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Sample records for freshwater bivalve speciation

  1. Uranium uptake by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea: links between speciation, bioavailability and effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, C.; Tran, D.; Simon, O.; Fournier, E.; Denison, D.; Massabuau, J.C.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of ENVIRHOM research programme, dealing with the chronic low-level exposure of ecosystems to radionuclides, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the links between speciation, bioavailability and effects of uranium in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Short-term uptake experiments were performed to link speciation to bioavailability, while evaluating the competitive effect of cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+} and H{sup +}) and the influence of uranium ligands in solution. Longer-term experiments were also performed to gain knowledge on distribution and uptake mechanisms. The effect of uranium on the bivalve behaviour was studied through (1) the valve movement activity, recorded by means of impedance measurements taken with two electrodes stuck on each shell of the bivalve, the measured current varying according to the distance between the electrodes and (2) the ventilation rate, whose measurement is based on the calculation of the volume of water cleared of algae per unit time in a transiently closed system. Effect Concentrations giving a closure response for p percent of the bivalves (ECp), can be calculated from experiments of valve movement activity via a logistic regression model. The main results of these studies will be presented, with a focus on their potential use for operational applications such as monitoring programmes. (author)

  2. Uranium(VI) speciation: modelling, uncertainty and relevance to bioavailability models. Application to uranium uptake by the gills of a freshwater bivalve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denison, F.H.

    2004-07-01

    The effects of varying solution composition on the interactions between uranium(VI) and excised gills of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been investigated in well defined solution media. A significant reduction in the uptake of uranium was observed on increasing the concentrations of the uranium complexing ligands citrate and carbonate. Saturation kinetics as a function of uranium concentration at a pH value of 5.0 were observed, indicating that the uptake of uranium is a facilitated process, probably involving one or several trans-membrane transport systems. A relatively small change in the uptake of uranium was found as a function of pH (factor of ca. 2), despite the extremely large changes to the solution speciation of uranium within the range of pH investigated (5.0 - 7.5). A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to the solution composition domain employed for this study was performed. Estimates of the uncertainties for the formation constants of aqueous uranium(VI) species were integrated into a thermodynamic database. A computer program was written to predict the equilibrium distribution of uranium(VI) in simple aqueous systems, using thermodynamic parameter mean-values. The program was extended to perform Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses, incorporating the thermodynamic database uncertainty estimates, to quantitatively predict the uncertainties inherent in predicting the solution speciation of uranium. The use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of uranium(VI) was investigated. Observed uranium(VI) uptake behaviour was interpreted as a function of the predicted changes to the solution speciation of uranium. Different steady-state or pre-equilibrium approaches to modelling uranium uptake were tested. Alternative modelling approaches were also tested, considering the potential changes to membrane transport system activity or sorption characteristics on

  3. Uranium(VI) speciation: modelling, uncertainty and relevance to bioavailability models. Application to uranium uptake by the gills of a freshwater bivalve; Speciation de l'uranium(6), modelisation, incertitude et implication pour les modeles de biodisponibilite. Application a l'accumulation dans les branchies d'un bivalve d'eau douce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denison, F.H

    2004-07-01

    The effects of varying solution composition on the interactions between uranium(VI) and excised gills of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been investigated in well defined solution media. A significant reduction in the uptake of uranium was observed on increasing the concentrations of the uranium complexing ligands citrate and carbonate. Saturation kinetics as a function of uranium concentration at a pH value of 5.0 were observed, indicating that the uptake of uranium is a facilitated process, probably involving one or several trans-membrane transport systems. A relatively small change in the uptake of uranium was found as a function of pH (factor of ca. 2), despite the extremely large changes to the solution speciation of uranium within the range of pH investigated (5.0 - 7.5). A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to the solution composition domain employed for this study was performed. Estimates of the uncertainties for the formation constants of aqueous uranium(VI) species were integrated into a thermodynamic database. A computer program was written to predict the equilibrium distribution of uranium(VI) in simple aqueous systems, using thermodynamic parameter mean-values. The program was extended to perform Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses, incorporating the thermodynamic database uncertainty estimates, to quantitatively predict the uncertainties inherent in predicting the solution speciation of uranium. The use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of uranium(VI) was investigated. Observed uranium(VI) uptake behaviour was interpreted as a function of the predicted changes to the solution speciation of uranium. Different steady-state or pre-equilibrium approaches to modelling uranium uptake were tested. Alternative modelling approaches were also tested, considering the potential changes to membrane transport system activity or sorption characteristics on

  4. Inter- and intraspecific variation of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in freshwater bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Novais, Adriana; Dias, Ester; Sousa, Ronaldo Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater bivalves provide important ecosystem functions and services, yet many of their ecological traits such as feeding mechanisms and resource use are largely ignored. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential overlap in resource use by bivalve species living in sympatry in European freshwater ecosystems. This was accomplished by analyzing the stable isotope ratios of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) values of six bivalve species (five native species plus th...

  5. Strontium and barium incorporation into freshwater bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liqiang; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite strong vital control, trace elements of bivalve shells can potentially serve as proxies of environmental change. However, to reconstruct past environments with the geochemical properties of the shells and determine the degree to which the element levels are biologically influenced, it is essential to experimentally determine the relationship between environmental variables and the element composition of the shells. In particular, the trace element geochemistry of freshwater bivalve shells has so far received little attention. Here, we present a controlled laboratory experiment that aimed at providing a better understanding of the influence of changing environmental variables on the incorporation of trace elements into freshwater bivalve shells. Under controlled conditions, Asian clams Corbicula fluminea were reared for 5 weeks in three sets of experiments: (1) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different food levels (an equally mixed Scenedesmu quadricanda and Chlorella vulgaris at rations of 0.4, 2, 4, and 8 × 104 cells ml-1 d-1); (2) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different element levels (Sr, Ba); (3) five sediment types (sand, slightly muddy sand, muddy sand, slightly sandy mud and mud). In the first set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca showed a significantly negative correlation with temperature, where Sr/Ca decreased linearly by about 1.6 to 2.1% per 1° C, but responded far more weakly to food availability. On the other hand, temperature and food availability affected shell Ba/Ca ratios, which potentially confounds the interpretation of Ba/Ca variations. Moreover, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca exhibited a clearly negative dependence on shells growth rate that varied significantly among combinations of temperature and food availability. In the second set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca were positively and linearly related to water Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca for all temperatures. However, significantly negative effects of

  6. The earliest post-paleozoic freshwater bivalves preserved in coprolites from the karoo basin, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Adam M; Neumann, Frank H; Hancox, P John

    2012-01-01

    Several clades of bivalve molluscs have invaded freshwaters at various times throughout Phanerozoic history. The most successful freshwater clade in the modern world is the Unionoida. Unionoids arose in the Triassic Period, sometime after the major extinction event at the End-Permian boundary and are now widely distributed across all continents except Antarctica. Until now, no freshwater bivalves of any kind were known to exist in the Early Triassic. Here we report on a faunule of two small freshwater bivalve species preserved in vertebrate coprolites from the Olenekian (Lower Triassic) of the Burgersdorp Formation of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Positive identification of these bivalves is not possible due to the limited material. Nevertheless they do show similarities with Unionoida although they fall below the size range of extant unionoids. Phylogenetic analysis is not possible with such limited material and consequently the assignment remains somewhat speculative. Bivalve molluscs re-invaded freshwaters soon after the End-Permian extinction event, during the earliest part of the recovery phase during the Olenekian Stage of the Early Triassic. If the specimens do represent unionoids then these Early Triassic examples may be an example of the Lilliput effect. Since the oldest incontrovertible freshwater unionoids are also from sub-Saharan Africa, it is possible that this subcontinent hosted the initial freshwater radiation of the Unionoida. This find also demonstrates the importance of coprolites as microenvironments of exceptional preservation that contain fossils of organisms that would otherwise have left no trace.

  7. The earliest post-paleozoic freshwater bivalves preserved in coprolites from the karoo basin, South Africa.

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    Adam M Yates

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clades of bivalve molluscs have invaded freshwaters at various times throughout Phanerozoic history. The most successful freshwater clade in the modern world is the Unionoida. Unionoids arose in the Triassic Period, sometime after the major extinction event at the End-Permian boundary and are now widely distributed across all continents except Antarctica. Until now, no freshwater bivalves of any kind were known to exist in the Early Triassic. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report on a faunule of two small freshwater bivalve species preserved in vertebrate coprolites from the Olenekian (Lower Triassic of the Burgersdorp Formation of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Positive identification of these bivalves is not possible due to the limited material. Nevertheless they do show similarities with Unionoida although they fall below the size range of extant unionoids. Phylogenetic analysis is not possible with such limited material and consequently the assignment remains somewhat speculative. CONCLUSIONS: Bivalve molluscs re-invaded freshwaters soon after the End-Permian extinction event, during the earliest part of the recovery phase during the Olenekian Stage of the Early Triassic. If the specimens do represent unionoids then these Early Triassic examples may be an example of the Lilliput effect. Since the oldest incontrovertible freshwater unionoids are also from sub-Saharan Africa, it is possible that this subcontinent hosted the initial freshwater radiation of the Unionoida. This find also demonstrates the importance of coprolites as microenvironments of exceptional preservation that contain fossils of organisms that would otherwise have left no trace.

  8. Escape Burrowing of Modern Freshwater Bivalves as a Paradigm for Escape Behavior in the Devonian Bivalve Archanodon catskillensis

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    Katja Knoll

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many freshwater bivalves restore themselves to the sediment water interface after burial by upward escape burrowing. We studied the escape burrowing capacity of two modern unionoids, Elliptio complanata and Pyganodon cataracta and the invasive freshwater venerid Corbicula fluminea, in a controlled laboratory setting varying sediment grain size and burial depth. We found that the relatively streamlined E. complanata is a better escape burrower than the more obese P. cataracta. E. complanata is more likely to escape burial in both fine and coarse sand, and at faster rates than P. cataracta. However, successful escape from 10 cm burial, especially in fine sand, is unlikely for both unionoids. The comparatively small and obese C. fluminea outperforms both unionoids in terms of escape probability and escape time, especially when body size is taken into consideration. C. fluminea can escape burial depths many times its own size, while the two unionoids rarely escape from burial equivalent to the length of their shells. E. complanata, and particularly P. cataracta, are morphological paradigms for the extinct Devonian unionoid bivalve Archanodon catskillensis, common in riverine facies of the Devonian Catskill Delta Complex of the eastern United States. Our observations suggest that the escape burrowing capability of A. catskillensis was no better than that of P. cataracta. Archanodon catskillensis was likely unable to escape burial of more than a few centimeters of anastrophically deposited sediment. The long (up to 1 meter, vertical burrows that are associated with A. catskillensis, and interpreted to be its escape burrows, represent a response to episodic, small-scale sedimentation events due to patterns of repetitive hydrologic or weather-related phenomena. They are not a response to a single anastrophic event involving the influx of massive volumes of sediment.

  9. Selenium bioaccumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and subsequent transfer to Corbicula fluminea: role of selenium speciation and bivalve ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Elodie; Adam, Christelle; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2006-10-01

    The uptake of Se by the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the subsequent transfer to the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea was investigated. The objective was to investigate the bioavailability of algal-bound Se for C. fluminea while taking into account Se speciation and bivalve ventilation. First, uptake rates of waterborne Se (selenite, selenate, and selenomethionine) in the algae during a 1-h exposure period were determined for a range of concentrations up to 2,000 microg/L. Fluxes for selenite uptake were constant in the range of concentrations tested, whereas fluxes for selenate and selenomethionine uptake decreased with increasing concentrations, suggesting a saturated transport system at high concentrations (approximately 1,000 microg/L for selenate and 100 microg/L for selenomethionine). These data were used to set the algal contamination for the study of trophic transfer to the clam. Three parameters were studied: The Se form, the algal density, and the Se burden in the algae. The results show that for a fixed algal density, an Se-contaminated algal diet does not modify ventilation. In this case, the driving factor for ventilation is the algal density, with ventilation being enhanced for low algal densities. On the basis of ventilatory flow rate measurements and Se burdens in algae, it was found that bioaccumulation of Se in C. fluminea was proportional to the total quantity of Se passing through the whole organism, but with a lesser extraction coefficient for selenomethionine than for the inorganic forms. These results underline the importance of both physiological factors and speciation in understanding the trophic transfer of Se.

  10. First records of Freshwater Bivalves of Ilha Grande National Park, Paraná, Brazil

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    Flávio Henrique Ragonha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ilha Grande National Park, Paraná, Brazil, is located in the Upper Paraná River and has characteristics typical of a floodplains. This protected area includes lagoons connected and disconnected to the Paraná River, although the latter also connect during periods of high water level, thus composing a heterogeneous group of lacustrine environments. The enormous potential the flora and fauna diversities are still little known to the region, as can be seen through benthic invertebrates, inclunding bivalves mollusks. The granulometric composition of these floodplain lagoons was formed mainly by mud and very fine sand. Furthermore, organic matter composition was predominantly of fine particulate. The other abiotic factors differed from lagoons located within the island of the park to those located in the left margin of Paraná River. The results demonstrated the importance of abiotic factors such as the physical composition of granulometric texture, organic matter and macrophyte banks, to the establishment of bivalves in these floodplain lagoons. We recorded bivalves of Pisidium (native, Diplodon (native, and Corbicula (invasive. The highest values of Diplodon sp. density were observed at São João/C lake, for Pisidium sterkianum (Pilsbry, 1897 at São João/M lake, and to Jatobá/C lagoon with high density of invasive species Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774. This study to obtain conduct the first records of freshwater bivalves in floodplains lagoon in the Ilha Grande National Park, and provides contributions to better understanding the ecology of these mollusks. The recording of native species in the region of Upper Paraná River floodplain after a lomg period without new records, demonstrated the importance of protecting the lagoons of the Ilha Grande National Park as they can be a possible refuge to some species of native freshwater bivalves.

  11. Consumption of freshwater bivalves by muskrats in the Green River, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Kimberly Asmus; Clark, Joseph D.; Layzer, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) are known to prey on freshwater bivalves (mussels and clams) and can negatively impact imperiled mussel species. However, factors that influence muskrat predation on bivalves are poorly understood. We evaluated the feeding ecology of muskrats in the Green River, Kentucky, by using stable isotope analysis of muskrat hair samples and by monitoring bivalve shell deposition at muskrat middens. Bayesian mixing-model analysis of stable isotope δ15N and δ13C ratios revealed that the median muskrat biomass derived from bivalves was 51.4% (5th and 95th percentiles were 39.1 to 63.4%, respectively), a much higher dietary proportion than previously reported. Shell depositions by muskrats at middens decreased with the availability of seasonal emergent vegetation, suggesting that the consumption of animal matter is in response to a scarcity of plant foods, perhaps exacerbated by the altered flow regimes on the Green River. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that muskrats have the potential to impact mussel population growth and recovery in some environments.

  12. The use of geochemical speciation modelling to predict the impact of uranium to freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markich, S.J.; Brown, P.L.; Jeffree, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium is the prime potential contaminant in mine waste waters that may be released from the Ranger Uranium Mine (RUM) into the receiving waters of the Magela Creek, Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Australia. The potential ecological impact of the migration of uranium, that would result from an elevation in its concentration above background, in the Magela Creek downstream of the RUM, has been experimentally investigated by integrating biomonitoring with geochemical speciation modelling. The freshwater bivalve Velesunio angasi, abundant throughout the Magela Creek catchment, was exposed to a variety of uranium concentrations in a synthetic Magela Creek water, at four pH levels (5.0, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0), in the presence (3.05 and 7.50 mg l -1 ) and absence of a model fulvic acid (FA), and its behavioural response was measured. Speciation modelling, using the HARPHRQ code, provided evidence that UO 2+ 2 and UO 2 OH + are the uranium species most responsible (ca. 96%) for eliciting an adverse behavioural response when UO 2+ 2 is assigned twice the toxic effect of UO 2 OH + . This finding rejects the notion that biota respond specifically to the sum total of inorganic uranyl species. (orig.)

  13. Inducing the Alternative Oxidase Forms Part of the Molecular Strategy of Anoxic Survival in Freshwater Bivalves

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    Maria S. Yusseppone

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in freshwater ecosystems is spreading as a consequence of global change, including pollution and eutrophication. In the Patagonian Andes, a decline in precipitation causes reduced lake water volumes and stagnant conditions that limit oxygen transport and exacerbate hypoxia below the upper mixed layer. We analyzed the molecular and biochemical response of the North Patagonian bivalve Diplodon chilensis after 10 days of experimental anoxia (<0.2 mg O2/L, hypoxia (2 mg O2/L, and normoxia (9 mg O2/L. Specifically, we investigated the expression of an alternative oxidase (AOX pathway assumed to shortcut the regular mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS during metabolic rate depression (MRD in hypoxia-tolerant invertebrates. Whereas, the AOX system was strongly upregulated during anoxia in gills, ETS activities and energy mobilization decreased [less transcription of glycogen phosphorylase (GlyP and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH in gills and mantle]. Accumulation of succinate and induction of malate dehydrogenase (MDH activity could indicate activation of anaerobic mitochondrial pathways to support anoxic survival in D. chilensis. Oxidative stress [protein carbonylation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx expression] and apoptotic intensity (caspase 3/7 activity decreased, whereas an unfolded protein response (HSP90 was induced under anoxia. This is the first clear evidence of the concerted regulation of the AOX and ETS genes in a hypoxia-tolerant freshwater bivalve and yet another example that exposure to hypoxia and anoxia is not necessarily accompanied by oxidative stress in hypoxia-tolerant mollusks.

  14. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on the immune cells of the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha exposed to the environmental neurotoxin BMAA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lepoutre, Alexandra; Milliote, Nadia; Bonnard, Marc; Palos-Ladeiro, Mélissa; Rioult, Damien; Bonnard, Isabelle; Bastien, Fanny; Faassen, Elisabeth; Geffard, Alain; Lance, Emilie

    2018-01-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been pointed out to be involved in human neurodegenerative diseases. This molecule is known to be bioaccumulated by bivalves. However, little data about its toxic effects on freshwater mussels is available, particularly on the

  15. Zoochorous dispersal of freshwater bivalves: an overlooked vector in biological invasions?

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    Coughlan Neil E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vectors that underpin the natural dispersal of invasive alien species are frequently unknown. In particular, the passive dispersal (zoochory of one organism (or propagule by another, usually more mobile animal, remains poorly understood. Field observations of the adherence of invasive freshwater bivalves to other organisms have prompted us to assess the importance of zoochory in the spread of three prolific invaders: zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha; quagga mussel Dreissena bugensis; and Asian clam Corbicula fluminea. An extensive, systematic search of the literature was conducted across multiple on-line scientific databases using various search terms and associated synonyms. In total, only five publications fully satisfied the search criteria. It appears that some fish species can internally transport viable adult D. polymorpha and C. fluminea specimens. Additionally, literature indicates that veligers and juvenile D. polymorpha can adhere to the external surfaces of waterbirds. Overall, literature suggests that zoochorous dispersal of invasive bivalves is possible, but likely a rare occurrence. However, even the establishment of a few individuals (or a single self-fertilising C. fluminea specimen can, over-time, result in a substantial population. Here, we highlight knowledge gaps, identify realistic opportunities for data collection, and suggest management protocols to mitigate the spread of invasive alien species.

  16. Sodium sulfate impacts feeding, specific dynamic action, and growth rate in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucek, David John

    2007-08-01

    Sodium sulfate is a ubiquitous salt that reaches toxic concentrations due to mining and other industrial activities, yet is currently unregulated at the Federal level in the United States. Previous studies have documented reduced growth of clams downstream of sulfate-dominated effluents, altered bioenergetics in filter-feeding invertebrates, and interactions between sulfate and other toxicants. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if sodium sulfate affects the bioenergetics of the filter-feeding, freshwater bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, and the mechanism by which the effects are elicited. In addition to measuring effects on feeding, respiration and growth rates, I evaluated the relative sensitivity of a green algae consumed by clams to determine if top-down or bottom-up effects might be exhibited under field conditions. This study demonstrated that sodium sulfate had no effect on basal metabolic rates, but significantly reduced the feeding, post-feeding metabolic, and growth rates of C. fluminea. The proposed mechanism for these impacts is that filtering rates are reduced upon exposure, resulting in reduced food consumption and therefore, preventing increased metabolic rates normally associated with post-feeding specific dynamic action (SDA). In the field, these effects may cause changes in whole stream respiration rates and organic matter dynamics, as well as alter uptake rates of other food-associated contaminants like selenium, the toxicity of which is known to be antagonized by sulfate, in filter-feeding bivalves.

  17. Bioavailability of cadmium and biochemical responses on the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea--the role of TiO₂ nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Gonçalo; Franco, Cristiana; Diniz, Mário S; dos Santos, Margarida M C; Domingos, Rute F

    2014-11-01

    The increasing and widespread applications of TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (nTiO2) led to the release of these materials into aquatic environments and consequently a change on the assessment of the environmental risk of trace metals. In this work, the role of two commercial nTiO2 with distinct crystalline phases and sizes (nTiO2-P25: 80% anatase+20% rutile, d=20nm; nTiO2-NA: 100% anatase, d=5 nm; 0.1 and 1.0 mg L(-1)) on Cd (112 μg L(-1)) speciation, biouptake and toxicity for the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea was evaluated. The electroanalytical technique 'absence of gradients and Nernstian equilibrium stripping (AGNES)' was used to quantify the free Cd concentrations in the exposure medium in presence of both particles. Despite ca. 30-40% decrease of free Cd in the medium in presence of nTiO2, Cd uptake by C. fluminea was similar in the absence and presence of either of the particles. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase activities remained unchanged for Cd in absence and presence of nTiO2, whereas a significant increase of the catalase activity was obtained at the third day for Cd in presence of both nTiO2. Despite lipid peroxidation data shows that the presence of both nTiO2 seems to exert cells damage, a more quantitative description is not possible with the obtained data. The lack of clear-cut responses by the studied biomarkers, even when only in presence of Cd, do not allow insights into the effect of the presence of nTiO2 on the Cd toxicity to the bivalves. Notwithstanding, morphological changes in the digestive gland were clearly obtained in the presence of Cd, nTiO2 and Cd+nTiO2 indicating an inflammatory response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ting Hui; Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C J

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity-59 species-of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future monitoring

  19. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C. J.

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity—59 species—of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future

  20. Biomarkers in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea confined downstream a domestic landfill leachate discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Luciana Fernandes; Santos, Caroline; Dos Reis Martinez, Claudia Bueno

    2016-07-01

    Landfills represent a severe environmental problem mainly due to the generation of leachates, and this study aimed to evaluate sublethal effects of a domestic landfill leachate in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Clams were submitted to in situ tests along a stream, at three sites, representing increasing distances from the leachate discharge (Pq1, Pq2, and Pq3), for 1, 5, and 15 days. The following biomarkers were analyzed in the gills and digestive glands: 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities, multixenobiotic resistance mechanism (MXR), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Metallothionein (MT) content was determined in the gills and DNA damage in hemocytes. The mortality rate of animals during in situ tests was reduced as the distance from the leachate discharge source increased. On the other hand, biomarker results showed sublethal effects on C. fluminea confined at all sites of PqS. GST, TAC, ROS, and DNA damage were the most significant biomarkers for this species and should be considered for future monitoring and assessment of freshwater environments located in landfill areas.

  1. Morphological and chemical characterization of mineral concretions in the freshwater bivalve Anodonta cygnea (Unionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzmann, Mariana F; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Bobos, Iulius; Ferreira, Jorge; Domingues, Bernardo; Machado, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater mussel Anodonta cygnea is commonly used as a model organism for biomineralization studies, its peculiar morphofunctional properties also make it an excellent environmental biomonitor. The first detailed on the calcareous concretions from gill and mantle tissue, as well as fluids of the freshwater bivalve A. cygnea, supported by histological, scanning, spectrometry, and spectroscopy analyses. Through these analyses, the morphology, structure, and chemical characterization of these biomineral concretions were accomplished. The concretions represent a high percentage of the dry weight of these organisms. In gill tissue, it can reach up to 50% of dry weight prior to reproductive maturity. Analysis of elemental composition of the tissue concretions showed the presence of calcium and phosphate, as main components, associated with other residual elements like iron, manganese, magnesium, and zinc. Concretions are arranged in concentric alternated layers of organic and inorganic matrix. The shape and size of the concretions vary substantially, from very small, less than 1 μm diameter with very regular round structure, found mainly in the mantle tissue, to more than 50 μm length with irregular globular clusters, found predominantly in the gills. The microstructural organization is of a hydroxyapatite polymorphism in the mantle, in contrast to the gills, which exhibit irregular structure and carbonated hydroxyapatite polymorphism. These differences are supported by higher contents of dinitrogen pentoxide, magnesium, and iron in the mantle concretions, but higher contents of manganese and zinc in the gills. Furthermore, the results indicate that the mineral concretion formation in A. cygnea is a hemocytes reaction to particle or toxic invasions. A second relevant role, concerns the close involvement of these microspherules on the adult and larval shell calcification. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effect of chronic selenium exposure on the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, E.; Adam, C.; Massabuau, J.C.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Selenium is essential for most of living organisms. In oxic to moderately oxic fresh-waters, Se exists predominantly in the (+VI) and (+IV) oxidation states as selenate (SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) and selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) respectively, whereas in the biota it is incorporated as Se(-II) into seleno-proteins or amino-acids, or as elemental selenium Se(0). At low concentrations, it acts against oxidative damages mainly as the glutathione peroxidase seleno-dependant, but it may be toxic at higher levels (for example, by replacing sulphur in important biomolecules). In filter feeders, such as the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea, selected as biological model, the ventilation activity is a primary limiting step that controls the water influx and therefore the delivery of contaminants. Consequently, a series of short-term experiments were performed to study the effects of different dissolved Se concentrations and forms (selenite; selenate; selenomethionine) on the ventilation activity of Corbicula fluminea and Se tissular distribution. The modification of the ventilation activity of the Se-exposed groups, in comparison to this of reference groups (not exposed to Se) varied greatly according to the form and the concentrations of the Se used. Se concentrations in tissues indicated that selenite was the less bioavailable form whereas selenomethionine displayed the opposite trend. On the basis of this set of experiments, a limited number of conditions have been selected to provide highly contrasting ventilation flow rates and selenium bioaccumulation levels, in order to study the effects of long term exposures, i) at the molecular level, by measuring bio-markers of oxidative stress (forms of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and bio-marker of genotoxicity (comet assay), ii) at the (sub)cellular level by analysing Se micro-localisation in target organs and iii) at the individual level by monitoring the variation

  3. Bioaccumulation of selenium and induced biological effects in the filter feeding bivalve Corbicula fluminea: influence of ventilatory activity, selenium speciation and route of transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, E.

    2005-10-01

    Selenium is an essential micro-nutrient for most of living organisms. However, toxic effects in several ecosystems have been reported in the literature. Toxicity comprehension is difficult due to the complexity of Se oxidation states in the environment. The aim of this thesis work was to acquire knowledge on the physiological and environmental factors involved in bioaccumulation and toxicity processes in the freshwater filter-feeding bivalve C. fluminea. The aims were: i) to define what the factors involved in Se bioaccumulation processes in the bivalve are, ii) to characterize Se bioaccumulation at different biological organisation levels, iii) to investigate Se toxic effects. First experiments, carried out for short term exposure duration (3 days), have permitted to underline the importance of Se chemical speciation in bioaccumulation processes in C. fluminea. It has been shown that the organic form, seleno-methionine, was much more bio-available than the inorganic forms, selenite and selenate. Moreover, the route of transfer was determinant in those processes. Inorganic forms have been better extracted by trophic route, whereas seleno-methionine has been better extracted by the direct route. In our experimental conditions, ventilation of the bivalve has not been a limiting factor for Se bioaccumulation by the direct route, whereas it has been for bioaccumulation by the trophic route. Ventilation has been largely modified by the presence of dissolved selenite and seleno-methionine. We have shown that the kinetics of seleno-methionine bioaccumulation are much more fast than those of selenite. Moreover, when introduced as SeMet, internalized Se appeared to be relatively remanent in soft tissues of C. fluminea in comparison with Se internalized when introduced as selenite. Subcellular and molecular distributions of these forms were very different. Finally, it has been shown that seleno-methionine and selenite could generate weak alterations of the anti

  4. Calibration of hydroclimate proxies in freshwater bivalve shells from Central and West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Zita; Gillikin, David P.; Graniero, Lauren E.; Havel, Holly; Darchambeau, François; Borges, Alberto V.; Yambélé, Athanase; Bassirou, Alhou; Bouillon, Steven

    2017-07-01

    Freshwater bivalve shell oxygen and carbon stable isotope ratios (δ18O, δ13C) may act as recorders of hydroclimate (e.g., precipitation-evaporation balance, discharge) and aquatic biogeochemistry. We investigate the potential of these hydroclimate proxies measured along the growth axis of shells collected from the Oubangui River (Bangui, Central African Republic) and the Niger River (Niamey, Niger). Biweekly water samples and in situ measurements collected over several years, along with daily discharge data from both sites allowed a direct comparison with proxies recorded in the shells. Data from a total of 14 unionid shells, including three species (Chambardia wissmanni, Aspatharia dahomeyensis, and Aspatharia chaiziana), confirmed that shells precipitate carbonate in oxygen isotope equilibrium with ambient water. Because water temperature variations were small, shell δ18O values (δ18Oshell) also accurately record the seasonality and the range observed in water δ18O (δ18Ow) values when calculated using an average temperature. Calculated δ18Ow values were in good agreement over the entire record of measured δ18Ow values, thus δ18Oshell records can be reliably used to reconstruct past δ18Ow values. Discharge and δ18Ow values from both rivers fit a logarithmic relationship, which was used to attempt reconstruction of past hydrological conditions, after calculating δ18Ow values from δ18Oshell values. A comparison with measured discharge data suggests that for the two rivers considered, δ18Oshell data are good proxies for recording discharge conditions during low(er) discharge levels, but that high discharge values cannot be accurately reconstructed due to the large scatter in the discharge-δ18Ow relationship. Moreover, periods of bivalve shell growth cessation due to high turbidity or air exposure should be taken into account. While δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon in both rivers showed clear seasonality and correlated well with discharge

  5. Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: a bivalve parasite of freshwater fishes / Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: um bivalve parasito de peixes de água doce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Teresa Silva-Souza

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve mollusk Anodontites trapesialis has been indicated as an alternative source for aquaculture because it is considered a food of good nutritional value with a protein content close to that of fish. Its shells can be utilized as fertilizer and mixed to the food of domestic animals, and the nacre can be used to manufacture buttons and crafts. However, the larvae of A. trapesialis, which are the lasidium type, are obligatory parasites of freshwater fishes, and the introduction of this bivalve in fish farm tanks have caused trouble and losses for producers. Nothing is known, however, about their development in these environments. On the other hand, it should be pointed out that A. trapesialis is on Brazil’s list of species threatened with extinction. This article provides a compilation of information present in the literature, offering a detailed review, with the aim of presenting a general panorama of what is known about Anodontites trapesialis and its larval parasitism of fishes.O molusco bivalve, Anodontites trapesialis, tem sido indicado como fonte alternativa para a aqüicultura, por ser considerado um alimento de bom valor nutricional com um conteúdo protéico próximo ao do pescado. Suas conchas podem ser utilizadas como fertilizantes calcáreos e ser agregadas a alimentos de animais domésticos e o nácar pode ser utilizado para fabricar botões e artesanatos. No entanto, as larvas de A. trapesialis, que são do tipo lasidium, são parasitas obrigatórias de peixes de água doce e a introdução desse bivalve em tanques de piscicultura tem causado transtornos e prejuízos aos produtores. Nada se conhece, porém, sobre o seu desenvolvimento nesses ambientes. Por outro lado, ressalta-se que A. trapesialis consta da lista brasileira de espécies ameaçadas de extinção. No presente artigo são compiladas as informações presentes na literatura, em uma revisão detalhada, com o objetivo de apresentar o panorama geral do

  6. Cadmium Accumulation and Metallothionein Response in the Freshwater Bivalve Corbicula fluminea Under Hydrodynamic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Nan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Qi, Ning; Ren, Lingxiao

    2015-06-01

    Freshwater bivalves such as Corbicula fluminea (Müller) are useful biomonitors for cadmium pollution because they absorb heavy metals and accumulate them in their tissues. We exposed C. fluminea in the laboratory to natural and cadmium (Cd)-spiked sediments below flowing water in order to evaluate the organisms' Cd accumulation and metallothionein (MT) response under hydrodynamic conditions. The accumulation of Cd and the induction of MT in C. fluminea were determined at 0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 16, and 23 days. Hydrodynamic conditions, represented by a water flow rate of 14 or 3.2 cm/s, increased Cd accumulation in the visceral mass, gill, foot, and mantle of C. fluminea in the first 3 or 6 days in the natural sediment. Cd concentrations in the C. fluminea tissues kept increasing over time in the three treatments, and significant differences were observed in Cd accumulation after 6 (visceral mass), 10 (foot) and 16 (gill and mantle) days among the three groups. The MT concentrations were barely affected by hydrodynamic conditions and were significantly linearly related to the Cd concentration in the visceral mass in the natural sediment and binomially related to it in the Cd-spiked sediment. Hydrodynamic conditions enhanced the accumulation of Cd in the soft tissues of C. fluminea, especially in the Cd-spiked sediment, but stronger hydrodynamic forces did not increase Cd accumulation. MT may be considered an indicator for Cd accumulation in C. fluminea under hydrodynamic conditions, but only when the Cd concentrations in the tissue remain below the toxic threshold values.

  7. Toxicokinetics of waterborne trivalent arsenic in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro M; Santos, Hugo M; Peres, Isabel; Costa, Maria H; Alves, Sheila; Capelo-Martinez, José Luís; Diniz, Mário S

    2009-08-01

    Arsenite (As(III)) uptake and elimination kinetics were studied in a freshwater bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, exposed to several nominal concentrations of As(III) (0, 100, 300, 500, and 1000 microg L(-1)) in a static 28-day assay, followed by a depuration stage of 14 days. At the end of each sampling time (days 0, 7, 28, and 42) whole-body portions were surveyed for total As concentrations and, complimentarily, surveyed for whole-body metallothionein (MT) induction to assess its role as a defense mechanism against exposure to As(III). Histochemical evaluation of the digestive gland was performed to verify As deposition and elimination in the tissue. Results show a significant increase in whole-body total As after 28 days of exposure for all treatments, followed by a decrease at the end of the depuration phase. Biodynamic kinetic models for As uptake and elimination were obtained from bioaccumulation data during the exposure phase, for all As treatments, by estimating uptake and elimination rate constants. Bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were estimated by the ratio of these constants. Results revealed that exposure to higher concentrations of As(III) causes a decrease in BCFs, suggesting that C. fluminea triggers effective regulatory mechanisms when exposed to higher concentrations of the metalloid. Significant induction of MT was detected during the exposure phase, followed by a decrease in MT concentration to control levels after depuration for all treatments. No significant differences in MT concentrations were observed between treatments. This finding may confirm the role of MT as part of the As regulation process, but its independence relative to concentrations of As(III) in water suggests that MT induction is not dose dependent. The histochemical evaluation provided clear evidence that As was effectively accumulated in the digestive gland during exposure and eliminated during depuration. The present work demonstrated that C. fluminea is capable of regulating As

  8. Bioaccumulation of selenium and induced biological effects in the filter feeding bivalve Corbicula fluminea: influence of ventilatory activity, selenium speciation and route of transfer; Bioaccumulation du selenium et effets biologiques induits chez le bivalve filtreur Corbicula fluminea: prise en compte de l'activite ventilatoire, de la speciation du selenium et de la voie de contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, E

    2005-10-15

    Selenium is an essential micro-nutrient for most of living organisms. However, toxic effects in several ecosystems have been reported in the literature. Toxicity comprehension is difficult due to the complexity of Se oxidation states in the environment. The aim of this thesis work was to acquire knowledge on the physiological and environmental factors involved in bioaccumulation and toxicity processes in the freshwater filter-feeding bivalve C. fluminea. The aims were: i) to define what the factors involved in Se bioaccumulation processes in the bivalve are, ii) to characterize Se bioaccumulation at different biological organisation levels, iii) to investigate Se toxic effects. First experiments, carried out for short term exposure duration (3 days), have permitted to underline the importance of Se chemical speciation in bioaccumulation processes in C. fluminea. It has been shown that the organic form, seleno-methionine, was much more bio-available than the inorganic forms, selenite and selenate. Moreover, the route of transfer was determinant in those processes. Inorganic forms have been better extracted by trophic route, whereas seleno-methionine has been better extracted by the direct route. In our experimental conditions, ventilation of the bivalve has not been a limiting factor for Se bioaccumulation by the direct route, whereas it has been for bioaccumulation by the trophic route. Ventilation has been largely modified by the presence of dissolved selenite and seleno-methionine. We have shown that the kinetics of seleno-methionine bioaccumulation are much more fast than those of selenite. Moreover, when introduced as SeMet, internalized Se appeared to be relatively remanent in soft tissues of C. fluminea in comparison with Se internalized when introduced as selenite. Subcellular and molecular distributions of these forms were very different. Finally, it has been shown that seleno-methionine and selenite could generate weak alterations of the anti

  9. Accumulation, elimination and chemical speciation of mercury in the bivalves Mytilus edulis and Macoma balthica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, H. U.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, F.

    1985-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis) transferred in net bags from clean to chronically mercury polluted water readily accumulated mercury during an exposure period of three months. Growth of the transplanted mussels had a “diluting” effect on the mercury concentration, but the absolute weight of mercury uptake...... for M. edulis from the chronically polluted area in contrast to only 53 d for mussels from a temporary massive mercury polluted area near a chemical deposit. In both cases about 75% of the total mercury in the mussels was inorganic, and it is suggested that both inorganic and organic mercury species...... were immobilized in mussels from the long-term mercury polluted area, whereas the immobilization capacity was exceeded in the short-term mercury exposed mussels near the chemical deposit. Very slow elimination of mercury was observed in the deposit-feeding bivalve Macoma balthica from the chronically...

  10. Early defense responses in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea exposed to copper and cadmium: Transcriptional and histochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Aurélie; Minguez, Laëtitia; Giambérini, Laure; Rodius, François

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure the early effects of copper (10 and 50 μg L(-1)), cadmium (2, 10, and 50 μg L(-1)) and mixtures of these metals in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea exposed for 12 h in laboratory. Transcription levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx), pi-class glutathione S-transferase (pi-GST), metallothionein (MT) in digestive gland and gills, and response of lysosomal system and neutral lipids in digestive gland were determined after the exposure period. Results showed that lysosomal system, neutral lipids content, and mRNA levels were modified, suggesting their early response against oxidative stress and their important role in cell integrity. The integrated biomarker response was calculated and showed that the effects of the combinations of Cu and Cd on the biomarker responses are additive. MT and pi-GST mRNA expression correspond to the largest ranges of response. As efficient biomarkers should have an early warning capacity, SOD, CAT, Se-GPx, pi-GST, MT transcripts levels, lysosomal system, and neutral lipids could be used as biomarkers of metal contamination in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects on the Immune Cells of the Freshwater Bivalve Dreissena polymorpha Exposed to the Environmental Neurotoxin BMAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lepoutre

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The environmental neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA has been pointed out to be involved in human neurodegenerative diseases. This molecule is known to be bioaccumulated by bivalves. However, little data about its toxic effects on freshwater mussels is available, particularly on the hemolymphatic compartment and its hemocyte cells involved in various physiological processes such as immune defenses, digestion and excretion, tissue repair, and shell production. Here we exposed Dreissena polymorpha to dissolved BMAA, at the environmental concentration of 7.5 µg of /mussel/3 days, during 21 days followed by 14 days of depuration in clear water, with the objective of assessing the BMAA presence in the hemolymphatic compartment, as well as the impact of the hemocyte cells in terms of potential cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxiciy. Data showed that hemocytes were in contact with BMAA. The presence of BMAA in hemolymph did not induce significant effect on hemocytes phagocytosis activity. However, significant DNA damage on hemocytes occurred during the first week (days 3 and 8 of BMAA exposure, followed by an increase of hemocyte mortality after 2 weeks of exposure. Those effects might be an indirect consequence of the BMAA-induced oxidative stress in cells. However, DNA strand breaks and mortality did not persist during the entire exposure, despite the BMAA persistence in the hemolymph, suggesting potential induction of some DNA-repair mechanisms.

  12. The unusual mineral vaterite in shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea from the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Nicole; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Aldridge, David C.

    2010-08-01

    Asian clams ( Corbicula fluminea) with abnormally thickened shell valves were found in four rivers in the UK (Rivers Yare, Waveney, Thames and New Bedford River). The material making up these malformations was the rare calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite. Vaterite is seldom found in the natural environment because it is less stable than the other calcium carbonate polymorphs (aragonite and calcite). In the few reported cases of vaterite formation in molluscs, it is usually related to unusual biomineralisation events such as shell regeneration, pearls and initial stages of shell formation. We compared two populations from the Rivers Yare and Waveney in the Norfolk Broads, UK, one (River Waveney) displaying dominantly the normal Corbicula shell form with aragonitic shells. In the River Yare population, all individuals sampled had shell deformations to different extents. These deformations were apparent as bulges on the inside of the ventral shell margin. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the shell material in the bulges of recently collected clams was vaterite. Other parts of the deformed shells were aragonitic. The shell deformations alter the shell morphology, leading to higher and wider shells. The shell microstructure is fibrous in the vateritic parts and crossed-lamellar in the aragonitic parts of deformed or non-deformed shells. The cause for the malformations is probably a disrupted biomineralisation process in the bivalves. Fossil Corbicula specimens from the late Pleistocene had similar deformations, suggesting that this is not a response to anthropogenic causes, such as pollution.

  13. Mechanisms of cadmium accumulation (adsorption and absorption) by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea under hydrodynamic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Geng; Peifang, Wang; Chao, Wang; Jun, Hou; Jin, Qian; Lingzhan, Miao

    2016-05-01

    Many heavy metals in sediments and water have potential adverse effects on aquatic organisms such as Corbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774), a bivalve species frequently used as a biomonitor for metal pollution. Studies over the past decades examining the heavy metal uptake by C. fluminea, very few has investigated the effect of hydrodynamic conditions on accumulation of heavy metal by C. fluminea. Therefore, in this study, to investigate the mechanism of intracellular and extracellular accumulation of metal, individuals of C. fluminea were exposed to cadmium (Cd)-treated water under three different hydrodynamic conditions. These included exposures in two set ups: three rates of rotation (500, 350, 200 r/min) in beakers for 10 days, and then exposure to Cd-treated sediment under two naturally turbulent water conditions (14 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s) in experimental flumes for 23 days. Hydrodynamic force increased the burrowing rate but decreased the activity of C. fluminea. After 10 days of exposure, the extracellular concentrations of Cd in the tissues of C. fluminea in the sand group were significantly higher than that in the gravel groups. The intracellular and extracellular concentrations of Cd in the tissues of C. fluminea dramatically increased in the Cd-treated sediment test. Moreover, the concentration of the extracellular Cd adsorbed on the tissues of C. fluminea in the 14 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s groups was significantly higher than that in the control group, whereas the effect of hydrodynamic force on absorption of Cd by C. fluminea was not obvious. These results suggest that hydrodynamic condition plays an important role in extracellular accumulation of Cd by C. fluminea. In future study, when using C. fluminea to assess Cd pollution in aquatic environment, extracellular Cd adsorbed on the tissue should be removed to avoid the influence of hydrodynamics. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Exposure dose response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to cadmium spiked sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marasinghe Wadige, Chamani P.M.; Maher, William A.; Taylor, Anne M.; Krikowa, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The exposure–dose–response approach was used to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. • Accumulated cadmium in H. australis reflected the sediment cadmium exposure. • Spill over of cadmium into the biologically active pool was observed. • Increased cadmium resulted in measurable biological effects. • H. australis has the potential to be a cadmium biomonitor in freshwater environments. - Abstract: To understand how benthic biota may respond to the additive or antagonistic effects of metal mixtures in the environment it is first necessary to examine their responses to the individual metals. In this context, laboratory controlled single metal-spiked sediment toxicity tests are useful to assess this. The exposure–dose–response relationships of Hyridella australis to cadmium-spiked sediments were, therefore, investigated in laboratory microcosms. H. australis was exposed to individual cadmium spiked sediments (<0.05 (control), 4 ± 0.3 (low) and 15 ± 1 (high) μg/g dry mass) for 28 days. Dose was measured as cadmium accumulation in whole soft body and individual tissues at weekly intervals over the exposure period. Dose was further examined as sub-cellular localisation of cadmium in hepatopancreas tissues. The biological responses in terms of enzymatic and cellular biomarkers were measured in hepatopancreas tissues at day 28. H. australis accumulated cadmium from spiked sediments with an 8-fold (low exposure organisms) and 16-fold (high exposure organisms) increase at day 28 compared to control organisms. The accumulated tissue cadmium concentrations reflected the sediment cadmium exposure at day 28. Cadmium accumulation in high exposure organisms was inversely related to the tissue calcium concentrations. Gills of H. australis showed significantly higher cadmium accumulation than the other tissues. Accumulated cadmium in biologically active and biologically detoxified metal pools was not significantly different in cadmium exposed

  15. Interpopulational variability of molecular responses to ionizing radiation in freshwater bivalves Anodonta anatina (Unionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falfushynska, H.; Gnatyshyna, L.; Yurchak, I.; Stoliar, O.; Sokolova, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are exposed to multiple anthropogenic stressors including chemical pollution and warming that can affect health of the resident organisms and their responses to novel challenges. We investigated the of in situ exposure history on molecular responses to a novel stressor, ionizing radiation, in unionid mollusks Anodonta anatina. Males from pristine (F-), agricultural (A-) sites and a cooling reservoir of a nuclear power plant (N-site) were exposed to acute low dose (2 mGy) X-ray radiation followed by 14 days of recovery (R-groups) or to control conditions (C-groups). Biomarkers of oxidative stress, geno-, cyto- and neurotoxicity were used to assess cellular injury and stress. Control group from the cooling reservoir (CN) had higher background levels of caspase-3 activity, metallothionein concentrations and nuclear lesions and lower levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione in the gills compared to other control groups (CF and CA). Irradiation induced cellular damage in mussels from all three sites including increased levels of nuclear lesions in hemocytes, depletion of caspase-3, suppression of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, an increase of the lipid peroxidation and oxidized glutathione levels, as well as down-regulation of cholinesterase indicating neurotoxicity. The up-regulation of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in the digestive gland and vitellogenin-like protein level in gonads were also found in radiation-exposed groups indicating feminization of males and disturbances of xenobiotic metabolism. The RA-group showed the greatest magnitude of radiation-induced stress responses compared to the other two groups. Overall, unionid mollusks, particularly those from a chronically polluted agricultural site, were highly sensitive to low-dose radiation (2 mGy) indicating limitations of stress protection mechanisms to deal with multiple stressors. - Highlights: • Habitat-specific effects of irradiation were studied

  16. Exposure dose response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to cadmium spiked sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasinghe Wadige, Chamani P.M., E-mail: chamani.marasinghe.wadige@canberra.edu.au; Maher, William A.; Taylor, Anne M.; Krikowa, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The exposure–dose–response approach was used to assess cadmium exposure and toxicity. • Accumulated cadmium in H. australis reflected the sediment cadmium exposure. • Spill over of cadmium into the biologically active pool was observed. • Increased cadmium resulted in measurable biological effects. • H. australis has the potential to be a cadmium biomonitor in freshwater environments. - Abstract: To understand how benthic biota may respond to the additive or antagonistic effects of metal mixtures in the environment it is first necessary to examine their responses to the individual metals. In this context, laboratory controlled single metal-spiked sediment toxicity tests are useful to assess this. The exposure–dose–response relationships of Hyridella australis to cadmium-spiked sediments were, therefore, investigated in laboratory microcosms. H. australis was exposed to individual cadmium spiked sediments (<0.05 (control), 4 ± 0.3 (low) and 15 ± 1 (high) μg/g dry mass) for 28 days. Dose was measured as cadmium accumulation in whole soft body and individual tissues at weekly intervals over the exposure period. Dose was further examined as sub-cellular localisation of cadmium in hepatopancreas tissues. The biological responses in terms of enzymatic and cellular biomarkers were measured in hepatopancreas tissues at day 28. H. australis accumulated cadmium from spiked sediments with an 8-fold (low exposure organisms) and 16-fold (high exposure organisms) increase at day 28 compared to control organisms. The accumulated tissue cadmium concentrations reflected the sediment cadmium exposure at day 28. Cadmium accumulation in high exposure organisms was inversely related to the tissue calcium concentrations. Gills of H. australis showed significantly higher cadmium accumulation than the other tissues. Accumulated cadmium in biologically active and biologically detoxified metal pools was not significantly different in cadmium exposed

  17. Interpopulational variability of molecular responses to ionizing radiation in freshwater bivalves Anodonta anatina (Unionidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falfushynska, H. [Research Laboratory of Comparative Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ternopil National Pedagogical University, 2, Kryvonosa Str, Ternopil 46027 (Ukraine); Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Department of General Chemistry, I.Ya. Horbachevsky Ternopil State Medical University, 1, Maidan Voli, Ternopil 46001 (Ukraine); Gnatyshyna, L. [Research Laboratory of Comparative Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ternopil National Pedagogical University, 2, Kryvonosa Str, Ternopil 46027 (Ukraine); Department of General Chemistry, I.Ya. Horbachevsky Ternopil State Medical University, 1, Maidan Voli, Ternopil 46001 (Ukraine); Yurchak, I.; Stoliar, O. [Research Laboratory of Comparative Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ternopil National Pedagogical University, 2, Kryvonosa Str, Ternopil 46027 (Ukraine); Sokolova, I.M., E-mail: isokolova@uncc.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Freshwater ecosystems are exposed to multiple anthropogenic stressors including chemical pollution and warming that can affect health of the resident organisms and their responses to novel challenges. We investigated the of in situ exposure history on molecular responses to a novel stressor, ionizing radiation, in unionid mollusks Anodonta anatina. Males from pristine (F-), agricultural (A-) sites and a cooling reservoir of a nuclear power plant (N-site) were exposed to acute low dose (2 mGy) X-ray radiation followed by 14 days of recovery (R-groups) or to control conditions (C-groups). Biomarkers of oxidative stress, geno-, cyto- and neurotoxicity were used to assess cellular injury and stress. Control group from the cooling reservoir (CN) had higher background levels of caspase-3 activity, metallothionein concentrations and nuclear lesions and lower levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione in the gills compared to other control groups (CF and CA). Irradiation induced cellular damage in mussels from all three sites including increased levels of nuclear lesions in hemocytes, depletion of caspase-3, suppression of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, an increase of the lipid peroxidation and oxidized glutathione levels, as well as down-regulation of cholinesterase indicating neurotoxicity. The up-regulation of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in the digestive gland and vitellogenin-like protein level in gonads were also found in radiation-exposed groups indicating feminization of males and disturbances of xenobiotic metabolism. The RA-group showed the greatest magnitude of radiation-induced stress responses compared to the other two groups. Overall, unionid mollusks, particularly those from a chronically polluted agricultural site, were highly sensitive to low-dose radiation (2 mGy) indicating limitations of stress protection mechanisms to deal with multiple stressors. - Highlights: • Habitat-specific effects of irradiation were studied

  18. Effect of in situ exposure history on the molecular responses of freshwater bivalve Anodonta anatina (Unionidae) to trace metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falfushynska, Halina I; Gnatyshyna, Lesya L; Stoliar, Oksana B

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the study was to assess the adequacy of molecular responses in mollusks in relation to their in situ exposure history. Freshwater male bivalve mollusks Anadonta anatina (Unionidae) from polluted (A) and unpolluted (F) sites were subjected to 14 days of exposure to copper (Cu(2+), 10 μg L(-1)), zinc (Zn(2+), 130 μg L(-1)) or cadmium (Cd(2+), 15 μg L(-1)). The comparison of two control groups showed that the specimens from site A had higher levels of Cu, Zn and Cd and metallothionein (measured both through metal (MT-Me), and protein (MT-SH) levels) in the tissues. Cytotoxicity (low lysosomal membrane stability), low glutathione level, high antioxidant and apoptotic enzymes activities, lipid and protein oxidative injury, depletion of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) in digestive gland, high vitellogenin-like protein (Vtg-LP) concentration in gonads confirmed the effect of toxic environment on this group. Exposures provoked increased number of hemocytes with micronuclei (by 100-500%) and nuclear abnormalities (by 50-400%) (genotoxicity), elevation of caspase-3 (in 1.5-10 times) and/or Vtg-LP (by 70-310%) levels in all groups. However, the responses were strongly dependent on the origin of mussels. Exposed mussels from site F demonstrated typical for the effect of toxic metals elevation of MT-SH (by 100-380%) and MT-Me (up to seven times) levels and accumulation of metals (with a few exceptions) in the tissues. Conversely, in the mussels inhabiting site A, exposures caused the decrease of metal (by 37% for Cu, by 62% for Zn, by 50% for Cd), MT-SH (by 68% in ZnA group) and MT-Me (by 50-68%) levels. That was accompanied with increase of cytotoxicity and EROD activity (by 144-240%). High level of protein carbonyls was the distinguished feature of all groups from site A. Hence, despite high efficiency of metal detoxification and oxidative stress responses in the mussels, in the specimens from spontaneously polluted site they were impaired. Copyright

  19. Characterization of freshwater bivalves as radio contamination (57Co, 110mAg, 134Cs) bio-indicators in a metallic multi pollution context (Cd, Zn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraysse, B.

    2001-07-01

    This study concerns freshwater bio-indicators of radio-contamination, in a metallic multi-pollution context. Metals, such as cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn), are widely represented in aquatic ecosystems, and their concentrations can induce physiological effects. This chronicle exposure generates both metabolic and behaviour stress of individuals, and can also yield to detoxification mechanisms induction. The main goal of this work was to estimate the influence of metals on the radionuclides ( 57 Co, 110m Ag, 134 Cs) bioaccumulation by two different bivalve species (Corbicula fluminea et Dreissena polymorpha), by studying the contamination level, the kinetic of the radionuclide transfer and the soft-body repartition. As the exploratory feature of this study, two parts have been developed: (i) testing the problematic suitability in a really bio-monitoring situation, and (ii) analysing the metal/radionuclide interaction mechanisms under controlled and standardised conditions (laboratory). For the different experimental conditions explored (laboratory and field), radionuclide bioaccumulation by freshwater bivalves has been influenced by metal exposure. This result was obtained after assessing a decrease of the organisms contamination level by radionuclide and their accumulation rate, an increase of their depuration rate and tissue and cellular repartition changes. (author)

  20. Sub-lethal effects induced by a mixture of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Marco; Binelli, Andrea

    2012-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the sixth top-selling drugs worldwide and are commonly found in freshwater ecosystems in the high ng/l to low μg/l range. Recent studies have investigated both the acute and the chronic toxicity of single NSAIDs on different biological models, but these studies have completely neglected the fact that, in the environment, non-target organisms are exposed to mixtures of drugs that have unforeseeable toxicological behavior. This work investigated the sub-lethal effects induced by a mixture of three common NSAIDs, namely, diclofenac, ibuprofen and paracetamol, on the freshwater bivalve, the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). The mussels were exposed to three different environmental concentrations of the mixture (Low, Mid and High). A multi-biomarker approach was used to highlight cyto-genotoxic effects and the imbalance of the oxidative status of the treated specimens. The Neutral Red Retention Assay (NRRA) was used as a biomarker of cytotoxicity, whereas the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase were measured to assess the role played by the oxidative stress enzymes. In addition, the single cell gel electrophoresis assay, the DNA Diffusion assay and the micronucleus test were used to investigate possible genotoxic effects. According to our NRRA results, each treatment was able to induce a significant cellular stress in bivalves, probably due to the raise of oxidative stress, as indicated by the alteration of enzyme activities measured in treated specimens. Moreover, the mixture induced significant enhancements of DNA fragmentation, which preluded fixed genetic damage, as highlighted by the increase of both apoptotic and micronucleated cells.

  1. Using biochemical and isotope geochemistry to understand the environmental and public health implications of lead pollution in the lower Guadiana River, Iberia: A freshwater bivalve study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Company, R. [CIMA, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)], E-mail: rcompany@ualg.pt; Serafim, A.; Lopes, B.; Cravo, A. [CIMA, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Shepherd, T.J.; Pearson, G. [Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, Science Labs., Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bebianno, M.J. [CIMA, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)], E-mail: mbebian@ualg.pt

    2008-11-01

    Lead is a natural component of aquatic ecosystems with no known biological role and is highly toxic. Its toxicity stems from its ability to mimic biologically important metals and to produce membrane damage through lipid peroxidation (LPO). Most lead poisoning symptoms are thought to occur by interfering with an essential enzyme, {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), the activity of which is markedly inhibited by lead. The purpose of this work was to study the levels and effects of lead pollution (responses of ALAD and oxidative stress biomarker LPO) in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea along the lower Guadiana River (Portugal and Spain); a major river system impacted by historic mining pollution and more recent anthropogenic inputs. The results show that the enzymatic activity of ALAD is negatively correlated with the total Pb concentration of the whole tissue suggesting that ALAD has considerable potential as a biomarker of lead exposure in C. fluminea. To identify the sources of lead to which bivalves have been exposed, high precision {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}/Pb ratios for C. fluminea confirm that historical mining activities in the Iberian Pyrite Belt are the dominant source of lead pollution in the lower Guadiana River. The isotope patterns however exhibit marked seasonal and geographic variation in response to rainfall and river water management. Locally, other anthropogenic sources of lead have been detected in C. fluminea close to population centres, thus adding to its versatility as a freshwater bio-indicator. Overall, the study highlights the value of natural ecosystems as monitors of water quality and their importance for public health assessment and surveillance.

  2. Bioavailability and toxicity of metals from a contaminated sediment by acid mine drainage: linking exposure-response relationships of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea to contaminated sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Bonnail, Estefanía; Nieto, José Miguel; DelValls, Ángel

    2016-11-01

    Streams and rivers strongly affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) have legal vacuum in terms of assessing the water toxicity, since the use of conventional environmental quality biomarkers is not possible due to the absence of macroinvertebrate organisms. The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea has been widely used as a biomonitor of metal contamination by AMD in freshwater systems. However, these clams are considered an invasive species in Spain and the transplantation in the field study is not allowed by the Environmental Protection Agency. To evaluate the use of the freshwater bivalve C. fluminea as a potential biomonitor for sediments contaminated by AMD, the metal bioavailability and toxicity were investigated in laboratory by exposure of clams to polluted sediments for 14 days. The studied sediments were classified as slightly contaminated with As, Cr, and Ni; moderately contaminated with Co; considerably contaminated with Pb; and heavily contaminated with Cd, Zn, and specially Cu, being reported as very toxic to Microtox. On the fourth day of the exposure, the clams exhibited an increase in concentration of Ga, Ba, Sb, and Bi (more than 100 %), followed by Co, Ni, and Pb (more than 60 %). After the fourth day, a decrease in concentration was observed for almost all metals studied except Ni. An allometric function was used to determine the relationship between the increases in metal concentration in soft tissue and the increasing bioavailable metal concentrations in sediments.

  3. Influence of a step-change in metal exposure (Cd, Cu, Zn) on metal accumulation and subcellular partitioning in a freshwater bivalve, Pyganodon grandis: A long-term transplantation experiment between lakes with contrasting ambient metal levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Sophie [INRS-Eau, Terre et Environnement, Université du Québec, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada); Bonneris, Emmanuelle [INRS-Eau, Terre et Environnement, Université du Québec, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada) and Bayer S.A.S., Bayer CropScience, 16 Rue Jean-Marie Leclair, CP 90106, F 69266 Lyon Cedex 09 (France); Michaud, Annick [INRS-Eau, Terre et Environnement, Université du Québec, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada) and Direction des Évaluations environnementales, Ministère du Développement durable, de l’Environnement et des Parcs, 675, boul. René-Lévesque Est, 6e étage, Québec, QC G1R 5V7 (Canada); Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette [Groupe de Recherche Interuniversitaire en Limnologie et Environnement Aquatique (GRIL), Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Campbell, Peter G.C., E-mail: peter.campbell@ete.inrs.ca [INRS-Eau, Terre et Environnement, Université du Québec, 490 de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? We transferred freshwater bivalves from a reference lake to a Cd and Zn contaminated lake. ? Changes in metal accumulation and subcellular partitioning were followed over time (up to 860 d). ? Metal detoxification strategies differed between target organs (gills vs. digestive gland). ? The ability to handle Cd is inherent in P. grandis, not a trait acquired after long-term adaptation. -- Abstract: The objective of the present field experiment was to identify detoxification responses in the gills and digestive gland of a freshwater unionid bivalve, Pyganodon grandis, subjected to a step-change in metal exposure. Adult bivalves were transferred from a reference site (Lake Opasatica) and a metal-contaminated lake (Lake Héva) to a second contaminated lake (Lake Vaudray) in northwestern Quebec, Canada. Changes in organ metal concentrations, in the subcellular distribution of metals and in metallothionein concentrations were followed over time (t = 0, 132, (400) and 860 days). At each collection time and for each bivalve, the gills and digestive gland were excised and gently homogenized; six sub-cellular fractions were separated by differential centrifugation and analyzed for their Cd, Cu and Zn content, and metallothionein was quantified independently. Metal detoxification strategies were shown to differ between target organs: in the gills, incoming metals were sequestered largely in the granules, whereas in the digestive gland the same metals primarily accumulated in the cytosol, in the metallothionein-like protein fraction. These metal-handling strategies, as employed by the metal-naïve bivalves originating in the reference lake, closely resemble those identified in free-living P. grandis chronically exposed in the metal-contaminated lake, suggesting that the ability to handle incoming metals (Cd in particular) is inherent in P. grandis and is not a trait acquired after long-term adaptation of the bivalve to metal-contaminated environments. The

  4. TiO2nanoparticles in sediments: Effect on the bioavailability of heavy metals in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiulei; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Hu, Bin; Wang, Xun

    2018-01-15

    Most studies investigating the influence of TiO 2 NPs on heavy metal bioavailability have focused on the aqueous phase; however, few have examined the sediments containing more nanoparticles. Here, we investigated the effects of TiO 2 NPs on heavy metal bioavailability in C. fluminea in sediments. The interactions between the TiO 2 NPs and metals in sediments, the influence of TiO 2 NPs on metals levels in aqueous phase and geochemical speciation were also explored. The results indicated the large adsorption capacity of TiO 2 NPs and the strong adsorption affinity to metals caused the metals adsorbed on nanoparticles, which decreased the metals concentrations in water phase. Changes in metal speciation caused by metals in EXC, CAR, and IMO partly transported from sediments to TiO 2 NPs during the aging of sediments. Heavy metals contents in C. fluminea tissues were in the order of gill>visceral mass>mantle>foot and increased with the increasing TiO 2 NPs contents in sediments. TiO 2 NPs enhanced the bioavailability of metals in the speciation of EXC, CAR, and IMO in sediments by the Trojan horse effects. The results can facilitate a more realistic evaluation of the environmental risks of TiO 2 NPs to benthic organisms in heavy metal-contaminated sediments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Field transplantation of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea along a polymetallic contamination gradient (River Lot, France): 2. Metallothionein response to metal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudrimont, M.; Andres, S.; Metivaud, J.; Lapaquellerie, Y.; Ribeyre, F.; Maillet, N.; Latouche, C.; Boudou, A.

    1999-11-01

    Specimens of the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea were transplanted from a clean lacustrine site to four stations along a polymetallic pollution gradient in the river Lot, France, downstream from an old Zn ore treatment facility (see Part 1). From April to September 1996, the authors studied Cd and Zn bioaccumulation and the metallothionein-like metal-binding protein (MT) concentrations by subsampling the ages at t = 0, 21, 49, 85, 120, and 150 d. Marked differences were observed among the four stations. At the most polluted station Riou-Mort, MT concentrations did not increase despite very rapid metal accumulation; all mollusks died between days 49 and 85, suggesting that the metal detoxification mechanisms were overwhelmed at this station. At the next station downstream, the final levels of bioaccumulated metal after 150 d were as high as those at the Riou-Mort station, but in this case the MT concentrations also increased progressively with positive correlations between MT and metal concentrations; no mortality was observed, but a significant growth inhibition was revealed in comparison to the reference site, with a lack of correlation between MT and reduced growth. Subcellular metal partitioning, as determined by size-exclusion chromatography, revealed that most of the Cd was sequestered by MT. In contrast, most of the Zn was bound to low molecular weight proteins, the MT fraction representing only 12% of cytosolic zn. These data show the marked role of MT toward Cd bioaccumulation and toxic effects on this freshwater bivalve species.

  6. Addressing Speciation in the Effect Factor for Characterisation of Freshwater Ecotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Karen Søgaard; Holm, Peter E; Borggaard, Ole K

    2011-01-01

    values for Cu show variations of one to several orders of magnitude for the same organism, but the study indicates that the large variation is caused by differences in water chemistry of the test media influencing the metal speciation. The relationship between the calculated free Cu2+ ion concentration...... the media contains more than 1 mg/L of DOC, and since Cu in such complexes has limited availability to the test organisms. Conclusions: These results suggest that speciation should be taken into account in the modelling of both EFs and fate factors (FF) for LCIA, and the EF for Cu in the aquatic environment...

  7. Lead accumulation (adsorption and absorption) by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea in sediments contaminated by TiO2nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiulei; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Hu, Bin; Wang, Xun

    2017-12-01

    With the increasing production and applications of TiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs), their presence in aquatic environments, especially in sediments, will inevitably increase over time. Most studies investigating the influence of TiO 2 NPs on the bioaccumulation of co-existing contaminants have focused on the aqueous phase; however, few have examined the sediment phase, which contains more TiO 2 NPs and contaminants. We investigated the effects of TiO 2 NPs on Pb accumulation by Corbicula fluminea in sediments, and explored extracellular and intracellular Pb concentrations in the various soft tissues of the bivalve. Pb was spiked with 50 mg/kg in sediment and TiO 2 NPs/sediments ratios were within the range 0.2-3.0%. The results showed that TiO 2 NPs presented larger adsorption capacity and affinity to Pb ions than the sediments. In addition, the large adsorption capacity of TiO 2 NPs and the strong adsorption affinity to Pb ions caused part of the Pb ions released from sediments to aqueous phase were re-adsorbed by TiO 2 NPs in sediments. The concentration of TiO 2 NPs in C. fluminea tissues significantly increased with increasing TiO 2 NP content in sediments, following the order: gill > mantle > foot > visceral mass, which differed from the results found in the aqueous phase. In addition, the proportions of extracellular and intracellular Pb concentrations changed significantly in all the tissues as a result of TiO 2 NP contamination of sediments. TiO 2 NPs promote increased extracellular Pb in foot, mantle, and gill tissues, and increased intracellular Pb in the visceral mass. These results may be beneficial to more scientifically evaluate and predict the environmental risks of TiO 2 NPs to benthic organisms in sediments contaminated by heavy metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Potential role of cholinesterases in the invasive capacity of the freshwater bivalve, Anodonta woodiana (Bivalvia: Unionacea): a comparative study with the indigenous species of the genus, Anodonta sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Ilaria; Pastore, Angela Maria; Lodde, Antonella; Palmerini, Emanuela; Castagnolo, Lucio; Focardi, Silvano

    2007-04-01

    To address the potential role of cholinesterase enzymes in the invasive capacity of species, the present study investigated ChE activity in the invasive freshwater bivalve Anodonta woodiana (Lea, 1834) comparing it with that of the indigenous species, Anodonta sp. (Linnaeus, 1758). The invasive capacity of pests has often been linked to their ecological plasticity and high intrinsic genetic variability; however the role played by molecular and cellular mechanisms, generally known as an organism's response to pollution, is unclear. Different substrates and selective ChE enzyme inhibitors were investigated in digestive gland, foot, gonad, adductor muscle and gill tissues while sensitivity to four organophosphate (OP) insecticides was investigated in vitro only in adductor muscle. The invasive species (A. woodiana) showed significantly greater (at least one order of magnitude) ChE activity than the endemic species (Anodonta sp.) (pindigenous species Anodonta sp. Similar IC(50) of 10(-5)-10(-6) M were observed for DFP and azamethiphos in both species. The hypotheses of other authors that acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is involved in the control of many essential functions, such as frontal ciliary activity of gill epithelium, temperature resistance, ciliary activity for transport of suspended particulate, valve opening and embryo development, suggest that the high catalytic efficiency of the invasive species may endow it with a competitive advantage over the endemic species. In view of the peculiar reproductive strategy of these mussels, higher ChE vs. ASCh activity in gonads of the invasive species could also favour glochidium production and embryo development under a wider range of environmental conditions.

  9. Temporal assessment of copper speciation, bioavailability and toxicity in UK freshwaters using chemical equilibrium and biotic ligand models: Implications for compliance with copper environmental quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathouri, Maria; Korre, Anna

    2015-12-15

    Although significant progress has been made in understanding how environmental factors modify the speciation, bioavailability and toxicity of metals such as copper in aquatic environments, the current methods used to establish water quality standards do not necessarily consider the different geological and geochemical characteristics of a given site and the factors that affect copper fate, bioavailability potential and toxicity. In addition, the temporal variation in the concentration and bioavailable metal fraction is also important in freshwater systems. The work presented in this paper illustrates the temporal and seasonal variability of a range of water quality parameters, and Cu speciation, bioavailability and toxicity at four freshwaters sites in the UK. Rivers Coquet, Cree, Lower Clyde and Eden (Kent) were selected to cover a broad range of different geochemical environments and site characteristics. The monitoring data used covered a period of around six years at almost monthly intervals. Chemical equilibrium modelling was used to study temporal variations in Cu speciation and was combined with acute toxicity modelling to assess Cu bioavailability for two aquatic species, Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex. The estimated copper bioavailability, toxicity levels and the corresponding ecosystem risks were analysed in relation to key water quality parameters (alkalinity, pH and DOC). Although copper concentrations did not vary much during the sampling period or between the seasons at the different sites; copper bioavailability varied markedly. In addition, through the chronic-Cu BLM-based on the voluntary risk assessment approach, the potential environmental risk in terms of the chronic toxicity was assessed. A much higher likelihood of toxicity effects was found during the cold period at all sites. It is suggested that besides the metal (copper) concentration in the surface water environment, the variability and seasonality of other important water quality

  10. The influence of lead on different proteins in gill cells from the freshwater bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, from defense to repair biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Caroline T; Souza, Marta M

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of lead (Pb) on regulatory proteins linked to mechanisms of animal adaptation to polluted environments (using in vivo and in vitro tests) and to validate the in vitro assay as a tool for environmental assessment. Specimens of the bivalve Corbicula fluminea were exposed to nominal concentrations of Pb 5 mg l(-1) for 96 h. Isolated gill cells were exposed to three concentrations (1, 10, and 100 μM) for 5 h. Metal toxicity was evaluated by cell viability (trypan blue exclusion). We also analyzed Na+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and carbonic anhydrase activity. Additionally, the multixenobiotic-resistance (MXR) phenotype was evaluated by the accumulation of rhodamine B (RB). Immunolabeling was used to quantify the expression of P-glycoproteins (C219) and proteins involved in ion transport, water movement, and cellular repair using antibodies against Na+/K+ ATPase, aquaporin 1, and heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Pb was shown to be toxic in both in vivo and in vitro tests, in which cellular viability significantly decreased by approximately 25%. Cellular viability in the in vivo assays was determined by gill cell isolation after the entire animal was exposed to Pb. We observed that Na+/K+ ATPase activity was inhibited by 70%. Also, the expression of the MXR phenotype significantly increased in our in vivo tests. A statistically significant difference was observed in the expression of all proteins in the in vitro assays, whereas only Hsp70 increased in vivo. Employing these analyses, we could validate the sensitivity of the in vitro tests and can propose our in vitro model as a possible tool for environmental assessment.

  11. Sequencing, De Novo Assembly, and Annotation of the Transcriptome of the Endangered Freshwater Pearl Bivalve, Cristaria plicata, Provides Novel Insights into Functional Genes and Marker Discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhusan Patnaik

    Full Text Available The freshwater mussel Cristaria plicata (Bivalvia: Eulamellibranchia: Unionidae, is an economically important species in molluscan aquaculture due to its use in pearl farming. The species have been listed as endangered in South Korea due to the loss of natural habitats caused by anthropogenic activities. The decreasing population and a lack of genomic information on the species is concerning for environmentalists and conservationists. In this study, we conducted a de novo transcriptome sequencing and annotation analysis of C. plicata using Illumina HiSeq 2500 next-generation sequencing (NGS technology, the Trinity assembler, and bioinformatics databases to prepare a sustainable resource for the identification of candidate genes involved in immunity, defense, and reproduction.The C. plicata transcriptome analysis included a total of 286,152,584 raw reads and 281,322,837 clean reads. The de novo assembly identified a total of 453,931 contigs and 374,794 non-redundant unigenes with average lengths of 731.2 and 737.1 bp, respectively. Furthermore, 100% coverage of C. plicata mitochondrial genes within two unigenes supported the quality of the assembler. In total, 84,274 unigenes showed homology to entries in at least one database, and 23,246 unigenes were allocated to one or more Gene Ontology (GO terms. The most prominent GO biological process, cellular component, and molecular function categories (level 2 were cellular process, membrane, and binding, respectively. A total of 4,776 unigenes were mapped to 123 biological pathways in the KEGG database. Based on the GO terms and KEGG annotation, the unigenes were suggested to be involved in immunity, stress responses, sex-determination, and reproduction. A total of 17,251 cDNA simple sequence repeats (cSSRs were identified from 61,141 unigenes (size of >1 kb with the most abundant being dinucleotide repeats.This dataset represents the first transcriptome analysis of the endangered mollusc, C. plicata

  12. Characterization of freshwater bivalves as radio contamination ({sup 57}Co, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 134}Cs) bio-indicators in a metallic multi pollution context (Cd, Zn); Caracterisation de mollusques dulcaquicoles en tant que bioindicateurs de radiocontamination dans un contexte de multipollution metallique (Cd, Zn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraysse, B

    2001-07-01

    This study concerns freshwater bio-indicators of radio-contamination, in a metallic multi-pollution context. Metals, such as cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn), are widely represented in aquatic ecosystems, and their concentrations can induce physiological effects. This chronicle exposure generates both metabolic and behaviour stress of individuals, and can also yield to detoxification mechanisms induction. The main goal of this work was to estimate the influence of metals on the radionuclides ({sup 57}Co, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 134}Cs) bioaccumulation by two different bivalve species (Corbicula fluminea et Dreissena polymorpha), by studying the contamination level, the kinetic of the radionuclide transfer and the soft-body repartition. As the exploratory feature of this study, two parts have been developed: (i) testing the problematic suitability in a really bio-monitoring situation, and (ii) analysing the metal/radionuclide interaction mechanisms under controlled and standardised conditions (laboratory). For the different experimental conditions explored (laboratory and field), radionuclide bioaccumulation by freshwater bivalves has been influenced by metal exposure. This result was obtained after assessing a decrease of the organisms contamination level by radionuclide and their accumulation rate, an increase of their depuration rate and tissue and cellular repartition changes. (author)

  13. Viruses infecting bivalve molluscs

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan; Novoa, Beatriz

    2004-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are filter feeders and as a consequence they may bioaccumulate in their tissues viruses that infect humans and higher vertebrates. However, there have also been described mortalities of bivalve molluscs associated with viruses belonging to different families. Mass mortalities of adult Portuguese oysters, Crassostrea angulata, among French livestocks (between 1967 and 1973) were associated with irido-like virus infections. Herpesviruses were reported in the eastern oyster, Pac...

  14. Viruses of bivalve shellfish

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan

    2006-01-01

    Les mollusques bivalves sont des filtreurs et de ce fait ils peuvent accumuler dans leurs tissus des virus d'origine anthropique. Par ailleurs, des mortalités ont été rapportées chez les bivalves en association à la détection de virus apparentés à différentes familles. Ainsi, des mortalités massives de l'huître portugaise, Crassostrea angulata, ont été observées entre 1967 et 1973 en France et associées à la présence de virus interprétés comme appartenant à la famille des Iridoviridae. Par ai...

  15. Field transplantation of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea along a polymetallic contamination gradient (River Lot, France): 1. Geochemical characteristics of the sampling sites and cadmium and zinc bioccumulation kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, S.; Baudrimont, M.; Lapaquellerie, Y.; Ribeyre, F.; Maillet, N.; Latouche, C.; Boudou, A.

    1999-11-01

    Specimens of the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea were transplanted from a clean lacustrine site to four stations along a polymetallic gradient in the river Lot (France), downstream from an old Zn ore treatment facility. The bivalves were held in benthic cages for a 5-month exposure period, April to September 1996; mollusk growth and metal bioaccumulation kinetics (Cd, Zn) were followed by subsampling the cages at t = 0, 21, 49, 85, 120, and 150 d. Rates of Cd bioaccumulation in the whole soft bodies and in individual organs were greater at the upstream stations located close to the pollution source, but there was no direct proportionality between Cd in the bivalves and in the unfiltered or filtered river water samples. Unlike the case for Cd, rates of Zn bioaccumulation did not reflect the contamination gradient. Marked growth differences were measured among the four stations, reflecting both nutritional differences and changes in the degree of metal contamination; these growth differences produced markedly different trends when metal bioaccumulation was expressed in terms of burdens rather than concentrations.

  16. Can bivalve veligers escape feeding currents of adult bivalves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, K.; Veldhuizen, R.; Stamhuis, E.J.; Wolff, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    While the stock of introduced Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) increased in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands), so did the filtration pressure of all bivalve species together. In the same period, stocks of native bivalves declined slightly. The expansion of Pacific oysters in Dutch

  17. Recirculation nursery systems for bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamermans, P.; Blanco Garcia, A.; Joaquim, Sandra; Matias, Domitilia; Magnesen, Thorolf; Nicolas, J.; Petten, Bruno; Robert, Rene

    2016-01-01

    n order to increase production of bivalves in hatcheries and nurseries, the development of new technology and its integration into commercial bivalve hatcheries is important. Recirculation aquaculture systems (RASs) have several advantages: high densities of the species can be cultured resulting in

  18. An isotope mass balance model for the correlation of freshwater bivalve shell (Unio pictorum carbonate δ18O to climatic conditions and water δ18O in Lake Balaton (Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella SCHÖLL-BARNA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen isotope composition of bivalve shells (δ18Oshell can potentially record environmental variability of shallow lakes and therefore it has been extensively used as a proxy in the reconstruction of past climate and environmental conditions. As δ18Oshell reflects - besides the water temperature - the oxygen isotope composition of lake water (δ18OL, it is required to interpret the quality and impact of parameters influencing the δ18OL. Using the isotope mass balance model, I tested the hypothesis that Balaton lake water δ18O variability can be described as a result of the combined effects of three main climatic parameters such as river runoff, precipitation and evaporation. I calculated δ18OL time series for the period 1999-2008 for the whole water body at Siófok (eastern part of Lake Balaton, Hungary based on measured precipitation, inflow and evaporation amount and measured inflow, precipitation δ18O and calculated vapour δ18O data. The comparison of the modelled δ18OL time series to measured surface δ18OL data revealed that δ18O of Balaton water is sensitive for variation of climatic parameters. This variability is most striking at the surface, while according to the results of the model, the whole water body itself is less sensitive. Monthly differences suggest that generally during summer the whole water body is mixed up, while moderate isotope stratification (0.3-0.7‰ difference between surface and whole water body can be assumed in early spring and autumn. Predictions of shell δ18O values were made using the measured surface water δ18O data and the modelled δ18O values for the whole water body. High-resolution sampling was conducted on two Unio pictorum shells covering the period of 2001-2008, and both predictions were compared to measured shell δ18O records. The results showed that the prediction for the whole water body gives a better fit to the measured shell δ18O, suggesting that the whole water body better

  19. Bivalve carrying capacity in coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dame, R.F.; Prins, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    carrying capacity of suspension feeding bivalves in 11 coastal and estuarine ecosystems is examined. Bivalve carrying capacity is defined in terms of water mass residence time, primary production time and bivalve clearance time. Turnover times for the 11 ecosystems are compared both two and three

  20. Galeommatid bivalves from Phuket, Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established. The spec......Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established...

  1. Dioxin-like chemicals in bivalves and sediment collected from around Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J.F.; Muller, R.; Goudkamp, K. [EnTox, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (AU)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    The aquatic environment is a significant sink for persistent organic pollutants including dioxin-like chemicals. Besides continuous investigations into sources of higher chlorinated PCDD that have initially been found in soils, and later in dugong and sediments little is known about the levels of dioxin-like chemicals in Australia's aquatic environment. In 2002 the National Dioxin Program (NDP) was commissioned by the Department of Environment and Heritage, Australia. One focus of the NDP was to evaluate background levels of dioxin-like chemicals in Australia's environment. One component of the 'Environmental Levels' project aimed to identify dioxinlike chemicals in the aquatic environment including bivalves collected in both marine, estuarine and freshwater systems. Here we report results from the NDP aquatic study with a particular emphasis on the levels of dioxin-like chemicals in bivalves and sediments respectively in areas from where the bivalves were collected.

  2. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. Proteomic profiling of cytosolic glutathione transferases from three bivalve species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, José Carlos; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; da Fonseca, Rute; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2014-01-27

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties) between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism.

  4. Proteomic Profiling of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferases from Three Bivalve Species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs, in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism.

  5. Bivalve aquaculture-environment interactions in the context of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Guyondet, Thomas; Comeau, Luc A; Tremblay, Réjean

    2016-12-01

    Coastal embayments are at risk of impacts by climate change drivers such as ocean warming, sea level rise and alteration in precipitation regimes. The response of the ecosystem to these drivers is highly dependent on their magnitude of change, but also on physical characteristics such as bay morphology and river discharge, which play key roles in water residence time and hence estuarine functioning. These considerations are especially relevant for bivalve aquaculture sites, where the cultured biomass can alter ecosystem dynamics. The combination of climate change, physical and aquaculture drivers can result in synergistic/antagonistic and nonlinear processes. A spatially explicit model was constructed to explore effects of the physical environment (bay geomorphic type, freshwater inputs), climate change drivers (sea level, temperature, precipitation) and aquaculture (bivalve species, stock) on ecosystem functioning. A factorial design led to 336 scenarios (48 hydrodynamic × 7 management). Model outcomes suggest that the physical environment controls estuarine functioning given its influence on primary productivity (bottom-up control dominated by riverine nutrients) and horizontal advection with the open ocean (dominated by bay geomorphic type). The intensity of bivalve aquaculture ultimately determines the bivalve-phytoplankton trophic interaction, which can range from a bottom-up control triggered by ammonia excretion to a top-down control via feeding. Results also suggest that temperature is the strongest climate change driver due to its influence on the metabolism of poikilothermic organisms (e.g. zooplankton and bivalves), which ultimately causes a concomitant increase of top-down pressure on phytoplankton. Given the different thermal tolerance of cultured species, temperature is also critical to sort winners from losers, benefiting Crassostrea virginica over Mytilus edulis under the specific conditions tested in this numerical exercise. In general, it is

  6. [Geographic variations in freshwater molluscs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinarskiĭ, M V

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of geographic variation is known in practically all taxa of living beings. However, the reality of this phenomenon in freshwater molluscs (snails and bivalves) has many times been questioned in the past. It was accepted that these animals do not demonstrate spatially-oriented variation, where specific "local race" is arisen in each specific habitat. Till the beginning of 1970s, there was no statistical evidence that geographic clines in freshwater molluscs really exist. However, a few species of freshwater molluscs has been studied in this respect so far, therefore it is almost impossible to draw any general patterns of geographical variation in this group of animals. Most species of freshwater molluscs studied to the date exhibit statistically significant decrease of their body size in the south-north direction. Perhaps, it may be explained by decrease of the duration of the growth season in high latitudes. Some species of freshwater snails demonstrate clinal changes in shell proportions. This allows to reject subspecies separation within these species since diagnostic characters of such "subspecies" may blur when geographic variation is taken into consideration. The data on geographic variation in anatomical traits in freshwater molluscs is much more scarce. At least one species of pond snails (Lymnaea terebra) demonstrates clinal variation in proportions of the copulative apparatus in the south-north direction. Further studies of geographic variation in freshwater molluscs should reveal whether it is truly adaptive, i.e. whether geographical clines have underlying genetic basis. Otherwise, the clines may arise as a result of direct modifying effect of a habitat.

  7. Mercury concentration in bivalve molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szkoda Józef

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 85 mussel samples of eight species were examined. Analysis of mercury in the freeze-dried samples was carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry method using direct mercury analyser AMA 254. The analytical procedure for determination of mercury was covered by the quality assurance programme of research and participation in national and international proficiency tests. Concentrations of total mercury in all investigated samples were found to be generally low, in the range of 0.033-0.577 mg/kg of dry weight and of 0.003-0.045 mg/kg of wet weight. The results indicate that obtained levels of mercury in bivalve molluscs are not likely to pose a risk to the health of consumers.

  8. Uptake of contaminants of emerging concern by the bivalves Anodonta californiensis and Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Niveen S; Müller, Claudia E; Morgan, Rachel R; Luthy, Richard G

    2014-08-19

    Uptake of seven contaminants regularly detected in surface waters and spanning a range of hydrophobicities (log D(ow) -1 to 5) was studied for two species of freshwater bivalves, the native mussel Anodonta californiensis and the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea. Batch systems were utilized to determine compound partitioning, and flow-through systems, comparable to environmental conditions in effluent dominated surface waters, were used to determine uptake and depuration kinetics. Uptake of compounds was independent of bivalve type. Log bioconcentration factor (BCF) values were correlated with log D(ow) for nonionized compounds with the highest BCF value obtained for triclocarban (TCC). TCC concentrations were reduced in the water column due to bivalve activity. Anionic compounds with low D(ow) values, i.e., clofibric acid and ibuprofen, were not removed from water, while the organic cation propranolol showed biouptake similar to that of TCC. Batch experiments supported compound uptake patterns observed in flow-through experiments. Contaminant removal from water was observed through accumulation in tissue or settling as excreted pseudofeces or feces. The outcomes of this study indicate the potential utility of bivalve augmentation to improve water quality by removing hydrophobic trace organic compounds found in natural systems.

  9. Metallothionein coding sequence identification and seasonal mRNA expression of detoxification genes in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Aurélie; Doyen, Périne; Vasseur, Paule; Rodius, François

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a metallothionein (MT) coding sequence from the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea and to measure the seasonal transcriptional pattern of MT in parallel with several detoxification genes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferases (GST) and glutathione peroxidases (GPx), in the digestive gland and the gills of this bivalve during a 1-year period. We identified a C. fluminea MT complete cDNA sequence using RT-PCR and RACE-PCR. The amino acid sequence deduced from the coding sequence encodes for a protein of 73 amino acids containing 21 cysteine residues. This protein exhibits high identities and similarities with the MT sequences of numerous bivalves. MT, SOD, CAT, pi-GST and Se-GPx expression patterns did not exhibit major seasonal variations. A slight increase of MT was observed in July. Therefore, the mRNA expression of these five genes could be used as biomarkers for monitoring studies.

  10. Morphological diversity of microstructures occurring in selected recent bivalve shells and their ecological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Krzysztof Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental adaptation of molluscs during evolution has led to form biomineral exoskeleton – shell. The main compound of their shells is calcium carbonate, which is represented by calcite and/or aragonite. The mineral part, together with the biopolymer matrix, forms many types of microstructures, which are differ in texture. Different types of internal shell microstructures are characteristic for some bivalve groups. Studied bivalve species (freshwater species – duck mussel (Anodonta anatina Linnaeus, 1758 and marine species – common cockle (Cerastoderma edule Linnaeus, 1758, lyrate Asiatic hard clam (Meretrix lyrata Sowerby II, 1851 and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 from different locations and environmental conditions, show that the internal shell microstructure with the shell morphology and thickness have critical impact to the ability to survive in changing environment and also to the probability of surviving predator attack. Moreover, more detailed studies on molluscan structures might be responsible for create mechanically resistant nanomaterials.

  11. Microplastics in commercial bivalves from China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiana; Yang, Dongqi; Li, Lan; Jabeen, Khalida; Shi, Huahong

    2015-01-01

    We investigated microplastic pollution in 9 commercial bivalves from a fishery market in China. Multiple types of microplastics, including fibers, fragments and pellets, occurred in the tissue of all bivalves. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.1 to 10.5 items/g and from 4.3 to 57.2 items/individual for bivalves. Scapharca subcrenata contained on average 10.5 items/g and exhibited the highest levels of microplastics by weight. Fibers were the most common microplastics and consisted of more than half of the total microplastics in each of the 8 species. In Alectryonella plicatula, pellets accounted for 60% of the total microplastics. The most common size class was less than 250 μm and accounted for 33–84% of the total microplastics calculated by species. Our results suggest that microplastic pollution was widespread and exhibited a relatively high level in commercial bivalves from China. More intensive investigations on microplastics should be conducted in seafood. - Highlights: • Fiber, fragment and pellet microplastics were found in 9 bivalves. • The abundance of microplastics was 2.1–10.5 items/g. • Fibers were the most common microplastics. • The most common size class of microplastics was less than 250 μm. • Microplastic pollution was widespread and serious in commercial bivalves. - Fiber, fragment and pellet microplastics in the range of 2.1–10.5 items/g were observed in 9 species of commercially popular bivalves from China.

  12. The use of bivalves as rapid, real-time indicators of aquatic pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markich, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The ability of bivalves to filter large volumes of water on a daily basis, combined with the relatively high permeability of their cell membranes, make them valuable organisms to use in the contemporary detection of pollution. Bivalves are well known to respond to chemical contaminants by isolating their soft tissues from the aquatic medium by valve closure. The sensory acuity (via specialized sensory regions including the osphradium) and associated repertoire of this behavioral response can be employed to assess subtle effects exerted by chemical contaminants, such as complex effluents, that may ultimately influence the survival of these organisms. As hazard assessment tools, behavioral studies reflect sublethal toxicity and often yield a highly sensitive estimate of the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC). Moreover, valve movement behavior has been identified as one of the more sensitive biological early warning measures to a variety of aquatic contaminants, in comparison with those used in other aquatic animal phyla. Therefore, the valve movement behavior of both freshwater (Hyridella depressa, Velesunio angasi and V. ambiguus) and marine (Mytilus edulis) bivalves was continuously monitored, using an on-line computer based data acquisition system, during exposure to either trace metals (e.g. Cu, Cd, Mn and U) or complex effluents (ie treated sewage effluent and acid leachate derived from contaminated Sydney Harbour sediments), in the context of using the valve movement behavior of the bivalve species to indicate the biological significance of exposure to the above-mentioned pollutants. The results indicate that several components of the valve movement behavior of each bivalve provide quantifiable and ecologically interpretable sub-lethal endpoints for the rapid and sensitive evaluation of waters containing either complex effluents or elevated levels of trace metals

  13. Morphology, Structure of Dimorphic Sperm, and Reproduction in the Hermaphroditic Commensal Bivalve Pseudopythina tsurumaru (Galeommatoidea: Kellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Jespersen, Åse; Takahashi, Tohru

    2004-01-01

    Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma......Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma...

  14. Internal distribution of uranium and associated genotoxic damages in the chronically exposed bivalve Corbicula fluminea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Adam, Christelle; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    Uranium (U) internal distribution and involved effects in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been studied after direct chronic exposure (90 d, 10 {mu}g.L-1). U distribution was assessed at the subcellular level (Metal Rich Granules -MRG-, pellets and cytosol fractions) in two main organs of the bivalve (gills and visceral mass). Micro-localisation was investigated by TEM-EDX analysis in the gills epithelium. DNA damage in gill and hemolymph samples was measured by the Comet assay. The 90-d exposure period led to a significant increase of U concentration in gills over time (x5) and a large U quantity in subcellular granules in gills. Finally, a significant increase (x2) in DNA damage was noted in exposed gills and haemocytes. This study shows that the accumulation levels and consequently the potential toxicity cannot be successfully predicted only on the basis of concentration in water or in tissues and subcellular fractions after chronic exposure. - Highlights: > Relevant information concerning the chronic impact of uranium on biota is scarce. > We study its biological speciation to explain bioavailability, accumulation, toxicity. > 80% of U accumulated was measured in the pellet fraction (organelles + granules/MRG). > Chronic exposure to U induced genetic damage in gill and haemolymph cells of the bivalve.

  15. Travel report Mauritania bivalve Molluscs october 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last four years Mauritania has been working on the completion of a Food Safety Program of Bivalve Mollusks, in order to obtain an export approval by the Europe Union. During the preparations for an inspection by the FVO (Food and Veterinary Office) no fisheries or production activities

  16. Microplastics in commercial bivalves from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiana; Yang, Dongqi; Li, Lan; Jabeen, Khalida; Shi, Huahong

    2015-12-01

    We investigated microplastic pollution in 9 commercial bivalves from a fishery market in China. Multiple types of microplastics, including fibers, fragments and pellets, occurred in the tissue of all bivalves. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.1 to 10.5 items/g and from 4.3 to 57.2 items/individual for bivalves. Scapharca subcrenata contained on average 10.5 items/g and exhibited the highest levels of microplastics by weight. Fibers were the most common microplastics and consisted of more than half of the total microplastics in each of the 8 species. In Alectryonella plicatula, pellets accounted for 60% of the total microplastics. The most common size class was less than 250 μm and accounted for 33-84% of the total microplastics calculated by species. Our results suggest that microplastic pollution was widespread and exhibited a relatively high level in commercial bivalves from China. More intensive investigations on microplastics should be conducted in seafood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bivalves: From individual to population modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saraiva, S.; van der Meer, J.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    An individual based population model for bivalves was designed, built and tested in a 0D approach, to simulate the population dynamics of a mussel bed located in an intertidal area. The processes at the individual level were simulated following the dynamic energy budget theory, whereas initial egg

  18. Bivalve grazing can shape phytoplankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa; Cloern, James E.; Thompson, Janet K.; Stacey, Mark T.; Koseff, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bivalve filter feeders to limit phytoplankton biomass in shallow waters is well-documented, but the role of bivalves in shaping phytoplankton communities is not. The coupled effect of bivalve grazing at the sediment-water interface and sinking of phytoplankton cells to that bottom filtration zone could influence the relative biomass of sinking (diatoms) and non-sinking phytoplankton. Simulations with a pseudo-2D numerical model showed that benthic filter feeding can interact with sinking to alter diatom:non-diatom ratios. Cases with the smallest proportion of diatom biomass were those with the fastest sinking speeds and strongest bivalve grazing rates. Hydrodynamics modulated the coupled sinking-grazing influence on phytoplankton communities. For example, in simulations with persistent stratification, the non-sinking forms accumulated in the surface layer away from bottom grazers while the sinking forms dropped out of the surface layer toward bottom grazers. Tidal-scale stratification also influenced vertical gradients of the two groups in opposite ways. The model was applied to Suisun Bay, a low-salinity habitat of the San Francisco Bay system that was transformed by the introduction of the exotic clam Potamocorbula amurensis. Simulation results for this Bay were similar to (but more muted than) those for generic habitats, indicating that P. amurensis grazing could have caused a disproportionate loss of diatoms after its introduction. Our model simulations suggest bivalve grazing affects both phytoplankton biomass and community composition in shallow waters. We view these results as hypotheses to be tested with experiments and more complex modeling approaches.

  19. Chemical Speciation - General Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page includes general information about the Chemical Speciation Network that is not covered on the main page. Commonly visited documents, including calendars, site lists, and historical files for the program are listed here

  20. Arsenic speciation results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Linear combination fitting results of synchrotron data to determine arsenic speciation in soil samples. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  1. Uranium Speciation and Bioavailability in Aquatic Systems: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Markich

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of uranium (U in relation to its bioavailability is reviewed for surface waters (fresh- and seawater and their sediments. A summary of available analytical and modeling techniques for determining U speciation is also presented. U(VI is the major form of U in oxic surface waters, while U(IV is the major form in anoxic waters. The bioavailability of U (i.e., its ability to bind to or traverse the cell surface of an organism is dependent on its speciation, or physicochemical form. U occurs in surface waters in a variety of physicochemical forms, including the free metal ion (U4+ or UO22+ and complexes with inorganic ligands (e.g., uranyl carbonate or uranyl phosphate, and humic substances (HS (e.g., uranyl fulvate in dissolved, colloidal, and/or particulate forms. Although the relationship between U speciation and bioavailability is complex, there is reasonable evidence to indicate that UO22+ and UO2OH+ are the major forms of U(VI available to organisms, rather than U in strong complexes (e.g., uranyl fulvate or adsorbed to colloidal and/or particulate matter. U(VI complexes with inorganic ligands (e.g., carbonate or phosphate and HS apparently reduce the bioavailability of U by reducing the activity of UO22+ and UO2OH+. The majority of studies have used the results from thermodynamic speciation modeling to support these conclusions. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is the only analytical technique able to directly determine specific U species, but is limited in use to freshwaters of low pH and ionic strength. Nearly all of the available information relating the speciation of U to its bioavailability has been derived using simple, chemically defined experimental freshwaters, rather than natural waters. No data are available for estuarine or seawater. Furthermore, there are no available data on the relationship between U speciation and bioavailability in sediments. An understanding of this relationship has been

  2. Turtles: Freshwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J. Whitfield; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Bowden, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    With their iconic shells, turtles are morphologically distinct in being the only extant or extinct vertebrate animals to have their shoulders and hips inside their rib cages. By the time an asteroid hit the earth 65.5 million years ago, causing the extinction of dinosaurs, turtles were already an ancient lineage that was 70% through their evolutionary history to date. The remarkable evolutionary success of turtles over 220 million years is due to a combination of both conservative and effective life history traits and an essentially unchanging morphology that withstood the test of time. However, the life history traits of many species make them particularly susceptible to overharvest and habitat destruction in the modern world, and a majority of the world’s species face serious conservation challenges with several extinctions documented in modern times. The global plight of turtles is underscored by the fact that the percentage of imperiled species exceeds that of even the critically endangered primates.Freshwater turtles, with over 260 recognized species, have become a focus on a worldwide scale for many conservation issues. This article is a synthesis of a diverse body of information on the general biology of freshwater turtles, with particular emphasis on the extensive research on ecology, life history, and behavior that has been accomplished in the last half century. Much of the research has been applicable to the aforementioned conservation challenges. The studies presented include a combination of laboratory and field experiments and observational studies on this intriguing group of animals.

  3. Artificially evolved functional shell morphology of burrowing bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, D. P.; Schatz, W.; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger

    2014-01-01

    The morphological evolution of bivalves is documented by a rich fossil record. It is believed that the shell shape and surface sculpture play an important role for the burrowing performance of endobenthic species. While detailed morphometric studies of bivalve shells have been done, there are alm...

  4. Davis Pond freshwater prediversion biomonitoring study: freshwater fisheries and eagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  5. Manganese speciation in Diplodon chilensis patagonicus shells: a XANES study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, A. L.; Vicente-Vilas, V.; Goettlicher, J.; Jacob, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    In addition to other types of climate archives, biogenic skeletons of a variety of different organisms (i.e. shells of bivalves, skeletal hard parts of corals or sponges) are increasingly used for high-resolution climate reconstructions. Bivalves are particularly suited for such analyses because they are geographically broadly distributed and have been shown to record climate and environmental information reliably and over long time intervals. Variation of environmental parameters such as food supply, substratum type, salinity, illumination, temperature, concentration of dissolved oxygen or oxygen/carbon dioxide ratio, among others, may affect growth pattern, shell structure, mineralogy, isotopic fractionation and chemistry. Thus, shell features, minor and trace element composition patterns and isotopic signals may serve as an archive of environmental history. In turn, palaeoclimatic parameters such as ambient temperature, precipitation gradients, seawater salinity and primary production can be reconstructed from the shells by means of sclerochronological and geochemical methods. However, the distribution of minor and trace elements in the biominerals is not only influenced by the environment or vital effects, but also by intrinsic biomineralisation parameters like the carbonate polymorphism and the mineral habit (Soldati et al., 2008a). Generally, it is assumed that the X2+ ions are replacing the Ca2+ ion in the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) structure, but newest findings show that amorphous (or disordered) phases may play a role in hosting some of the elements use as proxies (Meibom et al., 2008; and Finch and Allison, 2007). In this work we focused on the freshwater clam Diplodon chilensis patagonicus, a widely distributed inhabitant of lakes and rivers in southern South America. Thanks to its long life span and seasonal growth Diplodon mussels exhibit excellent characteristics to construct an accurate chronological archive, with time windows of up to around a

  6. Cambrian bivalved arthropod reveals origin of arthrodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, David A.; Sutton, Mark D.; Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Extant arthropods are diverse and ubiquitous, forming a major constituent of most modern ecosystems. Evidence from early Palaeozoic Konservat Lagerstätten indicates that this has been the case since the Cambrian. Despite this, the details of arthropod origins remain obscure, although most hypotheses regard the first arthropods as benthic predators or scavengers such as the fuxianhuiids or megacheirans (‘great-appendage’ arthropods). Here, we describe a new arthropod from the Tulip Beds locality of the Burgess Shale Formation (Cambrian, series 3, stage 5) that possesses a weakly sclerotized thorax with filamentous appendages, encased in a bivalved carapace, and a strongly sclerotized, elongate abdomen and telson. A cladistic analysis resolved this taxon as the basal-most member of a paraphyletic grade of nekto-benthic forms with bivalved carapaces. This grade occurs at the base of Arthropoda (panarthropods with arthropodized trunk limbs) and suggests that arthrodization (sclerotization and jointing of the exoskeleton) evolved to facilitate swimming. Predatory and fully benthic habits evolved later in the euarthropod stem-lineage and are plesiomorphically retained in pycnogonids (sea spiders) and euchelicerates (horseshoe crabs and arachnids). PMID:23055069

  7. Three simple biomarkers useful in conducting water quality assessments with bivalve mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaise, Christian; Gagné, François; Burgeot, Thierry

    2017-12-01

    While biomarkers are undeniably key tools in aquatic ecotoxicology to measure adverse effects linked to contamination events, their application is often inhibited by monetary constraints negating the possibility of having access to dedicated equipment, special wares, and/or expensive reagents. To offset this bottleneck, we propose three simple physiological biomarkers, quantifiable in bivalves, that are free of cost considerations and that can provide basic knowledge on animal health and water quality. Indeed, condition index (CI), growth index (GI), and SOS response (air-time survival) comprise measurements straightforward enough to perform by any laboratory or science body on the planet. Long-term monitoring or screening studies can be carried out with these biomarkers and they are able to provide robust information notably after exposure of bivalves to either singular or multiple agents of contamination. By highlighting examples of data generated in aquatic studies conducted in Eastern Canada under both laboratory and field situations with different species of marine and freshwater mollusks, we establish the suitability of these biomarkers for assessing environmental contamination. Their relationships with other biomarkers are also shown which further corroborate their value as reliable indicators of ecosystem health.

  8. Searching for speciation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Benjamin George; Côté, Isabelle M; Emerson, Brent C

    2011-01-01

    Closely related species that show clear phenotypic divergence, but without obvious geographic barriers, can provide opportunities to study how diversification can occur when opportunities for allopatric speciation are limited. We examined genetic divergence in the coral reef fish genus Hypoplectr...... evidence for genes that may be associated with colour morphotype in the genus Hypoplectrus....

  9. Speciation of Dissolved Cadmium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter Engelund; Andersen, Sjur; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    Equilibrium dialysis and ion exchange methods, as well as computer calculations (GEOCHEM), were applied for speciation of dissolved cadmium (Cd) in test solutions and leachate samples. The leachate samples originated from soil, compost, landfill waste and industrial waste. The ion exchange (IE...

  10. Influence of toxic cyanobacteria on community structure and microcystin accumulation of freshwater molluscs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerard, Claudia [ECOBIO, Universite de Rennes 1, CNRS, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France)], E-mail: claudia.gerard@univ-rennes1.fr; Poullain, Virginie [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Lance, Emilie [ECOBIO, Universite de Rennes 1, CNRS, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France); Acou, Anthony [ERT 52, Universite de Rennes 1, CNRS, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France); Brient, Luc; Carpentier, Alexandre [ECOBIO, Universite de Rennes 1, CNRS, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2009-02-15

    Community structure and microcystin accumulation of freshwater molluscs were studied before and after cyanobacterial proliferations, in order to assess the impact of toxic blooms on molluscs and the risk of microcystin transfer in food web. Observed decrease in mollusc abundance and changes in species richness in highly contaminated waters were not significant; however, relative abundances of taxa (prosobranchs, pulmonates, bivalves) were significantly different before and after cyanobacterial bloom. Pulmonates constituted the dominant taxon, and bivalves never occurred after bloom. Microcystin accumulation was significantly higher in molluscs from highly (versus lowly) contaminated waters, in adults (versus juveniles) and in pulmonates (versus prosobranchs and bivalves). Results are discussed according to the ecology of molluscs, their sensitivity and their ability to detoxify. - Proliferations of toxic cyanobacteria may alter the structure of mollusc communities with cyanotoxin accumulation depending on age and taxon.

  11. Influence of toxic cyanobacteria on community structure and microcystin accumulation of freshwater molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Claudia; Poullain, Virginie; Lance, Emilie; Acou, Anthony; Brient, Luc; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    Community structure and microcystin accumulation of freshwater molluscs were studied before and after cyanobacterial proliferations, in order to assess the impact of toxic blooms on molluscs and the risk of microcystin transfer in food web. Observed decrease in mollusc abundance and changes in species richness in highly contaminated waters were not significant; however, relative abundances of taxa (prosobranchs, pulmonates, bivalves) were significantly different before and after cyanobacterial bloom. Pulmonates constituted the dominant taxon, and bivalves never occurred after bloom. Microcystin accumulation was significantly higher in molluscs from highly (versus lowly) contaminated waters, in adults (versus juveniles) and in pulmonates (versus prosobranchs and bivalves). Results are discussed according to the ecology of molluscs, their sensitivity and their ability to detoxify.

  12. Artificially evolved functional shell morphology of burrowing bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, D. P.; Schatz, W.; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger

    2014-01-01

    The morphological evolution of bivalves is documented by a rich fossil record. It is believed that the shell shape and surface sculpture play an important role for the burrowing performance of endobenthic species. While detailed morphometric studies of bivalve shells have been done...... dimensional (3D) objects, the first ever artificial evolution of a physical bivalve shell was performed. The result was a vertically flattened shell occupying only the top sediment layers. Insufficient control of the sediment was the major limitation of the setup and restricted the significance of the results...

  13. Suspended material availability and filtration-biodeposition processes performed by a native and invasive bivalve species in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, C.L.; First, M.R.; Covich, A.P.; Opsahl, S.P.; Golladay, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Unionid mussels are among the most threatened group of freshwater organisms globally. They are known for their ability to filter food particles from flowing and standing waters. However, invasive bivalve species, such as the Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea) in North America, have the potential to overlap in feeding and potentially out-compete the native species. Yet, the feeding preferences of unionid mussels and C. fluminea are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that Elliptio crassidens (native) and C. fluminea (invasive) would select for specific organic components present within seston. We examined changes in seston (dry mass and ash-free dry mass) resulting from bivalve feeding activity for three size classes of material that were isolated using gravimetric filtration. The treatments were also sub-sampled for flow cytometry (FC) which separated the suspended materials in the stream water into five categories: detritus, heterotrophic bacteria, picoautotrophs, nanoautotrophs, and heterotrophic nanoeukaryotes. Our results indicated that both species of bivalve showed preferences for organic and living materials. E. crassidens preferentially filtered nanoeukaryotes, whose decreases were associated with an increase in bacteria. In contrast, C. fluminea preferred smaller materials through selective filtration of picoautotrophs. In addition, both species increased the concentration of large materials toward the end of the experiment because of the suspension of their pseudofeces biodeposits. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine grazing by bivalve species on natural stream particulate matter using FC. Our results suggest that native and non-native mussels have different functional roles, which has important implications for organic matter processing and food webs in streams. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  14. Kinetic analysis of uranium accumulation in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea: effect of pH and direct exposure levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Olivier; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2004-06-10

    The bioaccumulation of natural uranium in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea was investigated subsequent to the bivalve's experimental waterborne exposures. A first experiment determined the accumulation rate (transfer efficiency, tissular distribution) and subcellular distribution of uranium in organs after over 42 days of uranium exposure (100 {mu}g l{sup -1}; pH 7) and later following 60 days of depuration. Results showed that there was direct transfer of uranium to the bivalve organs ([U]{sub organism}/[U]{sub water} = 0.16, fresh weight, fw). The highest accumulation levels occurred in the visceral mass and remained constant throughout the exposure duration, although a linear increase in the U concentration in the gills was observed (2.98{+-}1.3-10.9{+-}3.7 {mu}g g{sup -1} between Days 2 and 42). A second set of experiments were performed in order to test the influence of the exposure levels (100; 500; 1500 {mu}g l{sup -1}) and pH (7 and 8.1) on the bioaccumulation capacities. A marked difference of U distribution is observed as a function of exposure levels (gills were favoured in the case of high exposure levels-relative burden: 49.1{+-}3% (1500 {mu}g l{sup -1}), whereas the visceral mass presented higher accumulation levels at environmentally relevant U concentrations). Uranium concentration in the insoluble fraction (80%) in the whole body does not depend upon exposure levels in the water column or upon duration. These experiments did not allow any link to be established between the free-metal ion concentration and the bioaccumulation efficiency. Results showed a significant pH effect and indicated a link between the exposure conditions and the distribution of uranium in the bivalve organs.

  15. Evaluation of speciation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognised among researchers that speciation data are essential for proper and reliable modelling of radionuclide behaviour, which is studied inter alia in the context of radioactive waste management. Participants at the OECD/NEA workshop on 'Evaluation of Speciation Technology' reviewed the various techniques used to identify different species of actinide and fission product elements present in nuclear waste and nuclear reprocessing streams. The review takes into account the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the various methods in relation to their field of application. Recommendations for future R and D are also provided. These proceedings will primarily be of interest to chemists specialized in separation techniques and radioactive waste management experts. (author)

  16. Cryptosporidium species from common edible bivalves in Manila Bay, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoso, Edison Jay A; Rivera, Windell L

    2017-06-15

    Manila Bay is one of the major propagation sites of edible bivalves in the Philippines. Studies have shown that bivalves might be contaminated with human pathogens like the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium, one of the major causes of gastroenteritis in the world. In this study, Cryptosporidium from four species of edible bivalves were isolated using a combination of sucrose flotation and immunomagnetic separation. Using direct fluorescent antibody test, Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in 67 out of 144 samples collected. DNA sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene of the isolates detected C. parvum and C. hominis (major causes of human cryptosporidiosis) and C. meleagridis (causes infection in avian species). Analysis of the 60kDa glycoprotein gene further confirmed the genotypes of the Cryptosporidium isolates. This study is the first to provide baseline information on Cryptosporidium contamination of Manila Bay where bivalves are commonly cultured. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physiology and the mariculture of some northeastern Pacific bivalve molluscs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernard, F. R

    1983-01-01

    Equations describing the effects of water temperature, salinity, oxygen, and food availability on ventilation and oxygen consumption rates of nine species of bivalve molluscs from the Oregonian Province are given...

  18. Assessment of mercury toxicity by the changes in oxygen consumption and ion levels in the freshwater snail, Pila globosa, and the mussel, Lamellidens marginalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishna, B.; Radhakrishnaiah, K.; Suresh, A. (Sri Krishnadevaraya Univ., Andhra Pradesh (India))

    1991-06-01

    There are many studies on mercury toxicity in freshwater fishes but very few on freshwater molluscs (Wright 1978) though they serve as bio-indicators of metal pollution. A few reports on marine gastropods and bivalves indicated the importance of these animals in metal toxicity studies. Hence, in the present study, the level of tolerance of the freshwater gastropod Pila globosa and of a freshwater bivalve Lamellidens marginalis mercury at lethal and sublethal levels was determined and compared with the rate of whole animal oxygen consumption and the level of sodium, potassium and calcium ions in the hepatopancreas and the foot of these animals. As the period of exposure is one of the important factors in toxicity studies, the level of tolerance was determined at 120 hours of exposure and the other parameters were analyzed at 1, 3 and 5 days in lethal and at 1, 7 and 15 days in sublethal concentrations.

  19. Microbial Diseases of Bivalve Mollusks: Infections, Immunology and Antimicrobial Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannella, Carla; Mosca, Francesco; Mariani, Francesca; Franci, Gianluigi; Folliero, Veronica; Galdiero, Marilena; Tiscar, Pietro Giorgio; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2017-06-17

    A variety of bivalve mollusks (phylum Mollusca, class Bivalvia) constitute a prominent commodity in fisheries and aquacultures, but are also crucial in order to preserve our ecosystem's complexity and function. Bivalve mollusks, such as clams, mussels, oysters and scallops, are relevant bred species, and their global farming maintains a high incremental annual growth rate, representing a considerable proportion of the overall fishery activities. Bivalve mollusks are filter feeders; therefore by filtering a great quantity of water, they may bioaccumulate in their tissues a high number of microorganisms that can be considered infectious for humans and higher vertebrates. Moreover, since some pathogens are also able to infect bivalve mollusks, they are a threat for the entire mollusk farming industry. In consideration of the leading role in aquaculture and the growing financial importance of bivalve farming, much interest has been recently devoted to investigate the pathogenesis of infectious diseases of these mollusks in order to be prepared for public health emergencies and to avoid dreadful income losses. Several bacterial and viral pathogens will be described herein. Despite the minor complexity of the organization of the immune system of bivalves, compared to mammalian immune systems, a precise description of the different mechanisms that induce its activation and functioning is still missing. In the present review, a substantial consideration will be devoted in outlining the immune responses of bivalves and their repertoire of immune cells. Finally, we will focus on the description of antimicrobial peptides that have been identified and characterized in bivalve mollusks. Their structural and antimicrobial features are also of great interest for the biotechnology sector as antimicrobial templates to combat the increasing antibiotic-resistance of different pathogenic bacteria that plague the human population all over the world.

  20. The growth rates and population dynamics of bivalves in estuaries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on bivalves in the SwartkOps estuary have indicated that spatfall oa::an dlD'iDllate summer. After adult populations had been decimated by floods in 1971 spat IDII.de up a Iarp proportion of the bivalve population in 1973. Growth rata! vary at difl"erent intertidallevela and in difl"erent parts of the estuary and growth ...

  1. Co-option of bacteriophage lysozyme genes by bivalve genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qian; Wang, Chunyang; Jin, Min; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ye, Ting; Hui, Kaimin; Tan, Jingmin; Wang, Zheng; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Wang, Wen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes have occasionally acquired genetic material through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, little is known about the evolutionary and functional significance of such acquisitions. Lysozymes are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls. Here, we provide evidence that two subclasses of bivalves (Heterodonta and Palaeoheterodonta) acquired a lysozyme gene via HGT, building on earlier findings. Phylogenetic analyses place the bivalve lysozyme genes within the clade of bacteriophage lysozyme genes, indicating that the bivalves acquired the phage-type lysozyme genes from bacteriophages, either directly or through intermediate hosts. These bivalve lysozyme genes underwent dramatic structural changes after their co-option, including intron gain and fusion with other genes. Moreover, evidence suggests that recurrent gene duplication occurred in the bivalve lysozyme genes. Finally, we show the co-opted lysozymes exhibit a capacity for antibacterial action, potentially augmenting the immune function of related bivalves. This represents an intriguing evolutionary strategy in the eukaryote-microbe arms race, in which the genetic materials of bacteriophages are co-opted by eukaryotes, and then used by eukaryotes to combat bacteria, using a shared weapon against a common enemy. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Culturally significant fisheries: keystones for management of freshwater social-ecological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mae Noble

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous peoples of North America, Australia, and New Zealand have a long tradition of harvesting freshwater animals. Over generations of reliance and subsistence harvesting, Indigenous peoples have acquired a profound understanding of these freshwater animals and ecosystems that have become embedded within their cultural identity. We have identified trans-Pacific parallels in the cultural significance of several freshwater animal groups, such as eels, other finfish, bivalves, and crayfish, to Indigenous peoples and their understanding and respect for the freshwater ecosystems on which their community survival depends. In recognizing such cultural connections, we found that non-Indigenous peoples can appreciate the deep significance of freshwater animals to Indigenous peoples and integrate Indigenous stewardship and Indigenous ecological knowledge into effective comanagement strategies for sustainable freshwater fisheries, such as Indigenous rangers, research partnerships, and Indigenous Protected Areas. Given that many of these culturally significant freshwater species also play key ecological roles in freshwater ecosystems, their recognition and prioritization in management and monitoring approaches should help sustain the health and well-being of both the social and ecological components of freshwater ecosystems.

  3. Freshwater mussels of Catalão, confluence of Solimões and Negro rivers, state of Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fettuccia, D. C.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides a species list of freshwater mussels from Catalão, the meeting of the Solimõesand Negro rivers, in state of Amazonas, northern Brazil. Expeditions to collect molluscs were carried out between 2004and 2006, during high and low water seasons. Three hundred and thirty-one bivalve shells, 25 valves, and 57 livespecimens of four families and 10 species were identified. A single exotic species, Corbicula fluminea, represented overhalf the collected shells. All bivalve shells were photographed and registered at the mollusc collection of the InstitutoNacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA, Manaus.

  4. Freshwater Fish Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater fish are ecologically important in stream ecosystems, and they provide people with significant food, recreation, and conservation value as biological indicator of freshwater streams. Historically, the streams and rivers of southern New England supported moderately dive...

  5. Exploring Freshwater Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hydrological modifications on freshwater fish communities ... transformation on eco-hydrology. Freshwater ecosystems and associated habitats harbor incred- ible biodiversity. They offer various ecosystem services and sustain human livelihoods. However, due to ... complete their life cycle exclusively in the freshwater ...

  6. Tropical Freshwater Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Freshwater Biology promotes the publication of scientific contributions in the field of freshwater biology in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. One issue is published annually but this number may be increased. Original research papers and short communications on any aspect of tropical freshwater ...

  7. Microplastics in bivalves cultured for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Janssen, Colin R

    2014-10-01

    Microplastics are present throughout the marine environment and ingestion of these plastic particles (microplastics in two species of commercially grown bivalves: Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Microplastics were recovered from the soft tissues of both species. At time of human consumption, M. edulis contains on average 0.36 ± 0.07 particles g(-1) (wet weight), while a plastic load of 0.47 ± 0.16 particles g(-1) ww was detected in C. gigas. As a result, the annual dietary exposure for European shellfish consumers can amount to 11,000 microplastics per year. The presence of marine microplastics in seafood could pose a threat to food safety, however, due to the complexity of estimating microplastic toxicity, estimations of the potential risks for human health posed by microplastics in food stuffs is not (yet) possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A critical examination of the possible application of zinc stable isotope ratios in bivalve mollusks and suspended particulate matter to trace zinc pollution in a tropical estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Daniel; Machado, Wilson; Weiss, Dominik; Mulholland, Daniel S; Boaventura, Geraldo R; Viers, Jerome; Garnier, Jeremie; Dantas, Elton L; Babinski, Marly

    2017-07-01

    The application of zinc (Zn) isotopes in bivalve tissues to identify zinc sources in estuaries was critically assessed. We determined the zinc isotope composition of mollusks (Crassostrea brasiliana and Perna perna) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) in a tropical estuary (Sepetiba Bay, Brazil) historically impacted by metallurgical activities. The zinc isotope systematics of the SPM was in line with mixing of zinc derived from fluvial material and from metallurgical activities. In contrast, source mixing alone cannot account for the isotope ratios observed in the bivalves, which are significantly lighter in the contaminated metallurgical zone (δ 66 Zn JMC  = +0.49 ± 0.06‰, 2σ, n = 3) compared to sampling locations outside (δ 66 Zn JMC  = +0.83 ± 0.10‰, 2σ, n = 22). This observation suggests that additional factors such as speciation, bioavailability and bioaccumulation pathways (via solution or particulate matter) influence the zinc isotope composition of bivalves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hitchhiking to speciation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daven C Presgraves

    Full Text Available The modern evolutionary synthesis codified the idea that species exist as distinct entities because intrinsic reproductive barriers prevent them from merging together. Understanding the origin of species therefore requires understanding the evolution and genetics of reproductive barriers between species. In most cases, speciation is an accident that happens as different populations adapt to different environments and, incidentally, come to differ in ways that render them reproductively incompatible. As with other reproductive barriers, the evolution and genetics of interspecific hybrid sterility and lethality were once also thought to evolve as pleiotripic side effects of adaptation. Recent work on the molecular genetics of speciation has raised an altogether different possibility-the genes that cause hybrid sterility and lethality often come to differ between species not because of adaptation to the external ecological environment but because of internal evolutionary arms races between selfish genetic elements and the genes of the host genome. Arguably one of the best examples supporting a role of ecological adaptation comes from a population of yellow monkey flowers, Mimulus guttatus, in Copperopolis, California, which recently evolved tolerance to soil contaminants from copper mines and simultaneously, as an incidental by-product, hybrid lethality in crosses with some off-mine populations. However, in new work, Wright and colleagues show that hybrid lethality is not a pleiotropic consequence of copper tolerance. Rather, the genetic factor causing hybrid lethality is tightly linked to copper tolerance and spread to fixation in Copperopolis by genetic hitchhiking.

  10. Hitchhiking to speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presgraves, Daven C

    2013-01-01

    The modern evolutionary synthesis codified the idea that species exist as distinct entities because intrinsic reproductive barriers prevent them from merging together. Understanding the origin of species therefore requires understanding the evolution and genetics of reproductive barriers between species. In most cases, speciation is an accident that happens as different populations adapt to different environments and, incidentally, come to differ in ways that render them reproductively incompatible. As with other reproductive barriers, the evolution and genetics of interspecific hybrid sterility and lethality were once also thought to evolve as pleiotripic side effects of adaptation. Recent work on the molecular genetics of speciation has raised an altogether different possibility-the genes that cause hybrid sterility and lethality often come to differ between species not because of adaptation to the external ecological environment but because of internal evolutionary arms races between selfish genetic elements and the genes of the host genome. Arguably one of the best examples supporting a role of ecological adaptation comes from a population of yellow monkey flowers, Mimulus guttatus, in Copperopolis, California, which recently evolved tolerance to soil contaminants from copper mines and simultaneously, as an incidental by-product, hybrid lethality in crosses with some off-mine populations. However, in new work, Wright and colleagues show that hybrid lethality is not a pleiotropic consequence of copper tolerance. Rather, the genetic factor causing hybrid lethality is tightly linked to copper tolerance and spread to fixation in Copperopolis by genetic hitchhiking.

  11. Speciation analysis of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment can be present in different physico-chemical forms (i. e. radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, complexing ability etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time dependent transformation processes such as mobilization of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, however, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time and influence the ecosystem behaviour. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews fractionation techniques which should be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes. (author)

  12. Metabolites of saxitoxin analogues in bivalves contaminated by Gymnodinium catenatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    Bivalve metabolites of saxitoxin analogues, not present in microalgae, were recently described as an important toxin fraction in mussels contaminated by Alexandrium tamarense. These possess very low fluorescence, and require mass spectrometry detection. HILIC-MS was implemented to look for these metabolites in bivalves contaminated during Gymnodinium catenatum blooms at the Portuguese coast. The presence of M1 was tentatively identified in several bivalves, ranging from estuarine (Mytilus galloprovinciallis, Cerastoderma edule and Ruditapes decussatus) to oceanic habitat (Donax trunculus and Ensis spp.). It was hypothesized that M1 could contribute to an important fraction of the profile of STX analogues. M1 was more abundant in estuarine bivalves that retain longer PSP toxins, in the following order: mussels>cockles>clams. These data highlight that the study by fluorimetry alone of the carbamoyl, N-sulfocarbamoyl, and decarbamoyl families is manifestly insufficient to fully understand toxin dynamics in bivalves feeding on G. catenatum without a proper study of hydroxybenzoate and hydroxylated M-toxins.

  13. Detection and molecular characterization of betanodaviruses retrieved from bivalve molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, E; Grodzki, M; Panzarin, V; Guercio, A; Purpari, G; Serratore, P; Ciulli, S

    2018-04-01

    Betanodaviruses are small ssRNA viruses responsible for viral encephalopathy and retinopathy, otherwise known as viral nervous necrosis, in marine fish worldwide. These viruses can be either horizontally or vertically transmitted and have been sporadically detected in invertebrates, which seem to be one of the possible viral sources. Twenty-eight new betanodavirus strains were retrieved in three molluscs species collected from different European countries between 2008 and 2015. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that strains retrieved from bivalve molluscs are closely related to viruses detected in finfish in Southern Europe in the period 2000-2009. Nevertheless, a new betanodavirus strain, markedly different from the other members of the RGNNV genotype, was detected. Such a massive and varied presence of betanodaviruses in bivalve molluscs greatly stresses the risks of transmission previously feared for other invertebrates. Bivalve molluscs reared in the same area as farmed and wild finfish could act as a reservoir of the virus. Furthermore, current European regulations allow relaying activities and the sale of live bivalve molluscs, which could pose a real risk of spreading betanodaviruses across different geographic regions. To our knowledge, this is the first study, which focuses on the detection and genetic characterization of betanodaviruses in bivalve molluscs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Environmental speciation of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kate; Bargar, John R; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-04-01

    Although minor in abundance in Earth's crust (U, 2-4 ppm; Th, 10-15 ppm) and in seawater (U, 0.003 ppm; Th, 0.0007 ppm), light actinides (Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) are important environmental contaminants associated with anthropogenic activities such as the mining and milling of uranium ores, generation of nuclear energy, and storage of legacy waste resulting from the manufacturing and testing of nuclear weapons. In this review, we discuss the abundance, production, and environmental sources of naturally occurring and some man-made light actinides. As is the case with other environmental contaminants, the solubility, transport properties, bioavailability, and toxicity of actinides are dependent on their speciation (composition, oxidation state, molecular-level structure, and nature of the phase in which the contaminant element or molecule occurs). We review the aqueous speciation of U, Np, and Pu as a function of pH and Eh, their interaction with common inorganic and organic ligands in natural waters, and some of the common U-containing minerals. We also discuss the interaction of U, Np, Pu, and Am solution complexes with common Earth materials, including minerals, colloids, gels, natural organic matter (NOM), and microbial organisms, based on simplified model system studies. These surface interactions can inhibit (e.g., sorption to mineral surfaces, formation of insoluble biominerals) or enhance (e.g., colloid-facilitated transport) the dispersal of light actinides in the biosphere and in some cases (e.g., interaction with dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, NOM, or Mn- and Fe-containing minerals) can modify the oxidation states and, consequently, the behavior of redox-sensitive light actinides (U, Np, and Pu). Finally, we review the speciation of U and Pu, their chemical transformations, and cleanup histories at several U.S. Department of Energy field sites that have been used to mill U ores, produce fissile materials for reactors and weapons, and store

  15. Chave pictórica para identificação dos bivalves do baixo Rio Aripuanã, Amazonas, Brasil (Sphaeriidae, Hyriidae e Mycetopodidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Pimpão, Daniel Mansur; Mansur, Maria Cristina Dreher

    2009-01-01

    A partir de moluscos bivalves coletados principalmente nos períodos de seca de 2004 e 2007, no curso inferior do Rio Aripuanã, afluente do Madeira na região amazônica, foi elaborada uma chave pictórica para identificação das espécies. Foram identificados 11 táxons, sendo dez até o nível específico. Starting from freshwater mussels sampled mainly during low water seasons of 2004 and 2007, on the lower Aripunã River, a tributary from Madeira River, from the Amazon Basin, a pictorial key for ...

  16. Sperm incorporation and pronuclear development during fertilization in the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misamore, Michael J; Stein, Katheryn K; Lynn, John W

    2006-09-01

    The invasive zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha (D. polymorpha), is proving to be a valuable model for understanding general mechanisms of fertilization, particularly regarding sperm incorporation. In the present study, we tracked the various components of the fertilizing sperm of D. polymorpha during sperm incorporation. During fertilization the sperm membrane remains associated with the egg surface as a distinct patch that disperses over time. This patch marked the site of sperm entry that occurs predominately on the CD blastomere. Taking advantage of the relatively unpigmented cytoplasm, real-time observations were made of the incorporated sperm nucleus as it decondensed and reformed as a developing pronucleus. Pronuclear enlargement occurred progressively and at rates comparable with previously reported fixed-time point observations. Sperm mitochondria were incorporated and separated from the sperm along the leading edge of the decondensing nucleus. Sperm mitochondria labeled with Mitotracker Green remained predominately associated with the CD blastomere following first cleavage and could be tracked to the 16-cell stage before the fluorescence was too faint to detect. Additionally, the demembranated sperm axoneme was incorporated, separated during nuclear decondensation, and remained visible in the egg cytoplasm up to 30 min postinsemination (PI). The present study provides one of the most complete descriptions of incorporation on multiple sperm components into the egg and coordinates fixed-time point observations with real-time observations of sperm within the remarkably transparent egg cytoplasm of zebra mussels.

  17. The ecology of freshwater bivalves in the Lake Sapanca basin, Turkey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ercan, E.; Gaygusuz, Ö.; Tarkan, A. S.; Reichard, Martin; Smith, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 6 (2013), s. 730-738 ISSN 1300-0179 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-05872S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Turkey * water quality * invasive species * age * growth Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.585, year: 2013

  18. A review of the feedbacks between bivalve grazing and ecosystem processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.C.; Smaal, A.C.; Dame, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of interactions between bivalve grazing and ecosystem processes, that may affect the carrying capacity of ecosystems for bivalve suspension feeders. These interactions consist of a number of positive and negative feedbacks. Bivalve grazing can result in local food

  19. Rare earth elements in the aragonitic shell of freshwater mussel Corbicula fluminea and the bioavailability of anthropogenic lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium in river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschel, Gila; Bau, Michael

    2015-11-15

    High-technology metals - such as the rare earth elements (REE) - have become emerging contaminants in the hydrosphere, yet little is known about their bioavailability. The Rhine River and the Weser River in Germany are two prime examples of rivers that are subjected to anthropogenic REE input. While both rivers carry significant loads of anthropogenic Gd, originating from contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging, the Rhine River also carries large amounts of anthropogenic La and lately Sm which are discharged into the river from an industrial point source. Here, we assess the bioavailability of these anthropogenic microcontaminants in these rivers by analyzing the aragonitic shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Concentrations of purely geogenic REE in shells of comparable size cover a wide range of about one order of magnitude between different sampling sites. At a given sampling site, geogenic REE concentrations depend on shell size, i.e. mussel age. Although both rivers show large positive Gd anomalies in their dissolved loads, no anomalous enrichment of Gd relative to the geogenic REE can be observed in any of the analyzed shells. This indicates that the speciations of geogenic and anthropogenic Gd in the river water differ from each other and that the geogenic, but not the anthropogenic Gd is incorporated into the shells. In contrast, all shells sampled at sites downstream of the industrial point source of anthropogenic La and Sm in the Rhine River show positive La and Sm anomalies, revealing that these anthropogenic REE are bioavailable. Only little is known about the effects of long-term exposure to dissolved REE and their general ecotoxicity, but considering that anthropogenic Gd and even La have already been identified in German tap water and that anthropogenic La and Sm are bioavailable, this should be monitored and investigated further. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Freshwater Mollusc Assemblages between Dry and Rainy Season in Situ Gede System, Bogor, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priawandiputra, W.; Nasution, D. J.; Prawasti, T. S.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropogenic activities, which reduced and damaged natural situ (freshwater ponds), also reduced fauna diversity in its aquatic ecosystem. Freshwater molluscs in the situ, one of the largest numbers of animals group with documented extinction, may also be impacted. The aims of this study were to record and to compare the abundance and species composition of freshwater molluscs between dry and rainy season in three situ. The freshwater molluscs were determined by twelve sampling points in Situ Gede (SG), Situ Panjang (SP) and Situ Burung (SB). Samplings were conducted once during dry season (August 2015) and rainy season (February 2016). Total abundance of molluscs encountered was 4321 individuals, which was comprised of 76 bivalve individuals (1.75 %) and 4245 gastropods individuals (98.44%). The abundance of molluscs were generally higher in rainy season than in dry season in all situ, while species richness showed the contrary. The species composition was significantly different between dry and rainy season in SP and SB but no significant differences was found in SG. From eight dominant species, there were six dominant species such as Filopaludina javanica, Melanoides tuberculata, Thiara scabra, Sermyla requeti, Pila scutata (gastropods) and Pilsbryoconcha exilis (bivalve) which were found in high numbers during dry season while two gastropod species (Pomacea canaliculata and Wattebledia crosseana) was numbered higher in rainy season than dry season.

  1. Organisms associated with the sandy-beach bivalve Donax serra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination of two collections of Donax serra from a South African west coast beach revealed the presence of Ciliophora, Trematoda, Nematoda and a parasitic pycnogonid. This is the first record of a pycnogonid from the genus Donax and the first published report of such a parasite from any southern African bivalve ...

  2. Lower Carboniferous marine bivalves from the Cantabrian Mountains (Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amler, M.R.W.; Winkler Prins, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    The Lower Carboniferous bivalves of the Vegamián and Genicera formations are described, followed by a brief discussion on palaeoenvironmental and palaeogeographical aspects. The black shales of the Vegamián Fm. (Tournaisian) yield a peculiar association of euchondriid taxa (Euchondria wagneri sp.

  3. Archives: Tropical Freshwater Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 23 of 23 ... Archives: Tropical Freshwater Biology. Journal Home > Archives: Tropical Freshwater Biology. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 23 of 23 Items ...

  4. The freshwater biodiversity crisis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    group of native fishes, the cyprinids, still persist in many of the country's freshwaters. This paper combines review of ... Key words/phrases: Deforestation, Ethiopia, fish diversity, freshwater ecosystems, introduced species ...... Stomach pH, feeding rhythm and ingestion rate in Oreo- chromis niloticus L. (Pisces: Cichlidae) in ...

  5. Speciation and bioavailability of Americium-241 in the fresh water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierkens, J.

    1986-01-01

    Due to its anthropogenic origin, the transuranic americium 241 confronts physiologists with the intriguing question, which mechanisms are involved in the incorporation or elimination of such artificial elements in biological cycles. The investigations on the speciation and bioavailability of 241 Am in the freshwater environment aim to establish a relation between the behavior of 241 Am in freshwater ecosystems and its availability for biota. In the limnic environment, most often characterized by a high organic load and a low conductivity, the effect of complexation of 241 Am with humic acids and competition with trivalent cations such as A1 and Fe, were proven to be significant on the speciation of 241 Am. Based on the registration of the 241 Am uptake by a large number of freshwater organisms, the crayfish Astacus leptodactylus Eschscholtz was chosen to study the whole-body uptake of 241 Am, its corresponding organ distribution and its retention in the animal. The share of external fixation and ingestion in the global uptake, and the effect of speciation on it, were studied more carefully. Other aspects in this physiological part were: the kinetics of 241 Am in the hemolymph and the hepatopancreas, and its subcellular distribution in the digestive gland. Finally, by comparing the physiology of 241 Am with some other metals ( 240 Pu, 64 Cu, 198 Au) with analogous or contradictional properties, we tried to find out whether the behavior of 241 Am in organisms can be explained from its chemical characteristics

  6. Context-dependent species identity effects within a functional group of filter-feeding bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Caryn C; Spooner, Daniel E; Galbraith, Heather S

    2007-07-01

    We asked whether species richness or species identity contributed more to ecosystem function in a trait-based functional group, burrowing, filter-feeding bivalves (freshwater mussels: Unionidae), and whether their importance changed with environmental context and species composition. We conducted a manipulative experiment in a small river examining the effects of mussel assemblages varying from one to eight species on benthic algal standing crop across two sets of environmental conditions: extremely low discharge and high water temperature (summer); and moderate discharge and water temperature (fall). We found strong species identity effects within this guild, with one species (Actinonaias ligamentina) influencing accrual of benthic algae more than other species, but only under summer conditions. We suspect that this effect is due to a combination of the greater biomass of this species and its higher metabolic and excretion rates at warm summer temperatures, resulting in increased nitrogen subsidies to benthic algae. We also found that Actinonaias influenced the condition of other mussel species, likely through higher consumption, interference, or both. This study demonstrates that species within trait-based functional groups do not necessarily have the same effects on ecosystem properties, particularly under different environmental conditions.

  7. Sympatric speciation by sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, M; Takimoto, G; Yamamura, N

    1999-12-02

    There is increasing evidence for the process of sympatric speciation, in which reproductive isolation of species occurs without physical isolation. Theoretical models have focused on disruptive natural selection as the crucial pressure for splitting a species. Here we report the theoretical finding that sympatric speciation may be caused by sexual selection even without disruptive natural selection. Specifically, we show that variation in a male secondary sexual character with two conspicuous extremes and the corresponding variance in female mating preference around no preference may jointly evolve into bimodal distributions with increasing modal divergence of the male and female traits, pulling a population apart into two prezygotically isolated populations. This mode of speciation, driven by two runaway processes in different directions, is promoted by an increase in the efficiency of females in discriminating among males or a decrease in the cost of male conspicuousness, indicating that sympatric speciation may occur more readily if barrier-free or predator-free conditions arise. Although even a slight cost of female preference would cancel the runaway process of sexual selection, it would not cancel the divergent runaway processes of sympatric speciation.

  8. CHURCH, Category, and Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinderknecht Jakob Karl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Roman Catholic definition of “church”, especially as applied to groups of Protestant Christians, creates a number of well-known difficulties. The similarly complex category, “species,” provides a model for applying this term so as to neither lose the centrality of certain examples nor draw a hard boundary to rule out border cases. In this way, it can help us to more adequately apply the complex ecclesiology of the Second Vatican Council. This article draws parallels between the understanding of speciation and categorization and the definition of Church since the council. In doing so, it applies the work of cognitive linguists, including George Lakoff, Zoltan Kovecses, Giles Fauconnier and Mark Turner on categorization. We tend to think of categories as containers into which we sort objects according to essential criteria. However, categories are actually built inductively by making associations between objects. This means that natural categories, including species, are more porous than we assume, but nevertheless bear real meaning about the natural world. Taxonomists dispute the border between “zebras” and “wild asses,” but this distinction arises out of genetic and evolutionary reality; it is not merely arbitrary. Genetic descriptions of species has also led recently to the conviction that there are four species of giraffe, not one. This engagement will ground a vantage point from which the Council‘s complex ecclesiology can be more easily described so as to authentically integrate its noncompetitive vision vis-a-vis other Christians with its sense of the unique place held by Catholic Church.

  9. Speciation through sensory drive in cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seehausen, Ole; Terai, Yohey; Magalhaes, Isabel S.; Carleton, Karen L.; Mrosso, Hillary D. J.; Miyagi, Ryutaro; van der Sluijs, Inke; Schneider, Maria V.; Maan, Martine E.; Tachida, Hidenori; Imai, Hiroo; Okada, Norihiro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretically, divergent selection on sensory systems can cause speciation through sensory drive. However, empirical evidence is rare and incomplete. Here we demonstrate sensory drive speciation within island populations of cichlid fish. We identify the ecological and molecular basis of divergent

  10. Freshwater Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections as a result of freshwater exposure or trauma are fortunately rare. Etiologic agents are varied, but commonly include filamentous fungi and Candida. This narrative review describes various sources of potential freshwater fungal exposure and the diseases that may result, including fungal keratitis, acute otitis externa and tinea pedis, as well as rare deep soft tissue or bone infections and pulmonary or central nervous system infections following traumatic freshwater exposure during natural disasters or near-drowning episodes. Fungal etiology should be suspected in appropriate scenarios when bacterial cultures or molecular tests are normal or when the infection worsens or fails to resolve with appropriate antibacterial therapy.

  11. Exploring Freshwater Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Freshwater ecosystems and associated habitats harbor incrediblebiodiversity. They offer various ecosystem services andsustain human livelihoods. However, due to increasing developmentalpressure and rising water demand, these systemsare under huge threat. As a result, many aquatic species arefeared to become ...

  12. Light indirectly mediates bivalve habitat modification and impacts on seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castorani, Max Christopher Nicholas; Glud, Ronnie N.; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2015-01-01

    by directly or indirectly influencing the effects of habitat-modifying organisms that are capable of simultaneously ameliorating and exacerbating multiple stressors. Itwas hypothesized that light availability changes seagrassmetabolismand thereby indirectly regulates bivalve habitat modification...... and respiration),mussels and lowlight availability exacerbated sulfide intrusion of eelgrass tissues. Surprisingly, sulfide stress did not affect plant growth, survival, or energy stores. Thus, habitat modification by musselsmay represent a risk to eelgrass, especially during low productivity conditions...

  13. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbusser, George G; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Chris J; Haley, Brian A; Schrader, Paul; Brunner, Elizabeth L; Gray, Matthew W; Miller, Cale A; Gimenez, Iria; Hutchinson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4) with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material affected only by

  14. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George G Waldbusser

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4 with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material

  15. Environmentally relevant microplastic exposure affects sediment-dwelling bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Agathe; Haarr, Ane; Keiter, Steffen; Hylland, Ketil

    2018-05-01

    Most microplastics are expected to sink and end up in marine sediments. However, very little is known concerning their potential impact on sediment-dwelling organisms. We studied the long-term impact of microplastic exposure on two sediment-dwelling bivalve species. Ennucula tenuis and Abra nitida were exposed to polyethylene microparticles at three concentrations (1; 10 and 25 mg/kg of sediment) for four weeks. Three size classes (4-6; 20-25 and 125-500 μm) were used to study the influence of size on microplastic ecotoxicity. Microplastic exposure did not affect survival, condition index or burrowing behaviour in either bivalve species. However, significant changes in energy reserves were observed. No changes were observed in protein, carbohydrate or lipid contents in E. tenuis, with the exception of a decrease in lipid content for one condition. However, total energy decreased in a dose-dependent manner for bivalves exposed to the largest particles. To the contrary, no significant changes in total energy were observed for A. nitida, although a significant decrease of protein content was observed for individuals exposed to the largest particles, at all concentrations. Concentration and particle size significantly influenced microplastic impacts on bivalves, the largest particles and higher concentrations leading to more severe effects. Several hypotheses are presented to explain the observed modulation of energy reserves, including the influence of microplastic size and concentration. Our results suggest that long-term exposure to microplastics at environmentally relevant concentrations can impact marine benthic biota. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting Effects of Coastal Acidification on Marine Bivalve ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) is increasing in the oceans and causing changes in seawater pH commonly described as ocean or coastal acidification. It is now well-established that, when reproduced in laboratory experiments, these increases in pCO2 can reduce survival and growth of early life stage bivalves. However, the effects that these impairments would have on whole populations of bivalves are unknown. In this study, these laboratory responses were incorporated into field-parameterized population models to assess population-level sensitivities to acidification for two northeast bivalve species with different life histories: Mercenaria mercenaria (hard clam) and Argopecten irradians (bay scallop). The resulting models permitted translation of laboratory pCO2 response functions into population-level responses to examine population sensitivity to future pCO2 changes. Preliminary results from our models indicate that if the current M. mercenaria negative population growth rate was attributed to the effects of pCO2 on early life stages, the population would decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at 420 microatmospheres (µatm) pCO2. If the current population growth rate was attributed to other additive factors (e.g., harvest, harmful algal blooms), M. mercenaria populations were predicted to decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at the preliminary estimate of 1010 µatm pCO2. The estimated population growth rate was positive for A. irradians,

  17. The consequences of genomic architecture on ecological speciation in postglacial fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M. ROGERS, Jonathan A. MEE, Ella BOWLES

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quest for the origin of species has entered the genomics era. Despite decades of evidence confirming the role of the environment in ecological speciation, an understanding of the genomics of ecological speciation is still in its infancy. In this review, we explore the role of genomic architecture in ecological speciation in postglacial fishes. Growing evidence for the number, location, effect size, and interactions among the genes underlying population persistence, adaptive trait divergence, and reproductive isolation in these fishes reinforces the importance of considering genomic architecture in studies of ecological speciation. Additionally, these populations likely adapt to new freshwater environments by selection on standing genetic variation, as de novo mutations are unlikely under such recent divergence times. We hypothesize that modular genomic architectures in postglacial fish taxa may be associated with the probability of population persistence. Empirical studies have confirmed the genic nature of ecological speciation, implicating surprisingly extensive linkage disequilibrium across the genome. An understanding of these genomic mosaics and how they contribute to reproductive barriers remains unclear, but migration rates and the strength of selection at these loci is predicted to influence the likelihood of population divergence. Altogether, understanding the role of genomic architecture is an important component of speciation research and postglacial fishes continue to provide excellent organisms to test these questions, both from the perspective of variation in architectures among taxa, and with respect to the distinct environments they have colonized. However, more empirical tests of ecological speciation predictions are needed [Current Zoo­logy 59 (1: 53–71, 2013].

  18. Disease and disorders of freshwater unionid mussels: a brief overview of recent studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Carella

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of aquatic invertebrates in biomedical research and as environmental sentinels has dramatically grown in recent decades, with an increased need in understanding of comparative pathology. The Unionids freshwater mussels are a group of worldwide distributed bivalves residing small ditches and ponds, lakes, canals and rivers, often used as animal test in eco-toxicological studies. Once one of the most abundant bivalve molluscs in ancient rivers around the world, now many of them are declining in many countries and consequently are nearly extinct in many areas. The causes of this decline are not fully understood but alteration and degradation of the freshwater habitat seemed to play a central role. To date, link causality to the observed losses during episode of mussel die-offs has been more difficult to establish, and disease and pathogen presence have been scarcely considered. In this article we provide a brief overview of unionids freshwater mussel conservation status, also describing reported diseases and pathogens and illustrating a few relatively well-documented studies.

  19. The Bivalve Production Chain in Santa Catarina, Brazil, and its Management and Operational Limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Gallon, Alessandra Vasconcelos; Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC); Nascimento, Cristiano; Universidade Federal do Paraná - UFPR; Pfitscher, Elisete Dahmer; Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

    2011-01-01

    Bivalve farming (mussels and oysters), a major component in the socio-economic development of the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, combines the activities of public and private agencies in fish farming. Current analysis deals with the management and the operational limitations of the local bivalve production chain. Current exploratory research, undertaken by direct observations and the literature on the subject, employs data quality. Results show that the bivalve production chain, comprising ...

  20. Freshwater and fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxen, R.

    1997-01-01

    Severe radioactive contamination of the freshwater environment could have serious consequences for both drinking water and fish. Most of the Nordic countries have an abundance of freshwater lakes and rivers. Finland alone has about 56,000 lakes, each with a surface area of 1 hectare or more. Nearly 10% of Finland's surface is covered with lakes and rivers. In Sweden, about 9% of the surface area is freshwater, in Norway about 5%, and in Denmark only about 2%. Freshwater plays a minor role in Iceland, but even there numerous rivers discharge from the volcanic soils to the Ocean. Cs-137 and 90 Sr are likely to be the most important radionuclides with respect to long term radioactive contamination of freshwater. If radioactive deposition occurs in the absence of snow and ice radionuclides will contaminate the surface water directly and may rapidly enter the aquatic food chain. Fish which eat contaminated plankton become contaminated almost immediately. Deposition during summer increases the transfer for radionuclides to fish since fish metabolism is faster during the warm season. During the cold period, fish metabolism is slow and thus uptake and excretion of radiocaesium are also slow. (EG)

  1. Arsenic in the aquatic environment - speciation and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landner, L. [Swedish Environmental Research Group (MFG)

    1998-03-01

    The present report is a contribution to EC Commission`s undertaking to review existing EC provisions on the substances for which Sweden has been granted transitional provisions. The provisions imply that Sweden may maintain more stringent regulations on four substances until the end of 1998. The present report deals with speciation and biological effects of arsenic in three types of aquatic environments - marine water, estuarine or brackish water and freshwater. The similarity between arsenate and phosphate and the interference in phosphorylation reactions is discussed. It is clear that in Scandinavian inland waters the concentration of phosphorous is on average lower than in most inland waters in continental Europe. However, in most inland waters phosphorus is the limiting factor for phytoplankton development and eutrophication, which means that there is a clear risk for detrimental effects in the great majority of inland waters, also eutrophic waters 167 refs, 27 figs, 12 tabs. Exemption Substances Project (Directive 89/677/EEC)

  2. Freshwater Megafauna: Flagships for Freshwater Biodiversity under Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizo, Savrina F; Jähnig, Sonja C; Bremerich, Vanessa; Freyhof, Jörg; Harrison, Ian; He, Fengzhi; Langhans, Simone D; Tockner, Klement; Zarfl, Christiane; Darwall, William

    2017-10-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is highly threatened and is decreasing more rapidly than its terrestrial or marine counterparts; however, freshwaters receive less attention and conservation investment than other ecosystems do. The diverse group of freshwater megafauna, including iconic species such as sturgeons, river dolphins, and turtles, could, if promoted, provide a valuable tool to raise awareness and funding for conservation. We found that freshwater megafauna inhabit every continent except Antarctica, with South America, Central Africa, and South and Southeast Asia being particularly species rich. Freshwater megafauna co-occur with up to 93% of mapped overall freshwater biodiversity. Fifty-eight percent of the 132 megafauna species included in the study are threatened, with 84% of their collective range falling outside of protected areas. Of all threatened freshwater species, 83% are found within the megafauna range, revealing the megafauna's capacity as flagship and umbrella species for fostering freshwater conservation.

  3. Aspects of speciation in foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crews, Helen M.

    2001-01-01

    Food is the primary source of trace elements for humans and it is now generally accepted that the bioavailability of a given element and its behaviour in the body depends upon its chemical form. This point was illustrated with the example of arsenic speciation in fish in which bioaccumulation takes place in the marine food chain, however, the species of arsenic ingested by man when the fish is consumed are not toxic. It was pointed out that species information will be vital in deciding upon realistic average dietary requirements for trace elements, particularly because both deficiency or excess of an element can have detrimental consequences on an individual's health. Two examples of speciation studies with food (Cd and Se) were presented and the importance of the use of label technology which will allow studies of target analytes at physiological levels, was stressed

  4. Speciation Analysis of Radionuclides in the Environment - NSK-B SPECIATION project report 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    The second stage of the NKS-B project SPECIATION was complemented in 2008-2009, which mainly focus on three aspects: (1) Further improvement and development of methods for speciation analysis of radionuclides; (2) Investigation of speciation of some radionuclides in the environment (water......, sediments, particles); and (3) Intercomparison excise for speciation analysis of radionu-clides in soil and sediment. This report summarizes the work completed in the project partners’ laboratories, Method developments include: Development of an rapid and in-suit separation method for the speciation...... analysis of 129I in seawater samples; Development of a simple method for the speciation analysis of 129I in fresh water and seawater samples; Development of an on-line HPLC-ICP-MS method for the direct speciation analysis of 127I in water and leachate samples; Speciation of radionuclides in water includes...

  5. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachhara, R. P.; Jodhawat, R. L.; Devi, K. Bigyapati

    2012-04-01

    Marine Oligocene sequences in India outcrop only in western part of Kachchh. Earlier researchers have recognized the Oligocene strata under the Nari Series (Nagappa 1959; Chatterji and Mathur 1966). The Nari Series has a type area in Pakistan. It has two subdivisions - the Lower Nari (Lower Oligocene) and the Upper Nari (Upper Oligocene). It seems that there is no valid proof about the age of the Lower Nari due to lack of proper fauna (Eames 1975), and according to Pascoe (1962), the Upper Nari slightly transgress into Aquitanian (Lower Miocene), therefore, one has to be very cautious. Biswas and Raju (1971) reclassified the Oligocene strata of Kachchh and lithostratigraphically clubbed them as the Maniyara Fort Formation with type section along the Bermoti stream. This Formation has four members. The lower three members correspond to the Ramanian Stage (Lower Oligocene, Biswas 1971, 1973) while the uppermost to the Waiorian Stage (Upper Oligocene, Biswas 1965, 1971, 1973). The Ramanian Stage is characterized by large forams especially Nummulites fichteli, Nummulites fichteli intermedius, Lepidocyclina ( Eulepidina) dialata and Operculina sp. Several ostracods are also known to occur. Megafauna include bivalves, gastropods, echinoids, corals, mammals and reptiles. Concerning bivalves earlier researchers have recorded a few taxa namely Trisidos semitorta (Lamarck), Cubitostrea angulata (J de C Sowerby), Pecten ( Amussiopecten) labadyei d'Archiac and Haime, Periglypta puerpera (Linne') var. aglaurae Brongniart, Ostrea fraasi Mayer Eymer and listed Pecten laevicostatus J de C Sowerby, Callista pseudoumbonella Vredenburg and Clementia papyracea (Gray) from Kachchh as against overall 42 forms from the Nari Series as a whole (Vredenburg 1928). This tempted us to make an attempt to collect bivalve fauna systematically which are occurring prolifically in the Ramanian Stage. In the present work, for this purpose, sections are worked out around Lakhpat (23°50'N; 68°47'E

  6. qPCR analysis of bivalve larvae feeding preferences when grazing on mixed microalgal diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Liao

    Full Text Available Characterization of the feeding preferences of bivalve larvae would help improving the bivalve aquaculture and hatchery by providing appropriate microalgal diets. However, inaccurate and laborious identification and counting of microalgal species have challenged the selective feeding of bivalves. In the present study, we developed a highly specific and sensitive assay using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to assess the selective feeding of bivalve larvae based on species-specific primers targeting to microalgal 18S rDNA sequences. The assay exhibited good specificity. The detection limits of the qPCR assay were 769, 71, 781 and 21 18S rDNA copies for Chaetoceros calcitrans, Isochrysis galbana, Platymonas helgolandica and Nannochloropsis oculata, respectively. Using such assay, we found that C. calcitrans and I. galbana were preferentially ingested, whereas N. oculata was preferentially rejected in biodeposits of four bivalve species, Tegillarca gransa, Cyclina sinensis, Scapharca subcrenata and Sinonovacula constricta. Furthermore, our growth experiments revealed that C. calcitrans and I. galbana could significantly promote the shell growth, whereas feeding of N. oculata resulted in poorer growth of four bivalve species. These data indicated that qPCR might be useful in screening of efficient and reliable microalgal species for each bivalve species, leading to improved bivalve aquaculture and hatchery.

  7. MAPPING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HARVESTED ESTUARINE BIVALVES WITH NATURAL HISTORY-BASED HABITAT SUITABILITY MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maps of harvested bivalve populations are invaluable for the management of fisheries species, yet the cost to produce them typically limits their availability. Here, we demonstrate a relatively low-cost approach to generate habitat maps for five species of bivalves found in many ...

  8. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on reproductive output and larval growth of bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, I.E.; Van Duren, L.A.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The pre-spawning condition of adult bivalves is influenced by quantity and quality of available food. For bivalves, the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) 20:5(n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 22:6(n-3) are presumed to determine the nutritional value of

  9. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Višnja Knjaz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The basic characteristics of freshwater fishery in Croatia are predominantly negative trend in the past twenty years. Even though the total fish pond area covers more than 12,000 hectares, only 6,200 hectares of carp ponds and 58,700 m2 of trout ponds have been exploited. In 2006 the production of total freshwater fish reached 6,547 tons, out of which the production of consumable fish amounted to 5,067 tons and the juveniles 1,480 tons. The export of freshwater fish to EU countries, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Monte Negro shows the positive trend and the Republic of Croatia continuously records a foreign trade surplus (987,000 US$. It must be pointed out, though, that the import of trout from Bosnia and Herzegovina significantly increased in the past three years which resulted in the decrease of the foreign trade surplus in that sector. The freshwater fishery in Croatia has been overly burdened by many problems

  10. Thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous and Paleogene cold seeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Hryniewicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a systematic study of thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous to Oligocene seep carbonates worldwide. Eleven species of thyasirid bivalves are identified belonging to three genera: Conchocele, Maorithyas, and Thyasira. Two species are new: Maorithyas humptulipsensis sp. nov. from middle Eocene seep carbonates in the Humptulips Formation, Washington State, USA, and Conchocele kiritachiensis sp. nov. from the late Eocene seep deposit at Kiritachi, Hokkaido, Japan. Two new combinations are provided: Conchocele townsendi (White, 1890 from Maastrichtian strata of the James Ross Basin, Antarctica, and Maorithyas folgeri (Wagner and Schilling, 1923 from Oligocene rocks from California, USA. Three species are left in open nomenclature. We show that thyasirids have Mesozoic origins and appear at seeps before appearing in “normal” marine environments. These data are interpreted as a record of seep origination of thyasirids, and their subsequent dispersal to non-seep environments. We discuss the age of origination of thyasirids in the context of the origin of the modern deep sea fauna and conclude that thyasirids could have deep sea origins. This hypothesis is supported by the observed lack of influence of the Cretaceous and Paleogene Oceanic Anoxic Events on the main evolutionary lineages of the thyasirids, as seen in several other members of the deep sea fauna.

  11. Flexible digestion strategies and trace metal assimilation in marine bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decho, Alan W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse-chase experiments show that two marine bivalves take optimal advantage of different types of particulate food by varying food retention time in a flexible two-phase digestive system. For example, carbon is efficiently assimilated from bacteria by subjecting nearly all the ingested bacteria to prolonged digestion. Prolonging digestion also enhances assimilation of metals, many of which are toxic in minute quantities if they are biologically available. Detritus-feeding aquatic organisms have always lived in environments naturally rich in particle-reactive metals. We suggest that avoiding excess assimilation of metals could be a factor in the evolution of digestion strategies. We tested that suggestion by studying digestion of particles containing different Cr concentrations. We show that bivalves are capable of modifying the digestive processing of food to reduce exposure to high, biologically available, Cr concentrations. The evolution of a mechanism in some species to avoid high concentrations of metals in food could influence how effects of modern metal pollution are manifested in marine ecosystems.

  12. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rosani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves.

  13. Subcellular fractionation associated to radionuclide analysis in various tissues: validation of the technique by using light and electron observations applied on gills bivalves and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, V.; Simon, O.; Grasset, G. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The metal bioaccumulation levels in target-organs associated with micro-localization approaches at the subcellular level provide information for the understanding of the metabolic metal cycle. These findings could be used to select relevant bio-markers of exposure and to focus on specific contaminated organelles to study potential biological effects. Moreover, the metal accumulated in the cytosol fraction can be bound to macromolecules in order to be eliminated and/or to induce a potential cellular effect. Tissular distribution, transfer efficiency from water and subcellular fractionation were investigated on the freshwater bivalve, Corbicula fluminea after uranium aqueous exposure. The subcellular fractionation was performed while measuring associated uranium to each cellular different fraction as follows: cellular debris and nuclei, mitochondria and lysosomes, membranes, microsomes and cytosol. In our experimental conditions, the accumulation in the cytosol fraction was low and more than 80 % of the total uranium in gills and visceral mass was accumulated in the insoluble fraction. Main results presented in this poster come from light and electron microscope observations of subcellular fractions (nuclei/debris and lysosomes/mitochondria) in order to validate the efficiency of the fractionation technique. An adaptation of the fractionation technique is proposed. This set of data confirms high differences of fractionation efficiency as a function of fractionation technique and organs/biological model used (gills of bivalves, digestive gland of crayfish). (author)

  14. Spatial structure of the meroplankton community along a Patagonian fjord - The role of changing freshwater inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerhoff, Erika; Tapia, Fabián J.; Castro, Leonardo R.

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater inputs are major drivers of circulation, hydrographic structure, and productivity patterns along estuarine systems. We assessed the degree to which meroplankton community structure in the Baker/Martinez fjord complex (Chilean Patagonia, 47.5°S) responds to spatial and temporal changes in hydrographic conditions driven by seasonal changes in Baker river outflow. Zooplankton and hydrographic measurements were conducted along the fjord in early spring (October) and late summer (February), when river outflow was minimal and maximal, respectively. Major meroplankton groups found on these surveys were larval barnacles, crabs, bivalves and gastropods. There was a clear change in community structure between October and February, explained by a switch in the numerically dominant group from barnacle to bivalve larvae. This change in community structure was related to changes in hydrographic structure along the fjord, which are mainly associated with seasonal changes in the Baker river outflow. A variance partition analysis showed no significant spatial trend that could account for the variation in meroplankton along the Martinez channel, whereas temporal variability and environmental variables accounted for 36.6% and 27.6% of the variance, respectively. When comparing meroplankton among the Baker and Martinez channels in October, changes in environmental variables explained 44.9% of total variance, whereas spatial variability accounted for 23.5%. Early and late-stage barnacle larvae (i.e. nauplii and cyprids) were more abundant in water with lower temperature, and higher dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll-a concentration, whereas bivalve larvae were more strongly associated to warmer waters. The seasonal shift in numerical dominance, from barnacle larvae in early spring to bivalve larvae in late summer, suggests that reproduction of these groups is triggered by substantially different sets of conditions, both in terms of hydrography and food availability. The

  15. Arsenic speciation in edible mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Michelle M; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2014-12-16

    The fruiting bodies, or mushrooms, of terrestrial fungi have been found to contain a high proportion of the nontoxic arsenic compound arsenobetaine (AB), but data gaps include a limited phylogenetic diversity of the fungi for which arsenic speciation is available, a focus on mushrooms with higher total arsenic concentrations, and the unknown formation and role of AB in mushrooms. To address these, the mushrooms of 46 different fungus species (73 samples) over a diverse range of phylogenetic groups were collected from Canadian grocery stores and background and arsenic-contaminated areas. Total arsenic was determined using ICP-MS, and arsenic speciation was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS and complementary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The major arsenic compounds in mushrooms were found to be similar among phylogenetic groups, and AB was found to be the major compound in the Lycoperdaceae and Agaricaceae families but generally absent in log-growing mushrooms, suggesting the microbial community may influence arsenic speciation in mushrooms. The high proportion of AB in mushrooms with puffball or gilled morphologies may suggest that AB acts as an osmolyte in certain mushrooms to help maintain fruiting body structure. The presence of an As(III)-sulfur compound, for the first time in mushrooms, was identified in the XAS analysis. Except for Agaricus sp. (with predominantly AB), inorganic arsenic predominated in most of the store-bought mushrooms (albeit with low total arsenic concentrations). Should inorganic arsenic predominate in these mushrooms from contaminated areas, the risk to consumers under these circumstances should be considered.

  16. Adaptive speciation theory : A conceptual review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weissing, Franz J.; Edelaar, Pim; van Doorn, G. Sander

    Speciation-the origin of new species-is the source of the diversity of life. A theory of speciation is essential to link poorly understood macro-evolutionary processes, such as the origin of biodiversity and adaptive radiation, to well understood micro-evolutionary processes, such as allele

  17. Speciation of heavy metals in River Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vega, F.A.; Weng, L.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical speciation of Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd and Pb in River Rhine was studied by measuring free ion concentration and distribution in nanoparticles, and by comparing the measurement with speciation modeling. Concentrations of free metal ions were determined in situ using Donnan Membrane Technique (DMT).

  18. Estimating the duration of speciation from phylogenies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.; Morlon, Helene; Lambert, Amaury

    Speciation is not instantaneous but takes time. The protracted birth-death diversification model incorporates this fact and predicts the often observed slowdown of lineage accumulation toward the present. The mathematical complexity of the protracted speciation model has barred estimation of its

  19. Light indirectly mediates bivalve habitat modification and impacts on seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castorani, Max Christopher Nicholas; Glud, Ronnie N.; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2015-01-01

    and respiration),mussels and lowlight availability exacerbated sulfide intrusion of eelgrass tissues. Surprisingly, sulfide stress did not affect plant growth, survival, or energy stores. Thus, habitat modification by musselsmay represent a risk to eelgrass, especially during low productivity conditions...... by directly or indirectly influencing the effects of habitat-modifying organisms that are capable of simultaneously ameliorating and exacerbating multiple stressors. Itwas hypothesized that light availability changes seagrassmetabolismand thereby indirectly regulates bivalve habitat modification...... and subsequent impacts on seagrasses by shifting net effects between alleviation of nutrient stress and intensification of sulfide stress. To test this hypothesis, manipulations of light availability and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) abundance were made in eelgrass (Zostera marina) mesocosms and biogeochemical...

  20. Optimal designs of mollusk shells from bivalves to snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Takuya; Yoshimura, Jin

    2017-02-10

    Bivalve, ammonite and snail shells are described by a small number of geometrical parameters. Raup noted that the vast majority of theoretically possible shell forms do not occur in nature. The constraint factors that regulate the biased distribution of natural form have long since been an open problem in evolution. The problem of whether natural shell form is a result of optimization remains unsolved despite previous attempts. Here we solve this problem by considering the scaling exponent of shell thickness as a morphological parameter. The scaling exponent has a drastic effect on the optimal design of shell shapes. The observed characteristic shapes of natural shells are explained in a unified manner as a result of optimal utilization of shell material resources, while isometric growth in thickness leads to impossibly tight coiling.

  1. Protozoan parasites of bivalve molluscs: literature follows culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Fernández Robledo

    Full Text Available Bivalve molluscs are key components of the estuarine environments as contributors to the trophic chain, and as filter -feeders, for maintaining ecosystem integrity. Further, clams, oysters, and scallops are commercially exploited around the world both as traditional local shellfisheries, and as intensive or semi-intensive farming systems. During the past decades, populations of those species deemed of environmental or commercial interest have been subject to close monitoring given the realization that these can suffer significant decline, sometimes irreversible, due to overharvesting, environmental pollution, or disease. Protozoans of the genera Perkinsus, Haplosporidium, Marteilia, and Bonamia are currently recognized as major threats for natural and farmed bivalve populations. Since their identification, however, the variable publication rates of research studies addressing these parasitic diseases do not always appear to reflect their highly significant environmental and economic impact. Here we analyzed the peer- reviewed literature since the initial description of these parasites with the goal of identifying potential milestone discoveries or achievements that may have driven the intensity of the research in subsequent years, and significantly increased publication rates. Our analysis revealed that after initial description of the parasite as the etiological agent of a given disease, there is a time lag before a maximal number of yearly publications are reached. This has already taken place for most of them and has been followed by a decrease in publication rates over the last decade (20- to 30- year lifetime in the literature. Autocorrelation analyses, however, suggested that advances in parasite purification and culture methodologies positively drive publication rates, most likely because they usually lead to novel molecular tools and resources, promoting mechanistic studies. Understanding these trends should help researchers in

  2. Reproductive investment in the intertidal bivalve Macoma balthica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkoop, P. J. C.; Van der Meer, J.; Beukema, J. J.; Kwast, D.

    1999-05-01

    Bivalve eggs generally contain large amounts of lipids which, in comparison with proteins and carbohydrates, have high energy contents and are thus costly in energetic terms. As lipid contents vary between species, comparisons of reproductive investments should not only include numbers and sizes of eggs, but also their energy content. We estimated the investment in egg material of mature females of the Baltic tellin Macoma balthica (L.) in terms of both mass and energy content. All mass below a minimum body mass (below which no eggs are produced) was defined as structural mass. This threshold amounts to a body mass index (BMI) of 5.6 (ash-free dry mass per cubic shell length in mg cm -3). More than half (55%) of the mass above the structural mass was invested in egg material and 45% in extra somatic tissue and tissue for production and storage of gametes. This means that the amount of eggs spawned ranged from 0 (at BMI = 5.6 mg cm -3) to 33% of the total ash-free dry mass (at a high BMI value of 14 mg cm -3). Eggs contained a relatively large amount of lipids, about 30% of their ash-free dry mass, whereas non-egg material contained only about 7% lipids. Eggs of two other bivalves in the Wadden Sea, the cockle Cerastoderma edule and the mussel Mytilus edulis, were smaller and contained only about 11% and 20% lipids, respectively. Energy content of M. balthica eggs amounted to ˜0.006 J, in the other two species to ˜0.002 J. The function of the more expensive eggs in M. balthica may be related to its early spawning in spring, causing slower larval development until first feeding.

  3. Mercury bioavailability, transformations, and effects on freshwater biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranguet, Perrine; Le Faucheur, Séverine; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2017-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) compounds represent an important risk to aquatic ecosystems because of their persistence, bioaccumulation, and biomagnification potential. In the present review, we critically examine state-of-the-art studies on the interactions of Hg compounds with freshwater biofilms, with an emphasis on Hg accumulation, transformations, and effects. Freshwater biofilms contain both primary producers (e.g., algae) and decomposers (e.g., bacteria and fungi), which contribute to both aquatic food webs and the microbial loop. Hence they play a central role in shallow water and streams, and also contribute to Hg trophic transfer through their consumption. Both inorganic and methylated mercury compounds accumulate in biofilms, which could transform them mainly by methylation, demethylation, and reduction. Accumulated Hg compounds could induce diverse metabolic and physiological perturbations in the microorganisms embedded in the biofilm matrix and affect their community composition. The bioavailability of Hg compounds, their transformations, and their effects depend on their concentrations and speciation, ambient water characteristics, biofilm matrix composition, and microorganism-specific characteristics. The basic processes governing the interactions of Hg compounds with biofilm constituents are understudied. The development of novel conceptual and methodological approaches allowing an understanding of the chemo- and biodynamic aspects is necessary to improve the knowledge on Hg cycling in shallow water as well as to enable improved use of freshwater biofilms as potential indicators of water quality and to support better informed risk assessment. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3194-3205. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  4. Assessing the effects of seawater temperature and pH on the bioaccumulation of emerging chemical contaminants in marine bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Camacho, Carolina; Barbosa, Vera; Alves, Ricardo; Anacleto, Patrícia; Fogaça, Fabiola; Kwadijk, Christiaan; Kotterman, Michiel; Cunha, Sara C; Fernandes, José O; Rasmussen, Rie R; Sloth, Jens J; Aznar-Alemany, Òscar; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià; Marques, António

    2018-02-01

    Emerging chemical contaminants [e.g. toxic metals speciation, flame retardants (FRs) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), among others], that have not been historically recognized as pollutants nor their toxicological hazards, are increasingly more present in the marine environment. Furthermore, the effects of environmental conditions (e.g. temperature and pH) on bioaccumulation and elimination mechanisms of these emerging contaminants in marine biota have been poorly studied until now. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the effect of warmer seawater temperatures (Δ = + 4°C) and lower pH levels (Δ = - 0.4 pH units), acting alone or combined, on the bioaccumulation and elimination of emerging FRs (dechloranes 602, 603 and 604, and TBBPA), inorganic arsenic (iAs), and PFCs (PFOA and PFOS) in two estuarine bivalve species (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Ruditapes philippinarum). Overall, results showed that warming alone or combined with acidification promoted the bioaccumulation of some compounds (i.e. dechloranes 602, 604, TBBPA), but also facilitated the elimination of others (i.e. iAs, TBBPA). Similarly, lower pH also resulted in higher levels of dechloranes, as well as enhanced iAs, PFOA and PFOS elimination. Data also suggests that, when both abiotic stressors are combined, bivalves' capacity to accumulate contaminants may be time-dependent, considering significantly drastic increase observed with Dec 602 and TBBPA, during the last 10 days of exposure, when compared to reference conditions. Such changes in contaminants' bioaccumulation/elimination patterns also suggest a potential increase of human health risks of some compounds, if the climate continues changing as forecasted. Therefore, this first study pointed out the urgent need for further research on the effects of abiotic conditions on emerging contaminants kinetics, to adequately estimate the potential toxicological hazards associated to these compounds and

  5. Radionuclide transfer to freshwater biota species: review of Russian language studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesenko, S; Fesenko, J; Sanzharova, N; Karpenko, E; Titov, I

    2011-01-01

    Around 130 publications reporting studies on radionuclide transfer to freshwater biota species conducted in the former USSR were reviewed to provide the concentration ratio values. None of these studies were available up to now in the English language reviews or publications. The values derived have been compared with the CR values used for freshwater systems in the International reviews. For some radionuclides reviewed in this paper, the data are in good agreement with the mean CR values presented earlier, however for some of them, in particular, for ²⁴¹Am (bivalve molluscs, gastropods and pelagic fish), ⁶⁰Co (gastropods, benthic fish and insect larvae), ⁹⁰Sr and ¹³⁷Cs (benthic fish and zooplankton), the mean values given here are substantially different from those presented earlier. The data reported in this paper for thirty five radionuclides and eleven groups of freshwater species markedly improve the extent of available data for evaluation of radiation impact on freshwater species. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Laboratory and field assessment of uranium trophic transfer efficiency in the crayfish Orconectes limosus fed the bivalve C. fluminea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Olivier [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat., 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)]. E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat., 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2005-09-30

    At present, ecotoxicological information regarding the impact of natural uranium (U) on freshwater ecosystems via the trophic contamination route is scarce. We generated an experimental trophic food chain involving the prey species, Corbicula fluminea, and a predator, Orconectes limosus, for a 10-day and a 30-day feeding periods (food ration: one whole soft body/day/crayfish). We studied the efficiency of U trophic transfer and the distribution of U in the predator. During the test, we varied the quantity of dietary U (from beforehand contaminated bivalves at concentrations ranging from 0.9 {+-} 0.1 to 20.2 {+-} 9 {mu}g/g fw provided to each crayfish over the 10 days) applying a daily feeding rate equal to 3.9 {+-} 0.8% fw. The efficiency of U trophic transfer from clams to crayfish varied between 1 and 13% depending on the prey exposure modalities. Accumulation of U was observed in the digestive gland but also in gills, in the muscle, and in the molt of the crayfish after trophic exposure treatments. Under high-level exposure conditions, the digestive gland was the main target-organ, however a significant accumulation was also observed in the stomach. With regard to low levels of trophic exposure, accumulation of U in gills, in the stomach, and in the digestive gland was of the same order of magnitude. Longer exposure period which incorporated a crayfish molt, resulted in a decrease of trophic transfer ratio and a modified U tissue distribution.

  7. Specific bio-markers of pollution: assessment of the exposure to-and effects of- solid wastes (municipal wastes, cinders) on the bivalve mollusc Corbicula fluminea (Muller, 1774); Biomarqueurs specifiques de pollution: evaluation de l'exposition et des effets precoces des dechets solides (ordures menageres, machefers) a l'egard du mollusque bivalve Corbicula fluminea (Muller, 1774)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainglet, F.

    1998-11-02

    There is a continual increase of the volume of wastes produced every year. Incineration is actually used for reducing their volume. The residues produced through this process (cinders) can be used for several road works. Rain leaching of these sites, sometimes close to streams, could lead to the solubilization of noxious elements that could affect aquatic fauna. The present study concerned potential effects of cinders produced in the 'District de Nantes', on a bivalve mollusc (Corbicula fluminea), which inhabits in the Loire and Garonne rivers. We focused on heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) contained in leachates prepared from cinders. C.fluminea were exposed to leachates, under laboratory controlled conditions during 15 days. Bivalves were exposed to mono-metallic solutions of Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn, under laboratory controlled conditions over a period of 15 days. Translocation experiments were conducted, from a control site to a site potentially submitted to influx of water contaminated through waste leaching. Next, the accumulation of heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) in the tissues as well as bio-markers of toxic effects (PTM, AChE, Catalase, GST and MDA) indicators of physiological response and/or damage, were analyzed. Moreover inter-annual fluctuations of these parameters were monitored, in order to discriminate between natural variations and pollutant-induced variations. All these data would allow an assessment of potential early effects of cinders on bivalves. Moreover the relevance of using this freshwater species, widespread in streams will be discussed. In fact, when creating other waste disposal areas, the use of robust and autochthonous organisms could be very interesting for environmental quality testing. (author)

  8. Rare earth elements in the aragonitic shell of freshwater mussel Corbicula fluminea and the bioavailability of anthropogenic lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium in river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merschel, Gila; Bau, Michael

    2015-01-01

    High-technology metals — such as the rare earth elements (REE) — have become emerging contaminants in the hydrosphere, yet little is known about their bioavailability. The Rhine River and the Weser River in Germany are two prime examples of rivers that are subjected to anthropogenic REE input. While both rivers carry significant loads of anthropogenic Gd, originating from contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging, the Rhine River also carries large amounts of anthropogenic La and lately Sm which are discharged into the river from an industrial point source. Here, we assess the bioavailability of these anthropogenic microcontaminants in these rivers by analyzing the aragonitic shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Concentrations of purely geogenic REE in shells of comparable size cover a wide range of about one order of magnitude between different sampling sites. At a given sampling site, geogenic REE concentrations depend on shell size, i.e. mussel age. Although both rivers show large positive Gd anomalies in their dissolved loads, no anomalous enrichment of Gd relative to the geogenic REE can be observed in any of the analyzed shells. This indicates that the speciations of geogenic and anthropogenic Gd in the river water differ from each other and that the geogenic, but not the anthropogenic Gd is incorporated into the shells. In contrast, all shells sampled at sites downstream of the industrial point source of anthropogenic La and Sm in the Rhine River show positive La and Sm anomalies, revealing that these anthropogenic REE are bioavailable. Only little is known about the effects of long-term exposure to dissolved REE and their general ecotoxicity, but considering that anthropogenic Gd and even La have already been identified in German tap water and that anthropogenic La and Sm are bioavailable, this should be monitored and investigated further. - Highlights: • Corbicula fluminea shells are bioarchives of dissolved geogenic REE in

  9. Rare earth elements in the aragonitic shell of freshwater mussel Corbicula fluminea and the bioavailability of anthropogenic lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium in river water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merschel, Gila, E-mail: g.merschel@jacobs-university.de; Bau, Michael

    2015-11-15

    High-technology metals — such as the rare earth elements (REE) — have become emerging contaminants in the hydrosphere, yet little is known about their bioavailability. The Rhine River and the Weser River in Germany are two prime examples of rivers that are subjected to anthropogenic REE input. While both rivers carry significant loads of anthropogenic Gd, originating from contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging, the Rhine River also carries large amounts of anthropogenic La and lately Sm which are discharged into the river from an industrial point source. Here, we assess the bioavailability of these anthropogenic microcontaminants in these rivers by analyzing the aragonitic shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Concentrations of purely geogenic REE in shells of comparable size cover a wide range of about one order of magnitude between different sampling sites. At a given sampling site, geogenic REE concentrations depend on shell size, i.e. mussel age. Although both rivers show large positive Gd anomalies in their dissolved loads, no anomalous enrichment of Gd relative to the geogenic REE can be observed in any of the analyzed shells. This indicates that the speciations of geogenic and anthropogenic Gd in the river water differ from each other and that the geogenic, but not the anthropogenic Gd is incorporated into the shells. In contrast, all shells sampled at sites downstream of the industrial point source of anthropogenic La and Sm in the Rhine River show positive La and Sm anomalies, revealing that these anthropogenic REE are bioavailable. Only little is known about the effects of long-term exposure to dissolved REE and their general ecotoxicity, but considering that anthropogenic Gd and even La have already been identified in German tap water and that anthropogenic La and Sm are bioavailable, this should be monitored and investigated further. - Highlights: • Corbicula fluminea shells are bioarchives of dissolved geogenic REE in

  10. Toxicology of freshwater cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, H M; Arachchi, D N Magana; Abeysekara, T; Guneratne, L

    2016-07-02

    Many chemical contaminants in drinking water have been shown to cause adverse health effects in humans after prolonged exposure. Cyanobacteria are one of the most potent and diverse groups of photosynthetic prokaryotes. One key component of cyanobacterial success in the environment is the production of potent toxins as secondary metabolites, which have been responsible for numerous adverse health impacts in humans. Anthropogenic activities have led to the increase of eutrophication in freshwater bodies' worldwide, causing cyanobacterial blooms to become more frequent. The present article will discuss about harmful cyanobacteria and their toxicology with special references to microcystin, nodularin, and cylindrospermopsin.

  11. Bivalve aquaculture transfers in Atlantic Europe. Part A: Transfer activities and legal framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muehlbauer, F.; Fraser, D.; Brenner, M.

    2014-01-01

    environment and address economic considerations remains unanswered. This study provides the first overview of bivalve transfer activities for aquaculture purposes along the European Atlantic coast. Existing international and EU legislation is described, and potential weaknesses in the existing legislative...

  12. Speciation gradients and the distribution of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Dolph; Pennell, Matthew W

    2017-05-31

    Global patterns of biodiversity are influenced by spatial and environmental variations in the rate at which new species form. We relate variations in speciation rates to six key patterns of biodiversity worldwide, including the species-area relationship, latitudinal gradients in species and genetic diversity, and between-habitat differences in species richness. Although they sometimes mirror biodiversity patterns, recent rates of speciation, at the tip of the tree of life, are often highest where species richness is low. Speciation gradients therefore shape, but are also shaped by, biodiversity gradients and are often more useful for predicting future patterns of biodiversity than for interpreting the past.

  13. Mercury accumulation in marine bivalves: Influences of biodynamics and feeding niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Ke [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-10-15

    Differences in the accumulation of mercury (Hg) in five species of marine bivalves, including scallops Chlamys nobilis, clams Ruditapes philippinarum, oysters Saccostrea cucullata, green mussels Perna viridis, and black mussels Septifer virgatus, were investigated. The bivalves displayed different patterns of Hg accumulation in terms of the body concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total Hg (THg), as well as the ratio of MeHg to THg. Parameters of the biodynamics of the accumulation of Hg(II) and MeHg could reflect the species-dependent Hg concentrations in the bivalves. With the exception of black mussels, we found a significant relationship between the efflux rates of Hg(II) and the THg concentrations in the bivalves. The interspecific variations in the MeHg to THg ratio were largely controlled by the relative difference between the elimination rates of Hg(II) and MeHg. Stable isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C) analysis indicated that the five bivalve species had contrasting feeding niches, which may also affect the Hg accumulation. - Highlights: > Significant difference in Hg accumulation and MeHg:THg ratio in different bivalves. > THg concentrations in the bivalves were generally related to the efflux rates of Hg(II). > Elimination of Hg(II) and MeHg controlled the interspecific variation in MeHg:THg ratio. > MeHg and THg concentrations reflect the interaction of Hg biodynamics and food. - The species-specific body concentrations of MeHg and THg in bivalves reflect the complicated interaction between the biodynamics of Hg(II) and MeHg and the different food sources.

  14. Mesozoic-Cenozoic crustaceans preserved within echinoid tests and bivalve shells

    OpenAIRE

    Gašparič, Rok; Fraaije, René H. B.; van Bakel, Barry W. M.; Jagt, John W. M.; Skupien, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Associations of crustaceans with echinoids (Echinodermata) and bivalves (Mollusca) are not uncommon in modern oceans. Here we record the occurrence of anomurans, brachyurans and isopods within echinoid tests and bivalve shells from the Middle Jurassic of France, the Upper Jurassic of the Czech Republic, the Eocene of Croatia and the Miocene of Austria. Additionally a new genus and species of fossil cirolanid isopod from the Middle Jurassic of France is described. The present examp...

  15. Speciation analysis of radionuclides in the environment - NSK-B SPECIATION project report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Aldahan, A. (Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Earth Science (Sweden)); Possnert, G. (Uppsala Univ., Tandem Lab. (Sweden)); Lujaniene, G. (Univ. of Helsinki, Lab. of Radiochemistry (Finland)); Lehto, J. (Institute of Physics (Lithuania)); Skipperud, L.; Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B. (Norwegian Univ. of Life Sciences, Isotope Lab., AAs (Norway))

    2009-10-15

    The second stage of the NKS-B project SPECIATION was complemented in 2008-2009, which mainly focus on three aspects: (1) Further improvement and development of methods for speciation analysis of radionuclides; (2) Investigation of speciation of some radionuclides in the environment (water, sediments, particles); and (3) Intercomparison excise for speciation analysis of radionuclides in soil and sediment. This report summarizes the work completed in the project partners' laboratories. Method developments include: Development of an rapid and in-suit separation method for the speciation analysis of 129I in seawater samples; Development of a simple method for the speciation analysis of 129I in fresh water and seawater samples; Development of an on-line HPLC-ICP-MS method for the direct speciation analysis of 127I in water and leachate samples; Speciation of radionuclides in water includes: Speciation of 129I and 127I in time-series precipitation samples collected in Denmark 2001-2006 and its application for the investigation of geochemistry and atmospheric chemistry of iodine, Speciation of radionuclides in Ob and Yenisey Rivers, and Speciation of 129I and 127I in Lake Heimdalen water. Speciation of radionuclides in soils and sediments includes: Sequential extraction of radionuclides in sediments and of trace elements in soil samples. Sequential extraction of radionuclides in aerosols and particles has also been performed. Furthermore, sorption experiments have been performed to investigate the association of Pu, Am and Cs with different geological materials. The intercomparison exercises included sequential extraction of Pu, 137Cs, U, Th, and 129I in one soil and one sediment standard reference materials (NIST-4354, IAEA-375) and Pu in sediment collected from the Lake Heimdalen, Norway. (author)

  16. The Zoogeography of North American freshwater fishes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hocutt, Charles H; Wiley, E. O

    1986-01-01

    ..., and Pleistoscene glaciation. The Zoogeography of North American Freshwater Fishes is a comprehensive treatment of the freshwater biogeography of North America, with implications for other disciplines...

  17. Evolution: sympatric speciation the eusocial way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Jacobus Jan; Nash, David Richard

    2014-01-01

    Sympatric speciation normally requires particular conditions of ecological niche differentiation. However, ant social parasites have been suspected to arise sympatrically, because (dis)loyalty to eusocial kin-structures induces disruptive selection for dispersal and inbreeding. A new study...

  18. Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Thomas B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) measures particle mass loading and chemical composition in real time for non-refractory sub-micron aerosol particles. The ACSM is designed for long-term unattended deployment and routine monitoring applications.

  19. Speciation of radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunten, H.R. von; Benes, P.

    1994-02-01

    Methods for the determination of the speciation of radionuclides in aerosols, in aquatic solutions, in sediments, soils and rocks are reviewed. At present, most of the results about speciation are deduced from model calculations, model experiments, and separation of species (forms) of radionuclides, e.g., by sequential extraction procedures. Methods of direct determination of speciation of radionuclides (e.g. by laser induced spectroscopy) are in general not yet sensitive enough for a measurement of the very low concentrations of radionuclides in the environment. The methodological part of this paper is followed by a review of the very abundant literature about speciation of important radionuclides in the environment, i.e. in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. The review does not include the biosphere. Literature up to spring 1993 is included (with a few more recent additions). (author)

  20. Speciation of Pb in industrially polluted soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2006-01-01

    This study was aimed at elucidating the importance of original Pb-speciation versus soil-characteristics to mobility and distribution of Pb in industrially polluted soils. Ten industrially polluted Danish surface soils were characterized and Pb speciation was evaluated through SEM-EDX studies......, examination of pH-dependent desorption, distribution in grain-size fractions and sequential extraction. Our results show that the first factors determining the speciation of Pb in soil are: (1) the stability of the original speciation and (2) the contamination level, while soil characteristics...... are of secondary importance. In nine of ten soils Pb was concentrated strongly in the soil fines (soils, particles with a highly concentrated Pb-content were observed during SEM-EDX. In eight of the soils, the particles contained various Pb-species with aluminum/iron, phosphate, sulfate...

  1. Dearborn GC-MS organic speciation data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ambient particulate matter organic speciation data from July - August, 2011. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Lynam, M., T. Dvonch, J....

  2. Pb speciation results in amended soils

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset shows the distribution of Pb phases resulting from various amendments to change Pb speciation. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  3. Distribution and density of the bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana in the estuarine region of Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. L. Rodrigues Maia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to analyze the density and distribution of the bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana in beaches in the estuarine region of the semiarid in Rio Grande do Norte State, Barra and Pernambuquinho (04°56.978’S and 37°08.961’W and 04°56.792’S and 37°09.375’W, respectively. Samples were collected monthly during 37 months using five transects (300 m long and 400 m apart laid perpendicularly to the beach line toward the sea. Seven collection points, 50 m apart, were set in each transect, and shellfish and sediment samples were collected. Temperature and salinity were measured in each transect. The results showed a temperature variation of average values of 3 °C; the greatest variation (33.2 °C was observed in May of 2009. The lowest average salinity values were observed between April and June of 2009 (5, 8.7, and 7.8, respectively. This fact was due to an atypical rainfall in the region, which resulted in a large freshwater inflow into the estuary; the average salinity values were about 40 in the remaining months. The highest precipitation values were observed in April/09, April/10, and April/11; the highest precipitation occurred in April/09 (316.3 mm. The lower average densities of A. brasiliana were observed in April and May/09 when compared to the other months; the lowest value was observed in April/09 (26 ind/m2. The highest densities occurred between November/10 and July/11, with values ranging from 70 to 322 ind/m2. The highest inflow of young individuals (lengths from 2 to 5 mm was observed between April and June of 2010 and on September/10 while the highest frequency of adults (from 20 to 25 mm occurred between December of 2010 and April of 2011. Hence, the results of this study show that in the months with the greatest rainfall, salinity and the average density of A. brasiliana showed the lowest values.

  4. Trace metal speciation in the Baltic sea

    OpenAIRE

    Gelting, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Physicochemical speciation of metals in natural waters is very important for understanding their distribution, mobility, bioavailability and toxicity. To be able to understand the behaviour of an aqueous element and the transformation between chemical and physical species, there is a need for reliable methods that enable measurements of specific fractions of metals. Many different techniques are used for metal speciation, of which many suffer from problems. Ultrafiltration has frequently been...

  5. Short-term fluctuations in bivalve larvae compared with some environmental factors in a coastal lagoon (South Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M.Z. Chícaro

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, short-term fluctuations in bivalve larvae were compared with some triggering factors for a period of sixteen months. Data on the abundance of planktonic larvae, collected two to three times a week were related to water temperature, salinity, wind velocity, tidal amplitude and chlorophyll a. Higher densities of planktonic bivalve larvae were caught between May and August, but intense fluctuations in abundance were observed. Planktonic bivalve larvae of eighteen taxa were identified. Larvae of Mytilus galloprovincialis, Cerastoderma edule, Ruditapes decussates and Venerupis spp. were the most abundant. The seasonal fluctuations of bivalve abundance seem to be controlled by temperature, the major factor in the timing of the reproduction of bivalves. Nevertheless, advection may be also a key factor during the planktonic life of bivalve species in coastal systems, such as the Ria Formosa.

  6. Anoxic survival potential of bivalves: (arte)facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwaan, Albertus; Babarro, Jose M F; Monari, Marta; Cattani, Otello

    2002-03-01

    The anoxic survival time of the bivalves Chamelea gallina, Cerastoderma edule and Scapharca inaequivalvis from two different ecosystems and differing anoxia tolerances was studied in static (closed) and flow-through systems. The antibiotics chloramphenicol, penicillin and polymyxin were added, and molybdate (specific inhibitor of the process of sulfate reduction). Survival in (near) anoxic seawater of Chamelea was studied in a static system by comparing untreated seawater with autoclaved seawater and untreated clams with clams incubated in well-aerated seawater, containing the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol, prior to the anoxic survival test. With untreated clams and natural seawater (median mortality time 2.4 days) a decrease in pH and exponential accumulation of sulfide and ammonium was observed in the anoxic medium, indicating excessive growth of (sulfate reducing) bacteria. In sterilized seawater LT50 (2.1 days) was not significantly different and again considerable amounts of ammonium and sulfide accumulated. However, pre-treatment of clams with chloramphenicol resulted in an increase of LT50 (11.0 days) by approximately fivefold. Accumulation of ammonium and sulfide was retarded, but was finally even stronger than in the medium containing untreated clams. Median mortality times were 2.5 and 2.4 days for Chamelea and 2.7 and 2.9 days for Cerastoderma for static and flow-through incubations, respectively. Addition of chloramphenicol increased strongly survival time in both systems with corresponding values of 11.0 and 16.3 days for Chamelea, and 6.4 and 6.5 days for Cerastoderma. LT50 of Scapharca in anoxic seawater was 14.4 days. Chloramphenicol and penicillin increased median survival time to 28.5 and 28.7 days, respectively, whereas polymyxin displayed no effect (LT50=13.6 days). Molybdate added to artificial sulfate free seawater blocked biotic sulfide formation, but did not improve survival time (LT50=13.7 days). Overall the results indicate

  7. An aquaculture-based method for calibrated bivalve isotope paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanamaker, Alan D.; Kreutz, Karl J.; Borns, Harold W.; Introne, Douglas S.; Feindel, Scott; Barber, Bruce J.

    2006-09-01

    To quantify species-specific relationships between bivalve carbonate isotope geochemistry (δ18Oc) and water conditions (temperature and salinity, related to water isotopic composition [δ18Ow]), an aquaculture-based methodology was developed and applied to Mytilus edulis (blue mussel). The four-by-three factorial design consisted of four circulating temperature baths (7, 11, 15, and 19°C) and three salinity ranges (23, 28, and 32 parts per thousand (ppt); monitored for δ18Ow weekly). In mid-July of 2003, 4800 juvenile mussels were collected in Salt Bay, Damariscotta, Maine, and were placed in each configuration. The size distribution of harvested mussels, based on 105 specimens, ranged from 10.9 mm to 29.5 mm with a mean size of 19.8 mm. The mussels were grown in controlled conditions for up to 8.5 months, and a paleotemperature relationship based on juvenile M. edulis from Maine was developed from animals harvested at months 4, 5, and 8.5. This relationship [T°C = 16.19 (±0.14) - 4.69 (±0.21) {δ18Oc VPBD - δ18Ow VSMOW} + 0.17 (±0.13) {δ18Oc VPBD - δ18Ow VSMOW}2; r2 = 0.99; N = 105; P < 0.0001] is nearly identical to the Kim and O'Neil (1997) abiogenic calcite equation over the entire temperature range (7-19°C), and it closely resembles the commonly used paleotemperature equations of Epstein et al. (1953) and Horibe and Oba (1972). Further, the comparison of the M. edulis paleotemperature equation with the Kim and O'Neil (1997) equilibrium-based equation indicates that M. edulis specimens used in this study precipitated their shell in isotopic equilibrium with ambient water within the experimental uncertainties of both studies. The aquaculture-based methodology described here allows similar species-specific isotope paleothermometer calibrations to be performed with other bivalve species and thus provides improved quantitative paleoenvironmental reconstructions.

  8. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Euo Chang; Park, K. K.; Cho, H. R.

    2012-04-01

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using highly sensitive and advanced laser-based spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been applied for the chemical speciation of actinide in aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. Development of TRLFS technology for the chemical speciation of actinides, Development of laser-induced photo-acoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) system, Application of LIBD technology to investigate dynamic behaviors of actinides dissolution reactions, Development of nanoparticle analysis technology in groundwater using LIBD, Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, Spectroscopic speciation of uranium-ligand complexes in aqueous solution, Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces

  9. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Euo Chang; Park, K. K.; Cho, H. R.

    2010-04-01

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using advanced laser-based highly sensitive spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been performed for the chemical speciation of actinide in an aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. (1) Development of TRLFS technology for chemical speciation of actinides, (2) Development of LIBD technology for measuring solubility of actinides, (3) Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, (4) Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, (5) Development of technology for the chemical speciation of actinides by CE, (6) Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, (7) Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces, (8) Determination of actinide source terms of spent nuclear fuel

  10. A Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian G. Jakobsen; Glenn A. Brock; Arne T. Nielsen

    2016-01-01

    A bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna is described from the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. The fauna comprises 16 species of bivalves and rostroconchs plus six gastropod species which are treated under open nomenclature. Two new bivalves, Sthenodonta paenesymmetrica sp. nov. and Modiolopsis pojetai sp. nov., are described. The relatively low-diverse molluscan fauna constitutes around 62% of the total benthic macrofauna. Approximately 75% of...

  11. Importance of chemical speciation of iodine in relation to dose estimates from 129I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.

    1996-12-01

    Biota live in a chemical milieu and take up elements according to laws of chemistry and physics. Radioactivity is not important to accumulation processes. However, for radionuclides it is almost always the radiological consequences that are important. As such, most discussions and modelling of the processes of distribution, exposure and consequences tend to deal with radionuclides and do not dwell on chemistry. In fact, the chemical aspects of dose estimation are dealt with quite adequately, but usually in an implicit rather than explicit manner. This report discusses the chemistry and chemical speciation of iodine (1) and illustrates how these topics have been implicitly included in biosphere models such as BIOTRAC, the model employed in the assessment of Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept. Iodine is emphasized because 129 I is the dominant contributor to the hypothetical doses estimated. Not all aspects of the behaviour of 1 are implicit in BIOTRAC, but the exceptions are of minor importance. In general, the very broad ranges in parameter values specified for BIOTRAC encompass substantial latitude for the possible effects of chemical behaviour and speciation. Nonetheless, detailed understanding of the behavior of 1 in the environment is essential to the credibility of models such as BIOTRAC. There is substantial room for improved knowledge of the speciation of I, especially in freshwater and soil environments. (author)

  12. Bacteriophages as enteric viral indicators in bivalve mollusc management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kate R; Torok, Valeria A; Turnbull, Alison R

    2017-08-01

    Human enteric viruses, such as norovirus and hepatitis A virus, are spread by a variety of routes including faecal-oral transmission. Contaminated bivalve shellfish are regularly implicated in foodborne viral disease outbreaks internationally. Traditionally indicator bacteria, the coliforms and Escherichia coli, have been used to detect faecal pollution in growing waters and shellfish. However, studies have established that they are inadequate as indicators of the risk of human enteric viruses. Bacteriophages have been identified as potential indicators or surrogates for human enteric viruses due to their similarities in morphology, behaviour in water environments and resistance to disinfectant treatments. The somatic coliphages, male-specific RNA coliphages (FRNA coliphages) and the bacteriophages of Bacteroides are the groups recognised as most suitable for water and shellfish testing. In this review, we discuss the rationale and supporting evidence for the application of bacteriophages as surrogates for human enteric viruses in shellfish under a variety of conditions. There is some evidence to support the validity of using bacteriophage levels to indicate viral risk in shellfish in highly contaminated sites and following adverse sewage events. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The bivalve Neithea from the Cretaceous of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus Andrade, Edilma; Seeling, Jens; Bengtson, Peter; Souza-Lima, Wagner

    2004-09-01

    On the basis of new collections from the Sergipe and Camamu (Bahia) basins, revision of previously described material from the Pernambuco-Paraíba Basin and a reassessment of previous descriptions, five species of the pectinid bivalve Neithea are described from the Cretaceous of northeastern Brazil: N. ( N.) alpina (d'Orbigny, 1847) from the Albian of the Camamu Basin; N. ( N.) coquandi (Peron, 1877) from the Aptian-Cenomanian of the Sergipe Basin, the Albian of the Camamu Basin, broadly mid-Cretaceous beds of the Tucano Sul Basin (Bahia), and the Cenomanian of the São Luís Basin (Maranhão); N. ( N.) hispanica (d'Orbigny, 1850) from the Albian-lower Turonian of the Sergipe Basin; N. ( N.) bexarensis (Stephenson, 1941) from the Campanian of the Pernambuco-Paraíba Basin; N. ( Neithella) notabilis (Münster in Goldfuss, 1833) from the Cenomanian of the Sergipe Basin. All species show a wide geographical distribution, in sharp contrast to previous studies that have indicated a highly endemic mollusc fauna in the Cretaceous of Brazil.

  14. Changing restoration rules: exotic bivalves interact with residence time and depth to control phytoplankton productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa V.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are a prevalent ecosystem stressor that can interact with other stressors to confound resource management and restoration. We examine how interactions between physical habitat attributes and a particular category of non-native species (invasive bivalves) influence primary production in aquatic ecosystems. Using mathematical models, we show how intuitive relationships between phytoplankton productivity and controllable physical factors (water depth, hydraulic transport time) that hold in the absence of bivalves can be complicated—and even reversed—by rapid bivalve grazing. In light-limited environments without bivalves, shallow, hydrodynamically “slow” habitats should generally have greater phytoplankton biomass and productivity than deeper, “faster” habitats. But shallower, slower environments can be less productive than deeper, faster ones if benthic grazing is strong. Moreover, shallower and slower waters exhibit a particularly broad range of possible productivity outcomes that can depend on whether bivalves are present. Since it is difficult to predict the response of non-native bivalves to habitat restoration, outcomes for new shallow, slow environments can be highly uncertain. Habitat depth and transport time should therefore not be used as indicators of phytoplankton biomass and production where bivalve colonization is possible. This study provides for ecosystem management a particular example of a broad lesson: abiotic ecosystem stressors should be managed with explicit consideration of interactions with other major (including biotic) stressors. We discuss the applicability and management implications of our models and results for a range of aquatic system types, with a case study focused on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA). Simple mathematical models like those used here can illuminate interactions between ecosystem stressors and provide process-based guidance for resource managers as they develop strategies

  15. Determination of the recovery efficiency of cryptosporidium oocysts and giardia cysts from seeded bivalve mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schets, Franciska M; van den Berg, Harold H J L; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal parasites Cryptosporidium and Giardia are transmitted by water and food and cause human gastroenteritis. Filter-feeding bivalve mollusks, such as oysters and mussels, filter large volumes of water and thus concentrate such pathogens, which makes these bivalves potential vectors of disease. To assess the risk of infection from consumption of contaminated bivalves, parasite numbers and parasite recovery data are required. A modified immunomagnetic separation (IMS) procedure was used to determine Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cyst numbers in individually homogenized oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Mytilus edulis). About 12% of the commercial bivalves were positive, with low (oo)cyst numbers per specimen. The recovery efficiency of the IMS procedure was systematically evaluated. Experiments included seeding of homogenized bivalves and whole animals with 100 to 1,000 (oo)cysts. Both seeding procedures yielded highly variable recovery rates. Median Cryptosporidium recoveries were 7.9 to 21% in oysters and 62% in mussels. Median Giardia recoveries were 10 to 25% in oysters and 110% in mussels. Giardia recovery was significantly higher than Cryptosporidium recovery. (Oo)cysts were less efficiently recovered from seeded whole animals than from seeded homogenates, with median Cryptosporidium recoveries of 5.3% in oysters and 45% in mussels and median Giardia recoveries of 4.0% in oysters and 82% in mussels. Both bivalve homogenate seeding and whole animal seeding yielded higher (oo)cyst recovery in mussels than in oysters, likely because of the presence of less shellfish tissue in IMS when analyzing the smaller mussels compared with the larger oysters, resulting in more efficient (oo)cyst extraction. The data generated in this study may be used in the quantitative assessment of the risk of infection with Cryptosporidium or Giardia associated with the consumption of raw bivalve mollusks. This information may be used for making risk management

  16. First evidence of immunomodulation in bivalves under seawater acidification and increased temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Matozzo

    Full Text Available Water acidification, temperature increases and changes in seawater salinity are predicted to occur in the near future. In such a global climate change (GCC scenario, there is growing concern for the health status of both wild and farmed organisms. Bivalve molluscs, an important component of coastal marine ecosystems, are at risk. At the immunological level, the ability of an organism to maintain its immunosurveillance unaltered under adverse environmental conditions may enhance its survival capability. To our knowledge, only a few studies have investigated the effects of changing environmental parameters (as predicted in a GCC scenario on the immune responses of bivalves. In the present study, the effects of both decreased pH values and increased temperature on the important immune parameters of two bivalve species were evaluated for the first time. The clam Chamelea gallina and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, widespread along the coast of the Northwestern Adriatic Sea, were chosen as model organisms. Bivalves were exposed for 7 days to three pH values (8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 at two temperatures (22 and 28°C. Three independent experiments were carried out at salinities of 28, 34 and 40 PSU. The total haemocyte count, Neutral Red uptake, haemolymph lysozyme activity and total protein levels were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that tested experimental conditions affected significantly most of the immune parameters measured in bivalves, even if the variation pattern of haemocyte responses was not always linear. Between the two species, C. gallina appeared more vulnerable to changing pH and temperature than M. galloprovincialis. Overall, this study demonstrated that climate changes can strongly affect haemocyte functionality in bivalves. However, further studies are needed to clarify better the mechanisms of action of changing environmental parameters, both individually and in combination, on bivalve haemocytes.

  17. Po-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial and freshwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjelsvik, Runhild; Brown, Justin (eds.) (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Holm, Elis (Univ. of Lund (Sweden)); Roos, Per (Risoe DTU (Denmark)); Saxen, Ritva; Outola, Iisa (STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    This report provides new information on Po-210 (and where appropriate its grandparent Pb-210) behaviour in environmental systems including humans. This has primarily been achieved through measurements of Po-210 in aquatic and terrestrial environments that has led to the derivation of information on the levels of this radioisotope in plants, animals and the biotic components of their habitat (i.e. water, soil) providing basic information on transfer where practicable. For freshwater environments, Po-210 concentration ratios derived for freshwater benthic fish and bivalve mollusc were substantially different to values collated from earlier review work. For terrestrial environments, activity concentrations of Po-210 in small mammals (although of a preliminary nature because no correction was made for ingrowth from Pb-210) were considerably higher than values derived from earlier data compilations. It was envisaged that data on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides would render underpinning data sets more comprehensive and would thus allow more robust background dose calculations to be performed subsequently. By way of example, unweighted background dose-rates arising from internal distributions of Po-210 were calculated for small mammals in the terrestrial study. The biokinetics of polonium in humans has been studied following chronic and acute oral intakes of selected Po radioisotopes. This work has provided information on gastrointestinal absorption factors and biological retention times thus improving the database upon which committed effective doses to humans are derived. The information generated in the report, in its entirety, should be of direct relevance for both human and non-human impact assessments. (au)

  18. Po-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial and freshwater environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjelsvik, Runhild; Brown, Justin; Roos, Per; Saxen, Ritva; Outola, Iisa

    2009-01-01

    This report provides new information on Po-210 (and where appropriate its grandparent Pb-210) behaviour in environmental systems including humans. This has primarily been achieved through measurements of Po-210 in aquatic and terrestrial environments that has led to the derivation of information on the levels of this radioisotope in plants, animals and the biotic components of their habitat (i.e. water, soil) providing basic information on transfer where practicable. For freshwater environments, Po-210 concentration ratios derived for freshwater benthic fish and bivalve mollusc were substantially different to values collated from earlier review work. For terrestrial environments, activity concentrations of Po-210 in small mammals (although of a preliminary nature because no correction was made for ingrowth from Pb-210) were considerably higher than values derived from earlier data compilations. It was envisaged that data on levels of naturally occurring radionuclides would render underpinning data sets more comprehensive and would thus allow more robust background dose calculations to be performed subsequently. By way of example, unweighted background dose-rates arising from internal distributions of Po-210 were calculated for small mammals in the terrestrial study. The biokinetics of polonium in humans has been studied following chronic and acute oral intakes of selected Po radioisotopes. This work has provided information on gastrointestinal absorption factors and biological retention times thus improving the database upon which committed effective doses to humans are derived. The information generated in the report, in its entirety, should be of direct relevance for both human and non-human impact assessments. (au)

  19. Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility, located at SANGB, has direct year-round access to water from Lake St. Clair and has a State of Michigan approved National...

  20. Bio-accumulation kinetics of radioruthenium in marine bivalves. Laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, D.H.; Yan, S.P.; Gu, Y.J.; Li, D.J.; Du, J.Z.

    2007-01-01

    Three kinds of marine bivalves (wild Saccostrea cucullata, aquacultured Perna viridis and aquacultured Pinctada martens), collected from Daya Bay, the South China Sea, were used to investigate the bio-accumulation of radioruthenium in the glass aquarium with natural seawater (pH 8.20, 35 per mille salinity, filtered by 0.45 μm) at ambient temperature under laboratory feeding conditions. The experimental results show that the stead-state of biology concentration factor (BCF, ml/g) of radioruthenium was approached around 6 days for most species of bivalves. The values of BCF in shells are the highest in organs all the three bivalves. The orders of BCF values (ml x g -1 ) are as: Perna viridis (33.2) < Saccostrea cucullata (47.0) < Pinctada martensi (208.4) for shells and Saccostrea cucullata (1.5) < Pinctada martensi (2.2) ∼ Perma viridis (2.4) for soft tissues, respectively, after exposed for 14 days. The rate constants of uptake and elimination of radioruthenium on marine bivalves were also discussed by first-order kinetics model. The Pinctada martensi may be applicable to be an indictor for monitoring radioruthenium among the three bivalves. (author)

  1. Trace Fossil Evidence of Trematode-Bivalve Parasite-Host Interactions in Deep Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, John Warren; De Baets, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Parasitism is one of the most pervasive phenomena amongst modern eukaryotic life and yet, relative to other biotic interactions, almost nothing is known about its history in deep time. Digenean trematodes (Platyhelminthes) are complex life cycle parasites, which have practically no body fossil record, but induce the growth of characteristic malformations in the shells of their bivalve hosts. These malformations are readily preserved in the fossil record, but, until recently, have largely been overlooked by students of the fossil record. In this review, we present the various malformations induced by trematodes in bivalves, evaluate their distribution through deep time in the phylogenetic and ecological contexts of their bivalve hosts and explore how various taphonomic processes have likely biased our understanding of trematodes in deep time. Trematodes are known to negatively affect their bivalve hosts in a number of ways including castration, modifying growth rates, causing immobilization and, in some cases, altering host behaviour making the host more susceptible to their own predators. Digeneans are expected to be significant agents of natural selection. To that end, we discuss how bivalves may have adapted to their parasites via heterochrony and suggest a practical methodology for testing such hypotheses in deep time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. How Facilitation May Interfere with Ecological Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Liancourt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the vast literature linking competitive interactions and speciation, attempts to understand the role of facilitation for evolutionary diversification remain scarce. Yet, community ecologists now recognize the importance of positive interactions within plant communities. Here, we examine how facilitation may interfere with the mechanisms of ecological speciation. We argue that facilitation is likely to (1 maintain gene flow among incipient species by enabling cooccurrence of adapted and maladapted forms in marginal habitats and (2 increase fitness of introgressed forms and limit reinforcement in secondary contact zones. Alternatively, we present how facilitation may favour colonization of marginal habitats and thus enhance local adaptation and ecological speciation. Therefore, facilitation may impede or pave the way for ecological speciation. Using a simple spatially and genetically explicit modelling framework, we illustrate and propose some first testable ideas about how, when, and where facilitation may act as a cohesive force for ecological speciation. These hypotheses and the modelling framework proposed should stimulate further empirical and theoretical research examining the role of both competitive and positive interactions in the formation of incipient species.

  3. Methods for macro concentration speciation (>106 M)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The range of topics covered by the term 'speciation' varies from the determination of isotopic composition, through whether an element or nuclide is present and under which form, to the full identification of the molecular compound present or the isolation of species. Therefore, it is quite understandable that a rather large range of techniques may be applicable for speciation purposes and that none may be sufficient by itself to cover all purposes. We tried in this report to review on technologies available for speciation purposes in nuclear fuel cycle activities and to provide a reference document to guide researchers in choosing the most useful technique for his purposes by summarizing their characteristics. Particular attention was given to highlight the advantages and disadvantages/limitations of a given technique as well as, when suitable, expected or necessary future improvements. It was also attempted to indicate a 'recommended' application field, though this was not an easy task. In the present part, we concentrate on techniques available for macro concentration speciation with an arbitrary limit fixed around 10 -6 M. However, one should be aware that some of the techniques discussed in the present may be also applicable for lower concentration (overlap with over Partim. of the whole report) and vice-versa. Then, we consider that the scope of the present can only be achieved considering the whole parts discussed at the OECD/NEA Workshop on evaluation of speciation technology held in October 1999 at JAERI/Tokai-mura. (author)

  4. Zebra mussel infestation of unionid bivalves (Unionidae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Don W.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Mackie, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1989, zebra mussels received national attention in North America when they reached densities exceeding 750,000/m2 in a water withdrawal facility along the shore of western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Although water withdrawal problems caused by zebra mussels have been of immediate concern, ecological impacts attributed to mussels are likely to be the more important long-term issue for surface waters in North America. To date, the epizoic colonization (i.e., infestation) of unionid bivalve mollusks by zebra mussels has caused the most direct and severe ecological impact. Infestation of and resulting impacts caused by zebra mussels on unionids in the Great Lakes began in 1988. By 1990, mortality of unionids was occurring at some locations; by 1991, extant populations of unionids in western Lake Erie were nearly extirpated; by 1992, unionid populations in the southern half of Lake St. Clair were extirpated; by 1993, unionids in widely separated geographic areas of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River showed high mortality due to mussel infestation. All infested unionid species in the Great Lakes (23) have become infested and exhibited mortality within two to four years after heavy infestation began. Data indicate that mean zebra mussel densities >5,000–6,000/m2 and infestation intensities >100-200/unionid in the presence of heavy zebra mussel recruitment results in near total mortality of unionids. At present, all unionid species in rivers, streams, and akes that sympatrically occur with zebra mussels have been infested and, in many locations, negatively impacted by zebra mussels. We do not know the potential consequences of infestation on the 297 unionid species found in North America, but believe zebra mussels pose an immediate threat to the abundance and diversity of unionids.

  5. Salting our freshwater lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Sarah L.; Burke, Samantha M.; Doubek, Jonathan P.; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E.; Skaff, Nicholas K.; Summers, Jamie C.; Farrell, Kaitlin J.; McCullough, Ian M.; Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Roberts, Derek C.; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2017-01-01

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L−1), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue. PMID:28396392

  6. Cobalt toxicity in anaerobic granular sludge: influence of chemical speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartacek, J.; Fermoso, F.G.; Baldo-Urrutia, A.M.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of cobalt speciation on the toxicity of cobalt to methylotrophic methanogenesis in anaerobic granular sludge was investigated. The cobalt speciation was studied with three different media that contained varying concentrations of complexing ligands [carbonates, phosphates and

  7. European Lampreys: New Insights on Postglacial Colonization, Gene Flow and Speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, Catarina Sofia; Almeida, Pedro Raposo; Mesquita, Natacha; Quintella, Bernardo Ruivo; Alves, Maria Judite

    2016-01-01

    Ice ages are known to be the most dominant palaeoclimatic feature occurring on Earth, producing severe climatic oscillations and consequently shaping the distribution and the population structure of several species. Lampreys constitute excellent models to study the colonization of freshwater systems, as they commonly appear in pairs of closely related species of anadromous versus freshwater resident adults, thus having the ability to colonize new habitats, through the anadromous species, and establish freshwater resident derivates. We used 10 microsatellite loci to investigate the spatial structure, patterns of gene flow and migration routes of Lampetra populations in Europe. We sampled 11 populations including the migratory L. fluviatilis and four resident species, L. planeri, L. alavariensis, L. auremensis and L. lusitanica, the last three endemic to the Iberian Peninsula. In this southern glacial refugium almost all sampled populations represent a distinct genetic cluster, showing high levels of allopatric differentiation, reflecting long periods of isolation. As result of their more recent common ancestor, populations from northern Europe are less divergent among them, they are represented by fewer genetic clusters, and there is evidence of strong recent gene flow among populations. These previously glaciated areas from northern Europe may have been colonized from lampreys expanding out of the Iberian refugia. The pair L. fluviatilis/L. planeri is apparently at different stages of speciation in different locations, showing evidences of high reproductive isolation in the southern refugium, and low differentiation in the north.

  8. European Lampreys: New Insights on Postglacial Colonization, Gene Flow and Speciation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Sofia Mateus

    Full Text Available Ice ages are known to be the most dominant palaeoclimatic feature occurring on Earth, producing severe climatic oscillations and consequently shaping the distribution and the population structure of several species. Lampreys constitute excellent models to study the colonization of freshwater systems, as they commonly appear in pairs of closely related species of anadromous versus freshwater resident adults, thus having the ability to colonize new habitats, through the anadromous species, and establish freshwater resident derivates. We used 10 microsatellite loci to investigate the spatial structure, patterns of gene flow and migration routes of Lampetra populations in Europe. We sampled 11 populations including the migratory L. fluviatilis and four resident species, L. planeri, L. alavariensis, L. auremensis and L. lusitanica, the last three endemic to the Iberian Peninsula. In this southern glacial refugium almost all sampled populations represent a distinct genetic cluster, showing high levels of allopatric differentiation, reflecting long periods of isolation. As result of their more recent common ancestor, populations from northern Europe are less divergent among them, they are represented by fewer genetic clusters, and there is evidence of strong recent gene flow among populations. These previously glaciated areas from northern Europe may have been colonized from lampreys expanding out of the Iberian refugia. The pair L. fluviatilis/L. planeri is apparently at different stages of speciation in different locations, showing evidences of high reproductive isolation in the southern refugium, and low differentiation in the north.

  9. Speciation from photon to ion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, C.

    2001-01-01

    New analytical techniques allowing to perform speciation in the framework of the nuclear fuel cycle are more and more needed. Among them, several laser-based analytical techniques present several advantages (non intrusive). Hence, Thermal Lensing (TL)/Photoacoustic (LIPAS), Time Resolved selective, sensitive Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) have been used for actinides/lanthanides interaction and speciation studies in inorganic and organic matrices, Laser Ablation-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA-OES or LIBS) for direct studies on solids, liquids,... where in situ measurements (elemental or isotopic) are mandatory. In complementary to these photon-based methods, new ion detection methods such as ElectroSpray-Mass Spectrometry (ES-MS) seems promising for speciation studies. Principle, advantages and limitations as well as results obtained and trends for these different methods will be presented. (author)

  10. Evolution of sex-dependent mtDNA transmission in freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Davide; Plazzi, Federico; Stewart, Donald T; Bogan, Arthur E; Hoeh, Walter R; Breton, Sophie

    2017-05-08

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) describes a mode of mtDNA transmission widespread in gonochoric freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Palaeoheterodonta: Unionida). In this system, both female- and male-transmitted mtDNAs, named F and M respectively, coexist in the same species. In unionids, DUI is strictly correlated to gonochorism and to the presence of the atypical open reading frames (ORFans) F-orf and M-orf, respectively inside F and M mtDNAs, which are hypothesized to participate in sex determination. However, DUI is not found in all three Unionida superfamilies (confirmed in Hyrioidea and Unionoidea but not in Etherioidea), raising the question of its origin in these bivalves. To reconstruct the co-evolution of DUI and of ORFans, we sequenced the mtDNAs of four unionids (two gonochoric with DUI, one gonochoric and one hermaphroditic without DUI) and of the related gonochoric species Neotrigonia margaritacea (Palaeoheterodonta: Trigoniida). Our analyses suggest that rearranged mtDNAs appeared early during unionid radiation, and that a duplicated and diverged atp8 gene evolved into the M-orf associated with the paternal transmission route in Hyrioidea and Unionoidea, but not in Etherioidea. We propose that novel mtDNA-encoded genes can deeply influence bivalve sex determining systems and the evolution of the mitogenomes in which they occur.

  11. In situ method for measurements of community clearance rate on shallow water bivalve populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni W.; Dolmer, Per; Vismann, Bent

    2011-01-01

    with an air lift connected to a SCUBA diver pressure tank generating a continuous and gentle water circulation. This ensures a complete mixture of suspended particles, and thereby, a maximum filtration by the bivalves. An in situ fluorometer was mounted to record plant pigment reduction due to mussel...... clearance in real-time. To calibrate the in situ fluorometer triplicate water samples were obtained initially in each of the bivalve filtration measurements. The water samples were filtrated, extracted, and later analyzed for plant pigment concentration on a laboratory spectrophotometer. The main conclusion......An open-top chamber was designed for measuring ambient community clearance rate on undisturbed bivalve populations in the field. The chamber was pressed 5-10 cm down in the sediment on the mussel bed. It holds approximately 30-40 cm water column equal to a volume of 43-77 L. It was provided...

  12. The bivalves from the Scotia Arc islands: species richness and faunistic affinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego G. Zelaya

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Species richness of the shallow-water bivalves from the Scotia Arc islands was studied on the basis of new collections and by reviewing extant information. Seventy-three species are recognised from the entire area. South Georgia, the South Orkney Islands and the South Shetland Islands were similar in species richness to the Antarctic Weddell sector. New records for 51 bivalve species are provided and the presence of 18 undescribed species is reported. The faunistic similarity of the islands of the Scotia Arc to the Magellan region and the Antarctic Weddell sector is re-examined. These islands show a high similarity to the Antarctic Weddell sector (49 to 85% and a low similarity to the Magellan region (12 to 32%. Evidence from bivalves clearly supports the placement of the Scotia Arc islands within the Antarctic region.

  13. Arsenic and trace metals in commercially important bivalves, Anadara granosa and Paphia undulata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mat, I. (Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia))

    1994-06-01

    The semi-culture of marine bivalves particularly Anadara granosa is of considerable economic importance in Malaysia. Currently, about 4-5000 ha of mudflats along the west coast are utilized for this purpose. Therefore, contamination of the highly productive mudflats with heavy metals tend to be accumulated in the filter feeding organisms such as bivalve molluscs which often serve as important environmental sinks of heavy metals. Bivalve molluscs, A. granosa and Paphia undulata are commercially important seafoods and popular among the locals in Malaysia. With this point in mind, it is intended to evaluate the concentration levels of arsenic as well as trace metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cd, Zn, Cr and Pb) in both species derived from retail outlets in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Although this analysis may not indicate the site of capture but may act as a direct check on the contamination of seafoods available to the consumers. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Sympatric speciation in Nicaraguan crater lake cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Barluenga, Marta; Stölting, Kai N.; Salzburger, Walter; Muschick, Moritz; Meyer, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Sympatric speciation, the formation of species in the absence of geographical barriers, remains one of the most contentious concepts in evolutionary biology. Although speciation under sympatric conditions seems theoretically possible, empirical studies are scarce and only a few credible examples of sympatric speciation exist6. Here we present a convincing case of sympatric speciation in the Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus sp.) in a young and small volcanic crater lake in Nicaragua....

  15. SHRIMP (CRANGON-CRANGON L) BROWSING UPON SIPHON TIPS INHIBITS FEEDING AND GROWTH IN THE BIVALVE MACOMA-BALTHICA (L)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMERMANS, P; HUITEMA, HJ

    1994-01-01

    The influence of siphon browsing on the feeding behaviour and growth of Macoma balthica, a deposit-feeding bivalve, was studied in three manipulative experiments. Browsing was simulated by removing part of the inhalant siphon with scissors, or studied by exposing the bivalves to shrimps (Crangon

  16. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filgueira, R.; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.; Jansen, H.M.; Smaal, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle has been commonly evaluated as the balance between respiration, shell calcium carbonate sequestration and CO2 release during biogenic calcification. However, this approach neglects the ecosystem implications of cultivating bivalves at high densities,

  17. The conditions for speciation through intraspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Reinhard; Schneider, Kristan A; Willensdorfer, Martin

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown theoretically that sympatric speciation can occur if intraspecific competition is strong enough to induce disruptive selection. However, the plausibility of the involved processes is under debate, and many questions on the conditions for speciation remain unresolved. For instance, is strong disruptive selection sufficient for speciation? Which roles do genetic architecture and initial composition of the population play? How strong must assortative mating be before a population can split in two? These are some of the issues we address here. We investigate a diploid multilocus model of a quantitative trait that is under frequency-dependent selection caused by a balance of intraspecific competition and frequency-independent stabilizing selection. This trait also acts as mating character for assortment. It has been established previously that speciation can occur only if competition is strong enough to induce disruptive selection. We find that speciation becomes more difficult for very strong competition, because then extremely strong assortment is required. Thus, speciation is most likely for intermediate strengths of competition, where it requires strong, but not extremely strong, assortment. For this range of parameters, however, it is not obvious how assortment can evolve from low to high levels, because with moderately strong assortment less genetic variation is maintained than under weak or strong assortment-sometimes none at all. In addition to the strength of frequency-dependent competition and assortative mating, the roles of the number of loci, the distribution of allelic effects, the initial conditions, costs to being choosy, the strength of stabilizing selection, and the particular choice of the fitness function are explored. A multitude of possible evolutionary outcomes is observed, including loss of all genetic variation, splitting in two to five species, as well as very short and extremely long stable limit cycles. On the methodological

  18. A Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian G. Jakobsen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna is described from the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. The fauna comprises 16 species of bivalves and rostroconchs plus six gastropod species which are treated under open nomenclature. Two new bivalves, Sthenodonta paenesymmetrica sp. nov. and Modiolopsis pojetai sp. nov., are described. The relatively low-diverse molluscan fauna constitutes around 62% of the total benthic macrofauna. Approximately 75% of the molluscs comprise bivalves, especially nuculoids, which were biogeographically restricted to low latitudes during the Ordovician. The molluscan assemblage displays a very high degree of endemism at species level, though the bivalve Sthenodonta eastii also occurs in the Georgina Basin farther to the northeast. This indicates a possible marine connective seaway between the Georgina and Amadeus basins during the Darriwilian. Nuculites, Cyrtodonta, and Modiolopsis are cosmopolitan and previously reported from North China, Avalonia, and Southern Gondwana.

  19. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    , e.g. the impact on phytoplankton dynamics and benthic-pelagic coupling, which can significantly contribute to the CO2 cycle. Therefore, an ecosystem approach that accounts for the trophic interactions of bivalve aquaculture, including dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon cycling......, is needed to provide a rigorous assessment of the role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle. On the other hand, the discussion about the inclusion of shells of cultured bivalves into the carbon trading system should be framed in the context of ecosystem goods and services. Humans culture bivalves...... with the aim of producing food, not sequestering CO2 in their shells, therefore the main ecosystem good provided by bivalve aquaculture is meat production, and shells should be considered as by-products of this human activity. This reasoning is key to split the CO2 released due to respiration between meat...

  20. Morphometric Studies on Anodonta Anatine Bivalve Population from the Dognecea Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Bura

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Dognecea Lake, near town Bocsa in Caras-Severin county a strong bivalve population has been discovered from the duck mussel specie (Anodonta anatina. Harvested individuals were transported to the Aquaculture laboratory where measurements and correct identification was made. This specie is considered endangered but in Banat area, especially in the Dognecea Lake it is well represented, having an ecological importance, but the bivalve can have an economical importance too, due to the high percentage of edible part of 56.5%.

  1. Temporal and spatial variations in iron concentrations of tropical bivalves during dredging event

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Brown, B.E.; Jayakumar, A.

    differs with respect to location, with highest iron levels being recorded in bivalves living in the vicinity of a tin-ore dressing plant. Temporal elevations in bivalve iron con- centrations closely parallel times of dredging activity and iron... causing con- siderable mortality to reef corals at this site (Brown et al., in press). In mid-1988 cracks appeared in the holding wall of the settling lagoon of the ore-dressing plant and iron- enriched liquor drained on to the reef flat at site A...

  2. Marine bivalve feeding strategy, radiocarbon ages and stable isotopes in Scottish coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giudice Cappelli, Elena; Austin, William

    2017-04-01

    Marine bivalve molluscs have been widely used for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions as their carbonate provides a direct chronology of environmental change through radiocarbon dating, and their shell composition, particularly with regard to their oxygen and carbon stable isotopes, is likely to reflect ambient seawater conditions. However, stable isotope signatures of marine bivalve shells are difficult to interpret, as shell formation can be influenced by secondary factors such as metabolic processes and feeding strategies. In radiocarbon ages, uncertainty is introduced as bivalves inhabit a range of ecological niches which may be of significance in the case of deep borrowing and deposit feeding bivalves, as they could incorporate older carbon in their shells, resulting in apparent older ages than the true age of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the overlying seawater. To discriminate between the different factors influencing the composition of marine molluscs' shells, we measured radiocarbon ages, oxygen and carbon stable isotopes in nine species of marine bivalves having different known feeding strategies and inhabiting a number of ecological niches; all shells being live-collected (between 1923-1925) from six localities around the Scottish coast, a wider context than has been previously undertaken. Our results show that in situ variability (i.e.: replicate measurements of the same species at the same location) is generally low for both stable isotope analyses and radiocarbon dates, indicating good accuracy of the measurements. Intra-species (i.e.: same species - different location) and inter-species (i.e.: different species - same location) variability is significant in stable isotopes measurements, meaning that marine bivalve shells do record changes in the local environment and are sensitive to different feeding strategies and ecological settings. In contrast, radiocarbon ages do not change with location and are not sensitive to molluscs' diets or

  3. Otimização do processo de depuração de moluscos bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Maria Helena Oliveira Casimiro

    2016-01-01

    A contaminação microbiológica de moluscos bivalves constitui uma das principais preocupações inerentes à segurança alimentar desta importante fonte de receitas para a economia portuguesa. Os bivalves capturados ou produzidos em zonas estuarinas ou lagunares devem passar por um processo de depuração, para redução dos níveis de contaminação microbiológica, antes da sua comercialização. Este trabalho teve como principal objetivo o desenvolvimento de sistemas modulares de dep...

  4. Desalination - an alternative freshwater resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakaib, M.

    2005-01-01

    Global water constitutes 94 percent salt water that is from the oceans and 6% is in the form of freshwater. Out of this 6% freshwater approximately 27% is trapped in glaciers and 72% is underground. The sea water is important for transportation, fisheries. Oceans regulate climate through air sea interaction. However direct consumption of sea water is too salty to sustain human life. Water with a dissolved solids (salt) content generally below about 1000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) is considered acceptable for human consumption. The application of desalting technologies over the past 50 years have been in many of the arid zone where freshwater is available. Pakistan lies in the Sun Belt. It is considered a wide margin coastal belt (990 km), having an Exclusive Economic Zone of 240,000 km/sup 2/, that strokes trillion cubic meters of sea water that can be made available as freshwater source to meet the shortfall in the supply of domestic water through desalination along the coastal belt of Pakistan. The freshwater obtained from the other desalination processes is slightly expensive, but the cost of desalination can be considerably reduced provided that the available inexpensive or free waste energy is utilized mainly. (author)

  5. Interactive effects of CO₂ and trace metals on the proteasome activity and cellular stress response of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Sandra; Matoo, Omera B; Beniash, Elia; Saborowski, Reinhard; Sokolova, Inna M

    2014-04-01

    Increased anthropogenic emission of CO2 changes the carbonate chemistry and decreases the pH of the ocean. This can affect the speciation and the bioavailability of metals in polluted habitats such as estuaries. However, the effects of acidification on metal accumulation and stress response in estuarine organisms including bivalves are poorly understood. We studied the interactive effects of CO2 and two common metal pollutants, copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), on metal accumulation, intracellular ATP/ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, stress response and energy metabolism in two common estuarine bivalves-Crassostrea virginica (eastern oyster) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard shell clam). Bivalves were exposed for 4-5 weeks to clean seawater (control) and to either 50 μg L(-1) Cu or 50 μg L(-1) Cd at one of three partial pressures of CO2 ( [Formula: see text] ∼ 395, ∼ 800 and ∼ 1500 μatm) representative of the present-day conditions and projections of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) for the years 2100 and 2250, respectively. Clams accumulated lower metal burdens than oysters, and elevated [Formula: see text] enhanced the Cd and Cu accumulation in mantle tissues in both species. Higher Cd and Cu burdens were associated with elevated mRNA expression of metal binding proteins metallothionein and ferritin. In the absence of added metals, proteasome activities of clams and oysters were robust to elevated [Formula: see text] , but [Formula: see text] modulated the proteasome response to metals. Cd exposure stimulated the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome at all CO2 levels. In contrast, trypsin- and caspase-like activities of the oyster proteasome were slightly inhibited by Cd exposure in normocapnia but this inhibition was reversed at elevated [Formula: see text] . Cu exposure inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome regardless of the exposure [Formula: see text] . The effects of metal exposure on

  6. Electrochemical metal speciation in colloidal dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wonders, J.H.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The term "heavy metals" is connected with toxicity. They form strong complexes with enzymes, other proteins and DNA in living organisms, which causes dysfunctioning and hence poisoning. In combination with the uptake mechanism of the organism, speciation of heavy metal determines the

  7. Behavioural reproductive isolation and speciation in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The origin of premating reproductive isolation continues to help elucidate the process of speciation and is the central event in the evolution of biological species. Therefore, during the process of species formation the diverging populations must acquire some means of reproductive isolation so that the genes from one gene ...

  8. Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Abigail M.; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.; Petersen, James N.

    2007-01-30

    A biosensor for metal analysis and speciation is disclosed. The biosensor comprises an electron carrier immobilized to a surface of an electrode and a layer of an immobilized enzyme adjacent to the electrode. The immobilized enzyme comprises an enzyme having biological activity inhibited by a metal to be detected by the biosensor.

  9. Biogeochemical speciation of Fe in ocean water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2006-01-01

    The biogeochemical speciation of Fe in seawater has been evaluated using the consistent Non-Ideal Competitive Adsorption model (NICA¿Donnan model). Two types of data sets were used, i.e. Fe-hydroxide solubility data and competitive ligand equilibration/cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE/CSV) Fe

  10. The speciation of iodine in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulman, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The speciation of iodine in the environment is discussed under the following topics: (i) sea surface to atmosphere, (ii) chemistry in bulk seawater, (iii) iodine in rocks, (iv) iodine in soils, (v) iodine in plants and (vi) iodine in solidified wastes. (author)

  11. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  12. Magic cues versus magic preferences in speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, Martine E.; Seehausen, Ole

    Question: How does divergent natural selection lead to divergence in mating traits and the evolution of reproductive isolation? Background: Ecological speciation of non-allopatric taxa usually requires the evolution of an association between selective mating and the traits underlying ecological

  13. Adding to the Mercury Speciation Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, J. P.; Northrup, P. A.; Chidambaram, D.; Kalb, P. D.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury was used to separate lithium-6 isotope for weapons production at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN in the 1950s and 1960s. A large portion of the waste Hg entered the environment and continues to move throughout the sub-surface and surface waters in the area. Environmental management of Hg contamination within this complex hydrologic system, where Hg speciation and the mobile fraction have been found to vary widely, will require ongoing characterization and predictive modeling of Hg speciation. State-of-the-art spectroscopic tools that can directly probe Hg speciation in preserved aqueous and sediment samples with greater sensitivity, however, are required to determine rates and mechanisms of biogeochemical reactions. We will present the first results demonstrating the use of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Hg M5 edge (2295 eV) to fingerprint Hg species. Heavy-metal M5 absorption edges can have very sharp features due to local electron transitions, and therefore, we are developing this edge as a tool for quantitative measurement of Hg species. In addition, sulfur speciation using the sulfur K absorption edge, which is at a similar energy (2472 eV), can be measured in the same scan as the Hg M5 edge. Potentially important organic and inorganic sulfur species (sulfide, disulfide, elemental sulfur, sulfite and sulfate) are readily differentiated, and thereby, provides an independent method for monitoring the redox state of the system along with changes in S-Hg bonding. We will also present x-ray microprobe 2-D concentration maps of Hg and other elements at the grain and pore scales to identify its microscopic distribution and chemical associations. When used in combination with established sequential extraction and direct spectroscopic methods, the addition of XAS at the Hg M5 edge should provide a significant advancement in the determination of Hg speciation in complex biogeochemical environments.

  14. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for...

  15. Modiolarca lateralis (Pteryomorphia: Mytilidae: bivalve associated to six species of ascidians from Bocas del Toro, Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I Cañete

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe the presence of the bivalve Modiolarca lateralis (Say, 1822 in six tropical ascidians Ascidia curvata, A. sydneiensis, A. panamensis, A. interrupta, Herdmania pallida and Polycarpa spongiabilis collected at depths of 1-3 m on coral reefs, mangrove roots and dock supports in Almirante Bay, Bocas del Toro, Panama (9°18'N, 82°13'W during June-July 2011. Bivalve prevalence varied between 9-30% across species, but was mainly associated with A. panamensis, P. spongiabilis and A. interrupta. Prevalence seems to be influenced by tunic thickness rather than by the ascidian size. Bivalves varied in size (0.6-11 mm shell length, with the smallest individual found in A. sydneiensis. There were only one or two bivalves per ascidians, although a maximum of 18 was found in one A. panamensis. M. lateralis seems to behave similarly to its temperate counterparts: it has a variety of hosts, occurs mainly in the anterior region of the ascidians, and has a variable abundance per host.

  16. Understanding the implications of a changing environment on harvested bivalve populations using habitat suitability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habitat suitability models are useful to forecast how environmental change may affect the abundance or distribution of species of interest. In the case of harvested bivalves, those models may be used to estimate the vulnerability of this valued ecosystem good to stressors. Using ...

  17. BIVALVE BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS, ABUNDANCES, AND CLIMATE VULNERABILITY FROM THE BEAUFORT SEA TO THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of an U.S. EPA/USGS project to predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change along the Pacific Coast, we have synthesized the biogeographic distributions and abundances of bivalves found in depths <200 m. We have included the twelve &ldqu...

  18. EMBATTLED BIVALVES: BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND ABUNDANCES FROM THE BEAUFORT SEA TO THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of an EPA/USGS project to predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change, we have synthesized in a web-based tool, the Coastal Biogeographic Risk Analysis Tool (CBRAT), the biogeographic distributions and abundances of bivalves, found in dept...

  19. An ecosystem-based approach and management framework for the integrated evaluation of bivalve aquaculture impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranford, P.J.; Kamermans, P.; Krause, G.H.M.; Mazurie, J.

    2012-01-01

    An ecosystem-based approach to bivalve aquaculture management is a strategy for the integration of aquaculture within the wider ecosystem, including human aspects, in such a way that it promotes sustainable development, equity, and resilience of ecosystems. Given the linkage between social and

  20. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect fecal-oral route involving fecal-contaminated water. In this study, the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water was examined. A single cla...

  1. Distribution of DTHS3 satellite DNA across 12 bivalve species Eva ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Windows User

    In this work, characterization of DTHS3 satellite DNA was further expanded within the Class. Bivalvia. Monomer variants of DTHS3 satDNA were compared in 12 bivalve species belonging to two different Subclasses, Heterodonta and Pteriomorphia. This satDNA, whose age is estimated to a minimum of 516 Ma, ...

  2. Estimation of density-dependent mortality of juvenile bivalves in the Wadden Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Andresen

    Full Text Available We investigated density-dependent mortality within the early months of life of the bivalves Macoma balthica (Baltic tellin and Cerastoderma edule (common cockle in the Wadden Sea. Mortality is thought to be density-dependent in juvenile bivalves, because there is no proportional relationship between the size of the reproductive adult stocks and the numbers of recruits for both species. It is not known however, when exactly density dependence in the pre-recruitment phase occurs and how prevalent it is. The magnitude of recruitment determines year class strength in bivalves. Thus, understanding pre-recruit mortality will improve the understanding of population dynamics. We analyzed count data from three years of temporal sampling during the first months after bivalve settlement at ten transects in the Sylt-Rømø-Bay in the northern German Wadden Sea. Analyses of density dependence are sensitive to bias through measurement error. Measurement error was estimated by bootstrapping, and residual deviances were adjusted by adding process error. With simulations the effect of these two types of error on the estimate of the density-dependent mortality coefficient was investigated. In three out of eight time intervals density dependence was detected for M. balthica, and in zero out of six time intervals for C. edule. Biological or environmental stochastic processes dominated over density dependence at the investigated scale.

  3. Validation and comparison of methods for enumeration of faecal coliforms and Escherichia coli in bivalve molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Poelman M; Stegeman H; Warmerdam C; Teunis PFM; Roda Husman AM de; RIKILT; MGB

    2007-01-01

    The main result of the validation study to show the equivalence of two methods for the enumeration of faecal coliforms in bivalve molluscs is that the plate count method on Mac Conkey agar was indeed found to be equivalent to the MPN method. Meaning that the Netherlands fulfilled the demands as

  4. Evaluation of the ligand specificity of hemolymph hemoagglutinins and hemolysins of gastropod and bivalve molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskakov, AV; Polevshchikov, AV; Kharazova, AD

    2000-01-01

    The study deals with evaluation of ligand specificities of hemoagglutinins and hemolysins of hemolymph of three species of gastropods ( Planorbius corneus, Lymnaea stagnalis, and Achatina fu[ica) and one species of bivalve molluscs (Anodonta cygnea). The hemoagglutinin titer was estimated from

  5. Bivalve grazing, nutrient cycling and phytoplankton dynamics in an estuarine ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.C.

    1996-01-01


    This thesis has considered the impact of the suspension feeding bivalve Mytilusedulis on nutrient cycling and phytoplankton in an estuarine ecosystem. The research was started within the framework of an extensive research project with the

  6. Distribution of DTHS3 satellite DNA across 12 bivalve species Eva ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Windows User

    Long-term conservation vs high sequence divergence: the case of an extraordinarily old satellite DNA in bivalve mollusks. Heredity. 104, 543–551. Salser W., Bowen S., Browne D., el-Adli F., Fedoroff N., Fry K., Heindell H., Paddock G.,. Poon R., Wallace B., Whitcome P. 1976 Investigation of the organization of mammalian.

  7. Callovian-Oxfordian bivalves from central Saudi Arabia: Systematic paleontology and paleobiogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhera, Mohamed; El-Hedeny, Magdy; El-Sabbagh, Ahmed; Al Farraj, Saleh

    2017-06-01

    Two hundred and seventy-eight specimens of fossil bivalves were collected from the Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone (Callovian) and the Hanifa Formation (Oxfordian), Central Saudi Arabia. Of all the outcrops studied, the Khashm al Qaddiyah contains the richest assemblage of the bivalves (49%), as regards variety and frequency; followed by Dirab (27%), Jabal al Abakkayn (13%) and Maáshabah (11%). Twenty bivalve species have been identified and systematically described. They belong to fourteen genera, twelve families and nine orders. Among these species, six Callovian species; Grammatodon (Cosmetodon) elongatum (J. Sowerby, 1824), Limea (Pseudolimea) duplicata (Sowerby, 1827), Liostrea multiformis (Koch and Dunker, 1837), Actinostreon marshi (Sowerby, 1814), Eopecten velatus (Goldfuss, 1833) and Ceratomya striata (Sowerby, 1815) and four Callovian-Oxfordian taxa; Musculus (M.) somaliensis (Cox, 1935), Actinostreon erucum (Defrance, 1821), Pholadomya (Ph.) deltoidea Sowerby, 1827 and Ph. (Ph.) socialis Morris and Lycett, 1854 were reported for the first time from the Jurassic deposits of Saudi Arabia. Paleobiogeographically, the studied bivalve assemblage has a dominantly Tethyan character and shows close relationships with Europe, East Africa, India and Iran. In addition, there are considerable links with the Middle East, North Africa and China. No endemic species were recorded from the studied sections.

  8. CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves identified as cytoskeletal and major vault proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøsvik, Bjørn Einar; Jonsson, Henrik; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J

    2006-01-01

    To identify possible CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves, we used anti-fish CYP1A antibodies combined with one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and found that two of the main CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in digestive gland of Mytilus edulis, were cytoskeletal...

  9. Mosaic haploid-diploid embryos and polyspermy in the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Pijnacker, LP

    We investigated meiosis, fertilization, and early development in eggs of the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica (L.), which has external fertilization. Meiosis is standard but polyspermy is found to be very common. In all eight crosses examined, mosaic embryos consisting of a mixture of diploid (2n =

  10. Changes in distribution and decrease in numbers during migration of the bivalve Macoma balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, J.G.; Wolff, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    The population development of the 1998 year class of the bivalve Macoma balthicd was studied by repeated sampling of a tidal flat area in the eastern Dutch Wadden Sea from May 1998 to August 2000. The juveniles migrated twice, once in mid-1998 from their primary settlement locations in the low sandy

  11. Wood-Boring Bivalves (Mollusca: Teredinidae, Pholadidae) of Pacific coast of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantera K, Jaime R

    2010-01-01

    Twelve species of wood-boring bivalves, ten of the family Teredinidae and two of family Pholadidae were collected in mangroves at 6 locations of the Pacific coast of Colombia. This paper presents a brief escription of these species, including size, ecological notes and geographical distribution.

  12. Chemical speciation analysis and environmental behaviour of 127I and 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Violeta

    2011-10-01

    Chemical speciation analysis of 129 I and 127 I as iodide, iodate and total inorganic iodine in seawater samples from the Baltic Proper, Skagerrak and Kattegat has been carried out. The important findings of this study are that the reduction of iodate and oxidation of iodide in Skagerrak and Kattegat may be a slow process while along the Baltic Sea surface water reduction of iodate is a relatively fast process. Although suboxic or anoxic condition are encountered in some of the Baltic Sea deep basins, the concentration of 129 IO 3 - increases with water depth indicating that the reduction of iodate in the oxygen deficient bottom water of the Baltic Sea is a slow process. Iodine chemical speciation analysis (as iodide, iodate and total iodine including inorganic and organic iodine species) in lake water samples collected from Denmark and southern Sweden has been carried out. Destruction of organic iodine was performed by alkaline oxidation using NaOH - NaClO at 100 deg. C and anion exchange chromatography was used for separation of iodide and iodate. Iodine-129 concentrations in the lakes ranged from 1.3 - 12.8 x10 9 at/L and show elevated concentrations in lakes located in southwest Jutland (Denmark), near the North Sea. Except the Skaersoe Lake, were the organic iodine - 127 accounts for 50% of the total iodine, iodide (both 129 I and 127 I) is the predominant species form in surface water of the studied lakes. An investigation was conducted in order to quantify the total aquatic iodine ( 129 I and 127 I as inorganic and organic iodine) from fresh water and seawater samples by adsorption onto activated charcoal and DEAE 32 cellulose followed by alkaline digestion or combustion. The results show that iodide from freshwater samples can easily be adsorbed onto activated charcoal. The sorption was not affected by the pH. The absorption capacity of iodate is low and reduces quickly when its concentration increases. Compared with activated charcoal, DEAE 32 cellulose

  13. Arctic freshwater export: Status, mechanisms, and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haine, T.W.N.; Curry, B.; Gerdes, R.; Hansen, E.; Karcher, M.; Lee, C.; Rudels, B.; Spreen, G.; de Steur, L.; Stewart, K.D.; Woodgate, R.

    2015-01-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980–2000, with an extra ˜ 5000 km3 — about 25% — being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and

  14. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Duperron

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria that ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, eastern Americas, the Gulf of Mexico, and from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In parallel, numerous, more easily accessible shallow marine species have been studied. Herein we provide a summary of the current knowledge available on chemosymbiotic bivalves in the area ranging west-to-east from the Gulf of Mexico to the Sea of Marmara, and north-to-south from the Arctic to the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristics of symbioses in 53 species from the area are summarized for each of the five bivalve families documented to harbor chemosynthetic symbionts (Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Solemyidae, Thyasiridae and Lucinidae. Comparisons are made between the families, with special emphasis on ecology, life cycle, and connectivity. Chemosynthetic symbioses are a major adaptation to ecosystems and habitats exposed to reducing conditions. However, relatively little is known regarding their diversity and functioning, apart from a few "model species" on which effort has focused over the last 30 yr. In the context of increasing concern about biodiversity and ecosystems, and increasing anthropogenic pressure on oceans, we advocate a better assessment of the diversity of bivalve symbioses in order to evaluate the capacities of these remarkable ecological and evolutionary units to withstand environmental change.

  15. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperron, S.; Gaudron, S. M.; Rodrigues, C. F.; Cunha, M. R.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.

    2013-05-01

    Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria that ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, eastern Americas, the Gulf of Mexico, and from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In parallel, numerous, more easily accessible shallow marine species have been studied. Herein we provide a summary of the current knowledge available on chemosymbiotic bivalves in the area ranging west-to-east from the Gulf of Mexico to the Sea of Marmara, and north-to-south from the Arctic to the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristics of symbioses in 53 species from the area are summarized for each of the five bivalve families documented to harbor chemosynthetic symbionts (Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Solemyidae, Thyasiridae and Lucinidae). Comparisons are made between the families, with special emphasis on ecology, life cycle, and connectivity. Chemosynthetic symbioses are a major adaptation to ecosystems and habitats exposed to reducing conditions. However, relatively little is known regarding their diversity and functioning, apart from a few "model species" on which effort has focused over the last 30 yr. In the context of increasing concern about biodiversity and ecosystems, and increasing anthropogenic pressure on oceans, we advocate a better assessment of the diversity of bivalve symbioses in order to evaluate the capacities of these remarkable ecological and evolutionary units to withstand environmental change.

  16. Freshwater sculpins: phylogenetics to ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan B. Adams; David A. Schmetterling

    2007-01-01

    Freshwater sculpins (Cottidae) are a diverse and ecologically important component of cool- and coldwater ecosystems throughout the northern hemisphere. More than 60 sculpin species occur in a variety of habitats, and sculpin distributions range from highly localized to widespread. Despite the frequently high biomass of sculpins and their numerous ecosystem functions,...

  17. Methods for preparing synthetic freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E J; Davison, W; Hamilton-Taylor, J

    2002-03-01

    Synthetic solutions that emulate the major ion compositions of natural waters are useful in experiments aimed at understanding biogeochemical processes. Standard recipes exist for preparing synthetic analogues of seawater, with its relatively constant composition, but, due to the diversity of freshwaters, a range of compositions and recipes is required. Generic protocols are developed for preparing synthetic freshwaters of any desired composition. The major problems encountered in preparing hard and soft waters include dissolving sparingly soluble calcium carbonate, ensuring that the ionic components of each concentrated stock solution cannot form an insoluble salt and dealing with the supersaturation of calcium carbonate in many hard waters. For acidic waters the poor solubility of aluminium salts requires attention. These problems are overcome by preparing concentrated stock solutions according to carefully designed reaction paths that were tested using a combination of experiment and equilibrium modeling. These stock solutions must then be added in a prescribed order to prepare a final solution that is brought into equilibrium with the atmosphere. The example calculations for preparing hard, soft and acidic freshwater surrogates with major ion compositions the same as published analyses, are presented in a generalized fashion that should allow preparation of any synthetic freshwater according to its known analysis.

  18. Environmental influences on the composition and structure of the freshwater mussels in shallow lakes in the Cuiabá River floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, A C; Callil, C T

    2012-05-01

    The maintenance of the freshwater mussels' community in lakes is determined by abiotic factors at the local scale and at regional scale by interspecific relations between the larvae of bivalves and fish host. Whereas the distribution pattern at local scale, our goal was to understand the abundance and community composition of bivalves and relate the environmental agents structuring this community. We sampled 20 lakes in the floodplain of the Cuiabá River using a standardized method of sampling. To evaluate the effect of environment on the community we applied multivariate inferential analyses. We found 1.143 individuals alive belonging into six species distributed at the family Hyriidae, Mycetopodidae, Sphaeridae and Corbiculidae. The results showed that in the Pantanal the bivalve assemblage structure is influenced locally by organic matter and particle size, variables that reflect the intense interactions between water-sediment. However it is important to emphasize that these environmental characteristics are the result of the dynamics of this system which is dependent on the flood pulse, a regional factor.

  19. Oxidative stress and histological changes following exposure to diamond nanoparticles in the freshwater Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Antonio; Picado, Ana; Correia, José Brito; Chaves, Rúben; Silva, Héber; Caldeira, Jorge; de Matos, António P Alves; Diniz, Mário S

    2015-03-02

    Recently, the scientific community became aware of the potential ability of nanoparticles to cause toxicity in living organisms. Therefore, many of the implications for aquatic ecosystems and its effects on living organisms are still to be evaluated and fully understood. In this study, the toxicity of nanodiamonds (NDs) was assessed in the freshwater bivalve (Corbicula fluminea) following exposure to different nominal concentrations of NDs (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg l(-1)) throughout 14 days. The NDs were characterized (gravimetry, pH, zeta potential, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy) confirming manufacturer information and showing NDs with a size of 4-6 nm. Oxidative stress enzymes activities (glutathione-S-transferase, catalase) and lipid peroxidation were determined. The results show a trend to increase in GST activities after seven days of exposure in bivalves exposed to NDs concentrations (>0.1 mg l(-1)), while for catalase a significant increase was found in bivalves exposed from 0.01 to 1.0 mg l(-1) following an exposure of 14 days. The histological analysis revealed alterations in digestive gland cells, such as vacuolization and thickening. The lipid peroxidation showed a trend to increase for the different tested NDs concentrations which is compatible with the observed cellular damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Environmental influences on the composition and structure of the freshwater mussels in shallow lakes in the Cuiabá River floodplain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AC. Colle

    Full Text Available The maintenance of the freshwater mussels' community in lakes is determined by abiotic factors at the local scale and at regional scale by interspecific relations between the larvae of bivalves and fish host. Whereas the distribution pattern at local scale, our goal was to understand the abundance and community composition of bivalves and relate the environmental agents structuring this community. We sampled 20 lakes in the floodplain of the Cuiabá River using a standardized method of sampling. To evaluate the effect of environment on the community we applied multivariate inferential analyses. We found 1.143 individuals alive belonging into six species distributed at the family Hyriidae, Mycetopodidae, Sphaeridae and Corbiculidae. The results showed that in the Pantanal the bivalve assemblage structure is influenced locally by organic matter and particle size, variables that reflect the intense interactions between water-sediment. However it is important to emphasize that these environmental characteristics are the result of the dynamics of this system which is dependent on the flood pulse, a regional factor.

  1. Development of analytical methods for iodine speciation in fresh water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaku, Yuichi; Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2007-01-01

    Analytical methods for physicochemical speciation of iodine in fresh water samples were developed to elucidate its behavior in the environment. The methods combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SEC) or capillary electrophoresis (CE). Freshwater samples were collected from Lake Towada and rivers surrounding the lake. After filtration through a 0.45 μm pore size membrane filter, iodine in the water samples was pre-concentrated with an ultra-filtration filter which had a cut-off size of 10 kDa. The fraction with molecular size over 10 kDa was concentrated to 100 times in the original water, and then introduced into the SEC-ICP-MS. Molecular size chromatograms of all river and lake water samples showed two peaks for iodine concentrations: 40 kDa and 20 kDa. The method for separately determining two valence states of inorganic iodine, I - and IO 3 - , was also developed using the CE-ICP-MS system and it was successfully applied to the fresh water samples. Analysis results of surface water samples in Lake Towada and rivers surrounding the lake indicated that the chemical form of inorganic iodine in all samples was IO 3 - . Additional lake water samples were collected from Lake O-ike-higashi in the Juni-ko area at Shirakami-Sanchi, which is a UNESCO natural world heritage. The lake has a strong thermocline during all seasons; its bottom layer is in a highly reductive state. Depth profiles of I - and IO 3 - clearly showed that I - was not detected in the surface layer, but it was predominant in the bottom layer, and vice versa for IO 3 - . As this separation method is rapid and sensitive, it will be widely used in the future. (author)

  2. Biogeochemistry of Lead. Its Release to the Environment and Chemical Speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Jay T; McAlister, Jason

    2017-04-10

    Lead (Pb) is a metal that is not essential for life processes and proves acutely toxic to most organisms. Compared to other metals Pb is rather immobile in the environment but still its biogeochemical cycling is greatly perturbed by human activities. In this review we present a summary of information describing the physical and chemical properties of Pb, its distribution in crustal materials, and the processes, both natural and anthropogenic, that contribute to the metal's mobilization in the biosphere. The relatively high volatility of Pb metal, low melting point, its large ionic radius, and its chemical speciation in aquatic systems contributes to its redistribution by anthropogenic and natural processes. The biogeochemical cycle of Pb is significantly altered by anthropogenic inputs. This alteration began in antiquity but accelerated during the industrial revolution, which sparked increases in both mining activities and fossil fuel combustion. Estimates of the flux of Pb to the atmosphere, its deposition and processing in soils and freshwater systems are presented. Finally, the basin scale distribution of dissolved Pb in the ocean is interpreted in light of the chemical speciation and association with inorganic and organic particulate matter. The utility of stable radiogenic Pb isotopes, as a complement to concentration data, to trace inputs to the ocean, better understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pb and track water mass circulation in the ocean is discussed. An ongoing international survey of trace elements and their isotopes in seawater will undoubtedly increase our understanding of the deposition, biogeochemical cycling and fate of this infamous toxic metal.

  3. Early human speciation, brain expansion and dispersal influenced by African climate pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Shultz

    Full Text Available Early human evolution is characterised by pulsed speciation and dispersal events that cannot be explained fully by global or continental paleoclimate records. We propose that the collated record of ephemeral East African Rift System (EARS lakes could be a proxy for the regional paleoclimate conditions experienced by early hominins. Here we show that the presence of these lakes is associated with low levels of dust deposition in both West African and Mediterranean records, but is not associated with long-term global cooling and aridification of East Africa. Hominin expansion and diversification seem to be associated with climate pulses characterized by the precession-forced appearance and disappearance of deep EARS lakes. The most profound period for hominin evolution occurs at about 1.9 Ma; with the highest recorded diversity of hominin species, the appearance of Homo (sensu stricto and major dispersal events out of East Africa into Eurasia. During this period, ephemeral deep-freshwater lakes appeared along the whole length of the EARS, fundamentally changing the local environment. The relationship between the local environment and hominin brain expansion is less clear. The major step-wise expansion in brain size around 1.9 Ma when Homo appeared was coeval with the occurrence of ephemeral deep lakes. Subsequent incremental increases in brain size are associated with dry periods with few if any lakes. Plio-Pleistocene East African climate pulses as evinced by the paleo-lake records seem, therefore, fundamental to hominin speciation, encephalisation and migration.

  4. Early human speciation, brain expansion and dispersal influenced by African climate pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Susanne; Maslin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Early human evolution is characterised by pulsed speciation and dispersal events that cannot be explained fully by global or continental paleoclimate records. We propose that the collated record of ephemeral East African Rift System (EARS) lakes could be a proxy for the regional paleoclimate conditions experienced by early hominins. Here we show that the presence of these lakes is associated with low levels of dust deposition in both West African and Mediterranean records, but is not associated with long-term global cooling and aridification of East Africa. Hominin expansion and diversification seem to be associated with climate pulses characterized by the precession-forced appearance and disappearance of deep EARS lakes. The most profound period for hominin evolution occurs at about 1.9 Ma; with the highest recorded diversity of hominin species, the appearance of Homo (sensu stricto) and major dispersal events out of East Africa into Eurasia. During this period, ephemeral deep-freshwater lakes appeared along the whole length of the EARS, fundamentally changing the local environment. The relationship between the local environment and hominin brain expansion is less clear. The major step-wise expansion in brain size around 1.9 Ma when Homo appeared was coeval with the occurrence of ephemeral deep lakes. Subsequent incremental increases in brain size are associated with dry periods with few if any lakes. Plio-Pleistocene East African climate pulses as evinced by the paleo-lake records seem, therefore, fundamental to hominin speciation, encephalisation and migration.

  5. Speciation and zoogeography of amphibian in Sundaland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nia Kurniawan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sundaland is an interesting area to be explored based on its geological history, topography, and climate. Sundaland consists of Penisular Malaysia, Sumatra, Borneo, and Java which experienced some emergence and submergence process in the past. During 1981-2015, most of research in Sundaland found that amphibian family in Sundaland was dominated by Bufonidae, Ranidae, Microhylidae, Megophrydae, Rachophoridae, and Dicroglossidae which experienced lot of speciation in its history. Among of 4 major islands in Sundaland, Borneo has the highest number of species diversity, then Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Java. During those years, Sumatra and Java got least concern by researcher. Therefore, it is suggested for further study to explore more in Sumatra and Java. Keywords: Sundaland, amphibian, speciation, zoogeography.

  6. Speciation studies of cobalt in sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toteja, R.S.D.; Sudersanan, M.; Iyer, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recent results on the speciation of cobalt in simulated and actual sea water is reported using ion exchangers. The influence of magnesium ions in affecting the composition of ion exchangers and subsequent interpretation of the results is discussed. The results indicated that Co +2 may predominate in both the simulated and actual sea water and the presence of other constituents in sea water does not affect the nature of complex species present. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  7. Metal speciation under Rhizophora and Avicennia mangles

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Regina Célia Bastos de; Patchineelam, Sambasiva Rao

    2000-01-01

    Speciation studies of Fe, Cr, Co, Ni and Cu on reactive fraction (adsorved on oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and clay minerals) and pyrite were performed in Avicennia schaueriana and Rhizophora mangle sediments from Amapá shoreline-Brazil. The soil under Avicennia showed a higher heavy metal concentration in reactive fraction than under Rhizophora. The soil under Rhizophora showed low heavy metal bioavailability, having an increasing association with pyrite across sediment section.

  8. Sensitivity of Mediterranean bivalve mollusc aquaculture to climate change, ocean acidification, and other environmental pressures: findings from a producers’ survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, L.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.; Mass, F.; Theodorou, J.A.; Ziveri, P.; Gazeau, F.

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced climate change and ocean acidification are global environmental phenomena with a common driver: anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. Both processes potentially threaten the Mediterranean bivalve mollusc aquaculture sector, which is economically relevant to several regions and

  9. Toxic elements and speciation in seafood samples from different contaminated sites in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Anacleto, Patrícia; Barbosa, Vera; Sloth, Jens J; Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Tediosi, Alice; Fernandez-Tejedor, Margarita; van den Heuvel, Fredericus H M; Kotterman, Michiel; Marques, António

    2015-11-01

    The presence of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), arsenic (TAs), inorganic arsenic (iAs), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr) and iron (Fe) was investigated in seafood collected from European marine ecosystems subjected to strong anthropogenic pressure, i.e. hotspot areas. Different species (Mytilus galloprovincialis, n=50; Chamelea gallina, n=50; Liza aurata, n=25; Platichthys flesus, n=25; Laminaria digitata, n=15; and Saccharina latissima, n=15) sampled in Tagus estuary, Po delta, Ebro delta, western Scheldt, and in the vicinities of a fish farm area (Solund, Norway), between September and December 2013, were selected to assess metal contamination and potential risks to seafood consumers, as well as to determine the suitability of ecologically distinct organisms as bioindicators in environmental monitoring studies. Species exhibited different elemental profiles, likely as a result of their ecological strategies, metabolism and levels in the environment (i.e. seawater and sediments). Higher levels of Cd (0.15-0.94 mg kg(-1)), Pb (0.37-0.89 mg kg(-1)), Co (0.48-1.1 mg kg(-1)), Cu (4.8-8.4 mg kg(-1)), Zn (75-153 mg kg(-1)), Cr (1.0-4.5 mg kg(-1)) and Fe (283-930 mg kg(-1)) were detected in bivalve species, particularly in M. galloprovincialis from Ebro and Po deltas, whereas the highest content of Hg was found in P. flesus (0.86 mg kg(-1)). In fish species, most Hg was organic (MeHg; from 69 to 79%), whereas lower proportions of MeHg were encountered in bivalve species (between 20 and 43%). The highest levels of As were found in macroalgae species L. digitata and S. latissima (41 mg kg(-1) and 43 mg kg(-1), respectively), with iAs accounting almost 50% of the total As content in L. digitata but not with S. latissima nor in the remaining seafood samples. This work highlights that the selection of the most appropriate bioindicator species is a fundamental step in environmental monitoring of each contaminant

  10. Oxidative stress and histological changes following exposure to diamond nanoparticles in the freshwater Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cid, Antonio [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnología, Centro de Química Fina e Biotecnología, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Picado, Ana; Correia, José Brito [LNEG-Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, I.P. Estrada do Paço do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Chaves, Rúben; Silva, Héber [Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz, Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde Egas Moniz, 2825-511 Caparica (Portugal); Caldeira, Jorge [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnología, Centro de Química Fina e Biotecnología, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz, Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde Egas Moniz, 2825-511 Caparica (Portugal); Alves de Matos, António P. [Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz, Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde Egas Moniz, 2825-511 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar (CESAM/FCUL)—Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2015-03-02

    Highlights: • We assess the toxicity of NDs in the bivalve Corbiculafluminea. • Exposure to NDs cause a stress oxidative response. • Stress oxidative enzymes increase following exposure to nanodiamonds. • Increase in lipid peroxidation suggests damage in cells membranes. • Histopathology reveals alterations in digestive gland cells. - Abstract: Recently, the scientific community became aware of the potential ability of nanoparticles to cause toxicity in living organisms. Therefore, many of the implications for aquatic ecosystems and its effects on living organisms are still to be evaluated and fully understood. In this study, the toxicity of nanodiamonds (NDs) was assessed in the freshwater bivalve (Corbicula fluminea) following exposure to different nominal concentrations of NDs (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg l{sup −1}) throughout 14 days. The NDs were characterized (gravimetry, pH, zeta potential, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy) confirming manufacturer information and showing NDs with a size of 4–6 nm. Oxidative stress enzymes activities (glutathione-S-transferase, catalase) and lipid peroxidation were determined. The results show a trend to increase in GST activities after seven days of exposure in bivalves exposed to NDs concentrations (>0.1 mg l{sup −1}), while for catalase a significant increase was found in bivalves exposed from 0.01 to 1.0 mg l{sup −1} following an exposure of 14 days. The histological analysis revealed alterations in digestive gland cells, such as vacuolization and thickening. The lipid peroxidation showed a trend to increase for the different tested NDs concentrations which is compatible with the observed cellular damage.

  11. Oxidative stress and histological changes following exposure to diamond nanoparticles in the freshwater Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cid, Antonio; Picado, Ana; Correia, José Brito; Chaves, Rúben; Silva, Héber; Caldeira, Jorge; Alves de Matos, António P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We assess the toxicity of NDs in the bivalve Corbiculafluminea. • Exposure to NDs cause a stress oxidative response. • Stress oxidative enzymes increase following exposure to nanodiamonds. • Increase in lipid peroxidation suggests damage in cells membranes. • Histopathology reveals alterations in digestive gland cells. - Abstract: Recently, the scientific community became aware of the potential ability of nanoparticles to cause toxicity in living organisms. Therefore, many of the implications for aquatic ecosystems and its effects on living organisms are still to be evaluated and fully understood. In this study, the toxicity of nanodiamonds (NDs) was assessed in the freshwater bivalve (Corbicula fluminea) following exposure to different nominal concentrations of NDs (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg l −1 ) throughout 14 days. The NDs were characterized (gravimetry, pH, zeta potential, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy) confirming manufacturer information and showing NDs with a size of 4–6 nm. Oxidative stress enzymes activities (glutathione-S-transferase, catalase) and lipid peroxidation were determined. The results show a trend to increase in GST activities after seven days of exposure in bivalves exposed to NDs concentrations (>0.1 mg l −1 ), while for catalase a significant increase was found in bivalves exposed from 0.01 to 1.0 mg l −1 following an exposure of 14 days. The histological analysis revealed alterations in digestive gland cells, such as vacuolization and thickening. The lipid peroxidation showed a trend to increase for the different tested NDs concentrations which is compatible with the observed cellular damage

  12. Linking emergence of fungal plant diseases and ecological speciation

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, Tatiana; Gladieux, Pierre; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    Emerging diseases represent a growing worldwide problem accompanying global environmental changes, and there is tremendous interest in identifying the factors controlling the appearance and spread of these diseases. Here, we discuss emerging fungal plant diseases, and argue that they often result from host shift speciation, a particular case of ecological speciation. We consider the factors controlling local adaptation and ecological speciation and show that certain life-history traits of man...

  13. Speciation in birds: Genes, geography, and sexual selection

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Scott V.; Kingan, Sarah B.; Calkins, Jennifer D.; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Jennings, W. Bryan; Swanson, Willie J.; Sorenson, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular studies of speciation in birds over the last three decades have been dominated by a focus on the geography, ecology, and timing of speciation, a tradition traceable to Mayr's Systematics and the Origin of Species. However, in the recent years, interest in the behavioral and molecular mechanisms of speciation in birds has increased, building in part on the older traditions and observations from domesticated species. The result is that many of the same mechanisms proffered for model l...

  14. Trace metals in the open oceans:speciation modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Stockdale, Anthony; Tipping, Edward; Hamilton-Taylor, John; Lofts, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The speciation of trace metals in the oceans is typically explained by invoking the concept of metal binding to specific organic ligands, but a lack of detailed knowledge about the ligands has impeded the formulation of comprehensive models to predict speciation chemistry. The aim of our study was to shed further light on the possible role of humic-type ligands in trace metal complexation in the oceans by comparing published seawater (open ocean) speciation measurements with predictions obtai...

  15. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikai Wang

    Full Text Available Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI and fatty acid (FA techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25% to particular organic matter (POM in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17% during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44% and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%, and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems.

  16. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sikai; Jin, Binsong; Qin, Haiming; Sheng, Qiang; Wu, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25%) to particular organic matter (POM) in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17%) during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44%) and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%), and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter) at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems.

  17. Bivalved Versus Circumferential Cast Immobilization for Displaced Forearm Fractures: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Assess Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Donald S; Valim, Clarissa; Connell, Patricia; Brustowicz, Katherine A; Waters, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of bivalved versus circumferential cast immobilization on maintenance of reduction and associated complications after closed reduction (CR) of radius and/or ulna fractures in children. Two hundred two children with displaced radius and/or ulna fractures were randomized to either circumferential (n=101) or bivalved (n=101) long-arm casts after CR. The mean age was 10±3 years. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of age, sex, or initial fracture displacement or angulation. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks postreduction. Radiographic loss of reduction (LOR), need for remanipulation or surgery, and associated complications of compartment syndrome, cast saw injury, and neurovascular compromise were recorded. Overall, the median angulation of the radius and ulna fractures improved from 20 and 18 degrees to 3 and 2 degrees after CR, respectively. The median cast index after reduction was 0.78 in the bivalved group and 0.80 in the circumferential group. The median angulation of the radius and ulna was 8 and 1 degrees at 4 weeks, with no significant difference between groups. By the fourth week of follow-up, 70 patients (34%)-35 bivalved and 35 circumferential-had radiographic LOR. Forty-seven patients (23%)-23 bivalved and 24 circumferential-underwent remanipulation or surgical reduction and fixation. There were no significant differences between groups with respect to LOR rate or need for surgical treatment. One bivalved patient sustained a cast saw injury, and 3 bivalved patients had transient neurological abnormalities. No patients developed compartment syndrome. Cast immobilization is effective in the majority of patients after CR of displaced forearm fractures. There were no significant differences in maintenance of reduction, need for surgery, or complications between bivalved or circumferential long-arm casts. Level I-therapeutic.

  18. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  19. Thermodynamics proposes, kinetics decides, speciation dares: speciation of actinides in biological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.

    2005-06-01

    After having recalled the content and purpose of his research thesis, the author proposes a detailed overview of the research works he performed thereafter in the field of the speciation of actinides at the level of the organism entry gates and in target tissues. These works therefore concern four important areas of research in radioprotection: bio-kinetic, toxicology, decorporation, and dosimetry studies. The author outlines how speciation studies can be useful for these different areas, and to better understand and describe, and therefore foresee, the biokinetics and toxicity of radionuclides

  20. Speciation of Long-Lived Radionuclides in the Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin

    , isotopes of Pu, and 237Np in seawater, fresh water, soil, sediment, vegetations, and concrete. The developed methods are used for the investigation of the chemical speciation of these radionuclides as well as their environmental behaviours, especially in Danish environment. In addition the speciation of Pu......This project started in November 2005 and ended in November 2008, the work and research approaches are summarized in this report. This project studied the speciation of radionuclides in environment. A number of speciation analytical methods are developed for determination of species of 129I, 99Tc...

  1. Speciational evolution of coloration in the genus Carduelis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Gonçalo C; Mota, Paulo Gama

    2008-04-01

    Sexual selection has been hypothesized to promote speciation, but evidence relating sexual selection to differences in speciation rates among taxa is equivocal. We note that evolutionary changes in ornaments are the link connecting sexual selection to speciation, and that ornament evolution is influenced by many factors so that its relationship with the strength of sexual selection may not be linear. We test if the evolution of ornamental coloration in Carduelis finches is related with speciation and if more ornamented lineages speciate more. We found that coloration evolves with a speciational pattern, but we found no evidence that the evolutionary changes associated with speciation are predominantly gains in ornamentation. The speciational pattern was found for both carotenoid- and melanin-based coloration, suggesting that traits putatively under stronger sexual selection by female choice (carotenoid coloration) are not the sole ones facilitating reproductive isolation. We conclude that in the genus Carduelis the evolutionary lability of ornaments influences speciation more than the strength of sexual selection, and we suggest that ornament lability should be considered as a possible causal factor in studies comparing cladogenesis among taxa.

  2. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  3. Conceptual model for invasive bivalve control on wetland productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Rosemary; Brown, Larry R.; Thompson, Janet K.; Parchaso, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Tidal wetlands were the historically dominant features of many coastal regions around the world, including the San Francisco Estuary (Callaway et al. 2011; Whipple et al. 2012). These mosaics of varied interconnected habitats (Mitsch and Gosselink 1993) provide a host of ecosystem services, including biodiversity maintenance, fish and wildlife habitat, water quality improvement, flood abatement, and carbon sequestration (Rabenhorst 1995; Costanza et al. 1997; Bottom et al. 2005; Zedler and Kercher 2005; Barbier et al. 2010). They also support human activities and values such as recreation and aesthetic appreciation (Barbier et al. 2010; Milligan and Kraus-Polk 2016). Despite their critical functions, many wetland landscapes have been destroyed or irreparably altered, either incidentally or intentionally, by human activities (Holland et al. 2004; Zedler and Kercher 2005; Callaway et al. 2011; Cloern and Jassby 2012; Whipple et al. 2012; Schile et al. 2014). San Francisco Estuary (SFE) (see Figure 1) tidal wetlands were largely converted to other land uses in the late 1800s and early 1900s, with the extent of loss and new use varying by region. Wetland losses in the North, Central, and South San Francisco bays and Suisun Bay ranged from 70 percent to 93 percent to accommodate agricultural uses, salt production, managed waterfowl habitat, and urban development (Callaway et al. 2011). Landscape transformation within the most inland portion of the SFE, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta), was even more dramatic. Overall, today’s Delta contains 97 percent less freshwater tidal wetland than its historical state and nearly double the open water area (Whipple et al. 2012). The majority of the modern Delta consists of agricultural tracts protected from tidal waters by human-made dikes or levees, which are commonly armored with riprap. The de-watered, rich peat soils of these created islands have supported abundant agricultural production, but have oxidized, compacted

  4. The known and unknown sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in haemocytes of marine bivalve molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Ludovic; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jauzein, Cécile; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) are naturally produced in all cells and organisms. Modifications of standard conditions alter reactive species generation and may result in oxidative stress. Because of the degradation of marine ecosystems, massive aquaculture productions, global change and pathogenic infections, oxidative stress is highly prevalent in marine bivalve molluscs. Haemocytes of bivalve molluscs produce ROS and RNS as part of their basal metabolism as well as in response to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. However, sources and pathways of reactive species production are currently poorly deciphered in marine bivalves, potentially leading to misinterpretations. Although sources and pathways of ROS and RNS productions are highly conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, some uncommon pathways seem to only exist in marine bivalves. To understand the biology and pathobiology of ROS and RNS in haemocytes of marine bivalves, it is necessary to characterise their sources and pathways of production. The aims of the present review are to discuss the currently known and unknown intracellular sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in marine bivalve molluscs, in light of terrestrial vertebrates, and to expose principal pitfalls usually encountered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mercury in freshwater ecosystems of the Canadian Arctic: recent advances on its cycling and fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chételat, John; Amyot, Marc; Arp, Paul; Blais, Jules M; Depew, David; Emmerton, Craig A; Evans, Marlene; Gamberg, Mary; Gantner, Nikolaus; Girard, Catherine; Graydon, Jennifer; Kirk, Jane; Lean, David; Lehnherr, Igor; Muir, Derek; Nasr, Mina; Poulain, Alexandre J; Power, Michael; Roach, Pat; Stern, Gary; Swanson, Heidi; van der Velden, Shannon

    2015-03-15

    The Canadian Arctic has vast freshwater resources, and fish are important in the diet of many Northerners. Mercury is a contaminant of concern because of its potential toxicity and elevated bioaccumulation in some fish populations. Over the last decade, significant advances have been made in characterizing the cycling and fate of mercury in these freshwater environments. Large amounts of new data on concentrations, speciation and fluxes of Hg are provided and summarized for water and sediment, which were virtually absent for the Canadian Arctic a decade ago. The biogeochemical processes that control the speciation of mercury remain poorly resolved, including the sites and controls of methylmercury production. Food web studies have examined the roles of Hg uptake, trophic transfer, and diet for Hg bioaccumulation in fish, and, in particular, advances have been made in identifying determinants of mercury levels in lake-dwelling and sea-run forms of Arctic char. In a comparison of common freshwater fish species that were sampled across the Canadian Arctic between 2002 and 2009, no geographic patterns or regional hotspots were evident. Over the last two to four decades, Hg concentrations have increased in some monitored populations of fish in the Mackenzie River Basin while other populations from the Yukon and Nunavut showed no change or a slight decline. The different Hg trends indicate that the drivers of temporal change may be regional or habitat-specific. The Canadian Arctic is undergoing profound environmental change, and preliminary evidence suggests that it may be impacting the cycling and bioaccumulation of mercury. Further research is needed to investigate climate change impacts on the Hg cycle as well as biogeochemical controls of methylmercury production and the processes leading to increasing Hg levels in some fish populations in the Canadian Arctic. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. New Insights into Pathogenic Vibrios Affecting Bivalves in Hatcheries: Present and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Dubert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hatcheries constitute nowadays the only viable solution to support the husbandry of bivalve molluscs due to the depletion and/or overexploitation of their natural beds. Hatchery activities include the broodstock conditioning and spawning, rearing larvae and spat, and the production of microalgae to feed all stages of the production cycle. However, outbreaks of disease continue to be the main bottleneck for successful larval and spat production, most of them caused by different representatives of the genus Vibrio. Therefore, attention must be paid on preventive and management measures that allow the control of such undesirable bacterial populations. The present review provides an updated picture of the recently characterized Vibrio species associated with disease of bivalve molluscs during early stages of development, including the controversial taxonomic affiliation of some of them and relevant advances in the knowledge of their virulence determinants. The problematic use of antibiotics, as well as its eco-friendly alternatives are also critically discussed.

  7. An ecosystem-based approach and management framework for the integrated evaluation of bivalve aquaculture impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cranford, Peter J.; Kamermans, Pauline; Krause, Gesche

    2012-01-01

    -Impact-Response (DPSIR) management framework incorporates the connectivity between human and ecological issues and would permit available performance indicators to be identified and organized in a manner that facilitates different regulatory needs. Suitable performance indicators and modeling approaches, which are used...... to assess DPSIR framework components, are reviewed with a focus on the key environmental issues associated with bivalve farming. Indicator selection criteria are provided to facilitate constraining the number of indicators within the management framework. It is recommended that an ecosystem-based approach......An ecosystem-based approach to bivalve aquaculture management is a strategy for the integration of aquaculture within the wider ecosystem, including human aspects, in such a way that it promotes sustainable development, equity, and resilience of ecosystems. Given the linkage between social...

  8. Metals and organotins in multiple bivalve species in a one-off global survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Mørk; Strand, Jakob; Christensen, Jan H.

    2011-01-01

    concentrations (BACs) agreed in the Oslo-Paris convention (OSPAR) for the North Sea, and at most harbours the concentrations were orders of magnitude above BACs. The lowest concentrations of Cd and Pb measured here suggest that the BACs should be lower in a worldwide context. The sources of metals were......The Galathea 3 expedition circumnavigated the globe in 2006-2007 and collected marine samples from six continents. Bivalves were collected from harbours, other impacted locations and reference sites, and samples from 57 sites were analyzed for metals and 47 for organotins, to assess current...... contamination levels on a global scale. Metal concentrations in nine bivalve species were normalised to the Mytilidae family using conversion factors based on cosampled species and literature bioconcentration factors. The lowest metal and tributyltin concentrations were below background assessment...

  9. Ocean acidification increases cadmium accumulation in marine bivalves: a potential threat to seafood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Che, Zhumei; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-21

    To date, the effects of ocean acidification on toxic metals accumulation and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown in marine bivalve species. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels on the cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills, mantle and adductor muscles of three bivalve species, Mytilus edulis, Tegillarca granosa, and Meretrix meretrix, were investigated. The results obtained suggested that all species tested accumulated significantly higher Cd (p ocean acidification-induced increase in Cd accumulation may have occurred due to (i) the ocean acidification increased the concentration of Cd and the Cd(2+)/Ca(2+) in the seawater, which in turn increased the Cd influx through Ca channel; (ii) the acidified seawater may have brought about epithelia damage, resulting in easier Cd penetration; and (iii) ocean acidification hampered Cd exclusion.

  10. Prevalence of hepatitis A virus in bivalve molluscs sold in Granada (Spain) fish markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Roldán, Elena; Espigares Rodríguez, Elena; Espigares García, Miguel; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Milagros

    2013-06-01

    Viruses are the leading cause of foodborne illness associated with the consumption of raw or slightly cooked contaminated shellfish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis A virus in molluscs. Standard and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction procedures were used to monitor bivalve molluscs from the Granada fish markets (southern Spain) for this human enteric virus. Between February 2009 and October 2010, we collected a total of 329 samples of different types of bivalve molluscs (mussels, smooth clams, striped venus, and grooved clams). The results showed the presence of hepatitis A virus in 8.5% of the 329 samples analyzed. We can therefore confirm that conventional fecal indicators are unreliable for demonstrating the presence or absence of viruses. The presence of hepatitis A virus in molluscs destined for human consumption is a potential health risk in southern Spain.

  11. Semi-automatic surface sediment sampling system - A prototype to be implemented in bivalve fishing surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufino, Marta M.; Baptista, Paulo; Pereira, Fábio; Gaspar, Miguel B.

    2018-01-01

    In the current work we propose a new method to sample surface sediment during bivalve fishing surveys. Fishing institutes all around the word carry out regular surveys with the aim of monitoring the stocks of commercial species. These surveys comprise often more than one hundred of sampling stations and cover large geographical areas. Although superficial sediment grain sizes are among the main drivers of benthic communities and provide crucial information for studies on coastal dynamics, overall there is a strong lack of this type of data, possibly, because traditional surface sediment sampling methods use grabs, that require considerable time and effort to be carried out on regular basis or on large areas. In face of these aspects, we developed an easy and un-expensive method to sample superficial sediments, during bivalve fisheries monitoring surveys, without increasing survey time or human resources. The method was successfully evaluated and validated during a typical bivalve survey carried out on the Northwest coast of Portugal, confirming that it had any interference with the survey objectives. Furthermore, the method was validated by collecting samples using a traditional Van Veen grabs (traditional method), which showed a similar grain size composition to the ones collected by the new method, on the same localities. We recommend that the procedure is implemented on regular bivalve fishing surveys, together with an image analysis system to analyse the collected samples. The new method will provide substantial quantity of data on surface sediment in coastal areas, using a non-expensive and efficient manner, with a high potential application in different fields of research.

  12. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen Jörn; Haynert Kristin; Wegner K Mathias; Melzner Frank

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve calcification, particular of the early larval stages is highly sensitive to the change of ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32−] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the e...

  13. Marine Bacteria with antimicrobials capacity isolated from cultures of bivalve mollusks

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiola Pellon; Rita Orozco; Jorge León

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms have commonly been studied as producers of antibacterial substances; yet they are also considered producers of antifungic, antiviral, antiparasitic, citotoxics and inhibitory of other forms of cellular growth substances. This paper describes the isolation, inhibitory potential and phenotipic characterization of native bacterial strains associated to bivalve mollusks such as Argopecten purpuratus “concha de abanico” and Crassostrea gigas “ostra” in cultivation systems. From ...

  14. Effect of different extraction procedures on antimicrobial activity of marine bivalves: A comparison

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, S.; Chatterji, A.; Das, P.

    Pertanika J. Trop. Agric. Sci. 32(1): 77 - 83 (2009) ISSN: 1511-3701 ©Universiti Putra Malaysia Press Received: 20 May 2008 Accepted: 8 October 2008 * Corresponding Author Effect of Different Extraction Procedures on Antimicrobial Activity of Marine... Bivalves: A Comparison Sumita Sharma 1* , Anil Chatterji 2 and Partha Das 1 1 National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 001, India 2 Institute of Tropical Aquaculture, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu...

  15. Identification of lysozyme activity from two edible bivalves - Perna viridis (Linnaeus) and Meretrix casta (Chemnitz)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, S.; Tanu; Chatterji, A.

    Pertanika J. Trop. Agric. Sci. 32(1): 85 - 90 (2009) ISSN: 1511-3701 ©Universiti Putra Malaysia Press Received: 20 May 2008 Accepted: 8 October 2008 * Corresponding Author Identification of Lysozyme Activity from Two Edible Bivalves - Perna viridis... (Linnaeus) and Meretrix casta (Chemnitz) Sumita Sharma 1* , Tanu 2 and Anil Chatterji 3 1 National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, India 2 Banasthali Universiti, Rajasthan 3 Institute of Tropical Aquaculture, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu...

  16. Ecology of megabenthic bivalve communities from sandy beaches on the south coast of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta M. Rufino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecological aspects of 75 megabenthic bivalve species found on the south coast of Portugal (from Vila Real to Sagres were studied based on the information provided by seasonal bivalve surveys from 2000 to 2007 (8600 hauls, simultaneously using a razor shell dredge and a clam dredge. Of the 75 species identified, 36 occurred less than 30 times, and thus were considered rare in the area. The remaining 39 bivalves were analysed according to their occurrence, bathymetric distribution, geographic preferences, seasonal preferences, burying-depth, beach exposure and river mouth proximity. All species belonging to the Pharidae and Solenidae families (razor shells and most Tellinidae were significantly more frequent in the razor shell dredge (indicating deeper burying in the sediment, whilst the families Cardiidae and Donacidae were significantly more frequent in the clam dredge (indicating that these species are probably closer to the sediment surface. As for the season, most bivalve species occurred similarly in both seasons (19 sp; 49%, but a large proportion were more abundant during the autumn surveys (17 sp., 44%, whereas only three species were commoner during the spring surveys. Most species belonging to the families Cardiidae and Mactridae were commoner in the autumn surveys. The spatial distribution differed between species and cluster analysis identified four communities with greater geographic affinity. Species belonging to the family Cardiidae were preferably found in the western part (WB and the eastern part (S of the study area, whereas the families Donacidae, Mactridae and Tellinidae occurred mainly in the central area (EB and the eastern (S coastal sectors. Overall, shallower species (modal depth at 3-6 m showed greater occurrences and abundances than the deeper ones, and the depth pattern observed did not change between seasons. Donacidae and Mactridae (except Mactra glauca were represented essentially by shallow species, whereas

  17. Bioaccumulation of selected metals in bivalves (Unionidae) and Phragmites australis inhabiting a municipal water reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Rzymski, Piotr; Niedzielski, Przemysław; Klimaszyk, Piotr; Poniedziałek, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization can considerably affect water reservoirs by, inter alia, input, and accumulation of contaminants including metals. Located in the course of River Cybina, Maltański Reservoir (Western Poland) is an artificial shallow water body built for recreation and sport purposes which undergoes restoration treatment (drainage) every 4 years. In the present study, we demonstrate an accumulation of nine metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) in water, sediment, three bivalve species (Anodo...

  18. The Freshwater Information Platform - an online network supporting freshwater biodiversity research and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kloiber, Astrid; De Wever, Aaike; Bremerich, Vanessa; Strackbein, Jörg; Hering, Daniel; Jähnig, Sonja; Kiesel, Jens; Martens, Koen; Tockner, Klement

    2017-04-01

    Species distribution data is crucial for improving our understanding of biodiversity and its threats. This is especially the case for freshwater environments, which are heavily affected by the global biodiversity crisis. Currently, a huge body of freshwater biodiversity data is often difficult to access, because systematic data publishing practices have not yet been adopted by the freshwater research community. The Freshwater Information Platform (FIP; www.freshwaterplatform.eu) - initiated through the BioFresh project - aims at pooling freshwater related research information from a variety of projects and initiatives to make it easily accessible for scientists, water managers and conservationists as well as the interested public. It consists of several major components, three of which we want to specifically address: (1) The Freshwater Biodiversity Data Portal aims at mobilising freshwater biodiversity data, making them online available Datasets in the portal are described and documented in the (2) Freshwater Metadatabase and published as open access articles in the Freshwater Metadata Journal. The use of collected datasets for large-scale analyses and models is demonstrated in the (3) Global Freshwater Biodiversity Atlas that publishes interactive online maps featuring research results on freshwater biodiversity, resources, threats and conservation priorities. Here we present the main components of the FIP as tools to streamline open access freshwater data publication arguing this will improve the capacity to protect and manage freshwater biodiversity in the face of global change.

  19. Interactive effects of CO₂ and trace metals on the proteasome activity and cellular stress response of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Götze, Sandra [Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar, Marine Research, Functional Ecology, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Matoo, Omera B. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Beniash, Elia [Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Saborowski, Reinhard [Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar, Marine Research, Functional Ecology, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany); Sokolova, Inna M., E-mail: isokolov@uncc.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Elevated PCO₂ enhanced accumulation of Cu and Cd in the gills of mollusks. • The proteasome activities were affected by metals but robust to elevated PCO₂. • Exposure to Cd and Cu had opposite effects on the proteasome activity. • Combined exposure to Cu and elevated PCO₂ negatively affected energy status. - Abstract: Increased anthropogenic emission of CO₂ changes the carbonate chemistry and decreases the pH of the ocean. This can affect the speciation and the bioavailability of metals in polluted habitats such as estuaries. However, the effects of acidification on metal accumulation and stress response in estuarine organisms including bivalves are poorly understood. We studied the interactive effects of CO₂ and two common metal pollutants, copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), on metal accumulation, intracellular ATP/ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, stress response and energy metabolism in two common estuarine bivalves—Crassostrea virginica (eastern oyster) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard shell clam). Bivalves were exposed for 4–5 weeks to clean seawater (control) and to either 50 μg L⁻¹ Cu or 50 μg L⁻¹ Cd at one of three partial pressures of CO₂ PCO₂ ~395, ~800 and ~1500 μatm) representative of the present-day conditions and projections of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) for the years 2100 and 2250, respectively. Clams accumulated lower metal burdens than oysters, and elevated PCO₂ enhanced the Cd and Cu accumulation in mantle tissues in both species. Higher Cd and Cu burdens were associated with elevated mRNA expression of metal binding proteins metallothionein and ferritin. In the absence of added metals, proteasome activities of clams and oysters were robust to elevated PCO₂, but PCO₂ modulated the proteasome response to metals. Cd exposure stimulated the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome

  20. Freshwater pearl mussels show plasticity of responses to different predation risks but also show consistent individual differences in responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Conor D; Arnott, Gareth; Elwood, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    Animals often show behavioural plasticity with respect to predation risk but also show behavioural syndromes in terms of consistency of responses to different stimuli. We examine these features in the freshwater pearl mussel. These bivalves often aggregate presumably to reduce predation risk to each individual. Predation risk, however, will be higher in the presence of predator cues. Here we use dimming light, vibration and touch as novel stimuli to examine the trade-off between motivation to feed and motivation to avoid predation. We present two experiments that each use three sequential novel stimuli to cause the mussels to close their valves and hence cease feeding. We find that mussels within a group showed shorter closure times than solitary mussels, consistent with decreased vulnerability to predation in group-living individuals. Mussels exposed to the odour of a predatory crayfish showed longer closures than control mussels, highlighting the predator assessment abilities of this species. However, individuals showed significant consistency in their closure responses across the trial series, in line with behavioural syndrome theory. Our results show that bivalves trade-off feeding and predator avoidance according to predation risk but the degree to which this is achieved is constrained by behavioural consistency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ethno-malacological knowledge of bivalve mollusks gathering in Acupe mangrove, Santo Amaro, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Bezerra Souto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove is a highly productive ecosystem that carries out important ecological functions and that historically it has been used for the subsistence and income of countless craft fishing communities. In the mangroves of Todos os Santos Bay, including those of the District of Acupe (Santo Amaro – Bahia State, the bivalve mollusks (shellfish are among the most important resources, and their gathering is known as “mariscagem”. This work aims to characterize the knowledge of the local female shellfish gatherers regarding the biology and ecology of bivalve shellfish. Semi-structured interviews were used with local shellfish women (N=54 involving ethnotaxonomy, trophic ecology, hydrodynamics, fenology and ethnocronology. Etic-emic analisys of the data was chosen in order to compare the information obtained in the field to that from the academic literature. The results demonstrated that the shellfish women of Acupe have a significant knowledge of bivalve shellfish, in addition to aspects related to the dynamics of local mangroves, that is sometimes compatible with academic knowledge.

  2. EU Regulatory Risk Management of Marine Biotoxins in the Marine Bivalve Mollusc Food-Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheál O’Mahony

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Food safety risk assessment in the European Union (EU recognises consumer illness that arises from marine biotoxins as a risk associated with bivalve mollusc consumption. EU food regulations contain various general food safety obligations, which should contribute significantly to managing this risk. EU food regulations additionally impose various specific obligations on both Food Business Operators and Competent Authorities in order to manage the marine biotoxin food safety risk in the bivalve mollusc food-chain. These have a particular focus on the pre-harvest component of the food-chain. A central component of these specific systems is the requirement for ongoing monitoring of phytoplankton and biotoxin concentrations in water and molluscs, respectively. This monitoring explicitly brings a potential outcome of closing production areas delineated by classification to prohibit the harvest of bivalve molluscs as food from those areas when acceptable biotoxin concentrations are exceeded. This review considers the utility of these systems, at conceptual and practical levels, and explores their contribution to an effective regulatory risk management approach.

  3. Bivalve molluscs of São Marcos locality, Medium Uruguay River Basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Édison Vicente Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available To verification of quali-quantitative it has been accomplished collected of bivalve molluscs during the period of twelve months, together with analysis of some abiotic variables in the middle care of Uruguay river, situated in São Marcos, Uruguaiana municipality. The place where the collects has been accomplished, were divided in three distinct spots, considerating the substract type predominant; sand, rock and mud. The individuals were collected using hands and with. The selection screen aid, of 0.8mm size net and were conserved in a dry environment. They had been collected a total of 1,022 units of bivalves, wich belong to 12 taxa, being that of these only specimens Cyanocyclas limosa and Diplodon parallelopipedon had been captured alive (tanatocenosis. It had great quantitative predominance of Corbicula fluminea and Diplodon uruguayensis. With exception of bivalves invading, the too much species had been collected only in the slimy substratum. Other species occurrence were Mycetopoda siliquosa and Anodontites trigonus, there two species a vulnerable to extinction in Rio Grande do Sul.

  4. Stress detection in bivalve mollusk using non-invasive bioelectric monitoring of myoneural behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, E.L.; Hardison, B.S. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biology; Dawson, V.K.; Waller, D. [National Fisheries Research Center, La Crosse, WI (United States); Waller, W.T.; Dickson, K.L.; Allen, H.J. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States). Inst. of Applied Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Few studies have demonstrated cause-and-effect linkages between extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic bioelectric action potentials of bivalve mollusk using non-invasive, non-destructive approaches. A non-invasive, external probe configuration and detection system, similar to one used previously with native unionids, was developed for continuously monitoring bioelectric activities of clams and mussels. Using remote probes and differential amplifiers, bioelectric activities were recorded for cardiac, adductor, siphon and foot responses using a computer equipped with integrating software. To test if remote, non-invasive probes would detect similar information to that recorded by invasive needle electrodes, two individuals of zebra mussel (Dreissenia polymorpha), and Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) were each configured with two sets of probes. One set was inserted between the valves and along the inside surface of the shelf; the other set was positioned remotely about the outside margins of the valves. Signal validation was made by simultaneously recording bioelectric responses for the same animal from both sets of probes. In preliminary stress tests monitored bivalves were subjected to changes in temperatures over 2 to 3 hr intervals from ambient to potentially lethal levels (20 to 30 C for zebra, 25 C to 40 C for corbicula). Dramatic increases resulted in both number and amplitude of cardiac events as temperature increased. Planned studies will use this approach to evaluate bivalve myoneural behavior patterns in response to chemical and non-chemical stimuli.

  5. Direct and indirect effects of biological factors on extinction risk in fossil bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnik, Paul G

    2011-08-16

    Biological factors, such as abundance and body size, may contribute directly to extinction risk and indirectly through their influence on other biological characteristics, such as geographic range size. Paleontological data can be used to explicitly test many of these hypothesized relationships, and general patterns revealed through analysis of the fossil record can help refine predictive models of extinction risk developed for extant species. Here, I use structural equation modeling to tease apart the contributions of three canonical predictors of extinction--abundance, body size, and geographic range size--to the duration of bivalve species in the early Cenozoic marine fossil record of the eastern United States. I find that geographic range size has a strong direct effect on extinction risk and that an apparent direct effect of abundance can be explained entirely by its covariation with geographic range. The influence of geographic range on extinction risk is manifest across three ecologically disparate bivalve clades. Body size also has strong direct effects on extinction risk but operates in opposing directions in different clades, and thus, it seems to be decoupled from extinction risk in bivalves as a whole. Although abundance does not directly predict extinction risk, I reveal weak indirect effects of both abundance and body size through their positive influence on geographic range size. Multivariate models that account for the pervasive covariation between biological factors and extinction are necessary for assessing causality in evolutionary processes and making informed predictions in applied conservation efforts.

  6. Dinophysis caudata generated lipophilic shellfish toxins in bivalves from the Nanji Islands, East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Xu, Yixiao; Li, Yang; Qi, Yuzao; Jiang, Tianjiu; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    A 12-month program of monitoring potentially toxic microalgae (that produce lipophilic shellfish toxins; LSTs) and their toxins in bivalves was conducted from April 2006 to March 2007 in the Nanji Islands, East China Sea. Two Dinophysis species, D. caudata and D. acuminata, were identified, and D. caudata was found to be the dominant species. D. caudata was detected in water samples between April and June 2006, and between February and March 2007. It reached its highest abundances in May, with a mean abundance of 1.38×102 cells/L in surface water and 1.25×102 cells/L in bottom water (cultured bivalves sampled between April and June were contaminated with LSTs, with an average toxicity of 85 μg okadaic acid (OA) eq./100 g meat, which was four times higher than the Chinese regulatory limit (20 μg OA eq./100 g meat). Ten out of fifteen wild samples (66.7%) collected during the same period were positive for LSTs, and contained an average LST toxicity of 45 μg OA eq./100 g meat (more than twice the regulatory value). Cultured Patinopecten yessoensis collected on 15 May 2006 had the highest toxicity, 320 μg OA eq./100 g meat, and relatively high toxicities (80 to 160 μg OA eq./100 g meat) were found in bivalves until the end of July.

  7. Availability of pearl producing marine bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Ataur Rahman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted during September 2014 to July 2015 to identify the pearl bearing bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities of marine oyster in captivity based on field investigation. A total of 7 pearl bearing bivalve species were identified in the coast with a salinity of 18-34 ppt, pH 8.1-8.3 and water depth ranged 0.2-2.0 meter in their habitat. From the collected bivalves, most abundant oyster species windowpane oyster, Placuna placenta (Linnaeus, 1758 was reared in fiber glass tanks with seawater for a period of 6 months. During rearing highest survival rate of 88% was observed in T1 with sandy and gravel substratum and lowest survival rate of 78% was found in T2 with muddy substratum. Average temperature and salinity were varied between 24 °C-25 °C and 21-26 ppt respectively. From the reared oyster, highest 54 nos. small pearls in the month of April and lowest 7 pearls in December from a single P. placenta were obtained. The study proved that pearls can be obtained from the marine oysters in captivity in Bangladesh, and this offers large scale culture potentialities in our coast.

  8. EU Regulatory Risk Management of Marine Biotoxins in the Marine Bivalve Mollusc Food-Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Micheál

    2018-03-10

    Food safety risk assessment in the European Union (EU) recognises consumer illness that arises from marine biotoxins as a risk associated with bivalve mollusc consumption. EU food regulations contain various general food safety obligations, which should contribute significantly to managing this risk. EU food regulations additionally impose various specific obligations on both Food Business Operators and Competent Authorities in order to manage the marine biotoxin food safety risk in the bivalve mollusc food-chain. These have a particular focus on the pre-harvest component of the food-chain. A central component of these specific systems is the requirement for ongoing monitoring of phytoplankton and biotoxin concentrations in water and molluscs, respectively. This monitoring explicitly brings a potential outcome of closing production areas delineated by classification to prohibit the harvest of bivalve molluscs as food from those areas when acceptable biotoxin concentrations are exceeded. This review considers the utility of these systems, at conceptual and practical levels, and explores their contribution to an effective regulatory risk management approach.

  9. Molecular Phylogeny and Morphological Distinctions of Two Popular Bivalves, Ctenoides scaber and Ctenoides mitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey F. Dougherty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most well-known species in the bivalve family Limidae (d’Orbigny, 1846 is the brightly colored Ctenoides scaber (Born, 1778, commonly known as the rough file clam or flame scallop. Distinguishing this bivalve from its close relative, C. mitis (Lamarck, 1807, can be difficult using only morphological features and has led to much taxonomic confusion throughout the literature. In this study, morphological characters were compared to a molecular phylogeny constructed using three genes (COI, 28S, and H3 in order to differentiate C. scaber and C. mitis. The phylogeny recovered two well-supported clades that differ significantly in shell rib numbers, but not tentacle colors. The two species were then placed in a larger phylogenetic context of the Limidae family, which revealed the need for further systematic revision across genera. As these bivalves are popular in aquaria, cannot be tank-raised, and have been overcollected in the past, proper species identification is important for assessing sustainable collection practices.

  10. Investigation of Nematopsis spp. oocysts in 7 species of bivalves from Chonburi province, Gulf of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiwaranuruk, C; Chalermwat, K; Upatham, E S; Kruatrachue, M; Azevedo, C

    2004-01-28

    This is the first detailed report of Nematopsis spp. in Thai bivalves. A monthly survey was conducted on 7 species of commercial bivalves from Chonburi province, on the eastern seaboard of Thailand, from November 2000 to November 2001 to investigate the prevalence of the apicomplexan parasite Nematopsis Schneider, 1892. Nematopsis spp. sporozoites were found in the cultivated bivalves Arcuatula arcuatula, Anadara granosa and Perna viridis as well as the locally harvested Paphia undulata. They were not found in Donax faba, Meretrix meretrix or Saccostrea cucullata. Using light microscopy, we were able to identiby 4 oocyst morphotypes of the gregarine Nematopsis spp. Prevalence of Nematopsis spp. during the 13 mo sampling period was highest in A. arcuatula (91.8%; n = 110) and lowest in A. granosa (59.2%; n = 130). The morphology of the oocysts differed between hosts, with an average (x +/- SD) length/width of 16.28 +/- 0.64/12.01 +/- 0.35 microm (n = 50) for A. arcuatula, 16.90 +/- 0.71/12.69 +/- 0.33 microm (n = 50) for A. granosa, 17.61 +/- 0.69/12.72 +/- 0.36 microm (n = 50) for P. viridis, and 11.21 +/- 0.62/8.55 +/- 0.52 microm (n = 50) for P. undulata. Identification of oocysts of these apicomplexan gregarines to species was not attempted. The prevalence of infection in relation to habitat and time of sampling is discussed.

  11. Phylogenies reveal new interpretation of speciation and the Red Queen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Chris; Meade, Andrew; Pagel, Mark

    2010-01-21

    The Red Queen describes a view of nature in which species continually evolve but do not become better adapted. It is one of the more distinctive metaphors of evolutionary biology, but no test of its claim that speciation occurs at a constant rate has ever been made against competing models that can predict virtually identical outcomes, nor has any mechanism been proposed that could cause the constant-rate phenomenon. Here we use 101 phylogenies of animal, plant and fungal taxa to test the constant-rate claim against four competing models. Phylogenetic branch lengths record the amount of time or evolutionary change between successive events of speciation. The models predict the distribution of these lengths by specifying how factors combine to bring about speciation, or by describing how rates of speciation vary throughout a tree. We find that the hypotheses that speciation follows the accumulation of many small events that act either multiplicatively or additively found support in 8% and none of the trees, respectively. A further 8% of trees hinted that the probability of speciation changes according to the amount of divergence from the ancestral species, and 6% suggested speciation rates vary among taxa. By comparison, 78% of the trees fit the simplest model in which new species emerge from single events, each rare but individually sufficient to cause speciation. This model predicts a constant rate of speciation, and provides a new interpretation of the Red Queen: the metaphor of species losing a race against a deteriorating environment is replaced by a view linking speciation to rare stochastic events that cause reproductive isolation. Attempts to understand species-radiations or why some groups have more or fewer species should look to the size of the catalogue of potential causes of speciation shared by a group of closely related organisms rather than to how those causes combine.

  12. Detection and analysis of the microdistribution of uranium in the gills of freshwater Corbicula fluminea by SIMS technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, C.; Suhard, D.; Simon, O.; Floriani, M.; Rebière, F.; Jourdain, J.-R.

    2009-06-01

    The microdistribution of uranium in the gills of freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea following chronic direct exposure to this radioelement has been investigated using the SIMS technique. Different exposure levels and exposure durations have been studied. The SIMS mass spectra and 238U + ion images produced with a SIMS CAMECA 4F-E7 show an U accumulation with the lower aqueous U concentration (20 μg/L) and the influence of the exposure levels on the bioaccumulation capacities. Furthermore, the ionic images display a heterogeneous distribution of uranium within the gill structure whatever the exposure conditions are. This study, in keeping with the ENVIRHOM French research program, was led to the conclusion that ion microscopy is an appropriate analytical method for trace elements and can give elemental cartography in a biological tissue section.

  13. Detection and analysis of the microdistribution of uranium in the gills of freshwater Corbicula fluminea by SIMS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessier, C. [IRSN, Direction de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de Dosimetrie Interne, Laboratoire de RadioChimie, IRSN, BP 17, F-92262 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)], E-mail: christine.tessier@irsn.fr; Suhard, D. [IRSN, Direction de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de Dosimetrie Interne, Laboratoire de RadioChimie, IRSN, BP 17, F-92262 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France); Simon, O.; Floriani, M. [IRSN, Direction de l' Environnement et de l' Intervention, Service d' Etude du Comportement des Radionucleides dans les ecosystemes, Laboratoire de Radioecologie et d' ecotoxicologie, IRSN, BP F6 Cadarache (France); Rebiere, F.; Jourdain, J.-R. [IRSN, Direction de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de Dosimetrie Interne, Laboratoire de RadioChimie, IRSN, BP 17, F-92262 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

    2009-06-01

    The microdistribution of uranium in the gills of freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea following chronic direct exposure to this radioelement has been investigated using the SIMS technique. Different exposure levels and exposure durations have been studied. The SIMS mass spectra and {sup 238}U{sup +} ion images produced with a SIMS CAMECA 4F-E7 show an U accumulation with the lower aqueous U concentration (20 {mu}g/L) and the influence of the exposure levels on the bioaccumulation capacities. Furthermore, the ionic images display a heterogeneous distribution of uranium within the gill structure whatever the exposure conditions are. This study, in keeping with the ENVIRHOM French research program, was led to the conclusion that ion microscopy is an appropriate analytical method for trace elements and can give elemental cartography in a biological tissue section.

  14. Meiosis and speciation: a study in a speciating Mus terricolor complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2000-12-27

    Dec 27, 2000 ... different implications in cladogenesis, it is crucial to analyse their effect on heterozygote fitness in the same given organism. Such an analysis may address two basic tenets of chromosomal speciation: first, the relative contri- bution of these CRs in reducing heterozygote fitness and thus in promoting species ...

  15. The hydrogeochemical evolution of a barrier island freshwater reservoir: Conceptual understanding and identification of key processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Stephan; Holt, Tobias; Greskowiak, Janek; Freund, Holger; Böttcher, Michael E.; Massmann, Gudrun

    2017-04-01

    Coastal aquifers play an important role in satisfying the water demands for many people in the world. However, exposition to storm surges, climate change and extensive abstraction pose a threat to current and future use of these valuable water resources in many cases. To mitigate water quality constraints and ensure safe water supply applications, an in-depth understanding of relevant process that determine the water quality is required. We investigated two freshwater reservoirs below the barrier island Spiekeroog, Germany. The main freshwater reservoir is located at the western part of the island, ˜350 years old and has a vertical extension of ˜45m. The other investigated freshwater reservoir is located at the east of Spiekeroog, only a few decades old and has a vertical extension pH values ranging between 7.5-8.5 confirm that groundwater at Spiekeroog is in equilibrium with calcite and underline that calcite dissolution is an important process. With respect to the redox system, the data indicates oxygen and nitrate reduction within the first meters of the saturated zone but Mn-Oxide and Fe-Oxide reduction rates seem to be low in the aquifer based on measured dissolved Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) concentrations. The absence of dissolved Fe(2+) could be explained by the formation of iron sulfide minerals which is in agreement with observed sulfate reduction at greater depth indicated by elevated H2S concentrations and PHREEQC speciation calculations.

  16. Speciation of arsenic in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Badal Kumar; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Anzai, Kazunori; Suzuki, Kazuo T

    2004-08-01

    Speciation of arsenicals in biological samples is an essential tool to gain insight into its distribution in tissues and its species-specific toxicity to target organs. Biological samples (urine, hair, fingernail) examined in the present study were collected from 41 people of West Bengal, India, who were drinking arsenic (As)-contaminated water, whereas 25 blood and urine samples were collected from a population who stopped drinking As contaminated water 2 years before the blood collection. Speciation of arsenicals in urine, water-methanol extract of freeze-dried red blood cells (RBCs), trichloroacetic acid treated plasma, and water extract of hair and fingernail was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS). Urine contained arsenobetaine (AsB, 1.0%), arsenite (iAs(III), 11.3), arsenate (iAs(V), 10.1), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III), 6.6), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V), 10.5), dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III), 13.0), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V), 47.5); fingernail contained iAs(III) (62.4%), iAs(V) (20.2), MMA(V) (5.7), DMA(III) (8.9), and DMA(V) (2.8); hair contained iAs(III) (58.9%), iAs(V) (34.8), MMA(V) (2.9), and DMA(V) (3.4); RBCs contained AsB (22.5%) and DMA(V) (77.5); and blood plasma contained AsB (16.7%), iAs(III) (21.1), MMA(V) (27.1), and DMA(V) (35.1). MMA(III), DMA(III), and iAs(V) were not found in any plasma and RBCs samples, but urine contained all of them. Arsenic in urine, fingernails, and hair are positively correlated with water As, suggesting that any of these measurements could be considered as a biomarker to As exposure. Status of urine and exogenous contamination of hair urgently need speciation of As in these samples, but speciation of As in nail is related to its total As (tAs) concentration. Therefore, total As concentrations of nails could be considered as biomarker to As exposure in the endemic areas.

  17. Speciation of arsenic in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Badal Kumar; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Anzai, Kazunori; Suzuki, Kazuo T.

    2004-01-01

    Speciation of arsenicals in biological samples is an essential tool to gain insight into its distribution in tissues and its species-specific toxicity to target organs. Biological samples (urine, hair, fingernail) examined in the present study were collected from 41 people of West Bengal, India, who were drinking arsenic (As)-contaminated water, whereas 25 blood and urine samples were collected from a population who stopped drinking As contaminated water 2 years before the blood collection. Speciation of arsenicals in urine, water-methanol extract of freeze-dried red blood cells (RBCs), trichloroacetic acid treated plasma, and water extract of hair and fingernail was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS). Urine contained arsenobetaine (AsB, 1.0%), arsenite (iAs III , 11.3), arsenate (iAs V , 10.1), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III , 6.6), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA V , 10.5), dimethylarsinous acid (DMA III , 13.0), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA V , 47.5); fingernail contained iAs III (62.4%), iAs V (20.2), MMA V (5.7), DMA III (8.9), and DMA V (2.8); hair contained iAs III (58.9%), iAs V (34.8), MMA V (2.9), and DMA V (3.4); RBCs contained AsB (22.5%) and DMA V (77.5); and blood plasma contained AsB (16.7%), iAs III (21.1), MMA V (27.1), and DMA V (35.1). MMA III , DMA III , and iAs V were not found in any plasma and RBCs samples, but urine contained all of them. Arsenic in urine, fingernails, and hair are positively correlated with water As, suggesting that any of these measurements could be considered as a biomarker to As exposure. Status of urine and exogenous contamination of hair urgently need speciation of As in these samples, but speciation of As in nail is related to its total As (tAs) concentration. Therefore, total As concentrations of nails could be considered as biomarker to As exposure in the endemic areas

  18. Uncharted waters: Bivalves of midway atoll and integrating mathematics into biology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Kristin M.

    To protect and conserve the Earth's biodiversity and ecosystem services, it is important not only to understand and conserve species and ecosystems, but also to instill an understanding and appreciation for biodiversity and ecosystem services in the next generations of both scientists and citizens. Thus, this dissertation combines research into the ecology and identity of large bivalves at Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) with research on pedagogical strategies for integrating mathematics into undergraduate biology education. The NWHI is one of the few remaining large, mainly intact, predator-dominated coral reef ecosystems and one of the world's largest marine protected areas. Previous bivalve studies focused on the black-lipped pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera, which was heavily harvested in the late 1920s, has not recovered, and is now a candidate species for restoration. First, I combined remote sensing, geographic information systems, SCUBA, and mathematical modeling to quantify the abundance, spatial distributions, and filtration capacity of large epifaunal bivalves at Midway Atoll. These bivalves are most abundant on the forereef outside the atoll, but densities are much lower than reported on other reefs, and Midway's bivalves are unlikely to affect plankton abundance and productivity inside the lagoon. Second, I used molecular techniques and phylogenetic reconstructions to identify pearl oysters (Pinctada) from Midway Atoll as P. maculata , a species not previously reported in Hawaii. As a small morphologically cryptic species, P. maculata may be a native species that has not been collected previously, a native species that has been identified incorrectly as the morphologically similar P. radiata, or it may be a recent introduction or natural range extension from the western Pacific. Finally, I review science education literature integrating mathematics into undergraduate biology curricula, and then present and evaluate a

  19. Patterns of Macroinvertebrate and Fish Diversity in Freshwater Sulphide Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Greenway

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extreme environments are characterised by the presence of physicochemical stressors and provide unique study systems to address problems in evolutionary ecology research. Sulphide springs provide an example of extreme freshwater environments; because hydrogen sulphide’s adverse physiological effects induce mortality in metazoans even at micromolar concentrations. Sulphide springs occur worldwide, but while microbial communities in sulphide springs have received broad attention, little is known about macroinvertebrates and fish inhabiting these toxic environments. We reviewed qualitative occurrence records of sulphide spring faunas on a global scale and present a quantitative case study comparing diversity patterns in sulphidic and adjacent non-sulphidic habitats across replicated river drainages in Southern Mexico. While detailed studies in most regions of the world remain scarce, available data suggests that sulphide spring faunas are characterised by low species richness. Dipterans (among macroinvertebrates and cyprinodontiforms (among fishes appear to dominate the communities in these habitats. At least in fish, there is evidence for the presence of highly endemic species and populations exclusively inhabiting sulphide springs. We provide a detailed discussion of traits that might predispose certain taxonomic groups to colonize sulphide springs, how colonizers subsequently adapt to cope with sulphide toxicity, and how adaptation may be linked to speciation processes.

  20. What do we need to know about speciation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butlin, Roger; Debelle, Allan; Kerth, Claudius; Snook, Rhonda R.; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Castillo Cajas, Ruth; Diao, Wenwen; Maan, Martine E.; Paolucci, Silvia; Weissing, Franz J.; van de Zande, Louis; Hoikkala, Anneli; Geuverink, Elzemiek; Jennings, Jackson; Kankare, Maaria; Knott, K. Emily; Tyukmaeva, Venera I.; Zoumadakis, Christos; Ritchie, Michael G.; Barker, Daniel; Immonen, Elina; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Noor, Mohamed; Macias Garcia, Constantino; Schmitt, Thomas; Schilthuizen, Menno

    Speciation has been a major focus of evolutionary biology research in recent years, with many important advances. However, some of the traditional organising principles of the subject area no longer provide a satisfactory framework, such as the classification of speciation mechanisms by geographical

  1. Self-consistent approach for neutral community models with speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haegeman, Bart; Etienne, Rampal S.

    Hubbell's neutral model provides a rich theoretical framework to study ecological communities. By incorporating both ecological and evolutionary time scales, it allows us to investigate how communities are shaped by speciation processes. The speciation model in the basic neutral model is

  2. The neutral theory of biodiversity with random fission speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.; Haegeman, Bart

    The neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography emphasizes the importance of dispersal and speciation to macro-ecological diversity patterns. While the influence of dispersal has been studied quite extensively, the effect of speciation has not received much attention, even though it was already

  3. Chemical Speciation of Some metal ions in Groundwaters of Yola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical speciation of some metal ions in groundwaters of Yola area using geochemical model were carried out to determine the water quality of the area using the PHREEQC speciation model. The study findings based on model calculations indicated that free Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ ions are present and the ...

  4. Sympatric speciation and extinction driven by environment dependent sexual selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, G.S.; Noest, A.J.; Hogeweg, P.

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical model is studied to investigate the possibility of sympatric speciation driven by sexual selection and ecological diversification. In particular, we focus on the rock-dwelling haplochromine cichlid species in Lake Victoria. The high speciation rate in these cichlids has been explained

  5. Sympatric speciation by sexual selection : A critical reevaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, G.S.; Dieckmann, U.; Weissing, F.J.

    Several empirical studies put forward sexual selection as an important driving force of sympatric speciation. This idea agrees with recent models suggesting that speciation may proceed by means of divergent Fisherian runaway processes within a single population. Notwithstanding this, the models so

  6. The EU network on trace element speciation in full swing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelis, R.; Camara, C.; Ebdon, L.

    2000-01-01

    The EC-funded thematic network 'Speciation 21' links scientists in analytical chemistry working in method development for the chemical speciation of trace elements, and potential users from industry and representatives of legislative agencies, in the field of environment, food and occupational he...

  7. On the dependence of speciation rates on species abundance and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    abundance largely determines the rate of generation of intraspecific endogenous genetic variation, the result obtained suggests that the latter rate is not a limiting factor for speciation. Furthermore, the observed approximate constancy of speciation rates in different taxa cannot be accounted for by assuming a neutral or ...

  8. Robustness of the approximate likelihood of the protracted speciation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonet, C.; Scherrer, R.; Rego-Costa, A.; Etienne, R. S.

    The protracted speciation model presents a realistic and parsimonious explanation for the observed slowdown in lineage accumulation through time, by accounting for the fact that speciation takes time. A method to compute the likelihood for this model given a phylogeny is available and allows

  9. Can DNA barcoding accurately discriminate megadiverse Neotropical freshwater fish fauna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The megadiverse Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna is the richest in the world with approximately 6,000 recognized species. Interestingly, they are distributed among only 17 orders, and almost 80% of them belong to only three orders: Characiformes, Siluriformes and Perciformes. Moreover, evidence based on molecular data has shown that most of the diversification of the Neotropical ichthyofauna occurred recently. These characteristics make the taxonomy and identification of this fauna a great challenge, even when using molecular approaches. In this context, the present study aimed to test the effectiveness of the barcoding methodology (COI gene) to identify the mega diverse freshwater fish fauna from the Neotropical region. For this purpose, 254 species of fishes were analyzed from the Upper Parana River basin, an area representative of the larger Neotropical region. Results Of the 254 species analyzed, 252 were correctly identified by their barcode sequences (99.2%). The main K2P intra- and inter-specific genetic divergence values (0.3% and 6.8%, respectively) were relatively low compared with similar values reported in the literature, reflecting the higher number of closely related species belonging to a few higher taxa and their recent radiation. Moreover, for 84 pairs of species that showed low levels of genetic divergence (2%), pointing to at least 23 strong candidates for new species. Conclusions Our study is the first to examine a large number of freshwater fish species from the Neotropical area, including a large number of closely related species. The results confirmed the efficacy of the barcoding methodology to identify a recently radiated, megadiverse fauna, discriminating 99.2% of the analyzed species. The power of the barcode sequences to identify species, even with low interspecific divergence, gives us an idea of the distribution of inter-specific genetic divergence in these megadiverse fauna. The results also revealed hidden genetic

  10. Can DNA barcoding accurately discriminate megadiverse Neotropical freshwater fish fauna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luiz H G; Hanner, Robert; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2013-03-09

    The megadiverse Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna is the richest in the world with approximately 6,000 recognized species. Interestingly, they are distributed among only 17 orders, and almost 80% of them belong to only three orders: Characiformes, Siluriformes and Perciformes. Moreover, evidence based on molecular data has shown that most of the diversification of the Neotropical ichthyofauna occurred recently. These characteristics make the taxonomy and identification of this fauna a great challenge, even when using molecular approaches. In this context, the present study aimed to test the effectiveness of the barcoding methodology (COI gene) to identify the mega diverse freshwater fish fauna from the Neotropical region. For this purpose, 254 species of fishes were analyzed from the Upper Parana River basin, an area representative of the larger Neotropical region. Of the 254 species analyzed, 252 were correctly identified by their barcode sequences (99.2%). The main K2P intra- and inter-specific genetic divergence values (0.3% and 6.8%, respectively) were relatively low compared with similar values reported in the literature, reflecting the higher number of closely related species belonging to a few higher taxa and their recent radiation. Moreover, for 84 pairs of species that showed low levels of genetic divergence (2%), pointing to at least 23 strong candidates for new species. Our study is the first to examine a large number of freshwater fish species from the Neotropical area, including a large number of closely related species. The results confirmed the efficacy of the barcoding methodology to identify a recently radiated, megadiverse fauna, discriminating 99.2% of the analyzed species. The power of the barcode sequences to identify species, even with low interspecific divergence, gives us an idea of the distribution of inter-specific genetic divergence in these megadiverse fauna. The results also revealed hidden genetic divergences suggestive of

  11. Burrowing criteria and burrowing mode adjustment in bivalves to varying geoenvironmental conditions in intertidal flats and beaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Sassa

    Full Text Available The response of bivalves to their abiotic environment has been widely studied in relation to hydroenvironmental conditions, sediment types and sediment grain sizes. However, the possible role of varying geoenvironmental conditions in their habitats remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the hardness of the surficial intertidal sediments varies by a factor of 20-50 due to suction development and suction-induced void state changes in the essentially saturated states of intertidal flats and beaches. We investigated the response of two species of bivalves, Ruditapes philippinarum and Donax semigranosus, in the laboratory by simulating such prevailing geoenvironmental conditions in the field. The experimental results demonstrate that the bivalve responses depended strongly on the varying geoenvironmental conditions. Notably, both bivalves consistently shifted their burrowing modes, reducing the burrowing angle and burial depth, in response to increasing hardness, to compensate for the excessive energy required for burrowing, as explained by a proposed conceptual model. This burrowing mode adjustment was accompanied by two burrowing criteria below or above which the bivalves accomplished vertical burrowing or failed to burrow, respectively. The suitable and fatal conditions differed markedly with species and shell lengths. The acute sensitivities of the observed bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes revealed two distinctive mechanisms accounting for the adult-juvenile spatial distributions of Ruditapes philippinarum and the behavioral adaptation to a rapidly changing geoenvironment of Donax semigranosus. The present results may provide a rational basis by which to understand the ensuing, and to predict future, bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes in intertidal zones.

  12. Tentacle structure in freshwater bryozoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamberg, Yuta; Shunatova, Natalia

    2017-05-01

    Tentacles are the main food-gathering organs of bryozoans. The most common design is a hollow tube of extracellular matrix (ECM), covered with ten columns of epithelial cells on the outside, and a coelothelium on the inside. Nerves follow the ECM, going between the bases of some epidermal cells. The tentacle musculature includes two bundles formed by myoepithelial cells of the coelothelium. The tentacles of freshwater (phylactolaemate) bryozoans, however, differ somewhat in structure from those of marine bryozoans. Here, we describe the tentacles of three species of phylactolaemates, comparing them to gymnolaemates and stenolaemates. Phylactolaemate tentacles tend to be longer, and with more voluminous coeloms. The composition of the frontal cell row and the number of frontal nerves is variable in freshwater bryozoans, but constant in marine groups. Abfrontal cells form a continuous row in Phylactolaemata, but occur intermittently in other two classes. Phylactolaemata lack the microvillar cuticle reported in Gymnolaemata. Abfrontal sensory tufts are always composed of pairs of mono- and/or biciliated cells. This arrangement differs from individual abfrontal ciliary cells of other bryozoans: monociliated in Stenolaemata and monociliated and multiciliated ones in Gymnolaemata. In all three groups, however, ciliated abfrontal cells probably serve as mechanoreceptors. We confirm previously described phylactolemate traits: an unusual arrangement of two-layered coelothelium lining the lateral sides of the tentacle and oral slits in the intertentacular membrane. As previously reported, tentacle movements involved in feeding differ between bryozoan groups, with phylactolaemates tending to have slower movements than both gymnolaemates and stenolaemates, and a narrower behavioral repertoire than gymnolaemates. The morphological and ultrastructural differences between the freshwater species we studied and marine bryozoans may be related to these functional differences. Muscle

  13. Speciation of arsenic and mercury in feed: why and how?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanisms of biological activities and biotransformation of trace elements such as arsenic and mercury has improved during recent years with the help of chemical speciation studies. However, the most important practical application of elemental speciation is in the area...... of toxicology. Toxicological knowledge on the individual trace element species can lead to more specific legislation of hazardous substances found in feed. Examples here are arsenic, where the inorganic forms are the most toxic, and mercury, where the organic form methylmercury is more toxic than inorganic...... mercury. In the present paper an overview of the current knowledge on arsenic and mercury speciation in feed and analytical methodologies for arsenic and mercury speciation analysis are given. Additionally the current status and expected future developments within legislation for trace element speciation...

  14. Resolving uncertainty in chemical speciation determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. Scott; Adams, Nicholas W. H.; Kramer, James R.

    1999-10-01

    Speciation determinations involve uncertainty in system definition and experimentation. Identification of appropriate metals and ligands from basic chemical principles, analytical window considerations, types of species and checking for consistency in equilibrium calculations are considered in system definition uncertainty. A systematic approach to system definition limits uncertainty in speciation investigations. Experimental uncertainty is discussed with an example of proton interactions with Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). A Monte Carlo approach was used to estimate uncertainty in experimental data, resulting from the propagation of uncertainties in electrode calibration parameters and experimental data points. Monte Carlo simulations revealed large uncertainties present at high (>9-10) and low (monoprotic ligands. Least-squares fit the data with 21 sites, whereas linear programming fit the data equally well with 9 sites. Multiresponse fitting, involving simultaneous fluorescence and pH measurements, improved model discrimination. Deconvolution of the excitation versus emission fluorescence surface for SRFA establishes a minimum of five sites. Diprotic sites are also required for the five fluorescent sites, and one non-fluorescent monoprotic site was added to accommodate the pH data. Consistent with greater complexity, the multiresponse method had broader confidence limits than the uniresponse methods, but corresponded better with the accepted total carboxylic content for SRFA. Overall there was a 40% standard deviation in total carboxylic content for the multiresponse fitting, versus 10% and 1% for least-squares and linear programming, respectively.

  15. Relative Bioavailability and Bioaccessability and Speciation of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Assessment of soil arsenic (As) bioavailability may profoundly affect the extent of remediation required at contaminated sites by improving human exposure estimates. Because small adjustments in soil As bioavailability estimates can significantly alter risk assessments and remediation goals, convenient, rapid, reliable, and inexpensive tools are needed to determine soil As bioavailability. Objectives: We evaluated inexpensive methods for assessing As bioavailability in soil as a means to improve human exposure estimates and potentially reduce remediation costs. Methods: Nine soils from residential sites affected by mining or smelting activity and two National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials were evaluated for As bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and speciation. Arsenic bioavailability was determined using an in vivo mouse model, and As bioaccessibility was determined using the Solubility/Bioavailability Research Consortium in vitro assay. Arsenic speciation in soil and selected soil physicochemical properties were also evaluated to determine whether these parameters could be used as predictors of As bio¬availability and bioaccessibility. Results: In the mouse assay, we compared bioavailabilities of As in soils with that for sodium arsenate. Relative bioavailabilities (RBAs) of soil As ranged from 11% to 53% (mean, 33%). In vitro soil As bioaccessibility values were strongly correlated with soil As RBAs (R

  16. Freshwater autotrophic picoplankton: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. STOCKNER

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic picoplankton (APP are distributed worldwide and are ubiquitous in all types of lakes of varying trophic state. APP are major players in carbon production in all aquatic ecosystems, including extreme environments such as cold ice-covered and/or warm tropical lakes and thermal springs. They often form the base of complex microbial food webs, becoming prey for a multitude of protozoan and micro-invertebrate grazers, that effectively channel APP carbon to higher trophic levels including fish. In this review we examine the existing literature on freshwater autotrophic picoplankton, setting recent findings and current ecological issues within an historic framework, and include a description of the occurrence and distribution of both single-cell and colonial APP (picocyanobacteria in different types of lakes. In this review we place considerable emphasis on methodology and ecology, including sampling, counting, preservation, molecular techniques, measurement of photosynthesis, and include extensive comment on their important role in microbial food webs. The model outlined by Stockner of an increase of APP abundance and biomass and a decrease of its relative importance with the increase of phosphorus concentration in lakes has been widely accepted, and only recently confirmed in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Nevertheless the relationship which drives the APP presence and importance in lakes of differing trophic status appears with considerable variation so we must conclude that the success of APP in oligotrophic lakes worldwide is not a certainty but highly probable.

  17. A Probabilistic Assessment of the Chemical and Radiological Risks of Chronic Exposure to Uranium in Freshwater Ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, T.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Gilbin, R.; Adam, Ch.; Della-Vedova, C.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium (U) presents a unique challenge for ecological risk assessments (ERA) because it induces both chemical and radiological toxicity, and the relative importance of these two toxicities differs among the various U source terms (i.e., natural, enriched, depleted). We present a method for the conversion between chemical concentrations (μgL -1 ) and radiological dose rates (μGyh -1 ) for a defined set of reference organisms, and apply this conversion method to previously derived chemical and radiological benchmarks to determine the extent to which these benchmarks ensure radiological and chemical protection, respectively, for U in freshwater ecosystems. Results show that the percentage of species radiologically protected by the chemical benchmark decreases with increasing degrees of U enrichment and with increasing periods of radioactive decay. In contrast, the freshwater ecosystem is almost never chemically protected by the radiological benchmark, regardless of the source term or decay period considered, confirming that the risks to the environment from uranium's chemical toxicity generally outweigh those of its radiological toxicity. These results are relevant to developing water quality criteria that protect freshwater ecosystems from the various risks associated with the nuclear applications of U exploitation, and highlight the need for (1) further research on the speciation, bioavailability, and toxicity of U-series radionuclides under different environmental conditions, and (2) the adoption of both chemical and radiological benchmarks for coherent ERAS to be conducted in U-contaminated freshwater ecosystems. (authors)

  18. Characterization of a Freshwater Crab Sudanonautes aubryi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... Recently, Cumberlidge and. Reed (2004) described the freshwater crab genus. Erimetopus of Congo basin. Sudanonautes aubryi, like all others edible crabs are also poorly understood. This preliminary study was undertaken to collect and realize a biometric characterization of this common freshwater crab ...

  19. Freshwater Ecology. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    Freshwater ecosystems include lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, and certain types of wetlands. This literature and resources guide is not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography on freshwater ecology; the guide is designed--as the name of the series implies--to put the reader or student "on target." Other literature guides related to…

  20. How Will Climate Change Affect Freshwater Fishing?

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Lael; Smith, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    This fact sheet reviews how climate change can affect freshwater fishing in the United States. Climate change can affect the availability and diversity of target species, the environmental and aesthetic quality of fishing sites, as well as the policies used to manage freshwater fishing.

  1. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungs, W. A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) water quality; (2) pesticide pollutants; (3) chemical pollutants; (4) miscellaneous pollutants; and (5) physical factors of pollution on freshwater fish. A list of 338 references is also presented. (HM)

  2. Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokumsen, Alfred; Svendsen, Lars Moeslund

    Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark......Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark...

  3. Tidal Freshwater Wetlands: Variation and Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, A.; Swarth, C.W.

    2013-01-01

    Tidal freshwater wetlands (TFW) are situated in the upper estuary in a zone bordered upstream by the nontidal river and downstream by the oligohaline region. Here, discharge of freshwater from the river and the daily tidal pulse from the sea combine to create conditions where TFW develop. TFW

  4. Integrating the social, hydrological and ecological dimensions of freshwater health: The Freshwater Health Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Derek; Shaad, Kashif; Souter, Nicholas J; Farrell, Tracy; Dudgeon, David; Sullivan, Caroline A; Fauconnier, Isabelle; MacDonald, Glen M; McCartney, Matthew P; Power, Alison G; McNally, Amy; Andelman, Sandy J; Capon, Timothy; Devineni, Naresh; Apirumanekul, Chusit; Ng, Cho Nam; Rebecca Shaw, M; Wang, Raymond Yu; Lai, Chengguang; Wang, Zhaoli; Regan, Helen M

    2018-06-15

    Degradation of freshwater ecosystems and the services they provide is a primary cause of increasing water insecurity, raising the need for integrated solutions to freshwater management. While methods for characterizing the multi-faceted challenges of managing freshwater ecosystems abound, they tend to emphasize either social or ecological dimensions and fall short of being truly integrative. This paper suggests that management for sustainability of freshwater systems needs to consider the linkages between human water uses, freshwater ecosystems and governance. We present a conceptualization of freshwater resources as part of an integrated social-ecological system and propose a set of corresponding indicators to monitor freshwater ecosystem health and to highlight priorities for management. We demonstrate an application of this new framework -the Freshwater Health Index (FHI) - in the Dongjiang River Basin in southern China, where stakeholders are addressing multiple and conflicting freshwater demands. By combining empirical and modeled datasets with surveys to gauge stakeholders' preferences and elicit expert information about governance mechanisms, the FHI helps stakeholders understand the status of freshwater ecosystems in their basin, how ecosystems are being manipulated to enhance or decrease water-related services, and how well the existing water resource management regime is equipped to govern these dynamics over time. This framework helps to operationalize a truly integrated approach to water resource management by recognizing the interplay between governance, stakeholders, freshwater ecosystems and the services they provide. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals and health risk assessment in three benthic bivalves along the coast of Laizhou Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinhu; Cao, Liang; Dou, Shuozeng

    2017-04-15

    This study investigated the tissue- and species-specific bioaccumulation of heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Hg, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb) in three benthic bivalves (the ark shell, Scapharca subcrenata; the surf clam, Mactra veneriformis; and the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum) collected from the coast of Laizhou Bay in the Bohai Sea. The results demonstrated that the visceral masses of the bivalves tended to accumulate heavy metals more efficiently than their muscles. The capacities of the bivalves to bioaccumulate metals followed a similar order: Cd>Hg>Zn=As>Cu>Cr=Pb. The conditions of metal contamination in the bivalves tended to be worse along the eastern coast than in other regions. Overall, the Manila clam was more severely contaminated by heavy metals than the surf clam and ark shell. Judging by the hazard quotients (HQ) of the metals in the muscles of the bivalves, the greatest hazard risk to human health comes primarily from As. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Jan A; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus), consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis). Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from 'normal' bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment.

  7. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A van Gils

    Full Text Available The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus, consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis. Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from 'normal' bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment.

  8. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    effect on radiocarbon dating in an estuarine environment is examined. Here, freshwater influence causes reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 14C years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. The examples in this study show clearly that the freshwater reservoir effect can seriously corrupt radiocarbon......The freshwater reservoir effect can result in anomalously old radiocarbon ages of samples from lakes and rivers. This includes the bones of people whose subsistence was based on freshwater fish, and pottery in which fish was cooked. Water rich in dissolved ancient calcium carbonates, commonly known...... as hard water, is the most common reason for the freshwater reservoir effect. It is therefore also called hardwater effect. Although it has been known for more than 60 years, it is still less well-recognized by archaeologists than the marine reservoir effect. The aim of this study is to examine the order...

  9. Freshwater to seawater transitions in migratory fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydlewski, Joseph D.; Michael P. Wilkie,

    2012-01-01

    The transition from freshwater to seawater is integral to the life history of many fishes. Diverse migratory fishes express anadromous, catadromous, and amphidromous life histories, while others make incomplete transits between freshwater and seawater. The physiological mechanisms of osmoregulation are widely conserved among phylogenetically diverse species. Diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater develop osmoregulatory mechanisms for different environmental salinities. Freshwater to seawater transition involves hormonally mediated changes in gill ionocytes and the transport proteins associated with hypoosmoregulation, increased seawater ingestion and water absorption in the intestine, and reduced urinary water losses. Fishes attain salinity tolerance through early development, gradual acclimation, or environmentally or developmentally cued adaptations. This chapter describes adaptations in diverse taxa and the effects of salinity on growth. Identifying common strategies in diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater will reveal the ecological and physiological basis for maintaining homeostasis in different salinities, and inform efforts to conserve and manage migratory euryhaline fishes.

  10. Ways of uptake for a freshwater bivalve of radiostrontium and its loss (Anodonta cygnea (L)); Modaites de la contamination d'un bivalve d'eau douce par le radiostrontium et de sa decontamination - Anodonta cygnea (L)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancio, D.; Foulquier, L.; Grauby, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The authors summarize general notions concerning ecological characteristics of Anodonta cygnea, commonly found in the hydrological system of the Rhone river. Experimental conditions allowing to follow the evolution of the animal's activity level are described. In general, the amount of radiostrontium retained by these organisms is low as compared to the existing activity in the aquaria (2 to 9 pour cent); after 35 days, a state of equilibrium is reached. The shell retains more than 50 per cent of the animal activity by adsorption mechanisms. The gills show a fixation capacity higher than the rest of the other organs. The concentration factor is about 9 for the entire animal, 4 for the shell and 78 for whole of the soft - tissues. The presence or absence of sediment has no influence on the accumulation process and the fixation capacity of the organisms. The absence of light decreases the concentration factor, this is due probably to a reduction of the contamination through micro-organisms. The decontamination does not follow a simple law; a rapid loss in the activity (T 1/2 {approx_equal} 8 days) is followed by a slower elimination (T 1/2 {approx_equal} 72 days). Independent on the type of experiment, the distribution of the activity in the organisms was similar, i.e. the shell represents almost 45 per cent of the animal activity, the soft tissues 40 per cent and the inner liquids 15 per cent. (authors) [French] Les auteurs donnent des notions generales concernant les caracteristiques ecologiques d'Anodonta cygnea tres repandue dans le Bassin Rhodanien. Ils indiquent les conditions experimentales ayant permis de suivre l'evolution de l'activite des animaux. D'une maniere generale la quantite de radiostrontium fixee par les organismes est faible par rapport a l'activite introduite dans le bac (2 a 9 pour cent). On obtient un etat d'equilibre au bout de 35 jours environ; la coquille, par des mecanismes d'adsorption, peut retenir plus de 50 pour cent de l'activite de l'animal; la capacite de fixation des branchies est nettement superieure a celle des autres organes. Le facteur de concentration se situe autour de 9 pour l'animal total, de 4 pour la coquille et de 78 pour l'ensemble des parties molles. La presence ou l'absence de sediment ne change en rien les processus et la capacite de fixation des organismes. L'absence de lumiere conduit a une baisse du facteur de concentration due, semble-t-il, a la reduction de la contamination, par l'intermediaire des microorganismes. La decontamination ne peut etre representee par une fonction simple; une perte rapide de l'activite (T 1/2 {approx_equal} 8 jours) est suivie d'une periode de decontamination plus lente (T 1/2 {approx_equal} 72 jours). Quel que soit le type d'experimentation, la repartition de l'activite dans l'organisme est semblable. La coquille represente environ 45 pour cent de l'activite totale de l'animal, les parties molles 40 pour cent et les liquides internes 15 pour cent. (auteurs)

  11. Metallic speciation in environmental samples. La especiacion metalica en muestras medioambientales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Uria, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    A review about chemical speciation in environmental samples was developed. Starting from definition of speciation, characteristic techniques and squemes for speciation more adequate for the characterization of the several organic/inorganic metal-species was considered. Finally, the possible future tendences of speciation techniques was also considered. (Author) 27 refs.

  12. Sexual selection and magic traits in speciation with gene flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria R. SERVEDIO, Michael KOPP

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which sexual selection is involved in speciation with gene flow remains an open question and the subject of much research. Here, we propose that some insight can be gained from considering the concept of magic traits (i.e., traits involved in both reproductive isolation and ecological divergence. Both magic traits and other, “non-magic”, traits can contribute to speciation via a number of specific mechanisms. We argue that many of these mechanisms are likely to differ widely in the extent to which they involve sexual selection. Furthermore, in some cases where sexual selection is present, it may be prone to inhibit rather than drive speciation. Finally, there are a priori reasons to believe that certain categories of traits are much more effective than others in driving speciation. The combination of these points suggests a classification of traits that may shed light on the broader role of sexual selection in speciation with gene flow. In particular, we suggest that sexual selection can act as a driver of speciation in some scenarios, but may play a negligible role in potentially common categories of magic traits, and may be likely to inhibit speciation in common categories of non-magic traits [Current Zoology 58 (3: 507–513, 2012].

  13. Genomic islands of speciation in Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (A. gambiae, provides a unique opportunity to study the evolution of reproductive isolation because it is divided into two sympatric, partially isolated subtaxa known as M form and S form. With the annotated genome of this species now available, high-throughput techniques can be applied to locate and characterize the genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation. In order to quantify patterns of differentiation within A. gambiae, we hybridized population samples of genomic DNA from each form to Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays. We found that three regions, together encompassing less than 2.8 Mb, are the only locations where the M and S forms are significantly differentiated. Two of these regions are adjacent to centromeres, on Chromosomes 2L and X, and contain 50 and 12 predicted genes, respectively. Sequenced loci in these regions contain fixed differences between forms and no shared polymorphisms, while no fixed differences were found at nearby control loci. The third region, on Chromosome 2R, contains only five predicted genes; fixed differences in this region were also verified by direct sequencing. These "speciation islands" remain differentiated despite considerable gene flow, and are therefore expected to contain the genes responsible for reproductive isolation. Much effort has recently been applied to locating the genes and genetic changes responsible for reproductive isolation between species. Though much can be inferred about speciation by studying taxa that have diverged for millions of years, studying differentiation between taxa that are in the early stages of isolation will lead to a clearer view of the number and size of regions involved in the genetics of speciation. Despite appreciable levels of gene flow between the M and S forms of A. gambiae, we were able to isolate three small regions of differentiation where genes responsible for ecological and behavioral

  14. Characterizing Photosymbiosis Between Fraginae Bivalves and Symbiodinium Using Phylogenetics and Stable Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Photosymbiotic associations between heterotrophic hosts and photosynthetic algae play crucial roles in maintaining the trophic and structural integrity of coral reef ecosystems. The marine bivalve subfamily Fraginae contains both non-symbiotic and photosymbiotic lineages, making it an ideal comparative system to study the origin and evolutionary adaptations of photosymbiosis. The symbiotic species exhibit unique morphological adaptations to photosymbiosis. However, the basic biology of these photosymbiotic relationships, such as symbiont diversity and nutritional benefits, has not been thoroughly characterized. In this study, we examined the general morphology of four Fraginae species occupying different depths (0–10 m: Corculum cardissa, Fragum fragum, Fragum scruposum, and Fragum sueziense. Abundant symbionts were found in the mantle, gill, and part of the foot, contained in tubular networks within host tissues. We used molecular phylogenetics to investigate the algal symbiont community of these Fraginae species. Results showed that symbionts from all four species are dinoflagellates belonging to the Symbiodinium clade C and we did not detect any host-specific or geographic-specific genetic structures within the symbionts. We also used stable carbon isotope analyses to examine whether the cockles are directly utilizing photosynthetically derived carbon sources. All species show less depleted 13C compared to filter-feeding bivalves, suggesting at least part of their organic carbon is derived directly from the symbionts. However, 13C depletion of Fragum sueziense collected from deeper habitats are less distinguishable from filter-feeding bivalves. This indicates that species in deeper habitats may rely less on photosymbiosis due to the reduced light availability. Given that the symbiotic fragines exhibit varying morphologies, habitats, and utilization of symbiont photosynthesis, the subfamily represents an ideal model system to study

  15. Prevalence of Calicivirus and Hepatitis A virus in bivalve molluscs from Galicia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Álvarez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From a virological standpoint, shellfish safety continues to be a sanitary challenge. Bivalves are one of the most common vehicles of viral illness and the adoption of viral standards into European Union legislation is being considered. In this study, a 18-months survey were conducted in ten harvesting areas from two estuaries in Galicia (NW of Spain, the most important bivalve production area in Europe. Hepatitis A virus (HAV and human norovirus (NoV, including genogroups I (GI and II (GII were quantified by reverse transcription-real time PCR (RT-qPCR, according to the recently developed standard method ISO/TS 15216:2013. Four bivalve species were studied, including wild and cultured mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, clams (Venerupis philippinarum and V. decussata and cockles (Cerastoderma edule. Overall, 54.8% of the analysed samples were contaminated by at least one of the studied viruses, being detected the simultaneous presence of two or three viruses in 11.3% of the samples. NoV GI was the most prevalent virus (32.1% followed by NoV GII (25.6% and HAV (9.5%. The results showed the presence of viral contamination throughout the year in both areas and all species of molluscs. However, diverse patterns of prevalence and seasonality were observed among different viruses. HAV was detected only between March and June 2012. NoV GI was detected intermittently throughout the study period, with significant peaks in the spring and summer of 2011. NoV GII showed a clear seasonality to during the cold months by 2011; however, a significant peak was detected in the spring of 2012.

  16. The EU network on trace element speciation in full swing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelis, R.; Camara, C.; Ebdon, L.

    2000-01-01

    The EC-funded thematic network 'Speciation 21' links scientists in analytical chemistry working in method development for the chemical speciation of trace elements, and potential users from industry and representatives of legislative agencies, in the field of environment, food and occupational...... as the influence of packing materials. Once the analytical methodology for the measurement of the trace element species has been optimised, the importance of trace element speciation will grow enormously. Food sciences, material sciences, medicine and occupational health, environmental sciences and related fields...

  17. Estimation of food limitation of bivalve larvae in coastal waters of north-western Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bos, O.G.; Hendriks, I.E.; Strasser, M.

    2006-01-01

    Marine invertebrate recruitment may be affected by food limitation during the pelagic larval life stages. In the present study, field data on abundance of bivalve larvae along with their prey (small phytoplankton) were examined to see whether they were consistent with predictions made...... assimilation rate averaged 7-26% of the maximum assimilation rate. Under the assumptions made for the present study, it is suggested that growth of larvae in north-west European waters is often food-limited. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved...

  18. Comparative sensitivity of European native (Anodonta anatina) and exotic (Corbicula fluminea) bivalves to mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Patrícia; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Machado, Jorge; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-12-01

    Pollution is believed to be an important factor modulating the competition between exotic invasive bivalves and their native competitors. Thus, the objective of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of the European native Anodonta anatina and the exotic invasive species Corbicula fluminea to mercury, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant of high concern. In laboratory acute bioassays, adult organisms of both species were exposed independently to mercury for 96 h (31-500 μg/L). The criteria indicative of toxicity were mortality and biomarkers of oxidative stress and damage, neurotoxicity, and energy production changes. Mercury induced mortality in A. anatina (72 h-LC10 and 72 h-LC50 of 14.0 μg/L and 49.6 μg/L, respectively) but not in C. fluminea. The ability of C. fluminea to maintaining the shell closed for considerable periods of time when exposed to high concentrations of mercury and the effective activation (up to 63 μg/L) of mechanisms against the oxidative stress caused by mercury may have contributed to its relatively low sensitivity. In the range of concentrations tested, mercury had no significant effects on the other parameters analysed in C. fluminea. Overall, the findings of the present study, suggest that in real scenarios of competition between C. fluminea and A. anatina populations, the presence of mercury may modulate the process, acting in favour of the exotic species because it is less sensitive to this environmental contaminant than the native bivalve. The results of the present study highlight the need of further investigation on the effects of mercury on the competition between exotic invasive species and their native competitors, especially the effects potentially induced by long-term exposure to low concentrations of this metal, the mechanisms involved in the tolerance to mercury-induced stress, and the potential post-exposure recovery of both exotic invasive and native bivalves. This knowledge is most important for

  19. NICKEL SPECIATION OF URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin C. Galbreath; Charlene R. Crocker; Carolyn M. Nyberg; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-10-01

    A four-step sequential Ni extraction method, summarized in Table AB-1, was evaluated for identifying and quantifying the Ni species occurring in urban total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and fine particulate matter (<10 {micro}m [PM{sub 10}] and <2.5 {micro}m [PM{sub 2.5}] in aerodynamic diameter). The extraction method was originally developed for quantifying soluble, sulfidic, elemental, and oxidic forms of Ni that may occur in industrial atmospheres. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the Ni species selectivity of the extraction method. Uncertainties in the chemical speciation of Ni in urban PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} greatly affect inhalation health risk estimates, primarily because of the large variability in acute, chronic, and cancer-causing effects for different Ni compounds.

  20. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R. Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  1. Selenium speciation from farm to faeces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, E.H.; Kapolna, E.; Hillestroem, P.R.; Laursen, K.; Budek, A.; Husted, S.; Buegel, S.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:The content and speciation of Se were studied in food crops originating from organic and conventional cultivation schemes. Additionally, carrots and onions were biofortified and intrinsically labelled using foliar spraying with isotopically enriched 77 SeO 3 -2 . HPLC-ICPMS and HPLC-ESIMS/MS analysis revealed that Se was mainly metabolized to 77 SeMet and to Me 77 SeCys, also in carrot. The 77 Se plants were processed to food (50 μg 77 Se/d) for a human intervention study. The isotopic enrichment by 77 Se as well as 67 Zn and 65 Cu in urine and faeces was determined by ICP(DRC)MS and the mineral absorption rates estimated. (author)

  2. Evaluation of γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in two species of bivalves and their relative sensitivity using comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, M.K., E-mail: here.praveen@gmail.com [Department of Zoology, Goa University, Goa 403206 (India); Shyama, S.K., E-mail: skshyama@gmail.com [Department of Zoology, Goa University, Goa 403206 (India); Sonaye, B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Goa Medical College, Goa (India); Naik, U Roshini; Kadam, S.B.; Bipin, P.D.; D’costa, A. [Department of Zoology, Goa University, Goa 403206 (India); Chaubey, R.C. [Radiation Biology and Health Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Possible genotoxic effect of accidental exposure of aquatic fauna to γ radiation. • Relative sensitivity of bivalves to γ radiation is also analyzed using comet assay. • γ radiation induced significant genetic damage in both the species of bivalves. • P. malabarica and M. casta exhibited a similar level of sensitivity to γ radiation. • Comet assay may be used as a biomarker for the environmental biomonitoring. - Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to induce genetic damage in diverse groups of organisms. Under accidental situations, large quantities of radioactive elements get released into the environment and radiation emitted from these radionuclides may adversely affect both the man and the non-human biota. The present study is aimed (a) to know the genotoxic effect of gamma radiation on aquatic fauna employing two species of selected bivalves, (b) to evaluate the possible use of ‘Comet assay’ for detecting genetic damage in haemocytes of bivalves as a biomarker for environmental biomonitoring and also (c) to compare the relative sensitivity of two species of bivalves viz. Paphia malabarica and Meretrix casta to gamma radiation. The comet assays was optimized and validated using different concentrations (18, 32 and 56 mg/L) of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), a direct-acting reference genotoxic agent, to which the bivalves were exposed for various times (24, 48 and 72 h). Bivalves were irradiated (single acute exposure) with 5 different doses (viz. 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy) of gamma radiation and their genotoxic effects on the haemocytes were studied using the comet assay. Haemolymph was collected from the adductor muscle at 24, 48 and 72 h of both EMS-exposed and irradiated bivalves and comet assay was carried out using standard protocol. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed as indicated by an increase in % tail DNA damage at different concentrations of EMS and all the doses of gamma radiation as compared to controls in

  3. Evaluation of γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in two species of bivalves and their relative sensitivity using comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen Kumar, M.K.; Shyama, S.K.; Sonaye, B.S.; Naik, U Roshini; Kadam, S.B.; Bipin, P.D.; D’costa, A.; Chaubey, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Possible genotoxic effect of accidental exposure of aquatic fauna to γ radiation. • Relative sensitivity of bivalves to γ radiation is also analyzed using comet assay. • γ radiation induced significant genetic damage in both the species of bivalves. • P. malabarica and M. casta exhibited a similar level of sensitivity to γ radiation. • Comet assay may be used as a biomarker for the environmental biomonitoring. - Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to induce genetic damage in diverse groups of organisms. Under accidental situations, large quantities of radioactive elements get released into the environment and radiation emitted from these radionuclides may adversely affect both the man and the non-human biota. The present study is aimed (a) to know the genotoxic effect of gamma radiation on aquatic fauna employing two species of selected bivalves, (b) to evaluate the possible use of ‘Comet assay’ for detecting genetic damage in haemocytes of bivalves as a biomarker for environmental biomonitoring and also (c) to compare the relative sensitivity of two species of bivalves viz. Paphia malabarica and Meretrix casta to gamma radiation. The comet assays was optimized and validated using different concentrations (18, 32 and 56 mg/L) of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), a direct-acting reference genotoxic agent, to which the bivalves were exposed for various times (24, 48 and 72 h). Bivalves were irradiated (single acute exposure) with 5 different doses (viz. 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy) of gamma radiation and their genotoxic effects on the haemocytes were studied using the comet assay. Haemolymph was collected from the adductor muscle at 24, 48 and 72 h of both EMS-exposed and irradiated bivalves and comet assay was carried out using standard protocol. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed as indicated by an increase in % tail DNA damage at different concentrations of EMS and all the doses of gamma radiation as compared to controls in

  4. First record of a pontoniine shrimp (Caridea, Palaemonidae) in association with a boring bivalve of the genus Spengleria (Bivalvia, Euheterodonta, Gastrochaenidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, C.H.J.M.; Meij, van der S.E.T.

    2010-01-01

    During fieldwork in Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia, in 2007, a pontoniine shrimp, most likely belonging to the genus Anchistus, was collected from a coral boring bivalve of the genus Spengleria. This is the first record of a pontoniine shrimp living in association with a boring bivalve. As it

  5. Speciation of metals in natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millero Frank

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The form or speciation of a metal in natural waters can change its kinetic and thermodynamic properties. For example, Cu(II in the free ionic form is toxic to phytoplankton, while copper complexed to organic ligands is not toxic. The form of a metal in solution can also change its solubility. For example, Fe(II is soluble in aqueous solutions while Fe(III is nearly insoluble. Natural organic ligands interactions with Fe(III can increase the solubility by 20-fold in seawater. Ionic interaction models that can be used to determine the activity and speciation of divalent and trivalent metals in seawater and other natural elements will be discussed. The model is able to consider the interactions of metals with the major (Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, CO32-, Br-, F- and minor (OH-, H2PO4-, HPO42-, PO43-, HS- anions as a function of temperature (0 to 50 °C, ionic strength [0 to 6 m (m = mol kg-1] and pH (1 to 13. Recently, it has been shown that many divalent metals are complexed with organic ligands. Although the composition of these ligands is not known, a number of workers have used voltammetry to determine the concentration of the ligand [Ln] and the stability constant (KML for the formation of the complex M2+ + Ln → MLn+2 KML= [MLn+2]/[M2+] [Ln] We have added the experimental values of KML for the formation of complexes of natural organics in seawater of known concentration ([Ln] with Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Co2+, and Fe3+ . The model can be used to examine the competition of inorganic and organic ligands for divalent metals as a function of ionic strength. The importance of organic ligands in controlling the solubility of Fe(III in seawater will be discussed. New experimental studies are needed to extend the model to higher temperatures and ionic strength.

  6. Speciation of actinides in marine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation state distribution of plutonium in seawater, pore water from marine sediments, and a series of model solutions similar to seawater was measured using a TTA solvent extraction technique and α liquid scintillation counting methods. Electromigration was used to compare migration behavior of americium in 0.7M NaCl solutions (pH 6.5 to 8.0) with the behavior calculated from predicted speciation. In all pH 8 solutions studied, Pu(VI) was rapidly reduced to Pu(V). In 0.7M NaCl, pH 8.0, and artifical seawater (no organics), the Pu(V) formed was stable. In real seawater (with organic components), a rapid reduction of Pu(VI) to Pu(IV) was also observed. The Pu(V) formed in seawater was metastable; a very slow reduction to Pu(IV) occurred. This reduction was catalyzed by light. Humic acid (obtained from marine sediments from the Bahama Islands), was added to 0.7M NaCl, pH 8.0 solutions to determine its effect on Pu redox reactions. The effect was similar to the reductions in seawater. Increasing the humic acid concentration decreased the amount of Pu(V) which was formed and favored the IV state. The americium electromigration experiments showed a +0.12 net charge for the Am complexes formed in 0.7M NaCl solutions from pH 7.0 to 8.0. This value was smaller than the charge of +0.94 calculated from predicted speciation

  7. Platinum uptake by the freshwater isopod Asellus Aquaticus in urban rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, S.; Morrison, G.M. [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1999-09-01

    Platinum has been increasing in the environment as a result of emissions from catalytic converters. The platinum emitted is principally located in the vicinity of roads but might be transported to urban rivers through highway and urban run-off water. Platinum concentrations in the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus were measured for two urban rivers and a stormwater detention pond. Concentrations ranged from 0.04 to 12.4 {mu}g g{sup -1} for direct analysis and from 0.16 to 4.5 {mu}g g{sup -1} after depuration. Analyses of water, pore water and sediments indicate that platinum in urban rivers is mostly found in the sediments and these provide the major contribution of platinum to Asellus aquaticus. Exposure experiments showed the importance of platinum speciation for uptake.

  8. Adaptive morphologies and guild structure in a high-diversity bivalve fauna from an early Campanian rocky shore, Ivö Klack (Sweden)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Mehlin; Surlyk, Finn; Jagt, John W. M.

    2012-01-01

    habitats. Study of the functional morphology of bivalve shells and comparison with extant relatives has resulted in a subdivision of the fauna into seven guilds and five habitats. The bivalve fauna represents a withinhabitat, time-averaged assemblage to which none of the species was introduced from......The bivalve fauna from a late early Campanian rocky shore at Ivö Klack (southern Sweden), comprises just over sixty species, a very high diversity in comparison to other Late Cretaceous and modern rocky shore bivalve assemblages. This high diversity is here considered to represent a reliable census...... of the fauna; only in part can it be explained by the cumulative effect of generations of bivalves inhabiting this coastal environment. The high density and diversity and the wide range of shell morphologies allow interpretation of different modes of life in this variable environment with many contrasting...

  9. Bivalves and Gastropods of the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico: A Checklist of Species with Notes on Their Habitat and Local Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ríos-Jara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic composition of 160 species of bivalves and gastropods recorded in the Gulf of Tehuantepec is presented with information on their habitat and distribution along 10 different localities of the shoreline and 42 stations of the continental shelf. The species were on sandy and rocky beaches, coastal lagoons, estuaries, mangroves, rocky breakwaters of ports, and shallow subtidal areas (14–47 m depth. A total of 78 bivalve species and 82 gastropod species were recorded. Most of these were associated with sandy and rocky beaches and breakwaters of ports. The estuaries host 30 species and the coastal lagoons only two. In the shallow subtidal there were 18 gastropod species and 40 bivalve species representing 36.3% of all. This study adds 24 bivalve species and 29 gastropod species not recorded in previous studies for a total count of 213 species (102 bivalves and 111 gastropods for Gulf of Tehuantepec.

  10. Novel Synechococcus Genomes Reconstructed from Freshwater Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Cabello-Yeves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater picocyanobacteria including Synechococcus remain poorly studied at the genomic level, compared to their marine representatives. Here, using a metagenomic assembly approach we discovered two novel Synechococcus sp. genomes from two freshwater reservoirs Tous and Lake Lanier, both sharing 96% average nucleotide identity and displaying high abundance levels in these two lakes located at similar altitudes and temperate latitudes. These new genomes have the smallest estimated size (2.2 Mb and average intergenic spacer length (20 bp of any previously sequenced freshwater Synechococcus, which may contribute to their success in oligotrophic freshwater systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed that Synechococcus sp. Tous comprises small cells (0.987 ± 0.139 μm length, 0.723 ± 0.119 μm width that amount to 90% of the picocyanobacteria in Tous. They appear together in a phylogenomic tree with Synechococcus sp. RCC307 strain, the main representative of sub-cluster 5.3 that has itself one of the smallest marine Synechococcus genomes. We detected a type II phycobilisome (PBS gene cluster in both genomes, which suggests that they belong to a phycoerythrin-rich pink low-light ecotype. The decrease of acidic proteins and the higher content of basic transporters and membrane proteins in the novel Synechococcus genomes, compared to marine representatives, support their freshwater specialization. A sulfate Cys transporter which is absent in marine but has been identified in many freshwater cyanobacteria was also detected in Synechococcus sp. Tous. The RuBisCo subunits from this microbe are phylogenetically close to the freshwater amoeba Paulinella chromatophora symbiont, hinting to a freshwater origin of the carboxysome operon of this protist. The novel genomes enlarge the known diversity of freshwater Synechococcus and improve the overall knowledge of the relationships among members of this genus at large.

  11. Status and Impacts of Arctic Freshwater Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine, T. W. N.

    2017-12-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980-2000, with an extra ≈5000 km3—about 25%—being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and runoff have increased between these periods (most of the evidence comes from models). Despite flux increases from 2001 to 2011, it is uncertain if the marine freshwater source through Bering Strait for the 2000s has changed, as observations in the 1980s and 1990s are incomplete. The marine freshwater fluxes draining the Arctic through Fram and Davis straits are also insignificantly different. In this way, the balance of sources and sinks of freshwater to the Arctic, Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), and Baffin Bay shifted to about 1200±730 km3yr-1 freshening the region, on average, during the 2000s. The observed accumulation of liquid freshwater is consistent with this increased supply and the loss of freshwater from sea ice (Figure, right). Evidence exists that such discharges can impact the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, and hence Atlantic sector climate. Nevertheless, it appears that the observed AMOC variability since 2004, when high quality measurements began, is not attributable to anthropogenic influence. This work is based on, and updated from, Haine et al. (2015), Carmack et al. (2016), and Haine (2016). Haine, T. W. N. Ocean science: Vagaries of Atlantic overturning. Nature Geoscience, 9, 479-480, 10.1038/ngeo2748, 2016. T. W. N. Haine et al., Arctic Freshwater Export: Status, Mechanisms, and Prospects, Global Planetary Change, 125, 13-35, 10.1016/j.glopacha.2014.11.013, 2015. E. Carmack et al., Fresh water and its role in the Arctic Marine System: sources, disposition, storage, export, and physical and biogeochemical consequences in the Arctic and global oceans. J. G. Res. Biogeosciences, 10.1002/2015JG003140, 2016.

  12. Novel Synechococcus Genomes Reconstructed from Freshwater Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Yeves, Pedro J.; Haro-Moreno, Jose M.; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; Ghai, Rohit; Picazo, Antonio; Camacho, Antonio; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Freshwater picocyanobacteria including Synechococcus remain poorly studied at the genomic level, compared to their marine representatives. Here, using a metagenomic assembly approach we discovered two novel Synechococcus sp. genomes from two freshwater reservoirs Tous and Lake Lanier, both sharing 96% average nucleotide identity and displaying high abundance levels in these two lakes located at similar altitudes and temperate latitudes. These new genomes have the smallest estimated size (2.2 Mb) and average intergenic spacer length (20 bp) of any previously sequenced freshwater Synechococcus, which may contribute to their success in oligotrophic freshwater systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed that Synechococcus sp. Tous comprises small cells (0.987 ± 0.139 μm length, 0.723 ± 0.119 μm width) that amount to 90% of the picocyanobacteria in Tous. They appear together in a phylogenomic tree with Synechococcus sp. RCC307 strain, the main representative of sub-cluster 5.3 that has itself one of the smallest marine Synechococcus genomes. We detected a type II phycobilisome (PBS) gene cluster in both genomes, which suggests that they belong to a phycoerythrin-rich pink low-light ecotype. The decrease of acidic proteins and the higher content of basic transporters and membrane proteins in the novel Synechococcus genomes, compared to marine representatives, support their freshwater specialization. A sulfate Cys transporter which is absent in marine but has been identified in many freshwater cyanobacteria was also detected in Synechococcus sp. Tous. The RuBisCo subunits from this microbe are phylogenetically close to the freshwater amoeba Paulinella chromatophora symbiont, hinting to a freshwater origin of the carboxysome operon of this protist. The novel genomes enlarge the known diversity of freshwater Synechococcus and improve the overall knowledge of the relationships among members of this genus at large. PMID:28680419

  13. Freshwater Mussels as Biological Sensors and Cyclers of Aquatic Nitrogen Constituents: An Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, A.; Just, C. L.; Mudumbai, R.; Dasgupta, S.; Newton, T. J.; Durst, J.; Boddicker, M. D.; Diken, M. B.; Bril, J.; Baidoo-Williams, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most extensive manifestations of anthropogenic mismanagement of nitrogen is eutrophication of the Gulf of Mexico. Leaching and runoff transport nitrate compounds-excess agricultural fertilizer and animal waste-via the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico. Phytoplankton then multiplies exponentially, and consumes most of the dissolved oxygen. This hypoxia kills fish and other organisms, leading to so-called dead zones in the Gulf that can cover 6,000-7,000 square miles. Dead zone mitigation plans call for coupling management actions with enhanced monitoring, modeling, and research on nitrogen delivery to, as well as processing within, the Mississippi River. Our vision is to create a biosensor network of native freshwater mussels in a major river to monitor, comprehend, and ultimately model key components of the nitrogen cycle. Native freshwater mussels are a guild of long-lived, suspension feeding bivalves that perform important ecological functions in aquatic systems. Mussels can influence nutrient cycling by transferring nutrients from the water column to the riverbed. A major problem for environmental scientists is that relatively little is known about the diurnal behaviors of freshwater mussels or the impacts these behaviors may have on the aquatic nitrogen cycle. Our multidisciplinary team is performing a series of laboratory experiments exploring the feasibility of using freshwater mussels as sensors of and capacitors for nitrates. For sensing, we place Hall-effect sensors on mussels to monitor the rhythmic opening and closing of their valves (gape). One shortcoming of previous work is that mussels were monitored in artificial conditions: glued fast in laboratory flumes, or tethered in constrained settings. To overcome this shortcoming, our team has built a mussel microhabitat with a constant river water feed stock, solar simulator, and a variety of water chemistry sensor. A main thrust of our work is to develop the technology to monitor mussel

  14. The evolution of reproductive isolation in a simultaneous hermaphrodite, the freshwater snail Physa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydeard Charles

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cosmopolitan freshwater snail Physa acuta has recently found widespread use as a model organism for the study of mating systems and reproductive allocation. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenies suggest that Physa carolinae, recently described from the American southeast, is a sister species of P. acuta. The divergence of the acuta/carolinae ancestor from the more widespread P. pomilia appears to be somewhat older, and the split between a hypothetical acuta/carolinae/pomilia ancestor and P. gyrina appears older still. Results Here we report the results of no-choice mating experiments yielding no evidence of hybridization between gyrina and any of four other populations (pomilia, carolinae, Philadelphia acuta, or Charleston acuta, nor between pomilia and carolinae. Crosses between pomilia and both acuta populations yielded sterile F1 progeny with reduced viability, while crosses between carolinae and both acuta populations yielded sterile F1 hybrids of normal viability. A set of mate-choice tests also revealed significant sexual isolation between gyrina and all four of our other Physa populations, between pomilia and carolinae, and between pomilia and Charleston acuta, but not between pomilia and the acuta population from Philadelphia, nor between carolinae and either acuta population. These observations are consistent with the origin of hybrid sterility prior to hybrid inviability, and a hypothesis that speciation between pomilia and acuta may have been reinforced by selection for prezygotic reproductive isolation in sympatry. Conclusions We propose a two-factor model for the evolution of postzygotic reproductive incompatibility in this set of five Physa populations consistent with the Dobzhansky-Muller model of speciation, and a second two-factor model for the evolution of sexual incompatibility. Under these models, species trees may be said to correspond with gene trees in American populations of the freshwater snail, Physa.

  15. The evolution of reproductive isolation in a simultaneous hermaphrodite, the freshwater snail Physa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Robert T; Wethington, Amy R; Lydeard, Charles

    2011-05-27

    The cosmopolitan freshwater snail Physa acuta has recently found widespread use as a model organism for the study of mating systems and reproductive allocation. Mitochondrial DNA phylogenies suggest that Physa carolinae, recently described from the American southeast, is a sister species of P. acuta. The divergence of the acuta/carolinae ancestor from the more widespread P. pomilia appears to be somewhat older, and the split between a hypothetical acuta/carolinae/pomilia ancestor and P. gyrina appears older still. Here we report the results of no-choice mating experiments yielding no evidence of hybridization between gyrina and any of four other populations (pomilia, carolinae, Philadelphia acuta, or Charleston acuta), nor between pomilia and carolinae. Crosses between pomilia and both acuta populations yielded sterile F1 progeny with reduced viability, while crosses between carolinae and both acuta populations yielded sterile F1 hybrids of normal viability. A set of mate-choice tests also revealed significant sexual isolation between gyrina and all four of our other Physa populations, between pomilia and carolinae, and between pomilia and Charleston acuta, but not between pomilia and the acuta population from Philadelphia, nor between carolinae and either acuta population. These observations are consistent with the origin of hybrid sterility prior to hybrid inviability, and a hypothesis that speciation between pomilia and acuta may have been reinforced by selection for prezygotic reproductive isolation in sympatry. We propose a two-factor model for the evolution of postzygotic reproductive incompatibility in this set of five Physa populations consistent with the Dobzhansky-Muller model of speciation, and a second two-factor model for the evolution of sexual incompatibility. Under these models, species trees may be said to correspond with gene trees in American populations of the freshwater snail, Physa.

  16. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    case studies will show the degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 years can occur within one river. In the Limfjord, freshwater influence...... caused reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. Finally, I will discuss the implications of the freshwater reservoir effect for radiocarbon dating of Mesolithic pottery from inland sites of the Ertebølle culture in Northern Germany....

  17. New analytic results for speciation times in neutral models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhard, Tanja

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the standard Yule model, and a recently studied model of speciation and extinction, the "critical branching process." We develop an analytic way-as opposed to the common simulation approach-for calculating the speciation times in a reconstructed phylogenetic tree. Simple expressions for the density and the moments of the speciation times are obtained. Methods for dating a speciation event become valuable, if for the reconstructed phylogenetic trees, no time scale is available. A missing time scale could be due to supertree methods, morphological data, or molecular data which violates the molecular clock. Our analytic approach is, in particular, useful for the model with extinction, since simulations of birth-death processes which are conditioned on obtaining n extant species today are quite delicate. Further, simulations are very time consuming for big n under both models.

  18. Chemical speciation of long-lived radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaolin Hou

    2008-11-01

    This project started in November 2005 and ended in November 2008, the work and research approaches are summarized in this report. This project studied the speciation of radionuclides in environment. A number of speciation analytical methods are developed for determination of species of 129 I, 99 Tc, isotopes of Pu, and 237 Np in seawater, fresh water, soil, sediment, vegetations, and concrete. The developed methods are used for the investigation of the chemical speciation of these radionuclides as well as their environmental behaviours, especially in Danish environment. In addition the speciation of Pu isotopes in waste samples from the decommissioning of Danish nuclear facilities is also investigated. The report summarizes these works completed in this project. Through this research project, a number of research papers have been published in the scientific journals, the research results has also been presented in the Nordic and international conference/meeting and communicated to international colleagues. Some publications are also enclosed to this report. (au)

  19. Speciation and Persistence of Dimethoate in the Aquatic Environment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Speciation and Persistence of Dimethoate in the Aquatic Environment: Characterization in Terms of a Rate Model that Takes Into Account Hydrolysis, Photolysis, Microbial Degradation and Adsorption of the Pesticide by Colloidal and Sediment Particles.

  20. Genomic support for speciation and specificity of baculoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakubowska, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Keywords: baculovirus, insects, speciation, genomics, phylogeny, host specificity The Baculoviridae comprise a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses infecting arthropods. In this thesis two baculoviruses, Leucoma salicis nucleopolyhedrovirus (LesaNPV) and Agrotis segetum (Agse) NPV, were

  1. The molecular basis of speciation: from patterns to processes, rules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    male; large X-effect; meiotic drive; genomic conflict. ... Haldane's rule, in particular, has played a major role in reviving interest in the genetics of speciation. However, the large genetic and reproductive differences between taxa and the ...

  2. Pb Speciation Data to Estimate Lead Bioavailability to Quail

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Linear combination fitting data for lead speciation of soil samples evaluated through an in-vivo/in-vitro correlation for quail exposure. This dataset is associated...

  3. Speciation of long-lived radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolin Hou

    2008-11-15

    This project started in November 2005 and ended in November 2008, the work and research approaches are summarized in this report. This project studied the speciation of radionuclides in environment. A number of speciation analytical methods are developed for determination of species of 129I, 99Tc, isotopes of Pu, and 237Np in seawater, fresh water, soil, sediment, vegetations, and concrete. The developed methods are used for the investigation of the chemical speciation of these radionuclides as well as their environmental behaviours, especially in Danish environment. In addition the speciation of Pu isotopes in waste samples from the decommissioning of Danish nuclear facilities is also investigated. The report summarizes these works completed in this project. Through this research project, a number of research papers have been published in the scientific journals, the research results has also been presented in the Nordic and international conference/meeting and communicated to international colleagues. Some publications are also enclosed to this report. (au)

  4. Biogeography and speciation of terrestrial fauna in the south-western Australian biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Michael G; Edwards, Danielle L; Byrne, Margaret; Harvey, Mark S; Joseph, Leo; Roberts, J Dale

    2015-08-01

    The south-western land division of Western Australia (SWWA), bordering the temperate Southern and Indian Oceans, is the only global biodiversity hotspot recognised in Australia. Renowned for its extraordinary diversity of endemic plants, and for some of the largest and most botanically significant temperate heathlands and woodlands on Earth, SWWA has long fascinated biogeographers. Its flat, highly weathered topography and the apparent absence of major geographic factors usually implicated in biotic diversification have challenged attempts to explain patterns of biogeography and mechanisms of speciation in the region. Botanical studies have always been central to understanding the biodiversity values of SWWA, although surprisingly few quantitative botanical analyses have allowed for an understanding of historical biogeographic processes in both space and time. Faunistic studies, by contrast, have played little or no role in defining hotspot concepts, despite several decades of accumulating quantitative research on the phylogeny and phylogeography of multiple lineages. In this review we critically analyse datasets with explicit supporting phylogenetic data and estimates of the time since divergence for all available elements of the terrestrial fauna, and compare these datasets to those available for plants. In situ speciation has played more of a role in shaping the south-western Australian fauna than has long been supposed, and has occurred in numerous endemic lineages of freshwater fish, frogs, reptiles, snails and less-vagile arthropods. By contrast, relatively low levels of endemism are found in birds, mammals and highly dispersive insects, and in situ speciation has played a negligible role in generating local endemism in birds and mammals. Quantitative studies provide evidence for at least four mechanisms driving patterns of endemism in south-western Australian animals, including: (i) relictualism of ancient Gondwanan or Pangaean taxa in the High Rainfall

  5. Traces (ichnospecies Oichnus paraboloides of predatory gastropods on bivalve shells from the Seogwipo Formation, Jejudo, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dal-Yong Kong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Circular to subcircular drill holes were identified on the bivalve shells collected from the Seogwipo Formation, Jejudo, Korea. A great majority of the drill holes (>70% were found on the surfaces of a bivalve species Glycymeris rotunda. They are characterized by a beveled sharp edge and paraboloid in cross section with larger outer borehole diameter (OBD; mean 4.21 mm and smaller inner borehole diameter (mean 2.94 mm. Walls of the drill holes are generally smooth, and walls ornamented with etched relief-like structures were also recognized. A slightly raised central boss observed in an incomplete specimen may indicate a failure of predator’s attack. All drill holes collected are classified as a single ichnospecies Oichnus paraboloides Bromley, 1981. They are interpreted as boring traces produced by predatory gastropods, particularly naticid gastropods. Most O. paraboloides boreholes are observed in the central area of shell surfaces; a few boreholes lie marginally, which may reflect a borehole-site selectivity. No correlation between size of prey (shell height and size of predator (OBD is recognized. It is likely, however, that drilled shells of about 30 mm in height represent optimal prey size for naticid predators that lived in a benthic Seogwipo community.

  6. Bivalve Omics: State of the Art and Potential Applications for the Biomonitoring of Harmful Marine Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Venier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The extraordinary progress experienced by sequencing technologies and bioinformatics has made the development of omic studies virtually ubiquitous in all fields of life sciences nowadays. However, scientific attention has been quite unevenly distributed throughout the different branches of the tree of life, leaving molluscs, one of the most diverse animal groups, relatively unexplored and without representation within the narrow collection of well established model organisms. Within this Phylum, bivalve molluscs play a fundamental role in the functioning of the marine ecosystem, constitute very valuable commercial resources in aquaculture, and have been widely used as sentinel organisms in the biomonitoring of marine pollution. Yet, it has only been very recently that this complex group of organisms became a preferential subject for omic studies, posing new challenges for their integrative characterization. The present contribution aims to give a detailed insight into the state of the art of the omic studies and functional information analysis of bivalve molluscs, providing a timely perspective on the available data resources and on the current and prospective applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds.

  7. Bivalve omics: state of the art and potential applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ulloa, Victoria; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Manfrin, Chiara; Gerdol, Marco; Venier, Paola; Eirín-López, José M

    2013-11-01

    The extraordinary progress experienced by sequencing technologies and bioinformatics has made the development of omic studies virtually ubiquitous in all fields of life sciences nowadays. However, scientific attention has been quite unevenly distributed throughout the different branches of the tree of life, leaving molluscs, one of the most diverse animal groups, relatively unexplored and without representation within the narrow collection of well established model organisms. Within this Phylum, bivalve molluscs play a fundamental role in the functioning of the marine ecosystem, constitute very valuable commercial resources in aquaculture, and have been widely used as sentinel organisms in the biomonitoring of marine pollution. Yet, it has only been very recently that this complex group of organisms became a preferential subject for omic studies, posing new challenges for their integrative characterization. The present contribution aims to give a detailed insight into the state of the art of the omic studies and functional information analysis of bivalve molluscs, providing a timely perspective on the available data resources and on the current and prospective applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds.

  8. Accumulation of butyl- and phenyltin compounds in starfish and bivalves from the coastal environment of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Won Joon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Kim, Nam Sook; Hong, Sang Hee; Oh, Jae Ryoung; Jeon, Joong Kyun; Okamura, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Triphenyltin (TPT) and tributyltin (TBT) concentrations were determined in two starfish species (Asteria pectinifera and Asterias amurensis), bivalves (Crassostrea gigas or Mytilus edulis), and seawater samples from sites around the coasts of Korea. Both TPT and TBT concentrations in starfish ranged from 8 to 1560 ng/g and from <2 to 797 ng/g as Sn on a dry weight basis, respectively. TPT concentration accounted for 75.4% and 86.4% of total phenyltin concentration in A. pectinifera and A. amurensis, respectively, while monobutyltin, a degradation product of TBT, accounted for 86.3% and 57.2% of total butyltin, respectively. Triphenyltin concentrations in A. pectinifera were significantly correlated to water and bivalve TPT concentrations, which implies that dietary uptake of TPT from contaminated prey as well as direct uptake from surrounding water contribute to TPT body residues in the starfish. Starfish could be target organisms for monitoring TPT compound in the marine environment, due to their high accumulation and low degradation capacity towards TPT. - Starfish are effective organisms for monitoring phenyltin contamination in the marine environment

  9. Evaluation of the effects of candidate molluscicides on two nontarget bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, D.L.; Marking, L.L.; Rach, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of molluscicides have been proposed for use in control of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha), but their effect on nontarget aquatic organisms has not been evaluated. Standard methods were adapted for assessing the toxicity of candidate molluscicides to two nontarget bivalves. Fingernail clams, Musculium transversum, and the fawnfoot mussel, Truncilla donaciformis, were selected to represent the two families of native bivalves. Test organisms were collected from pools 6 to 9 of the Upper Mississippi River near La Crosse, WI. Static acute toxicity tests were conducted for 48 hours followed by a 96-hour monitoring period in untreated water to more fully assess survival and mortality. Toxicity data were analyzed by probit analysis to give LC sub(50) values and 95% confidence limits. The same chemicals as those tested at Ohio State University were evaluated against zebra mussels. Results from these studies and those conducted at Ohio State University will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of chemicals in zebra mussel control and their potential hazard to nontarget organisms.

  10. Evaluating Microstructure Preservation using Scanning Electron Microscopy in an Extinct Bivalve, Lahillia larseni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, R. C.; Tobin, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    Ontogenetic stable isotope (δ18O) sampling of accretionary carbonate shells can provide sub-annual records of environmental conditions, such as seawater temperature, during the life of an organism. These records of seasonal temperature variations can refine our understanding of ancient climates and past climate change. However, because original isotopic signatures can be altered by diagenesis, it is necessary to examine potential specimens for evidence of diagenetic alteration. Abundant aragonitic Lahillia larseni bivalves from the latest Cretaceous and Early Paleogene on Seymour Island, Antarctica, provide excellent opportunities for sclerochronological investigations. Shells of L. larseni preserve clear annual growth bands, which make them ideal candidates for high-resolution δ18O sampling to produce sub-annual records of seawater temperature variation. While the good visual condition of these shells and the preservation of original aragonitic material suggests a high level of preservation suitable for isotopic analysis, subtle alteration of the original shell microstructures can still compromise the original isotopic signatures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can be used to evaluate the preservation of these microstructures. This study compares methods for imaging L. larseni bivalve shells with SEM and seeks a consistent way to evaluate their various microstructures for evidence of diagenetic alteration. High-resolution ontogenetic isotopic sampling will also be conducted on several L. larseni shells, as roughly sinusoidal δ18O profiles are often an indication that the original isotopic signatures have been preserved.

  11. Assessing phototoxicity of petroleum using the bivalve Mulinia lateralis and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, M.; Champlin, D.; Burgess, R.; Ho, K.; Kuhn-Hines, A.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major inputs of PAHs in the marine environment is petroleum products. A large and often catastrophic source of petroleum is an oil spill, which releases concentrated quantities of PAHs into the water column. Intermediate molecular weight compounds remain in the water column for a relatively extended length of time. These compounds include phototoxic PAHs such as anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and their substituted derivatives. Assessments of the environmental impact of marine oil spills have not included phototoxicity tests using pelagic larvae of benthic invertebrates. In this study, the photoreactive toxicity of individual PAHs, including anthracene, pyrene, and fluoranthene, were determined using the bivalve, Mulinia lateralis and the mysid, Mysidopsis bahia. Ultraviolet light exposures increased toxicity relative to fluorescent light for both species but a particularly dramatic response was seen using M. lateralis embryos. This species was relatively insensitive when exposed under fluorescent lights, but exhibited up to a 4,000 fold increase in toxicity under ultraviolet lights. Exposures with different types of petroleum (e.g., fuel oil number-sign 2 and crude oil) under fluorescent and ultraviolet light will demonstrate the utility of this bivalve and mysid for assessing oil spill-related acute and sublethal toxicity in the marine environment

  12. Stable oxygen and carbon isotope profiles in an invasive bivalve ( Corbicula fluminea) in North Carolina watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, John P.; Showers, William J.; Genna, Bernie; Levine, Jay F.

    2009-06-01

    The modern invasive bivalve Corbicula fluminea was collected in 2006 from three sites with different land uses located in a North Carolina River Basin. The primary objective was to describe the δ 18O and δ 13C profiles of C. fluminea shells under various land use conditions. An additional aim was to evaluate whether growth patterns of C. fluminea form seasonally. Annual shell growth patterns were measured from the umbo to the margin and co-varied with estimates of ambient water temperature, corresponding to seasonal variation. The C. fluminea growth patterns as translucent bands (slower growth) appeared to form during winter months and opaque bands (rapid growth) formed during summer. A mixed model analysis (ANOVA) showed a significant site level effect of δ 18O and δ 13C profiles examined among sites ( F = 17.1; p = 0.003). A second model showed a borderline significant site effect among profiles with variability more pronounced at the urban site, Crabtree Creek ( p = 0.085). Previous habitat assessment ratings and water chemistry measurements suggested that the urban site was more impacted by storm water runoff. Understanding δ 18O and δ 13C SHELL profiles and shell growth patterns of the invasive bivalve ( C. fluminea) may help establish a framework for using these animals as biomonitors to record water temperature and nutrient pollution.

  13. Internal distribution of uranium and associated genotoxic damages in the chronically exposed bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Olivier; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Adam, Christelle; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2011-08-01

    Uranium (U) internal distribution and involved effects in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been studied after direct chronic exposure (90 d, 10 μg.L-1). U distribution was assessed at the subcellular level (Metal Rich Granules -MRG-, pellets and cytosol fractions) in two main organs of the bivalve (gills and visceral mass). Micro-localisation was investigated by TEM-EDX analysis in the gills epithelium. DNA damage in gill and hemolymph samples was measured by the Comet assay. The 90-d exposure period led to a significant increase of U concentration in gills over time (× 5) and a large U quantity in subcellular granules in gills. Finally, a significant increase (× 2) in DNA damage was noted in exposed gills and haemocytes. This study shows that the accumulation levels and consequently the potential toxicity cannot be successfully predicted only on the basis of concentration in water or in tissues and subcellular fractions after chronic exposure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Drivers of shell growth of the bivalve, Callista chione (L. 1758) - Combined environmental and biological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purroy, Ariadna; Milano, Stefania; Schöne, Bernd R; Thébault, Julien; Peharda, Melita

    2018-03-01

    Seasonal shell growth patterns were analyzed using the stable oxygen and carbon isotope values of live-collected specimens of the bivalve Callista chione from two sites in the Adriatic Sea (Pag and Cetina, Croatia). Micromilling was performed on the shell surface of three shells per site and shell oxygen isotopes of the powder samples were measured. The timing and rate of seasonal shell growth was determined by aligning the δ 18 O shell -derived temperatures so that the best fit was achieved with the instrumental temperature curve. According to the data, shells grew only at very low rates or not at all during the winter months, i.e., between January and March. Shell growth slowdown/shutdown temperatures varied among sites, i.e., 13.6 °C at Pag and 16.6 °C at Cetina, indicating that temperature was not the only driver of shell growth. Likely, seasonal differences in seawater temperature and food supply were the major component explaining contrasting growth rates of C. chione at two study sites. Decreasing shell growth rates were also associated with the onset of gametogenesis suggesting a major energy reallocation toward reproduction rather than growth. These results highlight the need to combine sclerochronological analyses with ecological studies to understand life history traits of bivalves as archives of environmental variables. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Contrasting metal detoxification in polychaetes, bivalves and fish from a contaminated bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Xu, Zhizhen; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2015-02-01

    Jinzhou Bay in Bohai, Northern China, is historically contaminated with metals, but the organisms living in such contaminated environments are much less well studied. In this study, we contrasted the different subcellular and detoxification responses of polychaetes, bivalves and fish collected from different contaminated sites in Jinzhou Bay. In polychaete Neanthes japonica, metal-rich granule (MRG) was the main biologically detoxified metal compartment, and metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) detoxified a relatively smaller fraction of accumulated metals. The importance of MRG increased whereas that of MTLP decreased with increasing metal bioaccumulation. Detoxification in the two bivalves was similar to that in the polychaetes. However, the MRG appeared to play only a minor role in metal binding and detoxification in the gills and livers of fish, whereas MTLP was the dominating detoxification pool. Cellular debris was an important pool binding with metals in the three marine animals. Our study highlighted the contrasting cellular binding and detoxification among different marine organisms living in contaminated environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Contamination in sediments, bivalves and sponges of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negri, Andrew; Burns, Kathryn; Boyle, Steve; Brinkman, Diane; Webster, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the concentrations of total hydrocarbons (THC), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and trace metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Hg and As) in marine sediments off Scott Base (NZ) and compared them with sediments near the highly polluted McMurdo Station (US) as well as less impacted sites including Turtle Rock and Cape Evans. The Antarctic mollusc, Laternula elliptica and three common sponge species were also analysed for trace metals. The mean THC concentration in sediments from Scott Base was 3 fold higher than the pristine site, Turtle Rock, but 10 fold lower than samples from McMurdo Station. McMurdo Station sediments also contained the highest concentrations of PAHs, PCBs and the trace metals, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and Hg. Copper was significantly higher in bivalves from McMurdo Station than other sites. Trace metal concentrations in sponges were generally consistent within sites but no spatial patterns were apparent. - Analyses of Antarctic marine sediments, bivalves and sponges revealed strong PAH, PCB and trace metal gradients in McMurdo Sound

  17. Immunotoxicity of nanoparticle nTiO2 to a commercial marine bivalve species, Tegillarca granosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Han, Yu; Guo, Cheng; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Saixi; Su, Wenhao; Zha, Shanjie; Wang, Yichen; Liu, Guangxu

    2017-07-01

    The increasing production and extensive application of nanoparticles (NPs) inevitably leads to increased release of NPs into the marine environment and therefore poses a potential threat to marine organisms, especially the sessile benthic bivalves. However, the impacts of NPs on the immunity of commercial and ecological important bivalve species, Tegillarca granosa, still remain unknown to date. In addition, the molecular mechanism of the immunotoxicity of NPs still remains unclear in marine invertebrates. Therefore, the immunotoxicity of nTiO 2 exposure to T. granosa at environmental realistic concentrations was investigated in the present study. Results obtained showed that the total number, phagocytic activity, and red granulocytes ratio of the haemocytes were significantly reduced after 30 days nTiO 2 exposures at the concentrations of 10 and 100 μg/L. Furthermore, the expressions of genes encoding Pattern Recognition Receptors (PPRs) and downstream immune-related molecules were significantly down-regulated by nTiO 2 exposures, indicating a reduced sensitivity to pathogen challenges. In conclusion, evident immunotoxicity of nTiO 2 to T. granosa at environmental realistic concentrations was detected by the present study. In addition, the gene expression analysis suggests that the PRRs (both TLRs and RIG1 investigated) may be the molecules for NPs recognition in marine invertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. How humans drive speciation as well as extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Maron, M.

    2016-01-01

    A central topic for conservation science is evaluating how human activities influence global species diversity. Humanity exacerbates extinction rates. But by what mechanisms does humanity drive the emergence of new species? We review human-mediated speciation, compare speciation and known...... extinctions, and discuss the challenges of using net species diversity as a conservation objective. Humans drive rapid evolution through relocation, domestication, hunting and novel ecosystem creation—and emerging technologies could eventually provide additional mechanisms. The number of species relocated...

  19. An Early Instance of Upper Palaeolithic Personal Ornamentation from China: The Freshwater Shell Bead from Shuidonggou 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wei

    Full Text Available We report the discovery and present a detailed analysis of a freshwater bivalve from Shuidonggou Locality 2, layer CL3. This layer is located c. 40 cm below layer CL2, which has yielded numerous ostrich eggshell beads. The shell is identified as the valve of a Corbicula fluminea. Data on the occurrence of this species in the Shuidonggou region during Marine Isotope Stage 3 and taphonomic analysis, conducted in the framework of this study, of a modern biocoenosis and thanatocoenosis suggest that the archeological specimen was collected at one of the numerous fossil or sub-fossil outcrops where valves of this species were available at the time of occupation of level CL3. Experimental grinding and microscopic analysis of modern shells of the same species indicate that the Shuidonggou shell was most probably ground on coarse sandstone to open a hole on its umbo, attach a thread, and use the valve as a personal ornament. Experimental engraving of freshwater shells and microscopic analysis identify an incision crossing the archaeological valve outer surface as possible deliberate engraving. Reappraisal of the site chronology in the light of available radiocarbon evidence suggests an age of at least 34-33 cal kyr BP for layer CL3. Such estimate makes the C. fluminea recovered from CL3 one of the earliest instances of personal ornamentation and the earliest example of a shell bead from China.

  20. An Early Instance of Upper Palaeolithic Personal Ornamentation from China: The Freshwater Shell Bead from Shuidonggou 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yi; d’Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian; Li, Feng; Gao, Xing

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and present a detailed analysis of a freshwater bivalve from Shuidonggou Locality 2, layer CL3. This layer is located c. 40 cm below layer CL2, which has yielded numerous ostrich eggshell beads. The shell is identified as the valve of a Corbicula fluminea. Data on the occurrence of this species in the Shuidonggou region during Marine Isotope Stage 3 and taphonomic analysis, conducted in the framework of this study, of a modern biocoenosis and thanatocoenosis suggest that the archeological specimen was collected at one of the numerous fossil or sub-fossil outcrops where valves of this species were available at the time of occupation of level CL3. Experimental grinding and microscopic analysis of modern shells of the same species indicate that the Shuidonggou shell was most probably ground on coarse sandstone to open a hole on its umbo, attach a thread, and use the valve as a personal ornament. Experimental engraving of freshwater shells and microscopic analysis identify an incision crossing the archaeological valve outer surface as possible deliberate engraving. Reappraisal of the site chronology in the light of available radiocarbon evidence suggests an age of at least 34–33 cal kyr BP for layer CL3. Such estimate makes the C. fluminea recovered from CL3 one of the earliest instances of personal ornamentation and the earliest example of a shell bead from China. PMID:27227330

  1. Applications of methacrylate-based monolithic supports for speciation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scancar, Janez; Milacic, Radmila

    2009-08-01

    Liquid chromatography combined with element specific detection is commonly applied in speciation analysis. In these analyses, to obtain reliable data chemical species should not be transformed. To preserve chemical species during the separation step, fast chromatographic procedures and mild separation conditions are required. Monolithic supports that enable rapid chromatographic separations have rarely been used in speciation analysis. Methacrylate-based anion- and cation-exchange monolithic supports offer separation of charged chemical species of elements and can be used as a complementary tool to particle-packed liquid chromatographic columns. The present paper presents an overview of successful applications of methacrylate-based monolithic supports in speciation of zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr), and aluminium (Al) in environmental, occupational health, and biological samples. Measures of analytical performance of convective interaction media (CIM) monolithic chromatographic supports, namely selectivity, sensitivity, and time of analysis, are compared to those of particle-packed columns. The potential of CIM monolithic chromatography in speciation analysis is critically discussed. Direct comparison of the experimental data in speciation of elements by ion-exchange monolithic and fast protein liquid chromatography is reported for the first time. Finally, some recommendations are given for further investigations of the potential of monolithic chromatography and its implementations in different fields of element speciation analysis.

  2. Speciation in birds: genes, geography, and sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott V; Kingan, Sarah B; Calkins, Jennifer D; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Jennings, W Bryan; Swanson, Willie J; Sorenson, Michael D

    2005-05-03

    Molecular studies of speciation in birds over the last three decades have been dominated by a focus on the geography, ecology, and timing of speciation, a tradition traceable to Mayr's Systematics and the Origin of Species. However, in the recent years, interest in the behavioral and molecular mechanisms of speciation in birds has increased, building in part on the older traditions and observations from domesticated species. The result is that many of the same mechanisms proffered for model lineages such as Drosophila--mechanisms such as genetic incompatibilities, reinforcement, and sexual selection--are now being seriously entertained for birds, albeit with much lower resolution. The recent completion of a draft sequence of the chicken genome, and an abundance of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the autosomes and sex chromosomes, will dramatically accelerate research on the molecular mechanisms of avian speciation over the next few years. The challenge for ornithologists is now to inform well studied examples of speciation in nature with increased molecular resolution-to clone speciation genes if they exist--and thereby evaluate the relative roles of extrinsic, intrinsic, deterministic, and stochastic causes for avian diversification.

  3. A rapid Chelex column method for the determination of metal speciation in natural waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, K.C. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia); Apte, S.C. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: simon.apte@csiro.au; Batley, G.E. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia); Hales, L.T. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia); Rogers, N.J. [Centre for Environmental Contaminants Research, CSIRO Energy Technology, Bangor, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2006-02-03

    A simple, rapid Chelex resin column method has been developed for the determination of metal speciation in natural water samples. A water sample (pH 6-8.2) was pumped through a small plug of the Ca-form of Chelex 100 at a flow rate of 48 {+-} 4 mL/min. The flow regime was optimised to give the shortest possible contact time (0.25 s) but at the same time ensured quantitative uptake of inorganic metal standards onto the resin. Labile metal was calculated as the difference between influent and effluent metal concentrations, measured by some form of atomic spectrometry. In tests with six metal-spiked natural freshwater samples (10 {mu}g/L added metal, pH 7.0-8.2), the labile fraction measured ranged from 87 to 98%, 32 to 64%, 12 to 78%, 38 to 91% and 63 to 89% for cadmium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc, respectively. Application of the method to copper-contaminated waters showed that the results provided a conservative estimate of the fraction inhibiting growth of a copper-sensitive bacterium, thus proving to be a useful measure of bioavailability. Tests on a range of model metal complexes showed that the measured labile metal fraction was inversely proportional to log K, and controlled by the kinetics of metal complex dissociation. Iron-containing colloids, present in natural freshwaters were not retained by the column. The method therefore discriminates trace metal species on the basis of both size and kinetics.

  4. Paleoecological insights from fossil freshwater mollusks of the Kanapoi Formation (Omo-Turkana Basin, Kenya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bocxlaer, Bert

    2017-09-13

    The Early Pliocene Kanapoi Formation of the Omo-Turkana Basin consists of two fluvial/deltaic sedimentary sequences with an intermediate lacustrine sequence that was deposited in Paleolake Lonyumun, the earliest large lake in the basin. Overall, the geology and vertebrate paleontology of the Kanapoi Formation are well studied, but its freshwater mollusks, despite being a major component of the benthic ecosystem, have not been subjected to in-depth study. Here I present the first treatment of these mollusks, which have been retrieved mainly from the lacustrine but also from the upper fluvial sediments, with a focus on paleoecological implications. Overall, the freshwater mollusk fauna is reasonably diverse and contains the gastropods Bellamya (Viviparidae), Melanoides (Thiaridae), Cleopatra (Paludomidae) and Gabbiella (Bithyniidae), as well as the unionoid bivalves Coelatura, Pseudobovaria (Unionidae), Aspatharia, Iridina (Iridinidae) and Etheria (Etheriidae). Material is typically recrystallized and lithified and its taphonomy suggests deposition in a system with intermediate energy, such as a beach, with post-depositional deformation and abrasion. The mollusk assemblage is indicative of perennial, fresh and well-oxygenated waters in the Kanapoi region. It suggests that Paleolake Lonyumun had largely open shores with limited vegetation and that swampy or ephemeral backwaters were rare. Overall, these findings support earlier paleoecological interpretations based on the fish assemblage of Paleolake Lonyumun at Kanapoi. Moreover, mollusk assemblages from this lake are very similar across the Omo-Turkana Basin (Nachukui, Usno, Mursi and Koobi Fora Formations) suggesting that the lacustrine paleoecological conditions found in the Kanapoi Formation existed throughout the basin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of multixenobiotic resistance in dreissenid mussels as a screening tool for toxicity in freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ács, A; Imre, K; Kiss, Gy; Csaba, J; Győri, J; Vehovszky, Á; Farkas, A

    2015-05-01

    The multixenobiotic defense mechanism (MXR) in aquatic organisms was recognized as a first-line defense system, and its potential use as an early biomarker of exposure to environmental stress has raised attention in the last two decades. To evaluate the relevance of this biomarker in the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha, we studied its responsiveness within laboratory exposures to contaminants sequestered in freshwater sediments affected by moderate anthropogenic impact. The effectiveness of this biomarker was assessed by comparing the MXR-transporter activities determined in bivalves first with toxicity scores recorded with the D. rerio embryo developmental assay. Both bioassays were applied in the sediment contact test format. As a second evaluation approach, MXR activities determined in exposed mussels were compared with sediment-contamination data integrated into toxic units on the basis of acute toxicity to Daphnia magna. In D. polymorpha subjected to acute exposure with moderately polluted sediments, we detected limited (22-33 %) but statistically significant induction of MXR activity. Mean MXR activities significantly correlated with TU values computed for test sediments. MXR activities in mussels showed strong positive correlation with the metal load of sediments and proved to be unrelated to the contamination with polycyclic aromatic compounds. MXR activity in laboratory-exposed mussels showed low variability within treatments and thus reliably reflected even low contaminant differences between the negative reference and moderately polluted harbor sediments. The strong correlation found in this study between the MXR-transporter activity in exposed mussels and environmentally realistic sediment contamination underscores the fairly good sensitivity of this biomarker in laboratory testing conditions to signal the bioavailability of sediment bound contaminants, and it may also anticipate even the incidence of toxicity to biota.

  6. Exotic freshwater planarians currently known from Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluys, R.; Kawakatsu, M.; Yamamoto, K.

    2010-01-01

    Biogeographical and taxonomic information on the four non-indigenous freshwater planarians of Japan is reviewed, viz. Dugesia austroasiatica Kawakatsu, 1985, Girardia tigrina (Girard, 1850), G. dorotocephala (Woodworth, 1897), and Rhodax evelinae? Marcus, 1947. The occurrence of Girardia

  7. Progress and challenges in freshwater conservation planning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nel, JL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available . Challenges relating to both improvement of scientific rigour and implementation of freshwater conservation plans are identified. High demand for water from multiple stakeholders requires planning for implementation from the outset. Three guidelines...

  8. Persistent organochlorine pesticide residues in freshwater systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , heptachlor and endosulfan were determined in water and sediment samples of freshwater systems in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa that receive runoff from agricultural lands and effluents from industries. The organochlorine ...

  9. Freshwater Clam Extract Ameliorates Triglyceride and Cholesterol Metabolism through the Expression of Genes Involved in Hepatic Lipogenesis and Cholesterol Degradation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater clam (Corbicula spp. is a popular edible bivalve and has been used as a folk remedy for liver disease in Asia. As a Chinese traditional medicine, it is said that freshwater clam ameliorates alcoholic intoxication and cholestasis. In this study, to estimate the practical benefit of freshwater clam extract (FCE, we compared the effects of FCE and soy protein isolate (SPI on triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism in rats. FCE and SPI lowered serum cholesterol, and FCE tended to reduce serum triglycerides. FCE enhanced fecal sterol excretion and hepatic mRNA levels of CYP7A1 and ABCG5 more substantially than SPI; however, both diets reduced hepatic cholesterol. Both of the diets similarly suppressed liver lipids improved Δ9-desaturated fatty acid profile, and FCE was associated with a reduction in FAS and SCD1 mRNA levels. Hepatic transcriptome analysis revealed that inhibition of lipogenesis-related gene expression may contribute to downregulation of hepatic triglycerides by FCE. FCE would have better potential benefits for preventing metabolic disorders, through greater improvement of metabolism of triglycerides and cholesterol, likely through a mechanism similar to SPI.

  10. Freshwater Commercial Bycatch: an Understated Conservation Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raby, Graham D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch in marine systems has been regarded as a global conservation concern by environmental groups, scientists, government, and the public for decades. Fortunately, some headway has been made to mitigate the negative impacts of bycatch in marine environments. In a survey of the literature, we found that despite freshwater commercial fisheries yields comprising 11% of the global commercial catch, bycatch research focusing on freshwater commercial fisheries represented only {approx}3% of the total bycatch literature. This paucity of research is particularly alarming given that freshwater animals and habitats are some of the world's most imperiled. The limited inland bycatch literature that does exist includes examples of population declines attributed to commercial bycatch (e.g., freshwater dolphins in the Yangtze River in China) and illustrates that in some systems bycatch can be substantial (e.g., lake trout bycatch in the Laurentian Great Lakes). Encouraging results from the marine realm can serve as models for bycatch research in freshwater, and lead to measurable gains in conservation of freshwater ecosystems. We summarize existing work on inland bycatch in an effort to draw attention to this understated and understudied conservation problem.

  11. Growth and production of Pisidium amnicum in the freshwater tidal area of the River Minho estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ronaldo; Nogueira, António J. A.; Antunes, Carlos; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2008-09-01

    Pisidium amnicum is an important indigenous species in the freshwater tidal portion of the River Minho estuary and until the introduction of the non-indigenous invasive species Corbicula fluminea was the most abundant bivalve in this ecosystem. Between January 2005 and August 2006 monthly samples were collected in three sites to study the abundance, biomass, growth and production of P. amnicum. Results indicate that P. amnicum has continuous growth throughout its life span and growth rates were higher during the early phases of development, coincident with the spring and summer months. Life span estimated was 24 months. The annual 2005 growth production of P. amnicum estimated was 2.339 g AFDW m -2 year -1, and the mean annual biomass was 1.594 g AFDW m -2, resulting in a P/B¯ ratio of 1.47 year -1 and a turnover time of 248.7 days. The annual 2005 elimination production estimated was 7.541 g AFDW m -2 year -1, resulting in an E/B¯ ratio of 4.73 year -1. It is concluded that P. amnicum continues to play an important role in the food web in areas where it coexists with C. fluminea. Previous studies showed declines in the indigenous population after the introduction of C. fluminea and currently, areas of high abundance are restricted to small patches in the upper limit of the tidal influence. Consequently, P. amnicum is now under considerable pressure and this situation requires ecological and conservational attention.

  12. Molecular markers for genetic diversity, gene flow and genetic population structure of freshwater mussel species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AB Choupina

    Full Text Available Freshwater mussel species are in global decline. Anthropogenic changes of river channels and the decrease of autochthonous fish population, the natural hosts of mussels larval stages (glochidia, are the main causes. Therefore, the conservation of mussel species depends not only on habitat conservation, but also on the availability of the fish host. In Portugal, information concerning most of the mussel species is remarkably scarce. One of the most known species, Unio pictorum is also in decline however, in the basins of the rivers Tua and Sabor (Northeast of Portugal, there is some indication of relatively large populations. The aforementioned rivers can be extremely important for this species conservation not only in Portugal, but also in the remaining Iberian Peninsula. Thus, it is important to obtain data concerning Unio pictorum bioecology (distribution, habitat requirements, population structure, genetic variability, reproductive cycle and recruitment rates, as well as the genetic variability and structure of the population. Concomitantly, information concerning fish population structure, the importance of the different fish species as “glochidia” hosts and their appropriate density to allow effective mussel recruitment, will also be assessed. The achieved data is crucial to obtain information to develop effective management measures in order to promote the conservation of this bivalve species, the conservation of autochthonous fish populations, and consequently the integrity of the river habitats.

  13. The Freshwater Mussel (Elliptio complanata) as a Sentinel Species: Vitellogenin and Steroid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Seung-Jae; Novillo, Apolonia; Custodia, Noemi; Rie, Melanie T; Fitzgerald, Kelly; Osada, Makoto; Callard, Ian P

    2005-01-01

    Freshwater mussels, Elliptio complanata were collected from a reference and pollutant-impacted pond on Cape Cod, MA. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity was measured in gill, hepatopancreas and foot. In addition, content of seven heavy metals were measured in whole bodies. GST activity was significantly elevated in hepatopancreas and foot, as was whole body cadmium level in animals from the contaminated site suggesting that these animals have been exposed to organic and inorganic contaminants. Sodium dodecyl acrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed putative vitellogenins with molecular weight 180 and 205 kDa bands only in the ovary. In non-denatured gel electrophoresis ovarian extracts revealed two higher molecular weight bands at 550 and 700 kDa, which were reproductive stage specific. Western blotting of SDS-PAGE and non-denatured gels using the anti-scallop yolk-protein antibody confirmed the presence of cross-reacting bands of the same molecular weights in the ovary but not other tissues. Although several experiments involving steroid hormone exposure were done, no significant changes in vitellogenin protein levels were observed. However, using an anti-human ERβ antibody, ERβ positive bands were observed both in female foot, and the ovary. No cross reactivity with the antibody was observed in hepatopancreas. Additional studies are required to resolve questions of vitellogenin regulation and the role of (xeno)estrogens in bivalve molluscs.

  14. Comparative toxicity of metals to freshwater life in tropical Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markich, S.J. [ANSTO, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia). Environmental Science Program; Camilleri, C. [ERISS, Jabiru (Australia); Baird, D.J. [Univ. of Stirling (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    At present, there is a paucity of internally consistent datasets on the toxicity of metals (and other contaminants) in the tropics, relative to the cool and warm temperate regions of the world. Such information is considered mandatory before a proper comparison of the toxicity of metals to aquatic life between tropical and temperate regions is possible. As part of a larger study to investigate whether the toxicity of metals to aquatic life differs between the tropical and temperate regions of Australia, several species of tropical freshwater organisms, comprising a molluscs, fish, hydra, Daphnia and an alga were employed to obtain an internally consistent data set on the comparative toxicity of selected metals, such as U and Cu, that are of potential concern in the wet-dry tropics of Australia as a result of man`s activities. Both acute and chronic ecologically relevant sublethal endpoints, such as growth and reproduction (EC{sub 50}, BEC{sub 10}) were measured for the five species, which cover a variety of trophic levels. A synthetic water quality that closely resembled the inorganic composition of the natural waters in which the organisms inhabit, was used in all experiments. This facilitated the use of the geochemical modelling code, HARPHRQ, to predict the speciation, and hence, bioavailability of the selected metals. A knowledge of the bioavailable fraction of a metal is necessary for setting up national water quality guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. The results from this study are discussed and related to the derivation of both site-specific and national water quality-guidelines for metals.

  15. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN FRESHWATER MICROCOSMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, John T.

    1978-01-01

    Two cylindrical freshwater microcosms with a volume of 700 {ell} were maintained under controlled laboratory conditions for 190 days. The two microcosms were identical with regard to initial chemical composition and biological inocula, with the exceptions that in one microcosm (designated Tank 2) mosquitofish (Gambusia) and herbivorous catfish (Placostomas) were added. Three distinct communities developed in the tanks: (1) a phytoplankton-zooplankton assemblage and (2) two periphyton-zoobenthos communities associated with the sides and bottom of the tank, respectively. Community development and successional patterns were similar in both tanks. Major differences between the tanks involved timing of succession of the zooplankton and zoobenthos, attributable to predation by fish, principally Gambusia. A major drawback for these microcosms as use for experimental analogs such as lakes was a luxuriant periphyton growth which eventually overwhelmed the biomass of the system. The tanks displayed a degree of successional replicability, a large number of species, and a diversity of community development. Microcosms of this size could find use as experimental systems for higher level trophic manipulation and observation of life cycles not amenable to field studies.

  16. Variation of the physiological energetics of the bivalve Spisula subtruncata (da Costa, 1778) within an annual cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueda, J.L.; Smaal, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Spisula subtruncata is an infaunal filter-feeding bivalve, which lives in shallow sandy bottoms (2¿20 m depth) from Norway to the Atlantic coasts of Morocco, including the Mediterranean Sea. Considering that fisheries of this species have become an important economic resource in some European

  17. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds in macroalgaes, bivalves, and fish from coastal areas in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez-Muñoz, D.; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S.; Maulvault, A.L.; Tediosi, A.; Fernández-Tejedor, M.; Heuvel, Van den F.; Kotterman, M.; Marques, A.; Barceló, D.

    2015-01-01

    The ocurrence and levels of PhACs, Endocrine Disrupting and related Compounds (EDCs) in seafood from potential contaminated areas in Europe has been studied. Macroalgae (S. accharina latissima and Laminaria digitata), bivalves (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Mytilus spp., Chamalea gallina and

  18. Spatial intertidal distribution of bivalves and polychaetes in relation to environmental conditions in the Natori River estuary, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Takeshi; Komizunai, Nobuhiro; Shirase, Tatsuya; Ito, Kinuko; Omori, Michio

    2008-11-01

    This paper aims to reveal spatial variation in the abundance of infaunal bivalves and polychaetes at different spatial scales (station: 200-800 m intervals; plot: 5-20 m), and to reveal environmental variables affecting the spatial distribution of animals in the Natori River estuary, Japan. We found six bivalve species and eight polychaete species from 52 plots at 12 stations. Nuttallia olivacea and Heteromastus sp. were found to be the most abundant species of bivalves and polychaetes, respectively. Assemblage patterns of bivalves and polychaetes were classified into five distinct groups. Substrata (silt-clay contents), salinity, and relative elevation were the variables found to affect the infaunal assemblage patterns. Chlorophyll a was not a significant variable, but benthic animals were absent at sites with extremely low chlorophyll a conditions. Macrobenthic assemblage patterns were different not only between stations but often differed between plots at the same station, reflecting the complex assemblage structure of benthic invertebrates. Detailing such animal-environment relationship is essential in understanding the potential food supply for estuarine fishes.

  19. Uniform Variation in Genetic-Traits of a Marine Bivalve Related to Starvation, Pollution and Geographic Clines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, H.; Bogaards, R.H.; Amiard-Triquet, C.; Bachelet, G.; Desprez, M.; Marchand, J.; Rybarczyk, H.; Sylvand, B.; De Wit, Y.; De Wolf, L.

    1995-01-01

    Consistent patterns of genetic variation in the marine bivalve Macoma balthica (L.) were found after exposure to low levels of copper, starvation, and along geographic dines. The geographic dines were related to temperature and salinity. Genetic differences were primarily found in the LAP (Leucine

  20. Disjunct distribution of highly diverged mitochondrial lineage clade and population subdivision in a marine bivalve with pelagic larval dispersal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Drent, J; Baker, AJ

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence data for 295 individuals of the marine bivalve Macoma balthica (L.) were collected from 10 sites across the European distribution, and from Alaska. The data were used to infer population subdivision history and estimate current levels of gene flow. Inferred historical

  1. ESTIMATING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HARVESTED ESTUARINE BIVALVES WITH HABITAT SUITABILITY MODELS AND UNDERSTANDING THE IMPLICATIONS UNDER A CHANGING CLIMATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habitat suitability models are useful to forecast how environmental change may affect the abundance or distribution of species of interest. In the case of harvested bivalves, those models may be used to estimate the vulnerability of this valued ecosystem good to stressors. Usin...

  2. The vertical distribution and abundance of gastropods and bivalves from rocky beaches of Cuastecomate Bay, Jalisco, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esqueda, M C; Ríos-Jara, E; Michel-Morfín, J E; Landa-Jaime, V

    2000-12-01

    The vertical distribution and abundance of conspicuous gastropod and bivalve species were studied at five rocky beaches in Cuastecomate Bay, Jalisco. Sampling was done from September, 1993 through March, 1994 with 0.75 m2 quadrants placed along replicate transect lines (10 m long) in the supralittoral and mesolittoral (upper, middle and lower intertidal) zones. A total of 6,643 mollusks were collected. Gastropods dominated the samples (6,272 individuals, 44 species); the bivalves were less abundant and diverse (371 individuals, five species). Seventeen species comprised 89.8% of all individuals collected. The gastropods Nodilittorina aspera and Nerita scabricosta were the most abundant with 637.8 and 71.43 individuals/m2, respectively. The most abundant bivalves were Brachidontes adamsianus and Chloromytilus palliopunctatus with 60.7 and 61.3 individuals/m2 respectively. The abundance of gastropods decreased from the supralittoral to the lower tidal zones while the number of species increased in the same direction. The number of species of bivalves also increased from the supralittoral to the lower intertidal zone; the abundance of individuals was higher at the middle intertidal zone. Affinities between groups of species among sampling stations were identified by computing Pearson's correlation coefficient using abundance values (ind./m2) and Jaccard's dissimilarity index using species presence or absence in the lower intertidal zone. Affinity among stations was not dependent upon their vicinity but on the high dominance of few species, the occurrence of many secondary species and beach characteristics.

  3. Assessment of Heavy Metals in Bivalves Molluscs of Apulian Region: a 3-years control activity of a EU Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miedico O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve molluscs represent an important matrix to be studied for several reasons. Their nutritional properties make them valuable to the consumers, so that their consumption and commercial value has risen worldwide. Simultaneously, their significant water-filtering capability and their persistence in the same place make them good bio-indicators of marine ecosystems. The presence of the heavy metal contaminants, as Cd, Pb and Hg, was investigated in bivalve molluscs such as mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, clams (Venus gallina and oysters (Ostrea edulis. In the present study, a survey was carried out on 334 samples addressed to the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale – Puglia e Basilicata, Foggia (ITALY between 2009-2011, and collected by official authorities along the coasts of Apulia Region. The conformity of heavy metal content in bivalve molluscs was verified, in according to EC Reg. 1881/2006. The compliance was found for the total amount of samples. The obtained data on heavy metals concentration in bivalve molluscs were compared with data found in monitoring studies on the incidence of heavy metals in 1981 in North-Western Mediterranean Sea, in 2003 in Tyrrhenian Sea and in 2010 in Pacific Ocean (Chile, reported in literature. The information obtained from this work offer an essential database, not only for the authorities involved in food control, but also for the official institutions responsible of a constant control of the marine ecosystem pollution.

  4. [Detection of norovirus RNA in bivalve molluscs by using bacteria-culture-employed method (A3T method)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Nagano, Miyuki; Mori, Kohji; Hayashi, Yukinao; Obata, Hiromi; Chiba, Takashi; Ikuta, Yasuhisa; Kamiya, Yoriko; Nakama, Akiko; Hosaka, Mitsugu; Kai, Akemi

    2010-01-01

    Norovirus (NV) RNA has rarely been detected in foods despite the use of highly sensitive methods such as RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR. In the modified method (A3T method) reported previously, a bacterial culture process was introduced into the standard protocol for NV detection to remove some inhibitor(s) present in food ingredients. To confirm the efficiency of the A3T method and to examine NV contamination in bivalve molluscs, we tried to detect NV RNA in bivalve molluscs on the market and in oyster samples associated with foodborne outbreaks by using the standard method and the A3T method. NV RNAs were detected in 20 samples (18.0%) of 111 bivalve molluscs, including oysters, on the market by use of the A3T method, while only one sample (0.9%) was positive according to the standard method. NV RNA was also detected in 10 of 35 oyster samples related to foodborne outbreaks by the A3T method. Those results show that the A3T method is suitable for the detection of NV in bivalve molluscs in general laboratories.

  5. Meeting ecological and societal needs for freshwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jill S.; Poff, N.L.; Angermeier, P.L.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gleick, P.H.; Hairston, N.G.; Jackson, R.B.; Johnston, C.A.; Richter, B.D.; Steinman, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    Human society has used freshwater from rivers, lakes, groundwater, and wetlands for many different urban, agricultural, and industrial activities, but in doing so has overlooked its value in supporting ecosystems. Freshwater is vital to human life and societal well-being, and thus its utilization for consumption, irrigation, and transport has long taken precedence over other commodities and services provided by freshwater ecosystems. However, there is growing recognition that functionally intact and biologically complex aquatic ecosystems provide many economically valuable services and long-term benefits to society. The short-term benefits include ecosystem goods and services, such as food supply, flood control, purification of human and industrial wastes, and habitat for plant and animal life—and these are costly, if not impossible, to replace. Long-term benefits include the sustained provision of those goods and services, as well as the adaptive capacity of aquatic ecosystems to respond to future environmental alterations, such as climate change. Thus, maintenance of the processes and properties that support freshwater ecosystem integrity should be included in debates over sustainable water resource allocation.The purpose of this report is to explain how the integrity of freshwater ecosystems depends upon adequate quantity, quality, timing, and temporal variability of water flow. Defining these requirements in a comprehensive but general manner provides a better foundation for their inclusion in current and future debates about allocation of water resources. In this way the needs of freshwater ecosystems can be legitimately recognized and addressed. We also recommend ways in which freshwater ecosystems can be protected, maintained, and restored.Freshwater ecosystem structure and function are tightly linked to the watershed or catchment of which they are a part. Because riverine networks, lakes, wetlands, and their connecting groundwaters, are literally the

  6. Contrasting behavioral and feeding strategies recorded by tidal-flat bivalve trace fossils from the Upper Carboniferous of eastern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, M.G.; Buatois, L.A.; West, R.R.; Maples, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    Upper Carboniferous tidal-flat deposits near Waverly, eastern Kansas (Stull Shale Member, Kanwaka Shale Formation), host abundant and very well-preserved trace fossils attributed to the activity of burrowing bivalves. Thin shell lenses with an abundant bivalve fauna area associated with the ichnofossil-bearing beds and afford an unusual opportunity to relate trace fossils to their makers. Two distinctive life and feeding strategies can be reconstructed on the basis of trace fossil analysis and functional morphology. Lockeria siliquaria hyporeliefs commonly are connected with vertical to inclined, truncated endichnial shafts in the absence of horizontal locomotion traces. These structures record vertical and oblique displacement through the sediment, and suggest relatively stable domiciles rather than temporary resting traces as typically considered. Crowded bedding surfaces displaying cross-cutting relationships between specimens of L. siliquaria and differential preservation at the top (concave versus convex epireliefs) record a complex history of successive events of colonization, erosion, deposition, and recolonization (time-averaged assemblages). Irregujlar contours of some large hypichnia indicate the cast of the foot, while other outlines closely match the anterior area of Wilkingia, its suggested tracemaker. Relatively stable, vertical to inclined life positions and dominanit vertical mobility suggest a filter-feeding strategy. Moreover, the elongate shell and pallial sinus of Wilkingia providfe a strong independent line of evidence for an opisthosiphonate, moderately deep-tier inhabitant. Wilingia may represent a pioneer attempt at siphon-feeding in the late Paleozoic, preceding the outcome of the Mesozoic infaunal radiation. A second strategy is represented by Lockeia ornata and association locomotionm and locomotion/feding structures. Lockeia ornata is commonly connected with chevron locomotion traces that record the bifurcated foot of a protobranch

  7. Molecular activation analysis for chemical speciation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai-Chifang

    1998-01-01

    The term of Molecular Activation Analysis (MAA) refers to an activation analysis method that is able to provide information about the chemical species of elements in system of interests, though its definition has remained to be assigned. Its development is strongly stimulated by the urgent need to know the chemical species of elements, because the total concentrations are often without any meaning when assessing health or environmental risks of trace elements.In practice, the MAA is a combination of conventional instrumental or radiochemical activation analysis and physical, chemical or biochemical separation techniques. The MAA is able to play a particular role in speciation studies. However, the critical point in the MAA is that it is not permitted to change the primitive chemical species of elements in systems, or the change has to be under control; in the meantime it is not allowed to form the 'new artifact' originally not present in systems. Some practical examples of MAA for chemical species research performed recently in our laboratory will be presented as follows: Chemical species of platinum group elements in sediment; Chemical species of iodine in marine algae; Chemical species of mercury in human tissues; Chemical species of selenium in corn; Chemical species of rare earth elements in natural plant, etc. The merits and limitations of MAA will be described as well. (author)

  8. Endemic Lake Baikal sponges from deep water. 1: Potential cryptic speciation and discovery of living species known only from fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itskovich, Valeria B; Kaluzhnaya, Oxana V; Veynberg, Elena; Erpenbeck, Dirk

    2015-07-23

    We revealed new deep-water species and cryptic speciation within freshwater sponges of the endemic family Lubomirskiidae (Porifera; Demospongiae; Spongillina) based on molecular and spicule morphology analyses of ITS and CO1 mtDNA. Lubomirskiidae contains a group of closely related species which are a dominant component of the benthos in Lake Baikal, the world's deepest and most ancient lake. Spicule morphology was similar between two Recent samples and species only known previously from fossils in Late Pliocene (3.2-2.8 mya) sediments. Despite the morphological similarity with the cosmopolitan family Spongillidae, molecular analysis of ITS sequences has reliably assigned these species to Lubomirskiidae. This not only indicates that species identification of freshwater fossil sponge spicules should be made with caution, but also suggests that the structure of megascleres may not be a reliable character for interpretations of paleoclimatic reconstructions for the Baikal region. Our results do not support the current classification of Lubomirskiidae into its morphologically defined genera and species, suggesting a strong discrepancy between molecular and morphological variation in Baikalian sponges. This present contribution is the first part of a study on the phylogenetic relationships of the Lake Baikal deep water sponge fauna.

  9. Speciation of triphenyltin compounds using Moessbauer spectroscopy. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, G.

    1993-11-01

    Organotin compounds have been used widely as the active agent in antifouling marine paints. Organotin compounds, i.e., tributyltin compounds (TBTs) and triphenyltin compounds (TPTs) have been found to be effective in preventing the unwanted attachment and development of aquatic organisms such as barnacles, sea grass and hydroids on ships, hulls and underwater surfaces. However, these organotin compounds have been found to be toxic to non-targeted marine species as well. While speciation of tributyltins in environmental water systems has received much attention in the literature, little information concerning the speciation of triphenyltins is found. Therefore, it would be important to study the fate of TPTs in the aquatic environment, particularly in sediments, both oxic and anoxic, in order to obtain speciation data. Since marine estuaries consist of areas with varying salinity and pH, it is important to investigate the speciation of these compounds under varying salinity conditions. In addition, evaluation of the speciation of these compounds as a function of pH would give an insight into how these compounds might interact with sediments in waters where industrial chemical run-offs can affect the pH of the estuarine environment. Finally, since organotins are present in both salt and fresh water environments, the speciation of the organotins in seawater and distilled water should also be studied. Moessbauer spectroscopy would provide a preferred method to study the speciation of triphenyltins as they leach from marine paints into the aquatic environment. Compounds used in this study are those triphenyltin compounds that are commonly incorporated into marine paints such as triphenyltin fluoride (TPTF), triphenyltin acetate (TPTOAc), triphenyltin chloride (TPTCl) and triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTOH).

  10. Guidelines for terms related to chemical speciations and fractionation of elements : definitions, structural aspects, and methodological approaches (IUPAC Recommendations 2000)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Templeton, D.M.; Ariese, F.; Cornelis, R.; Danielsson, L.G.; Muntau, H.; Leeuwen, van H.P.; Lobínski, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents definitions of concepts related to speciation of elements, more particularly speciation analysis and chemical species. Fractionation is distinguished from speciation analysis, and a general outline of fractionation procedures is given. We propose a categorization of species

  11. Differential protein expression in two bivalve species; Mytilus galloprovincialis and Corbicula fluminea; exposed to Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto, Maria; Campos, Alexandre; Prieto, Ana; Cameán, Ana; de Almeida, André Martinho; Coelho, Ana Varela; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2011-01-17

    The cyanobacteria Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is considered a threat to aquatic organisms due to the production of the toxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN). Despite the numerous reports evidencing the toxic effects of C. raciborskii cells and CYN in different species, not much is known regarding the toxicity mechanisms associated with this toxin and the cyanobacteria. In this work, a proteomics approach based in the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was used to study the effects of the exposure of two bivalve species, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Corbicula fluminea, to CYN producing (CYN+) and non-producing (CYN-) C. raciborskii cells. Additionally the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined. Alterations in actin and tubulin isoforms were detected in gills of both bivalve species and digestive gland of M. galloprovincialis when exposed to CYN- and CYN+ cells. Moreover, GST and GPx activities changed in gills and digestive tract of bivalves exposed to both C. raciborskii freeze dried cells, in comparison to control animals exposed to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris. These results suggest the induction of physiological stress and tissue injury in bivalves by C. raciborskii. This condition is supported by the changes observed in GPx and GST activities which indicate alterations in the oxidative stress defense mechanisms. The results also evidence the capacity of CYN non-producing C. raciborskii to induce biochemical responses and therefore its toxicity potential to bivalves. The heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), extrapallial (EP) fluid protein and triosephosphate isomerase homologous proteins from gills of M. galloprovincialis were down-regulated specifically with the presence of CYN+ C. raciborskii cells. The presence of CYN may lead to additional toxic effects in M. galloprovincialis. This work demonstrates that proteomics is a powerful approach to characterize the biochemical effects of C

  12. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhou

    Full Text Available Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1 • d(-1, respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P < 0.001. Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P < 0.05. It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  13. The marbled crayfish as a paradigm for saltational speciation by autopolyploidy and parthenogenesis in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Vogt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The parthenogenetic all-female marbled crayfish is a novel research model and potent invader of freshwater ecosystems. It is a triploid descendant of the sexually reproducing slough crayfish, Procambarus fallax, but its taxonomic status has remained unsettled. By cross-breeding experiments and parentage analysis we show here that marbled crayfish and P. fallax are reproductively separated. Both crayfish copulate readily, suggesting that the reproductive barrier is set at the cytogenetic rather than the behavioural level. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes of marbled crayfish from laboratory lineages and wild populations demonstrates genetic identity and indicates a single origin. Flow cytometric comparison of DNA contents of haemocytes and analysis of nuclear microsatellite loci confirm triploidy and suggest autopolyploidisation as its cause. Global DNA methylation is significantly reduced in marbled crayfish implying the involvement of molecular epigenetic mechanisms in its origination. Morphologically, both crayfish are very similar but growth and fecundity are considerably larger in marbled crayfish, making it a different animal with superior fitness. These data and the high probability of a divergent future evolution of the marbled crayfish and P. fallax clusters suggest that marbled crayfish should be considered as an independent asexual species. Our findings also establish the P. fallax–marbled crayfish pair as a novel paradigm for rare chromosomal speciation by autopolyploidy and parthenogenesis in animals and for saltational evolution in general.

  14. A simple allometric diffusion-based biokinetic model to predict Cu(II) uptake across gills of freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W-Y; Lin, C-M; Ju, Y-R; Liao, C-M

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to link Fick's type mass transfer and biokinetics together with Michaelis-Menten kinetics to arrive at a simple predictive framework for quantifying biouptake mechanisms in gills of freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea exposed to Cu(II). A diffusion-based Cu(II) influx and permeability can be calculated using physiological and allometric-related parameters. Simulations indicate that Cu(II) bioconcentration factor of gills was 42. Estimated steady-state Cu(II) gill uptake influx and permeability were 0.097 nmol cm(-2) s(-1) and 0.48 cm s(-1), respectively. The proposed simple allometric diffusion-based biokinetic model meets the need for describing nonequilibrium aspects of biouptake mechanisms in bivalve gills.

  15. Modulation of metallothionein, pi-GST and Se-GPx mRNA expression in the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha transplanted into polluted areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Périne Doyen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferases (GST, glutathione peroxidases (GPx and metallothioneins (MT are essential components of cellular detoxication systems. We studied the expression of pi-GST, Se-GPx, and MT transcripts in the digestive gland of Dreissena polymorpha exposed to organic and metallic pollutants. Mussels from a control site were transplanted during 3, 15 and 30 days into the Moselle River, upstream and downstream to the confluence with the Fensch River, a tributary highly polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals. Se-GPx and pi-GST mRNA expression increased in mussels transplanted into the upstream site, Se-GPx response being the earliest. These genes were also induced after 3-days exposure at the downstream site. These inductions suggest an adaptative response to an alteration of the environment. Moreover, at this site, a significant decrease of the expression of MT, pi-GST and Se-GPx transcripts was observed after 30 days which could correspond to an inefficiency of detoxification mecanisms. The results are in correlation with the levels of pollutants in the sediments and their bioaccumulation in mussels, they confirm the environmental deleterious impact of the pollutants carried by the Fensch River.

  16. Chemical speciation analysis and environmental behaviour of 127I and 129I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Violeta

    2011-10-15

    Chemical speciation analysis of 129I and 127I as iodide, iodate and total inorganic iodine in seawater samples from the Baltic Proper, Skagerrak and Kattegat has been carried out. The important findings of this study are that the reduction of iodate and oxidation of iodide in Skagerrak and Kattegat may be a slow process while along the Baltic Sea surface water reduction of iodate is a relatively fast process. Although suboxic or anoxic condition are encountered in some of the Baltic Sea deep basins, the concentration of 129IO{sub 3}- increases with water depth indicating that the reduction of iodate in the oxygen deficient bottom water of the Baltic Sea is a slow process. Iodine chemical speciation analysis (as iodide, iodate and total iodine including inorganic and organic iodine species) in lake water samples collected from Denmark and southern Sweden has been carried out. Destruction of organic iodine was performed by alkaline oxidation using NaOH - NaClO at 100 deg. C and anion exchange chromatography was used for separation of iodide and iodate. Iodine-129 concentrations in the lakes ranged from 1.3 - 12.8 x109 at/L and show elevated concentrations in lakes located in southwest Jutland (Denmark), near the North Sea. Except the Skaersoe Lake, were the organic iodine - 127 accounts for 50% of the total iodine, iodide (both 129I and 127I) is the predominant species form in surface water of the studied lakes. An investigation was conducted in order to quantify the total aquatic iodine (129I and 127I as inorganic and organic iodine) from fresh water and seawater samples by adsorption onto activated charcoal and DEAE 32 cellulose followed by alkaline digestion or combustion. The results show that iodide from freshwater samples can easily be adsorbed onto activated charcoal. The sorption was not affected by the pH. The absorption capacity of iodate is low and reduces quickly when its concentration increases. Compared with activated charcoal, DEAE 32 cellulose showed

  17. Chemical composition of two mineralogically contrasting Arctic bivalves' shells and their relationships to environmental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglikowska, A; Bełdowski, J; Chełchowski, M; Chierici, M; Kędra, M; Przytarska, J; Sowa, A; Kukliński, P

    2017-01-30

    The main goal of this study was to determine the concentrations of trace elements in the mineralogically contrasting shells of two Arctic bivalves: Chlamys islandica and Ciliatocardium ciliatum. Aragonite shells seem to be more susceptible to the binding of metal ions, which is most likely a result of their crystal lattice structure. We suggest that less biologically controlled aragonite mineralization tends to incorporate more metal impurities into the crystal lattice in waters with a lower pH, where metal ions are more available. Higher concentrations of impurities may further increase the lattice distortion causing lower crystal lattice stability and higher susceptibility to dissolution. Calcitic shells seem to be less prone to bind metal ions than aragonite shells most likely because under strict biological control, the uptake of ions from ambient seawater is more selective; thus, the final crystal lattice is less contaminated by other metals and is more resistant to dissolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Uptake and metabolism of 14C-chloropyrifos by marine bivalves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, C.G.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Shi, J.; Carvalho, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    The uptake and metabolism of 14 C-chlorpyrifos by two marine bivalves, Paphia undulata and Sinonovacula constricta, were studied in a simulated ecosystem. The experiments were carried out in two 30 L glass tanks containing each 20 L of filtered sea water, contaminated with 14 C-chlorpyrifos 1.85x10 4 Bq.L -1 (16.7 μg.L -1 ) at the beginning of the exposure period. At different time intervals, three specimens of each species were sampled for analysis of the pesticide in the molluscs tissues. The 14 C-chlorpyrifos residues were extracted from the digestive gland of the molluscs and analyzed by co-chromatography with pesticide standards by TLC methods described before

  19. Broken Chains: The Effect of Ocean Acidification on Bivalve and Echinoid Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, K.

    2016-12-01

    Global warming is one of the most urgent issues facing the interconnected systems of our planet. One important impact of global warming is ocean acidification, which is a change in the pH of the oceans due to increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This can harm ocean life in many ways, including the disintegration of reef structures and the weakening of many types of sea animals' shells. The purpose of this project is to assess the efficacy of a novel method of raising the pH of increasingly acidic ocean waters. The experiment was set up with water of varying pH levels. There were three different experiment groups, including current ocean water (pH 8.1), increased acidity ocean water (pH 7.5), and an increased acidity ocean water with an activated carbon filter (pH 7.5). Six bivalve shells were placed in each solution . Mass loss data was taken from bivalve shells every three days over the course of thirty days (for a total of ten measurements). I hypothesized that the carbon filter would improve the pH of the ocean water (by raising the pH from 7.5) to that of normal ocean water (pH 8.1). The data showed that while the acidic ocean water shell's weight decreased (by 13%), the acidic water with the filter and current ocean water decreased by 0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. Overall, the activated carbon filter decreased the amount of weight change from the acidic water. The data is applicable to helping solve ocean acidification - activated charcoal greatly improved the effects of very acidic ocean water, which could be used in the future to help offset the impact of ocean acidification on its creatures.

  20. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, J.; Haynert, K.; Wegner, K. M.; Melzner, F.

    2015-07-01

    Bivalve calcification, particularly of the early larval stages, is highly sensitive to the change in ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32-] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the exact carbonate system component by which growth and calcification are affected it is necessary to utilize more complex carbonate chemistry manipulations. As single factors, pCO2 had no effects and [HCO3-] and pH had only limited effects on shell growth, while lowered [CO32-] strongly impacted calcification. Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) limiting conditions led to strong reductions in calcification, despite high [CO32-], indicating that [HCO3-] rather than [CO32-] is the inorganic carbon source utilized for calcification by mytilid mussels. However, as the ratio [HCO3-] / [H+] is linearly correlated with [CO32-] it is not possible to differentiate between these under natural seawater conditions. An equivalent of about 80 μmol kg-1 [CO32-] is required to saturate inorganic carbon supply for calcification in bivalves. Below this threshold biomineralization rates rapidly decline. A comparison of literature data available for larvae and juvenile mussels and oysters originating from habitats differing substantially with respect to prevailing carbonate chemistry conditions revealed similar response curves. This suggests that the mechanisms which determine sensitivity of calcification in this group are highly conserved. The higher sensitivity of larval calcification seems to primarily result from the much higher relative calcification rates in early life stages. In order to reveal and understand the mechanisms that limit or facilitate adaptation to future ocean acidification, it is necessary to better

  1. Occurrence and Trend of Hepatitis A Virus in Bivalve Molluscs Production Areas Following a Contamination Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffredini, Elisabetta; Proroga, Yolande Thérèse Rose; Di Pasquale, Simona; Di Maro, Orlandina; Losardo, Maria; Cozzi, Loredana; Capuano, Federico; De Medici, Dario

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the trend of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in a coastal zone impacted by a contamination event, providing data for the development of management strategies. A total of 352 samples, including four bivalve mollusc species (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Solen vagina, Venus gallina and Donax trunculus), were taken over a period of 6 months from 27 production areas of the coast and analysis were performed according to ISO/TS 15216-1:2013. HAV presence was detected in 77 samples from 11 production areas and all positive results were related to samples collected in the first 3 months of the surveillance, during which HAV prevalence was 39.9% and values as high as 5096 genome copies/g were detected. A progressive reduction of viral contamination was evident during the first trimester of the monitoring, with prevalence decreasing from 78.8% in the first month, to 37.8% in the second and 3.9% in the third and quantitative levels reduced from an average value of 672 genome copies/g to 255 genome copies/g over a period of 4 weeks (virus half-life: 21.5 days). A regression analysis showed that, during the decreasing phase of the contamination, the data fitted a reciprocal quadratic model (Ra 2  = 0.921) and, based on the model, a residual presence of HAV could be estimated after negativization of the production areas. The statistical analysis of the results per shellfish species and per production area showed that there were limited differences in contamination prevalence and levels among diverse bivalve species, while a statistically significant difference was present in quantitative levels of one production area. These data could be useful for the development of both risk assessment models and code of practice for the management of viral contamination in primary production.

  2. Sexual selection drives speciation in an Amazonian frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boul, K.E.; Funk, W.C.; Darst, C.R.; Cannatella, D.C.; Ryan, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    One proposed mechanism of speciation is divergent sexual selection, whereby divergence in female preferences and male signals results in behavioural isolation. Despite the appeal of this hypothesis, evidence for it remains inconclusive. Here, we present several lines of evidence that sexual selection is driving behavioural isolation and speciation among populations of an Amazonian frog (Physalaemus petersi). First, sexual selection has promoted divergence in male mating calls and female preferences for calls between neighbouring populations, resulting in strong behavioural isolation. Second, phylogenetic analysis indicates that populations have become fixed for alternative call types several times throughout the species' range, and coalescent analysis rejects genetic drift as a cause for this pattern, suggesting that this divergence is due to selection. Finally, gene flow estimated with microsatellite loci is an average of 30 times lower between populations with different call types than between populations separated by a similar geographical distance with the same call type, demonstrating genetic divergence and incipient speciation. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that sexual selection is driving behavioural isolation and speciation, supporting sexual selection as a cause for speciation in the wild. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  3. Genomics of Rapid Incipient Speciation in Sympatric Threespine Stickleback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Marques

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecological speciation is the process by which reproductively isolated populations emerge as a consequence of divergent natural or ecologically-mediated sexual selection. Most genomic studies of ecological speciation have investigated allopatric populations, making it difficult to infer reproductive isolation. The few studies on sympatric ecotypes have focused on advanced stages of the speciation process after thousands of generations of divergence. As a consequence, we still do not know what genomic signatures of the early onset of ecological speciation look like. Here, we examined genomic differentiation among migratory lake and resident stream ecotypes of threespine stickleback reproducing in sympatry in one stream, and in parapatry in another stream. Importantly, these ecotypes started diverging less than 150 years ago. We obtained 34,756 SNPs with restriction-site associated DNA sequencing and identified genomic islands of differentiation using a Hidden Markov Model approach. Consistent with incipient ecological speciation, we found significant genomic differentiation between ecotypes both in sympatry and parapatry. Of 19 islands of differentiation resisting gene flow in sympatry, all were also differentiated in parapatry and were thus likely driven by divergent selection among habitats. These islands clustered in quantitative trait loci controlling divergent traits among the ecotypes, many of them concentrated in one region with low to intermediate recombination. Our findings suggest that adaptive genomic differentiation at many genetic loci can arise and persist in sympatry at the very early stage of ecotype divergence, and that the genomic architecture of adaptation may facilitate this.

  4. Song evolution, speciation, and vocal learning in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Nicholas A; Burns, Kevin J; Tobias, Joseph A; Claramunt, Santiago; Seddon, Nathalie; Derryberry, Elizabeth P

    2017-03-01

    Phenotypic divergence can promote reproductive isolation and speciation, suggesting a possible link between rates of phenotypic evolution and the tempo of speciation at multiple evolutionary scales. To date, most macroevolutionary studies of diversification have focused on morphological traits, whereas behavioral traits─including vocal signals─are rarely considered. Thus, although behavioral traits often mediate mate choice and gene flow, we have a limited understanding of how behavioral evolution contributes to diversification. Furthermore, the developmental mode by which behavioral traits are acquired may affect rates of behavioral evolution, although this hypothesis is seldom tested in a phylogenetic framework. Here, we examine evidence for rate shifts in vocal evolution and speciation across two major radiations of codistributed passerines: one oscine clade with learned songs (Thraupidae) and one suboscine clade with innate songs (Furnariidae). We find that evolutionary bursts in rates of speciation and song evolution are coincident in both thraupids and furnariids. Further, overall rates of vocal evolution are higher among taxa with learned rather than innate songs. Taken together, these findings suggest an association between macroevolutionary bursts in speciation and vocal evolution, and that the tempo of behavioral evolution can be influenced by variation in developmental modes among lineages. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. Pollinator-Driven Speciation in Sexually Deceptive Orchids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqing Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollinator-mediated selection has been suggested to play a major role for the origin and maintenance of the species diversity in orchids. Sexually deceptive orchids are one of the prime examples for rapid, pollinator-mediated plant radiations, with many species showing little genetic differentiation, lack of postzygotic barriers, but strong prezygotic reproductive isolation. These orchids mimic mating signals of female insects and employ male insects as pollinators. This kind of sexual mimicry leads to highly specialised pollination and provides a good system for investigating the process of pollinator-driven speciation. Here, we summarise the knowledge of key processes of speciation in this group of orchids and conduct a meta-analysis on traits that contribute to species differentiation, and thus potentially to speciation. Our study suggests that pollinator shift through changes in floral scent is predominant among closely related species in sexually deceptive orchids. Such shifts can provide a mechanism for pollinator-driven speciation in plants, if the resulting floral isolation is strong. Furthermore, changes in floral scent in these orchids are likely controlled by few genes. Together these factors suggest speciation in sexually deceptive orchids may happen rapidly and even in sympatry, which may explain the remarkable species diversity observed in this plant group.

  6. Voltammetric Investigation Of Hydrothermal Iron Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eKleint

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal vent fluids are highly enriched in iron (Fe compared to ambient seawater, and organic ligands may play a role in facilitating the transport of some hydrothermal Fe into the open ocean. This is important since Fe is a limiting micronutrient for primary production in large parts of the world`s surface ocean. We have investigated the concentration and speciation of Fe in several vent fluid and plume samples from the Nifonea vent field, Coriolis Troughs, New Hebrides Island Arc, South Pacific Ocean using competitive ligand exchange - adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE - AdCSV with salicylaldoxime (SA as the artificial ligand. Our results for total dissolved Fe (dFe in the buoyant hydrothermal plume samples showed concentrations up to 3.86 µM dFe with only a small fraction between 1.1% and 11.8% being chemically labile. Iron binding ligand concentrations ([L] were found in µM level with strong conditional stability constants up to log K[L],Fe3+ of 22.9. Within the non-buoyant hydrothermal plume above the Nifonea vent field, up to 84.7% of the available Fe is chemically labile and [L] concentrations up to 97 nM were measured. [L] was consistently in excess of Felab, indicating that all available Fe is being complexed, which in combination with high Felab values in the non-buoyant plume, signifies that a high fraction of hydrothermal dFe is potentially being transported away from the plume into the surrounding waters, contributing to the global oceanic Fe budget.

  7. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data reveal cryptic species within cryptic freshwater snail species-The case of theAncylus fluviatilisspecies complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Martina; Weigand, Hannah; Weigand, Alexander M; Leese, Florian

    2018-01-01

    DNA barcoding utilizes short standardized DNA sequences to identify species and is increasingly used in biodiversity assessments. The technique has unveiled an unforeseeably high number of morphologically cryptic species. However, if speciation has occurred relatively recently and rapidly, the use of single gene markers, and especially the exclusive use of mitochondrial markers, will presumably fail in delimitating species. Therefore, the true number of biological species might be even higher. One mechanism that can result in rapid speciation is hybridization of different species in combination with polyploidization, that is, allopolyploid speciation. In this study, we analyzed the population genetic structure of the polyploid freshwater snail Ancylus fluviatilis , for which allopolyploidization was postulated as a speciation mechanism. DNA barcoding has already revealed four cryptic species within A. fluviatilis (i.e., A. fluviatilis s. str., Ancylus sp. A-C), but early allozyme data even hint at the presence of additional cryptic lineages in Central Europe. We combined COI sequencing with high-resolution genome-wide SNP data (ddRAD data) to analyze the genetic structure of A. fluviatilis populations in a Central German low mountain range (Sauerland). The ddRAD data results indicate the presence of three cryptic species within A. fluviatilis s. str. occurring in sympatry and even syntopy, whereas mitochondrial sequence data only support the existence of one species, with shared haplotypes between species. Our study hence points to the limitations of DNA barcoding when dealing with organismal groups where speciation is assumed to have occurred rapidly, for example, through the process of allopolyploidization. We therefore emphasize that single marker DNA barcoding can underestimate the true species diversity and argue in strong favor of using genome-wide data for species delimitation in such groups.

  8. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oequist, M.

    1996-01-01

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO 4 2- concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 μM. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 μM h -1 while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 μM h -1 , respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 μg d -1 g -1 ) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 μg d -1 g -1 ) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 μg d -1 g -1 ) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m -2 d -1 , while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m -2 d -1 , respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination paper. 67 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  9. Plutonium Speciation in Support of Oxidative-Leaching Demonstration Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2007-01-01

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the plutonium speciation in caustic solutions that reasonably represent the process streams from the oxidative-leaching demonstration test. Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to develop a spectrophotometric method to measure plutonium speciation at submicromolar (< 10-6 M) concentrations in alkaline solutions in the presence of chromate and carbonate. Data obtained from the testing will be used to identify the oxidation state of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) species, which potentially could exist in caustic leachates. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan TSS A-219 to evaluate the speciation of chromium, plutonium, and manganese before and after oxidative leaching. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PNNL Operating Contract MOA: 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001

  10. Chemical speciation of trace metals in seawater: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Katsumi

    2006-08-01

    The recent development of the chemical speciation of trace metals in seawater is described. The speciation studies reveal that metal ion complexation is one of the most important processes in seawater; especially, most bioactive trace metals, such as Fe(III) and Cu, exist as complexes with ligands in dissolved organic matter. The organic ligands in seawater are characterized with metal ions selected by the HSAB concept. A strong organic ligand, which originates from marine microorganisms, is classified as a hard base including carboxylates. The free organic ligand concentrations in seawater are buffered by complexation with excess amounts of Ca and Mg in seawater. The chemical equilibrium model suggested that the concentrations of bioactive free metal ions are at an optimal level to activities of marine microorganisms. For chemical speciation, it is important to have a better understanding of the ecological roles of trace metals in seawater.

  11. Investigating ecological speciation in non-model organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Andrew David

    2012-01-01

    Background: Studies of ecological speciation tend to focus on a few model biological systems. In contrast, few studies on non-model organisms have been able to infer ecological speciation as the underlying mechanism of evolutionary divergence. Questions: What are the pitfalls in studying ecological...... on killer whale evolutionary ecology in search of any difficulty in demonstrating causal links between variation in phenotype, ecology, and reproductive isolation in this non-model organism. Results: At present, we do not have enough evidence to conclude that adaptive phenotype traits linked to ecological...... variation underlie reproductive isolation between sympatric killer whale types. Perhaps ecological speciation has occurred, but it is hard to prove. We will probably face this outcome whenever we wish to address non-model organisms – species in which it is not easy to apply experimental approaches...

  12. Ecosystem Services : In Nordic Freshwater Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Kristin; Hasler, Berit; Zandersen, Marianne

    Human wellbeing is dependent upon and benefit from ecosystem services which are delivered by well-functioning ecosystems. Ecosystem services can be mapped and assessed consistently within an ecosystem service framework. This project aims to explore the use and usefulness of the ecosystem service...... framework in freshwater management, particularly water management according to the Water Framework Directive (WFD). There are several examples of how ecosystem services have been used in WFD related studies in all the Nordic countries. Most of them involve listing, describing and categorizing freshwater...... ecosystem services, while there are few comprehensive Cost Benefit Analyses and analyses of disproportionate costs that apply this framework. More knowledge about ecosystem services and the value of ecosystem services for freshwater systems is needed....

  13. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis at a freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Vibeke Margrethe Nyvang; Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    The freshwater-seawater interface was studied in a ~9-m thick anaerobic aquifer located in marine sand and gravel with thin peat lenses. Very limited amounts of iron-oxides are present. Consequently, the dominating redox processes are sulfate reduction and methanogenesis, and the groundwater...... is enriched in dissolved sulfide, methane and bicarbonate. Under normal conditions the seawater-freshwater interface is found at a depth of 4 m at the coastline and reaches the bottom of the aquifer 40 m inland. However, occasional flooding of the area occurs, introducing sulfate to the aquifer. Groundwater...... chemistry was studied in a 120 m transect perpendicular to the coast. Cores were taken for radiotracer rate measurements of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. In the saline part of the aquifer 35 m inland, sulfate reduction was the dominant process with rates of 0.1-10 mM/year. In the freshwater part 100...

  14. Towards accounting for dissolved iron speciation in global ocean models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tagliabue

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The trace metal iron (Fe is now routinely included in state-of-the-art ocean general circulation and biogeochemistry models (OGCBMs because of its key role as a limiting nutrient in regions of the world ocean important for carbon cycling and air-sea CO2 exchange. However, the complexities of the seawater Fe cycle, which impact its speciation and bioavailability, are simplified in such OGCBMs due to gaps in understanding and to avoid high computational costs. In a similar fashion to inorganic carbon speciation, we outline a means by which the complex speciation of Fe can be included in global OGCBMs in a reasonably cost-effective manner. We construct an Fe speciation model based on hypothesised relationships between rate constants and environmental variables (temperature, light, oxygen, pH, salinity and assumptions regarding the binding strengths of Fe complexing organic ligands and test hypotheses regarding their distributions. As a result, we find that the global distribution of different Fe species is tightly controlled by spatio-temporal environmental variability and the distribution of Fe binding ligands. Impacts on bioavailable Fe are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding which Fe species are bioavailable and how those species vary in space and time. When forced by representations of future ocean circulation and climate we find large changes to the speciation of Fe governed by pH mediated changes to redox kinetics. We speculate that these changes may exert selective pressure on phytoplankton Fe uptake strategies in the future ocean. In future work, more information on the sources and sinks of ocean Fe ligands, their bioavailability, the cycling of colloidal Fe species and kinetics of Fe-surface coordination reactions would be invaluable. We hope our modeling approach can provide a means by which new observations of Fe speciation can be tested against hypotheses of the processes present in governing the ocean Fe cycle in an

  15. Patterns of plant speciation in the Cape floristic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Niet, Timotheüs; Johnson, Steven D

    2009-04-01

    Plant species have accumulated in the Cape region of southern Africa to a much greater degree than in areas of equivalent size in the rest of the subcontinent. Although this could be a consequence simply of lower extinction rates in the Cape, most researchers have invoked high rates of ecological speciation, driven by unique aspects of the Cape environment, as the primary explanation for this richness. To assess these ideas, we analyzed the frequencies of ecological shifts among 188 sister species pairs obtained from molecular phylogenies of eight Cape clades. Ecological shifts were evident in 80% of sister species pairs, with general habitat, pollinator, and fire-survival strategy shifts being especially frequent. Contrary to an established idea that shifts in soil type are frequently associated with speciation of Cape taxa, these shifts were relatively rare, occurring in just 17% of species pairs. More cases of sister species divergence are accompanied solely by floral than by vegetative diversification, suggesting an important role for pollinator-driven speciation. In an analysis of two large orchid genera that have radiated in both the Cape and the rest of southern Africa, the frequency of ecological shifts (general habitat, soil type, altitude and flowering time), did not differ between sister species pairs in the Cape region and those outside it. Despite suggestions that Cape plants tend to have small range sizes and show fine-scale patterns of speciation, range size did not differ significantly between species in the Cape and those outside it. We conclude that ecological speciation is likely to have been important for radiation of the Cape flora, but there is no evidence as yet for special "Cape" patterns of ecological speciation.

  16. Assessing the effects of seawater temperature and pH on the bioaccumulation of emerging chemical contaminants in marine bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Camacho, Carolina; Barbosa, Vera; Alves, Ricardo; Anacleto, Patrícia; Fogaça, Fabiola; Kwadijk, Christiaan; Kotterman, Michiel; Cunha, Sara C.; Fernandes, José O.; Rasmussen, Rie R.; Sloth, Jens J.; Aznar-Alemany, Òscar; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià; Marques, António

    2018-01-01

    Emerging chemical contaminants [e.g. toxic metals speciation, flame retardants (FRs) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), among others], that have not been historically recognized as pollutants nor their toxicological hazards, are increasingly more present in the marine environment. Furthermore, the

  17. Phylogenetic analyses of the leaf beetle genus Galerucella: evidence for host switching at speciation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghuis, A.; Madsen, O.; Ouborg, N.J.; Groenendael, van J.

    2009-01-01

    It is still the subject of lively debate whether sympatric speciation is a general mode of speciation as opposed to allopatric speciation. In herbivorous insects, host switching, i.e. colonization of, and adaptation to, a new host by a herbivore, has been proposed as one of the driving mechanisms of

  18. Molecular and morphological data reveal non-monophyly and speciation in imperiled freshwater mussels (Anodontoides and Strophitus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chase; Johnson, Nathan A.; Pfeiffer, John M.; Gangloff, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    Accurate taxonomic placement is vital to conservation efforts considering many intrinsic biological characteristics of understudied species are inferred from closely related taxa. The rayed creekshell, Anodontoides radiatus (Conrad, 1834), exists in the Gulf of Mexico drainages from western Florida to Louisiana and has been petitioned for listing under the Endangered Species Act. We set out to resolve the evolutionary history of A. radiatus, primarily generic placement and species boundaries, using phylogenetic, morphometric, and geographic information. Our molecular matrix contained 3 loci: cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, NADH dehydrogenase subunit I, and the nuclear-encoded ribosomal internal transcribed spacer I. We employed maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference to estimate a phylogeny and test the monophyly of Anodontoides and Strophitus. We implemented two coalescent-based species delimitation models to test seven species models and evaluate species boundaries within A. radiatus. Concomitant to molecular data, we also employed linear morphometrics and geographic information to further evaluate species boundaries. Molecular and morphological evidence supports the inclusion of A. radiatus in the genus Strophitus, and we resurrect the binomial Strophitus radiatus to reflect their shared common ancestry. We also found strong support for polyphyly in Strophitus and advocate the resurrection of the genus Pseudodontoideus to represent ‘Strophitus’ connasaugaensis and ‘Strophitus’ subvexus. Strophitus radiatus exists in six well-supported clades that were distinguished as evolutionary independent lineages using Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and coalescent-based species delimitation models. Our integrative approach found evidence for as many as 4 evolutionary divergent clades within S. radiatus. Therefore, we formally describe two new species from the S. radiatus species complex (Strophitus williamsi and Strophitus pascagoulaensis) and recognize the potential for a third putative species (Strophitus sp. cf. pascagoulaensis). Our findings aid stakeholders in establishing conservation and management strategies for the members of Anodontoides, Strophitus, and Pseudodontoideus.

  19. Phylogeographic structure, cryptic speciation and demographic history of the sharpbelly (Hemiculter leucisculus), a freshwater habitat generalist from southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weitao; Zhong, Zaixuan; Dai, Wei; Fan, Qi; He, Shunping

    2017-09-12

    Species with broad distributions frequently divide into multiple genetic forms and may therefore be viewed as "cryptic species". Here, we used the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) and 12 nuclear DNA loci to investigate phylogeographic structures of the sharpbelly (Hemiculter leucisculus) in rivers in southern China and explored how the geological and climatic factors have shaped the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of this species. Our mitochondrial phylogenetic analysis identified three major lineages (lineages A, B, and C). Lineages B and C showed a relatively narrower geographic distribution, whereas lineage A was widely distributed in numerous drainages. Divergence dates suggested that H. leucisculus populations diverged between 1.61-2.38 Ma. Bayesian species delimitation analysis using 12 nuclear DNA loci indicated the three lineages probably represented three valid taxa. Isolation-with-migration (IM) analysis found substantial gene flow has occurred among the three lineages. Demographic analyses showed that lineages B and C have experienced rapid demographic expansion at 0.03 Ma and 0.08 Ma, respectively. Hemiculter leucisculus populations in drainages in southern China comprise three mtDNA lineages, and each of which may represent a separate species. Intense uplift of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, evolution of Asian monsoons, changes in paleo-drainages, and poor dispersal ability may have driven the divergence of the three putative species. However, gene flow occurs among the three lineages. Climatic fluctuations have a prominent impact on the populations from the lineages B and C, but exerted little influence on the lineage A.

  20. Freshwater exposure pathways in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1984-06-01

    The report relates to a subproject under a Nordic project called ''Large reactor accidents - consequences and mitigating actions''. The report summarizes information available, primarily in the Nordic countries, on freshwater exposure pathways. Experimental and theoretical data concerning the deposition and run-off of the nuclides *sp90*Sr and*Sp137*Cs is presented. Internal exposure via drinking water and freshwater fish is dealt with, as well as external exposure due to swimming, boating, contact with fishing utensils and use of beach areas. In addition is exposure via irrigated agricultural products considered. (RF)

  1. Threatened and Endangered Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all US listed Threatened and Endangered freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region....

  2. Thermodynamics and speciation: Carbonate complexation of Am(III) and speciation of actinides by pulsed laser spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Klenze, R.; Meinrath, G.; Wimmer, H.

    1989-12-01

    The report includes the carbonate complexation of Am(III) and speciation of actinides by pulsed laser spectroscopies. Part A describes the carbonate complexation behaviour of Am 3+ in aqueous solution under 1% CO 2 partial pressure, investigated by solubility and spectroscopic experiments. The average constants determined by the two methods are: log K sp (Am 2 (CO 3 ) 3 )=-29.7 ± 0.6, log β 1 =6.3 ± 0.3 and log β 2 = 9.7 ± 0.6. Part B presents speciation capabilities of three different pulsed laser spectroscopies: laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS), time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and photoacoustic detection of light scattering (PALS). Examples for the speciation of Am(III) and Cm(III) in different aquatic media are presented. (orig.)

  3. Neptunium speciation in humic acid - goethite system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, St.; Khasanova, A.; Shcherbina, N.; Perminova, I.; Schafer, T.; Claret, F.; Teterin, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Humic acids (HA) are known to have significant effect on metal ion speciation in the environment and may either enhance or depress their migration ability depending on geochemical conditions. This study deals with Np(V) behaviour in HA-goethite suspension at different pH values. The HA used in this study were enriched in hydroquinone group content that define their redox properties. The sorption of Np(V) by goethite in the presence of HA was studied in batch mode at pHs from 2.5 to 9. It was established that at low pH values the sorption of Np agrees with the sorption of HA by goethite and was significantly higher than in binary Np-goethite system. The scanning transmission X-ray microscopic (STXM) study done at National Synchrotron Light Source (BNL, USA) was used to characterize humic surface coatings on goethite. According to STXM, organic matter 'hot spots' were observed in the central region of goethite particles. These 'hot spots' revealed high amounts of C=C arom and aliphatic structures, whereas edge regions of goethite particles or the cloudy regions around this particle contained lower amounts of these organic functionalities. The particle edge structures and the surrounding of the particle were enriched in oxygen-containing functional groups. The enhanced Np sorption at low pH values was explained by its reduction to tetravalent state with formation of stable Np(IV) humates that was established by Vis-NIR spectrophotometry for binary Np(V)-HA solutions and XPS for ternary Np-HA-goethite system. At pH > 6 neptunium retention by HA-goethite suspension was slightly lower that in the absence of HA that is due to week Np(V) humic complexation in solution. According to STXM no detection of organics on goethite minerals by carbon K-edge measurements was possible and the results might be interpreted as an absence of organic matter sorption on the mineral phases under the conditions of batch-type studies. The absence of Np

  4. Radium-226 accumulation in Florida freshwater mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, M.; Smoak, J.M.; Leeper, D.A.; Streubert, M.; Baker, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Selected lakes in Hillsborough County, Florida have been hydrologically augmented with groundwater to offset stage declines caused by excessive pumping of the Floridan Aquifer. Augmentation water can be relatively rich in 226Ra (>5 decays per minute [dpm] L-1). We measured 226Ra activities in shells and soft tissues of adult bivalve molluscs (Elliptio cf. buckleyi) from groundwater-augmented and nonaugmented lakes to assess bioaccumulation of 226Ra by mussels. Mussels from augmented lakes displayed higher 226Ra in both shells and tissues than did mussels from nonaugmented lakes. Within a sample, 226Ra activity in Elliptio tissues was higher than the value measured in shells. Highest activities were found in a composite mussel sample (n = 6) from an augmented lake; soft tissue activity was 619 ?? 33 dpm g-1 dry weight and shell activity was 147 ?? 7 dpm g-1 g dry weight. Large mussels displayed greater activities in soft tissues and shells than did small mussels. We transplanted animals from a nonaugmented lake into a groundwater-augmented water body. 226Ra activity in dry tissue rose from 32 ?? 1 to 196 ?? 2 dpm g-1 within 2 months. When 226Ra-rich mussels (232 ?? 2 dpm g-1) from the augmented lake were transferred to the nonaugmented lake, they showed no significant 226Ra loss over the 69-d experiment. Large Elliptio mussels concentrated 226Ra in their soft tissues to levels about 1,000 to 25,000 times concentrations in lake water. Pumping of groundwater in Florida for residential, agricultural, and industrial use contributes dissolved 226Ra to some surface water bodies, where it can be bioaccumulated by bivalve molluscs. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  5. Freshwater crayfish invasions in South Africa: past, present and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Freshwater crayfish invasions have been studied around the world, but less so in Africa, a continent devoid of native freshwater crayfish. The present study reviews historical and current information on alien freshwater crayfish species introduced into South Africa and aims to indicate which areas are at risk from invasion.

  6. Field and model investigations of freshwater lenses in coastal aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    A major problem of sustaining freshwater supply from freshwater lens is the invasion of saline groundwater into a fresh groundwater body. In many coastal areas saltwater intrusion has led to well closure and reduced freshwater supply. Furthermore, in the future saltwater intrusion is expected to

  7. Molecular and Biochemical Methods Useful for the Epigenetic Characterization of Chromatin-Associated Proteins in Bivalve Molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Rivera-Casas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve molluscs constitute a ubiquitous taxonomic group playing key functions in virtually all ecosystems, and encompassing critical commercial relevance. Along with a sessile and filter-feeding lifestyle in most cases, these characteristics make bivalves model sentinel organisms routinely used for environmental monitoring studies in aquatic habitats. The study of epigenetic mechanisms linking environmental exposure and specific physiological responses (i.e., environmental epigenetics stands out as a very innovative monitoring strategy, given the role of epigenetic modifications in acclimatization and adaptation. Furthermore, the heritable nature of many of those modifications constitutes a very promising avenue to explore the applicability of epigenetic conditioning and selection in management and restoration strategies. Chromatin provides a framework for the study of environmental epigenetic responses. Unfortunately, chromatin and epigenetic information are very limited in most non-traditional model organisms and even completely lacking in most environmentally and ecologically relevant organisms. The present work aims to provide a comprehensive and reproducible experimental workflow for the study of bivalve chromatin. First, a series of guidelines for the molecular isolation of genes encoding chromatin-associated proteins is provided, including information on primers suitable for conventional PCR, Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE, genome walking and quantitative PCR (qPCR experiments. This section is followed by the description of methods specifically developed for the analysis of histone and SNBP proteins in different bivalve tissues, including protein extraction, purification, separation and immunodetection. Lastly, information about available antibodies, their specificity and performance is also provided. The tools and protocols described here complement current epigenetic analyses (usually limited to DNA methylation by incorporating

  8. Polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a one-off global survey of bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Strand, Jakob; Christensen, Jan H.

    2010-01-01

    During the Danish Galathea 3 expedition, bivalve samples were collected at the Faroe Islands, Greenland, Ghana, South Africa, Australia, Solomon Islands, New Zealand, Chile, US Virgin Islands, Boston, Newfoundland and Shetland Islands and analysed for organochlorines and PAHs. Concentration...... in terms of PCB and PAH levels, while other Greenland samples came closest to representing PAH background levels. Several locations had undetectable organochlorine levels, including Hobart and Chile, which had the lowest Sigma PAH concentrations (

  9. Dominance and population structure of freshwater crabs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-02-06

    Feb 6, 1997 ... CHASE, l.D. 1974. Models of hierarchy formation in animal societies. Behav. Sct. 19: 374-382. DU PREEZ, H.H., STEENKAMP, V.E. & SCHOONBEE, HJ. 1993. Bioaccumulation of zinc and lead in selected tissues and organs of the freshwater crab. PotamonQutes warreni. Sci. Tot. Environ. Suppl.: 469-478.

  10. Petroleum hydrocarbon degrading capability of freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petroleum hydrocarbon degrading capability and growth profile of indigenous filamentous freshwater fungi from four (4) different streams were determined in vitro. The result indicated that the streams under investigation contained an average heterotrophic fungal count of 5.55 0.25x105 cfu ml-1 while the mean count of ...

  11. Wnt signaling and polarity in freshwater sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor Reid, Pamela J; Matveev, Eugueni; McClymont, Alexandra; Posfai, Dora; Hill, April L; Leys, Sally P

    2018-02-02

    The Wnt signaling pathway is uniquely metazoan and used in many processes during development, including the formation of polarity and body axes. In sponges, one of the earliest diverging animal groups, Wnt pathway genes have diverse expression patterns in different groups including along the anterior-posterior axis of two sponge larvae, and in the osculum and ostia of others. We studied the function of Wnt signaling and body polarity formation through expression, knockdown, and larval manipulation in several freshwater sponge species. Sponge Wnts fall into sponge-specific and sponge-class specific subfamilies of Wnt proteins. Notably Wnt genes were not found in transcriptomes of the glass sponge Aphrocallistes vastus. Wnt and its signaling genes were expressed in archaeocytes of the mesohyl throughout developing freshwater sponges. Osculum formation was enhanced by GSK3 knockdown, and Wnt antagonists inhibited both osculum development and regeneration. Using dye tracking we found that the posterior poles of freshwater sponge larvae give rise to tissue that will form the osculum following metamorphosis. Together the data indicate that while components of canonical Wnt signaling may be used in development and maintenance of osculum tissue, it is likely that Wnt signaling itself occurs between individual cells rather than whole tissues or structures in freshwater sponges.

  12. Freshwater savings from marine protein consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Pace, Michael L.; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Marine fisheries provide an essential source of protein for many people around the world. Unlike alternative terrestrial sources of protein, marine fish production requires little to no freshwater inputs. Consuming marine fish protein instead of terrestrial protein therefore represents freshwater savings (equivalent to an avoided water cost) and contributes to a low water footprint diet. These water savings are realized by the producers of alternative protein sources, rather than the consumers of marine protein. This study quantifies freshwater savings from marine fish consumption around the world by estimating the water footprint of replacing marine fish with terrestrial protein based on current consumption patterns. An estimated 7 600 km3 yr-1 of water is used for human food production. Replacing marine protein with terrestrial protein would require an additional 350 km3 yr-1 of water, meaning that marine protein provides current water savings of 4.6%. The importance of these freshwater savings is highly uneven around the globe, with savings ranging from as little as 0 to as much as 50%. The largest savings as a per cent of current water footprints occur in Asia, Oceania, and several coastal African nations. The greatest national water savings from marine fish protein occur in Southeast Asia and the United States. As the human population increases, future water savings from marine fish consumption will be increasingly important to food and water security and depend on sustainable harvest of capture fisheries and low water footprint growth of marine aquaculture.

  13. Herbivory on freshwater and marine macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Wood, Kevin A.; Pagès, Jordi F.; Veen, G.F.; Christianen, Marjolijn J.A.; Santamaría, Luis; Nolet, Bart A.; Hilt, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Until the 1990s, herbivory on aquatic vascular plants was considered to be of minor importance, and the predominant view was that freshwater and marine macrophytes did not take part in the food web: their primary fate was the detritivorous pathway. In the last 25 years, a substantial body of

  14. Dactylobiotus luci , a new freshwater tardigrade (Eutardigrada ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new freshwater eutardigrade, Dactylobiotus luci sp. nov., is described from a permanent marsh pool (Zaphania's Pool) at 4225 m elevation in the Alpine zone of the Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda. The new species is most similar to D. dervizi Biserov, 1998 in the shape of the egg processes, absence of papillae and ...

  15. Heliozoa from Nigeria | Wujek | Tropical Freshwater Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of seven scaled protistans were observed from four freshwater sites in Nigeria. They include the holiozoan genera Acanthocystis, Polyplacocystis, Pterocystis, and Raphidiophrys. All are new records for Africa. KEY WORDS: Heliozoa, Protozoa, Acanthocystis, Polyplacocystis, Pterocystis, Raphidiophrys Tropical ...

  16. Methane emission from tidal freshwater marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Nat, F.J.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    In two tidal freshwater marshes, methane emission, production and accumulation in the pore-water have been studied. The two sites differ in their dominant vegetation, i.e., reed and bulrush, and in their heights above sea level. The reed site was elevated in relation to the bulrush site and had

  17. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buikema, A. L., Jr.; Herricks, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater invertebrates, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the areas covered are: (1) toxicant effects on invertebrates; (2) microcosm and community effects, and (3) biological control of aquatic life. A list of 123 references is also presented. (HM)

  18. Quantal Response Of Freshwater Shrimp ( Desmocaris trispinosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quantal-response of freshwater shrimp (Desmocaris trispinosa) to the toxicity of five azo dyes was studied. Generally, increase in percentage mortality of the organisms was obtained with increases in concentration of the toxicants and exposure time. The median lethal concentration50 (LC50) and median lethal ...

  19. Microplastic effect thresholds for freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redondo Hasselerharm, P.E.; Dede Falahudin, Dede; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Now that microplastics have been detected in lakes, rivers and estuaries all over the globe, evaluating their effects on biota has become an urgent research priority. This is the first study that aims at determining the effect thresholds for a battery of six freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates

  20. 2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Teel

    2009-05-01

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

  1. Review: Freshwater conservation planning in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Freshwater conservation planning in South Africa: Milestones to date and catalysts for implementation. ... To this end we highlight 4 potential catalysts for effective implementation in the receiving environment, namely, absorptive capacity, multi-party cooperation, science extension and adaptive management.

  2. Benthic freshwater nematode community dynamics under conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies of the influence of fish aquaculture on benthic freshwater nematode assemblages are scarce, but could provide a way of gauging environmental effects. The abundance and diversity of nematode assemblages in response to Oreochromis niloticus aquaculture were investigated in Kafr El-Sheikh Governorate, Egypt, ...

  3. Novel Synechococcus genomes reconstructed from freshwater reservoirs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cabello-Yeves, P.J.; Haro-Moreno, J.M.; Martin-Cuadrado, A.B.; Ghai, Rohit; Picazo, A.; Camacho, A.; Rodriguez-Valera, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, June (2017), č. článku 1151. ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-04828S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Synechococcus * picocyanobacteria * freshwater reservoirs * metagenomics * abundance Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.076, year: 2016

  4. Project Lifescape – Freshwater Fishes: Catfishes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 4. Project Lifescape – Freshwater Fishes: Catfishes. R J Ranjit Daniels. Classroom Volume 5 Issue 4 April 2000 pp 97-107. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/04/0097-0107 ...

  5. Field chronobiology of a molluscan bivalve: how the moon and sun cycles interact to drive oyster activity rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Damien; Nadau, Arnaud; Durrieu, Gilles; Ciret, Pierre; Parisot, Jean-Paul; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2011-05-01

    The present study reports new insights into the complexity of environmental drivers in aquatic animals. The focus of this study was to determine the main forces that drive mollusc bivalve behavior in situ. To answer this question, the authors continuously studied the valve movements of permanently immersed oysters, Crassostrea gigas, during a 1-year-long in situ study. Valve behavior was monitored with a specially build valvometer, which allows continuously recording of up to 16 bivalves at high frequency (10 Hz). The results highlight a strong relationship between the rhythms of valve behavior and the complex association of the sun-earth-moon orbital positions. Permanently immersed C. gigas follows a robust and strong behavior primarily driven by the tidal cycle. The intensity of this tidal driving force is modulated by the neap-spring tides (i.e., synodic moon cycle), which themselves depend of the earth-moon distance (i.e., anomalistic moon cycle). Light is a significant driver of the oysters' biological rhythm, although its power is limited by the tides, which remain the predominant driver. More globally, depending where in the world the bivalves reside, the results suggest their biological rhythms should vary according to the relative importance of the solar cycle and different lunar cycles associated with tide generation. These results highlight the high plasticity of these oysters to adapt to their changing environment.

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments and Bivalves on the Pacific Coast of Japan: Influence of Tsunami and Fire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayu Onozato

    Full Text Available Surface sediments and at least one edible bivalve species (Ruditapes philippinarum, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Crassostrea gigas were collected from each of seven intertidal sites in Japan in 2013. The sites had experienced varying levels of tsunami and fire disturbance following the major earthquake of 2011. Eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were identified and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total sediment PAH concentration (CT, the sum of the average concentrations of the eight PAHs, was 21-1447 μg kg-1-dry. Relative to the average level of one type of PAH in sediments collected around Japan in 2002 (benzo[a]pyrene = 21 μg kg-1-dry, five of the seven sites showed concentrations significantly lower than this average in 2013. The CTs for the three bivalves (134-450 μg kg-1-dry were within the range of the previous reports (2.2-5335 μg kg-1-dry. The data suggest that the natural disaster did not increase PAH concentrations or affect the distribution within sediment or bivalves in Tohoku district. Although PAH concentrations at the sites pose no risk to human health, the findings highlight that the observed PAH levels derive from pre- rather than post-quake processes.

  7. Investigation into Cryptosporidium and Giardia in bivalve mollusks farmed in Sardinia region and destined for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Tedde

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium and Giardia are protozoan parasites transmitted by fecal-oral ingestion of (oocysts, and are responsible for enteritis in several animal species and humans worldwide. These (oocysts can survive for over a year in aquatic environments and can accumulate in bivalve mollusks, which filter large volumes of water. The aim of this study is to evaluate the natural occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia contamination in different specimens of edible bivalves mollusks from farming sites of the western and north-eastern coasts of Sardinia. From April 2011 to February 2012, 1095 specimens of Mytilus galloprovincialis and 240 of Crassostrea gigas were sampled from Olbia and Oristano gulf and San Teodoro pond. Hepatopancreas and gills, including the labial palp, were examined for oocysts and cysts after pooling and homogenisation using different techniques: i staining for light and fluorescence microscopy; ii direct immunofluorescence (IF Merifluor® test Cryptosporidium/ Giardia (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, OH, USA; and iii molecular procedures. However, in the context under study, all mollusks examined with the three main diagnostic techniques were negative for both parasites pointing out the hypothetically low zoonotic risk related to Cryptosporidium and Giardia in bivalves, especially Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas.

  8. Thermal processing of live bivalve molluscs for controlling viruses: On the need for a risk-based design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messens, Winy; Fernandez-Escamez, Pablo S; Lees, David; Lindqvist, Roland; O'Mahony, Michael; Suffredini, Elisabetta; Cortiñas Abrahantes, José; Chantzis, Emmanouil; Koutsoumanis, Kostas

    2017-07-19

    Norovirus (NoV) and Hepatitis A virus (HAV) are the most important viral hazards associated with human illness following consumption of contaminated bivalve molluscs. The effectiveness of the current EU criteria for heat processing of bivalve molluscs (i.e. raising the temperature of the internal mollusc flesh to at least 90°C for a minimum of 90 seconds) was evaluated using predictive microbiology. A HAV thermal inactivation model was developed based on literature data in mollusc matrices during isothermal heat treatment. Application of the developed model demonstrated that the 90°C-90 s requirement may lead to significantly different virus inactivation depending on the commercial process design. This shows the need for the establishment of a Performance Criterion for bivalve molluscs heat processing which will assure a common specified level of consumer protection. A risk-based approach is described that allows for an effective processing design providing a more transparent and objective relation between the thermal processing targets and public health. Model simulations demonstrate that the F-value is a more appropriate Process Criterion than a single time-temperature combination since it enables the food business operators to design a process that is compliant with the safety requirements while at the same time achieving a desired product quality.

  9. A comparative study on effects of heterotrophic microbial activity on the stability of bivalve and coral carbonate during early diagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Skadi M.; Krause, Stefan; Immenhauser, Adrian; Ritter, Ann-Christin; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Kleinteich, Thomas; Treude, Tina

    2016-04-01

    Following deposition and shallow burial, marine biogenic carbonates are exposed to an environment that is geochemically affected by a manifold of bacterial metabolic redox processes. To allow for comparison of potential microbe-mediated alteration effects on carbonates, we used aragonitic bivalve shell samples and porous aragonitic coral fragments for incubation experiments in oxic- and anoxic seawater media. The media contained marine sediment slurries or bacterial cultures to mimic the natural processes in vitro. The results for anoxic experimental media containing bivalve shell samples or coral fragments displayed considerable changes in carbonate-system parameters (pH, AT, CA, DIC) and divalent-cation ratios (Mg/Ca, Mg/Sr, Sr/Ca) over time. Furthermore, incubated bivalve shell samples were altered in morphology, elemental composition and isotopic signature. Coral-fragment bearing oxic incubations were run at two temperature regimes and divalent-cation ratios of the high-temperature bacterial medium displayed withdrawal of Ca2+ and Sr2+ from the medium, thus indicating microbe-induced secondary aragonite precipitation. Analyses of coral fragments include electron-microprobe mapping and X-ray microtomography to resolve elemental sample composition and pore-space alteration features, respectively. Up to this point our results indicate that heterotrophic bacterial activity has the potential to affect surficial or open pore space in carbonate archives by increasing rates of alteration relative to sterile environments.

  10. Sexual selection and speciation : mechanisms in Lake Victoria cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, Martine Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    The several hundred species of cichlid fish endemic to Lake Victoria (East-Africa) are textbook examples of explosive speciation. This thesis evaluates the hypothesis that sexual selection by female mate choice has contributed to this process of divergence, by investigating the mechanisms that drive

  11. Speciation of Heavy Metals in Sediment of Agbabu Bitumen deposit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Speciation of heavy metals Cu, Cd, Pb, Ni, Zn, Mn, Fe, Cr and Hg was carried out on sediment of Agbabu with a sequential extraction procedure in the dry and rainy seasons of year 2008. Hg was not detected in all the fractions in the two seasons. In the dry season, all the metals were mostly abundant in Fraction-5, however ...

  12. Speciation Studies of Some Toxic Metal Complexes of Glycylglycine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    mixtures apart from its established utility in understanding ... Chemical speciation of metals is important for an understand- ... Titrations with differ- ent ratios (1:2.5, 1:3.5 and 1:5) of metal-ligand were performed with 0.4 mol L–1 sodium hydroxide solution. The mixtures obtained from PG and water are non-ideal due.

  13. Microscale characterization of sulfur speciation in lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Teng; Arnold, William A; Toner, Brandy M

    2013-02-05

    Prairie pothole lakes (PPLs) are naturally sulfur-enriched wetlands in the glaciated prairie region of North America. High sulfate levels and dynamic hydrogeochemistry in combination render PPLs a unique environment to explore the speciation of sedimentary sulfur (S). The goals of this research were to define and quantify the solid-phase S pools in PPL sediments and track seasonal dynamics of S speciation. A quantitative X-ray microprobe method was developed based on S 1s X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and multienergy X-ray fluorescence mapping. Three S pools-pyritic S, reduced organic S (organic mono- and disulfide), and oxidized S (inorganic sulfate, ester sulfate, and sulfonate)-were identified in PPL sediments. No significant seasonal variation was evident for total S, but S speciation showed a seasonal response. During the spring-summer transition, the reduced organic S decreased from 55 to 15 mol %, with a concomitant rise in the oxidized S. During the summer-fall transition, the trend reversed and the reduced organic S grew to 75 mol % at the expense of the oxidized S. The pyritic S, on the other hand, remained relatively constant (∼22 mol %) over time. The seasonal changes in S speciation have strong potential to force the cycling of elements such as mercury in prairie wetlands.

  14. Speciation and bioavailability of copper in Lake Tjeukemeer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, W.

    1991-01-01

    Chapter 1: introduction

    In this thesis an account is given of a research project dealing with the chemical speciation and bioavailability of copper in Lake Tjeukemeer, a lake in the north of the Netherlands. The reason for the initiation of this project was a lack of

  15. Speciation of Chromium and Vanadium in Medicinal Plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    maximum limits is not exceeded through normal consumption of tea infusion. KEYWORDS. Speciation, leaching, medicinal ... smelters make it a suitable case study to assess the effects of smelter emissions on medicinal plants. ... AAnalyst 600 which employs Zeeman-effect background correc- tion system was used for all ...

  16. Speciation and stability of methylene blue-metal-thiocyanate ion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative stabilities indicate that cobalt is preferred to other two metals in the speciation of ternary complexes comparable with similar complexes in biosystems. This study also provides a method for the spectrophotometric determination of Co(II) and Zn(II) ions at nanogram levels at 25 oC and an ionic strength of 0.15 M.

  17. Speciation and phase separation of water in quartz (A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By sp3-hybridization of electron bonds, the water molecule exhibits a tetrahedral charged structure, leading to various water point defects in the form of substitution of ... The formation of combined defect [SiO4]-H2O-M+ [M3+O4] upon water speciation (M+ is metallic ion), is an indication of the presence of hydrous species.

  18. Distribution and Speciation of Mercury in Mine Waste Dumps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hojdová, Maria; Navrátil, Tomáš; Rohovec, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 3 (2008), s. 237-241 ISSN 0007-4861 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300130615 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : mercury * mine waste * mercury speciation * thermo-desorption analysis Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 0.609, year: 2008

  19. Speciation study of copper, lead, chromium, cadmium and nickel in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cluster analysis of metals in the pond and stream samples revealed that the metals could have originated from agricultural runoff, activities on the surrounding farmlands, and vehicular emission, on one hand, and leaching from underlying bedrocks on the other hand. Keyword: Speciation analysis, fish pond, water, metals, ...

  20. FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND ORGANIC SPECIATION OF FIREPLACE EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents a summary of fireplace particle size and organic speciation data gathered to date in an on-going project. Tests are being conducted in a residential wood combustion (RWC) laboratory on three factory-built fireplaces. RWC wood smoke particles <10?m (PM10) con...