitans bacteria in standing freshwater habitats results from generalist adaptations of these bacteria

  17. Patterns of Limnohabitans microdiversity across a large set of freshwater habitats as revealed by Reverse Line Blot Hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jezbera

    Full Text Available Among abundant freshwater Betaproteobacteria, only few groups are considered to be of central ecological importance. One of them is the well-studied genus Limnohabitans and mainly its R-BT subcluster, investigated previously mainly by fluorescence in situ hybridization methods. We designed, based on sequences from a large Limnohabitans culture collection, 18 RLBH (Reverse Line Blot Hybridization probes specific for different groups within the genus Limnohabitans by targeting diagnostic sequences on their 16 S-23 S rRNA ITS regions. The developed probes covered in sum 92% of the available isolates. This set of probes was applied to environmental DNA originating from 161 different European standing freshwater habitats to reveal the microdiversity (intra-genus patterns of the Limnohabitans genus along a pH gradient. Investigated habitats differed in various physicochemical parameters, and represented a very broad range of standing freshwater habitats. The Limnohabitans microdiversity, assessed as number of RLBH-defined groups detected, increased significantly along the gradient of rising pH of habitats. 14 out of 18 probes returned detection signals that allowed predictions on the distribution of distinct Limnohabitans groups. Most probe-defined Limnohabitans groups showed preferences for alkaline habitats, one for acidic, and some seemed to lack preferences. Complete niche-separation was indicated for some of the probe-targeted groups. Moreover, bimodal distributions observed for some groups of Limnohabitans, suggested further niche separation between genotypes within the same probe-defined group. Statistical analyses suggested that different environmental parameters such as pH, conductivity, oxygen and altitude influenced the distribution of distinct groups. The results of our study do not support the hypothesis that the wide ecological distribution of Limnohabitans bacteria in standing freshwater habitats results from generalist adaptations of

  18. Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik

    2014-12-05

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  19. Temporal and Spatial Stability of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in Aquarium Biofilters

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E.; Sauder, Laura A.; Mosquera, Mariela; Neufeld, Josh D.; Boon, Nico; Poulain, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Nitrifying biofilters are used in aquaria and aquaculture systems to prevent accumulation of ammonia by promoting rapid conversion to nitrate via nitrite. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), as opposed to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), were recently identified as the dominant ammonia oxidizers in most freshwater aquaria. This study investigated biofilms from fixed-bed aquarium biofilters to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of AOA and AOB abundance and diversity. Over a period of four months, ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms from six freshwater and one marine aquarium were investigated at 4–5 time points. Nitrogen balances for three freshwater aquaria showed that active nitrification by aquarium biofilters accounted for ≥81–86% of total nitrogen conversion in the aquaria. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial and thaumarchaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes demonstrated that AOA were numerically dominant over AOB in all six freshwater aquaria tested, and contributed all detectable amoA genes in three aquarium biofilters. In the marine aquarium, however, AOB outnumbered AOA by three to five orders of magnitude based on amoA gene abundances. A comparison of AOA abundance in three carrier materials (fine sponge, rough sponge and sintered glass or ceramic rings) of two three-media freshwater biofilters revealed preferential growth of AOA on fine sponge. Denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated that community composition within a given biofilter was stable across media types. In addition, DGGE of all aquarium biofilters revealed low AOA diversity, with few bands, which were stable over time. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA genes placed freshwater and marine aquaria communities in separate clusters. These results indicate that AOA are the dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in freshwater aquarium

  20. Radurization of commercial freshwater fish species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuaqui-Offermanns, N.; McDougall, T.E.; Sprung, W.; Sullivan, V.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of radurization on the shelf life of fresh Whitefish obtained through ordinary commercial channels has been determined. Whitefish fillets irradiated at 1.2 kGy and stored at 3 0 C have a shelf life three times longer than the unirradiated fish. When the fish was irradiated at 0.82 kGy a two fold shelf-life extension was obtained. The shelf life was estimated by sensory, chemical and microbiological evaluations. Sensory evaluation involved organoleptic assessment of raw and cooked samples. Since freshwater fish do not contain trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), alternate tests for freshness were required. It was found the determination of hypoxanthine and total volatile acid number (VAN) are excellent tests for freshness and quality of freshwater fish; thus, these analyses were adopted. The degree of radiation-induced lipid oxidation was measured by the thiobarbituric acid test (TBA). It was found at doses of 0.82 and 1.2 kGy the TBA number remained within acceptable limits in all samples. Microbiological analyses consisted of the total microbial load assessment in the sample, as well as Pseudomonas and total psychrotrophic counts. The estimated shelf lives as determined by the three separate evaluations were in very good agreement. (author)

  1. Management and the conservation of freshwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, Mark S.; Richardson, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Riparian areas are the terrestrial environment adjacent to water that both influences and is influenced by the aquatic feature (Gregory et al., 1991; Naiman et al., 2010). Riparian areas along streams provide shade, sources of wood and organic matter, contribute to bank stability, filter sediments, take up excess nutrients from groundwater inputs, and other key processes that protect freshwaters (e.g. Naiman et al., 2010; Richardson & Danehy, 2007; Figure 9.1). Riparian areas also increase biodiversity through habitat complexity and close juxtaposition of aquatic and terrestrial environments (Quinn et al., 2004; Naiman et al., 2010). Alterations to riparian areas, despite their small area relative to the landscape, have disproportionate effects on habitats and fish communities (Naiman et al., 2010; Wipfli & Baxter, 2010). Key habitat losses and alterations are derived from modification of riparian areas by reducing instream habitat complexity (Bilby & Ward, 1989; Fausch & Northcote, 1992; Naiman et al., 2010), diminishing the productive basis of freshwater food webs (Belsky et al., 1999; Quinn et al., 2004), increasing nutrient, contaminant and sediment intrusion (Muscutt et al., 1993; Daniels & Gilliam, 1996; Nguyen et al., 1998; Waters, 1999).

  2. Radurization of commercial freshwater fish species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuaqui-Offermanns, N.; McDougall, T.E.; Sprung, W.; Sullivan, V.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of radurization on the shelf life of fresh Whitefish obtained through ordinary commercial channels has been determined. Whitefish fillets irradiated at 1.2 kGy and stored at 3/sup 0/C have a shelf life three times longer than the unirradiated fish. When the fish was irradiated at 0.82 kGy a two fold shelf-life extension was obtained. The shelf life was estimated by sensory, chemical and microbiological evaluations. Sensory evaluation involved organoleptic assessment of raw and cooked samples. Since freshwater fish do not contain trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), alternate tests for freshness were required. It was found the determination of hypoxanthine and total volatile acid number (VAN) are excellent tests for freshness and quality of freshwater fish;thus, these analyses were adopted. The degree of radiation-induced lipid oxidation was measured by the thiobarbituric acid test (TBA). It was found at doses of 0.82 and 1.2 kGy the TBA number remained within acceptable limits in all samples. Microbiological analyses consisted of the total microbial load assessment in the sample, as well as Pseudomonas and total psychrotrophic counts. The estimated shelf lives as determined by the three separate evaluations were in very good agreement

  3. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H.W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%.

  4. Persistence of environmental DNA in freshwater ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Dejean

    Full Text Available The precise knowledge of species distribution is a key step in conservation biology. However, species detection can be extremely difficult in many environments, specific life stages and in populations at very low density. The aim of this study was to improve the knowledge on DNA persistence in water in order to confirm the presence of the focus species in freshwater ecosystems. Aquatic vertebrates (fish: Siberian sturgeon and amphibian: Bullfrog tadpoles were used as target species. In control conditions (tanks and in the field (ponds, the DNA detectability decreases with time after the removal of the species source of DNA. DNA was detectable for less than one month in both conditions. The density of individuals also influences the dynamics of DNA detectability in water samples. The dynamics of detectability reflects the persistence of DNA fragments in freshwater ecosystems. The short time persistence of detectable amounts of DNA opens perspectives in conservation biology, by allowing access to the presence or absence of species e.g. rare, secretive, potentially invasive, or at low density. This knowledge of DNA persistence will greatly influence planning of biodiversity inventories and biosecurity surveys.

  5. Mycorrhiza helper bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Labbe, Jessy [ORNL

    2016-10-01

    This chapter focuses on the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacteria (MHB), a generic name given to bacteria which stimulate the formation of mycorrhizal symbiosis. By extension, some bacterial strains that positively impact the functioning of mycorrhizal symbiosis are also called MHB. These bacteria have applicative interests, as they indirectly improve the health and growth of tree seedlings. MHB are not restricted to a specific type of ecosystem, but are rather generalist in the way that they associate with both herbaceous and woody mycorrhizal plants from boreal, temperate, arid and tropical ecosystems. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms and their specificities will help us to know more about the ecology of the MHB. The process of acquisition varies between fungal species; while ectomycorrhizal fungi most probably recurrently acquire them from the environment, the association between bacterial endosymbionts and Glomeromycota probably dates back to very ancient times, and has since been vertically transmitted.

  6. LUMINESCENCE DIAGNOSTICS OF TUMORS WITH UPCONVERSION NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rocheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To improve quality of surgery in oncology, it is necessary to completely remove the tumor, including its metastases, to minimize injury to normal tissues and to reduce duration of an intervention. Modern methods of detection based on radiological computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can identify a tumor after its volume has become big enough, i.e. it contains more than 10 billion cells. Therefore, an improvement of sensitivity and resolution ability of diagnostic tools to identify early stages of malignant neoplasms seems of utmost importance. Aim: To demonstrate the potential of a new class of anti-Stokes luminescence nanoparticles for deep optical imaging with high contrast of malignant tumors. Materials and methods: Upconversion nanoparticles with narrow dispersion and a  size of 70 to 80  nm, with a  core/shell structure of NaYF4:Yb3+:Tm3+/NaYF4 were used in the study. The nanoparticles have an intensive band of anti-Stokes photoluminescence at a wavelength of 800  nm under irradiation with a  wavelength of 975  nm (both wavelengths are within the transparency window for biological tissues. The conversion coefficient of the excitation radiation into the anti-Stokes luminescence was 9%. To increase the time during which nanoparticles can circulate in blood flow of small animals, the nanoparticles were covered by a  biocompatible amphiphilic polymer shell. As a  tumor model we used Lewis epidermoid carcinoma transfected to mice. Results: We were able to obtain stable water colloids of nanoparticles covered with amphiphilic polymer that could preserve their initial size at least for one month. The use of upconversion nanoparticles with a  hydrophilic shell made of intermittent maleic anhydride and octadecene co-polymer with subsequent coating with diglycidyl polyethylene glycol ether allowed for reduction of non-specific reaction of nanoparticles with plasma proteins. In its turn, it resulted in an

  7. Contrasting ability to take up leucine and thymidine among freshwater bacterial groups: implications for bacterial production measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, María Teresa; Hörtnagl, Paul; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    We examined the ability of different freshwater bacterial groups to take up leucine and thymidine in two lakes. Utilization of both substrates by freshwater bacteria was examined at the community level by looking at bulk incorporation rates and at the single-cell level by combining fluorescent in situ hybridization and signal amplification by catalysed reporter deposition with microautoradiography. Our results showed that leucine was taken up by 70–80% of Bacteria-positive cells, whereas only 15–43% of Bacteria-positive cells were able to take up thymidine. When a saturating substrate concentration in combination with a short incubation was used, 80–90% of Betaproteobacteria and 67–79% of Actinobacteria were positive for leucine uptake, whereas thymidine was taken up by bacterial group. Bacterial abundance was a good predictor of the relative contribution of bacterial groups to leucine uptake, whereas when thymidine was used Actinobacteria represented the large majority (> 80%) of the cells taking up this substrate. Increasing the substrate concentration to 100 nM did not affect the percentage of R-BT cells taking up leucine (> 90% even at low concentrations), but moderately increased the fraction of thymidine-positive R-BT cells to a maximum of 35% of the hybridized cells. Our results show that even at very high concentrations, thymidine is not taken up by all, otherwise active, bacterial cells. PMID:19725866

  8. length-weight relationhip of freshwater wild fish species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Naeem

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... Length-weight (LWR) and length-length relationships (LLR) were determined for a freshwater catfish ... Key words: Mystus bleekeri, length-weight relationship, length-length relationship, predictive equations. INTRODUCTION. Mystus bleekeri (freshwater catfish Day, 1877), locally ..... fish farmers, Aquacult.

  9. Recent changes in the freshwater composition east of Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Steur, L.; Pickart, R.S.; Torres, D.J.; Valdimarsson, H.

    2015-01-01

    Results from three hydrographic surveys across the East Greenland Current between 2011 and 2013 are presented with focus on the freshwater sources. End-member analysis using salinity, d18O, and nutrient data shows that while meteoric water dominated the freshwater content, a significant amount of

  10. Occurrence of digenean larvae in freshwater snails in the Ruvu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of digenean larvae in freshwater snails in the Ruvu basin, Tanzania. G Nkwengulila, ESP Kigadye. Abstract. A survey was carried out on digenean larvae infecting freshwater snails in five habitats in Dar es Salaam, Ruvu and Morogoro. 9424 snails belonging to 12 species from five families were examined for ...

  11. Potential impacts of alien freshwater crayfish in South Africa | de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The habitat preferences and life history characteristics of four alien species of freshwater crayfish (Cherax tenuimanus, C. destructor, C. quadricarinatus and Procambarus clarkii) are reviewed. The potential impact of these species on South African freshwater ecosystems is assessed and the desirability of allowing their ...

  12. Ammonium transformation in a nitrogen-rich tidal freshwater marsh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribsholt, B.; Andersson, M.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2006-01-01

    The fate and transport of watershed-derived ammonium in a tidal freshwater marsh fringing the nutrient rich Scheldt River, Belgium, was quantified in a whole ecosystem 15N labeling experiment. In late summer (September) we added 15N-NH4+ to the flood water entering a 3477 m2 tidal freshwater marsh...

  13. Snail abundance in freshwater canals in the eastern province of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ksu-network

    2012-07-19

    Jul 19, 2012 ... Recent Advances in Freshwater Biology. New Delhi. Anmol. Publication. Vol. 2. pp. 187-202. Al-Akel and Suliman. 12261. Supian Z, Ikhwanuddin AM (2002). Population dynamics of freshwater mollusks (Gastropod: Melanoides Tuberculatus) in crocker range park, Sabah. ASEAN Rev. Biodiv. Environ.

  14. Predicting freshwater habitat integrity using land-use surrogates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Quantification of potential surrogates of freshwater habitat integrity. We chose a series of land-use variables that might be suitable predictors for assessing freshwater habitat integrity from the land cover map (CSIR 2005) and added separate GIS surfaces for human population density and the distribution of ...

  15. Invasive alien freshwater fishes in the Wilderness Lakes System, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Invasive alien freshwater fishes in the Wilderness Lakes System, a wetland of international importance in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. ... A total of 87 893 fish comprising 16 species were caught. In addition to confirming the ... Key words: freshwater fish, invasive alien fishes, estuary, RAMSAR site, diversity.

  16. Short Communications: First record of freshwater fish on the Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During a non-exhaustive survey of freshwater bodies on five islands of the archipelago, the first presence of a freshwater fish was recorded. Using barcoding sequences, the species was identified as the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a highly invasive species alien to the Cape Verdean Islands. Key words: Cape Verde, guppy, ...

  17. Luminescence studies of rare earth doped dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karali, T.

    1999-10-01

    from the rare earth sites, with signals characteristic of the RE 3+ states. Once more, the data suggest that the rare earth ions are active both in the trapping and luminescence processes where ionic radii influence the TL peak temperature. Finally, the research has expanded to include the analysis of high resolution RL spectra of CaSO 4 and MgB 4 O 7 doped with different concentrations of rare earths. This thesis presents the preliminary results and reveals that in higher concentrations, RE ions form a cluster which reduce the luminescence emission. (author)

  18. A Radiation Dosimetry Method Using Pulsed Optically Stimulated Luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselrod, M.S.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the determination of absorbed radiation dose is described based on pulsed optically stimulated luminescence (POSL). The method relies upon the stimulation of an irradiated sample with a train of light pulses from a suitable light source (e.g. a laser) using a wavelength which is within the range of wavelengths corresponding to the radiation-induced optical absorption in the irradiated sample. The subsequent emitted light, due to the detrapping of trapped charges and their subsequent recombination with charge of the opposite sign, is synchronously detected in the period between each stimulation pulse. The total luminescence is summed over the desired number of stimulation pulses and this forms the measured POSL signal. By monitoring the emitted light only in the period between stimulation pulses one can reduce the optical filtering required to discriminate between the stimulation light and the emission light; in this way a high measurement efficiency, and, therefore, a high radiation sensitivity (luminescence intensity per unit absorbed dose) is achieved. Key parameters in the method are the intrinsic luminescence lifetime for the material being used as the luminescent detector, the width of the optical stimulation pulse, and the period between pulses. For optimum operation the measurement parameters should be such that both the pulse width and the time between pulses are much less than the luminescence lifetime. By appropriate choice of the power of the optical stimulation, the frequency of the stimulation pulses, and the total stimulation period, one can also re-measure the absorbed dose several times. In this way, a re-read capability is available with the procedure. The method is illustrated using light from a 2nd-harmonic Nd:YAG laser, with irradiated, anion-deficient aluminium oxide as the luminescent detector material. (author)

  19. Dating Last Interglacial Coastal Systems Using New Feldspar Luminescence Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, M.

    2017-12-01

    The recent explosion in new luminescence dating technologies offers new opportunities to explore Quaternary marine coastal facies and landforms. However, tectonic and climatic processes controlling the development of Pleistocene coastal lithosomes are commonly obscured by their poorly constrained geological age. Luminescence dating of feldspar probes one order of magnitude deeper into geological time than radiocarbon and more than 5 times the current age range of quartz optically-stimulated luminescence, routinely used in luminescence dating. However, feldspar luminescence stimulated by infrared photons (eg IRSL) is hampered by anomalous fading. Successful correction methods developed by us over the last 15 years did produce sound chronologies but the fading-corrected ages carried large uncertainties. New approaches initiated by other laboratories, mainly in Europe, have isolated high temperature post-IRSL luminescence as this signal seems to be only slightly affected by fading. However, the gain in stability seems to be lessened due to bleachibility issues, generating age overestimations. We developed a novel protocol known as post-isothermal IRSL dating (Pit-IR) that focuses on a dual system of luminescence signals, probing low (50C) and medium (225C) temperature IRSL signals following isothermal treatments of various intensities. These protocols have been tested on Last interglacial coastal sediments in strikingly different GIA contexts along the Atlantic coastal areas of SE USA as well as from Morocco, Brazil and LIG sites in the Mediterranean basin. A systematic analysis of these results would suggest that a) falling-stages sequences are more commonly preserved as the OSL/IRSL ages are preferentially dating from the end of the MIS5e high stand and b) MIS5a marine sediments may be detectable away from areas generally thought to be affected by peripheral bulge collapse.

  20. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  1. Nonimaging optics in luminescent solar concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, B D; Ranade, R R; Giebink, N C

    2012-09-10

    Light trapped within luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) is naturally limited in angular extent by the total internal reflection critical angle, θcrit, and hence the principles of nonimaging optics can be leveraged to increase LSC concentration ratio by appropriately reshaping the edges. Here, we use rigorous ray-tracing simulations to explore the potential of this concept for realistic LSCs with compound parabolic concentrator (CPC)-tapered edges and show that, when applied to a single edge, the concentration ratio is increased by 23% while maintaining >90% of the original LSC optical efficiency. Importantly, we find that CPC-tapering all of the edges enables a significantly greater intensity enhancement up to 35% at >90% of the original optical efficiency, effectively enabling two-dimensional concentration through a cooperative, ray-recycling effect in which rays rejected by one CPC are accepted by another. These results open up a significant opportunity to improve LSC performance at virtually no added manufacturing cost by incorporating nonimaging optics into their design.

  2. Luminescence characterization of a sodium rich feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correcher, V.; Sanchez M, L.; Garcia G, J.; Rivera, T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of a sodium rich feldspar ((Na,K)[AlSi 3 O 8 ]) with a mean molecular composition of orthoclase (Or) and albite (Ab) of Or 1 Ab 99 . Despite the complexity of the luminescence signals of the sample, it is possible to determine six different emission bands at about 300, 380, 420, 460, 550 and 680 nm. The 300 nm emission can be associated to structural defects related to the recombination process in which the Na + ion diffusion-limited is involved. The UV-blue emission band at (i) 380 nm is characteristic of mineral phases containing SiO 4 tetrahedral and could be related to intrinsic defects in the lattice, (ii) the 420 nm band could be associated to the presence of Cu (II) ions placed next to the hole traps or the recombination on a centre formed from a hole-oxygen atom adjacent to two Al atoms (Al-O-Al) and (iii) the 460 nm waveband could be due to the presence of Ti 4+ . The green and red emissions are respectively associated to the presence of Mn 2+ and Fe 3+ ions. The ratio between the relative intensities, peaked at 290 (the more intense waveband) and 550 nm is about 10:1 in both TL and RL; this fact indicates that the efficiency of recombination centres does no changes regardless on the type of the process. (Author)

  3. Optically stimulated luminescence in retrospective dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Ris deg. into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this programme, including the evaluation of the single-aliquot regenerative-dose measurement protocol with brick quartz and the determination of dose-depth profiles in building materials as a guide to determining the mean energy of the incident radiation. Investigations into heated materials are most advanced, and a lower detection limit for quartz extracted from Chernobyl bricks was determined to be <10 mGy. The first results from the measurement of doses in unheated building materials such as mortar and concrete are also discussed. Both small-aliquot and single-grain techniques have been used to assess accident doses in these cement based building materials more commonly found in workplaces. Finally some results of a preliminary investigation of the OSL properties of household chemicals are discussed with reference to their potential as accident dosemeters. (author)

  4. Luminescent sulfides of monovalent and trivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention discloses a family of luminescent materials or phosphors having a rhombohedral crystal structure and consisting essentially of a mixed host sulfide of at least one monovalent host cation and at least one trivalent host cation, and containing, for each mole of phosphor, 0.0005 to 0.05 mole of at least one activating cation. The monovalent host cations may be Na, K or Rb and Cs. The trivalent host cations may be Gd, La, Lu, Sc and Y. The activating cations may be one or more of trivalent As, Bi, Ce, Dy, Er, Pr, Sb, Sm, Tb and Tm; divalent Lu, Mn, Pb and Sn; and monovalent Ag, Cu and Tl. The novel phosphors may be used in devices to convert electron-beam, ultraviolet or x-ray energy to light in the visible spectrum. Such energy conversion can be employed for example in fluoroscopic screens, and in viewing screens of cathode-ray tubes and other electron tubes

  5. Magnetic nanosensor particles in luminescence upconversion capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Stefan; Hirsch, Thomas; Scheucher, Elisabeth; Mayr, Torsten; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2011-09-05

    Nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit interesting size-dependent electrical, optical, magnetic, and chemical properties that cannot be observed in their bulk counterparts. The synthesis of NPs (i.e., crystalline particles ranging in size from 1 to 100 nm) has been intensely studied in the past decades. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) form a particularly attractive class of NPs and have found numerous applications such as in magnetic resonance imaging to visualize cancer, cardiovascular, neurological and other diseases. Other uses include drug targeting, tissue imaging, magnetic immobilization, hyperthermia, and magnetic resonance imaging. MNPs, due to their magnetic properties, can be easily separated from (often complex) matrices and manipulated by applying external magnetic field. Near-infrared to visible upconversion luminescent nanoparticles (UCLNPs) form another type of unusual nanoparticles. They are capable of emitting visible light upon NIR light excitation. Lanthanide-doped (Yb, Er) hexagonal NaYF₄ UCLNPs are the most efficient upconversion phosphors known up to now. The use of UCLNPs for in vitro imaging of cancer cells and in vivo imaging in tissues has been demonstrated. UCLNPs show great potential as a new class of luminophores for biological, biomedical, and sensor applications. We are reporting here on our first results on the combination of MNP and UCLNP technology within an ongoing project supported by the DFG and the FWF (Austria).

  6. Communication among Oral Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenbrander, Paul E.; Andersen, Roxanna N.; Blehert, David S.; Egland, Paul G.; Foster, Jamie S.; Palmer, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  7. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  8. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  9. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030 ...

  10. Spatially-resolved measurement of optically stimulated luminescence and time-resolved luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Mikhailik, V.B.

    2003-01-01

    Spatially-resolved measurements of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) were performed using a two-dimensional scanning system designed for use with planar samples. The scanning system employs a focused laser beam to stimulate a selected area of the sample, which is moved under the beam by a motorised stage. Exposure of the sample is controlled by an electronic shutter. Mapping of the distribution of OSL using a continuous wave laser source was obtained with sub-millimeter resolution for samples of sliced brick, synthetic single crystal quartz, concrete and dental ceramic. These revealed sporadic emission in the case of brick or concrete and significant spatial variation of emission for quartz and dental ceramic slices. Determinations of absorbed dose were performed for quartz grains within a slice of modern brick. Reconfiguration of the scanner with a pulsed laser source enabled quartz and feldspathic minerals within a ceramic sample to be thinner region. about 6 nm from the extrapolation of themeasuring the time-resolved luminescence spectrum

  11. Study of the luminescence properties of a natural amazonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Most gemstones, being natural materials (silicates, carbonates, phosphates, etc.), exhibit luminescence emission. This property could be potentially employed for personal dosimetry in the case of radiation accident or radiological terrorism where conventional monitoring has not been established. We, herein, report on the thermoluminescence (TL), radioluminescence (RL) and infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) response of a well-characterised natural amazonite (KAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) that, due to its bright blue-green colour when polished, is used as a gemstone. The luminescence emission wavelengths, intensities and thermal kinetics of the amazonite luminescence curves reveal that the ultraviolet band measured on amazonite aliquots is similar to other common K-rich feldspars. On this basis, one can conclude (i) association between twinning and the UV-blue TL emission can be related to structural defects located in the twin-domain boundaries where ionic alkali-self-diffusion, irreversible water losses and irreversible dehydroxylation processes can be involved. (ii) Amazonite exhibits a complex structure with several planar defects (twinning and exsolution interphases which can hold hydroxyl groups, water molecules, etc.) and point defects (impurities, Na, Pb, Mn, etc.) that can act as luminescence centres, and in fact, green and red emissions are respectively associated with the presence of Mn and Fe impurities. Finally, (iv) the thermal stability tests performed on the TL emission of the amazonite confirm a continuum in the trap distribution, i.e. progressive changes in the glow curve shape, intensity and temperature position of the maximum peak.

  12. Luminescence properties of tetravalent uranium in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirishima, A.; Kimura, T.; Nagaishi, R.; Tochiyama, O.

    2004-01-01

    The luminescence spectra of U 4+ in aqueous solutions were observed in the UV-VIS region at ambient and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The excitation spectrum indicates that the luminescence is arising from the deexcitation of a 5f electron at the 1 S 0 level and no other emissions of U 4+ in aqueous solutions were detected for other f-f transitions. All the luminescence peaks were assigned to the transitions from 1 S 0 to lower 5f levels. To estimate the luminescence lifetime, luminescence decay curves were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. At room temperature, the decay curve indicated that the lifetime was shorter than 20 ns. On the other hand, the frozen sample of U 4+ in aqueous solution at liquid nitrogen temperature showed the same emission spectrum as at room temperature and its lifetime was 149 ns in H 2 O system and 198 ns in D 2 O system. The longer lifetime at liquid nitrogen temperature made it possible to measure the spectrum of U 4+ at the concentration as low as 10 -6 M. The difference in the anion species (ClO 4 - , Cl - , SO 4 2- ) affected the structure of the emission spectrum to some extent. (orig.)

  13. Zero-reabsorption doped-nanocrystal luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Christian S; Bradshaw, Liam R; McDowall, Stephen; Gilbertson, John D; Gamelin, Daniel R; Patrick, David L

    2014-04-22

    Optical concentration can lower the cost of solar energy conversion by reducing photovoltaic cell area and increasing photovoltaic efficiency. Luminescent solar concentrators offer an attractive approach to combined spectral and spatial concentration of both specular and diffuse light without tracking, but they have been plagued by luminophore self-absorption losses when employed on practical size scales. Here, we introduce doped semiconductor nanocrystals as a new class of phosphors for use in luminescent solar concentrators. In proof-of-concept experiments, visibly transparent, ultraviolet-selective luminescent solar concentrators have been prepared using colloidal Mn(2+)-doped ZnSe nanocrystals that show no luminescence reabsorption. Optical quantum efficiencies of 37% are measured, yielding a maximum projected energy concentration of ∼6× and flux gain for a-Si photovoltaics of 15.6 in the large-area limit, for the first time bounded not by luminophore self-absorption but by the transparency of the waveguide itself. Future directions in the use of colloidal doped nanocrystals as robust, processable spectrum-shifting phosphors for luminescent solar concentration on the large scales required for practical application of this technology are discussed.

  14. Recent Advances on Luminescent Enhancement-Based Porous Silicon Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Plush, Sally E; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence-based detection paradigms have key advantages over other optical platforms such as absorbance, reflectance or interferometric based detection. However, autofluorescence, low quantum yield and lack of photostability of the fluorophore or emitting molecule are still performance-limiting factors. Recent research has shown the need for enhanced luminescence-based detection to overcome these drawbacks while at the same time improving the sensitivity, selectivity and reducing the detection limits of optical sensors and biosensors. Nanostructures have been reported to significantly improve the spectral properties of the emitting molecules. These structures offer unique electrical, optic and magnetic properties which may be used to tailor the surrounding electrical field of the emitter. Here, the main principles behind luminescence and luminescence enhancement-based detections are reviewed, with an emphasis on europium complexes as the emitting molecule. An overview of the optical porous silicon microcavity (pSiMC) as a biosensing platform and recent proof-of-concept examples on enhanced luminescence-based detection using pSiMCs are provided and discussed.

  15. The decline of North American freshwater fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Jelks, Howard L.; Burkhead, Noel M.

    2009-01-01

    North America has a broad array of freshwater ecosystems because of the continent's complex geography and geological history. Within a multitude of habitats—that include streams, large rivers, natural lakes, springs, and wetlands—rich assemblages of fishes reside, representing diverse taxonomic groups with unique ecological requirements. They face an unprecedented conservation crisis.1 In the last few decades, the proportion of inland fishes of North America, which are considered imperiled or extinct, increased from 20 to 40%.2 Although extinctions have occurred, many species and populations are declining in range size and abundance. The fish biota of the continent as a whole remains diverse; however, we can take action to stem any further declines.

  16. Freshwater algae of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.D.; Giles, K.R.

    1979-06-01

    Fifty-two species of freshwater algae were identified in samples collected from the eight known natural springs of the Nevada Test Site. Although several species were widespread, 29 species were site specific. Diatoms provided the greatest variety of species at each spring. Three-fifths of all algal species encountered were diatoms. Well-developed mats of filamentous green algae (Chlorophyta) were common in many of the water tanks associated with the springs and accounted for most of the algal biomass. Major nutrients were adequate, if not abundant, in most spring waters - growth being limited primarily by light and physical habitat. There was some evidence of cesium-137 bioconcentration by algae at several of the springs

  17. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  18. Freshwater salinization syndrome on a continental scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Sujay S; Likens, Gene E; Pace, Michael L; Utz, Ryan M; Haq, Shahan; Gorman, Julia; Grese, Melissa

    2018-01-23

    Salt pollution and human-accelerated weathering are shifting the chemical composition of major ions in fresh water and increasing salinization and alkalinization across North America. We propose a concept, the freshwater salinization syndrome, which links salinization and alkalinization processes. This syndrome manifests as concurrent trends in specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, and base cations. Although individual trends can vary in strength, changes in salinization and alkalinization have affected 37% and 90%, respectively, of the drainage area of the contiguous United States over the past century. Across 232 United States Geological Survey (USGS) monitoring sites, 66% of stream and river sites showed a statistical increase in pH, which often began decades before acid rain regulations. The syndrome is most prominent in the densely populated eastern and midwestern United States, where salinity and alkalinity have increased most rapidly. The syndrome is caused by salt pollution (e.g., road deicers, irrigation runoff, sewage, potash), accelerated weathering and soil cation exchange, mining and resource extraction, and the presence of easily weathered minerals used in agriculture (lime) and urbanization (concrete). Increasing salts with strong bases and carbonates elevate acid neutralizing capacity and pH, and increasing sodium from salt pollution eventually displaces base cations on soil exchange sites, which further increases pH and alkalinization. Symptoms of the syndrome can include: infrastructure corrosion, contaminant mobilization, and variations in coastal ocean acidification caused by increasingly alkaline river inputs. Unless regulated and managed, the freshwater salinization syndrome can have significant impacts on ecosystem services such as safe drinking water, contaminant retention, and biodiversity. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  19. The friendly bacteria within us Commensal bacteria of the intestine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balance of bacterial species in the gut · Immunosensory detection of intestinal bacteria · Pathogenic bacteria release interleukin-8 from HT-29 cells · Lactobacillus GG prevents the IL-8 release in response to pathogens · Effect of probiotic bacteria on chemokine response of epithelia to pathogens · PCR array studies in colon ...

  20. Anthropogenic shift of planktonic food web structure in a coastal lagoon by freshwater flow regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemraj, Deevesh A.; Hossain, A.; Ye, Qifeng; Qin, Jian G.; Leterme, Sophie C.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropogenic modification of aquatic systems has diverse impacts on food web interactions and ecosystem states. To reverse the adverse effects of modified freshwater flow, adequate management of discharge is required, especially due to higher water requirements and abstractions for human use. Here, we look at the effects of anthropogenically controlled freshwater flow regimes on the planktonic food web of a Ramsar listed coastal lagoon that is under recovery from degradation. Our results show shifts in water quality and plankton community interactions associated to changes in water flow. These shifts in food web interactions represent modifications in habitat complexity and water quality. At high flow, phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions dominate the food web. Conversely, at low flow, bacteria, viruses and nano/picoplankton interactions are more dominant, with a substantial switch of the food web towards heterotrophy. This switch can be associated with excess organic matter loading, decomposition of dead organisms, and synergistic and antagonistic interactions. We suggest that a lower variability in flow amplitude could be beneficial for the long-term sustaining of water quality and food web interactions, while improving the ecosystem health of systems facing similar stresses as the Coorong.

  1. Monocrystalline silicon photovoltaic luminescent solar concentrator with 4.2% power conversion efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, L.; Ras, A.J.M.; Boer, de D.K.G.; Debije, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    We report conversion efficiencies of experimental single and dual light guide luminescent solar concentrators. We have built several 5¿¿cm×5¿¿cm and 10¿¿cm×10¿¿cm luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) demonstrators consisting of c-Si photovoltaic cells attached to luminescent light guides of Lumogen

  2. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR-IR...

  3. Sub-ppb level detection of uranium using ligand sensitized luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-01-01

    Uranyl ion (UO 2 2+ ) is known to exhibit weak luminescence in aqueous medium due to poor molar absorptivity and low quantum yield. In order to enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in aqueous medium, luminescence enhancing reagents such as H 3 PO 4 , H 2 SO 4 , HClO 4 have been widely used. Like lanthanides, uranyl luminescence can also be sensitized by using some organic ligands. Pyridine 2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDA) has shown enhancement of luminescence of uranyl in aqueous medium. Enhancement in intensity is due to sensitization of uranyl luminescence by PDA. In order to see the effect of non-aqueous medium, in this work, luminescence of uranyl-PDA complex has been studied in acetonitrile medium. More than one order luminescence enhancement has been observed compared to UO 2 2+ - PDA complex in aqueous medium. The lifetime of uranyl luminescence of the complex in acetonitrile medium is 90 μs which is very high compared to 10 μs in aqueous medium, suggesting that the luminescence enhancement is a result of reduction in non-radiative decay channels in acetonitrile medium. The large enhancement of uranyl luminescence of uranyl-PDA complex in acetonitrile medium can be used for ultra-trace level detection of uranium. Linearity in the luminescence intensity has been observed over the uranium concentration range of 5 to 80 ppb and the detection limit calculated using the criterion of 3 σ is ~ 0.2 ppb. (author)

  4. Photoluminescence, reddish orange long persistent luminescence and photostimulated luminescence properties of praseodymium doped CdGeO3 phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yahong; Hu, Yihua; Chen, Li; Fu, Yinrong; Mu, Zhongfei; Wang, Tao; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel phosphor CdGeO 3 :Pr 3+ was synthesized successfully. • The persistent luminescence properties of CdGeO 3 :Pr 3+ were studied. • The photostimulated luminescence properties of CdGeO 3 :Pr 3+ were investigated. • The persistent and photostimulated luminescence mechanisms were discussed in detail. - Abstract: Praseodymium doped CdGeO 3 phosphors were prepared successfully by a conventional high temperature solid-state reaction method. It showed reddish orange long persistent luminescence (LPL) after the short UV-irradiation. The reddish orange photostimulated luminescence (PSL) was also observed upon near infrared stimulation at 980 nm after per-exposure into UV light. The origin of LPL and PSL was identified with the emission from Pr 3+ ions with the aid of traps in host lattice. The optimal concentration of Pr 3+ ions for the brightest photoluminescence (PL) emission and the best LPL characteristic were experimentally to be about 3% and 0.5 mol%, respectively. The trapping and de-trapping processes of charge carriers between shallower and deep traps were illustrated. A model was proposed on the basis of experimental results to study the mechanisms of LPL and PSL

  5. Negative consequences of glacial turbidity for the survival of freshwater planktonic heterotrophic flagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommaruga, Ruben; Kandolf, Georg

    2014-02-17

    Heterotrophic (phagotrophic) flagellates are key components of planktonic food webs in freshwater and marine ecosystems because they are the main consumers of bacteria. Although they are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, they were numerically undetectable in turbid glacier-fed lakes. Here we show that glacial particles had negative effects on the survival and growth of heterotrophic flagellates. The effect of glacial particles was concentration-dependent and was caused by their interference with bacterial uptake rather than by physical damage. These results are the first to reveal why establishment of heterotrophic flagellates populations is hindered in very turbid glacial lakes. Because glaciers are vanishing around the world, recently formed turbid meltwater lakes represent an excellent opportunity to understand the environmental conditions that probably shaped the establishment of lake communities at the end of the last glaciation.

  6. Luminescent properties of Al2O3: Tb powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esparza G, A.E.; Garcia, M.; Falcony, C.; Azorin N, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this work the photo luminescent and cathode luminescent characteristics of aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) powders impurified with terbium (Tb) were studied for their use in dosimetry. The optical, structural, morphological characteristics of the powders as function of variation in the impurity concentration and the annealing temperature will be presented. As regards the optical properties of powders (photoluminescence and cathode luminescence) it was observed a characteristic emission associated with radiative transitions between electron energy levels of terbium, the spectra associated with this emission consists of several peaks associated with such transitions. In the structural and morphological characterization (X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy) it was appreciated that in accordance the annealing temperature of powders is augmented it is evident the apparition of certain crystalline phases. The results show that this is a promissory material for radiation dosimetry. (Author)

  7. Optical and luminescence properties of zinc oxide (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodnyi, P. A.; Khodyuk, I. V.

    2011-11-01

    We generalize and systematize basic experimental data on optical and luminescence properties of ZnO single crystals, thin films, powders, ceramics, and nanocrystals. We consider and study mechanisms by which two main emission bands occur, a short-wavelength band near the fundamental absorption edge and a broad long-wavelength band, the maximum of which usually lies in the green spectral range. We determine a relationship between the two luminescence bands and study in detail the possibility of controlling the characteristics of ZnO by varying the maximum position of the short-wavelength band. We show that the optical and luminescence characteristics of ZnO largely depend on the choice of the corresponding impurity and the parameters of the synthesis and subsequent treatment of the sample. Prospects for using zinc oxide as a scintillator material are discussed. Additionally, we consider experimental results that are of principal interest for practice.

  8. Fiber-coupled Luminescence Dosimetry in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    . Some crystalline phosphors, such as carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) have the ability to store charge produced in the crystal during irradiation. The stored charge may later be released by fiber-guided laser light under emission of so-called optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The OSL signal......Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry is an emerging technology with several potentially attractive features of relevance for uses in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology: direct water equivalence (i.e. no significant perturbation of the radiation field in a water phantom or a patient), sub......-mm detector size, high dynamic range (below a mGy to several Gy), microsecond time resolution, and absence of electrical wires or other electronics in the dosimeter probe head. Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry systems typically consist of one or more small samples of phosphor, e.g. a mg of plastic...

  9. Luminescence properties of isomeric and tautomeric lanthanide pyridinedicarboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntus, L.N.; Zolin, V.F.; Babushkina, T.A.; Kutuza, I.B.

    2004-01-01

    The luminescence and PMR spectra of europium salts of six isomers of 2,3-, 2,4-, 2,5-, 2,6-, 3,4-, and 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acids (PDA) had been studied. The distribution of the effective charge in the nearest surroundings of the Eu 3+ ion in these salts was evaluated from Stark splittings of electronic transitions. The values of relative integral intensities of electronic transitions 5 D 0 - 7 F J (J=0-4) in the luminescence spectra were reported. Compounds investigated were divided into three subgroups taking into account the details of the structure of the ligands and details of the luminescence spectra. The ligand coordination manners as well as the strength of interaction between lanthanide ion and ligands were confirmed by data of the PMR and IR spectroscopy

  10. Bistable luminescence of trivalent rare-earth ions in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, Jose Garcia; Ramirez O, Maria de la; Rodenas, Airan; Jaque, Daniel; Bausa, Luisa; Bettinelli, Marco; Speghini, Adolfo; Cavalli, Enrico; Ivleva, Lioudmila

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we have examined three new bistable systems based on the luminescence of three different crystals activated with trivalent rare earth ions. We have focussed our attention on Yb 3+ ions activators, for which the most relevant results are obtained. The first crystal, Sr 0.6 Ba 0.4 Nb 2 O 6 , is a ferroelectric material with a relatively low phase transition temperature (∼370 K), which provides bistability in the luminescence of Yb 3+ ions due to the thermal hysteresis associated with phase transition. The second crystal, LiNbO 3 , provides an intrinsic bistability in the luminescence of Yb 3+ ions, which is driven by changes in the excitation intensity. In the third crystal, NdPO 4 , a new mechanism of excitation intensity driven bistability is obtained when activated with Yb 3+ ions, due to a interplay between the Nd 3+ ↔Yb 3+ energy transfer and back transfer processes

  11. Terbium and dysprosium complexes luminescence at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkova, S B; Kravchenko, T B; Kononenko, L.I.; Poluehktov, N S [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Odessa. Fiziko-Khimicheskij Inst.

    1979-01-01

    The variation is studied of the luminescence intensity of terbium and dysprosium complexes used in the analysis as solutions are cooled down to the liquid nitrogen temperature. Three groups of methods have been studied: observation of fluorescence of aqueous solutions, precipitate and extract suspensions in organic solvents. The brightest luminescence and greatest increase in luminescence intensity are observed at freezing of complex solvents with 1,2-dioxybenzene-3,5-disulfonic acid (DBSA) and iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and DBSA+EDTA, as well as in the case of benzene extracting of complexes with phenanthroline and salicylic acid. Otherwise the intensity increases 2-14-fold and for the complex of terbium with acetoacetic ester 36-fold.

  12. Luminescence and photosensitivity of PbI2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosad, S.S.; Novosad, I.S.; Matviishin, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    One studied effect of temperature treatment and storage conditions on spectra features of PbI 2 crystals grown by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method from salt additionally purified by directed crystallization. Spectra of X-ray luminescence, photoluminescence and thermostimulated luminescence were investigated within 85-295 K temperature range under stationary X-ray excitation and emission of N 2 -laser. One studied photoelectret properties of those crystals under 85 K. Luminescence of PbI 2 crystals with maximum within 595 nm region observed following their thermal annealing under 475-495 K temperature and typical for near-the-surface section of specimens may be caused by oxygen-containing centres [ru

  13. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials from fundamentals to bioapplications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao

    2014-01-01

    Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the ...

  14. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry with gypsum wallboard (drywall)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J. W.; Burdette, K. E.; Inrig, E. L.; Dewitt, R.; Mistry, R.; Rink, W. J.; Boreham, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Gypsum wallboard (drywall) represents an attractive target for retrospective dosimetry by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the event of a radiological accident or malicious use of nuclear material. In this study, wallboard is shown to display a radiation-induced luminescence signal (RIS) as well as a natural background signal (NS), which is comparable in intensity to the RIS. Excitation and emission spectra show that maximum luminescence intensity is obtained for stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes (470 nm) and for detection in the ultraviolet region (290-370 nm). It is necessary to decrease the optical stimulation power dramatically in order to adequately separate the RIS from the interfering background signal. The necessary protocols are developed for accurately measuring the absorbed dose as low as 500 mGy and demonstrate that the RIS decays logarithmically with storage time, with complete erasure expected within 1-4 d. (authors)

  15. Latest developments in silica fibre luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. A.; Abdul S, S. F.; Jafari, S. M.; Alanazi, A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Amouzad M, G. [University of Malaya, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Lightwave Research Group, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Addul R, H. A.; Mizanur R, A. K. M.; Zubair, H. T.; Begum, M.; Yusoff, Z.; Omar, N. Y. M. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, 2010 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Maah, M. J. [University of Malaya, Department of Chemistry, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Collin, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 OLW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mat-Sharif, K. A.; Muhd-Yassin, S. Z.; Zulkifli, M. I., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk [Telekom Malaysia Research and Development Sdn Bhd., 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using tailor made sub-mm diameter doped-silica fibres, we are carrying out luminescence dosimetry studies for a range of situations, including thermoluminescence (Tl)investigations on a liquid alpha source formed of {sup 223}RaCl (the basis of the Bayer Health care product Xofigo), the Tl response to a 62 MeV proton source and Tl response to irradiation from an {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. In regard to the former, in accord with the intrinsic high linear energy transfer (Let) and short path length (<100 um) of the α-particles in calcified tissue, the product is in part intended as a bone-seeking radionuclide for treatment of metastatic cancer, offering high specificity and efficacy. The Tl yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibres has been investigated including for photonic crystal fibre un collapsed, flat fibres and single mode fibres, these systems offering many advantages over conventional passive dosimetry types. In particular, one can mention comparable and even superior sensitivity, an effective atomic number Z{sub eff} of the silica dosimetric material close to that of bone, and the glassy nature of the fibres offering the additional advantage of being able to place such dosimeters directly into liquid environments. Finally we review the use of our tailor made fibres for on-line radioluminescence measurements of radiotherapy beams. The outcome from these various lines of research is expected to inform development of doped fiber radiation dosimeters of versatile utility, ranging from clinical applications through to industrial studies and environmental evaluations. (Author)

  16. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  17. Ion irradiation effect of alumina and its luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Shunya; Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; My, N T

    1997-03-01

    The luminescence spectra of single crystalline alpha-alumina and ruby which has 0.02% of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a impurity, induced by 200 keV He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} irradiation were measured at room temperature as a function of irradiation dose. The analysis of the measured spectra showed the existence of three main luminescence features in the wavelength region of 250 to 350 nm, namely anionic color centers, F-center at 411 nm and F{sup +}-center at 330 nm and a band observed around 315 nm. As alpha-alumina was irradiated with He{sup +}, F-center and F{sup +}-center luminescence grew and decayed, but the behaviors of those were different from each other. It seems that a concentration quenching occurred on the F-center luminescence in the dose range above 1x10{sup 14} He/cm{sup 2}. Furthermore, F-center luminescence was strongly suppressed in ruby, compared with that in alumina. On the other hand, the luminescence band around 315 nm appeared only in the early stage of irradiation and did not show its growth part. The dose dependent behavior was similar to that of Cr{sup 3+} emission at 695 nm (R-line) in ruby in both cases of He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} irradiation. Based on the experimental results mentioned above, the processes of defect formation and excitation in alumina in the early stage of ion irradiation will be discussed. (author)

  18. High-resolution light microscopy using luminescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Roy, Indrajit; Yong, Ken-Tye; Pudavar, Haridas E; Prasad, Paras N

    2010-01-01

    This review presents recent progress in the development of the luminescent nanoparticles for confocal and multiphoton microscopy. Four classes of nanomaterials are discussed: (1) silica-based nanoparticles doped with fluorescent molecules, (2) gold nanoparticles, (3) semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots/rods), and (4) nanophosphors. Special considerations are given to recently developed imaging nanoprobes, such as (1) organically modified silica (ORMOSIL) nanoparticles doped with two-photon absorbing fluorophores, which exhibit aggregation-enhanced fluorescence (AEF), and (2) nanophosphors (ceramic nanoparticles containing luminescent lanthanoid ions). Advantages and disadvantages of every class of nanomaterials and their specific applications are briefly discussed.

  19. Excitonic surface polaritons in luminescence from ZnTe crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, M.S.; Bandura, V.M.; Matsko, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The form and structure of reflection and exciton-polariton luminescence spectra of ZnTe crystals are studied in the region of the ground (n = 1) exciton state. The longitudinal-transverse splitting magnitude ΔE/sub LT/ is determined from the shape of the reflection spectra. A detected doublet structure of an emission band from the lower polariton branch is associated with the k-linear term. The evolution of bulk and surface polariton luminescence spectra versus temperature and wavelength of the exciting light is investigated. (author)

  20. Excitonic surface polaritons in luminescence from ZnTe crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, M.S.; Bandura, V.M.; Matsko, M.G. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Fiziki)

    1984-10-01

    The form and structure of reflection and exciton-polariton luminescence spectra of ZnTe crystals are studied in the region of the ground (n = 1) exciton state. The longitudinal-transverse splitting magnitude ..delta..E/sub LT/ is determined from the shape of the reflection spectra. A detected doublet structure of an emission band from the lower polariton branch is associated with the k-linear term. The evolution of bulk and surface polariton luminescence spectra versus temperature and wavelength of the exciting light is investigated.

  1. Organic scintillators with long luminescent lifetimes for radiotherapy dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Lindvold, Lars René; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    of experiments performed using two organic scintillators, one commercially available and one custom made. The luminescent lifetimes of the scintillators have been measured using i) optical excitation by pulsed UV light, and ii) irradiative excitation using high-energy X-rays from a linac. A luminescent lifetime...... component on the order of 20 μs was estimated for the custom-made organic scintillator, while the commercial scintillator exhibited a fast component of approximately 5 ns lifetime (7 ns as stated by the manufacturer) and an approximate 10 μs lifetime slow component. Although these lifetimes are not long...

  2. Concentration depolarization of luminescence of Eu3+-doped glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodunov, E.N.; Lebedev, V.P.; Malyshev, V.A.; Przheuskij, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental study of concentrational depolarization luminescence (CDL) of phosphate and germanate glasses, containing Eu 3+ ions, has been carried out. On the basis of three-body self-consistent approximation the theory of CDL is conceived, which takes into account Eu-Eu interaction of higher multipolarities. By comparing the theory with the experiment energy transfer radii for Eu-Eu dipole-dipole, dipole-quadrupole and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions are determined. The attempt to discriminate Eu-Eu interaction types in the studied range of Eu 3+ ion concentration change has failed owing to law accuracy of luminescence emittance anisotropy measurement

  3. Anti-Stokes Luminescence in High Quality Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinattieri, A.; Bogani, F.; Miotto, A.; Ceccherini, S.

    1997-11-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the anti-Stokes (AS) luminescence which originates from exciton recombination when below gap excitation is used, in a set of high quality quantum well structures. We observe strong excitonic resonances in the AS signal as measured from photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectra. We demonstrate that neither the electromagnetic coupling between the wells nor the morphological disorder can explain this up-conversion effect. Time-resolved luminescence data after ps excitation and fs correlation spectroscopy results provide clear evidence of the occurrence of a two-step absorption which is assisted by the exciton population resonantly excited by the first photon.

  4. LUMINESCENT PROPERTIES OF SILICATE GLASSES WITH CERIUM IONS AND ANTIMONY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Klykova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the results of an experimental study of luminescence excitation spectra and luminescence of silicate glasses containing cerium ions and antimony. The aim of this work was to study the features of the luminescence and the effect of UV irradiation and heat treatment on luminescence and the state of cerium ions and antimony in glass. We investigated glass system Na2O-ZnO-Al2O3-SiO2-NaF-NaBr with additives CeO2 and Sb2O3. Synthesis was carried out in platinum crucibles in the air at 14500C. The samples were polished glass plates with a thickness of 0.5-1 mm. UV irradiation was carried out with a mercury lamp having a wide range of radiation in the spectral range 240-390 nm. It was conducted in a Nabertherm muffle furnaces. Luminescence spectra and excitation spectra were measured using a spectrofluorimeter MPF-44A (PerkinElmer at the room temperature. Measured luminescence spectra were corrected in view of the spectral sensitivity of the photodetector for spectrofluorimeter. Adjustment of the excitation spectra for the spectral dependence of the intensity of the excitation source was not carried out. During the experiments it was found that in silicate glasses Sb3+ ions can exist in two energy states, which corresponds to a different environment with oxygen ions. Heat treatment of these glasses in an oxidizing atmosphere leads to an increase in ion concentration of Sb3+ ions with a greater amount of oxygen in the environment. In glasses containing antimony and cerium ions, ultraviolet irradiation causes a change in the valence of cerium ions and antimony, which is accompanied by luminescence quenching. Subsequent heat treatment of glass leads to the inverse processes and restore luminescence excitation spectra. The study of fluorescent properties of silicate glasses with cerium and antimony ions led to the conclusion of the practical significance of this work. Promising multifunctional materials can be created on the basis of

  5. The Freshwater Sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis Harbours Diverse Pseudomonas Species (Gammaproteobacteria, Pseudomonadales) with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Costa, Tina; Jousset, Alexandre; van Overbeek, Leo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Costa, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria are believed to play an important role in the fitness and biochemistry of sponges (Porifera). Pseudomonas species (Gammaproteobacteria, Pseudomonadales) are capable of colonizing a broad range of eukaryotic hosts, but knowledge of their diversity and function in freshwater invertebrates is rudimentary. We assessed the diversity, structure and antimicrobial activities of Pseudomonas spp. in the freshwater sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis. Polymerase Chain Reaction – Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints of the global regulator gene gacA revealed distinct structures between sponge-associated and free-living Pseudomonas communities, unveiling previously unsuspected diversity of these assemblages in freshwater. Community structures varied across E. fluviatilis specimens, yet specific gacA phylotypes could be detected by PCR-DGGE in almost all sponge individuals sampled over two consecutive years. By means of whole-genome fingerprinting, 39 distinct genotypes were found within 90 fluorescent Pseudomonas isolates retrieved from E. fluviatilis. High frequency of in vitro antibacterial (49%), antiprotozoan (35%) and anti-oomycetal (32%) activities was found among these isolates, contrasting less-pronounced basidiomycetal (17%) and ascomycetal (8%) antagonism. Culture extracts of highly predation-resistant isolates rapidly caused complete immobility or lysis of cells of the protozoan Colpoda steinii. Isolates tentatively identified as P. jessenii, P. protegens and P. oryzihabitans showed conspicuous inhibitory traits and correspondence with dominant sponge-associated phylotypes registered by cultivation-independent analysis. Our findings suggest that E. fluviatilis hosts both transient and persistent Pseudomonas symbionts displaying antimicrobial activities of potential ecological and biotechnological value. PMID:24533086

  6. Insights into the gut microbiota of freshwater shrimp and its associations with the surrounding microbiota and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanting; Duan, Cuilan; Zhang, Xuxiang; Chen, Huangen; Ren, Hongqiang; Yin, Ying; Ye, Lin

    2018-04-23

    The gut microbiota of aquatic animals plays a crucial role in host health through nutrient acquisition and outcompetition of pathogens. In this study, based on the high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we examined the bacterial communities in the gut of freshwater shrimp ( Macrobrachium nipponense ) and in their living environments (sediment and pond water) and analyzed the effects of abiotic and biotic factors on the shrimp gut bacterial communities. High bacterial heterogeneity was observed in the freshwater shrimp gut samples, and the result indicated that both the surrounding bacterial community and water quality factors (particularly dissolved oxygen and temperature) could affect the shrimp gut bacterial community. Despite the observed heterogeneity, 57 genera, constituting 38~99% of the total genera in each of the 40 shrimp gut samples, were identified as the main bacterial population in the gut of M. nipponense . In addition, a high diversity and abundance of lactic acid bacteria (26 genera), which could play significant roles in the digestion process in shrimp, were observed in the shrimp gut samples. Overall, this study provides insights into the gut bacterial communities of freshwater shrimp and basic information for shrimp farming regarding the application of probiotics and disease prevention.

  7. FRESHWATER FISHERY OF THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Homen

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available As fishery, including freshwater, is very important for economy of the Republic of Croatia, the aim of this paper is to show its condition from 1995 to 1998. and also to draw a plan for fish production in 1999. The period from 1998-1999. is more stressed in order to have a total and detailed view into the present condition of the freshwater fishery and into the direction in wish that production is going. Data about carp ponds and also about trout ponds is presented. Twentynine fish-ponds are processed out of which 20 are carp ponds and 9 trout ponds. Data was delivered to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry Fisheries Directorate. An assessment of the condition is made for 3 fish-ponds as the desired data was not provided. As to the number of employees on fish-ponds, a slight decline could be percived in the period from 1995 to 1997. In 1998 a number of employees considerably increased for 10.07% in relation to 1997. qualification of the employees in 1998. show that the most of them are unqualified what is in accord with the requirements of a job on a fish-pond. Overall surface of the carp ponds in 1998 was 12,708 and the production surface was 9,782 ha. The most of the fish-ponds have up to 500 ha of total surface (45.45%, while 50% of the fish-ponds have production surface from 500-100 ha. The production in the trout ponds is made on 165,905 m 2 of the overall surface of the ponds, and only 40,538 m 2 are the production surface of the ponds. The production of fish in that period was in constant increase and that increasing trend in expected in 1999, and it will be an 28.30 % increase in relation to 1998. The increase is expected for all kids of fish except for big head carps, silver carps and tinch fishs. As a part of the production of tinch fishs an increase in production of consumption tinch fish is expected, but a decrease in production of one-year and two-year old fishs and two-year old fish. Out of all kinds of fish, the most produced

  8. Pepsin homologues in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Alex

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidase family A1, to which pepsin belongs, had been assumed to be restricted to eukaryotes. The tertiary structure of pepsin shows two lobes with similar folds and it has been suggested that the gene has arisen from an ancient duplication and fusion event. The only sequence similarity between the lobes is restricted to the motif around the active site aspartate and a hydrophobic-hydrophobic-Gly motif. Together, these contribute to an essential structural feature known as a psi-loop. There is one such psi-loop in each lobe, and so each lobe presents an active Asp. The human immunodeficiency virus peptidase, retropepsin, from peptidase family A2 also has a similar fold but consists of one lobe only and has to dimerize to be active. All known members of family A1 show the bilobed structure, but it is unclear if the ancestor of family A1 was similar to an A2 peptidase, or if the ancestral retropepsin was derived from a half-pepsin gene. The presence of a pepsin homologue in a prokaryote might give insights into the evolution of the pepsin family. Results Homologues of the aspartic peptidase pepsin have been found in the completed genomic sequences from seven species of bacteria. The bacterial homologues, unlike those from eukaryotes, do not possess signal peptides, and would therefore be intracellular acting at neutral pH. The bacterial homologues have Thr218 replaced by Asp, a change which in renin has been shown to confer activity at neutral pH. No pepsin homologues could be detected in any archaean genome. Conclusion The peptidase family A1 is found in some species of bacteria as well as eukaryotes. The bacterial homologues fall into two groups, one from oceanic bacteria and one from plant symbionts. The bacterial homologues are all predicted to be intracellular proteins, unlike the eukaryotic enzymes. The bacterial homologues are bilobed like pepsin, implying that if no horizontal gene transfer has occurred the duplication

  9. Luminescence of uranyl ion complexed with 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid as ligand in acetonitrile medium. Observation of co-luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maji, Siuli; Kumar, Satendra; Sankaran, Kannan [Indira Ghandi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamil Nadu (India). Materials Chemistry Div.

    2017-10-01

    Luminescence from UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} (uranyl ion) complexed with 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (PDA) has been studied using acetonitrile (MeCN) as solvent between pH 1.0 and 6.0. The enhancement in luminescence intensity because of sensitization by PDA in the non-aqueous environment provided by the MeCN is found to be one order better than in aqueous medium. The luminescence is further enhanced by about four times following the addition of Y{sup 3+}; a process known as co-luminescence. This is the first study on co-luminescence of uranyl ion in its PDA complex. Lifetime studies indicate the presence of two species having different micro-environments. Formations of both intra and inter molecular complexes are believed to be responsible for enhancement due to co-luminescence.

  10. Luminescence of uranyl ion complexed with 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid as ligand in acetonitrile medium. Observation of co-luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maji, Siuli; Kumar, Satendra; Sankaran, Kannan

    2017-01-01

    Luminescence from UO_2"2"+ (uranyl ion) complexed with 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (PDA) has been studied using acetonitrile (MeCN) as solvent between pH 1.0 and 6.0. The enhancement in luminescence intensity because of sensitization by PDA in the non-aqueous environment provided by the MeCN is found to be one order better than in aqueous medium. The luminescence is further enhanced by about four times following the addition of Y"3"+; a process known as co-luminescence. This is the first study on co-luminescence of uranyl ion in its PDA complex. Lifetime studies indicate the presence of two species having different micro-environments. Formations of both intra and inter molecular complexes are believed to be responsible for enhancement due to co-luminescence.

  11. Na-rich feldspar as a luminescence dosimeter in infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank

    2013-01-01

    on geological origin and erosion history, but the dosimetry of K-rich feldspar grains extracted from rocks is complicated because the internal dose rate is very dependent on the original feldspar grain size. The in situ grain size information is lost during the crushing process used to separate the grains...... settings for which independent age control is available. The blue and yellow luminescence emissions are measured for IR stimulation at 50 °C (IR50), and post-IR IR stimulation at 290 °C (pIRIR290). Thermal stability experiments imply that the corresponding signals in both emissions have comparable thermal...... stabilities and that all signals have similar recombination kinetics and are thermally stable over geological timescales. The IR50 doses measured using blue and yellow emissions are similar to or lower than quartz doses while pIRIR290 blue doses are higher than those from yellow emission and quartz doses...

  12. The analysis of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence: I. Theoretical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithambo, M L

    2007-01-01

    This is the first of two linked papers on the analysis of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence. This paper focusses on a theoretical basis of analytical methods and on methods for interpretation of time-resolved luminescence spectra and calculation of luminescence throughput. Using a comparative analysis of the principal features of time-resolved luminescence and relevant analogues from steady state optical stimulation, formulae for configuring a measurement system for optimum performance are presented. We also examine the possible use of stretched-exponential functions for analysis of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence spectra

  13. Polarization memory of white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in glass host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A S; Tikhomirov, V K; Moshchalkov, V V

    2012-09-10

    A mechanism for white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in oxyfluoride glass host has been revealed by studying a temperature dependence of its polarization memory. The spectral dependence of the polarization memory indicates the presence of a variety of Ag nanoclusters, particularly emitting in the blue, green and red. Temperature activated intercluster energy transfer has been found responsible for white luminescence. The means for increasing luminescence quantum yield have been suggested. This efficient white luminescence may be used in highly demanded devices, such as luminescent lamps, displays, color phosphors for LEDs, photovoltaic devices based on down shifting of solar spectrum.

  14. Device and method for luminescence enhancement by resonant energy transfer from an absorptive thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akselrod, Gleb M.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Tischler, Jonathan R.; Tisdale, William A.; Walker, Brian J.

    2017-12-12

    Disclosed are a device and a method for the design and fabrication of the device for enhancing the brightness of luminescent molecules, nanostructures, and thin films. The device includes a mirror, a dielectric medium or spacer, an absorptive layer, and a luminescent layer. The absorptive layer is a continuous thin film of a strongly absorbing organic or inorganic material. The luminescent layer may be a continuous luminescent thin film or an arrangement of isolated luminescent species, e.g., organic or metal-organic dye molecules, semiconductor quantum dots, or other semiconductor nanostructures, supported on top of the absorptive layer.

  15. Influence of sample oxidation on the nature of optical luminescence from porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulthard, I.; Antel, W. J. Jr.; Freeland, J. W.; Sham, T. K.; Naftel, S. J.; Zhang, P.

    2000-01-01

    Site-selective luminescence experiments were performed upon porous-silicon samples exposed to varying degrees of oxidation. The source of different luminescence bands was determined to be due to either quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon or defective silicon oxide. Of particular interest is the defective silicon-oxide luminescence band found at 2.1 eV, which was found to frequently overlap with a luminescence band from nanocrystalline silicon. Some of the historical confusion and debate with regards to the source of luminescence from porous silicon can be attributed to this overlap. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  16. Extinction rates in North American freshwater fishes, 1900-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhead, Noel M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread evidence shows that the modern rates of extinction in many plants and animals exceed background rates in the fossil record. In the present article, I investigate this issue with regard to North American freshwater fishes. From 1898 to 2006, 57 taxa became extinct, and three distinct populations were extirpated from the continent. Since 1989, the numbers of extinct North American fishes have increased by 25%. From the end of the nineteenth century to the present, modern extinctions varied by decade but significantly increased after 1950 (post-1950s mean = 7.5 extinct taxa per decade). In the twentieth century, freshwater fishes had the highest extinction rate worldwide among vertebrates. The modern extinction rate for North American freshwater fishes is conservatively estimated to be 877 times greater than the background extinction rate for freshwater fishes (one extinction every 3 million years). Reasonable estimates project that future increases in extinctions will range from 53 to 86 species by 2050.

  17. Information to help reduce environmental impacts from freshwater oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, D.E.; Steen, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    The American Petroleum Institute (API) has been working since 1990 to provide information to help the response community minimize the impact of spills to pared jointly with the US inland freshwater. Projects have included a manual, pre National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to give guidance on the cleanup techniques that will minimize environmental impacts on spills in freshwater habitats. Nearing completion are a literature review and annotated bibliography of the environmental and human health effects of oil spilled in freshwater habitats. The use of chemical treating agents for freshwater spill applications is being studied with input from other industry and government groups. A project has begun, with funding from API, the Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research and Development Program, NOAA, the Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC), and the US Department of Energy, to evaluate in situ burning of oil spilled in marshes

  18. A NEW FRESHWATER GOBY (TELEOSTEI: GOBIIDAE) FROM THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    497. JUDB, R. A. 1967. Freshwater fishes of southern Africa. Cape Town: Balkema. KOUMANS, F. P. 1931. A preliminary revision of the genera of the gobioidfishes with united ventral fins. N. V. Lisse. (Netherlands) 1-174: Drukkerij, Imperator. R.

  19. The freshwater biodegradation potential of nine Alaskan oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blenkinsopp, S.; Segy, G.

    1997-01-01

    Nine Alaskan representative crude oils and oil products with freshwater spill potential were collected, aged, and incubated in the presence of the standard freshwater inoculum for 28 days at 10 degrees C. Detailed analytical chemistry was performed on all samples to quantify compositional changes. All of the samples tested exhibited measurable hydrocarbon loss as a result of incubation with the freshwater inoculum. Total saturate and total n-alkane biodegradation were greatly enhanced when nutrients were present. The oil products Jet B Fuel and Diesel No. 2 appear to be more biodegradable than the Alaska North Slope and Cook Inlet crude oils tested, while the Bunker C/Diesel mixture appears to be less biodegradable than these crude oils. These results suggest that the screening procedures described here can provide useful information when applying bioremediation technology to the cleanup of selected oiled freshwater environments. 10 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs

  20. Epigean freshwater Gammaridae (Crustacea, Amphipoda) from La Gomera (Canary Islands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, Gabriele; Stock, Jan H.

    1994-01-01

    Description of two new species of freshwater amphipods from La Gomera (Canary Islands), both found in the higher parts of the island: Chaetogammarus chaetocerus n. sp. and Rhipidogammarus gomeranus n. sp. Both species have distinct Afro- Iberian relationships.

  1. Freshwater conservation planning in South Africa: Milestones to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... freshwaters, implemented through a water resource classifica- tion system ... piled for each of South Africa's 19 Water Management Areas, which are ..... et al., 2011) and integrated water and land-use prioritisation. (Nel et al.

  2. New and interesting records of freshwater Verrucaria in Central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Krzewicka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Verrucaria madida is reported as new to Poland. Three other associated species, V. aquatilis, V. hydrela and V. rheitrophila, are compared. The known distribution in Poland and the ecology of these freshwater species are presented.

  3. Conservation status and distribution of freshwater fishes in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous fishes include 43 species of the Zambezian faunal group (70% of the ... andrewi, Pseudobarbus afer) all of which are classified as Endangered. ... support only half of the freshwater fish species occurring in all national parks.

  4. Bibliography on cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRiviere, M.G.; Scott, A.J.; Woodfield, W.G.; Cushing, C.E.

    1978-07-01

    This bibliography is a listing of pertinent literature directly addressing the cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems. Data on cycling, including the influences of environmental mediators, are included. 151 references

  5. The effects of carbamate pesticide on fish in freshwater ecosystems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of carbamate pesticide on fish in freshwater ecosystems: A review. ... organisms associated with uncontrolled use of pesticides in agriculture and other ... 85R and used in controlling soil insects and many insect pests of cash crops.

  6. In Silico characterization of growth hormone from freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dimensional (3D) structure prediction and evolutionary profile of growth hormone (GH) from 14 ornamental freshwater fishes. The analyses were performed using the sequence data of growth hormone gene (gh) and its encoded GH protein.

  7. Restricted-range fishes and the conservation of Brazilian freshwaters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Nogueira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Freshwaters are the most threatened ecosystems on earth. Although recent assessments provide data on global priority regions for freshwater conservation, local scale priorities remain unknown. Refining the scale of global biodiversity assessments (both at terrestrial and freshwater realms and translating these into conservation priorities on the ground remains a major challenge to biodiversity science, and depends directly on species occurrence data of high taxonomic and geographic resolution. Brazil harbors the richest freshwater ichthyofauna in the world, but knowledge on endemic areas and conservation in Brazilian rivers is still scarce. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data on environmental threats and revised species distribution data we detect and delineate 540 small watershed areas harboring 819 restricted-range fishes in Brazil. Many of these areas are already highly threatened, as 159 (29% watersheds have lost more than 70% of their original vegetation cover, and only 141 (26% show significant overlap with formally protected areas or indigenous lands. We detected 220 (40% critical watersheds overlapping hydroelectric dams or showing both poor formal protection and widespread habitat loss; these sites harbor 344 endemic fish species that may face extinction if no conservation action is in place in the near future. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the first analysis of site-scale conservation priorities in the richest freshwater ecosystems of the globe. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that freshwater biodiversity has been neglected in former conservation assessments. The study provides a simple and straightforward method for detecting freshwater priority areas based on endemism and threat, and represents a starting point for integrating freshwater and terrestrial conservation in representative and biogeographically consistent site-scale conservation strategies, that may be scaled-up following naturally linked

  8. Standard methods for sampling freshwater fishes: opportunities for international collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Bonar, Scott A.; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Hubert, Wayne A.; Beard, T. Douglas; Dave, Göran; Kubečka, Jan; Graeb, Brian D.S.; Lester, Nigel P.; Porath, Mark; Winfield, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    With publication of Standard Methods for Sampling North American Freshwater Fishes in 2009, the American Fisheries Society (AFS) recommended standard procedures for North America. To explore interest in standardizing at intercontinental scales, a symposium attended by international specialists in freshwater fish sampling was convened at the 145th Annual AFS Meeting in Portland, Oregon, in August 2015. Participants represented all continents except Australia and Antarctica and were employed by...

  9. Genetic calibration of species diversity among North America's freshwater fishes

    OpenAIRE

    April, Julien; Mayden, Richard L.; Hanner, Robert H.; Bernatchez, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are being heavily exploited and degraded by human activities all over the world, including in North America, where fishes and fisheries are strongly affected. Despite centuries of taxonomic inquiry, problems inherent to species identification continue to hamper the conservation of North American freshwater fishes. Indeed, nearly 10% of species diversity is thought to remain undescribed. To provide an independent calibration of taxonomic uncertainty and to establish a mor...

  10. Restricted-range fishes and the conservation of Brazilian freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Cristiano; Buckup, Paulo A; Menezes, Naercio A; Oyakawa, Osvaldo T; Kasecker, Thais P; Ramos Neto, Mario B; da Silva, José Maria C

    2010-06-30

    Freshwaters are the most threatened ecosystems on earth. Although recent assessments provide data on global priority regions for freshwater conservation, local scale priorities remain unknown. Refining the scale of global biodiversity assessments (both at terrestrial and freshwater realms) and translating these into conservation priorities on the ground remains a major challenge to biodiversity science, and depends directly on species occurrence data of high taxonomic and geographic resolution. Brazil harbors the richest freshwater ichthyofauna in the world, but knowledge on endemic areas and conservation in Brazilian rivers is still scarce. Using data on environmental threats and revised species distribution data we detect and delineate 540 small watershed areas harboring 819 restricted-range fishes in Brazil. Many of these areas are already highly threatened, as 159 (29%) watersheds have lost more than 70% of their original vegetation cover, and only 141 (26%) show significant overlap with formally protected areas or indigenous lands. We detected 220 (40%) critical watersheds overlapping hydroelectric dams or showing both poor formal protection and widespread habitat loss; these sites harbor 344 endemic fish species that may face extinction if no conservation action is in place in the near future. We provide the first analysis of site-scale conservation priorities in the richest freshwater ecosystems of the globe. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that freshwater biodiversity has been neglected in former conservation assessments. The study provides a simple and straightforward method for detecting freshwater priority areas based on endemism and threat, and represents a starting point for integrating freshwater and terrestrial conservation in representative and biogeographically consistent site-scale conservation strategies, that may be scaled-up following naturally linked drainage systems. Proper management (e. g. forestry code enforcement, landscape

  11. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P; Lewis, Jason S; Grimm, Jan

    2010-07-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters (18)F, (64)Cu, (89)Zr, and (124)I; beta-emitter (131)I; and alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (89)Zr-desferrioxamine B [DFO]-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-, beta-, and alpha-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of (89)Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  12. Bacteria and fluorescent organic matter: processing and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, B. G.; Thorn, R. M. S.; Reynolds, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    There is a need for a greater understanding of the importance of aquatic organic matter (OM) within global biogeochemical cycling. This need has prompted characterisation of OM using fluorescence spectroscopy. The origin, transformation and fate of fluorescent organic matter (FOM) is not fully understood within freshwater systems. This work demonstrates the importance of microbial processing in the creation and transformation of FOM, highlighting the dynamics of microbial-FOM interactions, using a model system. The FOM signature of different bacterial species common to surface freshwaters were analysed using a non-fluorescent media; Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. By undertaking bacterial growth curves, alongside fluorescence spectroscopy, we have been able to determine FOM development in relation to population growth. Within this, we have identified that FOM peaks are associated with different species and driven by bacterial processes, such as cell multiplication or as metabolic by-products. The intracellular and extracellular fluorescence signature of each species has also been analysed to better understand how the microbial community structure may impact the FOM signal in aquatic systems. For example, Peak T develops within the growth curves of all the cultured species and has been identified as both intracellular and extracellular FOM. Whilst Peak T has been termed `microbially-derived' previously, other fluorescence peaks associated with terrestrial high molecular weight compounds, e.g. Peak C, have also been shown to be produced by bacteria throughout growth stages. Additionally, the notion that cell lysis is responsible for the presence of larger FOM compounds was also explored. Our work highlights the capacity of bacteria to not only utilise and process OM but to actively be a source of both labile and recalcitrant OM in situ. The bacteria fluorescence signatures seen are complex with comparable fluorescence peaks to those

  13. Metagenomic analysis reveals symbiotic relationship among bacteria in Microcystis-dominated community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meili eXie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis bloom, a cyanobacterial mass occurrence often found in eutrophicated water bodies, is one of the most serious threats to freshwater ecosystems worldwide. In nature, Microcystis forms aggregates or colonies that contain heterotrophic bacteria. The Microcystis-bacteria colonies were persistent even when they were maintained in lab culture for a long period. The relationship between Microcystis and the associated bacteria was investigated by a metagenomic approach in this study. We developed a visualization-guided method of binning for genome assembly after total colony DNA sequencing. We found that the method was effective in grouping sequences and it did not require reference genome sequence. Individual genomes of the colony bacteria were obtained and they provided valuable insights into microbial community structures. Analysis of metabolic pathways based on these genomes revealed that while all heterotrophic bacteria were dependent upon Microcystis for carbon and energy, Vitamin B12 biosynthesis, which is required for growth by Microcystis, was accomplished in a cooperative fashion among the bacteria. Our analysis also suggests that individual bacteria in the colony community contributed a complete pathway for degradation of benzoate, which is inhibitory to the cyanobacterial growth, and its ecological implication for Microcystis bloom is discussed.

  14. Electromagnetic methods for mapping freshwater lenses on Micronesian atoll islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    The overall shape of freshwater lenses can be determined by applying electromagnetic methods and inverse layered-earth modeling to the mapping of atoll island freshwater lenses. Conductivity profiles were run across the width of the inhabited islands at Mwoakilloa, Pingelap, and Sapwuahfik atolls of the Pohnpei State, Federated States of Micronesia using a dual-loop, frequency-domain, electromagnetic profiling system. Six values of apparent conductivity were recorded at each sounding station and were used to interpret layer conductivities and/or thicknesses. A three-layer model that includes the unsaturated, freshwater, and saltwater zones was used to simulate apparent-conductivity data measured in the field. Interpreted results were compared with chloride-concentration data from monitoring wells and indicate that the interface between freshwater and saltwater layers, defined from electromagnetic data, is located in the upper part of the transition zone, where the chloride-concentration profile shows a rapid increase with depth. The electromagnetic method can be used to interpret the thickness of the freshwater between monitoring wells, but can not be used to interpret the thickness of freshwater from monitoring wells to the margin of an island. ?? 1992.

  15. Stormwater runoff drives viral community composition changes in inland freshwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kurt E.; Harris, Jamie V.; Green, Jasmin C.; Rahman, Faraz; Chambers, Randolph M.

    2014-01-01

    Storm events impact freshwater microbial communities by transporting terrestrial viruses and other microbes to freshwater systems, and by potentially resuspending microbes from bottom sediments. The magnitude of these impacts on freshwater ecosystems is unknown and largely unexplored. Field studies carried out at two discrete sites in coastal Virginia (USA) were used to characterize the viral load carried by runoff and to test the hypothesis that terrestrial viruses introduced through stormwater runoff change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Field data gathered from an agricultural watershed indicated that primary runoff can contain viral densities approximating those of receiving waters. Furthermore, viruses attached to suspended colloids made up a large fraction of the total load, particularly in early stages of the storm. At a second field site (stormwater retention pond), RAPD-PCR profiling showed that the viral community of the pond changed dramatically over the course of two intense storms while relatively little change was observed over similar time scales in the absence of disturbance. Comparisons of planktonic and particle-associated viral communities revealed two completely distinct communities, suggesting that particle-associated viruses represent a potentially large and overlooked portion of aquatic viral abundance and diversity. Our findings show that stormwater runoff can quickly change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Based on these findings, increased storms in the coastal mid-Atlantic region predicted by most climate change models will likely have important impacts on the structure and function of local freshwater microbial communities. PMID:24672520

  16. BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF SKIN SECRETIONS IN THE PERCIDAE FAMILY OF FISH WITH REGARD TO ERYSIPELOTHRIX RHUSIOPATHIAE BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Нulaі

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the effect of skin secretions in Percidae family of fish (Sander lucioperca, Perca fluviatilis on the cultures of pathogenic E. rhusiopathiae bacteria. Methodology. Filter paper was placed on the skin of live fish; after 1 minute it was removed, and the extraction of water-soluble components in the rate of 0.1 cm3 of water per 1 cm2 area of the paper was carried out. The resulting solutions of the secretions of fish skin glands were sterilized by vacuum filtration through the filters with a pore diameter The test samples contained E. rhusiopathiae cultures and fish skin secretions in 1:10, 1:100, 1:1000 and 1:10000 dilutions. The control samples contained a similar ratio of sterile water and cultures of the experimental bacteria type. The content of E. rhusiopathiae cells in the experimental and control samples was determined after 48 hours, the samples were stored at a temperature of +18... +20 °C. Findings. The presence of water-soluble extracts of skin secretions obtained from Percidae family of freshwater fish in the environment causes an increase in the density of E. rhusiopathiae bacteria cultures. The degree of the detected stimulating effect of E. rhusiopathiae directly depend on the concentration of the secretions of fish skin glands in the experimental samples. Under the conditions of freshwater ecosystems, such fish as S. lucioperca and P. fluviatilis and E. rhusiopathiae bacteria may form biocenotical relations of the trophic, topical and phoric types. Originality. The quantitative data proving the biological activity of skin secretions in Percidae family of fish with regard to E. rhusiopathiae pathogenic bacteria have been obtained for the first time. Practical Value. One of the factors contributing to E. rhusiopathiae bacteria staying in freshwater conditions for a long time can be their biocenotical relations with the components of freshwater biocenoses, including such fish as S. lucioperca and P

  17. Organic environmental poisons in Norwegian freshwater fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    According to this article, the level of organic poisons in Norwegian freshwater fish is, on the whole, is too small to threaten human health. It has been found, however, that liver from some species such as burbot, from some lakes, should not be eaten. These lakes are found to contain higher levels of PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) and DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Previously, pregnant or breast-feeding women anywhere in Norway have been advised not to eat pike, large perch or large trout because of too much mercury. Other people should not eat these species more often than once per month. In general, the level of organic environmental poisons is higher in the southern part of the country than in the northern part. The sediments of the lakes in large parts of South Norway are contaminated with lead, mercury and cadmium as compared with the conditions before the industrial revolution. However, the level of metals in the lake sediments are relatively low, and these substances are unlikely to appear in the food chain, by and large. The anthropogenic emission of lead was insignificant before the industrial revolution. The exception of lead from German mining industry in the 1700s

  18. Microplastic Effect Thresholds for Freshwater Benthic Macroinvertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Now that microplastics have been detected in lakes, rivers, and estuaries all over the globe, evaluating their effects on biota has become an urgent research priority. This is the first study that aims at determining the effect thresholds for a battery of six freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates with different species traits, using a wide range of microplastic concentrations. Standardized 28 days single species bioassays were performed under environmentally relevant exposure conditions using polystyrene microplastics (20–500 μm) mixed with sediment at concentrations ranging from 0 to 40% sediment dry weight (dw). Microplastics caused no effects on the survival of Gammarus pulex, Hyalella azteca, Asellus aquaticus, Sphaerium corneum, and Tubifex spp. and no effects were found on the reproduction of Lumbriculus variegatus. No significant differences in growth were found for H. azteca, A. aquaticus, S. corneum, L. variegatus, and Tubifex spp. However, G. pulex showed a significant reduction in growth (EC10 = 1.07% sediment dw) and microplastic uptake was proportional with microplastic concentrations in sediment. These results indicate that although the risks of environmentally realistic concentrations of microplastics may be low, they still may affect the biodiversity and the functioning of aquatic communities which after all also depend on the sensitive species. PMID:29337537

  19. Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in freshwaters of Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Bonilla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial blooms are a worldwide environmental problem. This phenomenon is typically associated with eutrophication (nutrient enrichment and changes in hydrology. In this study we analysed the distribution of planktonic cyanobacteria in Uruguay and their toxins (microcystin, saxitoxin and cylindrospermopsin, working with an interagency team (OSE, DINAMA, IM, University of the Republic and IIBCE. An historical data base (n = 3061 for 64 ecosystems, years 1980-2014 was generated. Differences between lotic and lentic ecosystems were found in terms of chlorophyll a and nutrient concentrations, usually indicating eutrophication. Two geo-referenced maps for the country were generated with cyanobacteria biomass indicators and the most relevant toxin (microcystin, according to risk levels suggested by the World Health Organization for recreational waters. The areas of greatest risk of exposure were the reservoirs of large rivers (Uruguay and Río Negro and Río de la Plata beaches. In the second part of the study, up to 20 mg L-1of microcystin was quantified in bloom (scum samples, as well as the presence of genes that suggest more microcystin varieties, potentially with greater toxicity. This study provides basic information about the distribution of cyanobacteria in Uruguayan freshwaters that will be useful for national monitoring programs and scientific research.

  20. The International Editorship of Freshwater Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl E. Havens

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It is my pleasure to announce that two distinguished internationalscientists have joined the editorship of the FreshwaterSystems domain of TheScientificWorldJOURNAL — Professor BrijGopal of Jawaharlal Nehru University (India and Dr. Manual Gra柠of the Universityof Coimbra (Portugal. Professor Gopal is the Secretary General of the NationalInstitute of Ecology, Editor of the InternationalJournal of Ecology & Environmental Science,and Chairman of the SIL (International Association of Theoretical and AppliedLimnology Committee on Limnology in Developing Countries. His research interestsinclude the ecology, biogeochemistry and biodiversity of wetland ecosystems,the management of wetlands as an integral part of the watershed, and wetlandwater policy–related issues. Dr. Gra柠is a stream ecologist whose researchinterests include the two general areas of organic matter decomposition andbiological monitoring. His specific areas of research focus include quantificationof organic matter and other chemical changes in decomposing leaves, the ecologyof aquatic hyphomycetes, and the ecology of animals feeding on detritus. Hisresearch dealing with biological monitoring is carried out in close cooperationwith the paper and mining industries, facilitating the practical applicationof his work.

  1. Bioaccumulation factors for radionuclides in freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderploeg, H.A.; Parzyck, D.C.; Wilcox, W.H.; Kercher, J.R.; Kaye, S.V.

    1975-11-01

    This report analyzes over 200 carefully selected papers to provide concise data sets and methodology for estimation of bioaccumulation factors for tritium and isotopes of strontium, cesium, iodine, manganese, and cobalt in major biotic components of freshwater environments. Bioaccumulation factors of different tissues are distinguished where significant differences occur. Since conditions in the laboratory are often unnatural in terms of chemical and ecological relationships, this review was restricted as far as possible to bioaccumulation factors determined for natural systems. Because bioaccumulation factors were not available for some shorter-lived radionuclides, a methodology for converting bioaccumulation factors of stable isotopes to those of shorter-lived radionuclides was derived and utilized. The bioaccumulation factor for a radionuclide in a given organism or tissue may exhibit wide variations among bodies of water that are related to differences in ambient concentrations of stable-element and carrier-element analogues. To account for these variations, simple models are presented that relate bioaccumulation factors to stable-element and carrier-element concentrations in water. The effects of physicochemical form and other factors in causing deviations from these models are discussed. Bioaccumulation factor data are examined in the context of these models, and bioaccumulation factor relations for the selected radionuclides are presented

  2. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism in freshwater phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeger, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Photosynthetic carbon metabolism of natural assemblages of freshwater phytoplankton was measured by following the flow of inorganic 14 C into the photosynthetic end products polysaccharide protein, lipid, and soluble metabolites. Data were collected from a wide range of physical, chemical, and trophic conditions in six southern United States reservoirs, with the primary environmental variables of interest being light intensity and nutrient supply. Polysaccharide and protein were consistently the primary products of photosynthetic carbon metabolism, comprising an average of 70% of the total carbon fixation over a wide range of light intensities. Polysaccharide was quantitatively more important at higher light intensities, and protein at lower light intensities, as light intensity varied both with depth within the water column and over diurnal cycles. Polysaccharide synthesis was more variable over the diurnal period than was protein synthesis. Phytoplankton in the downlake epilimnion of Normandy Lake, a central Tennessee reservoir, responded to summer nitrogen (N) deficiency by increasing relative rates of lipid synthesis from 10-15% to 20-25% of the total photosynthetic carbon fixation. Phytoplankton in more nitrogen-sufficient areas of the reservoir maintained lower rates of lipid synthesis throughout the summer. These results document the occurrence in nature of a relationship between N-deficiency and increased lipid synthesis previously observed only in laboratory algal culture studies

  3. Title: Freshwater phytoplankton responses to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Fanesi, Andrea; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-09-20

    Global warming alters species composition and function of freshwater ecosystems. However, the impact of temperature on primary productivity is not sufficiently understood and water quality models need to be improved in order to assess the quantitative and qualitative changes of aquatic communities. On the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that the commonly used photosynthetic and water chemistry parameters alone are not sufficient for modeling phytoplankton growth under changing temperature regimes. We present some new aspects of the acclimation process with respect to temperature and how contrasting responses may be explained by a more complete physiological knowledge of the energy flow from photons to new biomass. We further suggest including additional bio-markers/traits for algal growth such as carbon allocation patterns to increase the explanatory power of such models. Although carbon allocation patterns are promising and functional cellular traits for growth prediction under different nutrient and light conditions, their predictive power still waits to be tested with respect to temperature. A great challenge for the near future will be the prediction of primary production efficiencies under the global change scenario using a uniform model for phytoplankton assemblages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon [Pinole, CA; Schlamp, Michael C [Plainsboro, NJ; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  5. Organic wavelength selective mirrors for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbunt, P.P.C.; Debije, M.G.; Broer, D.J.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Boer, de D.K.G.; Wehrspohn, R.; Gombert, A.

    2012-01-01

    Organic polymeric chiral nematic liquid crystalline (cholesteric) wavelength selective mirrors can increase the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) when they are illuminated with direct sunlight normal to the device. However, due to the angular dependence of the reflection band, at

  6. Tm2+ luminescent materials for solar radiation conversion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kolk, E.

    2015-01-01

    A solar radiation conversion device is described that comprises a luminescent Tm 2+ inorganic material for converting solar radiation of at least part of the UV and/or visible and/or infra red solar spectrum into infrared solar radiation, preferably said infrared solar radiation having a wavelength

  7. Dosimetry based on thermally and optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agersnap Larsen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Thermally Stimulated Luminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) properties of quartz and α-Al 2 O 3 have been investigated. Anneling-induced OSL and TL sensitivity changes in quartz has been investigated by experiments and modelling. This study does not support a pre-dose effect to account for the observed annealing-induced sensitivity change. The experimental data indicates a more simple mechanism that involves alteration of the concentration of the defect centers. Results from modelling of removal or creation of defect centers comparing well with experimentally obtained data. Thermal quenching of luminescence for the main emission center, the F-center, in α-Al 2 O 3 :C has been investigated by analysing TL curves obtained at different heating rates. The thermal quenching dependence of luminescence is found to follow the classical Mott-Seitz expression. Basic investigations of OSL properties of αAl 2 O 3 :C, including: the thermal depth of the OSL traps, the temperature dependence of OSL, and the OSL stimulation spectra. Simultaneous measurements of TL and thermally stimulated conductivity (TSC) are presented for γ-irradiated αAl 2 O 3 :C. Activation energy analysis of the data reveals a superposition of several first-order TL and TSC peaks caused by release of charge carriers from a distribution of trapping states. Furthermore a description of an experimental method developed to determine the sign of the thermally released charge carriers has been presented. (au)

  8. Pukaki 1-01 : initial luminescence dating and radiometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2001-01-01

    Core from Pukaki 1-01 was sampled for luminescence dating and radiometric measurements on 14 March 2001 in the dark room laboratory at Victoria University. Seven samples were taken to get an overview of the crater history, and laboratory work was completed in August 2001. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  10. Cooled optically stimulated luminescence in CaF2:Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.D.; Endres, G.W.R.; McDonald, J.C.; Swinth, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    A new optically stimulated luminescence technique has been developed for the readout of CaF 2 :Mn thermoluminescent material. Minimum detectable gamma exposures may potentially be measured at 10 nC.kg -1 using the 254 nm line of a mercury lamp. Additional studies were done on CaF 2 :Mn using 351 nm excimer laser stimulation. (author)

  11. Leaf Roof – designing luminescent solar concentrating PV roof tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, A.H.M.E.; Doudart de la Grée, G.C.H.; Papadopoulos, A.; Rosemann, A.L.P.; Debije, M.G.; Cox, M.G.D.M.; Krumer, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The Leaf Roof project on the design features of PV roof tiles using Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) technology has resulted in a functional prototype . The results are presented in the context of industrial product design with a focus on the aesthetic aspects of LSCs. This paper outlines the

  12. Patterned dye structures limit reabsorption in luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoi, S.; Broer, D.J.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Debije, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes a method for limiting internal losses of a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) due to reabsorption through patterning the fluorescent dye doped coating of the LSC. By engineering the dye coating into regular line patterns with fill factors ranging from 20 - 80%, the surface

  13. Leaf Roof - Designing Luminescent Solar Concentrating PV Roof Tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; Doudart de la Gree, G.; Papadopoulos, A..; Rosemann, A.; Debije, M.G.; Cox, M.; Krumer, Zachar

    2016-01-01

    The Leaf Roof project on the design features of PV roof tiles using Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) technology [1] has resulted in a functional prototype. The results are presented in the context of industrial product design with a focus on the aesthetic aspects of LSCs [2]. This paper outlines

  14. Principles and applications of the digital luminescent radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doehring, W.; Prokop, M.; Bergh, B.

    1986-01-01

    Digital luminescent radiography is a novel technique for routine diagnostics that allows the establishment of digital projection radiograms. Two goals are pursued: Best possible utilisation of the image data contained in the radiation field, and integration of these data into a digital communication system. (orig.) [de

  15. Luminescence decay in condensed argon under high energy excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.J.; Klein, G.

    1978-01-01

    α and β particles were used to study the luminescence of condensed argon. The scintillation decay has always two components independently of the phase and the kind of the exciting particles. Decay time constants are given for solid, liquid and also gaseous argon. Changes in the relative intensity values of the two components are discussed in terms of track effects

  16. On the luminescence of perovskite type rare earth gallates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianmei, Y.; Qingyuan, W.; Shuzhen, L.; Lianren, S.; Mingyu, C.

    1985-01-01

    It has been reported that perovskite type lanthanum gallates may be a good host material for laser and luminescence, but in the rare earth gallates studied, the numbers of perovskite type are less than that of the garnet type and there is less report on their spectroscopic properties in the literature. In this paper synthesis and spectroscopic properties of these compounds are studied

  17. Luminescence (IRSL) dating of Yeni Rabat church in Artvin, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Şahiner, Eren; Meriç, Niyazi; Uygun, Selda

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence dating is a chronological method that has been used extensively in terrestrial materials. In this study, we present Infrared Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL) dating results obtained for sediment and pottery samples taken from Yeni Rabat Church, Ardanuç, Artvin, Turkey. For this purpose, equivalent dose (ED) and annual dose rate (AD) of samples were measured. For annual dose rate, concentrations of radioactive isotopes (U, Th, K) were determined by using a high-purity germanium detector. For the equivalent dose, polymineral fine grain SAR (Single Aliquot Regenerative Dose) and MAAD (Multiple Aliquot Additive Dose) procedures were used. The optimal preheat temperature was determined for sediment and pottery samples. Ages were calculated by Aitken's luminescence age calculation method, which found 710±190 years for the pottery sample and 1450±370 years, 1390±420 years, 1430±310 years, 2210±520 years and 1640±390 years for different sediment samples, respectively. These estimated age ranges support the theory that Yeni Rabat Church could have been constructed in medieval times. - Highlights: ► The luminescence (IRSL) ages of the samples, taken from in Yeni Rabat church in Artvin-Turkey were found. ► Equivalent doses and annual doses were determined. ► Polymineral fine grain SAR (Single Aliquot Regenerative Dose) and MAAD (Multiple Aliquot Additive Dose) procedures were used

  18. Doping the dots: doped quantum dots for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis methods for luminescent organically capped colloidal ZnSe QDs of different sizes, ranging from 4.0 to 7.5 nm are reported. These QDs are analyzed using TEM, absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence measurements and temperature dependent photoluminescence decay

  19. The effects of Tb 3+ doping concentration on luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BaF2 phosphor; crystal structure; luminescence properties; X-ray diffraction; concentration quenching. 1. Introduction ... reported that the particle size, shape, crystallinity, etc., sig- nificantly ... Figure 3 shows the excitation and emission spectra of sam- ple with 4 ... gies obtained earlier.9,10 The ground term of the Tb3+ ion is.

  20. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry using natural and synthetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1996-01-01

    The application of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) for use in radiation dosimetry is reviewed. A broad description is given of OSL techniques developed at Riso National Laboratory and at Oklahoma State University, and recent collaborative investigations on the properties of a variety...

  1. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstey, Mitchell R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Fruetel, Julia A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hayden, Carl C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Buckley, Heather L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Arnold, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves "Click" chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  2. Luminescence and energy transfer processes in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, J.P.M. van.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis some studies are presented of the luminescence and energy transfer in compounds containing Eu 3+ , Pr 3+ and Gd 3+ ions. Ch. 2 deals with the energy migration in the system Gd 1 - xEu x(IO 3) 3. In ch 3 the luminescence properties of the Pr 3+ ion in the system La 1 - xPr xMgAl 1 10 1 9 are reported. Ch. 4 discusses the luminescence properties of alkali europium double tungstates and molybdates AEuW 20 8 and AEuMo 20 * (A + = alkali metal atom). The luminiscence and energy migration characteristics of the isostructural system LiGd 1 - xEu xF 4 and Gd 1 - xEu xNbO 4 are reported in ch. 5. In ch. 6 the mechanism of energy migration in (La,Gd)AlO 3 and (Gd,Eu)AlO 3 is discussed. Ch. 7 deals with the system Na 5(Gd,Eu) (WO 4) 4. In ch. 8 the luminescence and energy transfer properties of two europium tellurite anti-glass phases are reported. The two phases are Eu 1 . 7 9TeO x, which has a pseudotetragonal structure, and Eu 1 . 0 6TeO x, which has a monoclinic, ordered structure. (author). 201 refs.; 39 figs.; 8 tabs

  3. Tuning luminescence intensity of RHO6G dye using silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Wang and Kerker (1982) found that due to interaction of metal and dye in core shell particles splitting of extinction bands occurs. En- hancement also has been reported due to such interaction. Quenching of the luminescence of dye molecules ad- sorbed on a smooth Ag surface was observed by Ritchie and Burstein (1981).

  4. A luminescence lifetime assisted ratiometric fluorimeter for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hung; Kostov, Yordan; Rao, Govind; Tolosa, Leah

    2009-12-01

    In general, the most difficult task in developing devices for fluorescence ratiometric sensing is the isolation of signals from overlapping emission wavelengths. Wavelength discrimination can be achieved by using monochromators or bandpass filters, which often lead to decreased signal intensities. The result is a device that is both complex and expensive. Here we present an alternative system—a low-cost standalone optical fluorimeter based on luminescence lifetime assisted ratiometric sensing (LARS). This paper describes the principle of this technique and the overall design of the sensor device. The most significant innovation of LARS is the ability to discriminate between two overlapping luminescence signals based on differences in their luminescence decay rates. Thus, minimal filtering is required and the two signals can be isolated despite significant overlap of luminescence spectra. The result is a device that is both simple and inexpensive. The electronic circuit employs the lock-in amplification technique for the signal processing and the system is controlled by an onboard microcontroller. In addition, the system is designed to communicate with external devices via Bluetooth.

  5. Systematic development of new thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihara, E.G., E-mail: eduardo.yukihara@okstate.edu [Physics Department, 145 Physical Sciences II, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Milliken, E.D.; Oliveira, L.C. [Physics Department, 145 Physical Sciences II, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Orante-Barron, V.R. [Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000, Mexico (Mexico); Jacobsohn, L.G. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Blair, M.W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    This paper presents an overview of a systematic study to develop new thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) materials using solution combustion synthesis (SCS) for applications such as personal OSL dosimetry, 2D dose mapping, and temperature sensing. A discussion on the material requirements for these applications is included. We present X-ray diffraction (XRD) data on single phase materials obtained with SCS, as well as radioluminescence (RL), TL and OSL data of lanthanide-doped materials. The results demonstrate the possibility of producing TL and OSL materials with sensitivity similar to or approaching those of commercial TL and OSL materials used in dosimetry (e.g., LiF:Mg,Ti and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) using SCS. The results also show that the luminescence properties can be improved by Li co-doping and annealing. The presence of an atypical TL background and anomalous fading are discussed and deserve attention in future investigations. We hope that these preliminary results on the use of SCS for production of TL and OSL materials are helpful to guide future efforts towards the development of new luminescence materials for different applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TL and OSL material produced with sensitivity similar to commercial materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence properties improved by Li co-doping and annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of atypical TL background and anomalous fading observed.

  6. Blue and green luminescence of reduced graphene oxide quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Henych, Jiří; Lang, Kamil; Kormunda, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 63, november (2013), s. 537-546 ISSN 0008-6223 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : different solvents * graphene oxides * green luminescence * intensive cavitations * N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.160, year: 2013

  7. Time-resolved luminescence from feldspars: New insight into fading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Denby, P.M.; Murray, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared optically stimulated luminescence (IR-OSL) signals of K- and Na-feldspar samples extracted from sediments were measured in UV, blue and red detection windows, using a fast photon counter and pulsed IR stimulation (lambda = 875 nm). We observe that the relative contribution ...

  8. Luminescence performance of Eu -doped lead-free zinc phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    luminescence properties in combination with its non-toxicity and non-hygroscopic nature ..... two colours will appear to the human eye as one colour and. Figure 10. ... [4] Mariappam C R, Govindaraj G, Rathan S V and Vijaya. Prakash G 2005 ...

  9. Luminescence of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn2+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, J.F.; Wuister, S.F.; Kelly, J.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2000-01-01

    The luminescence properties of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn^(2+) prepared via an inorganic chemical synthesis are described. Photoluminescence spectra show distinct ZnSe and Mn^(2+) related emissions, both of which are excited via the ZnSe host lattice. The Mn^(2+) emission wavelength and the

  10. Development of scintillation and luminescent detectors at BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Research and development work carried out at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, in the field of radiation detectors for various applications, particularly in the area of scintillation and luminescent detectors is reviewed. The review is presented in the form of 7 articles. (author). figs

  11. Application of Quantum Dot nanocrystal in Luminescent solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoda, Shokoufeh; Khalaji Assadi, Morteza; Ahmadi Kandjani, Sohrab; Kayiem, Hussain H. Al; Hussain Bhat, Aamir

    2018-03-01

    The basic design of luminescent solar concentrator is a transparent plate doped with an appropriate luminescent material (organic dyes, quantum dots), which is able to absorb sunlight (direct and diffuse), and then guides photons produced by photoluminescence to its narrow edges where they are converted by photovoltaic cells. Unfortunately, LSCs have suffered from numerous efficiency losses. Therefore, new luminescent species and novel approaches are needed for its practical application. This paper deals with investigation of nonhazardous, environmental friendly luminescent species include CuInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs. The CuInS2/ZnS QDs possess advantages of Stocks shift as large as more than 130 nm and high photoluminescence quantum yield of 80%. The paper presents the effect of large stock shift CuInS2/ZnS QDs on reducing the reabsorption losses in LSC by using experimental investigation. The LSC sheets were fabricated by dispersing CuInS2/ZnS QDs particles in a polymethylmethacrylate waveguide. A series of LSCs (dimension 4.0 cm × 3.0 cm × 0.3cm) with different CuInS2/ZnS QDs particles concentration (0.015 and 0.03 wt.%) were fabricated and their optical properties (absorptions/emissions) were characterized. The results show that the CuInS2/ZnS QDs-LSC provides a promising way for the reduction of reabsorption losses in LSCs.

  12. A new design for luminescent solar concentrating PV roof tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doudart de la Gree, G.C.H.; Papadopoulos, A.; Debije, M.G.; Cox, M.G.D.M.; Krumer, Z.; Reinders, A.H.M.E.; Rosemann, A.L.P.

    2015-01-01

    In our paper we explore the opportunity of combining luminescent solar concentrating (LSC) materials and crystalline PV solar cells in a new design for a roof tile by design-driven research on the energy performance of various configurations of the LSC PV device and on the aesthetic appeal in a roof

  13. Synthesis and luminescence in sol–gel auto-combustion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-11-14

    Nov 14, 2017 ... Eu-doped CaSnO3 showed broad blue emission centred about 434 nm, a ... symmetry [5]. Recently, luminescence properties of rare-earth-cation- ... able attention due to their abundant emission colours based on their 4f–4f or ...

  14. Structural, luminescence and biological studies of trivalent lanthanide complexes with N,N Prime -bis(2-hydroxynaphthylmethylidene)-1,3-propanediamine Schiff base ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, Ziyad A., E-mail: tahaz33@just.edu.jo [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Ajlouni, Abdulaziz M. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan); Al Momani, Waleed [Department of Allied Medical Sciences, Al Balqa Applied University (Jordan)

    2012-11-15

    New eight lanthanide metal complexes were prepared. These complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, spectral analysis ({sup 1}H NMR, FT-IR, UV-vis), luminescence and thermal gravimetric analysis. All Ln(III) complexes were 1:1 electrolytes as established by their molar conductivities. The microanalysis and spectroscopic analysis revealed eight-coordinated environments around lanthanide ions with two nitrate ligands behaving in a bidentate manner. The other four positions were found to be occupied with tetradentate L{sub III} ligand. Tb-L{sub III} and Sm-L{sub III} complexes exhibited characteristic luminescence emissions of the central metal ions and this was attributed to efficient energy transfer from the ligand to the metal center. The L{sub III} and Ln-L{sub III} complexes showed antibacterial activity against a number of pathogenic bacteria. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ln(III) ion adopts an eight-coordinate geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence spectra of Sm-L{sub III} and Tb-L{sub III} complexes display the metal centered line emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer process from L{sub III} to Sm in Sm-L{sub III} complex is more efficient than to Tb in Tb-L{sub III} complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ln(III) complexes may serve as models for biologically important species.

  15. Heavy metals detection using biosensor cells of a novel marine luminescent bacterium Vibrio sp. MM1 isolated from the Caspian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Mojtaba; Abbaszadeh, Jaber; Maghool, Shima-Sadat; Chaichi, Mohammad-Javad

    2018-02-01

    Monitoring and assessing toxic materials which are being released into the environment along with wastewater is a growing concern in many industries. The current research describes a highly sensitive and rapid method for the detection of toxic concentrations of heavy metals in aquatic environments. Water samples were collected from southern coasts of the Caspian Sea followed by screening of luminescent bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis, including gene sequence of 16S rRNA, and biochemical tests were performed for identification of the isolate. Luminescence activity was tested and measured after treatment of the isolate with different concentrations of heavy metals and reported as EC 50 value for each metal. A luminous, gram negative bacterium with the shape of a curved rod was isolated from the Caspian Sea. Biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the isolate MM1 had more than 99% similarity to Vibrio campbellii. The novel isolate is able to emit high levels of light. Bioluminescence inhibitory assay showed that the Vibrio sp. MM1 had the highest sensitivity to zinc and the lowest sensitivity to cadmium; EC 50 values were 0.97mgl -1 and 14.54mgl -1 , respectively. The current research shows that even low concentrations of heavy metals can cause a detectable decline in luminescence activity of the novel bacterium Vibrio sp. MM1; hence, it makes a good choice for commercial kits for the purpose of monitoring toxic materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Remote collection of microorganisms at two depths in a freshwater lake using an unmanned surface vehicle (USV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Powers

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are ubiquitous in freshwater aquatic environments, but little is known about their abundance, diversity, and transport. We designed and deployed a remote-operated water-sampling system onboard an unmanned surface vehicle (USV, a remote-controlled boat to collect and characterize microbes in a freshwater lake in Virginia, USA. The USV collected water samples simultaneously at 5 and 50 cm below the surface of the water at three separate locations over three days in October, 2016. These samples were plated on a non-selective medium (TSA and on a medium selective for the genus Pseudomonas (KBC to estimate concentrations of culturable bacteria in the lake. Mean concentrations ranged from 134 to 407 CFU/mL for microbes cultured on TSA, and from 2 to 8 CFU/mL for microbes cultured on KBC. There was a significant difference in the concentration of microbes cultured on KBC across three sampling locations in the lake (P = 0.027, suggesting an uneven distribution of Pseudomonas across the locations sampled. There was also a significant difference in concentrations of microbes cultured on TSA across the three sampling days (P = 0.038, demonstrating daily fluctuations in concentrations of culturable bacteria. There was no significant difference in concentrations of microbes cultured on TSA (P = 0.707 and KBC (P = 0.641 across the two depths sampled, suggesting microorganisms were well-mixed between 5 and 50 cm below the surface of the water. About 1 percent (7/720 of the colonies recovered across all four sampling missions were ice nucleation active (ice+ at temperatures warmer than −10 °C. Our work extends traditional manned observations of aquatic environments to unmanned systems, and highlights the potential for USVs to understand the distribution and diversity of microbes within and above freshwater aquatic environments.

  17. Luminescence properties of the Sm-doped borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindrat, I.I.; Padlyak, B.V.; Drzewiecki, A.

    2015-01-01

    The optical absorption and photoluminescence (emission and excitation) spectra as well as decay kinetics of a series of the Sm-doped glasses with Li 2 B 4 O 7 , LiKB 4 O 7 , CaB 4 O 7 , and LiCaBO 3 compositions were investigated and analysed. The Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Sm, LiKB 4 O 7 :Sm, CaB 4 O 7 :Sm, and LiCaBO 3 :Sm glasses of high optical quality have been obtained from the corresponding polycrystalline compounds in the air atmosphere, using a standard glass technology. On the basis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical spectra analysis it was shown that the samarium impurity is incorporated into the glass network as Sm 3+ (4f 5 , 6 H 5/2 ) ions, exclusively. All observed 4f – 4f transitions of the Sm 3+ centres in the optical absorption and luminescence spectra of the investigated glasses are identified. Most intense emission band of the Sm 3+ ions peaked about 598 nm ( 4 G 5/2 → 6 H 7/2 transition) is characterised by a single exponential decay with typical lifetime values, which depend on the basic glass composition as well as concentration and local structure of the Sm 3+ luminescence centres. The quantum efficiency has been evaluated for observed transitions of the Sm 3+ centres using obtained experimental lifetimes and radiative lifetimes calculated by Judd–Ofelt theory. The calculated high quantum efficiencies and measured quantum yields of luminescence show that the investigated borate glasses are perspective luminescence materials. Energy transfer from the Ce 3+ non-controlled impurity and intrinsic luminescence centres to the Sm 3+ centres has been observed. Peculiarities of the Sm 3+ local structure in the network of investigated glasses have been discussed based on the obtained spectroscopic results and structural data. - Highlights: • The Sm-doped Li 2 B 4 O 7 , LiKB 4 O 7 , CaB 4 O 7 , and LiCaBO 3 glasses of high quality were obtained. • EPR, optical absorption and luminescence spectra of Sm 3+ ions in obtained glasses were

  18. Thermal dependence of luminescence lifetimes and radioluminescence in quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, V., E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Chithambo, M.L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Chen, R. [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Chruścińska, A. [Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Fasoli, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Li, S.H. [Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Martini, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Ramseyer, K. [Institut für Geologie, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    During time-resolved optical stimulation experiments (TR-OSL), one uses short light pulses to separate the stimulation and emission of luminescence in time. Experimental TR-OSL results show that the luminescence lifetime in quartz of sedimentary origin is independent of annealing temperature below 500 °C, but decreases monotonically thereafter. These results have been interpreted previously empirically on the basis of the existence of two separate luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L} in quartz, each with its own distinct luminescence lifetime. Additional experimental evidence also supports the presence of a non-luminescent hole reservoir R, which plays a critical role in the predose effect in this material. This paper extends a recently published analytical model for thermal quenching in quartz, to include the two luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L}, as well as the hole reservoir R. The new extended model involves localized electronic transitions between energy states within the two luminescence centers, and is described by a system of differential equations based on the Mott–Seitz mechanism of thermal quenching. It is shown that by using simplifying physical assumptions, one can obtain analytical solutions for the intensity of the light during a TR-OSL experiment carried out with previously annealed samples. These analytical expressions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical solutions of the equations. The results from the model are shown to be in quantitative agreement with published experimental data for commercially available quartz samples. Specifically the model describes the variation of the luminescence lifetimes with (a) annealing temperatures between room temperature and 900 °C, and (b) with stimulation temperatures between 20 and 200 °C. This paper also reports new radioluminescence (RL) measurements carried out using the same commercially available quartz samples. Gaussian deconvolution of the RL emission spectra was

  19. Luminescence detection of phase transitions in crystals and nanoparticle inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, P. D.; Yang, B.; Wang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Luminescence measurements are extremely sensitive to variations in structural environment and thus have the potential to probe distortions of fluorescence sites. Changes can be monitored via luminescence efficiency, emission spectra or excited state lifetimes and these factors are influenced by the local neighbourhood around the emission site, and therefore by structure, composition, pressure and temperature. A rarely exploited approach for condensed matter has been to use the changes in luminescence responses during heating or cooling of a material to provide a rapid survey to detect the presence of phase transitions. One can often differentiate between bulk and surface effects by contrasting results from radioluminescence for bulk responses, and cathodoluminescence or photoluminescence for surface effects. One expects that discontinuous changes in optical parameters occur during temperature changes through phase transitions of insulating materials. In practice, optical signals also exist from surface states of fullerenes and high temperature superconductors etc which identify the presence of structural or superconducting transitions. Numerous examples are cited which match standard documented transitions. Interestingly many examples show the host signals are strongly sensitive to impurity phase transitions from inclusions such as nanoparticles of water, N 2 , O 2 or CO 2 . Recent luminescence data reveal many examples of new transitions, hysteresis and irreversible changes. The signals equally respond to relaxations of a structure and surprisingly indicate that in some materials, such as SrTiO 3 or ZnO, ion implantation of the surface triggers relaxations and phase changes throughout the bulk of the material. Luminescence routes to detect phase transitions are powerful tools but have a tiny literature and so the subject is ideal for rapid exploitation and development. (Author)

  20. Characterization and luminescent properties of thermally annealed olivines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin-Garcia, Maria; Correcher, Virgilio; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Heredia-Barbero, Alejandro; Roman-Lopez, Jesus; Ortega-Gutierrez, Fernando; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Olivine is an iron-magnesium solid solution silicate (Mg,Fe) 2 SiO 4 and it is probably one of the most abundant mineral phase in the Solar System, it is present in the primitive carbonaceous meteorites (i.e Allende), and in ordinary chondritic meteorite, comets or terrestrial planets. The olivine grains in those bodies have been exposed to different radiation sources like UV, electrons, cosmic radiation, etc. Here, we explore the effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on the luminescence emission of the two well-characterised olivine samples from Mexico and Spain by means of cathodoluminescence and thermoluminescence. The analyses by X-ray dispersive energies in the scanning electron microscopy show differences between the samples in the amount of iron and magnesium and also show traces of rare elements. Olivine exhibits spectral cathodoluminescence emissions of low intensity, explained for the quenching of the luminescence of the iron, and sharp signals assigned as impurities. Cathodoluminescence and thermoluminescence glow curves of the natural, and UV induced olivine samples were obtained. Our results show that thermal treatments at 1100 °C change the mineral molecular structure and the luminescence properties of this mineral phase. These results confirm an active participation of physical factors influencing the luminescent properties of olivine. -- Highlights: ► Luminescent properties of two olivines samples (Mexican and Spanish) were explored. ► EDS show different iron and magnesium content and traces of rare elements on both. ► Olivine exhibits spectral CL emissions of low intensity due to the quenching of iron. ► Treatments at 1100 °C change the mineral structure and its response to UV radiation