WorldWideScience

Sample records for fresh blood imaging

  1. Capabilities of diffusion-weighted and fresh blood imaging in depicting fresh thrombus. Presidential award proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Ritsuko; Manabe, Tsutomu; Tazawa, Satoru

    2007-01-01

    We examined the capabilities of diffusion-weighted (DWI) and fresh-blood imaging (FBI) in depicting thrombus. A paper-clay phantom holding test syringes of various sizes filled with either contrast medium or fresh human blood were scanned using a 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and signal intensities on DWI and FBI of the specimens were obtained. FBI depicted all the specimens regardless of syringe diameter, but DWI failed to image the syringe measuring 0.5 cm in diameter. B-factors and/or number of acquisitions (NAQ) seemed responsible for DWI's depiction capability. ADC values and signal intensities on DWI and FBI correlated with the viscosity of the contrast medium samples. Clotted blood, the most viscous of the samples, had the smallest ADC value and no relationship with signal intensities on DWI and FBI. Larger b-factors reduced signal intensity in contrast medium on DWI, but signals decreased only minimally in clotted blood. The result suggested that although viscosity was the influential factor for signal intensities on DWI in contrast medium, other factors, such as particle sizes of fibrin and hemoglobin, accounted for the low ADC values in clotting blood. T 2 relaxation time seemed to play a significant role in making signal intensities on DWI irrelevant to b-factors. Despite lapsed time, the clots were persistently hyperintense on FBI with a tendency to decrease only gradually. On DWI, there was a certain period when signal intensities were high and ADC values were low. The signal intensities on DWI and ADC values were considered to be influenced by the process of clot formation, and disappearance of signal seemed likely attributable to degeneration of protein and organization of the clot. (author)

  2. Warm fresh whole blood and thoracic traumain iraq and afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keneally, Ryan J; Parsons, Andrew M; Willett, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic trauma occurred in 10% of the patients seen at US military treatment facilities in Iraq and Afghanistan and 52% of those patients were transfused. Among those transfused, 281 patients received warm fresh whole blood. A previous report documented improved survival with warm fresh whole blood in patients injured in combat without stratification by injury pattern. A later report described an increase in acute lung injuries after its administration. Survivorship and warm fresh whole blood have never been analyzed in a subpopulation at highest risk for lung injuries, such as patients with thoracic trauma. There may be a heterogeneous relationship between whole blood and survival based on likelihood of a concomitant pulmonary injury. In this report, the relationship between warm fresh whole blood and survivorship was analyzed among patients at highest risk for concomitant pulmonary injuries. Patients with thoracic trauma who received a transfusion were identified in the Joint Theater Trauma Registry. Gross mortality rates were compared between whole blood recipients and patients transfused with component therapy only. The association between each blood component and mortality was determined in a regression model. The overall mortality risk was compared between warm fresh whole blood recipients and non-recipients. Patients transfused with warm fresh whole blood in addition to component therapy had a higher mortality rate than patients transfused only separated blood components (21.3% vs. 12.8%, P warm fresh whole blood in addition to component therapy was not associated with increased mortality risk compared with the transfusion of component therapy only (OR 1.247 [95% CI 0.760-2.048], P = 0.382). Patients with combat related thoracic trauma transfused with warm fresh whole blood were not at increased risk for mortality compared to those who received component therapy alone when controlling for covariates.

  3. Efficacy of fresh packed red blood transfusion in organophosphate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hang-Xing; Tong, Pei-Jian; Li, Cai-Xia; Du, Jing; Chen, Bing-Yu; Huang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Ying

    2017-03-01

    The mortality rate caused by organophosphate (OP) poisoning is still high, even the standard treatment such as atropine and oxime improves a lot. To search for alternative therapies, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of packed red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in acute OP poisoning, and compare the therapeutic effects of RBCs at different storage times.Patients diagnosed with OP poisoning were included in this prospective study. Fresh RBCs (packed RBCs stored less than 10 days) and longer-storage RBCs (stored more than 10 days but less than 35 days) were randomly transfused or not into OP poisoning patients. Cholinesterase (ChE) levels in blood, atropine usage and durations, pralidoxime durations were measured.We found that both fresh and longer-storage RBCs (200-400 mL) significantly increased blood ChE levels 6 hours after transfusion, shortened the duration for ChE recovery and length of hospital stay, and reduced the usage of atropine and pralidoxime. In addition, fresh RBCs demonstrated stronger therapeutic effects than longer-storage RBCs.Packed RBCs might be an alternative approach in patients with OP poisoning, especially during early stages.

  4. Diet enriched with fresh coconut decreases blood glucose levels and body weight in normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Venugopal; Shankar, Nagashree R; Mavathur, Ramesh; Mooventhan, A; Anju, Sood; Manjunath, N K

    2018-02-20

    Background There exist controversies about the health effects of coconut. Fresh coconut consumption on human health has not been studied substantially. Fresh coconut consumption is a regular part of the diet for many people in tropical countries like India, and thus there is an increasing need to understand the effects of fresh coconut on various aspects of health. Aim To compare the effects of increased saturated fatty acid (SFA) and fiber intake, provided by fresh coconut, versus monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) and fiber intake, provided by a combination of groundnut oil and groundnuts, on anthropometry, serum insulin, glucose levels and blood pressure in healthy adults. Materials Eighty healthy volunteers, randomized into two groups, were provided with a standardized diet along with either 100 g fresh coconut or an equivalent amount of groundnuts and groundnut oil for a period of 90 days. Assessments such as anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood sugar and insulin levels were performed before and after the supplementation period. Results Results of this study showed a significant reduction in fasting blood sugar (FBS) in both the groups. However, a significant reduction in body weight was observed in the coconut group, while a significant increase in diastolic pressure was observed in the groundnut group. Conclusions Results of this study suggest that fresh coconut-added diet helps reduce blood glucose levels and body weight in normal healthy individuals.

  5. Plasma free hemoglobin and microcirculatory response to fresh or old blood transfusions in sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Damiani

    Full Text Available Free hemoglobin (fHb may induce vasoconstriction by scavenging nitric oxide. It may increase in older blood units due to storage lesions. This study evaluated whether old red blood cell transfusion increases plasma fHb in sepsis and how the microvascular response may be affected.This is a secondary analysis of a randomized study. Twenty adult septic patients received either fresh or old (15 days storage, respectively RBC transfusions. fHb was measured in RBC units and in the plasma before and 1 hour after transfusion. Simultaneously, the sublingual microcirculation was assessed with sidestream-dark field imaging. The perfused boundary region was calculated as an index of glycocalyx damage. Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2 and Hb index (THI were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy and a vascular occlusion test was performed.Similar fHb levels were found in the supernatant of fresh and old RBC units. Despite this, plasma fHb increased in the old RBC group after transfusion (from 0.125 [0.098-0.219] mg/mL to 0.238 [0.163-0.369] mg/mL, p = 0.006. The sublingual microcirculation was unaltered in both groups, while THI increased. The change in plasma fHb was inversely correlated with the changes in total vessel density (r = -0.57 [95% confidence interval -0.82, -0.16], p = 0.008, De Backer score (r = -0.63 [95% confidence interval -0.84, -0.25], p = 0.003 and THI (r = -0.72 [95% confidence interval -0.88, -0.39], p = 0.0003.Old RBC transfusion was associated with an increase in plasma fHb in septic patients. Increasing plasma fHb levels were associated with decreased microvascular density.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01584999.

  6. On-line fresh-cut lettuce quality measurement system using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettuce, which is a main type of fresh-cut vegetable, has been used in various fresh-cut products. In this study, an online quality measurement system for detecting foreign substances on the fresh-cut lettuce was developed using hyperspectral reflectance imaging. The online detection system with a s...

  7. Quantify Glucose Level in Freshly Diabetic's Blood by Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Chen, Xiaofeng; Ma, Shihua; Wu, Xiumei; Yang, Wenxing; Zhang, Weifeng; Li, Xiao

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate the capability of terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) to quantify glucose level in ex vivo freshly diabetic's blood. By investigating the THz spectra of different human blood, we find out THz absorption coefficients reflect a high sensitivity to the glucose level in blood. With a quantitative analysis of 70 patients, we demonstrate that the THz absorption coefficients and the blood glucose levels perform a linear relationship. A comparative experiment between THz measurement and glucometers is also conducted with another 20 blood samples, and the results confirm that the relative error is as less as 15%. Our ex vivo human blood study indicates that THz technique has great potential application to diagnose blood glucose level in clinical practice.

  8. Elimination of heparin interference during microarray processing of fresh and biobank-archived blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebels, Dennie G A J; van Herwijnen, Marcel H M; Brauers, Karen J J; de Kok, Theo M C M; Chalkiadaki, Georgia; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2014-07-01

    In the context of environmental health research, biobank blood samples have recently been identified as suitable for high-throughput omics analyses enabling the identification of new biomarkers of exposure and disease. However, blood samples containing the anti-coagulant heparin could complicate transcriptomic analysis because heparin may inhibit RNA polymerase causing inefficient cRNA synthesis and fluorophore labelling. We investigated the inhibitory effect of heparin and the influence of storage conditions (0 or 3 hr bench times, storage at room temperature or -80°C) on fluorophore labelling in heparinized fresh human buffy coat and whole blood biobank samples during the mRNA work-up protocol for microarray analysis. Subsequently, we removed heparin by lithium chloride (LiCl) treatment and performed a quality control analysis of LiCl-treated biobank sample microarrays to prove their suitability for downstream data analysis. Both fresh and biobank samples experienced varying degrees of heparin-induced inhibition of fluorophore labelling, making most samples unusable for microarray analysis. RNA derived from EDTA and citrate blood was not inhibited. No effect of bench time was observed but room temperature storage gave slightly better results. Strong correlations were observed between original blood sample RNA yield and the amount of synthesized cRNA. LiCl treatment restored sample quality to normal standards in both fresh and biobank samples and the previously identified correlations disappeared. Microarrays hybridized with LiCl-treated biobank samples were of excellent quality with no identifiable influence of heparin. We conclude that, to obtain high quality results, in most cases heparin removal is essential in blood-derived RNA samples intended for microarray analysis. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A rapid and efficient DNA extraction protocol from fresh and frozen human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Pokhraj; Das, Avishek; Dutta, Somit; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Different methods available for extraction of human genomic DNA suffer from one or more drawbacks including low yield, compromised quality, cost, time consumption, use of toxic organic solvents, and many more. Herein, we aimed to develop a method to extract DNA from 500 μL of fresh or frozen human blood. Five hundred microliters of fresh and frozen human blood samples were used for standardization of the extraction procedure. Absorbance at 260 and 280 nm, respectively, (A 260 /A 280 ) were estimated to check the quality and quantity of the extracted DNA sample. Qualitative assessment of the extracted DNA was checked by Polymerase Chain reaction and double digestion of the DNA sample. Our protocol resulted in average yield of 22±2.97 μg and 20.5±3.97 μg from 500 μL of fresh and frozen blood, respectively, which were comparable to many reference protocols and kits. Besides yielding bulk amount of DNA, our protocol is rapid, economical, and avoids toxic organic solvents such as Phenol. Due to unaffected quality, the DNA is suitable for downstream applications. The protocol may also be useful for pursuing basic molecular researches in laboratories having limited funds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ) or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA. SETTING: Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013. PARTICIPANTS: 60 donors (≥50 years old....... CONCLUSIONS: Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing......OBJECTIVES: Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from...

  11. Fluorescence hyperspectral imaging technique for the foreign substance detection on fresh-cut lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nondestructive methods based on fluorescence hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques were developed in order to detect worms on fresh-cut lettuce. The optimal wavebands for detecting worms on fresh-cut lettuce were investigated using the one-way ANOVA analysis and correlation analysis. The worm detec...

  12. Viable bacteria associated with red blood cells and plasma in freshly drawn blood donations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA) or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA. Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013. 60 donors (≥50 years old), self-reported medically healthy. Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively). Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5%) or anaerobic (27.8%) species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening. Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended.

  13. Color image segmentation to detect defects on fresh ham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty-Mahe, Pascale; Loisel, Philippe; Brossard, Didier

    2003-04-01

    We present in this paper the color segmentation methods that were used to detect appearance defects on 3 dimensional shape of fresh ham. The use of color histograms turned out to be an efficient solution to characterize the healthy skin, but a special care must be taken to choose the color components because of the 3 dimensional shape of ham.

  14. Clinical blood pool MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiner, Tim [Maastrich University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Goyen, Martin [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Rohrer, Mathias [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany). European Business Unit Diagnostic Imaging; Schoenberg, Stefan O. (eds.) [University Hospital Mannheim Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2008-07-01

    Clinical Blood Pool MR Imaging - This excellent treatise on Vasovist {sup registered} created by a team of exceptional faculty who are pioneers in MR Angiography covers the basic techniques, safety, efficacy, image processing and pharmaco-economic details to successfully implement a new level of MRA image quality with this new contrast agent. Martin Prince, Cornell University, New York The editors and authors have made groundbreaking contributions towards establishing MR angiography in various investigative settings, rendering it more precise and applying it for diverse indications. The work presented here is founded upon the extensive experience of the editors, as well as the broad range of experience from other scientific working groups. Maximilian Reiser, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich Vasovist {sup registered} (Gadofosveset), worldwide the first blood pool agent, has only recently become available for clinical use, but has already gained wide acceptance as a tool to improve magnetic resonance angiography. This book presents the first in-depth introduction to the basic physicochemical aspects of the agent, the application of Vasovist {sup registered} in clinical MRA, as well as potential clinical applications beyond MRA and patient management-related aspects. The first part of the book explains basic and technical properties of the agent and the differences of Vasovist {sup registered} compared to currently available extracellular agents. The second part contains detailed chapters on safety and efficacy. In the third part the focus is on MR angiographic applications, and in the fourth part of the book potential clinical fields beyond MRA are explored. All clinical chapters feature ready-to-use clinical protocols and a series of take home messages that concisely summarize the current role of blood pool imaging for each specific indication. (orig.)

  15. Near-Infrared Confocal Laser Reflectance Cytoarchitectural Imaging of the Substantia Nigra and Cerebellum in the Fresh Human Cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyuo, Cletus; Grand, Walter; Balos, Lucia L

    2017-01-01

    Cytoarchitectural neuroimaging remains critical for diagnosis of many brain diseases. Fluorescent dye-enhanced, near-infrared confocal in situ cellular imaging of the brain has been reported. However, impermeability of the blood-brain barrier to most fluorescent dyes limits clinical utility of this modality. The differential degree of reflectance from brain tissue with unenhanced near-infrared imaging may represent an alternative technique for in situ cytoarchitectural neuroimaging. We assessed the utility of unenhanced near-infrared confocal laser reflectance imaging of the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra in 2 fresh human cadaver brains using a confocal near-infrared laser probe. Cellular images based on near-infrared differential reflectance were captured at depths of 20-180 μm from the brain surface. Parts of the cerebellum and substantia nigra imaged using the probe were subsequently excised and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histologic correlation. Near-infrared reflectance imaging revealed the 3-layered cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum, with Purkinje cells appearing hyperreflectant. In the substantia nigra, neurons appeared hyporeflectant with hyperreflectant neuromelanin cytoplasmic inclusions. Cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra revealed on near-infrared imaging closely correlated with the histology on hematoxylin-eosin staining. We showed that unenhanced near-infrared reflectance imaging of fresh human cadaver brain can reliably identify and distinguish neurons and detailed cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. NMR blood vessel imaging method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riederer, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    A high speed method of forming computed images of blood vessels based on measurements of characteristics of a body is described comprising the steps of: subjecting a predetermined body area containing blood vessels of interest to, successively, applications of a short repetition time (TR) NMR pulse sequence during the period of high blood velocity and then to corresponding applications during the period of low blood velocity for successive heart beat cycles; weighting the collected imaging data from each application of the NMR pulse sequence according to whether the data was acquired during the period of high blood velocity or a period of low blood velocity of the corresponding heart beat cycle; accumulating weighted imaging data from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to high blood velocity periods and from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to low blood velocity periods; subtracting the weighted imaging data corresponding to each specific phase encoding acquired during the high blood velocity periods from the weighted imaging data for the same phase encoding corresponding to low blood velocity periods in order to compute blood vessel imaging data; and forming an image of the blood vessels of interest from the blood vessel imaging data

  17. Fluorescence hyperspectral imaging technique for foreign substance detection on fresh-cut lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Changyeun; Kim, Giyoung; Kim, Moon S; Lim, Jongguk; Cho, Hyunjeong; Barnaby, Jinyoung Yang; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2017-09-01

    Non-destructive methods based on fluorescence hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques were developed to detect worms on fresh-cut lettuce. The optimal wavebands for detecting the worms were investigated using the one-way ANOVA and correlation analyses. The worm detection imaging algorithms, RSI-I (492-626)/492 , provided a prediction accuracy of 99.0%. The fluorescence HSI techniques indicated that the spectral images with a pixel size of 1 × 1 mm had the best classification accuracy for worms. The overall results demonstrate that fluorescence HSI techniques have the potential to detect worms on fresh-cut lettuce. In the future, we will focus on developing a multi-spectral imaging system to detect foreign substances such as worms, slugs and earthworms on fresh-cut lettuce. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Manage your blood sugar (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checking your blood sugar levels often and writing down the results will tell you how well you are managing your diabetes so you ... possible. The best times to check your blood sugar are before meals and at bedtime. Your blood ...

  19. Fluorescence hyper-spectral imaging to detecting faecal contamination on fresh tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Romaniello

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Faecal contamination of fresh fruits represents a severe danger for human health. Thus some techniques based on microbiological testing were developed to individuate faecal contaminants but those tests do not results efficient because their non-applicability on overall vegetable unity. In this work a methodology based on hyper-spectral fluorescence imaging was developed and tested to detecting faecal contamination on fresh tomatoes. Two image-processing methods were performed to maximise the contrast between the faecal contaminant and tomatoes skin: principal component analysis and band image ratio (BRI. The BRI method allows classifying correctly 70% of contaminated area, with no false-positives in all examined cases. Thus, the developed methodology can be employed for a fast and effective detection of faecal contamination on fresh tomatoes.

  20. Investigation of alpha emitters in fresh and powdered blood of fertile women: an in vitro application of CR-39 NTDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, N.F.; University of Koya, Kurdistan; Jaafar, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Blood samples were acquired from 60 women aged 20-44 years having decreased fertility, infertile or with uterine tumors in the Iraqi Kurdistan region. The concentrations of α emitters in fresh blood ranged from 0.0029 to 0.0088 ppm, whereas those in powdered blood ranged from 0.0036 ppm in Eiskan to 0.0096 ppm in Halabjay-Kon in Sulaymania. The α emitter concentrations in fresh blood ranged from 0.0029 to 0.0139 ppm, whereas those in powdered blood ranged from 0.0031 ppm in Shorsh to 0.0146 ppm in Sedakan in the Erbil Governorate. However, the concentrations of α emitters in the blood of women with decreased fertility were higher in the North than women from South Iraq. The difference significantly p < 0.001 revealed higher means of track density of fresh and powder blood in Erbil compared to Sulaymania. α are more damaging to the living tissue and exposure of the gonads leads to decreased fertility in women, most of data have been significant therefore, the result shown the radiation effect on women fertility. (author)

  1. Prediction of pH of fresh chicken breast fillets by VNIR hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visible and near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging (400–900 nm) was used to evaluate pH of fresh chicken breast fillets (pectoralis major muscle) from the bone (dorsal) side of individual fillets. After the principal component analysis (PCA), a band threshold method was applied to the first prin...

  2. Diabetes and blood pressure (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ... People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ...

  3. Discrimination methods of biological contamination on fresh-cut lettuce based on VNIR and NIR hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multispectral imaging algorithms were developed using visible-near-infrared (VNIR) and near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques to detect worms on fresh-cut lettuce. The optimal wavebands that detect worm on fresh-cut lettuce for each type of HSI were investigated using the one-way...

  4. SMA Diagnosis: Detection of SMN1 Deletion with Real-Time mCOP-PCR System Using Fresh Blood DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niba, Emma Tabe Eko; Ar Rochmah, Mawaddah; Harahap, Nur Imma Fatimah; Awano, Hiroyuki; Morioka, Ichiro; Iijima, Kazumoto; Saito, Toshio; Saito, Kayoko; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Lai, Poh San; Bouike, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Hisahide; Shinohara, Masakazu

    2017-12-18

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders. The symptoms are caused by defects of lower motor neurons in the spinal cord. More than 95% of SMA patients are homozygous for survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) deletion. We previously developed a screening system for SMN1 deletion based on a modified competitive oligonucleotide priming-PCR (mCOP-PCR) technique using dried blood spot (DBS) on filter paper. This system is convenient for mass screening in the large population and/or first-tier diagnostic method of the patients in the remote areas. However, this system was still time-consuming and effort-taking, because it required pre-amplification procedure to avoid non-specific amplification and gel-electrophoresis to detect the presence or absence of SMN1 deletion. When the fresh blood samples are used instead of DBS, or when the gel-electrophoresis is replaced by real-time PCR, we may have a simpler and more rapid diagnostic method for SMA. To establish a simpler and more rapid diagnostic method of SMN1 deletion using fresh blood DNA. DNA samples extracted from fresh blood and stored at 4 ℃ for 1 month. The samples were assayed using a real-time mCOP-PCR system without pre-amplification procedures. DNA samples had already been genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), showing the presence or absence of SMN1 exon 7. The DNA samples were directly subjected to the mCOP-PCR step. The amplification of mCOP-PCR was monitored in a real-time PCR apparatus. The genotyping results of the real-time mCOP-PCR system using fresh blood DNA were completely matched with those of PCR-RFLP. In this real-time mCOP-PCR system using fresh blood-DNA, it took only four hours from extraction of DNA to detection of the presence or absence of SMN1 deletion, while it took more than 12 hours in PCR-RFLP. Our real-time mCOP-PCR system using fresh blood DNA was rapid and accurate, suggesting it may be useful for the first

  5. Images of Blood in American Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødje, Kjetil

    Through studying images of blood in film from the mid-1950s to the end of the 1960s, this path-breaking book explores how blood as an (audio)visual cinematic element went from predominately operating as a signifier, providing audiences with information about a film’s plot and characters, to incre......Through studying images of blood in film from the mid-1950s to the end of the 1960s, this path-breaking book explores how blood as an (audio)visual cinematic element went from predominately operating as a signifier, providing audiences with information about a film’s plot and characters...... by following one (audio)visual element through an exploration that traverses established standards for film production and reception. This study does not heed distinctions regarding to genres (horror, western, gangster) or models of film production (exploitation, independent, studio productions) but rather...... images as well as with audiences....

  6. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, Kenya, E-mail: murase@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Faculty of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-06-23

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  7. Successful implementation of a packed red blood cell and fresh frozen plasma transfusion protocol in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E Szpila

    Full Text Available Blood product transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine if implementation of a restrictive protocol for packed red blood cell (PRBC and fresh frozen plasma (FFP transfusion safely reduces blood product utilization and costs in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU.We performed a retrospective, historical control analysis comparing before (PRE and after (POST implementation of a restrictive PRBC/FFP transfusion protocol for SICU patients. Univariate analysis was utilized to compare patient demographics and blood product transfusion totals between the PRE and POST cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed to determine if implementation of the restrictive transfusion protocol is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes after controlling for age, illness severity, and total blood products received.829 total patients were included in the analysis (PRE, n=372; POST, n=457. Despite higher mean age (56 vs. 52 years, p=0.01 and APACHE II scores (12.5 vs. 11.2, p=0.006, mean units transfused per patient were lower for both packed red blood cells (0.7 vs. 1.2, p=0.03 and fresh frozen plasma (0.3 vs. 1.2, p=0.007 in the POST compared to the PRE cohort, respectively. There was no difference in inpatient mortality between the PRE and POST cohorts (7.5% vs. 9.2%, p=0.39. There was a decreased risk of urinary tract infections (OR 0.47, 95%CI 0.28-0.80 in the POST cohort after controlling for age, illness severity and amount of blood products transfused.Implementation of a restrictive transfusion protocol can effectively reduce blood product utilization in critically ill surgical patients with no increase in morbidity or mortality.

  8. Pulsed terahertz imaging of breast cancer in freshly excised murine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Chavez, Tanny; Khan, Kamrul; Wu, Jingxian; Chakraborty, Avishek; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Bailey, Keith; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2018-02-01

    This paper investigates terahertz (THz) imaging and classification of freshly excised murine xenograft breast cancer tumors. These tumors are grown via injection of E0771 breast adenocarcinoma cells into the flank of mice maintained on high-fat diet. Within 1 h of excision, the tumor and adjacent tissues are imaged using a pulsed THz system in the reflection mode. The THz images are classified using a statistical Bayesian mixture model with unsupervised and supervised approaches. Correlation with digitized pathology images is conducted using classification images assigned by a modal class decision rule. The corresponding receiver operating characteristic curves are obtained based on the classification results. A total of 13 tumor samples obtained from 9 tumors are investigated. The results show good correlation of THz images with pathology results in all samples of cancer and fat tissues. For tumor samples of cancer, fat, and muscle tissues, THz images show reasonable correlation with pathology where the primary challenge lies in the overlapping dielectric properties of cancer and muscle tissues. The use of a supervised regression approach shows improvement in the classification images although not consistently in all tissue regions. Advancing THz imaging of breast tumors from mice and the development of accurate statistical models will ultimately progress the technique for the assessment of human breast tumor margins.

  9. Detection of decay in fresh-cut lettuce using hyperspectral imaging and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh-cut lettuce sold in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) is a desirable, but highly perishable product. Decay of tissue can start a few days after processing and may be difficult to detect by quick visual observation. A system for early detection of decay and gradual evaluation of its progress ...

  10. Visible and Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging for Cooking Loss Classification of Fresh Broiler Breast Fillets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe Jiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cooking loss (CL is a critical quality attribute directly relating to meat juiciness. The potential of the hyperspectral imaging (HSI technique was investigated for non-invasively classifying and visualizing the CL of fresh broiler breast meat. Hyperspectral images of total 75 fresh broiler breast fillets were acquired by the system operating in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR, 400–1000 nm range. Mean spectra were extracted from regions of interest (ROIs determined by pure muscle tissue pixels. CL was firstly measured by calculating the weight loss in cooking, and then fillets were grouped into high-CL and low-CL according to the threshold of 20%. The classification methods partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA and radial basis function-support vector machine (RBF-SVM were applied, respectively, to determine the optimal spectral calibration strategy. Results showed that the PLS-DA model developed using the data, that is, first-order derivative (Der1 of VNIR full spectra, performed best with correct classification rates (CCRs of 0.90 and 0.79 for the calibration and prediction sets, respectively. Furthermore, to simplify the optimal PLS-DA model and make it practical, effective wavelengths were individually selected using uninformative variable elimination (UVE and competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS. Through performance comparison, the CARS-PLS-DA combination was identified as the optimal method and the PLS-DA model built with 18 informative wavelengths selected by CARS resulted in good CCRs of 0.86 and 0.79. Finally, classification maps were created by predicting CL categories of each pixel in the VNIR hyperspectral images using the CARS-PLS-DA model, and the general CL categories of fillets were readily discernible. The overall results were encouraging and showed the promising potential of the VNIR HSI technique for classifying fresh broiler breast fillets into different CL categories.

  11. Fish freshness estimation using eye image processing under white and UV lightings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Katsuhiro; Shirataki, Yuri; Liao, Qiuhong; Ogawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Kondo, Naoshi

    2017-05-01

    A non-destructive method of estimating the freshness of fish is required for appropriate price setting and food safety. In particular, for determining the possibility of eating raw fish (sashimi), freshness estimation is critical. We studied such an estimation method by capturing images of fish eyes and performing image processing using the temporal changes of the luminance of pupil and iris. To detect subtle non-visible changes of these features, we used UV (375 nm) light illumination in addition to visible white light illumination. Polarization and two-channel LED techniques were used to remove strong specular reflection from the cornea of the eye and from clear-plastic wrap used to cover the fish to maintain humidity. Pupil and iris regions were automatically detected separately by image processing after the specular reflection removal process, and two types of eye contrast were defined as the ratio of mean and median pixel values of each region. Experiments using 16 Japanese dace (Tribolodon hakonensis) at 23° and 85% humidity for 24 hours were performed. The eye contrast of raw fish increase non-linearly in the initial period and then decreased; however, that of frozen-thawed fish decreased linearly throughout 24 hours, regardless of the lighting. Interestingly, the eye contrast using UV light showed a higher correlation with time than that using white light only in the case of raw fish within the early 6- hour period postmortem. These results show the possibility of estimating fish freshness in the initial stage when fish are eaten raw using white and UV lightings.

  12. Images of Blood in American Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødje, Kjetil

    by following one (audio)visual element through an exploration that traverses established standards for film production and reception. This study does not heed distinctions regarding to genres (horror, western, gangster) or models of film production (exploitation, independent, studio productions) but rather......Through studying images of blood in film from the mid-1950s to the end of the 1960s, this path-breaking book explores how blood as an (audio)visual cinematic element went from predominately operating as a signifier, providing audiences with information about a film’s plot and characters......, to increasingly operating in terms of affect, potentially evoking visceral and embodied responses in viewers. Using films such as The Return of Dracula, The Tingler, Blood Feast, Two Thousand Maniacs, Color Me Blood Red, Bonnie and Clyde, and The Wild Bunch, Rødje takes a novel approach to film history...

  13. Investigation of the ripeness of oil palm fresh fruit bunches using bio-speckle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salambue, R.; Adnan, A.; Shiddiq, M.

    2018-03-01

    The ripeness of the oil palm Fresh Fruit Bunches (FFB) determines the yield of the oil produced. Traditionally there are two ways to determine FFB ripeness which are the number of loose fruits and the color changes. Nevertheless, one drawback of visual determination is subjective and qualitative judgment. In this study, the FFB ripeness was investigated using laser based image processing technique. The advantages of using this technique are non-destructive, simple and quantitative. The working principle of the investigation is that a FFB is inserted into a light tight box which contains a laser diode and a CMOS camera, the FFB is illuminated, and then an image is recorded. The FFB image recorder was performed on four FFB fractions i.e. F0, F3, F4 and F5 on the front and rear surfaces at three sections. The recorded images are speckled granules that have light intensity variation (bio-speckle imaging). The feature extracted from the specked image is the contrast value obtained from the average gray value intensity and the standard deviation. Based on the contrast values, the four fractions of FFB can be grouped into three levels of ripeness of unripe (F0), ripe (F3) and overripe (F4 and F5) on the front surface of base section of FFB by 75%.

  14. Effect of antibrowning agents on fresh-cut potato tubers using frequency filtering of biospeckle images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minz, Preeti D; Ansari, Md Zaheer; Nirala, A K

    2015-01-01

    Our present work aims to study the physiological changes of chemically treated fresh-cut potato tubers and then to correlate such changes with the results of the non destructive and non invasive laser biospeckle technique. The effect of chemically treated (citric acid (CA-0.5% and 1.0%) and citric acid + sodium chloride (CS-0.5% and 1.0%)) fresh-cut potato tubers on physiological activities such as the respiration rate and weight loss at cold storage has been studied for eight consecutive days. In addition, biospeckle recording has been carried out for eight consecutive days for all the chemically treated samples and from captured images, and the numerical results (inertia moment (IM)) with and without frequency filtering have been obtained. A comparatively higher respiration rate and lower weight loss is observed for CS treated samples than that of CA treated samples. The results of the IM obtained with the exclusion of the higher frequency show a similar nature to the respiration rate and also, separations of the respiration curves at two concentrations for both the treated samples were well correlated with the IM curves. The concentration effect for both the treatments on the IM value with the exclusion of lower frequencies has also been presented. Thus the IM method with filtration of particular bands is able to separate the different physiological phenomena with one another and is also able to differentiate the chemical effect on the samples. (paper)

  15. Discrimination methods for biological contaminants in fresh-cut lettuce based on VNIR and NIR hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Changyeun; Kim, Giyoung; Kim, Moon S.; Lim, Jongguk; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Hong-Seok; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2017-09-01

    The rapid detection of biological contaminants such as worms in fresh-cut vegetables is necessary to improve the efficiency of visual inspections carried out by workers. Multispectral imaging algorithms were developed using visible-near-infrared (VNIR) and near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques to detect worms in fresh-cut lettuce. The optimal wavebands that can detect worms in fresh-cut lettuce were investigated for each type of HSI using one-way ANOVA. Worm-detection imaging algorithms for VNIR and NIR imaging exhibited prediction accuracies of 97.00% (RI547/945) and 100.0% (RI1064/1176, SI1064-1176, RSI-I(1064-1173)/1064, and RSI-II(1064-1176)/(1064+1176)), respectively. The two HSI techniques revealed that spectral images with a pixel size of 1 × 1 mm or 2 × 2 mm had the best classification accuracy for worms. The results demonstrate that hyperspectral reflectance imaging techniques have the potential to detect worms in fresh-cut lettuce. Future research relating to this work will focus on a real-time sorting system for lettuce that can simultaneously detect various defects such as browning, worms, and slugs.

  16. Two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging of freshly isolated frog retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rong-Wen; Li, Yi-Chao; Ye, Tong; Strang, Christianne; Keyser, Kent; Curcio, Christine A; Yao, Xin-Cheng

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cellular sources of autofluorescence signals in freshly isolated frog (Rana pipiens) retinas. Equipped with an ultrafast laser, a laser scanning two-photon excitation fluorescence microscope was employed for sub-cellular resolution examination of both sliced and flat-mounted retinas. Two-photon imaging of retinal slices revealed autofluorescence signals over multiple functional layers, including the photoreceptor layer (PRL), outer nuclear layer (ONL), outer plexiform layer (OPL), inner nuclear layer (INL), inner plexiform layer (IPL), and ganglion cell layer (GCL). Using flat-mounted retinas, depth-resolved imaging of individual retinal layers further confirmed multiple sources of autofluorescence signals. Cellular structures were clearly observed at the PRL, ONL, INL, and GCL. At the PRL, the autofluorescence was dominantly recorded from the intracellular compartment of the photoreceptors; while mixed intracellular and extracellular autofluorescence signals were observed at the ONL, INL, and GCL. High resolution autofluorescence imaging clearly revealed mosaic organization of rod and cone photoreceptors; and sub-cellular bright autofluorescence spots, which might relate to connecting cilium, was observed in the cone photoreceptors only. Moreover, single-cone and double-cone outer segments could be directly differentiated.

  17. Comparison of platelet transfusion as fresh whole blood versus apheresis platelets for massively transfused combat trauma patients (CME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P; Spinella, Philip C; Shorr, Andrew F; Beekley, Alec C; Grathwohl, Kurt W; Rentas, Francisco J; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2011-02-01

    At major combat hospitals, the military is able to provide blood products to include apheresis platelets (aPLT), but also has extensive experience using fresh whole blood (FWB). In massively transfused trauma patients, we compared outcomes of patients receiving FWB to those receiving aPLT. This study was a retrospective review of casualties at the military hospital in Baghdad, Iraq, between January 2004 and December 2006. Patients requiring massive transfusion (≥10 units in 24 hr) were divided into two groups: those receiving FWB (n = 85) or aPLT (n = 284) during their resuscitation. Admission characteristics, resuscitation, and survival were compared between groups. Multivariate regression analyses were performed comparing survival of patients at 24 hours and at 30 days. Secondary outcomes including adverse events and causes of death were analyzed. Unadjusted survival between groups receiving aPLT and FWB was similar at 24 hours (84% vs. 81%, respectively; p = 0.52) and at 30 days (60% versus 57%, respectively; p = 0.72). Multivariate regression failed to identify differences in survival between patients receiving PLT transfusions either as FWB or as aPLT at 24 hours or at 30 days. Survival for massively transfused trauma patients receiving FWB appears to be similar to patients resuscitated with aPLT. Prospective trials will be necessary before consideration of FWB in the routine management of civilian trauma. However, in austere environments where standard blood products are unavailable, FWB is a feasible alternative. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Hemostatic resuscitation for massive hemorrhage with warm fresh whole blood in a patient with severe blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hao Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old male Navy soldier was struck on the left thigh by a ruptured cable and was subsequently thrown into the sea. Initial evaluation showed an Injury Severity Score of 34. Core body temperature was 34.1°C. Laboratory data included a hemoglobin level of 4.5 g/dL and a hematocrit of 13.3%. Prothrombin time was prolonged (>100 seconds, international normalized ratio was elevated (9.99, and partial thromboplastin time was elevated (>180 seconds. The patient was treated for hypothermia, coagulopathy, and metabolic acidosis during resuscitation. The patient was transfused with 16,320 mL of blood during the first 24 hours following the accident, including 4500 mL (18 units of warm fresh whole blood (WFWB donated by the patient's military colleagues. The patient was successfully resuscitated, and the injured leg was salvaged. Component therapy can afford replacement of specific deficiencies or requirements, decrease the risk of transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases, and improve resource utilization. However, a protocol of early transfusion with WFWB should be considered during resuscitation following massive hemorrhage in specific conditions such as battle fields or urgent situations.

  19. Red blood cell image enhancement techniques for cells with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    quality or challenging conditions of the images such as poor illumination of blood smear and most importantly overlapping RBC. The algorithm comprises of two RBC segmentation that can be selected based on the image quality, circle mask technique and grayscale blood smear image processing. Detail explanations ...

  20. Screening vaccine formulations for biological activity using fresh human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Roger H; Hakimi, Jalil; Ha, Yukyung; Aboutorabian, Sepideh; Ausar, Salvador F; Hasija, Manvi; Smith, Steven G; Todryk, Stephen M; Dockrell, Hazel M; Rahman, Nausheen

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the relevant biological activity of any pharmaceutical formulation destined for human use is crucial. For vaccine-based formulations, activity must reflect the expected immune response, while for non-vaccine therapeutic agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, a lack of immune response to the formulation is desired. During early formulation development, various biochemical and biophysical characteristics can be monitored in a high-throughput screening (HTS) format. However, it remains impractical and arguably unethical to screen samples in this way for immunological functionality in animal models. Furthermore, data for immunological functionality lag formulation design by months, making it cumbersome to relate back to formulations in real-time. It is also likely that animal testing may not accurately reflect the response in humans. For a more effective formulation screen, a human whole blood (hWB) approach can be used to assess immunological functionality. The functional activity relates directly to the human immune response to a complete formulation (adjuvant/antigen) and includes adjuvant response, antigen response, adjuvant-modulated antigen response, stability, and potentially safety. The following commentary discusses the hWB approach as a valuable new tool to de-risk manufacture, formulation design, and clinical progression.

  1. Digital image analysis of radial shrinkage of fresh spruce (Picea abies L.) wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Christian; Konnerth, Johannes; Rosner, Sabine

    2011-03-21

    Contact-free digital image analysis was performed of the radial shrinkage of fresh, fully saturated small spruce wood beams. An experimental test set-up was developed to ensure constant distance from the charge-coupled device camera to the sample surface as well as constant climate and light conditions during the whole experiment. Dimensional changes were observed immediately after the drying process began. An unexpected distinct effect could be observed which could not be explained by drying surface layers only. After a fast initial radial shrinkage a slowing down of the dimensional changes occurred at high mean moisture contents. A complete interruption of any dimensional changes followed. Finally, a recovery from shrinkage was even observed. It is assumed that strong negative pressure occurred in the fully saturated capillaries owing to dehydration which led to additional dimensional changes. As a consequence, the break of the water column and aeration in these capillaries finally resulted in a recovery period in the shrinkage rate due to the pressure release. After this effect, the dehydration was characterized by a phase of fast and almost linear shrinkage due to drying surface layers. Finally, the shrinkage slowed down to zero when reaching equilibrium moisture content.

  2. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity

  3. Application of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and hyperspectral imaging in evaluation of decay in fresh-cut lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is commercially the most popular leafy vegetable whose leaves are usually consumed raw. Cleaned, cored, and chopped (fresh-cut) lettuce is a desirable, but highly perishable product. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) has been introduced to maintain quality of fresh-cut ...

  4. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells.

  5. Evaluation of blood signal in cardiac MR imaging using ''black-blood'' technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Tadashi; Yamada, Takayuki; Tamura, Akihisa; Miyasaka, Kenji; Kohata, Minako; Ono, Chiaki; Kajima, Toshio; Ito, Katsuhide

    1999-01-01

    Degradation of image quality encountered in cardiac imaging has been attributed to flowing blood signal in the ventricular cavity. To solve this problem, a sequence in which a pair of selective and non-selective inversion pulse in used for a preparation pulse, has been proposed. However, even with this sequence we frequently observed the signal in the blood pool caused by blood itself rather than blood flow. In this article, we investigated the characteristics of those signals. Five healthy normal volunteers and 13 patients with ischemic heart disease were scanned with a 1.5-tesla MR imager. Breath-hold ECG gated fast spin echo with the pair of inversion pulses was performed to obtain cardiac images with T 2 contrast. Typical blood signal appeared as inhomogeneous high intense band adjacent to inner surface of left ventricular apex. At ventricular base, no such signal was encountered even at akinetic myocardium in patients with old myocardial infarction. This signal was observed in all volunteers and 39% of patients. Decrease of TR resulting from tachycardia tended to reduce the blood signal in the left ventricular cavity. Thicker slice section and selective inversion pulse tended to increase the blood signal. Recognition of the signal is essential to differentiate true myocardial infarcts from blood signal, although bright blood imaging like gradient echo or thinner section can partly be helpful. (author)

  6. White blood cell count - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hand. The puncture site is cleaned with antiseptic, and a tourniquet (an elastic band) or blood ... or young child: The area is cleansed with antiseptic and punctured with a sharp needle or a ...

  7. Automatic segmentation of blood vessels from retinal fundus images ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The retinal blood vessels were segmented through color space conversion and color channel .... Retinal blood vessel segmentation was also attempted through multi-scale operators. A few works in this ... fundus camera at 35 degrees field of view. The image ... vessel segmentation is available from two human observers.

  8. Algorithm for detection of overlapped red blood cells in microscopic images of blood smears

    OpenAIRE

    Romero-Rondón, Miguel Fabián; Sanabria-Rosas, Laura Melissa; Bautista-Rozo, Lola Xiomara; Mendoza-Castellanos, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The hemogram is one of the most requested medical tests as it presents details about the three cell series in the blood: red series, white series and platelet series. To make some diagnostics, the specialist must undertake the test manually, observing the blood cells under the microscope, which implies a great physical effort. In order to facilitate this work, different digital image processing techniques to detect and classify red blood cells have been proposed. However, a common problem is ...

  9. Automatic segmentation of blood vessels from retinal fundus images ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The retinal blood vessels were segmented through color space conversion and color channel extraction, image pre-processing, Gabor filtering, image postprocessing, feature construction through application of principal component analysis, k-means clustering and first level classification using Naïve–Bayes classification ...

  10. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  11. Imaging of the bronchial blood flow using RI-angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Hirayama, Jiro; Kanai, Hisakata; Kobayashi, Toshio; Handa, Kenjiro

    1979-01-01

    RI-angiography with sup(99m)TcO 4 - was carried out using a scintillation camera with a digital minicomputer for the purpose of imaging of bronchial blood flow in various lung diseases, and as application of dual radioisotope techniques, other imagings such as tumor imaging with 197 HgCl 2 or 67 Ga-citrate and/or perfusion imaging with sup(99m)Tc-MAA, were performed simultaneously in patients remaining the same position, too. The image as a iso-count map extracted out of the image of 197 HgCl 2 , 67 Ga-citrate or sup(99m)Tc-MAA, was superimposed to the brightness image of RI-angiogram (aortic phase). By these procedures, the image of bronchial blood flow were obtained in some patients with lung cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, lung abscess, and chronic bronchitis. The dual radioisotope techniques using RI-angiography and the other imaging were useful to make isotope diagnosis of lung diseases more reliable, and the image superimposition methods using RI-angiogram and the image of tumor of perfusion, were useful to improve anatomic orientation of the former. (author)

  12. The challenges of analysing blood stains with hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuula, J.; Puupponen, H.-H.; Rinta, H.; Pölönen, I.

    2014-06-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a potential noninvasive technology for detecting, separating and identifying various substances. In the forensic and military medicine and other CBRNE related use it could be a potential method for analyzing blood and for scanning other human based fluids. For example, it would be valuable to easily detect whether some traces of blood are from one or more persons or if there are some irrelevant substances or anomalies in the blood. This article represents an experiment of separating four persons' blood stains on a white cotton fabric with a SWIR hyperspectral camera and FT-NIR spectrometer. Each tested sample includes standardized 75 _l of 100 % blood. The results suggest that on the basis of the amount of erythrocytes in the blood, different people's blood might be separable by hyperspectral analysis. And, referring to the indication given by erythrocytes, there might be a possibility to find some other traces in the blood as well. However, these assumptions need to be verified with wider tests, as the number of samples in the study was small. According to the study there also seems to be several biological, chemical and physical factors which affect alone and together on the hyperspectral analyzing results of blood on fabric textures, and these factors need to be considered before making any further conclusions on the analysis of blood on various materials.

  13. Quantitative imaging of coronary blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Alessio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Adam M. Alessio received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 2003. During his graduate studies he developed tomographic reconstruction methods for correlated data and helped construct a high-resolution PET system. He is currently a Research Assistant Professor in Radiology at the University of Washington. His research interests focus on improved data processing and reconstruction algorithms for PET/CT systems with an emphasis on quantitative imaging. Erik Butterworth recieved the BA degree in Mathematics from the University of Chicago in 1977. Between 1977 and 1987 he worked as a computer programmer/analyst for several small commercial software firms. Since 1988, he has worked as a software engineer on various research projects at the University of Washington. Between 1988 and 1993 he developed a real-time data aquisition for the analysis of estuarine sediment transport in the department of Geophysics. Between 1988 and 2002 he developed I4, a system for the display and analysis of cardic PET images in the department of Cardiology. Since 1993 he has worked on physiological simulation systems (XSIM from 1993 to 1999, JSim since 1999 at the National Simulation Resource Facility in Cirulatory Mass Transport and Exchange, in the Department of Bioengineering. His research interests include simulation systems and medical imaging. James H. Caldwell, MD, University of Missouri-Columbia 1970, is Professor of Medicine (Cardiology and Radiology and Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Acting Head, Division of Cardiology and Director of Nuclear Cardiology for the University of Washington Hospitals, Seattle WA, USA. James B. Bassingthwaighte, MD, Toronto 1955, PhD Mayo Grad Sch Med 1964, was Professor of Physiology and of Medicine at Mayo Clinic until 1975 when he moved to the University of Washington to chair Bioengineering. He is Professor of Bioengineering and

  14. Nanoparticle encapsulation in red blood cells enables blood-pool magnetic particle imaging hours after injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmer, J; Gleich, B; Borgert, J; Antonelli, A; Sfara, C; Magnani, M; Tiemann, B; Weizenecker, J

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging approach that is based on the nonlinear magnetization response of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) injected into the blood stream. To date, real-time MPI of the bolus passage of an approved MRI SPIO contrast agent injected into the tail vein of living mice has been demonstrated. However, nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood stream by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Therefore, imaging applications for long-term monitoring require the repeated administration of bolus injections, which complicates quantitative comparisons due to the temporal variations in concentration. Encapsulation of SPIOs into red blood cells (RBCs) has been suggested to increase the blood circulation time of nanoparticles. This work presents first evidence that SPIO-loaded RBCs can be imaged in the blood pool of mice several hours after injection using MPI. This finding is supported by magnetic particle spectroscopy performed to quantify the iron concentration in blood samples extracted from the mice 3 and 24 h after injection of SPIO-loaded RBCs. Based on these results, new MPI applications can be envisioned, such as permanent 3D real-time visualization of the vessel tree during interventional procedures, bleeding monitoring after stroke, or long-term monitoring and treatment control of cardiovascular diseases. (paper)

  15. Imaging Blood Vessel Morphology in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuh, Sandra; Holmes, Jon; Ulrich, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Conventional optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables the visualization of morphological changes of skin cancer. The use of OCT in the diagnostic investigation and in the therapy decision of non-melanoma skin cancer and other skin changes is already established, and has found its way into routine...... practice. With the development of speckle-variance OCT, also named dynamic OCT (D-OCT), the vascular architecture and the blood flow of the skin can be displayed in vivo and in 3D. This novel angiographic variant of OCT offers the ability to visualize and measure vessel morphology providing a new insight...... into healthy, inflammatory and neoplastic skin lesions such as malignant melanoma. This review focuses on the possibilities of using D-OCT on healthy and diseased skin. We suggest and illustrate key diagnostic characteristics by analyzing the initial publications and preliminary unpublished data on vessel...

  16. Identification and red blood cell automated counting from blood smear images using computer-aided system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Vasundhara; Kumar, Preetham

    2018-03-01

    Red blood cell count plays a vital role in identifying the overall health of the patient. Hospitals use the hemocytometer to count the blood cells. Conventional method of placing the smear under microscope and counting the cells manually lead to erroneous results, and medical laboratory technicians are put under stress. A computer-aided system will help to attain precise results in less amount of time. This research work proposes an image-processing technique for counting the number of red blood cells. It aims to examine and process the blood smear image, in order to support the counting of red blood cells and identify the number of normal and abnormal cells in the image automatically. K-medoids algorithm which is robust to external noise is used to extract the WBCs from the image. Granulometric analysis is used to separate the red blood cells from the white blood cells. The red blood cells obtained are counted using the labeling algorithm and circular Hough transform. The radius range for the circle-drawing algorithm is estimated by computing the distance of the pixels from the boundary which automates the entire algorithm. A comparison is done between the counts obtained using the labeling algorithm and circular Hough transform. Results of the work showed that circular Hough transform was more accurate in counting the red blood cells than the labeling algorithm as it was successful in identifying even the overlapping cells. The work also intends to compare the results of cell count done using the proposed methodology and manual approach. The work is designed to address all the drawbacks of the previous research work. The research work can be extended to extract various texture and shape features of abnormal cells identified so that diseases like anemia of inflammation and chronic disease can be detected at the earliest.

  17. Cytological comparison of gill chloride cells and blood serum ion concentrations in kutum (Rutilus frisii kutum spawners from brackish (Caspian Sea and fresh water (Khoshkrood River environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghahremanzadeh Zahra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The size and number of chloride cells and serum ion concentrations in kutum, Rutillus frisii kutum Nordman, from brackish (Caspian Sea and fresh water (Khoshkrood River environments were studied to gain a better understanding of osmoregulation in this species. Twenty mature kutum specimens were collected from the Caspian Sea (Anzali coasts, 8.49 ppt salinity and 12.4°C temperature and 20 specimens from Khoshkrood River (0.18 ppt salinity and 18°C temperature. Gill samples were analyzed histologically and concentrations of Na+, Cl- , K+, and Mg2+ ions were determined in the blood serum. Concentrations of Na+, Cl- , K+, and Mg2+ ions and osmotic pressure in mature kutum from brackish water were significantly higher than in specimens from fresh water. The average size and number of chloride cells in the fish from seawater were considerably larger than those from fresh water. The mean size of chloride cells was 6.89 ± 1.16 μm in brackish water samples and 5.1 ± 0.81 μm in river samples. The average number of chloride cells in brackish and river water samples were 16.92 and 6.57, respectively. The density and size of chloride cells increased with increases in salinity

  18. A comparison of positron-emitting blood pool imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnatowich, D.J.; Kulprathipanja, S.; Evans, G.; Elmaleh, D.

    1979-01-01

    The three agents, 11 C-carboxyhaemoglobin, 68 Ga-transferrin and 68 Ga-labelled red cells have been compared in dogs to assess their relative merits for blood-pool imaging. For 1 h following administration of each agent, periodic blood samples were withdrawn for counting in a NaI (Tl) well counter while conventional two-dimensional images were obtained simultaneously on the Massachusetts General Hospital positron camera. Count rates in regions about the heart, liver and spleen were obtained for each image. The disappearance of blood activity as shown from the results of counting the blood samples and from the counting rates in regions about the heart was found to be identical within experimental error for the three agents. In the liver and spleen regions, the highest count rates were obtained with 68 Ga-transferrin and the lowest with 68 Ga-labelled red cells; count rates in these regions with labelled red cells were virtually constant throughout the 1 h study. It may be concluded that with the exceptions noted above, the three agents are approximately equivalent for blood-pool imaging. (author)

  19. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD). Renal imaging. Concepts and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissen, Johanna C.; Haneder, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J.

    2010-01-01

    Many renal diseases as well as several pharmacons cause a change in renal blood flow and/or renal oxygenation. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging takes advantage of local field inhomogeneities and is based on a T2 * -weighted sequence. BOLD is a non-invasive method allowing an estimation of the renal, particularly the medullary oxygenation, and an indirect measurement of blood flow without administration of contrast agents. Thus, effects of different drugs on the kidney and various renal diseases can be controlled and observed. This work will provide an overview of the studies carried out so far and identify ways how BOLD can be used in clinical studies. (orig.)

  20. High-speed imaging of blood splatter patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, T.E.; Albright, K.A.; King, N.S.P.; Yates, G.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Levine, G.F. (California Dept. of Justice, Sacramento, CA (United States). Bureau of Forensic Services)

    1993-01-01

    The interpretation of blood splatter patterns is an important element in reconstructing the events and circumstances of an accident or crime scene. Unfortunately, the interpretation of patterns and stains formed by blood droplets is not necessarily intuitive and study and analysis are required to arrive at a correct conclusion. A very useful tool in the study of blood splatter patterns is high-speed photography. Scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Department of Energy (DOE), and Bureau of Forensic Services, State of California, have assembled a high-speed imaging system designed to image blood splatter patterns. The camera employs technology developed by Los Alamos for the underground nuclear testing program and has also been used in a military mine detection program. The camera uses a solid-state CCD sensor operating at approximately 650 frames per second (75 MPixels per second) with a microchannel plate image intensifier that can provide shuttering as short as 5 ns. The images are captured with a laboratory high-speed digitizer and transferred to an IBM compatible PC for display and hard copy output for analysis. The imaging system is described in this paper.

  1. High-speed imaging of blood splatter patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, T.E.; Albright, K.A.; King, N.S.P.; Yates, G.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Levine, G.F. [California Dept. of Justice, Sacramento, CA (United States). Bureau of Forensic Services

    1993-05-01

    The interpretation of blood splatter patterns is an important element in reconstructing the events and circumstances of an accident or crime scene. Unfortunately, the interpretation of patterns and stains formed by blood droplets is not necessarily intuitive and study and analysis are required to arrive at a correct conclusion. A very useful tool in the study of blood splatter patterns is high-speed photography. Scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Department of Energy (DOE), and Bureau of Forensic Services, State of California, have assembled a high-speed imaging system designed to image blood splatter patterns. The camera employs technology developed by Los Alamos for the underground nuclear testing program and has also been used in a military mine detection program. The camera uses a solid-state CCD sensor operating at approximately 650 frames per second (75 MPixels per second) with a microchannel plate image intensifier that can provide shuttering as short as 5 ns. The images are captured with a laboratory high-speed digitizer and transferred to an IBM compatible PC for display and hard copy output for analysis. The imaging system is described in this paper.

  2. Thermal imaging of levitated fresh and salt water drops during laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Cody; Biggs, Harrison

    2017-11-01

    Simulation of high energy laser propagation and scattering in the maritime environment is problematic, due to the high likelihood of turbulence, fog, and rain or sea spray within the beam path. Considering large water drops (diameters of approximately 1-mm), such as those found in a light rain, an incident high energy laser will lead to rapid evaporation of the water drop as it traverses the beam path. In this work we present surface temperature measurements of a water drop obtained using a FLIR IR camera. The drop is acoustically levitated, and subject to a continuous wave laser with a wavelength of 1070-nm and a mean irradiance of approximately 800 W/cm2. These measurements show that the steady-state surface temperature of the drop is well below the saturation temperature, and for pure substances the equilibrium temperature decreases with decreasing drop volume similar to observations with smaller aqueous aerosols. Temperature non-uniformity within the drop is also assessed from statistics of the surface temperature fluctuations. Preliminary results from irradiated salt water drops show notably different behavior from fresh water drops, including temperature spikes as the drop volume decreases and occasional nucleate boiling. Acknowledge support from ONR #N00014-17-WX-00031.

  3. White blood cell counting analysis of blood smear images using various segmentation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safuan, Syadia Nabilah Mohd; Tomari, Razali; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Othman, Nurmiza

    2017-09-01

    In white blood cell (WBC) diagnosis, the most crucial measurement parameter is the WBC counting. Such information is widely used to evaluate the effectiveness of cancer therapy and to diagnose several hidden infection within human body. The current practice of manual WBC counting is laborious and a very subjective assessment which leads to the invention of computer aided system (CAS) with rigorous image processing solution. In the CAS counting work, segmentation is the crucial step to ensure the accuracy of the counted cell. The optimal segmentation strategy that can work under various blood smeared image acquisition conditions is remain a great challenge. In this paper, a comparison between different segmentation methods based on color space analysis to get the best counting outcome is elaborated. Initially, color space correction is applied to the original blood smeared image to standardize the image color intensity level. Next, white blood cell segmentation is performed by using combination of several color analysis subtraction which are RGB, CMYK and HSV, and Otsu thresholding. Noises and unwanted regions that present after the segmentation process is eliminated by applying a combination of morphological and Connected Component Labelling (CCL) filter. Eventually, Circle Hough Transform (CHT) method is applied to the segmented image to estimate the number of WBC including the one under the clump region. From the experiment, it is found that G-S yields the best performance.

  4. Fine structures and ion images on fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections by transmission electron and scanning ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaya, K.; Okabe, M.; Sawataishi, M.; Takashima, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2003-01-01

    Ion microscopy (IM) of air-dried or freeze-dried cryostat and semi-thin cryosections has provided ion images of elements and organic substances in wide areas of the tissue. For reproducible ion images by a shorter time of exposure to the primary ion beam, fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections were prepared by freezing the tissue in propane chilled with liquid nitrogen, cryocut at 60 nm, mounted on grids and silicon wafer pieces, and freeze-dried. Rat Cowper gland and sciatic nerve, bone marrow of the rat administered of lithium carbonate, tree frog and African toad spleen and buffy coat of atopic dermatitis patients were examined. Fine structures and ion images of the corresponding areas in the same or neighboring sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) followed by sector type and time-of-flight type IM. Cells in the buffy coat contained larger amounts of potassium and magnesium while plasma had larger amounts of sodium and calcium. However, in the tissues, lithium, sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium were distributed in the cell and calcium showed a granular appearance. A granular cell of the tree frog spleen contained sodium and potassium over the cell and magnesium and calcium were confined to granules

  5. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging [blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Presented an approach for synthetic aperture blood flow ultrasound imaging. Estimates with a low bias and standard deviation can be obtained with as few as eight emissions. The performance of the new estimator is verified using both simulations and measurements. The results demonstrate that a fully...

  6. Cerebral blood flow imaging with thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate SPECT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Royen, E. A.; de Bruïne, J. F.; Hill, T. C.; Vyth, A.; Limburg, M.; Byse, B. L.; O'Leary, D. H.; de Jong, J. M.; Hijdra, A.; van der Schoot, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate ([201TI]DDC) was studied in humans as an agent for cerebral blood flow imaging. Brain uptake proved to be complete 90 sec after injection with no appreciable washout or redistribution for hours. Intracarotid injection suggested an almost 100% extraction during the

  7. Peripheral blood smear image analysis: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad A Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood smear image examination is a part of the routine work of every laboratory. The manual examination of these images is tedious, time-consuming and suffers from interobserver variation. This has motivated researchers to develop different algorithms and methods to automate peripheral blood smear image analysis. Image analysis itself consists of a sequence of steps consisting of image segmentation, features extraction and selection and pattern classification. The image segmentation step addresses the problem of extraction of the object or region of interest from the complicated peripheral blood smear image. Support vector machine (SVM and artificial neural networks (ANNs are two common approaches to image segmentation. Features extraction and selection aims to derive descriptive characteristics of the extracted object, which are similar within the same object class and different between different objects. This will facilitate the last step of the image analysis process: pattern classification. The goal of pattern classification is to assign a class to the selected features from a group of known classes. There are two types of classifier learning algorithms: supervised and unsupervised. Supervised learning algorithms predict the class of the object under test using training data of known classes. The training data have a predefined label for every class and the learning algorithm can utilize this data to predict the class of a test object. Unsupervised learning algorithms use unlabeled training data and divide them into groups using similarity measurements. Unsupervised learning algorithms predict the group to which a new test object belong to, based on the training data without giving an explicit class to that object. ANN, SVM, decision tree and K-nearest neighbor are possible approaches to classification algorithms. Increased discrimination may be obtained by combining several classifiers together.

  8. Frontiers in optical imaging of cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devor, Anna; Sakadžić, Sava; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Nizar, Krystal; Saisan, Payam A; Tian, Peifang; Dale, Anders M; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Boas, David A

    2012-07-01

    In vivo optical imaging of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism did not exist 50 years ago. While point optical fluorescence and absorption measurements of cellular metabolism and hemoglobin concentrations had already been introduced by then, point blood flow measurements appeared only 40 years ago. The advent of digital cameras has significantly advanced two-dimensional optical imaging of neuronal, metabolic, vascular, and hemodynamic signals. More recently, advanced laser sources have enabled a variety of novel three-dimensional high-spatial-resolution imaging approaches. Combined, as we discuss here, these methods are permitting a multifaceted investigation of the local regulation of CBF and metabolism with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Through multimodal combination of these optical techniques with genetic methods of encoding optical reporter and actuator proteins, the future is bright for solving the mysteries of neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling and translating them to clinical utility.

  9. High-resolution ultrasound imaging and noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of blood variables in peripheral blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is being widely used in clinics to obtain diagnostic information non-invasively and in real time. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging platform, Vevo (VisualSonics, Inc.) provides in vivo, real-time images with exceptional resolution (up to 30 microns) using high-frequency transducers (up to 80 MHz). Recently, we built optoacoustic systems for probing radial artery and peripheral veins that can be used for noninvasive monitoring of total hemoglobin concentration, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and concentration of important endogenous and exogenous chromophores (such as ICG). In this work we used the high-resolution ultrasound imaging system Vevo 770 for visualization of the radial artery and peripheral veins and acquired corresponding optoacoustic signals from them using the optoacoustic systems. Analysis of the optoacoustic data with a specially developed algorithm allowed for measurement of blood oxygenation in the blood vessels as well as for continuous, real-time monitoring of arterial and venous blood oxygenation. Our results indicate that: 1) the optoacoustic technique (unlike pure optical approaches and other noninvasive techniques) is capable of accurate peripheral venous oxygenation measurement; and 2) peripheral venous oxygenation is dependent on skin temperature and local hemodynamics. Moreover, we performed for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) a comparative study of optoacoustic arterial oximetry and a standard pulse oximeter in humans and demonstrated superior performance of the optoacoustic arterial oximeter, in particular at low blood flow.

  10. [Study on modeling method of total viable count of fresh pork meat based on hyperspectral imaging system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Peng, Yan-Kun; Zhang, Xiao-Li

    2010-02-01

    Once the total viable count (TVC) of bacteria in fresh pork meat exceeds a certain number, it will become pathogenic bacteria. The present paper is to explore the feasibility of hyperspectral imaging technology combined with relevant modeling method for the prediction of TVC in fresh pork meat. For the certain kind of problem that has remarkable nonlinear characteristic and contains few samples, as well as the problem that has large amount of data used to express the information of spectrum and space dimension, it is crucial to choose a logical modeling method in order to achieve good prediction result. Based on the comparative result of partial least-squares regression (PLSR), artificial neural networks (ANNs) and least square support vector machines (LS-SVM), the authors found that the PLSR method was helpless for nonlinear regression problem, and the ANNs method couldn't get approving prediction result for few samples problem, however the prediction models based on LS-SVM can give attention to the little training error and the favorable generalization ability as soon as possible, and can make them well synchronously. Therefore LS-SVM was adopted as the modeling method to predict the TVC of pork meat. Then the TVC prediction model was constructed using all the 512 wavelength data acquired by the hyperspectral imaging system. The determination coefficient between the TVC obtained with the standard plate count for bacterial colonies method and the LS-SVM prediction result was 0.987 2 and 0.942 6 for the samples of calibration set and prediction set respectively, also the root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) and the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 0.207 1 and 0.217 6 individually, and the result was considerably better than that of MLR, PLSR and ANNs method. This research demonstrates that using the hyperspectral imaging system coupled with the LS-SVM modeling method is a valid means for quick and nondestructive determination of TVC of pork

  11. Feeling Fresh

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Feeling Fresh KidsHealth / For Teens / Feeling Fresh Print en español La higiene femenina As ... the other products that claim to make women feel cleaner and fresher. But do these work? And ...

  12. Personal identification based on blood vessels of retinal fundus images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Hatanaka, Yuji; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Biometric technique has been implemented instead of conventional identification methods such as password in computer, automatic teller machine (ATM), and entrance and exit management system. We propose a personal identification (PI) system using color retinal fundus images which are unique to each individual. The proposed procedure for identification is based on comparison of an input fundus image with reference fundus images in the database. In the first step, registration between the input image and the reference image is performed. The step includes translational and rotational movement. The PI is based on the measure of similarity between blood vessel images generated from the input and reference images. The similarity measure is defined as the cross-correlation coefficient calculated from the pixel values. When the similarity is greater than a predetermined threshold, the input image is identified. This means both the input and the reference images are associated to the same person. Four hundred sixty-two fundus images including forty-one same-person's image pairs were used for the estimation of the proposed technique. The false rejection rate and the false acceptance rate were 9.9×10 -5% and 4.3×10 -5%, respectively. The results indicate that the proposed method has a higher performance than other biometrics except for DNA. To be used for practical application in the public, the device which can take retinal fundus images easily is needed. The proposed method is applied to not only the PI but also the system which warns about misfiling of fundus images in medical facilities.

  13. The study of fresh-water lake ice using multiplexed imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Bryan M.; Larson, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The study of ice in the upper Great Lakes, both from the operational and the scientific points of view, is receiving continued attention. Quantitative and qualitative field work is being conducted to provide the needed background for accurate interpretation of remotely sensed data. The data under discussion in this paper were obtained by a side-looking multiplexed airborne radar (SLAR) supplemented with ground-truth data.Because of its ability to penetrate adverse weather, radar is an especially important instrument for monitoring ice in the upper Great Lakes. It has previously been shown that imaging radars can provide maps of ice cover in these areas. However, questions concerning both the nature of the surfaces reflecting radar energy and the interpretation of the radar imagery continually arise.Our analysis of ice in Whitefish Bay (Lake Superior) indicates that the combination of the ice/water interlace and the ice/air interface is the major contributor to the radar backscatter as seen on the imagery At these frequencies the ice has a very low relative dielectric permittivity (types studied include newly formed black ice, pancake ice, and frozen and consolidated pack and brash ice.Although ice thickness cannot be measured directly from the received signals, it is suspected that by combining the information pertaining to radar backscatter with data on the meteorological and sea-state history of the area, together with some basic ground truth, better estimates of the ice thickness may be provided. In addition, certain ice features (e.g. ridges, ice-foot formation, areas of brash ice) may be identified with reasonable confidence. There is a continued need for additional ground work to verify the validity of imaging radars for these types of interpretations.

  14. Comparison of Platelet Transfusion as Fresh Whole Blood Versus Apheresis Platelets for Massively Transfused Combat Trauma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Cosgriff N, Moore EE, Sauaia A, Kenny-Moynihan M, Burch JM, Galloway B. Predicting life-threatening coagulopathy in the massively transfused trauma patient...BM, Lloyd JV. The stability of coagulation factors in stored blood. Aust N Z J Surg 1982;52:265-9. 43. Scott E, Puca K, Heraly J, Gottschall J

  15. Fusion of spectra and texture data of hyperspectral imaging for the prediction of the water-holding capacity of fresh chicken breast filets

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the fusion of spectra and texture data of hyperspectral imaging (HSI, 1000–2500 nm) for predicting the water-holding capacity (WHC) of intact, fresh chicken breast filets. Three physical and chemical indicators drip loss, expressible fluid, and salt-induced water gain were me...

  16. Nephron blood flow dynamics measured by laser speckle contrast imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Pavlov, Alexey N

    2011-01-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) has an important role in autoregulation of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Because of the characteristics of signal transmission in the feedback loop, the TGF undergoes self-sustained oscillations in single-nephron blood flow, GFR, and tubular...... simultaneously. The interacting nephron fields are likely to be more extensive. We have turned to laser speckle contrast imaging to measure the blood flow dynamics of 50-100 nephrons simultaneously on the renal surface of anesthetized rats. We report the application of this method and describe analytic...... pressure and flow. Nephrons interact by exchanging electrical signals conducted electrotonically through cells of the vascular wall, leading to synchronization of the TGF-mediated oscillations. Experimental studies of these interactions have been limited to observations on two or at most three nephrons...

  17. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  18. Imaging of blood plasma coagulation at supported lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxälv, Lars; Hume, Jasmin; Kasemo, Bengt; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-12-15

    The blood coagulation system relies on lipid membrane constituents to act as regulators of the coagulation process upon vascular trauma, and in particular the 2D configuration of the lipid membranes is known to efficiently catalyze enzymatic activity of blood coagulation factors. This work demonstrates a new application of a recently developed methodology to study blood coagulation at lipid membrane interfaces with the use of imaging technology. Lipid membranes with varied net charges were formed on silica supports by systematically using different combinations of lipids where neutral phosphocholine (PC) lipids were mixed with phospholipids having either positively charged ethylphosphocholine (EPC), or negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) headgroups. Coagulation imaging demonstrated that negatively charged SiO(2) and membrane surfaces exposing PS (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of PS) had coagulation times which were significantly shorter than those for plain PC membranes and EPC exposing membrane surfaces (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of EPC). Coagulation times decreased non-linearly with increasing negative surface charge for lipid membranes. A threshold value for shorter coagulation times was observed below a PS content of ∼6%. We conclude that the lipid membranes on solid support studied with the imaging setup as presented in this study offers a flexible and non-expensive solution for coagulation studies at biological membranes. It will be interesting to extend the present study towards examining coagulation on more complex lipid-based model systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oil palm fresh fruit bunch ripeness classification based on rule- based expert system of ROI image processing technique results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfatni, M S M; Shariff, A R M; Marhaban, M H; Shafie, S B; Saaed, O M B; Abdullah, M Z; BAmiruddin, M D

    2014-01-01

    There is a processing need for a fast, easy and accurate classification system for oil palm fruit ripeness. Such a system will be invaluable to farmers and plantation managers who need to sell their oil palm fresh fruit bunch (FFB) for the mill as this will avoid disputes. In this paper,a new approach was developed under the name of expert rules-based systembased on the image processing techniques results of thethree different oil palm FFB region of interests (ROIs), namely; ROI1 (300x300 pixels), ROI2 (50x50 pixels) and ROI3 (100x100 pixels). The results show that the best rule-based ROIs for statistical colour feature extraction with k-nearest neighbors (KNN) classifier at 94% were chosen as well as the ROIs that indicated results higher than the rule-based outcome, such as the ROIs of statistical colour feature extraction with artificial neural network (ANN) classifier at 94%, were selected for further FFB ripeness inspection system

  20. Red blood cell transfusion is associated with further bleeding and fresh-frozen plasma with mortality in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Kavitha; Spilsbury, Katrina; Ayonrinde, Oyekoya T; Latchmiah, Faye; Mukhtar, Syed A; Semmens, James B; Leahy, Michael F; Olynyk, John K

    2016-04-01

    Blood products are commonly transfused for patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). While concerns exist about further bleeding and mortality in subsets of patients receiving red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, the impact of non-RBC blood products has not previously been systematically investigated. The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between blood products transfusion, further bleeding, and mortality after acute NVUGIB. A retrospective cohort study examined further bleeding and 30-day and 1-year mortality in adult patients who underwent gastroscopy for suspected acute NVUGIB between 2008 and 2010 in three tertiary hospitals in Western Australia. Survival analysis was performed. A total of 2228 adults (63% male) with 2360 hospital admissions for NVUGIB met the inclusion criteria. Median age at presentation was 70 years (range, 19-99 years). Thirty-day mortality was 4.9% and 1-year mortality was 13.9%. Transfusion of 4 or more units of RBCs was associated with greater than 10 times the odds of further bleeding in patients with a hemoglobin level of more than 90 g/L (odds ratio, 11.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-45.7; p ≤ 0.001), but was not associated with mortality. Administration of 5 or more units of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) was associated with increased 30-day (hazard ratio, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3-5.9; p = 0.008) and 1-year (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.0; p = 0.005) mortality after adjusting for coagulopathy, comorbidity, Rockall score, and other covariates. In this large, multicenter study of NVUGIB, RBC transfusion was associated with further bleeding but not mortality, while FFP transfusion was associated with increased mortality in a subset of patients. © 2015 AABB.

  1. A novel method for sample preparation of fresh lung cancer tissue for proteomics analysis by tumor cell enrichment and removal of blood contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orre Lotta

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In-depth proteomics analyses of tumors are frequently biased by the presence of blood components and stromal contamination, which leads to large experimental variation and decreases the proteome coverage. We have established a reproducible method to prepare freshly collected lung tumors for proteomics analysis, aiming at tumor cell enrichment and reduction of plasma protein contamination. We obtained enriched tumor-cell suspensions (ETS from six lung cancer cases (two adenocarcinomas, two squamous-cell carcinomas, two large-cell carcinomas and from two normal lung samples. The cell content of resulting ETS was evaluated with immunocytological stainings and compared with the histologic pattern of the original specimens. By means of a quantitative mass spectrometry-based method we evaluated the reproducibility of the sample preparation protocol and we assessed the proteome coverage by comparing lysates from ETS samples with the direct lysate of corresponding fresh-frozen samples. Results Cytological analyses on cytospin specimens showed that the percentage of tumoral cells in the ETS samples ranged from 20% to 70%. In the normal lung samples the percentage of epithelial cells was less then 10%. The reproducibility of the sample preparation protocol was very good, with coefficient of variation at the peptide level and at the protein level of 13% and 7%, respectively. Proteomics analysis led to the identification of a significantly higher number of proteins in the ETS samples than in the FF samples (244 vs 109, respectively. Albumin and hemoglobin were among the top 5 most abundant proteins identified in the FF samples, showing a high contamination with blood and plasma proteins, whereas ubiquitin and the mitochondrial ATP synthase 5A1 where among the top 5 most abundant proteins in the ETS samples. Conclusion The method is feasible and reproducible. We could obtain a fair enrichment of cells but the major benefit of the method

  2. Fresh whole blood transfusions in coalition military, foreign national, and enemy combatant patients during Operation Iraqi Freedom at a U.S. combat support hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Grathwohl, Kurt W; Repine, Thomas; Beekley, Alec C; Sebesta, James; Jenkins, Donald; Azarow, Kenneth; Holcomb, John B

    2008-01-01

    United States military doctrine permits the use of fresh whole blood (FWB), donated by U.S. military personnel on site, for casualties with life-threatening injuries at combat support hospitals. U.S. Military Medical Department policy dictates that all patients treated at military facilities during combat (coalition military personnel, foreign nationals, and enemy combatants) are to be treated equally. The objectives of this study were to describe admission vital signs and laboratory values and injury location for patients transfused with FWB, and to determine if FWB was employed equally among all patient personnel categories at a combat support hospital. This retrospective cohort study evaluated admission vital signs and laboratory values, injury location, and personnel category for all patients receiving FWB at a U.S. Army combat support hospital in Baghdad, Iraq, between January and December 2004. Eighty-seven patients received 545 units of FWB. Upon admission, the average (+/-S.D.) heart rate was 144 bpm (+/-25); systolic blood pressure, 106 mmHg (+/-33); base deficit, 9 (+/-6.5); hemoglobin, 9.0 g/dl (+/-2.6); platelet concentration, 81.9 x 10(3)/mm(3) (+/-81); international normalized ratio (INR), 2.0 (+/-1.1); and temperature 95.7 degrees F (+/-2.6). The percentages of intensive care patients who received FWB by personnel category were as follows: coalition soldiers, 51/592 (8.6%); foreign nationals, 25/347 (7.2%); and enemy combatants, 11/128 (8.5% (p = 0.38). The amount of FWB transfused by personnel category was as follows: coalition soldier, 4 units (1-35); foreign national, 4 units (1-36); and enemy combatant, 4 units (1-11) (p = 0.9). Fresh whole blood was used for anemic, acidemic, hypothermic, coagulopathic patients with life-threatening traumatic injuries in hemorrhagic shock, and it was transfused in equal percentages and amounts for coalition soldiers, foreign nationals, and enemy combatants.

  3. Fingerprint enhancement revisited and the effects of blood enhancement chemicals on subsequent profiler Plus fluorescent short tandem repeat DNA analysis of fresh and aged bloody fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, C J; Germain, O; Fourney, R M

    2000-03-01

    This study was aimed at determining the effect of seven blood enhancement reagents on the subsequent Profiler Plus fluorescent STR DNA analysis of fresh or aged bloody fingerprints deposited on various porous and nonporous surfaces. Amido Black, Crowle's Double Stain. 1,8-diazafluoren-9-one (DFO), Hungarian Red, leucomalachite green, luminol and ninhydrin were tested on linoleum, glass, metal, wood (pine, painted white), clothing (85% polyester/15% cotton, 65% polyester/35% cotton, and blue denim) and paper (Scott 2-ply and Xerox-grade). Preliminary experiments were designed to determine the optimal blood dilutions to use to ensure a DNA typing result following chemical enhancement. A 1:200 blood dilution deposited on linoleum and enhanced with Crowle's Double Stain generated enough DNA for one to two rounds of Profiler Plus PCR amplification. A comparative study of the DNA yields before and after treatment indicated that the quantity of DNA recovered from bloody fingerprints following enhancement was reduced by a factor of 2 to 12. Such a reduction in the DNA yields could potentially compromise DNA typing analysis in the case of small stains. The blood enhancement chemicals selected were also evaluated for their capability to reveal bloodmarks on the various porous and nonporous surfaces chosen in this study. Luminol. Amido Black and Crowle's Double Stain showed the highest sensitivity of all seven chemicals tested and revealed highly diluted (1:200) bloody fingerprints. Both luminol and Amido Black produced excellent results on both porous and nonporous surfaces, but Crowle's Double Stain failed to produce any results on porous substrates. Hungarian Red, DFO, leucomalachite green and ninhydrin showed lower sensitivities. Enhancement of bloodmarks using any of the chemicals selected, and short-term exposure to these same chemicals (i.e., less than 54 days), had no adverse effects on the PCR amplification of the nine STR systems surveyed (D3S 1358, HumvWA, Hum

  4. Combining satellite image data and field observations to characterize fresh-water carbonates in Kurkur Oasis, Southern Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Ahmed; Khalaf, Fikry; Bastawisy, Mohamed; El-Baz, Farouk

    2018-03-01

    Several fresh-water carbonate deposits (tufa and travertine) were formed at different elevations within the Kurkur paleolake, 50 km west of Aswan, Egypt. Such paleolake was unique and confined in sag between the cuesta and the capping platform of Sin El-Kaddabaa Plateau. This work aims at integrating the remote sensing data together with the chemical and petrographic analyses to map and characterize these tufa and travertine deposits to define their paleo-depositional environment. A DEM with 2.5 m spatial resolution was generated from two ALOS/PRISM images to show geomorphological and hydrological parameters. In addition, full-polarimetric SAR data were used to investigate the scattering response of these tufa and travertine deposits. These deposits show a volume scattering response, with an increase in the pedestal height of the co- and cross-polarized signatures. The tufa and travertine deposits range from Pleistocene (older upper level) to Recent (younger lower level). The young tufa is hard, light brown porous and thinly-laminated, while the old tufa is generally coarse crystalline and consists of columnar pseudo denderitic calcite crystals. The travertine displays a stromatolitic fabric, where thin dark micritic algal laminae alternate with relatively thick calcitic bands (∼1 cm). Conducted XRD and chemical analyses reveal that these tufa and travertine are entirely composed of low magnesium calcite, with traces of quartz (developed during warm pluvial periods, while the younger ones were precipitated in drier periods. Two hypotheses were introduced to explain the changes in the hydrological regime of Kurkur paleolake; the first proposes a hydrological breaching due to water overflow on the lake's low periphery areas that led to their desiccation (where the tufa and travertine were deposited) and the second is the possible integration into the regional drainage networks of the area presently occupied by Lake Nasser.

  5. Molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilki, Derya; Seitz, Michael; Singer, Bernhard B; Irmak, Ster; Stief, Christian G; Reich, Oliver; Ergün, Süleyman

    2009-05-01

    In the past three decades many efforts have been undertaken to understand the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis. The introduction of anti-angiogenic drugs in tumor therapy during the last few years necessitates the establishment of new techniques enabling molecular imaging of tumor vascular remodelling. The determination of tumor size as commonly used is not appropriate since the extended necrosis under anti-angiogenic therapy does not necessarily result in the reduction of tumor diameter. The basis for the molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels is the remodelling of the tumor vessels under anti-angiogenic therapy which obviously occurs at an early stage and seems to be a convincing parameter. Beside the enormous progress in this field during the last few years the resolution is still not high enough to evaluate the remodelling of the micro tumor vessels. New imaging approaches combining specific molecular markers for tumor vessels with the different imaging techniques are needed to overcome this issue as exemplarily discussed for prostate cancer in this review. Molecular contrast agents targeting the vasculature will allow clinicians the visualization of vascular remodelling processes taking place under anti-angiogenic therapy and improve tumor diagnosis and follow-up.

  6. Spatio-temporal analysis of blood perfusion by imaging photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaunseder, Sebastian; Trumpp, Alexander; Ernst, Hannes; Förster, Michael; Malberg, Hagen

    2018-02-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) has attracted much attention over the last years. The vast majority of works focuses on methods to reliably extract the heart rate from videos. Only a few works addressed iPPGs ability to exploit spatio-temporal perfusion pattern to derive further diagnostic statements. This work directs at the spatio-temporal analysis of blood perfusion from videos. We present a novel algorithm that bases on the two-dimensional representation of the blood pulsation (perfusion map). The basic idea behind the proposed algorithm consists of a pairwise estimation of time delays between photoplethysmographic signals of spatially separated regions. The probabilistic approach yields a parameter denoted as perfusion speed. We compare the perfusion speed versus two parameters, which assess the strength of blood pulsation (perfusion strength and signal to noise ratio). Preliminary results using video data with different physiological stimuli (cold pressure test, cold face test) show that all measures are influenced by those stimuli (some of them with statistical certainty). The perfusion speed turned out to be more sensitive than the other measures in some cases. However, our results also show that the intraindividual stability and interindividual comparability of all used measures remain critical points. This work proves the general feasibility of employing the perfusion speed as novel iPPG quantity. Future studies will address open points like the handling of ballistocardiographic effects and will try to deepen the understanding of the predominant physiological mechanisms and their relation to the algorithmic performance.

  7. Statistical image analysis of cerebral blood flow in moyamoya disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaru; Yuzawa, Izumi; Suzuki, Sachio; Kurata, Akira; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Asano, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The Summary of this study was to investigate pathophysiology of moyamoya disease, we analyzed brain single photon emission tomography (SPECT) images of patients with this disease by using interface software for a 3-dimensional (3D) data extraction format. Presenting symptoms were transient ischemic attack (TIA) in 21 patients and hemorrhage in 6 patients. All the patients underwent brain SPECT scan of 123 I-iofetamine (IMP) at rest and after acetazolamide challenge (17 mg/kg iv, 2-day method). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was quantitatively measured using arterial blood sampling and an autoradiography model. The group of the patients who presented with TIAs showed decreased CBF in the frontal lobe at rest compared to that of patients with hemorrhage, but Z-score ((mean-patient data)/ standard deviation (SD)) did not reach statistical significance. Significant CBF decrease after acetazolamide challenge was observed in a wider cerebral cortical area in the TIA group than in the hemorrhagic group. The brain region of hemodynamic ischemia (stage II) correlated well with the responsible cortical area for clinical symptoms of TIA. A hemodynamic ischemia stage image clearly represented recovery of reserve capacity after bypass surgery. Statistical evaluation of SPECT may be useful to understand and clarify the pathophysiology of this disease. (author)

  8. A fresh frozen plasma to red blood cell transfusion ratio of 1:1 mitigates lung injury in a rat model of damage control resuscitation for hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingxiang; Pan, Guocheng; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Yuhua; You, Guoxing; Wang, Ying; Gao, Dawei; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, Lian

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of resuscitation with different ratios of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to red blood cells (RBCs) on pulmonary inflammatory injury and to illuminate the beneficial effects of FFP on lung protection compared with lactated ringers (LR) using a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. Rats underwent pressure-controlled hemorrhage for 60 minutes and were then transfused with LR for initial resuscitation. Thereafter, the rats were transfused with varying ratios of FFP:RBC (1:4, 1:2, 1:1, and 2:1) or LR:RBC (1:1) to hold their mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 100 ± 3 mm Hg for 30 minutes. After 4 hours of observation, lung tissue was harvested to determine the wet/dry weight, myeloperoxidase levels, tumor necrosis factor α levels, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) levels, inducible nitric oxide synthase activity, and the nuclear factor κB p65 DNA-binding activity. With an increase in the FFP:RBC ratio, the volume of required RBC to maintain the target MAP decreased. The MAP value in each group was not significantly different during the whole experiment period. The values of the wet/dry weights and MIP-2 were significantly lower in the FFP:RBC = 1:1 group than the other groups (P ratio of FFP to RBC results in decreased lung inflammation. Compared with LR, FFP could further mitigate lung inflammatory injury. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Imaging flow cytometry assays for quantifying pigment grade titanium dioxide particle internalization and interactions with immune cells in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Rachel E; Vis, Bradley; Pele, Laetitia C; Faria, Nuno; Powell, Jonathan J

    2017-10-01

    Pigment grade titanium dioxide is composed of sub-micron sized particles, including a nanofraction, and is widely utilized in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and biomedical industries. Oral exposure to pigment grade titanium dioxide results in at least some material entering the circulation in humans, although subsequent interactions with blood immune cells are unknown. Pigment grade titanium dioxide is employed for its strong light scattering properties, and this work exploited that attribute to determine whether single cell-particle associations could be determined in immune cells of human whole blood at "real life" concentrations. In vitro assays, initially using isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, identified titanium dioxide associated with the surface of, and within, immune cells by darkfield reflectance in imaging flow cytometry. This was confirmed at the population level by side scatter measurements using conventional flow cytometry. Next, it was demonstrated that imaging flow cytometry could quantify titanium dioxide particle-bearing cells, within the immune cell populations of fresh whole blood, down to titanium dioxide levels of 10 parts per billion, which is in the range anticipated for human blood following titanium dioxide ingestion. Moreover, surface association and internal localization of titanium dioxide particles could be discriminated in the assays. Overall, results showed that in addition to the anticipated activity of blood monocytes internalizing titanium dioxide particles, neutrophil internalization and cell membrane adhesion also occurred, the latter for both phagocytic and nonphagocytic cell types. What happens in vivo and whether this contributes to activation of one or more of these different cells types in blood merits further attention. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  10. Frozen cord blood hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into higher numbers of functional natural killer cells in vitro than mobilized hematopoietic stem cells or freshly isolated cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Luevano

    Full Text Available Adoptive natural killer (NK cell therapy relies on the acquisition of large numbers of NK cells that are cytotoxic but not exhausted. NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC has become an alluring option for NK cell therapy, with umbilical cord blood (UCB and mobilized peripheral blood (PBCD34(+ being the most accessible HSC sources as collection procedures are less invasive. In this study we compared the capacity of frozen or freshly isolated UCB hematopoietic stem cells (CBCD34(+ and frozen PBCD34(+ to generate NK cells in vitro. By modifying a previously published protocol, we showed that frozen CBCD34(+ cultures generated higher NK cell numbers without loss of function compared to fresh CBCD34(+ cultures. NK cells generated from CBCD34(+ and PBCD34(+ expressed low levels of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors but high levels of activating receptors and of the myeloid marker CD33. However, blocking studies showed that CD33 expression did not impact on the functions of the generated cells. CBCD34(+-NK cells exhibited increased capacity to secrete IFN-γ and kill K562 in vitro and in vivo as compared to PBCD34(+-NK cells. Moreover, K562 killing by the generated NK cells could be further enhanced by IL-12 stimulation. Our data indicate that the use of frozen CBCD34(+ for the production of NK cells in vitro results in higher cell numbers than PBCD34(+, without jeopardizing their functionality, rendering them suitable for NK cell immunotherapy. The results presented here provide an optimal strategy to generate NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy that exhibit enhanced effector function when compared to alternate sources of HSC.

  11. Laser Doppler Blood Flow Imaging Using a CMOS Imaging Sensor with On-Chip Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cally Gill

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The first fully integrated 2D CMOS imaging sensor with on-chip signal processing for applications in laser Doppler blood flow (LDBF imaging has been designed and tested. To obtain a space efficient design over 64 × 64 pixels means that standard processing electronics used off-chip cannot be implemented. Therefore the analog signal processing at each pixel is a tailored design for LDBF signals with balanced optimization for signal-to-noise ratio and silicon area. This custom made sensor offers key advantages over conventional sensors, viz. the analog signal processing at the pixel level carries out signal normalization; the AC amplification in combination with an anti-aliasing filter allows analog-to-digital conversion with a low number of bits; low resource implementation of the digital processor enables on-chip processing and the data bottleneck that exists between the detector and processing electronics has been overcome. The sensor demonstrates good agreement with simulation at each design stage. The measured optical performance of the sensor is demonstrated using modulated light signals and in vivo blood flow experiments. Images showing blood flow changes with arterial occlusion and an inflammatory response to a histamine skin-prick demonstrate that the sensor array is capable of detecting blood flow signals from tissue.

  12. Laser doppler blood flow imaging using a CMOS imaging sensor with on-chip signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Diwei; Nguyen, Hoang C; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R; Zhu, Yiqun; Crowe, John A; Gill, Cally; Clough, Geraldine F; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-09-18

    The first fully integrated 2D CMOS imaging sensor with on-chip signal processing for applications in laser Doppler blood flow (LDBF) imaging has been designed and tested. To obtain a space efficient design over 64 × 64 pixels means that standard processing electronics used off-chip cannot be implemented. Therefore the analog signal processing at each pixel is a tailored design for LDBF signals with balanced optimization for signal-to-noise ratio and silicon area. This custom made sensor offers key advantages over conventional sensors, viz. the analog signal processing at the pixel level carries out signal normalization; the AC amplification in combination with an anti-aliasing filter allows analog-to-digital conversion with a low number of bits; low resource implementation of the digital processor enables on-chip processing and the data bottleneck that exists between the detector and processing electronics has been overcome. The sensor demonstrates good agreement with simulation at each design stage. The measured optical performance of the sensor is demonstrated using modulated light signals and in vivo blood flow experiments. Images showing blood flow changes with arterial occlusion and an inflammatory response to a histamine skin-prick demonstrate that the sensor array is capable of detecting blood flow signals from tissue.

  13. A CZT-based blood counter for quantitative molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espagnet, Romain; Frezza, Andrea; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Hamel, Louis-André; Lechippey, Laëtitia; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Després, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Robust quantitative analysis in positron emission tomography (PET) and in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) typically requires the time-activity curve as an input function for the pharmacokinetic modeling of tracer uptake. For this purpose, a new automated tool for the determination of blood activity as a function of time is presented. The device, compact enough to be used on the patient bed, relies on a peristaltic pump for continuous blood withdrawal at user-defined rates. Gamma detection is based on a 20 × 20 × 15 mm 3 cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, read by custom-made electronics and a field-programmable gate array-based signal processing unit. A graphical user interface (GUI) allows users to select parameters and easily perform acquisitions. This paper presents the overall design of the device as well as the results related to the detector performance in terms of stability, sensitivity and energy resolution. Results from a patient study are also reported. The device achieved a sensitivity of 7.1 cps/(kBq/mL) and a minimum detectable activity of 2.5 kBq/ml for 18 F. The gamma counter also demonstrated an excellent stability with a deviation in count rates inferior to 0.05% over 6 h. An energy resolution of 8% was achieved at 662 keV. The patient study was conclusive and demonstrated that the compact gamma blood counter developed has the sensitivity and the stability required to conduct quantitative molecular imaging studies in PET and SPECT.

  14. Intelligent Fish Freshness Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gholam Hosseini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish species identification and automated fish freshness assessment play important roles in fishery industry applications. This paper describes a method based on support vector machines (SVMs to improve the performance of fish identification systems. The result is used for the assessment of fish freshness using artificial neural network (ANN. Identification of the fish species involves processing of the images of fish. The most efficient features were extracted and combined with the down-sampled version of the images to create a 1D input vector. Max-Win algorithm applied to the SVM-based classifiers has enhanced the reliability of sorting to 96.46%. The realisation of Cyranose 320 Electronic nose (E-nose, in order to evaluate the fish freshness in real-time, is experimented. Intelligent processing of the sensor patterns involves the use of a dedicated ANN for each species under study. The best estimation of freshness was provided by the most sensitive sensors. Data was collected from four selected species of fishes over a period of ten days. It was concluded that the performance can be increased using individual trained ANN for each specie. The proposed system has been successful in identifying the number of days after catching the fish with an accuracy of up to 91%.

  15. Chagas Parasite Detection in Blood Images Using AdaBoost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Uc-Cetina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chagas disease is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Visual detection of such parasite through microscopic inspection is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper, we provide an AdaBoost learning solution to the task of Chagas parasite detection in blood images. We give details of the algorithm and our experimental setup. With this method, we get 100% and 93.25% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively. A ROC comparison with the method most commonly used for the detection of malaria parasites based on support vector machines (SVM is also provided. Our experimental work shows mainly two things: (1 Chagas parasites can be detected automatically using machine learning methods with high accuracy and (2 AdaBoost + SVM provides better overall detection performance than AdaBoost or SVMs alone. Such results are the best ones known so far for the problem of automatic detection of Chagas parasites through the use of machine learning, computer vision, and image processing methods.

  16. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging using ultrasound: In-vivo examples of complex blood flow in the vascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color flow images of the blood motion are restricted by a relatively low frame rate and angle dependent velocity estimates. The Plane Wave Excitation (PWE) method has been proposed to solve these limitations. The frame rate can be increased, and the 2-D...... vector velocity of the blood motion can be estimated. The transmitted pulse is not focused, and a full speckle image of the blood can be acquired for each emission. A 13 bit Barker code is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element. The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is found using 2-D...... speckle tracking between segments in consecutive speckle images. The flow patterns of six bifurcations and two veins were investigated in-vivo. It was shown: 1) that a stable vortex in the carotid bulb was present opposed to other examined bifurcations, 2) that retrograde flow was present...

  17. 18F-FDG-labeled red blood cell PET for blood-pool imaging: preclinical evaluation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusaka, Yohji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Iwabuchi, Yu; Nishime, Chiyoko; Kajimura, Mayumi; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) labeled with single-photon emitters have been clinically used for blood-pool imaging. Although some PET tracers have been introduced for blood-pool imaging, they have not yet been widely used. The present study investigated the feasibility of labeling RBCs with 18 F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) for blood-pool imaging with PET. RBCs isolated from venous blood of rats were washed with glucose-free phosphate-buffered saline and labeled with 18 F-FDG. To optimize labeling efficiency, the effects of glucose deprivation time and incubation (labeling) time with 18 F-FDG were investigated. Post-labeling stability was assessed by calculating the release fraction of radioactivity and identifying the chemical forms of 18 F in the released and intracellular components of 18 F-FDG-labeled RBCs incubated in plasma. Just after intravenous injection of the optimized autologous 18 F-FDG-labeled RBCs, dynamic PET scans were performed to evaluate in vivo imaging in normal rats and intraabdominal bleeding models (temporary and persistent bleeding). The optimal durations of glucose deprivation and incubation (labeling) with 18 F-FDG were 60 and 30 min, respectively. As low as 10% of 18 F was released as the form of 18 F-FDG from 18 F-FDG-labeled RBCs after a 60-min incubation. Dynamic PET images of normal rats showed strong persistence in the cardiovascular system for at least 120 min. In the intraabdominal bleeding models, 18 F-FDG-labeled RBC PET visualized the extravascular blood clearly and revealed the dynamic changes of the extravascular radioactivity in the temporary and persistent bleeding. RBCs can be effectively labeled with 18 F-FDG and used for blood-pool imaging with PET in rats.

  18. The values of myocardial tomography imaging and gated cardiac blood pool imaging in detecting left ventricular aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mei; Pan Zhongyun; Li Jinhui

    1992-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of myocardial tomography imaging and gated cardiac blood-pool imaging in detecting LVA were studied in 36 normal subjects and 68 patients with myocardial infarction. The sensitivities of exercise and rest myocardial imaging in detecting LVA were 85% and 77.3% respectively. The specificity of both is 95.5%. The sensitivity of cinema display, phase analysis and left ventricular phase shift in evaluating LVA were 86.7%, 86.7%, 100% respectively. Their specificity were all 100%. It is concluded that blood pool imaging is of choice for the diagnosis of LVA, and that myocardial imaging could also demonstrate LVA during diagnosing myocardial infarction

  19. In-vivo brain blood flow imaging based on laser speckle contrast imaging and synchrotron radiation microangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Peng; Feng, Shihan; Zhang, Qi; Lin, Xiaojie; Xie, Bohua; Liu, Chenwei; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In-vivo imaging of blood flow in the cortex and sub-cortex is still a challenge in biological and pathological studies of cerebral vascular diseases. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) only provides cortex blood flow information. Traditional synchrotron radiation micro-angiography (SRA) provides sub-cortical vasculature information with high resolution. In this study, a bolus front-tracking method was developed to extract blood flow information based on SRA. Combining LSCI and SRA, arterial blood flow in the ipsilateral cortex and sub-cortex was monitored after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage of mice. At 72 h after injury, a significant blood flow increase was observed in the lenticulostriate artery along with blood flow decrease in cortical branches of the middle cerebral artery. This combined strategy provides a new approach for the investigation of brain vasculature and blood flow changes in preclinical studies. (paper)

  20. Estimation of vessel diameter and blood flow dynamics from laser speckle images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging is a rapidly developing method to study changes of blood velocity in the vascular networks. However, to assess blood flow and vascular responses it is crucial to measure vessel diameter in addition to blood velocity dynamics. We suggest an algorithm that allows for dynamical...

  1. Determining tumor blood flow parameters from dynamic image measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertini, Jessica M.

    2008-11-01

    Many recent cancer treatments focus on preventing angiogenesis, the process by which a tumor promotes the growth of large and efficient capillary beds for the increased nourishment required to support the tumor's rapid growth[l]. To measure the efficacy of these treatments in a timely fashion, there is an interest in using data from dynamic sequences of contrast-enhanced medical imaging, such as MRI and CT, to measure blood flow parameters such as perfusion, permeability-surface-area product, and the relative volumes of the plasma and extracellular-extravascular space. Starting with a two compartment model presented by the radiology community[2], this work challenges the application of a simplification to this problem, which was originally developed to model capillary reuptake[3]. While the primary result of this work is the demonstration of the inaccuracy of this simplification, the remainder of the paper is dedicated to presenting alternative methods for calculating the perfusion and plasma volume coefficients. These methods are applied to model data sets based on real patient data, and preliminary results are presented.

  2. Blood vessel classification into arteries and veins in retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondermann, Claudia; Kondermann, Daniel; Yan, Michelle

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase dramatically in coming years; already today it accounts for a major proportion of the health care budget in many countries. Diabetic Retinopathy (DR), a micro vascular complication very often seen in diabetes patients, is the most common cause of visual loss in working age population of developed countries today. Since the possibility of slowing or even stopping the progress of this disease depends on the early detection of DR, an automatic analysis of fundus images would be of great help to the ophthalmologist due to the small size of the symptoms and the large number of patients. An important symptom for DR are abnormally wide veins leading to an unusually low ratio of the average diameter of arteries to veins (AVR). There are also other diseases like high blood pressure or diseases of the pancreas with one symptom being an abnormal AVR value. To determine it, a classification of vessels as arteries or veins is indispensable. As to our knowledge despite the importance there have only been two approaches to vessel classification yet. Therefore we propose an improved method. We compare two feature extraction methods and two classification methods based on support vector machines and neural networks. Given a hand-segmentation of vessels our approach achieves 95.32% correctly classified vessel pixels. This value decreases by 10% on average, if the result of a segmentation algorithm is used as basis for the classification.

  3. Three-dimensional visualization of myocardial motion and blood flow with cine-MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Matani, Ayumu; Chihara, Kunihiro; Mikami, Taisei; Kitabatake, Akira.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and presentation method to visualize myocardial motion and blood flow in a heart using cine-MR (magnetic resonance) images. Firstly, the region of myocardium and blood were segmented with certain threshold gray values. Secondly, some slices were interpolated linearly to reconstruct a 3D static image. Finally, a 3D dynamic image was presented with displaying the 3D static images sequentially. The experimental results indicate that this method enables to visualize not only normal but also abnormal blood flow in cine-mode. (author)

  4. Multi-modal in vivo imaging of brain blood oxygenation, blood flow and neural calcium dynamics during acute seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringuette, Dene; Jeffrey, Melanie A.; Carlen, Peter L.; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium has been implicated in the development of epilepsy. To better understand the relation between vascular function and seizure and provide a foundation for interpreting results from functional imaging in chronic disease models, we investigate the relationship between intracellular calcium dynamics and local cerebral blood flow and blood oxygen saturation during acute seizure-like events and pharmacological seizure rescue. To probe the relation between the aforementioned physiological markers in an acute model of epilepsy in rats, we integrated three different optical modalities together with electrophysiological recordings: Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) was used to study changes in flow speeds, Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOSI) was used to monitor changes in oxygenated, de-oxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentration, and Calcium-sensitive dye imaging was used to monitor intracellular calcium dynamics. We designed a dedicated cortical flow chamber to remove superficial blood and dye resulting from the injection procedure, which reduced spurious artifacts. The near infrared light used for IOSI and LSCI was delivered via a light pipe integrated with the flow chamber to minimize the effect of fluid surface movement on illumination stability. Calcium-sensitive dye was injected via a glass electrode used for recording the local field potential. Our system allowed us to observe and correlate increases in intracellular calcium, blood flow and blood volume during seizure-like events and provide a quantitative analysis of neurovascular coupling changes associated with seizure rescue via injection of an anti-convulsive agent.

  5. Effect of blood glucose level on 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Haibo; Lin Xiangtong; Guan Yihui; Zhao Jun; Zuo Chuantao; Hua Fengchun; Tang Wenying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of blood glucose level on the image quality of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT imaging. Methods: Eighty patients referred to the authors' department for routine whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT check up were recruited into this study. The patients were classified into 9 groups according to their blood glucose level: normal group avg and SUV max ) of liver on different slices. SPSS 12.0 was used to analyse the data. Results: (1) There were significant differences among the 9 groups in image quality scores and image noises (all P avg and SUV max : 0.60 and 0.33, P<0.05). Conclusions: The higher the blood glucose level, the worse the image quality. When the blood glucose level is more than or equal to 12.0 mmol/L, the image quality will significantly degrade. (authors)

  6. Continuous non-invasive blood glucose monitoring by spectral image differencing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Liao, Ningfang; Cheng, Haobo; Liang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Currently, the use of implantable enzyme electrode sensor is the main method for continuous blood glucose monitoring. But the effect of electrochemical reactions and the significant drift caused by bioelectricity in body will reduce the accuracy of the glucose measurements. So the enzyme-based glucose sensors need to be calibrated several times each day by the finger-prick blood corrections. This increases the patient's pain. In this paper, we proposed a method for continuous Non-invasive blood glucose monitoring by spectral image differencing method in the near infrared band. The method uses a high-precision CCD detector to switch the filter in a very short period of time, obtains the spectral images. And then by using the morphological method to obtain the spectral image differences, the dynamic change of blood sugar is reflected in the image difference data. Through the experiment proved that this method can be used to monitor blood glucose dynamically to a certain extent.

  7. Calculation of Blood Dose in Patients Treated With 131I Using MIRD, Imaging, and Blood Sampling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piruzan, Elham; Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Faghihi, Reza; Entezarmahdi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    Radioiodine therapy is known as the most effective treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) to ablate remnant thyroid tissue after surgery. In patients with DTC treated with radioiodine, internal radiation dosimetry of radioiodine is useful for radiation risk assessment. The aim of this study is to describe a method to estimate the absorbed dose to the blood using medical internal radiation dosimetry methods. In this study, 23 patients with DTC with different administrated activities, 3.7, 4.62, and 5.55 GBq after thyroidectomy, were randomly selected. Blood dosimetry of treated patients was performed with external whole body counting using a dual-head gamma camera imaging device and also with blood sample activity measurements using a dose calibrator. Absorbed dose to the blood was measured at 2, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 hours after the administration of radioiodine with the 2 methods. Based on the results of whole body counting and blood sample activity dose rate measurements, 96 hours after administration of 3.7, 4.62, and 5.55 GBq of radioiodine, absorbed doses to patients' blood were 0.65 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.18, 0.79 ± 0.51 Gy, respectively. Increasing radioiodine activity from 3.7 to 5.55 GBq increased blood dose significantly, while there was no significant difference in blood dose between radioiodine dosages of 3.7 and 4.62 GBq. Our results revealed a significant correlation between the blood absorbed dose and blood sample activity and between the blood absorbed dose and whole body counts 24 to 48 hours after the administration of radioiodine.

  8. Image resizing using saliency strength map and seam carving for white blood cell analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam JaeYeal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new image-resizing method using seam carving and a Saliency Strength Map (SSM is proposed to preserve important contents, such as white blood cells included in blood cell images. Methods To apply seam carving to cell images, a SSM is initially generated using a visual attention model and the structural properties of white blood cells are then used to create an energy map for seam carving. As a result, the energy map maximizes the energies of the white blood cells, while minimizing the energies of the red blood cells and background. Thus, the use of a SSM allows the proposed method to reduce the image size efficiently, while preserving the important white blood cells. Results Experimental results using the PSNR (Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio and ROD (Ratio of Distortion of blood cell images confirm that the proposed method is able to produce better resizing results than conventional methods, as the seam carving is performed based on an SSM and energy map. Conclusions For further improvement, a faster medical image resizing method is currently being investigated to reduce the computation time, while maintaining the same image quality.

  9. Image resizing using saliency strength map and seam carving for white blood cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, ByoungChul; Kim, SeongHoon; Nam, JaeYeal

    2010-09-20

    A new image-resizing method using seam carving and a Saliency Strength Map (SSM) is proposed to preserve important contents, such as white blood cells included in blood cell images. To apply seam carving to cell images, a SSM is initially generated using a visual attention model and the structural properties of white blood cells are then used to create an energy map for seam carving. As a result, the energy map maximizes the energies of the white blood cells, while minimizing the energies of the red blood cells and background. Thus, the use of a SSM allows the proposed method to reduce the image size efficiently, while preserving the important white blood cells. Experimental results using the PSNR (Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio) and ROD (Ratio of Distortion) of blood cell images confirm that the proposed method is able to produce better resizing results than conventional methods, as the seam carving is performed based on an SSM and energy map. For further improvement, a faster medical image resizing method is currently being investigated to reduce the computation time, while maintaining the same image quality.

  10. High-speed video capillaroscopy method for imaging and evaluation of moving red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurov, Igor; Volkov, Mikhail; Margaryants, Nikita; Pimenov, Aleksei; Potemkin, Andrey

    2018-05-01

    The video capillaroscopy system with high image recording rate to resolve moving red blood cells with velocity up to 5 mm/s into a capillary is considered. Proposed procedures of the recorded video sequence processing allow evaluating spatial capillary area, capillary diameter and central line with high accuracy and reliability independently on properties of individual capillary. Two-dimensional inter frame procedure is applied to find lateral shift of neighbor images in the blood flow area with moving red blood cells and to measure directly the blood flow velocity along a capillary central line. The developed method opens new opportunities for biomedical diagnostics, particularly, due to long-time continuous monitoring of red blood cells velocity into capillary. Spatio-temporal representation of capillary blood flow is considered. Experimental results of direct measurement of blood flow velocity into separate capillary as well as capillary net are presented and discussed.

  11. The clinical study of cerebral blood flow imaging in patients with early syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zengli; Shi Xin; Wu Jinchang; Tang Jun; Zhong Jijun

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of cerebral blood flow imaging for evaluation of patients with early syphilis. Methods: Fifty-three patients with early syphilis underwent cerebral blood flow imaging using 99 Tc m -ethylenecysteinate dimer(ECD). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes were analyzed. Results: The acquired images of 53 patients were graded as 5 types. The rCBF was significantly depressed in 48 of 53 patients mainly in the areas dominated by anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery. Conclusion: Treponema pallidum (TP) could start invading central nervous system at the early stage of infection

  12. Highly sensitive transient absorption imaging of graphene and graphene oxide in living cells and circulating blood

    OpenAIRE

    Junjie Li; Weixia Zhang; Ting-Fung Chung; Mikhail N. Slipchenko; Yong P. Chen; Ji-Xin Cheng; Chen Yang

    2015-01-01

    We report a transient absorption (TA) imaging method for fast visualization and quantitative layer analysis of graphene and GO. Forward and backward imaging of graphene on various substrates under ambient condition was imaged with a speed of 2??s per pixel. The TA intensity linearly increased with the layer number of graphene. Real-time TA imaging of GO in vitro with capability of quantitative analysis of intracellular concentration and ex vivo in circulating blood were demonstrated. These re...

  13. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... in cerebral hemodynamics than noncontrast-enhanced imaging. The results of the deconvolution analysis suggested that perfusion calculation by conventional tracer kinetic methods may be impracticable because of nonlinear effects in contrast-enhanced MR imaging....

  14. Evaluation on the imaging of the bronchial blood flow using nuclear angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Hirayama, Jiro; Kanai, Hisakata; Kobayashi, Toshio; Handa, Kenjiro

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear angiocardiography with sup(99m)TcO 4 - was performed for the purpose of the delineation of the systemic perfusion in various lung diseases, using a scintillation camera with a digital minicomputer system. The images of the bronchial blood flow were obtained in cases with primary lung cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, lung abscess, bronchiectasis and chronic bronchitis. The fair images of the bronchial blood flow were taken in cases of peripheral type, adenocarcinoma and primary foci of atelectatic type in primary lung cancer. The grade of delineation of the bronchial blood flow and vascularity of bronchial artery in foci of primary lung cancer were correlative to the grade of accumulation of 197 HgCl 2 , respectively. The joint use of nuclear angiocardiography and other imagings such as tumor or perfusion one was useful for evaluation of the pulmonary and systemic circulation, and that made isotope diagnosis of primary lung cancer more reliable too. The image as a isocount map extracted out of the image of 197 HgCl 2 or sup(99m)Tc-MAA, was superimposed to the brightness image of the nuclear angiocardiogram (aortic phase). This image superimposition methods were valuable to improve anatomic orientation of the nuclear angiocardiogram. The delineation of the bronchial blood flow on the subtraction image, which obtained from the two time-different images in aortic phase of the nuclear angiocardiogram, was better than that of the original images. (author)

  15. The value of thyroid blood flow and static imaging for diagnosis of hashimotos disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Bangkun; Yang Jishen; Shen Dawei; Liu Bin; Xue Yuanming; Shi Jue

    1995-01-01

    The diagnostic value of the combination of thyroid blood flow and static imaging for Hashimotos disease are evaluated. Both thyroid blood flow and static imaging with 99m Tc was carried out in 108 Hashimotos disease proved by fine needle biopsy. 87% of them had markedly or slightly increased thyroid blood flow. On static imaging 89.8% showed active nonuniformity, among them, 16.7% was cold nodules. The 99m Tc uptake was normal in 66 (58.3%), decreased in 26 (26.9%), but only increased in 16, in them 4 accompanying hyperthyroidism. Thyroid blood flow and static imaging, a simple and convenient approach, combining with radioimmunoassay and clinical manifestation, can be used as routine diagnostic model

  16. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The

  17. Induced renal artery stenosis in rabbits: magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, and radionuclide determination of blood volume and blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.G.; Tobin, M.; LeVeen, R.; Tomaczewski, J.; Alavi, A.; Staum, M.; Kundel, H.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the ability of MRI to detect alterations due to renal ischemia, a rabbit renal artery stenosis (RAS) model was developed. Seven rabbits had RAS induced by surgically encircling the artery with a polyethylene band which had a lumen of 1 mm, 1 to 2 weeks prior to imaging. The stenosis was confirmed by angiography, and the rabbits were then imaged in a 1.4 T research MRI unit. T1 was calculated using four inversion recovery sequences with different inversion times. Renal blood flow, using 113 Sn-microspheres, and regional water content by drying were then measured. The average T1 of the inner medulla was shorter for the ischemia (1574 msec) than for the contralateral kidney (1849 msec), while no change ws noted in the cortex. Ischemic kidneys had less distinct outer medullary zones on IR images with TI = 600 msec than did contralateral or control kidneys. Blood flow to both the cortex and medulla were markedly reduced in ischemic kidneys compared with contralateral kidneys (119.5 vs. 391 ml/min/100 gm for cortex and 19.8 vs. 50.8 ml/min/100 gm for medulla). Renal water and blood content were less affected. Our rabbit model of renal artery stenosis with MRI, radionuclide, and angiographic correlation has the potential to increase our understanding of MR imaging of the rabbit kidney

  18. Value of blood-pool subtraction in cardiac indium-111-labeled platelet imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machac, J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Goldman, M.E.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Palestro, C.; Strashun, A.; Vaquer, R.; Phillips, R.A.; Fuster, V. (Mt. Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Blood-pool subtraction has been proposed to enhance {sup 111}In-labeled platelet imaging of intracardiac thrombi. We tested the accuracy of labeled platelet imaging, with and without blood-pool subtraction, in ten subjects with cardiac thrombi of varying age, eight with endocarditis being treated with antimicrobial therapy and ten normal controls. Imaging was performed early after labeled platelet injection (24 hr or less) and late (48 hr or more). Blood-pool subtraction was carried out. All images were graded subjectively by four experienced, blinded readers. Detection accuracy was measured by the sensitivity at three fixed levels of specificity estimated from receiver operator characteristic curve analysis and tested by three-way analysis of variance. Detection accuracy was generally improved on delayed images. Blood-pool subtraction did not improve accuracy. Although blood-pool subtraction increased detection sensitivity, this was offset by decreased specificity. For this population studied, blood-pool subtraction did not improve subjective detection of abnormal platelet deposition by 111In platelet imaging.

  19. Value of blood-pool subtraction in cardiac indium-111-labeled platelet imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machac, J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Goldman, M.E.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Palestro, C.; Strashun, A.; Vaquer, R.; Phillips, R.A.; Fuster, V.

    1989-01-01

    Blood-pool subtraction has been proposed to enhance 111 In-labeled platelet imaging of intracardiac thrombi. We tested the accuracy of labeled platelet imaging, with and without blood-pool subtraction, in ten subjects with cardiac thrombi of varying age, eight with endocarditis being treated with antimicrobial therapy and ten normal controls. Imaging was performed early after labeled platelet injection (24 hr or less) and late (48 hr or more). Blood-pool subtraction was carried out. All images were graded subjectively by four experienced, blinded readers. Detection accuracy was measured by the sensitivity at three fixed levels of specificity estimated from receiver operator characteristic curve analysis and tested by three-way analysis of variance. Detection accuracy was generally improved on delayed images. Blood-pool subtraction did not improve accuracy. Although blood-pool subtraction increased detection sensitivity, this was offset by decreased specificity. For this population studied, blood-pool subtraction did not improve subjective detection of abnormal platelet deposition by 111In platelet imaging

  20. Imaging tumor hypoxia: Blood-borne delivery of imaging agents is fundamentally different in hypoxia subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vaupel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic tissue subvolumes are a hallmark feature of solid malignant tumors, relevant for cancer therapy and patient outcome because they increase both the intrinsic aggressiveness of tumor cells and their resistance to several commonly used anticancer strategies. Pathogenetic mechanisms leading to hypoxia are diverse, may coexist within the same tumor and are commonly grouped according to the duration of their effects. Chronic hypoxia is mainly caused by diffusion limitations resulting from enlarged intercapillary distances and adverse diffusion geometries and — to a lesser extent — by hypoxemia, compromised perfusion or long-lasting microregional flow stops. Conversely, acute hypoxia preferentially results from transient disruptions in perfusion. While each of these features of the tumor microenvironment can contribute to a critical reduction of oxygen availability, the delivery of imaging agents (as well as nutrients and anticancer agents may be compromised or remain unaffected. Thus, a critical appraisal of the effects of the various mechanisms leading to hypoxia with regard to the blood-borne delivery of imaging agents is necessary to judge their ability to correctly represent the hypoxic phenotype of solid malignancies.

  1. Changes of renal blood flow after ESWL: assessment by ASL MR imaging, contrast enhanced MR imaging, and renal resistive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Ellah, Mohamed; Kremser, Christian; Pallwein, Leo; Aigner, Friedrich; Schocke, Michael; Peschel, Reinhard; Pedross, Florian; Pinggera, Germar-Michael; Wolf, Christian; Alsharkawy, Mostafa A M; Jaschke, Werner; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2010-10-01

    The annual incidence of stone formation is increased in the industrialised world. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a non-invasive effective treatment of upper urinary tract stones. This study is aimed to evaluate changes of renal blood flow in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and renal resistive index (RI). Thirteen patients with nephrolithiasis were examined using MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound 12h before and 12h after ESWL. ASL sequence was done for both kidneys and followed by contrast enhanced MR imaging. In addition RI Doppler ultrasound measurements were performed. A significant increase in RI (pESWL causes changes in RI and ASL MR imaging, which seem to reflect changes in renal blood flow. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In-vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2000-04-01

    Noninvasive quantitation of blood flow in the retinal micro circulation may elucidate the progression and treatment of ocular disorders including diabetic retinopathy, age-related degeneration, and glaucoma. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography was recently introduced as a technique allowing simultaneous micron-scale resolution cross-sectional imaging of tissue micro structure and blood flow in the human retina. Here, time-resolved imaging of dynamics of blood flow profiles was performed to measure cardiac pulsatility within retinal vessels. Retinal pulsatility has been shown to decrease throughout the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

  3. Effective segmentation of fresh post-mortem murine lung parenchyma in phase contrast X-ray tomographic microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikonomidis, Ioannis Vogiatzis; Cremona, Tiziana P; Schittny, Johannes C; Lovric, Goran; Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The acinus represents the functional unit of the mammalian lung. It is defined as the small tree of gas-exchanging airways, which is fed by the most distal purely conducting airway. Different hypotheses exist on how the fine structure of the acinus changes during ventilation and development. Since in classical 2-dimensional (2D) sections of the lung the borders of the acini are not detectable, every study of acini requires 3-dimensional (3D) datasets. As a basis for further studies of pulmonary acini we imaged rodent lungs as close to life as possible using phase contrast synchrotron radiation-based X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), and developed a protocol for the segmentation of the alveolar septa. The method is based on a combined multilevel filtering approach. Seeds are automatically defined for separate regions of tissue and airspace during each 2D filtering level and then given as input to a 3D random walk segmentation. Thus, the different types of artifacts present in the images are treated separately, taking into account the sample’s structural complexity. The proposed procedure yields high-quality 3D segmentations of acinar microstructure that can be used for a reliable morphological analysis. (paper)

  4. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...

  5. Multimodal imaging of vascular network and blood microcirculation by optical diagnostic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu L; Kalchenko, V V; Meglinski, I V

    2011-01-01

    We present a multimodal optical diagnostic approach for simultaneous non-invasive in vivo imaging of blood and lymphatic microvessels, utilising a combined use of fluorescence intravital microscopy and a method of dynamic light scattering. This approach makes it possible to renounce the use of fluorescent markers for visualisation of blood vessels and, therefore, significantly (tenfold) reduce the toxicity of the technique and minimise side effects caused by the use of contrast fluorescent markers. We demonstrate that along with the ability to obtain images of lymph and blood microvessels with a high spatial resolution, current multimodal approach allows one to observe in real time permeability of blood vessels. This technique appears to be promising in physiology studies of blood vessels, and especially in the study of peripheral cardiovascular system in vivo. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  6. Computer Aided Solution for Automatic Segmenting and Measurements of Blood Leucocytes Using Static Microscope Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhay, Enas; Mohammed, Mazin Abed; Ibrahim, Dheyaa Ahmed; Arunkumar, N; Venkatraman, V

    2018-02-17

    Blood leucocytes segmentation in medical images is viewed as difficult process due to the variability of blood cells concerning their shape and size and the difficulty towards determining location of Blood Leucocytes. Physical analysis of blood tests to recognize leukocytes is tedious, time-consuming and liable to error because of the various morphological components of the cells. Segmentation of medical imagery has been considered as a difficult task because of complexity of images, and also due to the non-availability of leucocytes models which entirely captures the probable shapes in each structures and also incorporate cell overlapping, the expansive variety of the blood cells concerning their shape and size, various elements influencing the outer appearance of the blood leucocytes, and low Static Microscope Image disparity from extra issues outcoming about because of noise. We suggest a strategy towards segmentation of blood leucocytes using static microscope images which is a resultant of three prevailing systems of computer vision fiction: enhancing the image, Support vector machine for segmenting the image, and filtering out non ROI (region of interest) on the basis of Local binary patterns and texture features. Every one of these strategies are modified for blood leucocytes division issue, in this manner the subsequent techniques are very vigorous when compared with its individual segments. Eventually, we assess framework based by compare the outcome and manual division. The findings outcome from this study have shown a new approach that automatically segments the blood leucocytes and identify it from a static microscope images. Initially, the method uses a trainable segmentation procedure and trained support vector machine classifier to accurately identify the position of the ROI. After that, filtering out non ROI have proposed based on histogram analysis to avoid the non ROI and chose the right object. Finally, identify the blood leucocytes type using

  7. Application of Thinned-Skull Cranial Window to Mouse Cerebral Blood Flow Imaging Using Optical Microangiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo imaging of mouse brain vasculature typically requires applying skull window opening techniques: open-skull cranial window or thinned-skull cranial window. We report non-invasive 3D in vivo cerebral blood flow imaging of C57/BL mouse by the use of ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) techniques to evaluate two cranial window types based on their procedures and ability to visualize surface pial vessel dynamics. Application of the thinned-skull technique is found to be effective in achieving high quality images for pial vessels for short-term imaging, and has advantages over the open-skull technique in available imaging area, surgical efficiency, and cerebral environment preservation. In summary, thinned-skull cranial window serves as a promising tool in studying hemodynamics in pial microvasculature using OMAG or other OCT blood flow imaging modalities. PMID:25426632

  8. Optimum allocation of imaging time and minimum detectable activity in dual isotope blood pool subtraction indium-111 platelet imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machac, J.; Horowitz, S.F.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Fuster, V.

    1984-01-01

    Indium-111 labeled platelet imaging is a tool for detection of thrombus formation in vascular spaces. Dual isotope blood pool subtraction may help differentiate focal platelet accumulation from blood pool activity. This study used a computer model to calculate the minimum excess-to-blood pool platelet ratio (EX/BP) and the optimum dual isotope imaging times under varied conditions of lesion size. The model simulated usual human imaging doses of 500 μCi of In-111 platelets and 5mCi of Tc-99m labeled RBCs giving a reference cardiac blood pool region (100cc) of 10000 cpm for Tc-99m and 500 cpm for In-111. The total imaging time was fixed at 20 minutes, while the two isotope imaging times (TIn/TTc) were varied, as were the simulated lesion size (cc) and EX/BP. The relative error of the excess counts was calculated using propagation of error theory. At the critical level of detection, where the excess lesion counts equal 3 times the standard deviation, the optimum TIn/TTc and minimum Ex/BP were determined for each lesion size. For the smallest lesion size (0.1cc), the minimum detectable EX/BP ratio was 1.6, with the best TIn/TTC ratio of 18/2 minutes, and for large lesions, an EX/BP of 0.1, with a TIn/TTc of 16/4. This model provides an estimate of the sensitivity and optimizes imaging times in dual isotope subtraction platelet imaging. The model is adaptable to varying isotope doses, total imaging times and lesion size. This information will be helpful in future in- vivo imaging studies of intravascular thrombi in humans

  9. Using wavelet denoising and mathematical morphology in the segmentation technique applied to blood cells images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, Macarena; Cantó, Begoña

    2013-04-01

    Accurate image segmentation is used in medical diagnosis since this technique is a noninvasive pre-processing step for biomedical treatment. In this work we present an efficient segmentation method for medical image analysis. In particular, with this method blood cells can be segmented. For that, we combine the wavelet transform with morphological operations. Moreover, the wavelet thresholding technique is used to eliminate the noise and prepare the image for suitable segmentation. In wavelet denoising we determine the best wavelet that shows a segmentation with the largest area in the cell. We study different wavelet families and we conclude that the wavelet db1 is the best and it can serve for posterior works on blood pathologies. The proposed method generates goods results when it is applied on several images. Finally, the proposed algorithm made in MatLab environment is verified for a selected blood cells.

  10. Using wavelet denoising and mathematical morphology in the segmentation technique applied to blood cells images

    OpenAIRE

    Boix García, Macarena; Cantó Colomina, Begoña

    2013-01-01

    Accurate image segmentation is used in medical diagnosis since this technique is a noninvasive pre-processing step for biomedical treatment. In this work we present an efficient segmentation method for medical image analysis. In particular, with this method blood cells can be segmented. For that, we combine the wavelet transform with morphological operations. Moreover, the wavelet thresholding technique is used to eliminate the noise and prepare the image for suitable segmentation. In wavelet...

  11. Recent advances in blood flow vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Udesen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    tracking. The key advantages of these techniques are very fast imaging that can attain an order of magnitude higher precision than conventional methods. SA flow imaging was implemented on the experimental scanner RASMUS using an 8-emission spherical emission sequence and reception of 64 channels on a BK...... investigated using both simulations, flow rig measurements, and in-vivo validation against MR scans. The TO method obtains a relative accuracy of 10% for a fully transverse flow in both simulations and flow rig experiments. In-vivo studies performed on 11 healthy volunteers comparing the TO method...... been acquired using a commercial implementation of the method (BK Medical ProFocus Ultraview scanner). A range of other methods are also presented. This includes synthetic aperture imaging using either spherical or plane waves with velocity estimation performed with directional beamforming or speckle...

  12. Long-Term Stored Hemoglobin-Vesicles, a Cellular Type of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carrier, Has Resuscitative Effects Comparable to That for Fresh Red Blood Cells in a Rat Model with Massive Hemorrhage without Post-Transfusion Lung Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Tokuno

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin-vesicles (HbV, encapsulating highly concentrated human hemoglobin in liposomes, were developed as a substitute for red blood cells (RBC and their safety and efficacy in transfusion therapy has been confirmed in previous studies. Although HbV suspensions are structurally and physicochemically stabile for least 1-year at room temperature, based on in vitro experiments, the issue of whether the use of long-term stored HbV after a massive hemorrhage can be effective in resuscitations without adverse, post-transfusion effects remains to be clarified. We report herein on a comparison of the systemic response and the induction of organ injuries in hemorrhagic shock model rats resuscitated using 1-year-stored HbV, freshly packed RBC (PRBC-0 and by 28-day-stored packed RBC (PRBC-28. The six-hour mortality after resuscitation was not significantly different among the groups. Arterial blood pressure and blood gas parameters revealed that, using HbV, recovery from the shock state was comparable to that when PRBC-0 was used. Although no significant change was observed in serum parameters reflecting liver and kidney injuries at 6 hours after resuscitation among the three resuscitation groups, results based on Evans Blue and protein leakage in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the lung wet/dry weight ratio and histopathological findings indicated that HbV as well as PRBC-0 was less predisposed to result in a post-transfusion lung injury than PRBC-28, as evidenced by low levels of myeloperoxidase accumulation and subsequent oxidative damage in the lung. The findings reported herein indicate that 1-year-stored HbV can effectively function as a resuscitative fluid without the induction of post-transfused lung injury and that it is comparable to fresh PRBC, suggesting that HbV is a promising RBC substitute with a long shelf-life.

  13. Technical Note: Measurement of common carotid artery lumen dynamics using black-blood MR cine imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Erpeng; Dong, Li; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Lyu; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Xihai; Wang, Jinnan; Yuan, Chun; Guo, Hua

    2017-03-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the common carotid artery (CCA) lumen dynamics using a black-blood cine (BB-cine) imaging method. Motion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (MSDE) prepared spoiled gradient sequence was used for the BB-cine imaging. CCAs of eleven healthy volunteers were studied using this method. Lumen dynamics, including lumen area evolution waveforms and distension values, were measured and evaluated by comparing this method with bright-blood cine (BrB-cine) imaging. Compared with the BrB-cine images, flow artifacts were effectively suppressed in the BB-cine images. BrB-cine images generally show larger lumen areas than BB-cine images. The lumen area waveforms and distension measurements from BB-cine imaging showed smaller variances among different subjects than BrB-cine imaging. The proposed BB-cine imaging technique can suppress the flow artifacts effectively and reduce the partial volume effects from the vessel wall. This might allow more accurate lumen dynamics measurements than traditional BrB-cine imaging, which may further be valuable for investigating biomechanical and functional properties of the cardiovascular system. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Adaptive and automatic red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Zhou, Mei; Qiu, Song; Sun, Li; Liu, Hongying; Li, Qingli; Wang, Yiting

    2017-12-01

    Red blood cell counting, as a routine examination, plays an important role in medical diagnoses. Although automated hematology analyzers are widely used, manual microscopic examination by a hematologist or pathologist is still unavoidable, which is time-consuming and error-prone. This paper proposes a full-automatic red blood cell counting method which is based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging of blood smears and combines spatial and spectral information to achieve high precision. The acquired hyperspectral image data of the blood smear in the visible and near-infrared spectral range are firstly preprocessed, and then a quadratic blind linear unmixing algorithm is used to get endmember abundance images. Based on mathematical morphological operation and an adaptive Otsu’s method, a binaryzation process is performed on the abundance images. Finally, the connected component labeling algorithm with magnification-based parameter setting is applied to automatically select the binary images of red blood cell cytoplasm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can perform well and has potential for clinical applications.

  15. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K [University of Washington, Department of Bioengineering, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  16. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  17. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitzke, Dietrich; Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  18. Cardiac tumours: non invasive detection and assessment by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, D.; Wainwright, R.; Brennand-Roper, D.; Deverall, P.; Sowton, E.; Maisey, M.

    1980-01-01

    Four patients with cardiac tumours were investigated by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging and echocardiography. Contrast angiocardiography was performed in three of the cases. Two left atrial tumours were detected by all three techniques. In one of these cases echocardiography alone showed additional mitral valve stenosis, but isotope imaging indicated tumour size more accurately. A large septal mass was detected by all three methods. In this patient echocardiography showed evidence of left ventricular outflow obstruction, confirmed at cardiac catheterisation, but gated isotope imaging provided a more detailed assessment of the abnormal cardiac anatomy. In the fourth case gated isotope imaging detected a large right ventricular tumour which had not been identified by echocardiography. Gated cardiac blood pool isotope imaging is a complementary technique to echocardiography for the non-invasive detection and assessment of cardiac tumours. (author)

  19. Imaging experimental infective endocarditis with indium-111-labeled blood cellular components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riba, A.L.; Thakur, M.L.; Gottschalk, A.; Andriole, V.T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    The capability of radionuclide imaging to detect experimental aortic valve infective endocarditis was assessed with indium-111 ( 111 In)-labeled blood cells. Sequential cardiac imaging and tissue distribution studies were obtained in 17 rabbits with infective endocarditis after administration of 111 In-platelets and in five after 111 In-polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Forty-eight to 72 hours after platelet administration, in vivo imaging demonstrated abnormal 111 In uptake in all animals in the region of the aortic valve in an anatomically distinct pattern. Images of the excised heart showed discrete cardiac uptake conforming to the in vivo image and gross pathological examination. 111 In-platelet uptake in vegetations from the 17 animals averaged 240 +- 41 times greater than that in normal myocardium and 99 +- 15 times greater uptake in blood. In contrast, 111 In-leukocyte cardiac imaging showed no abnormal aortic valve uptake 24 hours after tracer administration and the lesion myocardium activity ratio was only 5 +- 2 (3 +- 1 for lesion/blood activity). Four normal rabbits demonstrated neither positive 111 In-platelet scintigraphs nor abnormal cardiac tissue uptake. Likewise, noncellular 111 In was not concentrated to any significant extent in three animals with infective endocarditis. This study demonstrates that 111 In-platelet, but not leukocyte cardiac imaging, is a sensitive technique for detecting experimental infective endocarditis. The imaging data conform to the cellular pathology of the infective endocarditis vegetation

  20. Evaluation of RI images of hepatic blood flow using Tc-99m PMT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Hiromichi; Iwasaki, Naoya; Ichikawa, Kesato

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of RI images of hepatic blood flow using Tc-99m-PMT, analysis of the RI images and estimation of hepatic blood flow were carried out in patients with various liver diseases (37 cases). After intravenous injection of Tc-99m-PMT, hepatic accumulation curve of ROI positioned at whole liver area and time activity curve of ROI positioned at celiac artery were obtained through scintillation camera images with the computer-analysed system. Hepatic blood flow coefficient (K) was calculated from the hepatic accumulation curve. Based on the differential curve calculated from the time activity curve, chronological images of arterial, portal, parenchymal and saturated parenchymal phases were obtained. Results ; 1) K was 0.50 + 0.04, 0.35 + 0.02 and 0.26 + 0.04/min in normal type, CH type and LC type respectively. These coefficients well correlated with clinical severity of hepatic diseases. 2) Perfusional phase images of the liver became poorer in accordance with progression of liver disease, while images of spleen, portal venous system and collateral channels were more clearly obtained in liver cirrhosis. This method was shown to have a potential to understanding of severity of liver disease and hepatic blood flow dynamics.

  1. A Means for the Scintigraphic Imaging of Regional Brain Dynamics. Regional Cerebral Blood Flow and Regional Cerebral Blood Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potchen, E. J.; Bentley, R.; Gerth, W.; Hill, R. L.; Davis, D. O. [Washington University School Of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1969-05-15

    The use of freely diffusable inert radioactive gas as a washout indicator to measure regional cerebral blood flow has become a standardized kinetic procedure in many laboratories. Recent investigations with this technique have led us to conclude that we can reliably distinguish regional flow with perfusion against regional flow without perfusion from the early portion of the curve. Based on a detailed study of the early curve kinetics in patients with and without cerebral vascular disease we have defined the sampling duration necessary for application of the Anger gamma camera imaging process to regional changes in cerebral radioactivity. Using a standard camera and a small computer, a procedure has been developed and based upon entire field to determine the time of maximum height followed by analysis of the data in a matrix. This will permit a contour plot presentation of calculated regional cerebral blood flow in millilitres per 100 grams perfused brain per minute. In addition, we propose to augment this data by the display of regional non-perfusion blood flow versus regional cerebral flow with perfusion. Preliminary investigation on sampling duration, and Compton scattering were prerequisite to clinical scintigraphy of regional cerebral blood flow. In addition, the method of interface for the conventional Anger gamma camera to digital computers used in this procedure are discussed. Applications to further assess regional cerebral dynamics by scintigraphy are presented. (author)

  2. Extraction of Nucleolus Candidate Zone in White Blood Cells of Peripheral Blood Smear Images Using Curvelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Soltanzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main part of each white blood cell (WBC is its nucleus which contains chromosomes. Although white blood cells (WBCs with giant nuclei are the main symptom of leukemia, they are not sufficient to prove this disease and other symptoms must be investigated. For example another important symptom of leukemia is the existence of nucleolus in nucleus. The nucleus contains chromatin and a structure called the nucleolus. Chromatin is DNA in its active form while nucleolus is composed of protein and RNA, which are usually inactive. In this paper, to diagnose this symptom and in order to discriminate between nucleoli and chromatins, we employ curvelet transform, which is a multiresolution transform for detecting 2D singularities in images. For this reason, at first nuclei are extracted by means of K-means method, then curvelet transform is applied on extracted nuclei and the coefficients are modified, and finally reconstructed image is used to extract the candidate locations of chromatins and nucleoli. This method is applied on 100 microscopic images and succeeds with specificity of 80.2% and sensitivity of 84.3% to detect the nucleolus candidate zone. After nucleolus candidate zone detection, new features that can be used to classify atypical and blast cells such as gradient of saturation channel are extracted.

  3. High Frame-Rate Blood Vector Velocity Imaging Using Plane Waves: Simulations and Preliminary Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2008-01-01

    ) The ultrasound is not focused during the transmissions of the ultrasound signals; 2) A 13-bit Barker code is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element; and 3) The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is estimated using 2-D cross-correlation. A parameter study was performed using the Field II program......, and performance of the method was investigated when a virtual blood vessel was scanned by a linear array transducer. An improved parameter set for the method was identified from the parameter study, and a flow rig measurement was performed using the same improved setup as in the simulations. Finally, the common...... carotid artery of a healthy male was scanned with a scan sequence that satisfies the limits set by the Food and Drug Administration. Vector velocity images were obtained with a frame-rate of 100 Hz where 40 speckle images are used for each vector velocity image. It was found that the blood flow...

  4. Highly sensitive transient absorption imaging of graphene and graphene oxide in living cells and circulating blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Zhang, Weixia; Chung, Ting-Fung; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Chen, Yong P; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Yang, Chen

    2015-07-23

    We report a transient absorption (TA) imaging method for fast visualization and quantitative layer analysis of graphene and GO. Forward and backward imaging of graphene on various substrates under ambient condition was imaged with a speed of 2 μs per pixel. The TA intensity linearly increased with the layer number of graphene. Real-time TA imaging of GO in vitro with capability of quantitative analysis of intracellular concentration and ex vivo in circulating blood were demonstrated. These results suggest that TA microscopy is a valid tool for the study of graphene based materials.

  5. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... to be in accordance with results obtained by other methods. Noncontrast functional MR (fMR) imaging showed signal increases in gray matter, but also inconsistent changes in some white matter regions. CONCLUSION: In this experiment, contrast-enhanced imaging seemed to show a somewhat higher sensitivity towards changes...

  6. Changes of renal blood flow after ESWL: Assessment by ASL MR imaging, contrast enhanced MR imaging, and renal resistive index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd Ellah, Mohamed, E-mail: dr_m_hamdy2006@hotmail.co [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kremser, Christian, E-mail: christian.kremser@i-med.ac.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pallwein, Leo, E-mail: leo.pallwein-prettner@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Aigner, Friedrich, E-mail: friedrich.Aigner@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schocke, Michael, E-mail: michael.schocke@i-med.ac.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Peschel, Reinhard, E-mail: reinhard.peschel@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Urology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pedross, Florian, E-mail: florian.pedross@i-med.ac.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Medical Statistics Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pinggera, Germar-Michael, E-mail: germar.pinggera@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Urology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Wolf, Christian, E-mail: christian.wolf@bkh-reutte.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Alsharkawy, Mostafa A.M., E-mail: drmostafamri@yahoo.co [Assiut University, Radiology Dept., Assiut (Egypt); Jaschke, Werner, E-mail: werner.jaschke@i-med.ac.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Frauscher, Ferdinand, E-mail: ferdinand.frauscher@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-10-15

    The annual incidence of stone formation is increased in the industrialised world. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a non-invasive effective treatment of upper urinary tract stones. This study is aimed to evaluate changes of renal blood flow in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and renal resistive index (RI). Thirteen patients with nephrolithiasis were examined using MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound 12 h before and 12 h after ESWL. ASL sequence was done for both kidneys and followed by contrast enhanced MR imaging. In addition RI Doppler ultrasound measurements were performed. A significant increase in RI (p < 0.001) was found in both treated and untreated kidneys. ASL MR imaging also showed significant changes in both kidneys (p < 0.001). Contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging did not show significant changes in the kidneys. ESWL causes changes in RI and ASL MR imaging, which seem to reflect changes in renal blood flow.

  7. Hybrid image and blood sampling input function for quantification of small animal dynamic PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoghi, Kooresh I.; Welch, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe and validate a hybrid image and blood sampling (HIBS) method to derive the input function for quantification of microPET mice data. The HIBS algorithm derives the peak of the input function from the image, which is corrected for recovery, while the tail is derived from 5 to 6 optimally placed blood sampling points. A Bezier interpolation algorithm is used to link the rightmost image peak data point to the leftmost blood sampling point. To assess the performance of HIBS, 4 mice underwent 60-min microPET imaging sessions following a 0.40-0.50-mCi bolus administration of 18 FDG. In total, 21 blood samples (blood-sampled plasma time-activity curve, bsPTAC) were obtained throughout the imaging session to compare against the proposed HIBS method. MicroPET images were reconstructed using filtered back projection with a zoom of 2.75 on the heart. Volumetric regions of interest (ROIs) were composed by drawing circular ROIs 3 pixels in diameter on 3-4 transverse planes of the left ventricle. Performance was characterized by kinetic simulations in terms of bias in parameter estimates when bsPTAC and HIBS are used as input functions. The peak of the bsPTAC curve was distorted in comparison to the HIBS-derived curve due to temporal limitations and delay in blood sampling, which affected the rates of bidirectional exchange between plasma and tissue. The results highlight limitations in using bsPTAC. The HIBS method, however, yields consistent results, and thus, is a substitute for bsPTAC

  8. Evaluation of musculoskeletal sepsis with indium-111 white blood cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouzounian, T.J.; Thompson, L.; Grogan, T.J.; Webber, M.M.; Amstutz, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of musculoskeletal sepsis, especially following joint replacement, continues to be a challenging problem. Often, even with invasive diagnostic evaluation, the diagnosis of infection remains uncertain. This is a report on the first 55 Indium-111 white blood cell (WBC) images performed in 39 patients for the evaluation of musculoskeletal sepsis. There were 40 negative and 15 positive Indium-111 WBC images. These were correlated with operative culture and tissue pathology, aspiration culture, and clinical findings. Thirty-eight images were performed for the evaluation of possible total joint sepsis (8 positive and 30 negative images); 17 for the evaluation of nonarthroplasty-related musculoskeletal sepsis (7 positive and 10 negative images). Overall, there were 13 true-positive, 39 true-negative, two false-positive, and one false-negative images. Indium-111 WBC imaging is a sensitive and specific means of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis, especially following total joint replacement

  9. Estimation of center line and diameter of brain blood vessel using three-dimensional blood vessel matching method with head three-dimensional CTA image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Masashi; Shinohara, Toshihiro; Nakayama, Masato; Nakasako, Noboru

    2010-01-01

    To support and automate the brain blood vessel disease diagnosis, a novel method to obtain the center line and the diameter of a blood vessel is proposed with a three-dimensional head computed tomographic angiography (CTA) image. Although the line thinning processing with distance transform or gray information is generally used to obtain the blood vessel center line, this method is not essentially one to obtain the center line and tends to yield extra lines depending on CTA images. In this study, the center line of the blood vessel is obtained by tracing the vessel. The blood vessel is traced by sequentially estimating the center point and direction of the blood vessel. The center point and direction of the blood vessel are estimated by taking the correlation between the blood vessel and a solid model of the blood vessel that is designed by considering noise influence. In addition, the vessel diameter is also estimated by correlating the blood vessel and the blood vessel model of which the diameter is variable. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by experimentally applied the proposed method to an actual three-dimensional head CTA image. (author)

  10. Modelling the influence of noise of the image sensor for blood cells recognition in computer microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitaev, V. G.; Nagornov, O. V.; Pronichev, A. N.; Polyakov, E. V.; Dmitrieva, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    The first stage of diagnostics of blood cancer is the analysis of blood smears. The application of decision-making support systems would reduce the subjectivity of the diagnostic process and avoid errors, resulting in often irreversible changes in the patient's condition. In this regard, the solution of this problem requires the use of modern technology. One of the tools of the program classification of blood cells are texture features, and the task of finding informative among them is promising. The paper investigates the effect of noise of the image sensor to informative texture features with application of methods of mathematical modelling.

  11. NMR multiple-echo phase-contrast blood flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, M.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for magnetic resonance imaging of fluid flow in a sample, comprising the steps of: (a) immersing the sample in a static magnetic field disposed in a first direction; (b) applying a first sequence of magnetic field gradients and radio-frequency signals to the sample to both define a slab, of the sample to be imaged, in a plane substantially orthogonal to a selected direction for which flow velocity is to be measured, and to obtain a plurality N of spin-echo response signals form that slab; (c) processing the plurality of first sequence spin-echo signals to obtain a complex value A/sub 1/(X,Y,Z) relating both the spin density rho'(X,Y,Z),... and the phase rotation phi(X,Y,Z), induced by the first sequence, for each of a selected number of sequential locations (X,Y,Z) in the sample slab; (d) applying a second sequence of magnetic field gradient and radio-frequency signals to both define the same sample slab as in step (b) and to obtain another plurality N of spin-echo response signals from that slab; (e) including a waveform in at least one of the magnetic field gradient and radio-frequency signals applied in step (d) for imparting to each of the spin-echo signal components from each slab location having a flowing material therein a phase rotation dependent upon the magnitude of the flow velocity therein in the selected direction; (f) processing the plurality of second sequence spin-echo signals to obtain a complex value A/sub 2/(X,Y,Z) relating the spin density rho'(X,Y,Z) and the imparted phase rotation of the sample material along the selected flow measurement direction for each of the sequential locations (X,Y,Z) in the sample slab; and (g) processing the complex values A/sub 1/(X,Y,Z) and A/sub 2/(X,Y,Z) for each sample location to obtain a differential phase-contrast value related to the velocity of the flowing material therein in the selected measurement direction

  12. New algorithm for detecting smaller retinal blood vessels in fundus images

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeAnder, Robert; Bidari, Praveen I.; Mohammed, Tauseef A.; Das, Moumita; Umbaugh, Scott E.

    2010-03-01

    About 4.1 million Americans suffer from diabetic retinopathy. To help automatically diagnose various stages of the disease, a new blood-vessel-segmentation algorithm based on spatial high-pass filtering was developed to automatically segment blood vessels, including the smaller ones, with low noise. Methods: Image database: Forty, 584 x 565-pixel images were collected from the DRIVE image database. Preprocessing: Green-band extraction was used to obtain better contrast, which facilitated better visualization of retinal blood vessels. A spatial highpass filter of mask-size 11 was applied. A histogram stretch was performed to enhance contrast. A median filter was applied to mitigate noise. At this point, the gray-scale image was converted to a binary image using a binary thresholding operation. Then, a NOT operation was performed by gray-level value inversion between 0 and 255. Postprocessing: The resulting image was AND-ed with its corresponding ring mask to remove the outer-ring (lens-edge) artifact. At this point, the above algorithm steps had extracted most of the major and minor vessels, with some intersections and bifurcations missing. Vessel segments were reintegrated using the Hough transform. Results: After applying the Hough transform, both the average peak SNR and the RMS error improved by 10%. Pratt's Figure of Merit (PFM) was decreased by 6%. Those averages were better than [1] by 10-30%. Conclusions: The new algorithm successfully preserved the details of smaller blood vessels and should prove successful as a segmentation step for automatically identifying diseases that affect retinal blood vessels.

  13. Unique identification code for medical fundus images using blood vessel pattern for tele-ophthalmology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anushikha; Dutta, Malay Kishore; Sharma, Dilip Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Identification of fundus images during transmission and storage in database for tele-ophthalmology applications is an important issue in modern era. The proposed work presents a novel accurate method for generation of unique identification code for identification of fundus images for tele-ophthalmology applications and storage in databases. Unlike existing methods of steganography and watermarking, this method does not tamper the medical image as nothing is embedded in this approach and there is no loss of medical information. Strategic combination of unique blood vessel pattern and patient ID is considered for generation of unique identification code for the digital fundus images. Segmented blood vessel pattern near the optic disc is strategically combined with patient ID for generation of a unique identification code for the image. The proposed method of medical image identification is tested on the publically available DRIVE and MESSIDOR database of fundus image and results are encouraging. Experimental results indicate the uniqueness of identification code and lossless recovery of patient identity from unique identification code for integrity verification of fundus images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of the effects of fresh leaf and peel extracts of walnut (Juglans regia L. on blood glucose and β-cells of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Javidanpour

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is some report about the hypoglycemic effect of Juglans rejia L. leaf in alloxan induced diabetic rats and hypoglycemic effect of its fruit peel administered intra peritoneally. Thirty male Wistar rats divided into five groups, to evaluate the hypoglycemic and pancreas β-cells regenerative effects of oral methanolic extracts of leaf and fruit peel of walnut. Rats were made diabetic by intravenous (IV injection of 50 mg kg-1 streptozotocin (STZ. Negative control group did not get STZ and any treatment. Positive control, leaf extract, peel extract and insulin groups were treated orally by extract solvent, 200 mg kg-1 leaf extract, 200 mg kg-1 peel extract and 5 IU kg-1 of subcutaneous neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin, respectively. Four weeks later, blood was collected for biochemical analysis and pancreases were removed for β-cells counts in histological sections. Diabetes leads to increase of fast blood sugar (FBS and HbA1c, and decrease of β-cell number and insulin. FBS decreased only in leaf extract group. HbA1c decreased in leaf extract and insulin groups. The β-cells number increased in leaf and peel extract groups. Insulin increased moderately in all treatment groups. We showed the proliferative properties of leaves and peel of Juglans regia L. methanolic extract in STZ- induced diabetic rats, which was accompanied by hypoglycemic effect of leaf extract.

  15. Relationship between dynamic infrared thermal images and blood perfusion rate of the tongue in anaemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiwei; Zhang, Yan

    2018-03-01

    The relationship between dynamic infrared (IR) thermal images and blood perfusion rate of the tongues of anaemia patients was investigated. Blood perfusion rates at multiple locations on the tongues of 62 anaemia patients and 70 control subjects were measured. For both groups of subjects, dynamic IR thermal images were also recorded within 16 s after the mouth opened. The results showed that the blood perfusion rates at different sites (apex, middle, left side and right side) on the tongues in anaemia patients (3.49, 3.71, 3.85 and 3.77 kg/s m-3) were significantly lower than those at the corresponding sites in control subjects (4.45, 4.66, 4.81 and 4.70 kg/s m-3). After the mouth opened, the tongue temperature decreased more rapidly in anaemia patients than in control subjects. To analyse the heat transfer mechanism, a transient heat transfer model of the tongue was developed. The tongue temperatures in anaemia patients and control subjects were calculated using this model and compared to the tongue temperatures measured by the IR thermal imager. The relationship between the tongue surface temperature and the tongue blood perfusion rate was analysed. The simulation results indicated that the low blood perfusion rate and the correlated changes in anaemia patients can cause faster temperature decreases of the tongue surface.

  16. Effect of blood glucose levels on image quality in 18F fluorodeoxyglucose scanning - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeto, E.; Keane, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In December last year, a 71-year-old gentleman presented to the Nuclear Medicine Department at St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney for an FDG coincidence detection positron emission scan. The patient had cancer of the lung with a large lesion in the left upper lobe and a small lesion in the right middle lobe. On initial investigation, this patient had a blood sugar level of 17mmol/L which was eventually reduced to 6.7mmol/L just prior to scanning. The patient was then asked to return to be rescanned without his blood sugar levels being adjusted. Just prior to his second scan, his blood sugar level was 15.4mmollL. The aim of the initial scan being repeated was to see just how important a role blood sugar levels play in the quality of a Co Pet scan. The first scan showed excellent image quality while the repeated scan showed markedly inferior image quality due to unwanted soft tissue FDG uptake. In conclusion, blood sugar levels play a significant role in output image quality in FDG coincidence detection positron emission scanning. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  17. Multispectral Imaging Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells in Negatively Enriched Peripheral Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brandon; Lustberg, Maryam; Summers, Thomas A; Chalmers, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    A variety of biomarkers are present on cells in peripheral blood of patients with a variety of disorders, including solid tumor malignancies. While rare, characterization of these cells for specific protein levels with the advanced technology proposed, will lead to future validation studies of blood samples as "liquid biopsies" for the evaluation of disease status and therapeutic response. While circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been isolated in the blood samples of patients with solid tumors, the exact role of CTCs as clinically useful predictive markers is still debated. Current commercial technology has significant bias in that a positive selection technology is used that preassumes specific cell surface markers (such as EpCAM) are present on CTCs. However, CTCs with low EpCAM expression have been experimentally demonstrated to be more likely to be missed by this method. In contrast, this application uses a previously developed, technology that performs a purely negative enrichment methodology on peripheral blood, yielding highly enriched blood samples that contain CTCs as well as other, undefined cell types. The focus of this contribution is the use of multispectral imaging of epifluorescent, microscopic images of these enriched cells in order to help develop clinically relevant liquid biopsies from peripheral blood samples.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a double-ring sensor featuring a narrow angular aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; de Mul, F.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic double-ring sensor, featuring a narrow angular aperture, is developed for laser-induced photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels. An integrated optical fiber enables reflection-mode detection of ultrasonic waves. By using the cross-correlation between the signals detected by the two

  19. Scintigraphic detection of gynaecological tumours by sup(99m)Tc-HSA blood pool imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, E C; Arkas, A Z; Alevizaki, C C; Gnafakis, N [Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece). Dept. of Endocrinology and Radioisotopes; Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece). Gynaecology Clinic)

    1979-12-01

    Three cases of scintigraphic visualization of gynaecological tumours by sup(99m)Tc-HSA blood pool imaging are presented, i.e. one case of fibrothecoma ('cold' area visualization) and two cases of fibromyoma ('hot' area visualization). It is suggested that this technique may be useful in the preoperative evaluation of gynaecological tumours and their vascularity.

  20. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging: Simulations and Preliminary In Vivo Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2007-01-01

    for each pulse emission. 2) The transmitted pulse consists of a 13 bit Barker code which is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element. 3) The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is found using 2-D speckle tracking between segments in consecutive speckle images. III Results: The method was tested...

  1. Multimodal in vivo blood flow sensing combining particle image velocimetry and optical tweezers-based blood steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Robert; Sugden, Wade W.; Siekmann, Arndt F.; Denz, Cornelia

    2018-02-01

    All higher developed organisms contain complex hierarchical networks of arteries, veins and capillaries. These constitute the cardiovascular system responsible for supplying nutrients, gas and waste exchange. Diseases related to the cardiovascular system are among the main causes for death worldwide. In order to understand the processes leading to arteriovenous malformation, we studied hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), which has a prevalence of 1:5000 worldwide and causes internal bleeding. In zebrafish, HHT is induced by mutation of the endoglin gene involved in HHT and observed to reduce red blood cell (RBC) flow to intersegmental vessels (ISVs) in the tail due to malformations of the dorsal aorta (DA) and posterior cardinal vein (PCV). However, these capillaries are still functional. Changes in the blood flow pattern are observed from in vivo data from zebrafish embryos through particle image velocimetry (PIV). Wall shear rates (WSRs) and blood flow velocities are obtained non-invasively with millisecond resolution. We observe significant increases of blood flow velocity in the DA for endoglin-deficient zebrafish embryos (mutants) at 3 days post fertilization. In the PCV, this increase is even more pronounced. We identified an increased similarity between the DA and the PCV of mutant fish compared to siblings, i.e., unaffected fish. To counteract the reduced RBC flow to ISVs we implement optical tweezers (OT). RBCs are steered into previously unperfused ISVs showing a significant increase of RBC count per minute. We discuss limitations with respect to biocompatibility of optical tweezers in vivo and determination of in vivo wall shear stress (WSS) connected to normal and endoglin-deficicent zebrafish embryos.

  2. Evaluation of ocular acupuncture on cerebral infarction with cerebral blood flow perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuge; Gao Qinyi; Wang Shuang; Zhao Yong

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the immediate effect of ocular acupuncture on patients, an method of SPECT image of cerebral blood flow daily stress test was established. 10 patients diagnosed as cerebral infarction by CT or MRI were tested. They all received 99 Tc m -ECD SPECT imaging at twice before and after ocular acupuncture. By means of image subtraction technique and semi-quantitative method of regional interesting area, the change of regional cerebral blood flow was observed between the two images. Under restful state perfusion of cerebral blood flow in 18 foci was low at the frontal lobe, the cerebellum, the basal ganglia and temporal lobe. After ocular acupuncture, the perfusions were obviously increased in 16 foci among them and the reactivity of the frontal lobe and the cerebellum to ocular acupuncture was higher, the average improvement rate of which was 55.15% and 53.06% respectively, lower in the basal ganglia and temporal lobe, the average improvement rate was 31.79% and 36.67% respectively. 99 Tc m -ECD SPECT cerebral perfusion image has some significant clinic value for evaluating the effect of ocular acupuncture to treating cerebral infarction. (authors)

  3. A thresholding based technique to extract retinal blood vessels from fundus images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotiprava Dash

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Retinal imaging has become the significant tool among all the medical imaging technology, due to its capability to extract many data which is linked to various eye diseases. So, the accurate extraction of blood vessel is necessary that helps the eye care specialists and ophthalmologist to identify the diseases at the early stages. In this paper, we have proposed a computerized technique for extraction of blood vessels from fundus images. The process is conducted in three phases: (i pre-processing where the image is enhanced using contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and median filter, (ii segmentation using mean-C thresholding to extract retinal blood vessels, (iii post-processing where morphological cleaning operation is used to remove isolated pixels. The performance of the proposed method is tested on and experimental results show that our method achieve an accuracies of 0.955 and 0.954 on Digital retinal images for vessel extraction (DRIVE and Child heart and health study in England (CHASE_DB1 databases respectively.

  4. Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow and Oxygenation in CKD Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatir, Dinah S; Pedersen, Michael; Jespersen, Bente; Buus, Niels H

    2015-09-01

    Animal studies suggest that progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is related to renal hypoxia. With renal blood supply determining oxygen delivery and sodium absorption being the main contributor to oxygen consumption, we describe the relationship between renal oxygenation, renal artery blood flow, and sodium absorption in patients with CKD and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study. 62 stable patients with CKD stages 3 to 4 (mean age, 61±13 [SD] years) and 24 age- and sex-matched controls. CKD versus control status. Renal artery blood flow, tissue oxygenation (relative changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration of the renal medulla [MR2*] and cortex [CR2*]), and sodium absorption. Renal artery blood flow was determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); MR2* and CR2* were determined by blood oxygen level-dependent MRI. Ultrafiltered and reabsorbed sodium were determined from measured glomerular filtration rate (mGFR) and 24-hour urine collections. mGFR in patients was 37% that of controls (36±15 vs 97±23 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P renal artery blood flow was 72% that of controls (319 vs 443 mL/min; P renal artery blood flow or sodium absorption. Increasing arterial blood oxygen tension by breathing 100% oxygen had very small effects on CR2*, but reduced MR2* in both groups. Only renal artery blood flow was determined and thus regional perfusion could not be related to CR2* or MR2*. In CKD, reductions of mGFR and reabsorbed sodium are more than double that of renal artery blood flow, whereas cortical and medullary oxygenation are within the range of healthy persons. Reduction in glomerular filtration fraction may prevent renal hypoxia in CKD. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of renal first pass blood flow with a functional image technique in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Morita, Seiichiro; Umezaki, Noriyoshi; Ohtake, Hisashi

    1988-01-01

    The renal circulation of patients with essential hypertension and renovascular hypertension was evaluated using 99m Tc-DTPA. The first renal peak count (the first C max ; FC max ), time phase distribution (the first T max ; FT max ), and blood velocity (the FC max /FT max ) were calculated by digital imaging. This yields a visual image of the renal circulation. We consider that the increase in the renal first pass blood flow in patients with essential hypertension is best observed pixel by pixel. The FC max and FC max /FT max images before and after treatment by percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty in patients with renovascular hypertension clearly show its therapeutic effect. The FI technique, therefore, has the advantage that it can be performed at the same time as the conventional routine examinations of renal function. This makes it very useful clinically. (orig.)

  6. Tomographic images of cerebral blood flow using a slant hole collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wraight, E.P.; Barber, R.W.; Crossland, P.; Maltby, P.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using a rotating slant hole (RSH) collimator on simple tomographic equipment such as a standard gamma camera interfaced to a general purpose Nuclear Medicine computer is reported for producing images of cerebral blood flow following the administration of 123 I-iodoamphetamine to patients. Initial studies produced satisfactory images, thus opening the possibility of tomographic cerebral blood flow imaging to centres not possessing sophisticated tomographic equipment. Planar resolution is superior to that reported for a 25 0 RSH collimator. Axial resolution is not as good at small source distances but is comparable at distances beyond 10 cm. Sensitivity is comparable to other RSH collimators and is similar to Technicare's parallel hole general all purpose collimator. (UK)

  7. Use of blood-pool imaging in evaluation of diffuse activity patterns in technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, M J; Mantle, J A; Rogers, W J; Russell, R O; Rackley, C E; Logic, J R

    1979-06-01

    It has been suggested that diffuse Tc-99m pyrophosphate precordial activity may be due to persistent blood-pool activity in routine delayed views during myocardial imaging. To answer this question, we reviewed myocardial scintigrams recorded 60--90 min following the injection of 12--15 mCi of Tc-99m pyrophosphate for the presence of diffuse precordial activity, and compared these with early images of the blood pool in 265 patients. Diffuse activity in the delayed images was identified in 48 patients: in 20 with acute myocardial infarction and in 28 with no evidence of it. Comparison of these routine delayed images with early views of the blood pool revealed two types of patterns. In patients with acute infarction, 95% had delayed images that were distinguishable from blood pool either because the activity was smaller than the early blood pool, or by the presence of localized activity superimposed on diffuse activity identical to blood pool. In those without infarction, 93% had activity distribution in routine delayed views matching that in the early blood-pool images. The usefulness of the diffuse TcPPi precordial activity in myocardial infarction is improved when early blood-pool imaging is used to exclude persistence of blood-pool activity as its cause. Moreover, it does not require additional amounts of radioactivity nor complex computer processing, a feature that may be of value in the community hospital using the technique to "rule out" infarction 24--72 hr after onset of suggestive symptoms.

  8. Use of blood-pool imaging in evaluation of diffuse activity patterns in technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, M.J.; Mantle, J.A.; Rogers, W.J.; Russell, R.O. Jr.; Rackley, C.E.; Logic, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    It has been suggested that diffuse 99m Tc pyrophosphate precordial activity may be due to persistent blood-pool activity in routine delayed views during myocardial imaging. To answer this question, we reviewed myocardial scintigrams recorded 60 to 90 min following the injection of 12 to 15 mCi of 99m Tc pyrophosphate for the presence of diffuse precordial activity, and compared these with early images of the blood pool in 265 patients. Diffuse activity in the delayed images was identified in 48 patients: in 20 with acute myocardial infarction and in 28 with no evidence of it. Comparison of these routine delayed images with early views of the blood pool revealed two types of patterns. In patients with acute infarction, 95% had delayed images that were distinguishable from blood pool either because the activity was smaller than the early blood pool, or by the presence of localized activity superimposed on diffuse activity identical to blood pool. In those without infarction, 93% had activity distribution in routine delayed views matching that in the early blood-pool images. The usefulness of the diffuse TcPPi precordial activity in myocardial infarction is improved when early blood-pool imaging is used to exclude persistence of blood-pool activity as its cause. Moreover, it does not require additional amounts of radioactivity nor complex computer processing, a feature that may be of value in the community hospital using the technique to rule out infarction 24 to 72 hr after onset of suggestive symptoms

  9. Spatial Temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (STICS) for Flow Analysis with Application for Blood Flow Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossow, Molly; Gratton, Enrico; Mantulin, William M.

    2009-01-01

    It is important for surgeons to be able to measure blood flow in exposed arterioles during surgery. We report our progress in the development of an optical technique that will measure blood flow in surgically exposed blood vessels and enable previously difficult measurements. By monitoring optical fluctuations, the optical technique, based on Spatial Temporal Image Correlation (STICS), will directly measure the velocity of micron-scale particles--such as red blood cells. It will complement existing technology and provide qualitative measurements that were not previously possible. It relies on the concept that blood, when viewed on a small enough scale, is an inhomogeneous substance. Individual blood cells passing between a near-infrared light source and a detector will cause fluctuations in the transmitted optical signal. The speed, direction, and flow pattern of blood cells can be determined from these optical fluctuations. We present a series of computer simulations and experiments on phantom and animal systems to test this technique's ability to map complex flow patterns.

  10. Spatial Temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (STICS) for Flow Analysis with Application for Blood Flow Mapping (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Molly; Mantulin, William M.; Gratton, Enrico

    2009-04-01

    It is important for surgeons to be able to measure blood flow in exposed arterioles during surgery. We report our progress in the development of an optical technique that will measure blood flow in surgically exposed blood vessels and enable previously difficult measurements. By monitoring optical fluctuations, the optical technique, based on Spatial Temporal Image Correlation (STICS), will directly measure the velocity of micron-scale particles-such as red blood cells. It will complement existing technology and provide qualitative measurements that were not previously possible. It relies on the concept that blood, when viewed on a small enough scale, is an inhomogeneous substance. Individual blood cells passing between a near-infrared light source and a detector will cause fluctuations in the transmitted optical signal. The speed, direction, and flow pattern of blood cells can be determined from these optical fluctuations. We present a series of computer simulations and experiments on phantom and animal systems to test this technique's ability to map complex flow patterns.

  11. Feasibility evaluation of 3D photoacoustic imaging of blood vessel structure using multiple wavelengths with a handheld probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimoto, Yo; Namita, Takeshi; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2018-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is anticipated for use in portraying blood vessel structures (e.g. neovascularization in inflamed regions). To reduce invasiveness and enhance ease handling, we developed a handheld photoacoustic imaging system using multiple wavelengths. The usefulness of the proposed system was investigated in phantom experiments and in vivo measurements. A silicon tube was embedded into chicken breast meat to simulate the blood vessel. The tube was filled with ovine blood. Then laser light was guided to the phantom surface by an optical fiber bundle close to the linear ultrasound probe. Photoacoustic images were obtained at 750-950 nm wavelengths. Strong photoacoustic signals from the boundary between blood and silicon tube are observed in these images. The shape of photoacoustic spectrum at the boundary resembles that of the HbO2 absorption spectrum at 750-920 nm. In photoacoustic images, similarity between photoacoustic spectrum and HbO2 absorption spectrum was evaluated by calculating the normalized correlation coefficient. Results show high correlation in regions of strong photoacoustic signals in photoacoustic images. These analyses demonstrate the feasibility of portraying blood vessel structures under practical conditions. To evaluate the feasibility of three-dimensional vascular imaging, in vivo experiments were conducted using three wavelengths. A right hand and ultrasound probe were set in degassed water. By scanning a probe, cross-sectional ultrasound and photoacoustic images were obtained at each location. Then, all ultrasound or photoacoustic images were piled up respectively. Then three-dimensional images were constructed. Resultant images portrayed blood vessel-like structures three-dimensionally. Furthermore, to distinguish blood vessels from other tissues (e.g. skin), distinguishing images of them were constructed by comparing photoacoustic signal intensity among three wavelengths. The resultant image portrayed blood vessels as

  12. Analysis of blood flow dynamics in the abdominal aorta based on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, Koumei; Tsubota, Kenichi; Ryu, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2010-01-01

    Images of the abdominal aorta including peri-renal artery by PCMRA (phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography) were analyzed to calculate WSS (wall shear stress) and its OSI (oscillatory shear index) in order to visually elucidate the cause of aneurysm formation. PCMRA was conducted for acquisitions of vascular morphology in one cardiac cycle of a healthy male 30s with cardiac gating, and of blood flow rates from 3 directions. Images were median-filtered to reduce noises and regions of interest of rectangular parallelepiped were defined to involve the aorta. WSS, the parameter representing the intensity of friction stress to the vessel wall of blood flow, and OSI, the degree of oscillatory WSS change, were calculated firstly by the reported Snake model for the vessel morphology and then by applying its local information to blood flow rate information from 3 directions. Color-displayed images revealed that both WSS and OS were high at the highest incidental region of aortic aneurysm formation around the peri-renal artery. The finding was in good agreement with the result of computed bio-dynamic simulation that the strong WSS by elevated swirling of blood flow is generated at the region. Thus WSS and OS can be significant factors of aneurismal formation, which should be further confirmed from aspects of increased case number and precision. (T.T.)

  13. Continuous blood pressure recordings simultaneously with functional brain imaging: studies of the glymphatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienkiewicz, Aleksandra; Huotari, Niko; Raitamaa, Lauri; Raatikainen, Ville; Ferdinando, Hany; Vihriälä, Erkki; Korhonen, Vesa; Myllylä, Teemu; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2017-03-01

    The lymph system is responsible for cleaning the tissues of metabolic waste products, soluble proteins and other harmful fluids etc. Lymph flow in the body is driven by body movements and muscle contractions. Moreover, it is indirectly dependent on the cardiovascular system, where the heart beat and blood pressure maintain force of pressure in lymphatic channels. Over the last few years, studies revealed that the brain contains the so-called glymphatic system, which is the counterpart of the systemic lymphatic system in the brain. Similarly, the flow in the glymphatic system is assumed to be mostly driven by physiological pulsations such as cardiovascular pulses. Thus, continuous measurement of blood pressure and heart function simultaneously with functional brain imaging is of great interest, particularly in studies of the glymphatic system. We present our MRI compatible optics based sensing system for continuous blood pressure measurement and show our current results on the effects of blood pressure variations on cerebral brain dynamics, with a focus on the glymphatic system. Blood pressure was measured simultaneously with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with an ultrafast functional brain imaging (fMRI) sequence magnetic resonance encephalography (MREG, 3D brain 10 Hz sampling rate).

  14. Imaging of cerebral blood flow in patients with severe traumatic brain injury in the neurointensive care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham eRostami

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI. A great challenge for the treatment of TBI patients in the neurointensive care unit (NICU is to detect early signs of ischemia in order to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. Today, several imaging techniques are available to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF in the injured brain such as Positron emission tomography (PET, Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, Xenon-CT, perfusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and CT perfusion scan. An ideal imaging technique would enable continuous noninvasive measurement of blood flow and metabolism across the whole brain. Unfortunately, no current imaging method meets all these criteria. These techniques offer snapshots of the CBF. MRI may also provide some information about the metabolic state of the brain. PET provides images with high resolution and quantitative measurements of CBF and metabolism however it is a complex and costly method limited to few TBI centres. All of these methods except mobile Xenon-CT require transfer of TBI patients to the radiological department. Mobile Xenon-CT emerges as a feasible technique to monitor CBF in the NICU, with lower risk of adverse effects. Promising results have been demonstrated with Xenon-CT in predicting outcome in TBI patients. This review covers available imaging methods used to monitor CBF in patients with severe TBI.

  15. Automated image processing method for the diagnosis and classification of malaria on thin blood smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Nicholas E; Pritchard, Charles J; Rubin, David M; Dusé, Adriano G

    2006-05-01

    Malaria is a serious global health problem, and rapid, accurate diagnosis is required to control the disease. An image processing algorithm to automate the diagnosis of malaria on thin blood smears is developed. The image classification system is designed to positively identify malaria parasites present in thin blood smears, and differentiate the species of malaria. Images are acquired using a charge-coupled device camera connected to a light microscope. Morphological and novel threshold selection techniques are used to identify erythrocytes (red blood cells) and possible parasites present on microscopic slides. Image features based on colour, texture and the geometry of the cells and parasites are generated, as well as features that make use of a priori knowledge of the classification problem and mimic features used by human technicians. A two-stage tree classifier using backpropogation feedforward neural networks distinguishes between true and false positives, and then diagnoses the species (Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale or P. malariae) of the infection. Malaria samples obtained from the Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the University of the Witwatersrand Medical School are used for training and testing of the system. Infected erythrocytes are positively identified with a sensitivity of 85% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 81%, which makes the method highly sensitive at diagnosing a complete sample provided many views are analysed. Species were correctly determined for 11 out of 15 samples.

  16. Fast and robust segmentation of white blood cell images by self-supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xin; Wang, Yong; Wang, Guoyou; Liu, Jianguo

    2018-04-01

    A fast and accurate white blood cell (WBC) segmentation remains a challenging task, as different WBCs vary significantly in color and shape due to cell type differences, staining technique variations and the adhesion between the WBC and red blood cells. In this paper, a self-supervised learning approach, consisting of unsupervised initial segmentation and supervised segmentation refinement, is presented. The first module extracts the overall foreground region from the cell image by K-means clustering, and then generates a coarse WBC region by touching-cell splitting based on concavity analysis. The second module further uses the coarse segmentation result of the first module as automatic labels to actively train a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Then, the trained SVM classifier is further used to classify each pixel of the image and achieve a more accurate segmentation result. To improve its segmentation accuracy, median color features representing the topological structure and a new weak edge enhancement operator (WEEO) handling fuzzy boundary are introduced. To further reduce its time cost, an efficient cluster sampling strategy is also proposed. We tested the proposed approach with two blood cell image datasets obtained under various imaging and staining conditions. The experiment results show that our approach has a superior performance of accuracy and time cost on both datasets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantification of renal cortical blood flow using factor analysis of O-15 water dynamic PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kang Jun; Ahn, Ji Young; Lee, Jae Sung; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Noh, Tae Won; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2000-01-01

    To obtain spatial distribution of renal factor images, input function, and regional tissue time-activity curve (TAC) from O-15 water dynamic PET images non-invasively, factor analysis (FA) was used. O-15 water dynamic PET scans were performed on 3 normal dogs (22 ∼ 29 kg) with the bolus injection of O-15 water (555 ∼ 740 Mbq). We performed FA on the masked dynamic images and obtained the pure TACs and the corresponding factor images. Microsphere experiment also was performed. 37MBq of microsphere labeled with Sc-46 was injected into the left ventricle. Arterial input functions derived from the PET images using FA were compared with the invasively derived arterial blood samples. The renal cortical blood flow using the TACs by FA was within the normal range of 1.23 ∼ 2.46 ml/min/g. In microsphere study, the renal cortical blood flow of left kidney by FA was 2.49±0.47 ml/min/g (1.81∼2.90 ml/min/g) and by microsphere was 2.52 ±0.19 ml/min/g (2.34 ∼2.68 ml/min/g). In right kidney, flow by FA was 2.02 ±0.32 ml/min/g (1.82∼2.49 ml/min/g) and by microsphere was 2.49 ±0.27 ml/min/g (2.02∼2.7). FA is a useful and robust method to extract input functions and tissue TACs from O-15 dynamic renal PET. Renal cortical blood flow can be estimated non-invasively using FA and it will be helpful for the assessment of renal functional disease

  18. Studies on so-called redistribution phenomenon of cerebral blood flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between so-called redistribution phenomenon and metabolism or viability of the brain tissue, a new quantitative triple-radionuclide autoradiography was developed, whereby making it possible to compare both late images and reditribution of IMP with cerebral metabolism in experimentally induced unilateral ischemic brain tissue of rats. Iodine-123 IMP and I-125 IMP were used as tracers for early and late imaging, and H-3 amino acid mixture or H-3 H-2 deoxyglucose as a tracer for protein synthesis or glucose metabolism imaging. There was no significant relationship between redistribution index and protein synthesis or glucose metabolism. Protein synthesis was remarkably decreased in the affected hemisphere regardless of redistribution index values. Although the redistribution indices showed a gentle peak at approximately 34 μ mol/100 g/ min of glucose metabolism, there was no obvious relationship between either late images or redistribution index images and glucose metabolism images. Redistribution indices showed a maximum value at approximately 40 to 50 ml/100 g/min of cerebral blood flow. Reverse redistribution was observed with 160 ml/100 g/min or more of flow. Thin layer chromatographic findings were similar in the affected and non-affected resions, suggesting redistribution of a lipophilic IMP metabolite of p-iodoamphetamine in the affected region. In vitro autoradiography revealed no significant reduction in binding ability of IMP to the affected ischemic cortex. In a computer simulation study for brain activity curve, brain activity at 150 min was found to be almost constant at more than 25 ml/100 g/min of flow. IMP redistribution was unlikely to reflect directly either brain metabolism or function, and both blood flow partition coefficient and blood flow values were independently responsible for cerebral kinetics of IMP. (N.K.)

  19. Multispectral photoacoustic characterization of ICG and porcine blood using an LED-based photoacoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, Yusuke; Sato, Naoto; Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Agano, Toshitaka

    2018-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging modality that has emerged over the last decade. In photoacoustic imaging, pulsed-light absorbed by the target emits ultrasound that can be detected using a conventional ultrasound array. This ultrasound data can be used to reconstruct the location and spatial details of the intrinsic/extrinsic light absorbers in the tissue. Recently we reported on the development of a multi-wavelength high frame-rate LED-based photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging system (AcousticX). In this work, we photoacoustically characterize the absorption spectrum of ICG and porcine blood using LED arrays with multiple wavelengths (405, 420, 470, 520, 620, 660, 690, 750, 810, 850, 925, 980 nm). Measurements were performed in a simple reflection mode configuration in which LED arrays where fixed on both sides of the linear array ultrasound probe. Phantom used consisted of micro-test tubes filled with ICG and porcine blood, which were placed in a tank filled with water. The photoacoustic spectrum obtained from our measurements matches well with the reference absorption spectrum. These results demonstrate the potential capability of our system in performing clinical/pre-clinical multispectral photoacoustic imaging.

  20. An integrated 3-D image of cerebral blood vessels and CT view of tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetens, P.; Baert, A.L.; Gybels, J.; Haegemans, S.; Jansen, P.; Oosterlinck, A.; Wilms, G.

    1984-01-01

    The authors developed a method that yields an integrated three-dimensional image of cerebral blood vessels and CT view of tumor. This method allows the neurosurgeon to choose any electrode trajectory that looks convenient to him, without imminent danger of causing a hemorrhage. Besides offering more safety to stereotactic interventions, this integrated 3-D image also has other applications. First, it gives a better characterization of most focal mass lesions seen by CT. Second, it allows high dose focal irradiation to be effected in such a way as to avoid arteries and veins. Third, it provides useful information for planning the strategy of open surgery

  1. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-06-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology.

  2. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-06-30

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology.

  3. A rapid method for counting nucleated erythrocytes on stained blood smears by digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, E.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    Measures of parasitemia by intraerythrocytic hematozoan parasites are normally expressed as the number of infected erythrocytes per n erythrocytes and are notoriously tedious and time consuming to measure. We describe a protocol for generating rapid counts of nucleated erythrocytes from digital micrographs of thin blood smears that can be used to estimate intensity of hematozoan infections in nonmammalian vertebrate hosts. This method takes advantage of the bold contrast and relatively uniform size and morphology of erythrocyte nuclei on Giemsa-stained blood smears and uses ImageJ, a java-based image analysis program developed at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and available on the internet, to recognize and count these nuclei. This technique makes feasible rapid and accurate counts of total erythrocytes in large numbers of microscope fields, which can be used in the calculation of peripheral parasitemias in low-intensity infections.

  4. Application of image flow cytometry for the characterization of red blood cell morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ruben N.; Sebastian, Joseph A.; Parsons, Michael; Chang, Tim C.; Acker, Jason P.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-02-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) stored in hypothermic environments for the purpose of transfusion have been documented to undergo structural and functional changes over time. One sign of the so-called RBC storage lesion is irreversible damage to the cell membrane. Consequently, RBCs undergo a morphological transformation from regular, deformable biconcave discocytes to rigid spheroechinocytes. The spherically shaped RBCs lack the deformability to efficiently enter microvasculature, thereby reducing the capacity of RBCs to oxygenate tissue. Blood banks currently rely on microscope techniques that include fixing, staining and cell counting in order to morphologically characterize RBC samples; these methods are labor intensive and highly subjective. This study presents a novel, high-throughput RBC morphology characterization technique using image flow cytometry (IFC). An image segmentation template was developed to process 100,000 images acquired from the IFC system and output the relative spheroechinocyte percentage. The technique was applied on samples extracted from two blood bags to monitor the morphological changes of the RBCs during in vitro hypothermic storage. The study found that, for a given sample of RBCs, the IFC method was twice as fast in data acquisition, and analyzed 250-350 times more RBCs than the conventional method. Over the lifespan of the blood bags, the mean spheroechinocyte population increased by 37%. Future work will focus on expanding the template to segregate RBC images into more subpopulations for the validation of the IFC method against conventional techniques; the expanded template will aid in establishing quantitative links between spheroechinocyte increase and other RBC storage lesion characteristics.

  5. Value of lateral blood pool imaging in patients with suspected stress fractures of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Hosahalli K; Clarke, Susan E M; Centenara, Martin; Lucarelli, Amanda; Baron, Daniel; Fogelman, Ignac

    2011-03-01

    To critically evaluate the use of lateral blood pool imaging in athletes with lower limb pain and with a clinical suspicion of stress fracture. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians evaluated 3-phase bone scans using 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate performed in 50 consecutive patients referred from a specialist sports injury clinic for suspected tibial stress fracture. The vascularity to the tibia as seen on the blood pool (second phase) images in the anterior/posterior views was compared with the lateral/medial view assessments. Stress fractures were presumed to be present when on the delayed images (third phase) there was a focal or fusiform area of increased tracer uptake involving the tibial cortex. Shin splints which are a recognized cause of lower limb pain in athletes mimicking stress fracture were diagnosed if increased tracer uptake was seen extending along the posterior tibial surface with no significant focal or fusiform area of uptake within this. Inter-reviewer agreement for the assessment of vascularity was also assessed using Cohen's Kappa scores. Twenty-four stress fractures in 24 patients and 66 shin splints in 40 patients were diagnosed. In 18 patients stress fracture and shin splints coexisted. In 10 patients no tibial pathology was identified. Of the 24 patients diagnosed with stress fractures, lateral/medial blood pool imaging was superior in the assessment of blood pool activity (P tibial stress fractures, lateral views of the tibia provide the optimal method for evaluation of vascularity. Prospective studies with quantitative or semi-quantitative assessment of skeletal vascularity could provide supplementary information relating to the pathophysiology of stress fractures, for example, the time scale of vascular changes after a tibial stress fracture, and potentially could have clinical relevance as to the assessment of the severity of stress fractures and their prognosis.

  6. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joyce T. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Deng, Jie [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  7. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Joyce T.; Robinson, Joshua D.; Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  8. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reduced production of red blood cells, including: Iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and ... inflammatory bowel disease are especially likely to have iron deficiency anemia. Anemia due to chronic disease. People with chronic ...

  9. Assessing the blood pressure waveform of the carotid artery using an ultrasound image processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani, Effat; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe [Dept. of Medical Physics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatouraee, Nasser [Dept. of Medical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saben, Hazhir [Dept. Radiology, Imaging Center of Imam Khomaini Hospital, Tehran Medical Sciences University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to introduce and implement a noninvasive method to derive the carotid artery pressure waveform directly by processing diagnostic sonograms of the carotid artery. Ultrasound image sequences of 20 healthy male subjects (age, 36±9 years) were recorded during three cardiac cycles. The internal diameter and blood velocity waveforms were extracted from consecutive sonograms over the cardiac cycles by using custom analysis programs written in MATLAB. Finally, the application of a mathematical equation resulted in time changes of the arterial pressure. The resulting pressures were calibrated using the mean and the diastolic pressure of the radial artery. A good correlation was found between the mean carotid blood pressure obtained from the ultrasound image processing and the mean radial blood pressure obtained using a standard digital sphygmomanometer (R=0.91). The mean absolute difference between the carotid calibrated pulse pressures and those measured clinically was -1.333±6.548 mm Hg. The results of this study suggest that consecutive sonograms of the carotid artery can be used for estimating a blood pressure waveform. We believe that our results promote a noninvasive technique for clinical applications that overcomes the reproducibility problems of common carotid artery tonometry with technical and anatomical causes.

  10. Imaging local cerebral blood flow by xenon-enhanced computed tomography - technical optimization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.S.; Shinohara, T.; Imai, A.; Kobari, M.; Solomon, E.

    1988-01-01

    Methods are described for non-invasive, computer-assisted serial scanning throughout the human brain during eight minutes of inhalation of 27%-30% xenon gas in order to measure local cerebral blood flow (LCBF). Optimized xenon-enhanced computed tomography (XeCT) was achieved by 5-second scanning at one-minute intervals utilizing a state-of-the-art CT scanner and rapid delivery of xenon gas via a face mask. Values for local brain-blood partition coefficients (Lλ) measured in vivo were utilized to calculate LCBF values. Previous methods assumed Lλ values to be normal, introducing the risk of systematic errors, because Lλ values differ throughout normal brain and may be altered by disease. Color-coded maps of Lλ and LCBF values were formatted directly onto CT images for exact correlation of function with anatomic and pathologic observations (spatial resolution: 26.5 cubic mm). Results were compared among eight normal volunteers, aged between 50 and 88 years. Mean cortical gray matter blood flow was 46.3 ± 7.7, for subcortical gray matter it was 50.3 ± 13.2 and for white matter it was 18.8 ± 3.2. Modern CT scanners provide stability, improved signal to noise ratio and minimal radiation scatter. Combining these advantages with rapid xenon saturation of the blood provides correlations of Lλ and LCBF with images of normal and abnormal brain in a safe, useful and non-invasive manner. (orig.)

  11. Hyperspectral imaging and multivariate analysis in the dried blood spots investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Alicja; Wietecha-Posłuszny, Renata; Mendys, Agata; Wójtowicz, Anna; Łydżba-Kopczyńska, Barbara

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to apply a new methodology using the combination of the hyperspectral imaging and the dry blood spot (DBS) collecting. Application of the hyperspectral imaging is fast and non-destructive. DBS method offers the advantage also on the micro-invasive blood collecting and low volume of required sample. During experimental step, the reflected light was recorded by two hyperspectral systems. The collection of 776 spectral bands in the VIS-NIR range (400-1000 nm) and 256 spectral bands in the SWIR range (970-2500 nm) was applied. Pixel has the size of 8 × 8 and 30 × 30 µm for VIS-NIR and SWIR camera, respectively. The obtained data in the form of hyperspectral cubes were treated with chemometric methods, i.e., minimum noise fraction and principal component analysis. It has been shown that the application of these methods on this type of data, by analyzing the scatter plots, allows a rapid analysis of the homogeneity of DBS, and the selection of representative areas for further analysis. It also gives the possibility of tracking the dynamics of changes occurring in biological traces applied on the surface. For the analyzed 28 blood samples, described method allowed to distinguish those blood stains because of time of apply.

  12. Assessing the blood pressure waveform of the carotid artery using an ultrasound image processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soleimani, Effat; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Fatouraee, Nasser; Saben, Hazhir

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce and implement a noninvasive method to derive the carotid artery pressure waveform directly by processing diagnostic sonograms of the carotid artery. Ultrasound image sequences of 20 healthy male subjects (age, 36±9 years) were recorded during three cardiac cycles. The internal diameter and blood velocity waveforms were extracted from consecutive sonograms over the cardiac cycles by using custom analysis programs written in MATLAB. Finally, the application of a mathematical equation resulted in time changes of the arterial pressure. The resulting pressures were calibrated using the mean and the diastolic pressure of the radial artery. A good correlation was found between the mean carotid blood pressure obtained from the ultrasound image processing and the mean radial blood pressure obtained using a standard digital sphygmomanometer (R=0.91). The mean absolute difference between the carotid calibrated pulse pressures and those measured clinically was -1.333±6.548 mm Hg. The results of this study suggest that consecutive sonograms of the carotid artery can be used for estimating a blood pressure waveform. We believe that our results promote a noninvasive technique for clinical applications that overcomes the reproducibility problems of common carotid artery tonometry with technical and anatomical causes

  13. Imaging local cerebral blood flow by xenon-enhanced computed tomography - technical optimization procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.S.; Shinohara, T.; Imai, A.; Kobari, M.; Sakai, F.; Hata, T.; Oravez, W.T.; Timpe, G.M.; Deville, T.; Solomon, E.

    1988-08-01

    Methods are described for non-invasive, computer-assisted serial scanning throughout the human brain during eight minutes of inhalation of 27%-30% xenon gas in order to measure local cerebral blood flow (LCBF). Optimized xenon-enhanced computed tomography (XeCT) was achieved by 5-second scanning at one-minute intervals utilizing a state-of-the-art CT scanner and rapid delivery of xenon gas via a face mask. Values for local brain-blood partition coefficients (Llambda) measured in vivo were utilized to calculate LCBF values. Previous methods assumed Llambda values to be normal, introducing the risk of systematic errors, because Llambda values differ throughout normal brain and may be altered by disease. Color-coded maps of Llambda and LCBF values were formatted directly onto CT images for exact correlation of function with anatomic and pathologic observations (spatial resolution: 26.5 cubic mm). Results were compared among eight normal volunteers, aged between 50 and 88 years. Mean cortical gray matter blood flow was 46.3 +- 7.7, for subcortical gray matter it was 50.3 +- 13.2 and for white matter it was 18.8 +- 3.2. Modern CT scanners provide stability, improved signal to noise ratio and minimal radiation scatter. Combining these advantages with rapid xenon saturation of the blood provides correlations of Llambda and LCBF with images of normal and abnormal brain in a safe, useful and non-invasive manner.

  14. Laser speckle imaging of rat retinal blood flow with hybrid temporal and spatial analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Haiying; Yan, Yumei; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2009-02-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of blood flow in retinal circulation will reveal the progression and treatment of ocular disorders, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. A non-invasive and direct BF measurement technique with high spatial-temporal resolution is needed for retinal imaging. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is such a method. Currently, there are two analysis methods for LSI: spatial statistics LSI (SS-LSI) and temporal statistical LSI (TS-LSI). Comparing these two analysis methods, SS-LSI has higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) and TSLSI is less susceptible to artifacts from stationary speckle. We proposed a hybrid temporal and spatial analysis method (HTS-LSI) to measure the retinal blood flow. Gas challenge experiment was performed and images were analyzed by HTS-LSI. Results showed that HTS-LSI can not only remove the stationary speckle but also increase the SNR. Under 100% O2, retinal BF decreased by 20-30%. This was consistent with the results observed with laser Doppler technique. As retinal blood flow is a critical physiological parameter and its perturbation has been implicated in the early stages of many retinal diseases, HTS-LSI will be an efficient method in early detection of retina diseases.

  15. Regional Myocardial Blood Volume and Flow: First-Pass MR Imaging with Polylysine-Gd-DTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Norbert; Kroll, Keith; Merkle, Hellmut; Wang, Ying; Ishibashi, Yukata; Xu, Ya; Zhang, Jiani; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Mühler, Andreas; Stillman, Arthur E.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.; Bache, Robert; Ugurbil, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated the utility of an intravascular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent, poly-L-lysine-gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), for differentiating acutely ischemic from normally perfused myocardium with first-pass MR imaging. Hypoperfused regions, identified with microspheres, on the first-pass images displayed significantly decreased signal intensities compared with normally perfused myocardium (P < .0007). Estimates of regional myocardial blood content, obtained by measuring the ratio of areas under the signal intensity-versus-time curves in tissue regions and the left ventricular chamber, averaged 0.12 mL/g ± 0.04 (n = 35), compared with a value of 0.11 mL/g ± 0.05 measured with radiolabeled albumin in the same tissue regions. To obtain MR estimates of regional myocardial blood flow, in situ calibration curves were used to transform first-pass intensity-time curves into content-time curves for analysis with a multiple-pathway, axially distributed model. Flow estimates, obtained by automated parameter optimization, averaged 1.2 mL/min/g ± 0.5 [n = 29), compared with 1.3 mL/min/g ± 0.3 obtained with tracer microspheres in the same tissue specimens at the same time. The results represent a combination of T1-weighted first-pass imaging, intravascular relaxation agents, and a spatially distributed perfusion model to obtain absolute regional myocardial blood flow and volume. PMID:7766986

  16. C-arm flat detector computed tomography parenchymal blood volume imaging: the nature of parenchymal blood volume parameter and the feasibility of parenchymal blood volume imaging in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V.

    2015-01-01

    C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) parenchymal blood volume (PBV) measurements allow assessment of cerebral haemodynamics in the neurointerventional suite. This paper explores the feasibility of C-arm computed tomography (CT) PBV imaging and the relationship between the C-arm CT PBV and the MR-PWI-derived cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) parameters in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) patients developing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Twenty-six patients with DCI following aneurysmal SAH underwent a research C-arm CT PBV scan using a biplane angiography system and contemporaneous MR-PWI scan as part of a prospective study. Quantitative whole-brain atlas-based volume-of-interest analysis in conjunction with Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman tests was performed to explore the agreement between C-arm CT PBV and MR-derived CBV and CBF measurements. All patients received medical management, while eight patients (31 %) underwent selective intra-arterial chemical angioplasty. Colour-coded C-arm CT PBV maps were 91 % sensitive and 100 % specific in detecting the perfusion abnormalities. C-arm CT rPBV demonstrated good agreement and strong correlation with both MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF measurements; the agreement and correlation were stronger for MR-rCBF relative to MR-rCBV and improved for C-arm CT PBV versus the geometric mean of MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF. Analysis of weighted means showed that the C-arm CT PBV has a preferential blood flow weighting (∼60 % blood flow and ∼40 % blood volume weighting). C-arm CT PBV imaging is feasible in DCI following aneurysmal SAH. PBV is a composite perfusion parameter incorporating both blood flow and blood volume weightings. That PBV has preferential (∼60 %) blood flow weighting is an important finding, which is of clinical significance when interpreting the C-arm CT PBV maps, particularly in the setting of acute brain ischemia. (orig.)

  17. C-arm flat detector computed tomography parenchymal blood volume imaging: the nature of parenchymal blood volume parameter and the feasibility of parenchymal blood volume imaging in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V. [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) parenchymal blood volume (PBV) measurements allow assessment of cerebral haemodynamics in the neurointerventional suite. This paper explores the feasibility of C-arm computed tomography (CT) PBV imaging and the relationship between the C-arm CT PBV and the MR-PWI-derived cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) parameters in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) patients developing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Twenty-six patients with DCI following aneurysmal SAH underwent a research C-arm CT PBV scan using a biplane angiography system and contemporaneous MR-PWI scan as part of a prospective study. Quantitative whole-brain atlas-based volume-of-interest analysis in conjunction with Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman tests was performed to explore the agreement between C-arm CT PBV and MR-derived CBV and CBF measurements. All patients received medical management, while eight patients (31 %) underwent selective intra-arterial chemical angioplasty. Colour-coded C-arm CT PBV maps were 91 % sensitive and 100 % specific in detecting the perfusion abnormalities. C-arm CT rPBV demonstrated good agreement and strong correlation with both MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF measurements; the agreement and correlation were stronger for MR-rCBF relative to MR-rCBV and improved for C-arm CT PBV versus the geometric mean of MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF. Analysis of weighted means showed that the C-arm CT PBV has a preferential blood flow weighting (∼60 % blood flow and ∼40 % blood volume weighting). C-arm CT PBV imaging is feasible in DCI following aneurysmal SAH. PBV is a composite perfusion parameter incorporating both blood flow and blood volume weightings. That PBV has preferential (∼60 %) blood flow weighting is an important finding, which is of clinical significance when interpreting the C-arm CT PBV maps, particularly in the setting of acute brain ischemia. (orig.)

  18. Detection of Blood Vessels in Color Fundus Images using a Local Radon Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pourreza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper addresses a method for automatic detection of blood vessels in color fundus images which utilizes two main tools: image partitioning and local Radon transform. Material and Methods: The input images are firstly divided into overlapping windows and then the Radon transform is applied to each. The maximum of the Radon transform in each window corresponds to the probable available sub-vessel. To verify the detected sub-vessel, the maximum is compared with a predefined threshold. The verified sub-vessels are reconstructed using the Radon transform information. All detected and reconstructed sub-vessels are finally combined to make the final vessel tree. Results: The algorithm’s performance was evaluated numerically by applying it to 40 images of DRIVE database, a standard retinal image database. The vessels were extracted manually by two physicians. This database was used to test and compare the available and proposed algorithms for vessel detection in color fundus images. By comparing the output of the algorithm with the manual results, the two parameters TPR and FPR were calculated for each image and the average of TPRs and FPRs were used to plot the ROC curve. Discussion and Conclusion: Comparison of the ROC curve of this algorithm with other algorithms demonstrated the high achieved accuracy. Beside the high accuracy, the Radon transform which is integral-based makes the algorithm robust against noise.

  19. Synthesis of fluorine-18 radio-labeled serum albumins for PET blood pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basuli, Falguni; Li, Changhui; Xu, Biying; Williams, Mark; Wong, Karen; Coble, Vincent L.; Vasalatiy, Olga; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V.; Griffiths, Gary L.; Choyke, Peter L.; Jagoda, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to develop a practical, reproducible and clinically translatable method of radiolabeling serum albumins with fluorine-18 for use as a PET blood pool imaging agent in animals and man. Fluorine-18 radiolabeled fluoronicotinic acid-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester, [ 18 F]F-Py-TFP was prepared first by the reaction of its quaternary ammonium triflate precursor with [ 18 F]tetrabutylammonium fluoride ([ 18 F]TBAF) according to a previously published method for peptides, with minor modifications. The incubation of [ 18 F]F-Py-TFP with rat serum albumin (RSA) in phosphate buffer (pH 9) for 15 min at 37–40 °C produced fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA and the product was purified using a mini-PD MiniTrap G-25 column. The overall radiochemical yield of the reaction was 18–35% (n = 30, uncorrected) in a 90-min synthesis. This procedure, repeated with human serum albumin (HSA), yielded similar results. Fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA demonstrated prolonged blood retention (biological half-life of 4.8 hours) in healthy awake rats. The distribution of major organ radioactivity remained relatively unchanged during the 4 hour observation periods either by direct tissue counting or by dynamic PET whole-body imaging except for a gradual accumulation of labeled metabolic products in the bladder. This manual method for synthesizing radiolabeled serum albumins uses fluorine-18, a widely available PET radionuclide, and natural protein available in both pure and recombinant forms which could be scaled up for widespread clinical applications. These preclinical biodistribution and PET imaging results indicate that [ 18 F]RSA is an effective blood pool imaging agent in rats and might, as [ 18 F]HSA, prove similarly useful as a clinical imaging agent

  20. Synthesis of fluorine-18 radio-labeled serum albumins for PET blood pool imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuli, Falguni; Li, Changhui; Xu, Biying; Williams, Mark; Wong, Karen; Coble, Vincent L; Vasalatiy, Olga; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V; Griffiths, Gary L; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2015-03-01

    We sought to develop a practical, reproducible and clinically translatable method of radiolabeling serum albumins with fluorine-18 for use as a PET blood pool imaging agent in animals and man. Fluorine-18 radiolabeled fluoronicotinic acid-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester, [(18)F]F-Py-TFP was prepared first by the reaction of its quaternary ammonium triflate precursor with [(18)F]tetrabutylammonium fluoride ([(18)F]TBAF) according to a previously published method for peptides, with minor modifications. The incubation of [(18)F]F-Py-TFP with rat serum albumin (RSA) in phosphate buffer (pH9) for 15 min at 37-40 °C produced fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA and the product was purified using a mini-PD MiniTrap G-25 column. The overall radiochemical yield of the reaction was 18-35% (n=30, uncorrected) in a 90-min synthesis. This procedure, repeated with human serum albumin (HSA), yielded similar results. Fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA demonstrated prolonged blood retention (biological half-life of 4.8 hours) in healthy awake rats. The distribution of major organ radioactivity remained relatively unchanged during the 4 hour observation periods either by direct tissue counting or by dynamic PET whole-body imaging except for a gradual accumulation of labeled metabolic products in the bladder. This manual method for synthesizing radiolabeled serum albumins uses fluorine-18, a widely available PET radionuclide, and natural protein available in both pure and recombinant forms which could be scaled up for widespread clinical applications. These preclinical biodistribution and PET imaging results indicate that [(18)F]RSA is an effective blood pool imaging agent in rats and might, as [(18)F]HSA, prove similarly useful as a clinical imaging agent. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Non invasive blood flow assessment in diabetic foot ulcer using laser speckle contrast imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthy, A. K.; Sujatha, N.; Reddy, M. Ramasubba; Narayanamoorthy, V. B.

    2014-03-01

    Measuring microcirculatory tissue blood perfusion is of interest for both clinicians and researchers in a wide range of applications and can provide essential information of the progress of treatment of certain diseases which causes either an increased or decreased blood flow. Diabetic ulcer associated with alterations in tissue blood flow is the most common cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations. A technique which can detect the onset of ulcer and provide essential information on the progress of the treatment of ulcer would be of great help to the clinicians. A noninvasive, noncontact and whole field laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique has been described in this paper which is used to assess the changes in blood flow in diabetic ulcer affected areas of the foot. The blood flow assessment at the wound site can provide critical information on the efficiency and progress of the treatment given to the diabetic ulcer subjects. The technique may also potentially fulfill a significant need in diabetic foot ulcer screening and management.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging as a diagnostic method for assessing function. New procedures for the non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood volume and blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueckel, F.; Rempp, K.; Becker, G.; Koepke, J.; Loose, R.; Brix, G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a brief introduction to the current status of cerebral blood volume and blood flow imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. A new method for the quantitative assessment of regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) on the basis of the indicator dilution theory is described and preliminary quantitative results from healthy volunteers are presented. The mean values for the rCBV are 8,27±1,85 ml/100 g for grey matter and 3,78±1,34 ml/100 g for white matter. The mean values for the rCBF are 44,8±11,29 ml/min/100 g for the grey matter and 20,88±8,42 ml/min/100 g for the white matter. These results are in good agreement with PET results from the literature. (orig.) [de

  3. Bone marrow blood supply in gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saifuddin, A.; Bann, K.; Ridgway, J.P.; Butt, W.P.

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to determine whether bone blood supply can be assessed on gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of 49 patients attending for post-laminectomy examination were reviewed (30 male, 19 female, mean age 46.4 years, age range 23-84 years). Each study included sagittal T1-weighted spin echo sequences before and after gadolinium administration. Regions of interest were drawn within the L3 vertebral body from a parasagittal slice from each sequence. Signal intensity (SI) values were ascertained and the percentage increase in SI was calculated. For each patient, changes in receiver gain for pre- and post-gadolinium images were corrected by an image scaling factor. In all cases, a measurable increase in SI was found (mean 15.3%, range 4.4-55.7) due to bone vascularity. The results give no indication of the quantity or timing of blood supply but provide a basis for further work. (orig.)

  4. A NIR-BODIPY derivative for sensing copper(II) in blood and mitochondrial imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shao-Jun; Xie, Yu-Wen; Chen, Qiu-Yun

    2018-04-01

    In order to develop NIR BODIPY for mitochondria targeting imaging agents and metal sensors, a side chain modified BODIPY (BPN) was synthesized and spectroscopically characterized. BPN has NIR emission at 765 nm when excited at 704 nm. The emission at 765 nm responded differently to Cu2+ and Mn2+ ions, respectively. The BPN coordinated with Cu2+ forming [BPNCu]2+ complex with quenched emission, while Mn2+ induced aggregation of BPN with specific fluorescence enhancement. Moreover, BPN can be applied to monitor Cu2+ in live cells and image mitochondria. Further, BPN was used as sensor for the detection of Cu2+ ions in serum with linear detection range of 0.45 μM-36.30 μM. Results indicate that BPN is a good sensor for the detection of Cu2+ in serum and image mitochondria. This study gives strategies for future design of NIR sensors for the analysis of metal ions in blood.

  5. Mobile phone based laser speckle contrast imager for assessment of skin blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Saknite, Inga; Krievina, Gita; Zaharans, Janis; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of skin blood flow is of interest for evaluation of skin viability as well as for reflection of the overall condition of the circulatory system. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LASCI) are optical techniques used for assessment of skin perfusion. However, these systems are still too expensive and bulky to be widely available. Implementation of such techniques as connection kits for mobile phones have a potential for primary diagnostics. In this work we demonstrate simple and low cost LASCI connection kit for mobile phone and its comparison to laser Doppler perfusion imager. Post-occlusive hyperemia and local thermal hyperemia tests are used to compare both techniques and to demonstrate the potential of LASCI device.

  6. Estimation of lung volume and pulmonary blood volume from radioisotopic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Minoru

    1989-01-01

    Lung volume and pulmonary blood volume in man were estimated from the radioisotopic image using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Six healthy volunteers were studied in a supine position with normal and altered lung volumes by applying continuous negative body-surface pressure (CNP) and by positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). 99m Tc labeled human serum albumin was administered as an aerosol to image the lungs. The CNP caused the diaphragm to be lowered and it increased the mean lung tissue volume obtained by SPECT from 3.09±0.49 l for baseline to 3.67±0.62 l for 10 cmH 2 O (p 2 O (p 2 O), respectively. The PEEP also increased the lung tissue volume to 3.68±0.68 l for 10 cmH 2 O as compared with the baseline (p 2 O PEEP. The lung tissue volume obtained by SPECT showed a positive correlation with functional residual capacity measured by the He dilution method (r=0.91, p 99m Tc-labeled red blood cells. The L/H ratio decreased after either the CNP or PEEP, suggesting a decrease in the blood volume per unit lung volume. However, it was suggested that the total pulmonary blood volume increased slightly either on the CNP (+7.4% for 10 cmH 2 O, p 2 O,p<0.05) when we extrapolated the L/H ratio to the whole lungs by multiplying the lung tissue volume obtained by SPECT. We concluded that SPECT could offer access to the estimation of lung volume and pulmonary blood volume in vivo. (author)

  7. Altered Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Novel Imaging Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Gaurav; Jones, Jordan T; Lee, Gregory; Altaye, Mekibib; Beebe, Dean W; Meyers-Eaton, Jamie; Wiley, Kasha; Brunner, Hermine I; DiFrancesco, Mark W

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate a safe, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method to measure regional blood-brain barrier integrity and investigate its relationship with neurocognitive function and regional gray matter volume in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this cross-sectional, case-control study, capillary permeability was measured as a marker of blood-brain barrier integrity in juvenile SLE patients and matched healthy controls, using a combination of arterial spin labeling and diffusion-weighted brain MRI. Regional gray matter volume was measured by voxel-based morphometry. Correlation analysis was done to investigate the relationship between regional capillary permeability and regional gray matter volume. Formal neurocognitive testing was completed (measuring attention, visuoconstructional ability, working memory, and psychomotor speed), and scores were regressed against regional blood-brain barrier integrity among juvenile SLE patients. Formal cognitive testing confirmed normal cognitive ability in all juvenile SLE subjects (n = 11) included in the analysis. Regional capillary permeability was negatively associated (P = 0.026) with neurocognitive performance concerning psychomotor speed in the juvenile SLE cohort. Compared with controls (n = 11), juvenile SLE patients had significantly greater capillary permeability involving Brodmann's areas 19, 28, 36, and 37 and caudate structures (P < 0.05 for all). There is imaging evidence of increased regional capillary permeability in juvenile SLE patients with normal cognitive performance using a novel noninvasive MRI technique. These blood-brain barrier outcomes appear consistent with functional neuronal network alterations and gray matter volume loss previously observed in juvenile SLE patients with overt neurocognitive deficits, supporting the notion that blood-brain barrier integrity loss precedes the loss of cognitive ability in juvenile SLE. Longitudinal studies are needed to

  8. Study of regional cerebral blood flow SPECT imaging for sudden sensorineural deafness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Changhui; Kui Xixiao; Xiong Qibin; Wen Hui; Xie Jiabiao

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the clinical value of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) SPECT imaging for sudden sensorineural deafness (SSD). Methods: 10 normal persons, 19 conductive deafness and 31 SSD patients were examined by rCBF SPECT imaging, and compared with X CT at the same time. All SSD patients were followed up for 6∼12 months with repeated rCBF SPECT imaging. Results: 1) The radioactivity of diseased and normal horizontal temporal gyrus ratio (T/NT) in SSD patients was the lowest among three groups (P < 0.01). 2) The sensitivity (80.6%) and accurate rate (88.3%) of rCBF SPECT imaging in SSD patients were much higher than those of CT (3.2% and 50%, P < 0.01). 3) There was a significant correlation between degree of deafness and T/NT in SSD patients. 4) Good prognosis of SSD patients with normal rCBF SPECT was found. 5) The rCBF SPECT had close concordance between rCBF SPECT imaging and clinical prognosis (84.6%). Conclusions: rCBF SPECT imaging was superior to X CT in diagnosis of SSD and played an important clinical role

  9. Automatic localization of the left ventricular blood pool centroid in short axis cardiac cine MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li Kuo; Liew, Yih Miin; Lim, Einly; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Chee, Kok Han; McLaughlin, Robert A

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we develop and validate an open source, fully automatic algorithm to localize the left ventricular (LV) blood pool centroid in short axis cardiac cine MR images, enabling follow-on automated LV segmentation algorithms. The algorithm comprises four steps: (i) quantify motion to determine an initial region of interest surrounding the heart, (ii) identify potential 2D objects of interest using an intensity-based segmentation, (iii) assess contraction/expansion, circularity, and proximity to lung tissue to score all objects of interest in terms of their likelihood of constituting part of the LV, and (iv) aggregate the objects into connected groups and construct the final LV blood pool volume and centroid. This algorithm was tested against 1140 datasets from the Kaggle Second Annual Data Science Bowl, as well as 45 datasets from the STACOM 2009 Cardiac MR Left Ventricle Segmentation Challenge. Correct LV localization was confirmed in 97.3% of the datasets. The mean absolute error between the gold standard and localization centroids was 2.8 to 4.7 mm, or 12 to 22% of the average endocardial radius. Graphical abstract Fully automated localization of the left ventricular blood pool in short axis cardiac cine MR images.

  10. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae-Ryon Kong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA of 1.0 from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22. A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests.

  11. Image-based model of the spectrin cytoskeleton for red blood cell simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fai, Thomas G; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Stokes, David L; Peskin, Charles S

    2017-10-01

    We simulate deformable red blood cells in the microcirculation using the immersed boundary method with a cytoskeletal model that incorporates structural details revealed by tomographic images. The elasticity of red blood cells is known to be supplied by both their lipid bilayer membranes, which resist bending and local changes in area, and their cytoskeletons, which resist in-plane shear. The cytoskeleton consists of spectrin tetramers that are tethered to the lipid bilayer by ankyrin and by actin-based junctional complexes. We model the cytoskeleton as a random geometric graph, with nodes corresponding to junctional complexes and with edges corresponding to spectrin tetramers such that the edge lengths are given by the end-to-end distances between nodes. The statistical properties of this graph are based on distributions gathered from three-dimensional tomographic images of the cytoskeleton by a segmentation algorithm. We show that the elastic response of our model cytoskeleton, in which the spectrin polymers are treated as entropic springs, is in good agreement with the experimentally measured shear modulus. By simulating red blood cells in flow with the immersed boundary method, we compare this discrete cytoskeletal model to an existing continuum model and predict the extent to which dynamic spectrin network connectivity can protect against failure in the case of a red cell subjected to an applied strain. The methods presented here could form the basis of disease- and patient-specific computational studies of hereditary diseases affecting the red cell cytoskeleton.

  12. Application of LASCA imaging for detection of disorders of blood microcirculation in chicken embryo, infected by Chlamydia trachomatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianova, Onega; Subbotina, Irina; Filonova, Nadezhda; Zaitsev, Sergey; Saltykov, Yury; Polyanina, Tatiana; Lyapina, Anna; Ulyanov, Sergey; Larionova, Olga; Feodorova, Valentina

    2018-04-01

    Methods of t-LASCA and s-LASCA imaging have been firstly adapted to the problem of monitoring of blood microcirculation in chicken embryo model. Set-up for LASCA imaging of chicken embryo is mounted. Disorders of blood microcirculation in embryonated chicken egg, infected by Chlamydia trachomatis, are detected. Speckle-imaging technique is compared with white-light ovoscopy and new method of laser ovoscopy, based on the scattering of coherent light, advantages of LASCA imaging for the early detection of developmental process of chlamydial agent is demonstrated.

  13. Imaging blood-brain barrier dysfunction as a biomarker for epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Klein, Guy; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Kamintsky, Lyn; Noyman, Iris; Veksler, Ronel; Dalipaj, Hotjensa; Senatorov, Vladimir V; Swissa, Evyatar; Rosenbach, Dror; Elazary, Netta; Milikovsky, Dan Z; Milk, Nadav; Kassirer, Michael; Rosman, Yossi; Serlin, Yonatan; Eisenkraft, Arik; Chassidim, Yoash; Parmet, Yisrael; Kaufer, Daniela; Friedman, Alon

    2017-06-01

    A biomarker that will enable the identification of patients at high-risk for developing post-injury epilepsy is critically required. Microvascular pathology and related blood-brain barrier dysfunction and neuroinflammation were shown to be associated with epileptogenesis after injury. Here we used prospective, longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging to quantitatively follow blood-brain barrier pathology in rats following status epilepticus, late electrocorticography to identify epileptic animals and post-mortem immunohistochemistry to confirm blood-brain barrier dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Finally, to test the pharmacodynamic relevance of the proposed biomarker, two anti-epileptogenic interventions were used; isoflurane anaesthesia and losartan. Our results show that early blood-brain barrier pathology in the piriform network is a sensitive and specific predictor (area under the curve of 0.96, P brain barrier pathology as a clinically relevant predictive, diagnostic and pharmaco!dynamics biomarker for acquired epilepsy. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Deriving a blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry in Sylgard-184 vascular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Majid Y; Holdsworth, David W; Poepping, Tamie L

    2009-01-01

    A new blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) has been developed for particle image velocimetry (PIV), which enables flow studies in vascular models (phantoms). A major difficulty in PIV that affects measurement accuracy is the refraction and distortion of light passing through the interface between the model and the fluid, due to the difference in refractive index (n) between the two materials. The problem can be eliminated by using a fluid with a refractive index matching that of the model. Such fluids are not commonly available, especially for vascular research where the fluid should also have a viscosity similar to human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid, composed of water (47.38% by weight), glycerol (36.94% by weight) and sodium iodide salt (15.68% by weight), was developed for compatibility with our silicone (Sylgard 184; n = 1.414) phantoms. The fluid exhibits a dynamic viscosity of 4.31+/-0.03 cP which lies within the range of human blood viscosity (4.4+/-0.6 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at 22.2+/-0.2 degrees C, which is a feasible room temperature, thus eliminating the need for a temperature-control system. The fluid will be used to study hemodynamics in vascular flow models fabricated from Sylgard 184.

  15. The image of the butcher (13th-20th): In search of respectability between corporate pride and blood concealment.

    OpenAIRE

    Leteux , Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In most images that represent butchers in France since the Middle Ages, the animal’s blood and death are often eclipsed or softened, except for the realistic photographs of slaughterhouses in the 20th century. The will to conceal blood shows the butchers’ will to build an honourable image of themselves. This quest for respectability is obvious if you look at the ceremony clothes worn by butchers during civil and religious celebrations. In the 19th century, as the trade...

  16. Imaging transient blood vessel fusion events in zebrafish by correlative volume electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E J Armer

    Full Text Available The study of biological processes has become increasingly reliant on obtaining high-resolution spatial and temporal data through imaging techniques. As researchers demand molecular resolution of cellular events in the context of whole organisms, correlation of non-invasive live-organism imaging with electron microscopy in complex three-dimensional samples becomes critical. The developing blood vessels of vertebrates form a highly complex network which cannot be imaged at high resolution using traditional methods. Here we show that the point of fusion between growing blood vessels of transgenic zebrafish, identified in live confocal microscopy, can subsequently be traced through the structure of the organism using Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM and Serial Block Face/Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBF/SEM. The resulting data give unprecedented microanatomical detail of the zebrafish and, for the first time, allow visualization of the ultrastructure of a time-limited biological event within the context of a whole organism.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging and peripheral blood abnormalities in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, L.M.; Alvord, E.C. Jr.; Richards, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in twelve cynomologous macaques (Macaca fascicularis) by sensitization to autologous myelin basic protein (BP) in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The white blood cell (WBC) count, absolute number of lymphocytes and absolute numbers of CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell subsets were measured weekly. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the animals were monitored twice weekly for the development of central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Conventional spin-warp imaging was performed using a General Electric CSI-II NMR imager/spectrometer (2 Tesla magnet). CNS lesions were detected by MRI in all of the animals sensitized to myelin BP. Longitudinal analysis of their peripheral blood leukocytes revealed a progressive leukocytosis and lymphopenia, which always preceded the onset of clinical signs and almost always also preceded the formation of detectable CNS lesions. These results suggest that frequent analysis of T-cell subsets may provide a more accurate means of predicting episodes of disease activity than clinical or MRI evaluation

  18. Adaptable three-dimensional Monte Carlo modeling of imaged blood vessels in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefer, T. Joshua; Barton, Jennifer K.; Chan, Eric K.; Ducros, Mathieu G.; Sorg, Brian S.; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Welch, Ashley J.

    1997-06-01

    In order to reach a higher level of accuracy in simulation of port wine stain treatment, we propose to discard the typical layered geometry and cylindrical blood vessel assumptions made in optical models and use imaging techniques to define actual tissue geometry. Two main additions to the typical 3D, weighted photon, variable step size Monte Carlo routine were necessary to achieve this goal. First, optical low coherence reflectometry (OLCR) images of rat skin were used to specify a 3D material array, with each entry assigned a label to represent the type of tissue in that particular voxel. Second, the Monte Carlo algorithm was altered so that when a photon crosses into a new voxel, the remaining path length is recalculated using the new optical properties, as specified by the material array. The model has shown good agreement with data from the literature. Monte Carlo simulations using OLCR images of asymmetrically curved blood vessels show various effects such as shading, scattering-induced peaks at vessel surfaces, and directionality-induced gradients in energy deposition. In conclusion, this augmentation of the Monte Carlo method can accurately simulate light transport for a wide variety of nonhomogeneous tissue geometries.

  19. Automated red blood cells extraction from holographic images using fully convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Javidi, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present two models for automatically extracting red blood cells (RBCs) from RBCs holographic images based on a deep learning fully convolutional neural network (FCN) algorithm. The first model, called FCN-1, only uses the FCN algorithm to carry out RBCs prediction, whereas the second model, called FCN-2, combines the FCN approach with the marker-controlled watershed transform segmentation scheme to achieve RBCs extraction. Both models achieve good segmentation accuracy. In addition, the second model has much better performance in terms of cell separation than traditional segmentation methods. In the proposed methods, the RBCs phase images are first numerically reconstructed from RBCs holograms recorded with off-axis digital holographic microscopy. Then, some RBCs phase images are manually segmented and used as training data to fine-tune the FCN. Finally, each pixel in new input RBCs phase images is predicted into either foreground or background using the trained FCN models. The RBCs prediction result from the first model is the final segmentation result, whereas the result from the second model is used as the internal markers of the marker-controlled transform algorithm for further segmentation. Experimental results show that the given schemes can automatically extract RBCs from RBCs phase images and much better RBCs separation results are obtained when the FCN technique is combined with the marker-controlled watershed segmentation algorithm. PMID:29082078

  20. Feasibility of the optical imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump by near-infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    Blood coagulation is one of the primary concerns when using mechanical circulatory support devices such as blood pumps. Noninvasive detection and imaging of thrombus formation is useful not only for the development of more hemocompatible devices but also for the management of blood coagulation to avoid risk of infarction. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of near-infrared light for imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump. The optical properties of a thrombus at wavelengths ranging from 600 to 750 nm were analyzed using a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system. A specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a visible bottom area was used. In vitro antithrombogenic testing was conducted five times with the pump using bovine whole blood in which the activated blood clotting time was adjusted to 200 s prior to the experiment. Two halogen lights were used for the light sources. The forward scattering through the pump and backward scattering on the pump bottom area were imaged using the HSI system. HSI showed an increase in forward scattering at wavelengths ranging from 670 to 750 nm in the location of thrombus formation. The time at which the thrombus began to form in the impeller rotating at 2780 rpm could be detected. The spectral difference between the whole blood and the thrombus was utilized to image thrombus formation. The results indicate the feasibility of dynamically detecting and imaging thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Dynamic circular buffering: a technique for equilibrium gated blood pool imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, J J; Rahms, H; Green, M V; Del Pozo, F

    1996-03-01

    We have devised a software technique called "dynamic circular buffering" (DCB) with which we create a gated blood pool image sequence of the heart in real time using the best features of LIST and FRAME mode methods of acquisition/processing. The routine is based on the concept of independent "agents" acting on the timing and position data continuously written into the DCB. This approach allows efficient asynchronous operation on PC-type machines and enhanced capability on systems capable of true multiprocessing and multithreading.

  2. Evaluating the pacemaker effect with the pump parameter of gated blood-pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Muhua

    1995-01-01

    13 normal controls and 27 patients with ventricular pacemaker had undergone planar gated blood-pool imaging in different conditions. Result shows: (1) Pump parameters can successfully reflect therapeutic effect of pacemaker among them EMP is the most valuable parameter for evaluating the cardiac pumping effect. (2) After implantation of the ventricular pacemaker, the LVEF did not increase, but the CO and EMP was significantly increased. (3) Compared with right ventricular demand pacemaker, the rate-responsive ventricular pacemaker give better hemodynamic benefit at exercise condition. (4) Through restrained cardiac pacemaker the functional change was analyzed on or off pace, and monitoring the cardiac function itself after the pacemaker was implanted

  3. Non-invasive imaging of retinal blood flow in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Anne; Hansen, Mathias M; Klefter, Oliver Niels

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the circulation in the retinal vessels in patients with blood dyscrasia due to myeloproliferative neoplasms using non-invasive retinal imaging. METHODS: Prospective consecutive case series of seven treatment-naïve patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (n = 2), polycythemia vera...... present at baseline in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia and were replaced by normal patterns at follow-up. Retinopathy, in the form of cotton-wool spots and retinal haemorrhages, was found at presentation in the two patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia and in one patient with polycythemia vera...

  4. Investigations of new cardiac functional imaging using Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, H.; Takeda, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Taguchi, M.; Konishi, T.; Hamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new cardiac functional imaging, using temporal Fourier analysis of 28-frame gated cardiac blood-pool studies, was developed. A time-activity curve of each pixel was approximated by its Fourier series. Approximation by the sum for terms to the 3rd frequency of its Fourier series was considered to be most reasonable because of having the least aberration due to statistical fluctuation and close agreement between the global left ventricular curve and the regional fitted curves in normal subjects. To evaluate the ventricular systolic and diastolic performances, 9 parameters were analyzed from thus fitted curves on a pixel-by-pixel basis and displayed on a colour CRT in 64x64 matrix form. In patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and other cardiac lesions, detailed information on the regional ventricular systolic and diastolic performances was clearly visualized by this method, which was difficult to obtain from the usual functional images of phase and amplitude at the fundamental frequency alone

  5. Methods of Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis for Evaluating Renal Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI has recently been utilized as a noninvasive tool for evaluating renal oxygenation. Several methods have been proposed for analyzing BOLD images. Regional ROI selection is the earliest and most widely used method for BOLD analysis. In the last 20 years, many investigators have used this method to evaluate cortical and medullary oxygenation in patients with ischemic nephropathy, hypertensive nephropathy, diabetic nephropathy, chronic kidney disease (CKD, acute kidney injury and renal allograft rejection. However, clinical trials of BOLD MRI using regional ROI selection revealed that it was difficult to distinguish the renal cortico-medullary zones with this method, and that it was susceptible to observer variability. To overcome these deficiencies, several new methods were proposed for analyzing BOLD images, including the compartmental approach, fractional hypoxia method, concentric objects (CO method and twelve-layer concentric objects (TLCO method. The compartmental approach provides an algorithm to judge whether the pixel belongs to the cortex or medulla. Fractional kidney hypoxia, measured by using BOLD MRI, was negatively correlated with renal blood flow, tissue perfusion and glomerular filtration rate (GFR in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. The CO method divides the renal parenchyma into six or twelve layers of thickness in each coronal slice of BOLD images and provides a R2* radial profile curve. The slope of the R2* curve associated positively with eGFR in CKD patients. Indeed, each method invariably has advantages and disadvantages, and there is generally no consensus method so far. Undoubtedly, analytic approaches for BOLD MRI with better reproducibility would assist clinicians in monitoring the degree of kidney hypoxia and thus facilitating timely reversal of tissue hypoxia.

  6. Brain oxygen saturation assessment in neonates using T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alderliesten, Thomas; De Vis, Jill B; Lemmers, Petra Ma

    2017-01-01

    saturation in the sagittal sinus (R(2 )= 0.49, p = 0.023), but no significant correlations could be demonstrated with frontal and whole brain cerebral blood flow. These results suggest that measuring oxygen saturation by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation is feasible, even in neonates. Strong...... sinus. A strong linear relation was found between the oxygen saturation measured by magnetic resonance imaging and the oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (R(2 )= 0.64, p ..., and magnetic resonance imaging measures of frontal cerebral blood flow, whole brain cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus (R(2 )= 0.71, 0.50, 0.65; p 

  7. Segmentation, Reconstruction, and Analysis of Blood Thrombus Formation in 3D 2-Photon Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhiliang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of segmenting, reconstructing, and analyzing the structure growth of thrombi (clots in blood vessels in vivo based on 2-photon microscopic image data. First, we develop an algorithm for segmenting clots in 3D microscopic images based on density-based clustering and methods for dealing with imaging artifacts. Next, we apply the union-of-balls (or alpha-shape algorithm to reconstruct the boundary of clots in 3D. Finally, we perform experimental studies and analysis on the reconstructed clots and obtain quantitative data of thrombus growth and structures. We conduct experiments on laser-induced injuries in vessels of two types of mice (the wild type and the type with low levels of coagulation factor VII and analyze and compare the developing clot structures based on their reconstructed clots from image data. The results we obtain are of biomedical significance. Our quantitative analysis of the clot composition leads to better understanding of the thrombus development, and is valuable to the modeling and verification of computational simulation of thrombogenesis.

  8. Infrared tomography for diagnostic imaging of port wine stain blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The objective of this work is the development of Infrared Tomography (IRT) for detecting and characterizing subsurface chromophores in human skin. Characterization of cutaneous chromophores is crucial for advances in the laser treatment of pigmented lesions (e.g., port wine stain birthmarks and tatoos). Infrared tomography (IRT) uses a fast infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA) to detect temperature rises in a substrate induced by pulsed radiation. A pulsed laser is used to produce transient heating of an object. The temperature rise, due to the optical absorption of the pulsed laser light, creates an increase in infrared emission which is measured by the IR-FPA. Although the application of IRT to image subsurface cracks due to metal fatigue is a topic of great interest in the aircraft industry, the application to image subsurface chromophores in biological materials is novel. We present an image recovery method based on a constrained conjugate gradient algorithm that has obtained the first ever high quality images of port wine blood vessels.

  9. Magnetic particle imaging for in vivo blood flow velocity measurements in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Michael G.; Salamon, Johannes; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald; Adam, Gerhard; Weller, Horst; Jung, Caroline

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging technology. It is a potential candidate to be used for angiographic purposes, to study perfusion and cell migration. The aim of this work was to measure velocities of the flowing blood in the inferior vena cava of mice, using MPI, and to evaluate it in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A phantom mimicking the flow within the inferior vena cava with velocities of up to 21 cm s‑1 was used for the evaluation of the applied analysis techniques. Time–density and distance–density analyses for bolus tracking were performed to calculate flow velocities. These findings were compared with the calibrated velocities set by a flow pump, and it can be concluded that velocities of up to 21 cm s‑1 can be measured by MPI. A time–density analysis using an arrival time estimation algorithm showed the best agreement with the preset velocities. In vivo measurements were performed in healthy FVB mice (n  =  10). MRI experiments were performed using phase contrast (PC) for velocity mapping. For MPI measurements, a standardized injection of a superparamagnetic iron oxide tracer was applied. In vivo MPI data were evaluated by a time–density analysis and compared to PC MRI. A Bland–Altman analysis revealed good agreement between the in vivo velocities acquired by MRI of 4.0  ±  1.5 cm s‑1 and those measured by MPI of 4.8  ±  1.1 cm s‑1. Magnetic particle imaging is a new tool with which to measure and quantify flow velocities. It is fast, radiation-free, and produces 3D images. It therefore offers the potential for vascular imaging.

  10. Orthogonal Views of Coronary Vessels: A Method for Imaging the Delivery of Blood Cardioplegia Using Transesophageal Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maracaja Neto, Luiz F; Modak, Raj; Schonberger, Robert B

    2017-04-01

    Coronary blood flow can be disrupted during cardiac interventions such as mitral valve surgeries, left atrial appendage ligation, transcatheter aortic valve implantation, and aortic procedures involving reimplantation of coronary buttons. Although difficult to accomplish, coronary imaging using transesophageal echocardiography can be performed by the use of orthogonal imaging with the ability for real-time tilt for angle adjustment. The technique described herein allows imaging of the right coronary artery, left main coronary artery bifurcation, left anterior descending, and circumflex coronary arteries. The imaging is facilitated by acquisition during the delivery of blood cardioplegia. Coronary sinus and great cardiac vein imaging also can be obtained during the delivery of retrograde cardioplegia. Although further studies are needed, this imaging technique may prove useful in procedures where coronary flow disruption is suspected or as an additional parameter to confirm delivery of cardioplegia.

  11. Development of 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (Neurolite) for imaging brain blood flow in stroke and other disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liteplo, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    Compounds labeled with 99m Tc are widely used for imaging in diagnostic medicine to provide information on physiological functions of the body not obtainable with other imaging techniques that give primarily anatomical information, such as X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging. These radiopharmaceuticals are typically injected intravenously and allowed to distribute in the body; the patient is then imaged using a scintillation gamma camera. For example, in patients suspected of coronary artery disease, 99m Tc-Sestamibi (Cardiolite reg-sign) is injected into the blood stream during a stress test and is rapidly extracted by the heart muscle in proportion to its regional blood supply. The resulting images of the heart clearly distinguish areas of normal heart muscle form areas where the blood supply is compromised by coronary artery disease. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the application of 99m Tc compounds to the diagnosis of brain diseases and disorders. This paper describes the development of 99m Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD, Neurolite reg-sign) as a radiopharmaceutical for imaging the blood supply to the brain in patients with stroke or head trauma. In research, this agent is also useful in studying the effect of sensory stimuli, therapeutic drugs, and drugs of abuse on brain blood flow

  12. Measurement of portal blood flow in healthy individuals: a comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Juliana Dantas da; Sebastiane, Patricia Moreno; Leao, Alberto Ribeiro de Souza; Santos, Jose Eduardo Mourao; Moulin, Danilo Sales; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the inter-observer agreement between Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the quantification of portal blood flow in healthy individuals, as well as evaluating the reproducibility of both methods. Materials and methods: A prospective, transverse, observational and self-paired study was developed evaluating 20 healthy volunteers whose portal blood flow was measured by means of Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging performed by two independent observers. Interobserver and inter method agreements were calculated using the intra class and Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results: The agreement between Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging was low (intra class coefficient: 1.9%-18.2%; Pearson's coefficient: 0.1%-13.7%; p=0.565). Mean values for the portal blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging were respectively 0.768 l/min and 0.742 l/min. Interobserver agreement for quantification of the portal blood flow by Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging was respectively reasonable (intra class coefficient: 43.3%; Pearson's coefficient: 43.0%) and excellent (intra class coefficient: 91.4%; Pearson's coefficient: 93.4%). Conclusion: In the present study, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated to be a reliable method for quantifying the portal blood flow, with a higher interobserver agreement than Doppler ultrasonography. The inter method agreement was low. (author)

  13. A blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry with silicone vascular models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Majid Y.; Holdsworth, David W.; Poepping, Tamie L.

    2011-03-01

    For accurate particle image velocimetry measurements in hemodynamics studies, it is important to use a fluid with a refractive index ( n) matching that of the vascular models (phantoms) and ideally a dynamic viscosity matching human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) composed of water, glycerol, and sodium iodide was formulated for a range of refractive indices to match most common silicone elastomers ( n = 1.40-1.43) and with corresponding dynamic viscosity within the average cited range of healthy human blood (4.4 ± 0.5 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at room temperature (22.2 ± 0.2°C), which eliminates the need for a temperature-control system. An optimally matched BMF, suitable for use in a vascular phantom ( n = 1.4140 ± 0.0008, Sylgard 184), was demonstrated with composition (by weight) of 47.38% water, 36.94% glycerol (44:56 glycerol-water ratio), and 15.68% sodium iodide salt, resulting in a dynamic viscosity of 4 .31 ± 0 .03 cP.

  14. Three-dimensional power Doppler sonography: imaging and quantifying blood flow and vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pairleitner, H; Steiner, H; Hasenoehrl, G; Staudach, A

    1999-08-01

    To assess the feasibility of imaging low-velocity blood flow in adnexal masses by transvaginal three-dimensional power Doppler sonography, to analyze three-dimensional power Doppler sonography data sets with a new computer-assisted method and to test the reproducibility of the technique. A commercially available 5-MHz Combison 530 ultrasound system was used to perform three-dimensional power Doppler sonography transvaginally. A cube (= volume of interest) was defined enclosing the vessels of the cyst and the Cartesian characteristics were stored on a hard disk. This cube was analyzed using specially designed software. Five indices representing vascularization (the vascularization index (VI) or blood flow (the flow index (FI)) or both (the vascularization-flow index (VFI)) were calculated. The intraobserver repeatability of cube definition and scan repetition was assessed using Hartley's test for homogeneous variances. Interobserver agreement was assessed by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Imaging of vessels with low-velocity blood flow by three-dimensional power Doppler sonography and cube definition was possible in all adnexal massed studied. In some cases even induced non-vascular flow related to endometriosis was detected. The calculated F value with intraobserver repeated Cartesian file-saving ranged from 0 to 18.8, with intraobserver scan repetition from 4.74 to 24.8 for VI, FI 1, FI 2 and VFI 1; for VFI 2 the calculated F value was 64. The interobserver correlation coefficient ranged between 0.83 and 0.92 for VI, FI 1, FI 2 and VFI 1; for VFI 2 the correlation coefficient was less than 0.75. Vessels with low-velocity blood flow can be imaged using three-dimensional power Doppler sonography. Induced non-vascular flow was detected in endometriotic cyst fluid. Three-dimensional power Doppler sonography combined with the cube method gave reproducible information for all indices except VFI 2. These indices might prove to be a new predictor in all fields of

  15. Arterial spin labeling blood flow magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yupin P; Song, Rui; Liang, Chang hong; Chen, Xin; Liu, Bo

    2012-08-15

    A multitude of evidence suggests that iodinated contrast material causes nephrotoxicity; however, there have been no previous studies that use arterial spin labeling (ASL) blood flow functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the alterations in effective renal plasma flow between normointensive and hypertensive rats following injection of contrast media. We hypothesized that FAIR-SSFSE arterial spin labeling MRI may enable noninvasive and quantitative assessment of regional renal blood flow abnormalities and correlate with disease severity as assessed by histological methods. Renal blood flow (RBF) values of the cortex and medulla of rat kidneys were obtained from ASL images postprocessed at ADW4.3 workstation 0.3, 24, 48, and 72 h before and after injection of iodinated contrast media (6 ml/kg). The H&E method for morphometric measurements was used to confirm the MRI findings. The RBF values of the outer medulla were lower than those of the cortex and the inner medulla as reported previously. Iodinated contrast media treatment resulted in decreases in RBF in the outer medulla and cortex in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), but only in the outer medulla in normotensive rats. The iodinated contrast agent significantly decreased the RBF value in the outer medulla and the cortex in SHR compared with normotensive rats after injection of the iodinated contrast media. Histological observations of kidney morphology were also consistent with ASL perfusion changes. These results demonstrate that the RBF value can reflect changes of renal perfusion in the cortex and medulla. ASL-MRI is a feasible and accurate method for evaluating nephrotoxic drugs-induced kidney damage.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound to increase localized blood-spinal cord barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Allison H; Hawryluk, Gregory W; Anzai, Yoshimi; Odéen, Henrik; Ostlie, Megan A; Reichert, Ethan C; Stump, Amanda J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2017-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects thousands of people every year in the USA, and most patients are left with some permanent paralysis. Therapeutic options are limited and only modestly affect outcome. To address this issue, we used magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) as a non-invasive approach to increase permeability in the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We hypothesize that localized, controlled sonoporation of the BSCB by MRgFUS will aid delivery of therapeutics to the injury. Here, we report our preliminary findings for the ability of MRgFUS to increase BSCB permeability in the thoracic spinal cord of a normal rat model. First, an excised portion of normal rat spinal column was used to characterize the acoustic field and to estimate the insertion losses that could be expected in an MRgFUS blood spinal cord barrier opening. Then, in normal rats, MRgFUS was applied in combination with intravenously administered microbubbles to the spinal cord region. Permeability of the BSCB was indicated as signal enhancement by contrast administered prior to T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and verified by Evans blue dye. Neurological testing using the Basso, Beattie, and Breshnahan scale and the ladder walk was normal in 8 of 10 rats tested. Two rats showed minor impairment indicating need for further refinement of parameters. No gross tissue damage was evident by histology. In this study, we have opened successfully the blood spinal cord barrier in the thoracic region of the normal rat spine using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles.

  17. Fresh Water Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Yang Mun; Kim, O Sik; Kim, Jin Nam; Kim, Cheol Su

    1985-02-01

    This book tells US summary of fresh water with evaporation system like basic principle and outline, multistage flash evaporation, multiple-effect evaporation, other evaporation, evaporation plant by development merger, design of evaporation plant, reverse osmosis on summary, type and production of membrane, reverse osmosis device, reverse osmosis process, electrodialysis with outline of electrodialysis and polarization and energy, freezing preservation and corrosion and scale.

  18. Measurement of cerebral blood flow in normal subjects by phase contrast MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimada, Akio; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Mamiya, Toshio; Takahashi, Taku; Kamano, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Yusuke; Osada, Hisato

    1994-01-01

    Global cerebral blood flow (CBF) was quantitatively measured with a two-dimensional phase contrast cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique in 24 normal subjects (mean age, 38.6 years; range, 12-70 years). Cine transverse images of the upper cervical region (32 phases/cardiac cycle) were acquired with a 1.5 Tesla MR imaging unit. In five subjects, measurement of CBF was performed before and after intravenous administration of acetazolamide (DIAMOX, 15 mg/kg). Inter- and intra-observer variations in flow volume measurement were small (r=0.970, standard error of the estimate (SEE)=2.9 ml/min, n=8; r=0.963, SEE=4.6 ml/min, n=40, respectively). In measuring flow velocity, they were inferior to those of flow volume measurement. On a visually determined setting of region of interest (ROI), reproducibility of the measurement of flow velocity was not satisfactory in this study. Thus only the results of flow volume measurement are presented. Mean summed vertebral flow volume (171 ml/min, SD=40.6) was significantly less than mean summed internal carotid flow volume (523 ml/min, SD=111). Total blood flow volume showed a significant decline with age (r=-0.45, p<0.05). The mean proportions of carotid and vertebral flow volume to total flow volume were 75.3% and 24.7%, respectively, and showed no significant change with age. The left-to-right ratio of vertebral flow volume (1.39) was significantly higher than that of internal carotid flow volume (0.99, r=0.05). After DIAMOX i.v., the mean rate of increase in total flow volume was 157%. Mean rates of increase in carotid and vertebral flow volume were 154% and 166%, respectively, which were not significantly different. In conclusion, this method is useful for estimating carotid and vertebral flow volume. (author)

  19. Estimating skin blood saturation by selecting a subset of hyperspectral imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewerlöf, Maria; Salerud, E. Göran; Strömberg, Tomas; Larsson, Marcus

    2015-03-01

    Skin blood haemoglobin saturation (?b) can be estimated with hyperspectral imaging using the wavelength (λ) range of 450-700 nm where haemoglobin absorption displays distinct spectral characteristics. Depending on the image size and photon transport algorithm, computations may be demanding. Therefore, this work aims to evaluate subsets with a reduced number of wavelengths for ?b estimation. White Monte Carlo simulations are performed using a two-layered tissue model with discrete values for epidermal thickness (?epi) and the reduced scattering coefficient (μ's ), mimicking an imaging setup. A detected intensity look-up table is calculated for a range of model parameter values relevant to human skin, adding absorption effects in the post-processing. Skin model parameters, including absorbers, are; μ's (λ), ?epi, haemoglobin saturation (?b), tissue fraction blood (?b) and tissue fraction melanin (?mel). The skin model paired with the look-up table allow spectra to be calculated swiftly. Three inverse models with varying number of free parameters are evaluated: A(?b, ?b), B(?b, ?b, ?mel) and C(all parameters free). Fourteen wavelength candidates are selected by analysing the maximal spectral sensitivity to ?b and minimizing the sensitivity to ?b. All possible combinations of these candidates with three, four and 14 wavelengths, as well as the full spectral range, are evaluated for estimating ?b for 1000 randomly generated evaluation spectra. The results show that the simplified models A and B estimated ?b accurately using four wavelengths (mean error 2.2% for model B). If the number of wavelengths increased, the model complexity needed to be increased to avoid poor estimations.

  20. Examination of attenuation correction method for cerebral blood Flow SPECT Using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Takashi; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    Authors developed a software for attenuation correction using MR imaging (MRAC) (Toshiba Med. System Engineer.) based on the idea that precision of AC could be improved by the head contour in MRI T2-weighted images (T2WI) obtained before 123 I-iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement. In the present study, this MRAC was retrospectively evaluated by comparison with the previous standard AC methods derived from transmission CT (TCT) and X-CT which overcoming the problem of sinogram threshold Chang method but still having cost and patient exposure issues. MRAC was essentially performed in the Toshiba GMS5500/PI processor where 3D registration was conducted with images of SPECT and MRI of the same patient. The gamma camera for 123 I-IMP SPECT and 99m TcO 4 - TCT was Toshiba 3-detector GCA9300A equipped with the above processor for MRAC and with low energy high resolution (LEHR) fan beam collimator. Machines for MRI and CT were Siemens-Asahi Meditech. MAGNETOM Symphony 1.5T and SOMATOM plus4, respectively. MRAC was examined in 8 patients with images of T1WI, TCT and SPECT, and in 18 of T2WI, CT and SPECT. Evaluation was made by comparison of attenuation coefficients (μ) by the 4 methods. As a result, the present MRAC was found to be closer to AC by TCT and CT than by the Chang method since MRAC, due to exact imaging of the head contour, was independent on radiation count, and was thought to be useful for improving the precision of CBF SPECT. (K.T.)

  1. Patient motion effects on the quantification of regional myocardial blood flow with dynamic PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Chad R. R. N.; Kemp, Robert A. de, E-mail: RAdeKemp@ottawaheart.ca [Physics Department, Room 3302 Herzberg Laboratories, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Cardiac Imaging, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4W7 (Canada); Klein, Ran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, 1053 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4E9 (Canada); Beanlands, Rob S. [Cardiac Imaging, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4W7 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Patient motion is a common problem during dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans for quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). The purpose of this study was to quantify the prevalence of body motion in a clinical setting and evaluate with realistic phantoms the effects of motion on blood flow quantification, including CT attenuation correction (CTAC) artifacts that result from PET–CT misalignment. Methods: A cohort of 236 sequential patients was analyzed for patient motion under resting and peak stress conditions by two independent observers. The presence of motion, affected time-frames, and direction of motion was recorded; discrepancy between observers was resolved by consensus review. Based on these results, patient body motion effects on MBF quantification were characterized using the digital NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom, with characteristic time activity curves (TACs) assigned to the heart wall (myocardium) and blood regions. Simulated projection data were corrected for attenuation and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. All simulations were performed without noise added, and a single CT image was used for attenuation correction and aligned to the early- or late-frame PET images. Results: In the patient cohort, mild motion of 0.5 ± 0.1 cm occurred in 24% and moderate motion of 1.0 ± 0.3 cm occurred in 38% of patients. Motion in the superior/inferior direction accounted for 45% of all detected motion, with 30% in the superior direction. Anterior/posterior motion was predominant (29%) in the posterior direction. Left/right motion occurred in 24% of cases, with similar proportions in the left and right directions. Computer simulation studies indicated that errors in MBF can approach 500% for scans with severe patient motion (up to 2 cm). The largest errors occurred when the heart wall was shifted left toward the adjacent lung region, resulting in a severe undercorrection for attenuation of the heart wall. Simulations

  2. Patient motion effects on the quantification of regional myocardial blood flow with dynamic PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Chad R. R. N.; Kemp, Robert A. de; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patient motion is a common problem during dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans for quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). The purpose of this study was to quantify the prevalence of body motion in a clinical setting and evaluate with realistic phantoms the effects of motion on blood flow quantification, including CT attenuation correction (CTAC) artifacts that result from PET–CT misalignment. Methods: A cohort of 236 sequential patients was analyzed for patient motion under resting and peak stress conditions by two independent observers. The presence of motion, affected time-frames, and direction of motion was recorded; discrepancy between observers was resolved by consensus review. Based on these results, patient body motion effects on MBF quantification were characterized using the digital NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom, with characteristic time activity curves (TACs) assigned to the heart wall (myocardium) and blood regions. Simulated projection data were corrected for attenuation and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. All simulations were performed without noise added, and a single CT image was used for attenuation correction and aligned to the early- or late-frame PET images. Results: In the patient cohort, mild motion of 0.5 ± 0.1 cm occurred in 24% and moderate motion of 1.0 ± 0.3 cm occurred in 38% of patients. Motion in the superior/inferior direction accounted for 45% of all detected motion, with 30% in the superior direction. Anterior/posterior motion was predominant (29%) in the posterior direction. Left/right motion occurred in 24% of cases, with similar proportions in the left and right directions. Computer simulation studies indicated that errors in MBF can approach 500% for scans with severe patient motion (up to 2 cm). The largest errors occurred when the heart wall was shifted left toward the adjacent lung region, resulting in a severe undercorrection for attenuation of the heart wall. Simulations

  3. Patient motion effects on the quantification of regional myocardial blood flow with dynamic PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Chad R R N; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S; deKemp, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Patient motion is a common problem during dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans for quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). The purpose of this study was to quantify the prevalence of body motion in a clinical setting and evaluate with realistic phantoms the effects of motion on blood flow quantification, including CT attenuation correction (CTAC) artifacts that result from PET-CT misalignment. A cohort of 236 sequential patients was analyzed for patient motion under resting and peak stress conditions by two independent observers. The presence of motion, affected time-frames, and direction of motion was recorded; discrepancy between observers was resolved by consensus review. Based on these results, patient body motion effects on MBF quantification were characterized using the digital NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom, with characteristic time activity curves (TACs) assigned to the heart wall (myocardium) and blood regions. Simulated projection data were corrected for attenuation and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. All simulations were performed without noise added, and a single CT image was used for attenuation correction and aligned to the early- or late-frame PET images. In the patient cohort, mild motion of 0.5 ± 0.1 cm occurred in 24% and moderate motion of 1.0 ± 0.3 cm occurred in 38% of patients. Motion in the superior/inferior direction accounted for 45% of all detected motion, with 30% in the superior direction. Anterior/posterior motion was predominant (29%) in the posterior direction. Left/right motion occurred in 24% of cases, with similar proportions in the left and right directions. Computer simulation studies indicated that errors in MBF can approach 500% for scans with severe patient motion (up to 2 cm). The largest errors occurred when the heart wall was shifted left toward the adjacent lung region, resulting in a severe undercorrection for attenuation of the heart wall. Simulations also indicated that the

  4. A simple method to recover Norovirus from fresh produce with large sample size by using histo-blood group antigen-conjugated to magnetic beads in a recirculating affinity magnetic separation system (RCAMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Yang, David; Mandrell, Robert

    2011-06-30

    Human norovirus (NoV) outbreaks are major food safety concerns. The virus has to be concentrated from food samples in order to be detected. PEG precipitation is the most common method to recover the virus. Recently, histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been recognized as receptors for human NoV, and have been utilized as an alternative method to concentrate human NoV for samples up to 40 mL in volume. However, to wash off the virus from contaminated fresh food samples, at least 250 mL of wash volume is required. Recirculating affinity magnetic separation system (RCAMS) has been tried by others to concentrate human NoV from large-volume samples and failed to yield consistent results with the standard procedure of 30 min of recirculation at the default flow rate. Our work here demonstrates that proper recirculation time and flow rate are key factors for success in using the RCAMS. The bead recovery rate was increased from 28% to 47%, 67% and 90% when recirculation times were extended from 30 min to 60 min, 120 min and 180 min, respectively. The kinetics study suggests that at least 120 min recirculation is required to obtain a good recovery of NoV. In addition, different binding and elution conditions were compared for releasing NoV from inoculated lettuce. Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and water results in similar efficacy for virus release, but the released virus does not bind to RCAMS effectively unless pH was adjusted to acidic. Either citrate-buffered saline (CBS) wash, or water wash followed by CBS adjustment, resulted in an enhanced recovery of virus. We also demonstrated that the standard curve generated from viral RNA extracted from serially-diluted virus samples is more accurate for quantitative analysis than standard curves generated from serially-diluted plasmid DNA or transcribed-RNA templates, both of which tend to overestimate the concentration power. The efficacy of recovery of NoV from produce using RCAMS was directly compared with that of the

  5. Low-dose myocardial blood flow imaging using 82Rb-PET (RUBILOW 2.0)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Camilla Molich; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Harms, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Relative and absolute measures of myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be derived from a 82Rb PET/CT scan using list mode data to extract static, gated and dynamic PET series. High doses of 82Rb are used to maximize image quality in especially static images. High doses require large eluate volumes......, may degrade scanner dead time performance at first pass and decreases generator lifetime. Lower doses will expand the availability of 82Rb PET/CT and lower doses to personnel and patients. The aim of the current study was to examine MBF with a low dose (LD) 82Rb protocol compared to the institution......’s standard (STD) protocol. Methods: Twenty-one patients referred to 82Rb PET were included in the study. Patients were examined during rest and stress with repeated LD (740 MBq) and STD dose (1110 MBq) Rb-PET during the same imaging session. Regional and global rest and stress MBF values, total perfusion...

  6. Blood group typing based on recording the elastic scattering of laser radiation using the method of digital imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolmashkin, A A; Dubrovskii, V A; Zabenkov, I V

    2012-01-01

    The possibility is demonstrated to determine the human blood group by recording the scattering of laser radiation with the help of the digital imaging method. It is experimentally shown that the action of a standing ultrasound wave leads to acceleration of the agglutination reaction of red blood cells, to formation of larger immune complexes of red blood cells, and, as a consequence, to acceleration of their sedimentation. In the absence of agglutination of red blood cells the ultrasound does not enhance the relevant processes. This difference in the results of ultrasound action on the mixture of blood and serum allows a method of blood typing to be offered. Theoretical modelling of the technique of the practical blood typing, carried out on the basis of the elastic light scattering theory, agrees well with the experimental results, which made it possible to plan further improvement of the proposed method. The studies of specific features of sedimentation of red blood cells and their immune complexes were aimed at the optimisation of the sample preparation, i.e., at the search for such experimental conditions that provide the maximal resolution of the method and the device for registering the reaction of red blood cells agglutination. The results of the study may be used in designing the instrumentation for blood group assessment in humans.

  7. Blood group typing based on recording the elastic scattering of laser radiation using the method of digital imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolmashkin, A A; Dubrovskii, V A; Zabenkov, I V [V.I.Razumovsky Saratov State Medical University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-31

    The possibility is demonstrated to determine the human blood group by recording the scattering of laser radiation with the help of the digital imaging method. It is experimentally shown that the action of a standing ultrasound wave leads to acceleration of the agglutination reaction of red blood cells, to formation of larger immune complexes of red blood cells, and, as a consequence, to acceleration of their sedimentation. In the absence of agglutination of red blood cells the ultrasound does not enhance the relevant processes. This difference in the results of ultrasound action on the mixture of blood and serum allows a method of blood typing to be offered. Theoretical modelling of the technique of the practical blood typing, carried out on the basis of the elastic light scattering theory, agrees well with the experimental results, which made it possible to plan further improvement of the proposed method. The studies of specific features of sedimentation of red blood cells and their immune complexes were aimed at the optimisation of the sample preparation, i.e., at the search for such experimental conditions that provide the maximal resolution of the method and the device for registering the reaction of red blood cells agglutination. The results of the study may be used in designing the instrumentation for blood group assessment in humans.

  8. Intraoperative laser speckle contrast imaging for monitoring cerebral blood flow: results from a 10-patient pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lisa M.; Weber, Erica L.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Kappeler, Kaelyn L.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2012-02-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) during neurosurgery can provide important physiological information for a variety of surgical procedures. Although multiple intraoperative vascular monitoring technologies are currently available, a quantitative method that allows for continuous monitoring is still needed. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an optical imaging method with high spatial and temporal resolution that has been widely used to image CBF in animal models in vivo. In this pilot clinical study, we adapted a Zeiss OPMI Pentero neurosurgical microscope to obtain LSCI images by attaching a camera and a laser diode. This LSCI adapted instrument has been used to acquire full field flow images from 10 patients during tumor resection procedures. The patient's ECG was recorded during acquisition and image registration was performed in post-processing to account for pulsatile motion artifacts. Digital photographs confirmed alignment of vasculature and flow images in four cases, and a relative change in blood flow was observed in two patients after bipolar cautery. The LSCI adapted instrument has the capability to produce real-time, full field CBF image maps with excellent spatial resolution and minimal intervention to the surgical procedure. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using LSCI to monitor blood flow during neurosurgery.

  9. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD). Renal imaging. Concepts and applications; Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD). Bildgebung der Nieren. Konzepte und Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, Johanna C.; Haneder, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Mie, Moritz B.; Zoellner, Frank G. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (DE). Inst. fuer Computerunterstuetzte Klinische Medizin (CKM)

    2010-07-01

    Many renal diseases as well as several pharmacons cause a change in renal blood flow and/or renal oxygenation. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging takes advantage of local field inhomogeneities and is based on a T2{sup *}-weighted sequence. BOLD is a non-invasive method allowing an estimation of the renal, particularly the medullary oxygenation, and an indirect measurement of blood flow without administration of contrast agents. Thus, effects of different drugs on the kidney and various renal diseases can be controlled and observed. This work will provide an overview of the studies carried out so far and identify ways how BOLD can be used in clinical studies. (orig.)

  10. Autologous blood injection to the temporomandibular joint: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candirili, Celal; Yuece, Serdar; Cavus, Umut Yuecel; Akin, Kayihan; Cakir, Banu [Fatih University Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2012-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the autologous blood injection (ABI) for chronic recurrent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ABI was applied to 14 patients who had chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation. MRIs of the patients were taken and compared before and one month after the injection. All of the patients had no dislocations of their TMJs on clinical examination one month after the injection. In the pre-injection, unilateral or bilateral TMJ dislocations were observed on MRIs in all patients. One month after the injection, TMJ dislocations were not observed in MRI evaluation of any patients. A significant structural change that caused by ABI was not observed. The procedure was easy to perform and it caused no foreign body reaction. However, it was unclear how the procedure prevented the dislocation.

  11. Patterns of ventricular dysfunction in patients receiving cardiotoxic chemotherapy as assessed with gated blood pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, S.M.; Parikh, S.R.; Spies, W.G.; Zimmer, A.M.; Silverstein, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    Clinical concern over significant cardiotoxicity of commonly employed chemotherapeutic regimens is a common indication for gated blood pool imaging. The authors have undertaken a review of 102 patients referred for such evaluation during a 14-month period. Ventricular ejection fractions, cine displays, and phase analysis were performed on each patient study. Approximately one-third of the cases showed significant abnormalities in wall motion or global ejection fraction. Many abnormal cases had isolated left ventricular findings, while fewer had isolated right ventricular findings. Left ventricular wall motion abnormalities were often focal. The patterns of ventricular dysfunction in patients receiving cardiotoxic chemotherapy are diverse, and awareness of the various possibilities is important for accurate clinical assessment of these patients

  12. Detecting early cardiac dysfunction with radionuclide cardiac blood-pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kegui; Chen Daguang; Lin Haoxue

    1992-01-01

    Cardiac function was measured by radionuclide cardiac blood-pool imaging in 15 normal persons, 19 cases of hypertension, 32 cases of coronary heart disease, 35 cases of coronary heart disease combined with hypertension and 44 cases of myocardial infarction. Significant differences have been found in indices of cardiac function between normal subjects and patients with coronary heart disease and coronary heart disease combined with hypertension, even though the patients were without any clinical sin of cardiac failure. Lowered regional EF and decreased ventricular was motion were found in 38.8% of patients, while 65.7%of patients revealed marked abnormality in MFR. The results indicate that latent cardiac dysfunction is common in patients with coronary heart disease. The earliest change is diastolic function abnormalities

  13. Evaluation of cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolism and cerebral function by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Umeda, Masahiro; Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Ueda, Satoshi; Furuya, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) method has the unique potentiality of detecting cerebral metabolites, cerebral blood flow and brain functions in a noninvasive fashion. We have developed several MR techniques to detect these cerebral parameters with the use of clinical MRI scanners. By modifying the MR spectroscopy (MRS) technique, both 31 P- and 1 H-MRS data can be obtained from multiple, localized regions (multi-voxel method) of the brain, and the distribution of each metabolite in the brain can be readily visualized by metabolite mapping. The use of diffusion weighted images (DWI) permits visualization of the anisotropy of water diffusion in white matter, and based on the difference of diffusion coefficiency, the differential diagnosis between epidermoid tumor and arachnoid cyst can be made. By employing dynamic-MRI (Dyn-MRI) with Gd-DTPA administration, it is possible to examine the difference in blood circulation between brain tumor tissue and normal tissue, as well as among different types of brain tumors. By using magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging, it has become possible to detect brain tumors, and with a small dose of Gd-DTPA, to visualize the vascular system. Functional MRI (fMRI) visualizes the activated brain by using conventional gradient echo technique on conventional MRI scanners. This method has the unique characteristic of detecting a brain function with high spatial and temporal resolution by using the intrinsic substance. Moreover, the localization of motor and sensory areas was detected by noninvasive means within few minutes. The fMRI procedure will be used in the future to analyze the higher and complex brain functions. In conclusion, multi-modality MR is a powerful technique that is useful for investigating the pathogenesis of many diseases, and provides a noninvasive analytic modality for studying brain function. (author)

  14. Computer-aided detection of basal cell carcinoma through blood content analysis in dermoscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharazmi, Pegah; Kalia, Sunil; Lui, Harvey; Wang, Z. Jane; Lee, Tim K.

    2018-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer, which is highly damaging to the skin at its advanced stages and causes huge costs on the healthcare system. However, most types of BCC are easily curable if detected at early stage. Due to limited access to dermatologists and expert physicians, non-invasive computer-aided diagnosis is a viable option for skin cancer screening. A clinical biomarker of cancerous tumors is increased vascularization and excess blood flow. In this paper, we present a computer-aided technique to differentiate cancerous skin tumors from benign lesions based on vascular characteristics of the lesions. Dermoscopy image of the lesion is first decomposed using independent component analysis of the RGB channels to derive melanin and hemoglobin maps. A novel set of clinically inspired features and ratiometric measurements are then extracted from each map to characterize the vascular properties and blood content of the lesion. The feature set is then fed into a random forest classifier. Over a dataset of 664 skin lesions, the proposed method achieved an area under ROC curve of 0.832 in a 10-fold cross validation for differentiating basal cell carcinomas from benign lesions.

  15. Transport of nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier for imaging and therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Malka; Motiei, Menachem; Hana, Panet; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2014-01-01

    A critical problem in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, is the incapability to overcome the restrictive mechanism of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to deliver important therapeutic agents to the brain. During the last decade, nanoparticles have gained attention as promising drug delivery agents that can transport across the BBB and increase the uptake of appropriate drugs in the brain. In this study we have developed insulin-targeted gold nanoparticles (INS-GNPs) and investigated quantitatively the amount of INS-GNPs that cross the BBB by the receptor-mediated endocytosis process. For this purpose, INS-GNPs and control GNPs were injected into the tail vein of male BALB/c mice. Major organs were then extracted and a blood sample was taken from the mice, and thereafter analyzed for gold content by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results show that two hours post-intravenous injection, the amount of INS-GNPs found in mouse brains is over 5 times greater than that of the control, untargeted GNPs. Results of further experimentation on a rat model show that INS-GNPs can also serve as CT contrast agents to highlight specific brain regions in which they accumulate. Due to the fact that they can overcome the restrictive mechanism of the BBB, this approach could be a potentially valuable tool, helping to confront the great challenge of delivering important imaging and therapeutic agents to the brain for detection and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and diseases.

  16. Vertigo-related cerebral blood flow changes on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feiyan; Li, Zhongshi; Xie, Sheng; Liu, Hui; Wang, Wu

    2014-11-01

    A prospective study using magnetic resonance imaging on a consecutive cohort of patients with cervical vertigo. To quantitatively investigate the cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with cervical vertigo by using 3-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling. Previous studies reported blood flow velocity reduction in posterior circulation during vertigo. However, the detailed information of CBF related to cervical vertigo has not been provided. A total of 33 patients with cervical vertigo and 14 healthy volunteers were recruited in this study. Three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling was performed on each subject to evaluate the CBF before and after the cervical hyperextension-hyperflexion movement tests, which was used to induce cervical vertigo. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to assess the effect of subjects and tests. There were time effects of CBF in the territory of bilateral superior cerebellar artery, bilateral posterior cerebral artery, bilateral middle cerebral artery, and right anterior cerebral artery, but no group effect was observed. The analysis of CBF revealed a significant main effect of tests (P=0.024) and participants (P=0.038) in the dorsal pons. Cervical vertigo onset may be related to CBF reduction in the dorsal pons, which sequentially evokes the vestibular nuclei. 2.

  17. Quantitative phase imaging characterization of tumor-associated blood vessel formation on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Huang, Jing; Moses, Marsha A.

    2018-02-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing ones, is a biological process that has an essential role in solid tumor growth, development, and progression. Recent advances in Lab-on-a-Chip technology has created an opportunity for scientists to observe endothelial cell (EC) behaviors during the dynamic process of angiogenesis using a simple and economical in vitro platform that recapitulates in vivo blood vessel formation. Here, we use quantitative phase imaging (QPI) microscopy to continuously and non-invasively characterize the dynamic process of tumor cell-induced angiogenic sprout formation on a microfluidic chip. The live tumor cell-induced angiogenic sprouts are generated by multicellular endothelial sprouting into 3 dimensional (3D) Matrigel using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By using QPI, we quantitatively measure a panel of cellular morphological and behavioral parameters of each individual EC participating in this sprouting. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate that QPI is a powerful tool that can provide real-time quantitative analysis of biological processes in in vitro 3D biomimetic devices, which, in turn, can improve our understanding of the biology underlying functional tissue engineering.

  18. Blood Vessel Extraction in Color Retinal Fundus Images with Enhancement Filtering and Unsupervised Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal blood vessels have a significant role in the diagnosis and treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, arteriosclerosis, and hypertension. For this reason, retinal vasculature extraction is important in order to help specialists for the diagnosis and treatment of systematic diseases. In this paper, a novel approach is developed to extract retinal blood vessel network. Our method comprises four stages: (1 preprocessing stage in order to prepare dataset for segmentation; (2 an enhancement procedure including Gabor, Frangi, and Gauss filters obtained separately before a top-hat transform; (3 a hard and soft clustering stage which includes K-means and Fuzzy C-means (FCM in order to get binary vessel map; and (4 a postprocessing step which removes falsely segmented isolated regions. The method is tested on color retinal images obtained from STARE and DRIVE databases which are available online. As a result, Gabor filter followed by K-means clustering method achieves 95.94% and 95.71% of accuracy for STARE and DRIVE databases, respectively, which are acceptable for diagnosis systems.

  19. A neutral lipophilic technetium-99m complex for regional cerebral blood flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narra, R.K.; Nunn, A.D.; Kuczynski, B.L.; DiRocco, R.J.; Feld, T.; Silva, D.A.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Technetium-99m-DMG-2MP (Chloro[bis[2,3-butanedionedioxime(1-)-0][2,3- butanedionedioximato (2-)-N,N',N double-prime,N'double-prime,N double-prime double-prime,N'double-prime double-prime] (2-methylpropyl borato (2-))technetium]), also known as SQ 32097 is a member of a family of neutral lipophilic compounds generally known as boronic acid adducts of technetium dioxime complexes (BATOs). After i.v. administration, the concentration of [ 99m Tc]DMG-2MP in various regions of the brain appears to be proportional to blood flow. In rats, 1.1% ID was in the brain at 5 min postinjection when the blood contained less than 3% ID. Over 24 hr excretion was 59% in the feces and 23% in the urine. The activity in monkey brain at 5 min was 2.8% ID and it cleared with a t1/2 of 86 min. Autoradiographs of monkey brain sections showed excellent regional detail with a gray/white ratio of 3.6 at 10 min. The distribution of [ 99m Tc]DMG-2MP in the monkey brain corresponds to the known cytoarchitectural pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism. The properties of [ 99m Tc]DMG-2MP make it a potentially useful agent for cerebral perfusion imaging in man

  20. Measurement of renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging during septic acute kidney injury: a pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowle, John R; Molan, Maurice P; Hornsey, Emma; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2012-06-01

    In septic patients, decreased renal perfusion is considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury. However, the accurate measurement of renal blood flow in such patients is problematic and invasive. We sought to overcome such obstacles by measuring renal blood flow in septic patients with acute kidney injury using cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Pilot observational study. University-affiliated general adult intensive care unit. Ten adult patients with established septic acute kidney injury and 11 normal volunteers. Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging measurement of renal blood flow and cardiac output. The median age of the study patients was 62.5 yrs and eight were male. At the time of magnetic resonance imaging, eight patients were mechanically ventilated, nine were on continuous hemofiltration, and five required vasopressors. Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging examinations were carried out without complication. Median renal blood flow was 482 mL/min (range 335-1137) in septic acute kidney injury and 1260 mL/min (range 791-1750) in healthy controls (p = .003). Renal blood flow indexed to body surface area was 244 mL/min/m2 (range 165-662) in septic acute kidney injury and 525 mL/min/m2 (range 438-869) in controls (p = .004). In patients with septic acute kidney injury, median cardiac index was 3.5 L/min/m2 (range 1.6-8.7), and median renal fraction of cardiac output was only 7.1% (range 4.4-10.8). There was no rank correlation between renal blood flow index and creatinine clearance in patients with septic acute kidney injury (r = .26, p = .45). Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging can be used to noninvasively and safely assess renal perfusion during critical illness in man. Near-simultaneous accurate measurement of cardiac output enables organ blood flow to be assessed in the context of the global circulation. Renal blood flow seems consistently reduced as a fraction of cardiac output in

  1. Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI for combined imaging of blood-brain barrier break down and increased blood volume in brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Chan, Kannie W Y; Knutsson, Linda; Artemov, Dmitri; Xu, Jiadi; Liu, Guanshu; Kato, Yoshinori; Lal, Bachchu; Laterra, John; McMahon, Michael T; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2015-12-01

    Recently, natural d-glucose was suggested as a potential biodegradable contrast agent. The feasibility of using d-glucose for dynamic perfusion imaging was explored to detect malignant brain tumors based on blood brain barrier breakdown. Mice were inoculated orthotopically with human U87-EGFRvIII glioma cells. Time-resolved glucose signal changes were detected using chemical exchange saturation transfer (glucoCEST) MRI. Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI was used to measure tissue response to an intravenous bolus of d-glucose. DGE images of mouse brains bearing human glioma showed two times higher and persistent changes in tumor compared with contralateral brain. Area-under-curve (AUC) analysis of DGE delineated blood vessels and tumor and had contrast comparable to the AUC determined using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI with GdDTPA, both showing a significantly higher AUC in tumor than in brain (P blood volume and permeability with respect to normal brain. We expect DGE will provide a low-risk and less expensive alternative to DCE MRI for imaging cancer in vulnerable populations, such as children and patients with renal impairment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) of keratinocytes, blood vessels and nerves in hairless mouse skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUSSAU, L. J.; VO, L. T.; DELANEY, P. M.; PAPWORTH, G. D.; BARKLA, D. H.; KING, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    Fibre optic confocal imaging (FOCI) enabled subsurface fluorescence microscopy of the skin of hairless mice in vivo. Application of acridine orange enabled imaging of the layers of the epidermis. The corneocytes of the stratum corneum, the keratinocytes in the basal layers and redundant hair follicles were visualised at depths greater than 100 μm. Cellular and nuclear membranes of keratinocytes of the skin were visualised by the use of acridine orange and DIOC5(3). Imaging of the skin after injection of FITC-dextran revealed an extensive network of blood vessels with a size range up to 20 μm. Blood cells could be seen moving through dermal vessels and the blood circulation through the dermal vascular bed was video-taped. The fluorescent dye 4-di-2-ASP showed the presence of nerves fibres around the hair follicles and subsurface blood vessels. Comparison was made between images obtained in vivo using FOCI and in vitro scanning electron microscopy and conventional histology. FOCI offers the potential to study dynamic events in vivo, such as blood flow, skin growth, nerve regeneration and many pathological processes, in ways which have not previously been possible. PMID:9643419

  3. Quantitative myocardial blood flow imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kero, Tanja; Nordström, Jonny; Harms, Hendrik J; Sörensen, Jens; Ahlström, Håkan; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The use of integrated PET-MR offers new opportunities for comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function. However, little is known on the quantitative accuracy of cardiac PET imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR. The aim of the present work was to validate the GE Signa PET-MR scanner for quantitative cardiac PET perfusion imaging. Eleven patients (nine male; mean age 59 years; range 46-74 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent 15 O-water PET scans at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia on a GE Discovery ST PET-CT and a GE Signa PET-MR scanner. PET-MR images were reconstructed using settings recommended by the manufacturer, including time-of-flight (TOF). Data were analysed semi-automatically using Cardiac VUer software, resulting in both parametric myocardial blood flow (MBF) images and segment-based MBF values. Correlation and agreement between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based MBF values for all three coronary artery territories were assessed using regression analysis and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to the cardiac PET-MR reconstruction protocol as recommended by the manufacturer, comparisons were made using a PET-CT resolution-matched reconstruction protocol both without and with TOF to assess the effect of time-of-flight and reconstruction parameters on quantitative MBF values. Stress MBF data from one patient was excluded due to movement during the PET-CT scanning. Mean MBF values at rest and stress were (0.92 ± 0.12) and (2.74 ± 1.37) mL/g/min for PET-CT and (0.90 ± 0.23) and (2.65 ± 1.15) mL/g/min for PET-MR (p = 0.33 and p = 0.74). ICC between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based regional MBF was 0.98. Image quality was improved with PET-MR as compared to PET-CT. ICC between PET-MR-based regional MBF with and without TOF and using different filter and reconstruction settings was 1.00. PET-MR-based MBF values correlated well with PET-CT-based MBF values and

  4. Information content of the space-frequency filtering of blood plasma layers laser images in the diagnosis of pathological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, A. G.; Boychuk, T. M.; Mincer, O. P.; Bodnar, G. B.; Kushnerick, L. Ya.; Savich, V. O.

    2013-12-01

    The bases of method of the space-frequency of the filtering phase allocation of blood plasma pellicle are given here. The model of the optical-anisotropic properties of the albumen chain of blood plasma pellicle with regard to linear and circular double refraction of albumen and globulin crystals is proposed. Comparative researches of the effectiveness of methods of the direct polarized mapping of the azimuth images of blood plasma pcllicle layers and space-frequency polarimetry of the laser radiation transformed by divaricate and holelikc optical-anisotropic chains of blood plasma pellicles were held. On the basis of the complex statistic, correlative and fracta.1 analysis of the filtered frcquencydimensional polarizing azimuth maps of the blood plasma pellicles structure a set of criteria of the change of the double refraction of the albumen chains caused by the prostate cancer was traced and proved.

  5. An Intelligent Decision Support System for Leukaemia Diagnosis using Microscopic Blood Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin Neoh, Siew; Srisukkham, Worawut; Zhang, Li; Todryk, Stephen; Greystoke, Brigit; Peng Lim, Chee; Alamgir Hossain, Mohammed; Aslam, Nauman

    2015-01-01

    This research proposes an intelligent decision support system for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia diagnosis from microscopic blood images. A novel clustering algorithm with stimulating discriminant measures (SDM) of both within- and between-cluster scatter variances is proposed to produce robust segmentation of nucleus and cytoplasm of lymphocytes/lymphoblasts. Specifically, the proposed between-cluster evaluation is formulated based on the trade-off of several between-cluster measures of well-known feature extraction methods. The SDM measures are used in conjuction with Genetic Algorithm for clustering nucleus, cytoplasm, and background regions. Subsequently, a total of eighty features consisting of shape, texture, and colour information of the nucleus and cytoplasm sub-images are extracted. A number of classifiers (multi-layer perceptron, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Dempster-Shafer ensemble) are employed for lymphocyte/lymphoblast classification. Evaluated with the ALL-IDB2 database, the proposed SDM-based clustering overcomes the shortcomings of Fuzzy C-means which focuses purely on within-cluster scatter variance. It also outperforms Linear Discriminant Analysis and Fuzzy Compactness and Separation for nucleus-cytoplasm separation. The overall system achieves superior recognition rates of 96.72% and 96.67% accuracies using bootstrapping and 10-fold cross validation with Dempster-Shafer and SVM, respectively. The results also compare favourably with those reported in the literature, indicating the usefulness of the proposed SDM-based clustering method. PMID:26450665

  6. Evaluation of carotid stenosis with axial high-resolution black-blood MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U-King-Im, Jean M.; Trivedi, Rikin A.; Sala, Evis; Graves, Martin J.; Gaskarth, Mathew; Higgins, Nicholas J.; Cross, Justin C.; Coulden, Richard A.; Antoun, Nagui M.; Gillard, Jonathan H. [University Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hollingworth, William [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 98103, Seattle, WA (United States); Kirkpatrick, Peter J. [Academic Department of Neurosurgery, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, CB2 2QQ, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    High-resolution axial black-blood MR imaging (BB MRI) has been shown to be able to characterise carotid plaque morphology. The aim of this study was to explore the accuracy of this technique in quantifying the severity of carotid stenosis. A prospective study of 54 patients with symptomatic carotid disease was conducted, comparing BB MRI to the gold standard, conventional digital subtraction X-ray angiography (DSA). The BB MRI sequence was a fast-spin echo acquisition (TE=42 ms, ETL=24, field of view = 100 x 100 mm, slice thickness = 3.0 mm) at 1.5 T using a custom-built phased-array coil. Linear measurements of luminal and outer carotid wall diameter were made directly from the axial BB MRI slices by three independent blinded readers and stenosis was calculated according to European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST) criteria. There was good agreement between BB MRI and DSA (intraclass correlation = 0.83). Inter-observer agreement was good (average kappa = 0.77). BB MRI was accurate for detection of severe stenosis ({>=}80%) with sensitivity and specificity of 87 and 81%, respectively. Eight cases of ''DSA-defined'' moderate stenosis were overestimated as severe by BB MRI and this may be related to non-circular lumens. Axial imaging with BB MRI could potentially be used to provide useful information about severity of carotid stenosis. (orig.)

  7. Remote spectral measurements of the blood volume pulse with applications for imaging photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.; McDuff, Daniel J.

    2018-02-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography uses camera image sensors to measure variations in light absorption related to the delivery of the blood volume pulse to peripheral tissues. The characteristics of the measured BVP waveform depends on the spectral absorption of various tissue components including melanin, hemoglobin, water, and yellow pigments. Signal quality and artifact rejection can be enhanced by taking into account the spectral properties of the BVP waveform and surrounding tissue. The current literature regarding the spectral relationships of remote PPG is limited. To supplement this fundamental data, we present an analysis of remotely-measured, visible and near-infrared spectroscopy to better understand the spectral signature of remotely measured BVP signals. To do so, spectra were measured from the right cheek of 25, stationary participants whose heads were stabilized by a chinrest. A collimating lens was used to collect reflected light from a region of 3 cm in diameter. The spectrometer provided 3 nm resolution measurements from 500-1000 nm. Measurements were acquired at a rate of 50 complete spectra per second for a period of five minutes. Reference physiology, including electrocardiography was simultaneously and synchronously acquired. The spectral data were analyzed to determine the relationship between light wavelength and the resulting remote-BVP signal-to-noise ratio and to identify those bands best suited for pulse rate measurement. To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive dataset of remotely-measured spectral iPPG data. In due course, we plan to release this dataset for research purposes.

  8. Cerebral blood volume imaging by flat detector computed tomography in comparison to conventional multislice perfusion CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struffert, Tobias; Kloska, Stephan; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Boese, Jan; Zellerhoff, Michael; Schwab, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Flat Detector computed tomography (FD-CT) with intravenous contrast medium would allow the calculation of whole brain cerebral blood volume (CBV) mapping (FD-CBV) and would correlate with multislice Perfusion CT (PCT). Twenty five patients were investigated with FD-CBV and PCT. Correlation of the CBV maps of both techniques was carried out with measurements from six anatomical regions from both sides of the brain. Mean values of each region and the correlation coefficient were calculated. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to compare the two different imaging techniques. The image and data quality of both PCT and FD-CBV were suitable for evaluation in all patients. The mean CBV values of FD-CBV and PCT showed only minimal differences with overlapping standard deviation. The correlation coefficient was 0.79 (p < 0.01). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -0.077 ± 0.48 ml/100 g between FD-CBV and PCT CBV measurements, indicating that FD-CBV values were only slightly lower than those of PCT. CBV mapping with intravenous contrast medium using Flat Detector CT compared favourably with multislice PCT. The ability to assess cerebral perfusion within the angiographic suite may improve the management of ischaemic stroke and evaluation of the efficacy of dedicated therapies. (orig.)

  9. Quantification of regional cerebral blood flow and volume with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempp, K A; Brix, G; Wenz, F; Becker, C R; Gückel, F; Lorenz, W J

    1994-12-01

    Quantification of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and volume (rCBV) with dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. After bolus administration of a paramagnetic contrast medium, rapid T2*-weighted gradient-echo images of two sections were acquired for the simultaneous creation of concentration-time curves in the brain-feeding arteries and in brain tissue. Absolute rCBF and rCBV values were determined for gray and white brain matter in 12 subjects with use of principles of the indicator dilution theory. The mean rCBF value in gray matter was 69.7 mL/min +/- 29.7 per 100 g tissue and in white matter, 33.6 mL/min +/- 11.5 per 100 g tissue; the average rCBV was 8.0 mL +/- 3.1 per 100 g tissue and 4.2 mL +/- 1.0 per 100 g tissue, respectively. An age-related decrease in rCBF and rCBV for gray and white matter was observed. Preliminary data demonstrate that the proposed technique allows the quantification of rCBF and rCBV. Although the results are in good agreement with data from positron emission tomography studies, further evaluation is needed to establish the validity of method.

  10. Simultaneous imaging of cerebral partial pressure of oxygen and blood flow during functional activation and cortical spreading depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakadžić, Sava; Yuan, Shuai; Dilekoz, Ergin; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Ayata, Cenk; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a novel imaging technique that provides real-time two-dimensional maps of the absolute partial pressure of oxygen and relative cerebral blood flow in rats by combining phosphorescence lifetime imaging with laser speckle contrast imaging. Direct measurement of blood oxygenation based on phosphorescence lifetime is not significantly affected by changes in the optical parameters of the tissue during the experiment. The potential of the system as a novel tool for quantitative analysis of the dynamic delivery of oxygen to support brain metabolism was demonstrated in rats by imaging cortical responses to forepaw stimulation and the propagation of cortical spreading depression waves. This new instrument will enable further study of neurovascular coupling in normal and diseased brain. PMID:19340106

  11. Noninvasive measurement of renal blood flow by magnetic resonance imaging in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Cesar A; Cabral, Glauber; Knight, Robert A; Ding, Guangliang; Peterson, Edward L; Carretero, Oscar A

    2018-01-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) provides important information regarding renal physiology and nephropathies. Arterial spin labeling-magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) is a noninvasive method of measuring blood flow without exogenous contrast media. However, low signal-to-noise ratio and respiratory motion artifacts are challenges for RBF measurements in small animals. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of RBF measurements by ASL-MRI using respiratory-gating and navigator correction methods to reduce motion artifacts. ASL-MRI images were obtained from the kidneys of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats on a 7-Tesla Varian MRI system with a spin-echo imaging sequence. After 4 days, the study was repeated to evaluate its reproducibility. RBF was also measured in animals under unilateral nephrectomy and in renal artery stenosis (RST) to evaluate the sensitivity in high and low RBF models, respectively. RBF was also evaluated in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR). In SD rats, the cortical RBFs (cRBF) were 305 ± 59 and 271.8 ± 39 ml·min -1 ·100 g tissue -1 in the right and left kidneys, respectively. Retest analysis revealed no differences ( P = 0.2). The test-retest reliability coefficient was 92 ± 5%. The cRBFs before and after the nephrectomy were 296.8 ± 30 and 428.2 ± 45 ml·min -1 ·100 g tissue -1 ( P = 0.02), respectively. The kidneys with RST exhibited a cRBF decrease compared with sham animals (86 ± 17.6 vs. 198 ± 33.7 ml·min -1 ·100 g tissue -1 ; P < 0.01). The cRBFs in SD, Dahl-SS, and SHR rats were not different ( P = 0.35). We conclude that ASL-MRI performed with navigator correction and respiratory gating is a feasible and reliable noninvasive method for measuring RBF in rats.

  12. Dark blood versus bright blood T2* acquisition in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for thalassaemia major (TM) patients: Evaluation of feasibility, reproducibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Carlo, E-mail: c.liguori@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Di Giampietro, Ilenia; Pitocco, Francesca; De Vivo, Aldo Eros [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Schena, Emiliano [Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Mortato, Luca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Pirro, Federica [Department of Biomaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of Sacred Herart, Largo A. Gemelli 1, 00135 Rome (Italy); Cianciulli, Paolo [Thalassemia Unit, Ospedale Sant Eugenio, Piazzale dell’Umanesimo 10, 00143 Rome (Italy); Zobel, Bruno Beomonte [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of dark blood (DB) versus bright blood (BB) sequences. To assess the intra and inter-observer variability and inter-study reproducibility between BB versus DB. To evaluate image quality level in the two sequences. Methods: In a setting of 138 patients we performed CMR using cardiac gated Gradient-multiecho single breath-hold BB and DB sequences in the middle ventricular septum. Each acquisition was repeated during the same exam. Truncation method was used to account for background noise. Image quality (IQ) was assessed using a 5 point grading scale and image analysis was conducted by 2 experienced observers. Results: Compared with the conventional BB acquisition, the coefficient of correlation and significance of the DB technique was superior for intra-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001), inter-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001) and inter-study reproducibility (p < 0.001). The variability is also lower for DB sequences for T2* values <14 ms. Assessment of artifacts showed a superior score for DB versus BB scans (4 versus 3, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Improvement in terms of inter observer and inter study variability using DB sequences was obtained. The greatest disparity between them was seen in inter-study reproducibility and higher IQ in DB was seen. Study demonstrates better performance of DB imaging compared to BB in presence of comparable effectiveness.

  13. Gated blood pool imaging in the diagnosis and management of arrhythmia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Kawai, Naoki; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Matsushima, Hideo; Kato, Rinya; Sotobata, Iwao; Tanahashi, Yoshibumi.

    1985-01-01

    The usefulness of multigated cardiac blood pool imaging in evaluating left ventricular function and ventricular activation was studied in patients with cardiac arrhythmias. Subjects consisted of 12 patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome; 20 with ventricular premature contractions (VPC); 21 with various modes of artificial pacemakers; and two normal controls. 1. Phase analysis was useful in localizing the bypass tract in patients with the WPW syndrome. In four patients with the WPW syndrome and five with VVI pacing, the phase difference between the posterolateral wall of the left ventricle (LV) and the right ventricular apex correlated significantly with the activation time difference between these two regions as assessed by endocardial electrograms (r = 0.94, p < 0.001). 2. Images of VPC were obtained using the bad beat rejection program in an ADAC computer system. The origin of VPCs evaluated by phase image coincided with results of standard 12-lead electrograms. 3. The LV ejection fraction (LVEF) decreased significantly (p < 0.001) after the injection of lidocaine (-3.7 %) or disopyramide (-6.2 %). The percent reduction in LVEF was significantly greater with disopyramide than with lidocaine (-15.1 vs -11.2 %). There was a significant correlation between the percent reduction in LVEF and the disopyramide plasma concentrations (r = -0.62, p < 0.001). 4. The influence of the pacing mode and exercise on LV function was studied in 21 patients with artificial pacemakers. In the VDD and DDD modes, end-diastolic volume (EDV) and cardiac output (CO) decreased after converting to VVI mode. CO increased markedly to approximately 250 % of the control value in the VDD and DDD, and moderately in the VVI and AAI modes during ergometer exercise. (J.P.N.)

  14. Micro-PIV (micro particle image velocimetry) visualization of red blood cells (RBCs) sucked by a female mosquito

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, K; Mochizuki, O

    2011-01-01

    A mosquito's pump is a highly effective system in the small suction domain. To understand a mosquito's blood suction mechanism, we analysed the characteristics of red blood cells (RBCs) in human blood during and after suction by a female mosquito. Focussing on the flow patterns of the RBCs in human blood being sucked by a mosquito, we visualized blood flow by using a micro-particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) system, which combines an optical microscope and a PIV method. In an ex vivo experiment, a female mosquito was supplied diluted blood at the tip of the proboscis. We examined the blood flow around the tip of the proboscis and observed that RBCs were periodically sucked towards a hole around the tip. The sucked RBCs then homogeneously flowed parallel to the inner surface of the proboscis without adhering to the wall. Furthermore, using a bioelectric recording system, we directly measured electrical signals generated during suction by the pump muscles located in the mosquito's head. We found that the electrical signal power was synchronized with the acceleration of the RBCs in the sucking phase. A histological stain method was adapted for the observation of the form and internal structure of RBCs in the mosquito. Although the blood flow analysis revealed that the RBCs underwent shear stress during suction, RBCs in the mosquito's stomach maintained their original shape

  15. A new 99mTc-red blood cell labeling procedure for cardiac blood pool imaging: Clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelbaek, H.; Buelow, K.; Aldershvile, J.; Moegelyang, J.; Nielsen, S.L.; Copenhagen Univ.

    1989-01-01

    The first clinical results of a new 99m Tc-red blood cell labeling procedure avoiding cell centrifugation are presented. One ml heparinized blood samples were incubated with small amounts of a stannous kit. By titration studies, ideal quantities of sodium hypochlorite for oxidation of extracellular tin and of EDTA as stabilizer of the label were found. The Cl - concentration and pH of the labeled blood were acceptable, and EDTA increased labeling yield and stability determined in vitro by a few percent. The new procedure gave a slightly higher labeling yield than a current technique using centrifugation of cells. Labeling efficiency expressed as cell bound/total activity was 96.6%±1.3% in healthy subjects and 95.5%±2.2% in cardiac patients and remained high for 2 h after reinjection. The biological halflife of labeled cells following the new procedure was 11-12 h rendering it suitable for serial determinations of radionuclide cardiography. (orig.)

  16. Time-resolved blood flow measurement in the in vivo mouse model by optical frequency domain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Julia; Mueller, Gregor; Meissner, Sven; Cimalla, Peter; Homann, Hanno; Morawietz, Henning; Koch, Edmund

    2009-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that phase-resolved Doppler optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is very suitable to quantify the pulsatile blood flow within a vasodynamic measurement in the in vivo mouse model. For this, an OFDI-system with a read-out rate of 20 kHz and a center wavelength of 1320 nm has been used to image the time-resolved murine blood flow in 300 μμm vessels. Because OFDI is less sensitive to fringe washout due to axial sample motion, it is applied to analyze the blood flow velocities and the vascular dynamics in six-week-old C57BL/6 mice compared to one of the LDLR knockout strain kept under sedentary conditions or with access to voluntary wheel running. We have shown that the systolic as well as the diastolic phase of the pulsatile arterial blood flow can be well identified at each vasodynamic state. Furthermore, the changes of the flow velocities after vasoconstriction and -dilation were presented and interpreted in the entire physiological context. With this, the combined measurement of time-resolved blood flow and vessel diameter provides the basis to analyze the vascular function and its influence on the blood flow of small arteries of different mouse strains in response to different life styles.

  17. In-vivo imaging of blood flow in human retinal vessels using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    1999-04-01

    Quantification of retinal blood flow may lead to a better understanding of the progression and treatment of several ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age- related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Current techniques, such as fluorescein angiography and laser Doppler velocimetry are limited, failing to provide sufficient information to the clinician. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is a novel technique using coherent heterodyne detection for simultaneous cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure and blood flow. This technique is capable of high spatial and velocity resolution imaging in highly scattering media. We implemented CDOCT for retinal blood flow mapping in human subjects. No dilation of the pupil was necessary. CDOCT is demonstrated for determining bidirectional flow in sub- 100micrometers diameter vessels in the retina. Additionally, we calculated Doppler broadening using the variance of depth- resolved spectra to identify regions with large velocity gradients within the Xenopus heart. This technique may be useful in quantifying local tissue perfusion in highly vascular retinal tissue.

  18. Noninvasive, low-noise, fast imaging of blood volume and deoxygenation changes in muscles using light-emitting diode continuous-wave imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuanqing; Lech, Gwen; Nioka, Shoko; Intes, Xavier; Chance, Britton

    2002-08-01

    This article focuses on optimizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a three-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) near-infrared continuous-wave (cw) imager and its application to in vivo muscle metabolism measurement. The shot-noise limited SNR is derived and calculated to be 2 x104 for the physiological blood concentrations of muscle. Aiming at shot-noise limited SNR performance and fast imaging, we utilize sample and hold circuits to reduce high-frequency noise. These circuits have also been designed to be parallel integrating, through which SNR of 2 x103 and 2 Hz imaging acquisition rate have been achieved when the probe is placed on a muscle model. The noise corresponds to 2 x10-4 optical density error, which suggests an in vitro resolution of 15. 4 nM blood volume and 46.8 nM deoxygenation changes. A 48 dB digital gain control circuit with 256 steps is employed to enlarge the dynamic range of the imager. We utilize cuff ischemia as a living model demonstration and its results are reported. The instrument is applied during exercise to measure the changes of blood volume and deoxygenation, which provides important information about muscle metabolism. We find that the primary source of noise encountered during exercise experiment is from the random motion of muscle. The results demonstrate that the LED cw imager is ideal for the noninvasive study of muscle metabolism.

  19. Repeatability of regional myocardial blood flow calculation in 82Rb PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knešaurek, Karin; Machac, Josef; Zhang, Zhuangyu

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the repeatability of the calculation of myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest and pharmacological stress, and calculated the coronary flow reserve (CFR) utilizing 82 Rb PET imaging. The aim of the research was to prove high repeatability for global MBF and CFR values and good repeatability for regional MBF and CFR values. The results will have significant impact on cardiac PET imaging in terms of making it more affordable and increasing its use. 12 normal volunteers were imaged at rest and during pharmacological stress, with 2220 MBq of 82 Rb each. A GE Advance PET system was used to acquire dynamic 50-frame studies. MBF was calculated with a 2-compartmental model using a modified PMOD program (PMOD; University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland). Two differential equations, describing a 2-compartmental model, were solved by numerical integration and using Levenberg-Marquardt's method for fitting data. The PMOD program defines 16 standard segments and calculates myocardial flow for each segment, as well as average septal, anterior, lateral, inferior and global flow. Repeatability was evaluated according to the method of Bland and Altman. Global rest and stress MBF, as well as global CFR, showed very good repeatability. No significant differences were found between the paired resting global MBF (0.63 ± 0.13 vs. 0.64 ± 0.13 mL/min/g; mean difference, -1.0% ± 2.6%) and the stress global MBF (1.37 ± 0.23 vs. 1.37 ± 0.24; mean difference, 0.1% ± 2.3%). Global CFR was highly reproducible (2.25 ± 0.56 vs. 2.22 ± 0.54, P = not statistically significant; mean difference, 1.3% ± 14.3%). Repeatability coefficients for global rest MBF were 0.033 (5.2%) and stress MBF 0.062 (4.5%) mL/min/g. Regional rest and stress MBF and CFR have shown good reproducibility. The average per sector repeatability coefficients for rest MBF were 0.056 (8.5%) and stress MBF 0.089 (6.3%) mL/min/g, and average repeatability coefficient for CFR was 0.25 (10.6%). The results

  20. Rouleaux red blood cells splitting in microscopic thin blood smear images via local maxima, circles drawing, and mapping with original RBCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Amjad; Abbas, Naveed; Saba, Tanzila; Mahmood, Toqeer; Kolivand, Hoshang

    2018-04-10

    Splitting the rouleaux RBCs from single RBCs and its further subdivision is a challenging area in computer-assisted diagnosis of blood. This phenomenon is applied in complete blood count, anemia, leukemia, and malaria tests. Several automated techniques are reported in the state of art for this task but face either under or over splitting problems. The current research presents a novel approach to split Rouleaux red blood cells (chains of RBCs) precisely, which are frequently observed in the thin blood smear images. Accordingly, this research address the rouleaux splitting problem in a realistic, efficient and automated way by considering the distance transform and local maxima of the rouleaux RBCs. Rouleaux RBCs are splitted by taking their local maxima as the centres to draw circles by mid-point circle algorithm. The resulting circles are further mapped with single RBC in Rouleaux to preserve its original shape. The results of the proposed approach on standard data set are presented and analyzed statistically by achieving an average recall of 0.059, an average precision of 0.067 and F-measure 0.063 are achieved through ground truth with visual inspection. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Dynamic Glucose Enhanced (DGE) MRI for Combined Imaging of Blood Brain Barrier Break Down and Increased Blood Volume in Brain Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Chan, Kannie WY; Knutsson, Linda; Artemov, Dmitri; Xu, Jiadi; Liu, Guanshu; Kato, Yoshinori; Lal, Bachchu; Laterra, John; McMahon, Michael T.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently, natural d-glucose was suggested as a potential biodegradable contrast agent. The feasibility of using d-glucose for dynamic perfusion imaging was explored to detect malignant brain tumors based on blood brain barrier breakdown. Methods Mice were inoculated orthotopically with human U87-EGFRvIII glioma cells. Time-resolved glucose signal changes were detected using chemical exchange saturation transfer (glucoCEST) MRI. Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI was used to measure tissue response to an intravenous bolus of d-glucose. Results DGE images of mouse brains bearing human glioma showed two times higher and persistent changes in tumor compared to contralateral brain. Area-under-curve (AUC) analysis of DGE delineated blood vessels and tumor and had contrast comparable to the AUC determined using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI with GdDTPA, both showing a significantly higher AUC in tumor than in brain (pblood volume and permeability with respect to normal brain. We expect DGE will provide a low-risk and less expensive alternative to DCE MRI for imaging cancer in vulnerable populations, such as children and patients with renal impairment. PMID:26404120

  2. Usage of CO2 microbubbles as flow-tracing contrast media in X-ray dynamic imaging of blood flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Park, Han Wook; Jung, Sung Yong

    2014-09-01

    X-ray imaging techniques have been employed to visualize various biofluid flow phenomena in a non-destructive manner. X-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV) was developed to measure velocity fields of blood flows to obtain hemodynamic information. A time-resolved X-ray PIV technique that is capable of measuring the velocity fields of blood flows under real physiological conditions was recently developed. However, technical limitations still remained in the measurement of blood flows with high image contrast and sufficient biocapability. In this study, CO2 microbubbles as flow-tracing contrast media for X-ray PIV measurements of biofluid flows was developed. Human serum albumin and CO2 gas were mechanically agitated to fabricate CO2 microbubbles. The optimal fabricating conditions of CO2 microbubbles were found by comparing the size and amount of microbubbles fabricated under various operating conditions. The average size and quantity of CO2 microbubbles were measured by using a synchrotron X-ray imaging technique with a high spatial resolution. The quantity and size of the fabricated microbubbles decrease with increasing speed and operation time of the mechanical agitation. The feasibility of CO2 microbubbles as a flow-tracing contrast media was checked for a 40% hematocrit blood flow. Particle images of the blood flow were consecutively captured by the time-resolved X-ray PIV system to obtain velocity field information of the flow. The experimental results were compared with a theoretically amassed velocity profile. Results show that the CO2 microbubbles can be used as effective flow-tracing contrast media in X-ray PIV experiments.

  3. Advance prediction of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using 99mTc-ECD SPECT brain blood flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Yohsuke

    2008-01-01

    Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is considered as a precursor state of Alzheimer disease (AD). Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain blood flow imaging was investigated in MCI and it's relevance to the prognosis of MCI was evaluated in an attempt define the characteristics of brain blood flow imaging of MCI (amnestic MCI; aMCI) converting to AD. Ninety-two patients over 60 years old with amnesia were studied. 99m Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT brain blood flow examinations of the subject under drug-free conditions were conducted and imaging was analyzed according to the first clinical diagnosis. Patients given a diagnosis of MCI on the first clinical diagnosis, were examined again after 2 years and the SPECT imaging before 2 years previously was classified and analyzed. Of them, there were 35 MCI patients, converting of 13 AD patients (37.1%; aMCI), 10 MCI patients (28.6%; non-converter), 4 depression patients (11.4%; Depression type MCI (dMCI)), 1 Geriatric psychosis patient, but 7 patients dropped out. In the aMCI group, relative hypoperfusion was recognized in the posterior cingulate and the precuneus. In the dMCI group, relative hypoperfusion was recognized in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the anterior cingulate. In the non-converter group, relative hypoperfusion was recognized in the basal forebrain. The hypoperfusion of the precuneus in aMCI, and the hypoperfusion of the right frontal lobe (DLPFC, dorsal-anterior cingulate) in dMCI were characteristic brain blood-flow abnormalities. We believe 99m Tc-ECD SPECT brain blood flow imaging to be useful in the diagnosis of aMCI and in the early detection of depression. (author)

  4. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2-M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists.

  5. Perception of body image of adolescents and of their parents in relation to the nutritional status and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira Vieira, Raquel; Dal Bosco, Simone Morelo; Grave, Magali Trezinha Quevedo; Adami, Fernanda Scherer

    2015-04-01

    The perception of body image of adolescents is an instrument for nutritional assessment to health conditions. To verify the body image perception of adolescents and their parents in relation to nutritional status and blood pressure levels. Population-based study, and cross-sectional model, conducted with parents and adolescents aged 10-19 years old, in rural and urban zones in public schools. There was applied the Scale silhouettes for parents about the perception of the described body image and a question about the concern of the nutritional status of their children. There were verified the blood pressure, weight, height and waist circumference, the BMI (kg/m²) calculation of the adolescents, and the self-perceived body image. The data was expressed as average ± standard deviation and percentages. The sample consisted of 914 adolescents with a mean age of 13.12 ± 2.17 years, 56.8% female and 68.9% were eutrophic. As for blood pressure levels, 17.6% were classified in pre-hypertensive, 18.8% in stage 1 hypertension and 6% in stage 2. About the self-perception, 68% considered themselves being eutrophic and 64.75% of the parents classified their children as eutrophic. There was observed a direct and significant correlation among the body mass index, waist circumference, weight, systemic and diastolic blood pressure with the self-perception of the adolescents and the body image perceptions of the parents (ppressure, waist circumference and body image perceptions of the adolescents and their respective parents. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Cerebral blood flow imaging by I-123 IMP and Tc-99m HM-PAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Minoshima, Satoshi; Imaseki, Keiko; Arimizu, Noboru; Yamaura, Akira; Uematsu, Sadao

    1988-02-01

    SPECT studies with either N-isopropyl-p-(I-123)iodo- amphetamine (I-123 IMP) or Tc-99m hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (Tc-99m HM-PAO) were cuncurrently performed in 12 patients with brain disorders, comprising cerebral infarction (7), cerebral aneurysm (one), intracranial hemorrhage (3), and subdural hematoma (one). Whereas I-123 IMP was taken up gradually into the brain, the uptake of Tc-99m-HM-PAO in the brain reached the peak immediately after the iv injection, with 90% or more remaining constant by 15 min postinjection. On early SPECT images, a high uptake of I-123 IMP was observed in the lung, and the uptake of Tc-99m HM-PAO was observed as well in the soft tissue of cervical region. In all patients except for one, decreased rCBF was observed in the lesions on both I-123 and Tc-99m SPECT scans. Both of the radiopharmaceuticals were analogous in that decreased blood flow corresponded to cerebral lesions. (Namekawa, K).

  7. An Automatic Cognitive Graph-Based Segmentation for Detection of Blood Vessels in Retinal Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Al Shehhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a hierarchical graph-based segmentation for blood vessel detection in digital retinal images. This segmentation employs some of perceptual Gestalt principles: similarity, closure, continuity, and proximity to merge segments into coherent connected vessel-like patterns. The integration of Gestalt principles is based on object-based features (e.g., color and black top-hat (BTH morphology and context and graph-analysis algorithms (e.g., Dijkstra path. The segmentation framework consists of two main steps: preprocessing and multiscale graph-based segmentation. Preprocessing is to enhance lighting condition, due to low illumination contrast, and to construct necessary features to enhance vessel structure due to sensitivity of vessel patterns to multiscale/multiorientation structure. Graph-based segmentation is to decrease computational processing required for region of interest into most semantic objects. The segmentation was evaluated on three publicly available datasets. Experimental results show that preprocessing stage achieves better results compared to state-of-the-art enhancement methods. The performance of the proposed graph-based segmentation is found to be consistent and comparable to other existing methods, with improved capability of detecting small/thin vessels.

  8. SPR imaging biosensor for the quantitation of fibronectin concentration in blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankiewicz, Anna; Romanowicz, Lech; Pyc, Marlena; Hermanowicz, Adam; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa

    2018-02-20

    The purpose of this study was presentation of a new biosensor capable of determination of fibronectin. This biosensor was based on the specific interaction of anti-fibronectin antibody produced in rabbit with fibronectin. The surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) technique was used as a detecting method. Optimization and characterization properties of the biosensor were studied. The determination of fibronectin concentration in natural samples was done. The results were compared with a reference method (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay-ELISA). The analytically useful dynamic response range of biosensor is between 5 and 400ngmL -1 . The detection limit is 1.5ngmL -1 and limit quantification is 5ngmL -1 . The proposed SPRI biosensor showed good selectivity for potential interferences. It was applied to determine fibronectin concentrations in plasma of healthy donors and of patients after thermal injury. Good correlations between results obtained using the SPRI biosensor and ELISA test (correlation coefficients for healthy donors 0.996, for patients 0.984) were obtained. The average fibronectin concentration of healthy donors was 140.5±24.6μgmL -1 and the average fibronectin concentration of patients was 601.5±72.1μgmL -1 , which was in agreement with results obtained by other investigators. The obtained results indicate that the developed biosensor may be a candidate for monitoring fibronectin concentration in blood samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic arrythmia filtration for gated blood pool imaging: Validation against list - Mode technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Rocchini, A.; Wu-Connolly, L.

    1985-01-01

    Normal resting heart rate variation distort the diastolic portions of time-activity curves (TACs) generated from gated blood pool (GBP) images. This alters calculated measures of diastolic function e.g. peak filling rate (PFR). The authors compared diastolic filling parameters obtained by two methods of arrythmia removal, list-mode (LM) acquisition and a new approach, dynamic arrythima filtration (DAF). LM acquisition techniques reject beats of unusual cycle length, thus reducing the TAC distortions caused by heart rate variation but is time consuming and requires large amounts of disk storage. In DAF systems data is evaluated for cycle length in real-time and accepted or rejected immediately according to preset, operator determined cycle-length criteria, thus eliminating the need for post-processing of data and for large mass data storage. The authors prospectively determined EF, time to end-systole (TES), PFR, ad TPFR on 25 GBP patients. Camera and ECG data were sent simultaneously to 2 computers. One acquired data via LM and the other by DAF. Fluctuations in heart rate during GBP acquisition may cause errors in calculation of filling parameters. Both LM and DAF remove cycles of unusual length. DAF is less time consuming and technically demanding than LM and provides results which correlate closely with those obtained by LM

  10. Irradiation of fresh fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yueh-jen, Y.; Jin-lai, Z.; Shao-chun, L.

    1983-01-01

    Occasionally, in China, marine products can not be provided for the markets in good quality, for during the time when they are being transported from the sea port to inland towns or even at the time when they are unloaded from the ship, they are beginning to spoil. Obviously, it is very important that appropriate measures should be taken to prevent them from decay. Our study has proved that the shelf life of fresh Flatfish (Cynoglossue robustus) and Silvery pomfret (stromateoides argenteus), which, packed in sealed containers, are irradiated by 1.5 kGy, 2.2 kGy and 3.0 kGy, can be stored for about 13 to 26 days at 3 deg to 5 deg C. (author)

  11. Three-dimensional imaging of absolute blood flow velocity and blood vessel position under low blood flow velocity based on Doppler signal information included in scattered light from red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Tajiri, Tomoki; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2017-11-01

    The development of a system for in vivo visualization of occluded distal blood vessels for diabetic patients is the main target of our research. We herein describe two-beam multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (MLDV), which measures the instantaneous multipoint flow velocity and can be used to observe the blood flow velocity in peripheral blood vessels. By including a motorized stage to shift the measurement points horizontally and in the depth direction while measuring the velocity, the path of the blood vessel in the skin could be observed using blood flow velocity in three-dimensional space. The relationship of the signal power density between the blood vessel and the surrounding tissues was shown and helped us identify the position of the blood vessel. Two-beam MLDV can be used to simultaneously determine the absolute blood flow velocity distribution and identify the blood vessel position in skin.

  12. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F; Boas, David A; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These "bottom-up" models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans.

  13. Rapid dual-tracer PTSM+ATSM PET imaging of tumour blood flow and hypoxia: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, T C; Kadrmas, D J

    2006-01-01

    Blood flow and hypoxia are interrelated aspects of physiology that affect cancer treatment and response. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are related PET tracers for blood flow and hypoxia, and the ability to rapidly image both tracers in a single scan would bring several advantages over conventional single-tracer techniques. Using dynamic imaging with staggered injections, overlapping signals for multiple PET tracers may be recovered utilizing information from kinetics and radioactive decay. In this work, rapid dual-tracer PTSM+ATSM PET was simulated and tested as a function of injection delay, order and relative dose for several copper isotopes, and the results were compared relative to separate single-tracer data. Time-activity curves representing a broad range of tumour blood flow and hypoxia levels were simulated, and parallel dual-tracer compartment modelling was used to recover the signals for each tracer. The main results were tested further using a torso phantom simulation of PET tumour imaging. Using scans as short as 30 minutes, the dual-tracer method provided measures of blood flow and hypoxia similar to single-tracer imaging. The best performance was obtained by injecting PTSM first and using a somewhat higher dose for ATSM. Comparable results for different copper isotopes suggest that tracer kinetics with staggered injections play a more important role than radioactive decay in the signal separation process. Rapid PTSM+ATSM PET has excellent potential for characterizing both tumour blood flow and hypoxia in a single, fast scan, provided that technological hurdles related to algorithm development and routine use can be overcome

  14. Measurement of renal blood flow by 131I-labelled sodium iodohippurate imaging in a rat model of herpes encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleator, G.M.; Klapper, P.E.; Lewis, A.G.; Sharma, H.L.; Smith, A.M.; Manchester Univ.

    1990-01-01

    Renal blood flow was assessed qualitatively over a 30 min period in a rat model of herpes encephalitis by extra-renal scintigraphic imaging following the injection of 131 I-labelled sodium iodohippurate. No significant differences were observed for renal blood flow in either kidney between (or within) infected and control groups. Our data suggest that kidney function is not compromised in this animal model of encephalitis. The results are discussed in the context of the development of a non-invasive protocol for the in vivo diagnosis of herpes encephalitis. (orig.)

  15. Label-free in vivo optical micro-angiography imaging of cerebral capillary blood flow within meninges and cortex in mice with the skull left intact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    Abnormal microcirculation within meninges is common in many neurological diseases. There is a need for an imaging method that is capable of visualizing functional meningeal microcirculations alone, preferably decoupled from the cortical blood flow. Optical microangiography (OMAG) is a recently developed label-free imaging method capable of producing 3D images of dynamic blood perfusion within micro-circulatory tissue beds at an imaging depth up to ~2 mm, with an unprecedented imaging sensitivity to the blood flow at ~4 μm/s. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of ultra-high sensitive OMAG in imaging the detailed blood flow distributions, at a capillary level resolution, within meninges and cortex in mice with the cranium left intact. The results indicate that OMAG can be a valuable tool for the study of meningeal circulations.

  16. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Min; Gao, Zhongxue; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-06-30

    Fresh foods are perishable, seasonal and regional in nature and their storage, transportation, and preservation of freshness are quite challenging. Smart storage technologies can online detection and monitor the changes of quality parameters and storage environment of fresh foods during storage, so that operators can make timely adjustments to reduce the loss. This article reviews the smart storage technologies from two aspects: online detection technologies and smartly monitoring technologies for fresh foods. Online detection technologies include electronic nose, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), hyperspectral imaging and computer vision. Smartly monitoring technologies mainly include some intelligent indicators for monitoring the change of storage environment. Smart storage technologies applied to fresh foods need to be highly efficient and nondestructive and need to be competitively priced. In this work, we have critically reviewed the principles, applications, and development trends of smart storage technologies.

  17. Parametric renal blood flow imaging using [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O and PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Liukko, Kaisa E.; Oikonen, Vesa J.; Tolvanen, Tuula [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); Koivuviita, Niina; Tertti, Risto; Metsaerinne, Kaj [University of Turku, Department of Medicine, Turku (Finland); Iida, Hidehiro [National Cardiovascular Center-Research Institute, Department of Investigative Radiology, Advanced Medical-Engineering Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Iozzo, Patricia [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); National Research Council, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy); Nuutila, Pirjo [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Medicine, Turku (Finland)

    2009-04-15

    The quantitative assessment of renal blood flow (RBF) may help to understand the physiological basis of kidney function and allow an evaluation of pathophysiological events leading to vascular damage, such as renal arterial stenosis and chronic allograft nephropathy. The RBF may be quantified using PET with H{sub 2} {sup 15}O, although RBF studies that have been performed without theoretical evaluation have assumed the partition coefficient of water (p, ml/g) to be uniform over the whole region of renal tissue, and/or radioactivity from the vascular space (V{sub A}. ml/ml) to be negligible. The aim of this study was to develop a method for calculating parametric images of RBF (K{sub 1}, k{sub 2}) as well as V{sub A} without fixing the partition coefficient by the basis function method (BFM). The feasibility was tested in healthy subjects. A simulation study was performed to evaluate error sensitivities for possible error sources. The experimental study showed that the quantitative accuracy of the present method was consistent with nonlinear least-squares fitting, i.e. K{sub 1,BFM}=0.93K{sub 1,NLF}-0.11 ml/min/g (r=0.80, p<0.001), k{sub 2,BFM}=0.96k{sub 2,NLF}-0.13 ml/min/g (r=0.77, p<0.001), and V{sub A,BFM}=0.92V{sub A,NLF}-0.00 ml/ml (r=0.97, p<0.001). Values of the Akaike information criterion from this fitting were the smallest for all subjects except two. The quality of parametric images obtained was acceptable. The simulation study suggested that delay and dispersion time constants should be estimated within an accuracy of 2 s. V{sub A} and p cannot be neglected or fixed, and reliable measurement of even relative RBF values requires that V{sub A} is fitted. This study showed the feasibility of measurement of RBF using PET with H{sub 2} {sup 15}O. (orig.)

  18. Reduced dose measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow using dynamic SPECT imaging in a porcine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmins, Rachel; Klein, Ran; Petryk, Julia; Marvin, Brian; Kemp, Robert A. de; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn; Wei, Lihui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements provide important additional information over traditional relative perfusion imaging. Recent advances in camera technology have made this possible with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). Low dose protocols are desirable to reduce the patient radiation risk; however, increased noise may reduce the accuracy of MBF measurements. The authors studied the effect of reducing dose on the accuracy of dynamic SPECT MBF measurements. Methods: Nineteen 30–40 kg pigs were injected with 370 + 1110 MBq of Tc-99m sestamibi or tetrofosmin or 37 + 111 MBq of Tl-201 at rest + stress. Microspheres were injected simultaneously to measure MBF. The pigs were imaged in list-mode for 11 min starting at the time of injection using a Discovery NM 530c camera (GE Healthcare). Each list file was modified so that 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 of the original counts were included in the projections. Modified projections were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction and an energy window-based scatter correction and analyzed with FlowQuant kinetic modeling software using a 1-compartment model. A modified Renkin-Crone extraction function was used to convert the tracer uptake rate K1 to MBF values. The SPECT results were compared to those from microspheres. Results: Correlation between SPECT and microsphere MBF values for the full injected activity was r ≥ 0.75 for all 3 tracers and did not significantly degrade over all count levels. The mean MBF and MFR and the standard errors in the estimates were not significantly worse than the full-count data at 1/4-counts (Tc99m-tracers) and 1/2-counts (Tl-201). Conclusions: Dynamic SPECT measurement of MBF and MFR in pigs can be performed with 1/4 (Tc99m-tracers) or 1/2 (Tl-201) of the standard injected activity without significantly reducing accuracy and precision

  19. Reduced dose measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow using dynamic SPECT imaging in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, Rachel; Klein, Ran; Petryk, Julia; Marvin, Brian; Kemp, Robert A. de; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn, E-mail: gwells@ottawaheart.ca [Division of Cardiology, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y4W7 (Canada); Wei, Lihui [Nordion, Inc., Ottawa, Ontario K2K 1X8 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements provide important additional information over traditional relative perfusion imaging. Recent advances in camera technology have made this possible with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). Low dose protocols are desirable to reduce the patient radiation risk; however, increased noise may reduce the accuracy of MBF measurements. The authors studied the effect of reducing dose on the accuracy of dynamic SPECT MBF measurements. Methods: Nineteen 30–40 kg pigs were injected with 370 + 1110 MBq of Tc-99m sestamibi or tetrofosmin or 37 + 111 MBq of Tl-201 at rest + stress. Microspheres were injected simultaneously to measure MBF. The pigs were imaged in list-mode for 11 min starting at the time of injection using a Discovery NM 530c camera (GE Healthcare). Each list file was modified so that 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 of the original counts were included in the projections. Modified projections were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction and an energy window-based scatter correction and analyzed with FlowQuant kinetic modeling software using a 1-compartment model. A modified Renkin-Crone extraction function was used to convert the tracer uptake rate K1 to MBF values. The SPECT results were compared to those from microspheres. Results: Correlation between SPECT and microsphere MBF values for the full injected activity was r ≥ 0.75 for all 3 tracers and did not significantly degrade over all count levels. The mean MBF and MFR and the standard errors in the estimates were not significantly worse than the full-count data at 1/4-counts (Tc99m-tracers) and 1/2-counts (Tl-201). Conclusions: Dynamic SPECT measurement of MBF and MFR in pigs can be performed with 1/4 (Tc99m-tracers) or 1/2 (Tl-201) of the standard injected activity without significantly reducing accuracy and precision.

  20. Assessment of cardiac blood pool imaging in patients with left ventricular outflow tract stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yutaka; Ono, Yasuo; Kohata, Tohru; Tsubata, Shinichi; Kamiya, Tetsuroh.

    1993-01-01

    We performed cardiac blood pool imagings with Tc-99m at rest and during supine ergometer exercise to evaluate left ventricular performance in 14 patients with left ventricular outflow tract stenosis. All catheterized patients were divided into two subgroups: 8 patients with peak systolic left ventricular to descending aortic pressure gradients of less than 50 mmHg (LPG group) and 6 patients with peak systolic gradients of more than 50 mmHg (HPG group). Control group included 10 patients without stenotic coronary lesions after Kawasaki disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained as systolic index; both filling fraction during the first third of diastole (1/3FF) and mean filling rate during the first third of diastole (1/3FR mean) were obtained as diastolic indices. None of the patients had abnormal findings on 201 Tl imaging. LVEF at rest in HPG group was significantly higher than those in control group, but LVEF in HPG group did not increase after exercise. It increased significantly in control group and LPG group. 1/3 FF in HPG group was significantly lower not only at rest but also during exercise. 1/3 FR mean at rest was not different significantly among the 3 groups. However, 1/3FR mean during exercise in LPG group was significantly lower; and 1/3 FR mean during exercise was significantly lower in HPG group than LPG group. The ratio of left ventricular muscular mass to left ventricular end-diastolic volume (M/V) calculated from left ventricular cineangiograms was different significantly among the 3 groups. The M/V ratio showed a correlation with LVEF and 1/3 FF both at rest and during exercise. These results would indicate that systolic function was impaired on exercise in severe left ventricular outflow tract stenosis and diastolic function was impaired on exercise in mild and severe left ventricular outflow tract stenosis. This may correlate with left ventricular hypertrophy and interaction of systolic function. (author)

  1. Automated high resolution full-field spatial coherence tomography for quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Neeru; Dubey, Kavita; Srivastava, Vishal; Ahmad, Azeem; Mehta, D. S.

    2018-02-01

    We developed an automated high-resolution full-field spatial coherence tomography (FF-SCT) microscope for quantitative phase imaging that is based on the spatial, rather than the temporal, coherence gating. The Red and Green color laser light was used for finding the quantitative phase images of unstained human red blood cells (RBCs). This study uses morphological parameters of unstained RBCs phase images to distinguish between normal and infected cells. We recorded the single interferogram by a FF-SCT microscope for red and green color wavelength and average the two phase images to further reduced the noise artifacts. In order to characterize anemia infected from normal cells different morphological features were extracted and these features were used to train machine learning ensemble model to classify RBCs with high accuracy.

  2. Color capable sub-pixel resolving optofluidic microscope and its application to blood cell imaging for malaria diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Ah Lee

    Full Text Available Miniaturization of imaging systems can significantly benefit clinical diagnosis in challenging environments, where access to physicians and good equipment can be limited. Sub-pixel resolving optofluidic microscope (SROFM offers high-resolution imaging in the form of an on-chip device, with the combination of microfluidics and inexpensive CMOS image sensors. In this work, we report on the implementation of color SROFM prototypes with a demonstrated optical resolution of 0.66 µm at their highest acuity. We applied the prototypes to perform color imaging of red blood cells (RBCs infected with Plasmodium falciparum, a particularly harmful type of malaria parasites and one of the major causes of death in the developing world.

  3. Functional neuroanatomy in depressed patients with sexual dysfunction: blood oxygenation level dependent functional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jong Chul

    2004-01-01

    To demonstrate the functional neuroanatomy associated with sexual arousal visually evoked in depressed males who have underlying sexual dysfunction using Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent-based fMRI. Ten healthy volunteers (age range 21-55: mean 32.5 years), and 10 depressed subjects (age range 23-51: mean 34.4 years, mean Beck Depression Inventory score of 39.6 ± 5.9, mean Hamilton Rating Scale Depression (HAMD)-17 score of 33.5 ± 6.0) with sexual arousal dysfunction viewed erotic and neutral video films during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 oblique planes using gradient-echo EPI (flip angle/TR/TE=90 .deg. /6000 ms/50 ms). The visual stimulation paradigm began with 60 sec of black screen, 150 sec of neutral stimulation with a documentary video film, 30 sec of black screen, 150 sec of sexual stimulation with an erotic video film followed by 30 sec of black screen. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by SPM99 program. There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation. In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri. On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences (ρ < 0.01). This study is the first demonstration of the functional neuroanatomy of the brain associated with sexual dysfunction in depressed patients using fMRI. In order to validate our physiological neuroscience results, further studies that would include patients with other disorders and sexual dysfunction, and depressed patients without sexual dysfunction and their treatment response are needed

  4. Functional neuroanatomy in depressed patients with sexual dysfunction: blood oxygenation level dependent functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jong Chul [Chonnam National Univ. Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    To demonstrate the functional neuroanatomy associated with sexual arousal visually evoked in depressed males who have underlying sexual dysfunction using Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent-based fMRI. Ten healthy volunteers (age range 21-55: mean 32.5 years), and 10 depressed subjects (age range 23-51: mean 34.4 years, mean Beck Depression Inventory score of 39.6 {+-} 5.9, mean Hamilton Rating Scale Depression (HAMD)-17 score of 33.5 {+-} 6.0) with sexual arousal dysfunction viewed erotic and neutral video films during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 oblique planes using gradient-echo EPI (flip angle/TR/TE=90 .deg. /6000 ms/50 ms). The visual stimulation paradigm began with 60 sec of black screen, 150 sec of neutral stimulation with a documentary video film, 30 sec of black screen, 150 sec of sexual stimulation with an erotic video film followed by 30 sec of black screen. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by SPM99 program. There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation. In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri. On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences ({rho} < 0.01). This study is the first demonstration of the functional neuroanatomy of the brain associated with sexual dysfunction in depressed patients using fMRI. In order to validate our physiological neuroscience results, further studies that would include patients with other disorders and sexual dysfunction, and depressed patients without sexual dysfunction and their treatment response are needed.

  5. Functional characterization of neotropical snakes peripheral blood leukocytes subsets: Linking flow cytometry cell features, microscopy images and serum corticosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Marcelo Pires Nogueira; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, Nicolle Gilda Teixeira; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Sant'Anna, Sávio Stefanini; Lourenço, Mariana Mathias; Levin, Gabriel; Sogayar, Mari Cleide; Grego, Kathleen Fernandes; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2017-09-01

    Reptiles are the unique ectothermic amniotes, providing the key link between ectothermic anamniotes fish and amphibians, and endothermic birds and mammals; becoming an important group to study with the aim of providing significant knowledge into the evolutionary history of vertebrate immunity. Classification systems for reptiles' leukocytes have been described by their appearance rather than function, being still inconsistent. With the advent of modern techniques and the establishment of analytical protocols for snakes' blood by flow cytometry, we bring a qualitative and quantitative assessment of innate activities presented by snakes' peripheral blood leukocytes, thereby linking flow cytometric features with fluorescent and light microscopy images. Moreover, since corticosterone is an important immunomodulator in reptiles, hormone levels of all blood samples were measured. We provide novel and additional information which should contribute to better understanding of the development of the immune system of reptiles and vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A review of suspension-Scattered particles used in blood-mimicking fluid for doppler ultrasound imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar A Oglat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppler ultrasound imaging system description and calibration need blood-mimicking fluids (BMFs for the test target of medical ultrasound diagnostic tools, with known interior features and acoustic and physical properties of this fluid (BMF. Physical and acoustical properties determined in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC standard are specified as constant values, the materials used in the BMF preparation should have values similar to the IEC standard values. However, BMF is ready-made commercially from a field of medical usage, which may not be appropriate in the layout of ultrasound system or for an estimate of novel imaging mechanism. It is often eligible to have the capability to make sound properties and mimic blood arrangement for specific applications. In this review, sufficient BMF materials, liquids, and measures are described which have been generated by utilizing diverse operation mechanism and materials that have sculptured a range of biological systems.

  7. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brückner, Michael [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Becker, Katja [Justus Liebig University Giessen, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Popp, Jürgen [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany); Frosch, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.frosch@uni-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  8. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brückner, Michael; Becker, Katja; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  9. Performance evaluation of photoacoustic oximetry imaging systems using a dynamic blood flow phantom with tunable oxygen saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Zhou, Xuewen; Andriani, Rudy; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, Joshua

    2018-02-01

    Photoacoustic Imaging (PAI) is an emerging technology with strong potential for broad clinical applications from breast cancer detection to cerebral monitoring due to its ability to compute maps of blood oxygen saturation (SO2) distribution in deep tissues using multispectral imaging. However, no well-validated consensus test methods currently exist for evaluating oximetry-specific performance characteristics of PAI devices. We have developed a phantombased flow system capable of rapid SO2 adjustment to serve as a test bed for elucidation of factors impacting SO2 measurement and quantitative characterization of device performance. The flow system is comprised of a peristaltic pump, membrane oxygenator, oxygen and nitrogen gas, and in-line oxygen, pH, and temperature sensors that enable real-time estimation of SO2 reference values. Bovine blood was delivered through breast-relevant tissue phantoms containing vessel-mimicking fluid channels, which were imaged using a custom multispectral PAI system. Blood was periodically drawn for SO2 measurement in a clinical-grade CO-oximeter. We used this flow phantom system to evaluate the impact of device parameters (e.g.,wavelength-dependent fluence corrections) and tissue parameters (e.g. fluid channel depth, blood SO2, spectral coloring artifacts) on oximetry measurement accuracy. Results elucidated key challenges in PAI oximetry and device design trade-offs, which subsequently allowed for optimization of system performance. This approach provides a robust benchtop test platform that can support PAI oximetry device optimization, performance validation, and clinical translation, and may inform future development of consensus test methods for performance assessment of photoacoustic oximetry imaging systems.

  10. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images of hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation with histological grading and portal blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogita, Sachiyo; Imai, Yasuharu; Fukuda, Kazuto; Igura, Takumi; Sawai, Yoshiyuki [Ikeda Municipal Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka (Japan); Okada, Masahiro; Murakami, Takamichi [Kinki University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Kim, Tonsok; Onishi, Hiromitsu; Hori, Masatoshi [Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Takamura, Manabu [Ikeda Municipal Hospital, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Morimoto, Osakuni [Ikeda Municipal Hospital, Department of Surgery, Osaka (Japan); Nagano, Hiroaki [Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Osaka (Japan); Wakasa, Kenichi [Osaka City University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Osaka (Japan); Hayashi, Norio [Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Osaka (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    To retrospectively investigate enhancement patterns of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and dysplastic nodule (DN) in the hepatobiliary phase of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced MRI in relation to histological grading and portal blood flow. Sixty-nine consecutive patients with 83 histologically proven HCCs and DNs were studied. To assess Gd-EOB-DTPA uptake, we calculated the EOB enhancement ratio, which is the ratio of the relative intensity of tumorous lesion to surrounding nontumorous area on hepatobiliary phase images (post-contrast EOB ratio) to that on unenhanced images (pre-contrast EOB ratio). Portal blood flow was evaluated by CT during arterial portography. Post-contrast EOB ratios significantly decreased as the degree of differentiation declined in DNs (1.00 {+-} 0.14) and well, moderately and poorly differentiated HCCs (0.79 {+-} 0.19, 0.60 {+-} 0.27, 0.49 {+-} 0.10 respectively). Gd-EOB-DTPA uptake, assessed by EOB enhancement ratios, deceased slightly in DNs and still more in HCCs, while there was no statistical difference in the decrease between different histological grades of HCC. Reductions in portal blood flow were observed less frequently than decreases in Gd-EOB-DTPA uptake in DNs and well-differentiated HCCs. Reduced Gd-EOB-DTPA uptake might be an early event of hepatocarcinogenesis, preceding portal blood flow reduction. The hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI may help estimate histological grading, although difficulties exist in differentiating HCCs from DNs. (orig.)

  11. Absolute quantification of regional renal blood flow in swine by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a blood pool contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdemann, Lutz; Nafz, Benno; Elsner, Franz; Grosse-Siestrup, Christian; Meissler, Michael; Kaufels, Nicola; Rehbein, Hagen; Persson, Pontus B; Michaely, Henrik J; Lengsfeld, Philipp; Voth, Matthias; Gutberlet, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate for the first time in an animal model the possibility of absolute regional quantification of renal medullary and cortical perfusion by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using a blood pool contrast agent. A total of 18 adult female pigs (age, 16-22 weeks; body weight, 45-65 kg; no dietary restrictions) were investigated by DCE-MRI. Absolute renal blood flow (RBF) measured by an ultrasound transit time flow probe around the renal vein was used as the standard of reference. An inflatable stainless cuff placed around the renal artery near its origin from the abdominal aorta was used to reduce RBF to 60%, 40%, and 20% of the baseline flow. The last measurement was performed with the cuff fully reopened. Absolute RBF values during these 4 perfusion states were compared with the results of DCE-MRI performed on a 1.5-T scanner with an 8-channel phased-array surface coil. All scans were acquired in breath-hold technique in the coronal plane using a field of view of 460 mm.Each dynamic scan commenced with a set of five 3D T1-weighted gradient echo sequences with different flip angles (alpha = 2 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees): TE, 0.88 milliseconds; TR, 2.65 milliseconds; slice thickness, 8.8 mm for 4 slices; acquisition matrix, 128 x 128; and acquisitions, 4. These data served to calculate 3D intrinsic longitudinal relaxation rate maps (R10) and magnetization (M0). Immediately after these images, the dynamic 3D T1-weighted gradient echo images were acquired with the same parameters and a constant alpha = 30 degrees, half Fourier, 1 acquisition, 64 frames, a time interval of 1.65 seconds between each frame, and a total duration of 105.6. Three milliliters of an albumin-binding blood pool contrast agent (0.25 mmol/mL gadofosveset trisodium, Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) was injected at a rate of 3 mL/s. Perfusion was calculated using the arterial input function from the aorta, which was

  12. Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Awake Mice by Measurements of Flavoprotein Autofluorescence Corrected for Cerebral Blood Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Manami; Urushihata, Takuya; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Sakata, Kazumi; Takado, Yuhei; Shimizu, Eiji; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto; Ito, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Green fluorescence imaging (e.g., flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging, FAI) can be used to measure neuronal activity and oxygen metabolism in living brains without expressing fluorescence proteins. It is useful for understanding the mechanism of various brain functions and their abnormalities in age-related brain diseases. However, hemoglobin in cerebral blood vessels absorbs green fluorescence, hampering accurate assessments of brain function in animal models with cerebral blood vessel dysfunctions and subsequent cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations. In the present study, we developed a new method to correct FAI signals for hemoglobin-dependent green fluorescence reductions by simultaneous measurements of green fluorescence and intrinsic optical signals. Intrinsic optical imaging enabled evaluations of light absorption and scatters by hemoglobin, which could then be applied to corrections of green fluorescence intensities. Using this method, enhanced flavoprotein autofluorescence by sensory stimuli was successfully detected in the brains of awake mice, despite increases of CBF, and hemoglobin interference. Moreover, flavoprotein autofluorescence could be properly quantified in a resting state and during sensory stimulation by a CO 2 inhalation challenge, which modified vascular responses without overtly affecting neuronal activities. The flavoprotein autofluorescence signal data obtained here were in good agreement with the previous findings from a condition with drug-induced blockade of cerebral vasodilation, justifying the current assaying methodology. Application of this technology to studies on animal models of brain diseases with possible changes of CBF, including age-related neurological disorders, would provide better understanding of the mechanisms of neurovascular coupling in pathological circumstances.

  13. Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Awake Mice by Measurements of Flavoprotein Autofluorescence Corrected for Cerebral Blood Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manami Takahashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Green fluorescence imaging (e.g., flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging, FAI can be used to measure neuronal activity and oxygen metabolism in living brains without expressing fluorescence proteins. It is useful for understanding the mechanism of various brain functions and their abnormalities in age-related brain diseases. However, hemoglobin in cerebral blood vessels absorbs green fluorescence, hampering accurate assessments of brain function in animal models with cerebral blood vessel dysfunctions and subsequent cerebral blood flow (CBF alterations. In the present study, we developed a new method to correct FAI signals for hemoglobin-dependent green fluorescence reductions by simultaneous measurements of green fluorescence and intrinsic optical signals. Intrinsic optical imaging enabled evaluations of light absorption and scatters by hemoglobin, which could then be applied to corrections of green fluorescence intensities. Using this method, enhanced flavoprotein autofluorescence by sensory stimuli was successfully detected in the brains of awake mice, despite increases of CBF, and hemoglobin interference. Moreover, flavoprotein autofluorescence could be properly quantified in a resting state and during sensory stimulation by a CO2 inhalation challenge, which modified vascular responses without overtly affecting neuronal activities. The flavoprotein autofluorescence signal data obtained here were in good agreement with the previous findings from a condition with drug-induced blockade of cerebral vasodilation, justifying the current assaying methodology. Application of this technology to studies on animal models of brain diseases with possible changes of CBF, including age-related neurological disorders, would provide better understanding of the mechanisms of neurovascular coupling in pathological circumstances.

  14. Improving left ventricular segmentation in four-dimensional flow MRI using intramodality image registration for cardiac blood flow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vikas; Bustamante, Mariana; Fredriksson, Alexandru; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Ebbers, Tino

    2018-01-01

    Assessment of blood flow in the left ventricle using four-dimensional flow MRI requires accurate left ventricle segmentation that is often hampered by the low contrast between blood and the myocardium. The purpose of this work is to improve left-ventricular segmentation in four-dimensional flow MRI for reliable blood flow analysis. The left ventricle segmentations are first obtained using morphological cine-MRI with better in-plane resolution and contrast, and then aligned to four-dimensional flow MRI data. This alignment is, however, not trivial due to inter-slice misalignment errors caused by patient motion and respiratory drift during breath-hold based cine-MRI acquisition. A robust image registration based framework is proposed to mitigate such errors automatically. Data from 20 subjects, including healthy volunteers and patients, was used to evaluate its geometric accuracy and impact on blood flow analysis. High spatial correspondence was observed between manually and automatically aligned segmentations, and the improvements in alignment compared to uncorrected segmentations were significant (P  0.05). Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach in improving left-ventricular segmentation in four-dimensional flow MRI, and its potential for reliable blood flow analysis. Magn Reson Med 79:554-560, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Produce: Outbreaks, Prevalence and Contamination Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous system infections, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Generally, processed ready-to-eat and cold-stored meat and dairy products are considered high-risk foods for L. monocytogenes infections that cause human illness (listeriosis. However, recently, several listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to fresh produce contamination around the world. Additionally, many studies have detected L. monocytogenes in fresh produce samples and even in some minimally processed vegetables. Thus L. monocytogenes may contaminate fresh produce if present in the growing environment (soil and water. Prevention of biofilm formation is an important control measure to reduce the prevalence and survival of L. monocytogenes in growing environments and on fresh produce. This article specifically focuses on fresh produce–associated listeriosis outbreaks, prevalence in growing environments, contamination levels of fresh produce, and associated fresh produce safety challenges.

  16. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique

  17. PulseCam: high-resolution blood perfusion imaging using a camera and a pulse oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mayank; Suliburk, James; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2016-08-01

    Measuring blood perfusion is important in medical care as an indicator of injury and disease. However, currently available devices to measure blood perfusion like laser Doppler flowmetry are bulky, expensive, and cumbersome to use. An alternative low-cost and portable camera-based blood perfusion measurement system has recently been proposed, but such camera-only system produces noisy low-resolution blood perfusion maps. In this paper, we propose a new multi-sensor modality, named PulseCam, for measuring blood perfusion by combining a traditional pulse oximeter with a video camera in a unique way to provide low noise and high-resolution blood perfusion maps. Our proposed multi-sensor modality improves per pixel signal to noise ratio of measured perfusion map by up to 3 dB and improves the spatial resolution by 2 - 3 times compared to best known camera-only methods. Blood perfusion measured in the palm using our PulseCam setup during a post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) test replicates standard PORH response curve measured using laser Doppler flowmetry device but with much lower cost and a portable setup making it suitable for further development as a clinical device.

  18. Relations between radiobiological hypoxia and nuclear magnetic resonance-imaged blood microcirculation in experimental tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Sachiko; Ando, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of hypoxic cells subjected to radiation were investigated and compared with those of microcirculation for two murine fibrosarcomas growing in C3H mice. Small NFSa tumors, growing in air-breathing mice, developed a radioresistant tail on the survival curve. The tail was indistinguishably parallel to a survival curve for an artificially hypoxic tumor. As the NFSa tumors increased in size, the hypoxic tail moved upward with no change of Do, resulting in increase of hypoxic fraction from 3.9% to 40%. The R1137 tumors had no radioresistant tail nor hypoxic fraction regardless of tumor size. However, large-sized R1137 tumors developed a significant number of radioresistant, hypoxic cells with an intermediate Do, and were effectively sensitized by administrating misonidazole before irradiation. Thus, the NFSa tumors were fractionally hypoxic, and the large R1137 tumors had intermediate hypoxia. Measurement of tumor microcirculation by gadolinium-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance indicated that both blood flow and blood volume decreased significantly when the NFSa tumor grew large. Similar reduction in these microcirculation parameters was also observed for the R1137 tumor. The small-sized NFSa tumor had relatively larger blood volume and faster blood flow than the small-sized R1137 tumor. When large-sized tumors were compared to each other, the NFSa again had better blood flow than the R1137. However, the blood volume in the large-sized tumors was significantly (p<0.05) smaller for the NFSa tumor than for the R1137 tumor. It was concluded that blood flow could not be a single determinant for tumor hypoxia, and the difference between fractional hypoxia and intermediate hypoxia would be reflected in the ratio of blood flow to blood volume. (author)

  19. Assessment of cerebral blood flow reserve using blood oxygen level-dependent echo planar imaging after acetazolamide administration in patients post-STA-MCA anastomosis surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenke, Kiichiro; Kusunoki, Katsusuke; Saito, Masahiro; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Shinsuke; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Sakaki, Saburo; Nagasawa, Kiyoshi

    1998-01-01

    Recently, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) echo planar imaging (EPI) has been used to estimate blood flow changes. Theoretically, a relative decrement of deoxyhemoglobin in cerebral blood supply induces a MR signal change after neuronal stimulation. In the present study, we have attempted to evaluate CBF reserve capacity by the BOLD EPI in patients who had undergone STA-MCA anastomosis surgery. Then, we compared with the signal intensity changes obtained by this procedure with the CBF changes by Xe-SPECT after acetazolamide administration. Six patients, post-STA-MCA anastomosis surgery, were studied. Pre-operatively, MR signal intensity and CBF, by Xe-SPECT, were increased in the intact side after acetazolamide administration in all patients, and MR signal intensities were decreased in low flow regions after acetazolamide administration in all four patients in whom so-called steal phenomenon was demonstrated by Xe-SPECT study. Post-operatively, poor response was shown after acetazolamide administration with both Xe-SPECT and BOLD EPI in the two patients who had unsuccessful anastomoses. In the successfully anastomosed patients, improved vascular reactivity was demonstrated on BOLD EPI after acetazolamide administration in 3 of 4 patients in whom an improvement of vascular reactivity was demonstrated on Xe-SPECT. In one patient, MRI studies were considered to have technical artifacts, because the MR signal intensity did not increase, even in the intact side after acetazolamide administration. In conclusion, BOLD EPI after acetazolamide administration is an useful procedure for the pre- and post-operative of vascular reserve in patients with ischemic stroke. (author)

  20. Automatic detection of blood vessels in retinal images for diabetic retinopathy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, D Siva Sundhara; Vasuki, S

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision loss in diabetic patients. DR is mainly caused due to the damage of retinal blood vessels in the diabetic patients. It is essential to detect and segment the retinal blood vessels for DR detection and diagnosis, which prevents earlier vision loss in diabetic patients. The computer aided automatic detection and segmentation of blood vessels through the elimination of optic disc (OD) region in retina are proposed in this paper. The OD region is segmented using anisotropic diffusion filter and subsequentially the retinal blood vessels are detected using mathematical binary morphological operations. The proposed methodology is tested on two different publicly available datasets and achieved 93.99% sensitivity, 98.37% specificity, 98.08% accuracy in DRIVE dataset and 93.6% sensitivity, 98.96% specificity, and 95.94% accuracy in STARE dataset, respectively.

  1. Cardiac MRI. T2-mapping versus T2-weighted dark-blood TSE imaging for myocardial edema visualization in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassenstein, K.; Nensa, F.; Schlosser, T.; Umutlu, L.; Lauenstein, T.; Bruder, O.; Maderwald, S.; Ladd, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of T2 mapping for the detection of myocardial edema in acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and to compare this diagnostic accuracy with that of the current standard for myocardial edema imaging, which is T2w dark-blood TSE imaging. Materials and Methods: 29 patients with AMI were examined at 1.5 T. For the visualization of myocardial edema, T2 maps, calculated from three T2w SSFP images, and T2w dark-blood TSE images were acquired in standard short- and long-axis views. Cine SSFP images were acquired for the analysis of left ventricular (LV) function and late gadolinium enhancement images (LGE) for the visualization of myocardial necrosis. The T2 maps as well as the T2w dark-blood TSE images were evaluated twice independently from the cine SSFP and LGE images. The presence or absence of myocardial edema was rated visually for each LV segment. As the standard of reference, the infarct zone was defined based on the cine SSFP and the LGE images. Results: In this segment-based analysis, T2 mapping showed a sensitivity of 82 % and a specificity of 94 % for the detection of edema in the infarct zone. T2w dark-blood TSE imaging revealed a sensitivity of 50 % and a specificity of 98 %. T2 mapping showed a higher intra-rater agreement compared to T2w dark-blood TSE imaging (κ: 0.87 vs. 0.76). Conclusions: T2 mapping allows for the visualization of myocardial edema in AMI with a high sensitivity and specificity, and features better diagnostic accuracy in terms of a higher sensitivity compared to T2w dark-blood TSE imaging. (orig.)

  2. Analysis of blood flow patterns in aortic aneurysm by cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    Cine MRI (0.5 T) using rephased gradient echo technique was performed to study the patterns of blood flow in the aortic aneurysm of 16 patients with aortic aneurysm, and the data were compared with those of 5 healthy volunteers. In the transaxial section, the blood flow in normal aorta appeared as homogeneous high intensity during systole. On the other hand, the blood flow in the aneurysm appeared as inhomogeneous flow enhancement with flow void. In the sagittal scan, the homogeneous flow enhancement in a normal aorta was also observed during systole and its apex of flow enhancement was 'taper'. The blood flow patterns in the aneurysm were classified as 'irregular', 'zonal', 'eddy', and 'obscure' depending on the contrast of flow enhancement and flow void. Their apexes were 'taper' or 'round'. The blood flow patterns in the aneurysm were related to the size of aneurysm. In patients with a large size 'aneurysm, their flow patterns were 'eddy' or 'obscure' and the flow enhancement was 'round'. On the other hand, in patients with a small size aneurysm, their flow patterns were 'irregular' or 'zonal', and their flow enhancement was 'taper'. Though the exact mechanism of abnormal flow patterns in an aortic aneurysm remains to be determined, cine MRI gives helpful informations in assessing blood flow dynamics in the aneurysm. (author)

  3. Elevation of the correlation between cerebral blood volume and permeability surface from CT perfusion images with glioma grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Bei; Ling Huawei; Zhang Huan; Song Qi; Dong Haipeng; Chen Kemin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between cerebral blood volume and permeability surface by using multislice CT perfusion imaging with glioma grade. Methods: Ninteen patients with gliomas underwent conventional MR and multislice CT perfusion imaging preoperatively. These patients were divided into low grade and high grade groups which were correspond to WHO II grade gliomas and WHO III or IV grade gliomas respectively. CT data were transferred to on-line working station and processed to obtain time-signal curves, color perfusion maps and calculated perfusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTF) and permeability surfaces (PS) in tumoral parenchyma. Kruskal-Wallis test and correlation of CBV and PS was assessed by using SPSS 11.0 software. Results: The median of CBV and PS in low-grade and high-grade glioma were 2.7, 6.5 ml/100 g; 0.389, 12.810 ml·100 g -1 ·min -1 respectively, corresponding t value were 12.907 13.500 with P<0.05. Pearson correlations between CBV and PS were as follows: in low-grade group, r=-0.058, in high-grade group, r=0.648. Conclusion: Both CBV and PS have obvious correlation with glioma grade. The correlation between CBV and PS in low-grade glioma was weaker, probably because of the focal high vascularity in oligodendroglioma. (authors)

  4. Prevention of ligneous conjunctivitis by topical and subconjunctival fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F

    2004-08-01

    To present a case of ligneous conjunctivitis where the recurrence of membranous conjunctivitis was prevented by subconjunctival and topical instillation of fresh frozen plasma. Interventional case report. A case of ligneous conjunctivitis with multiple recurrences since the age of 3 years developed recurrent membranous conjunctivitis after transconjunctival levator recession. Blood plasminogen activity was determined. The membrane was excised, and the membrane reappeared 4 days later. The patient was treated with excision of the membrane and subconjunctival injection of fresh frozen plasma and topical fresh frozen plasma. Plasminogen activity of the fresh frozen plasma was normal. Plasminogen blood functional activity was 52% (normal is 80%-120%). The patient had complete remission with no recurrences of membranous conjunctivitis after topical and subconjunctival fresh frozen plasma. Prophylactic use of topical and subconjunctival fresh frozen plasma may help in the prevention of membranes in susceptible patients with plasminogen deficiency.

  5. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H. (Den Sundhedsfaglige Kandidatuddannelse, Aarhus Universitet Bygning 1264, Aarhus (Denmark); University College Nordjylland, Aalborg (Denmark)), Email: hnt@ucn.dk; Steffensen, E. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark)); Larsson, E. M. (Aalborg Hospital/Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aalborg (Denmark); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    Background. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in the evaluation of brain tumors. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is usually obtained by dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using normal appearing white matter as reference region. The emerging perfusion technique arterial spin labelling (ASL) presently provides measurement only of cerebral blood flow (CBF), which has not been widely used in human brain tumor studies. Purpose. To assess if measurement of blood flow is comparable with measurement of blood volume in human biopsy-proven gliomas obtained by DSC-MRI using two different regions for normalization and two different measurement approaches. Material and Methods. Retrospective study of 61 patients with different types of gliomas examined with DSC perfusion MRI. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in tumor portions with maximum perfusion on rCBF and rCBV maps, with contralateral normal appearing white matter and cerebellum as reference regions. Larger ROIs were drawn for histogram analyses. The type and grade of the gliomas were obtained by histopathology. Statistical comparison was made between diffuse astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and glioblastomas. Results. rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r = 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r = 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated (0.61 < r < 0.93), whereas for kurtosis and peak height, the correlation coefficient was about 0.3 when comparing rCBF and rCBV values for the same reference region. Neither rCBF nor rCBV quantification provided a statistically significant difference between the three types of gliomas. However, both rCBF and rCBV tended to increase with tumor grade and to be lower in patients who had undergone resection/treatment. Conclusion. rCBF measurements normalized to white matter

  6. Maintained functionality of an implantable radiotelemetric blood pressure and heart rate sensor after magnetic resonance imaging in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nölte, I; Boll, H; Figueiredo, G; Groden, C; Brockmann, M A; Gorbey, S; Lemmer, B

    2011-01-01

    Radiotelemetric sensors for in vivo assessment of blood pressure and heart rate are widely used in animal research. MRI with implanted sensors is regarded as contraindicated as transmitter malfunction and injury of the animal may be caused. Moreover, artefacts are expected to compromise image evaluation. In vitro, the function of a radiotelemetric sensor (TA11PA-C10, Data Sciences International) after exposure to MRI up to 9.4 T was assessed. The magnetic force of the electromagnetic field on the sensor as well as radiofrequency (RF)-induced sensor heating was analysed. Finally, MRI with an implanted sensor was performed in a rat. Imaging artefacts were analysed at 3.0 and 9.4 T ex vivo and in vivo. Transmitted 24 h blood pressure and heart rate were compared before and after MRI to verify the integrity of the telemetric sensor. The function of the sensor was not altered by MRI up to 9.4 T. The maximum force exerted on the sensor was 273 ± 50 mN. RF-induced heating was ruled out. Artefacts impeded the assessment of the abdomen and thorax in a dead rat, but not of the head and neck. MRI with implanted radiotelemetric sensors is feasible in principal. The tested sensor maintains functionality up to 9.4 T. Artefacts hampered abdominal and throacic imaging in rats, while assessment of the head and neck is possible

  7. Effects of high-fat diet and losartan on renal cortical blood flow using contrast ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declèves, Anne-Emilie; Rychak, Joshua J; Smith, Dan J; Sharma, Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Obesity-related kidney disease occurs as a result of complex interactions between metabolic and hemodynamic effects. Changes in microvascular perfusion may play a major role in kidney disease; however, these changes are difficult to assess in vivo. Here, we used perfusion ultrasound imaging to evaluate cortical blood flow in a mouse model of high-fat diet-induced kidney disease. C57BL/6J mice were randomized to a standard diet (STD) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 30 wk and then treated either with losartan or a placebo for an additional 6 wk. Noninvasive ultrasound perfusion imaging of the kidney was performed during infusion of a microbubble contrast agent. Blood flow within the microvasculature of the renal cortex and medulla was derived from imaging data. An increase in the time required to achieve full cortical perfusion was observed for HFD mice relative to STD. This was reversed following treatment with losartan. These data were concurrent with an increased glomerular filtration rate in HFD mice compared with STD- or HFD-losartan-treated mice. Losartan treatment also abrogated fibro-inflammatory disease, assessed by markers at the protein and messenger level. Finally, a reduction in capillary density was found in HFD mice, and this was reversed upon losartan treatment. This suggests that alterations in vascular density may be responsible for the elevated perfusion time observed by imaging. These data demonstrate that ultrasound contrast imaging is a robust and sensitive method for evaluating changes in renal microvascular perfusion and that cortical perfusion time may be a useful parameter for evaluating obesity-related renal disease.

  8. Cerebral misery perfusion diagnosed using hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Olympio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cerebral misery perfusion represents a failure of cerebral autoregulation. It is an important differential diagnosis in post-stroke patients presenting with collapses in the presence of haemodynamically significant cerebrovascular stenosis. This is particularly the case when cortical or internal watershed infarcts are present. When this condition occurs, further investigation should be done immediately. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian man presented with a stroke secondary to complete occlusion of his left internal carotid artery. He went on to suffer recurrent seizures. Neuroimaging demonstrated numerous new watershed-territory cerebral infarcts. No source of arterial thromboembolism was demonstrable. Hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure his cerebrovascular reserve capacity. The findings were suggestive of cerebral misery perfusion. Conclusions Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging allows the inference of cerebral misery perfusion. This procedure is cheaper and more readily available than positron emission tomography imaging, which is the current gold standard diagnostic test. The most evaluated treatment for cerebral misery perfusion is extracranial-intracranial bypass. Although previous trials of this have been unfavourable, the results of new studies involving extracranial-intracranial bypass in high-risk patients identified during cerebral perfusion imaging are awaited. Cerebral misery perfusion is an important and under-recognized condition in which emerging imaging and treatment modalities present the possibility of practical and evidence-based management in the near future. Physicians should thus be aware of this disorder and of recent developments in diagnostic tests that allow its detection.

  9. Correlation of antigen-specific IFN-γ responses of fresh blood samples from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected heifers with responses of day-old samples co-cultured with IL-12 or anti-IL-10 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2012-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic infection of the intestine of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Early stage MAP infection can be detected by measuring cell-mediated immune responses using the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) assay. Whole blood samples are cultured...... to enhance IFN-γ responses of cultures stimulated with Johnin purified protein derivative (PPDj). Here we examined the correlation of IFN-γ production in response to PPDj and 15 recombinant antigens in day-old blood samples from heifers 10–21 months of age from a MAP infected herd with addition of either...... overnight with specific MAP antigens followed by quantification of IFN-γ by ELISA. It is recommended that the time interval from sampling to culture does not exceed eight hours but addition of the co-stimulating cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12) or anti-IL-10 antibodies to culture have been demonstrated...

  10. Myocardial blood flow estimates from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: three quantitative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrazzo, Cristian; Galea, Nicola; Pacilio, Massimiliano; Altabella, Luisa; Preziosi, Enrico; Carnì, Marco; Ciolina, Federica; Vullo, Francesco; Francone, Marco; Catalano, Carlo; Carbone, Iacopo

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging can be used to quantitatively assess the myocardial blood flow (MBF), recovering the tissue impulse response function for the transit of a gadolinium bolus through the myocardium. Several deconvolution techniques are available, using various models for the impulse response. The method of choice may influence the results, producing differences that have not been deeply investigated yet. Three methods for quantifying myocardial perfusion have been compared: Fermi function modelling (FFM), the Tofts model (TM) and the gamma function model (GF), with the latter traditionally used in brain perfusion MRI. Thirty human subjects were studied at rest as well as under cold pressor test stress (submerging hands in ice-cold water), and a single bolus of gadolinium weighing 0.1  ±  0.05 mmol kg-1 was injected. Perfusion estimate differences between the methods were analysed by paired comparisons with Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis, and Bland-Altman plots, as well as also using the two-way ANOVA, considering the MBF values of all patients grouped according to two categories: calculation method and rest/stress conditions. Perfusion estimates obtained by various methods in both rest and stress conditions were not significantly different, and were in good agreement with the literature. The results obtained during the first-pass transit time (20 s) yielded p-values in the range 0.20-0.28 for Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis slopes between 0.98-1.03, and R values between 0.92-1.01. From the Bland-Altman plots, the paired comparisons yielded a bias (and a 95% CI)—expressed as ml/min/g—for FFM versus TM, -0.01 (-0.20, 0.17) or 0.02 (-0.49, 0.52) at rest or under stress respectively, for FFM versus GF, -0.05 (-0.29, 0.20) or  -0.07 (-0.55, 0.41) at rest or under stress, and for TM versus GF, -0.03 (-0.30, 0.24) or  -0.09 (-0.43, 0.26) at rest or under stress. With the

  11. Comparison of benzodiazepine receptor and regional cerebral blood flow imagings of epileptiform foci in hippocampal kindled rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Kenzo

    1993-01-01

    To compare the benzodiazepine (Bz) receptor imaging and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) imaging in the detection of epileptic foci, the distribution pattern of the Bz receptor and rCBF in hippocampal kindled rabbits was examined by a double tracer autoradiography using ethyl 7-[ 125 I]-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1, 5-a][1,4] benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate ( 125 I-Ro 16-0154) and 99m Tc-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime ( 99m Tc-HMPAO). In visual and quantitative analyses, 125 I-Ro 16-0154 accumulation in brain slices extracted after the completion of the kindling was markedly and extensively decreased in the kindled CA1 region mimicking a primary epileptic focus. 125 I-Ro 16-0154 accumulation was moderately decreased in the ipsilateral temporal lobe, dentate gyrus, CA2, CA4, and bilateral CA3 regions, regarded as the propagated sites of seizure discharges. 99m Tc-HMPAO accumulation was found to be decreased in the ipsilateral CA1, frontal, temporal and dentate gyri. However, the decrease was much more slight and less extensive than that in 125 I-Ro 16-0154 accumulation. These results suggest that Bz receptor imaging is much more sensitive in the detection of epileptic foci than rCBF imaging, and therefore that Bz receptor imaging is useful in clinical epilepsy. (author)

  12. Decreased right heart blood volume determined by magnetic resonance imaging: evidence of central underfilling in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Søndergaard, L; Møgelvang, J

    1995-01-01

    mL, NS), and left atrial volume (70 vs. 57 mL, P = .08) were normal or slightly increased. The right ejection fraction (68% vs. 53%, P fraction was slightly reduced (61% vs. 69%, NS). The central and arterial blood volume (CBV), assessed......Whether the central blood volume is reduced or expanded in cirrhosis is still under debate. Accordingly, the current study was undertaken to assess the volume of the heart cavities. Ten cirrhotic patients and matched controls had their right and left ventricular end-diastolic volumes (RVDV and LVDV...... as the cardiac output (CO) multiplied by the central circulation time, was significantly decreased (1.47 vs. 1.81 L, P blood volume (4.43 vs. 3.64 L, P

  13. Clinical research on quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow using 123I-IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hirofumi

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow measurement was performed using N-Isopropyl-p-( 123 I)-Iodoam-phetamine (IMP) and rotating gammacamera emission computed tomography (ECT), and a new quantitative profile curve was designed. There was a good correlation between the cerebral blood flow measured by intravenous Xe-133 method and that measured by IMP method in ten normal volunteers. IMP-ECT was performed in 40 patients with various cerebral diseases. The following results were obtained: 1. Minimum recognizable cerebral blood flow difference was 5 ml/100 g/min. 2. Quantitative redistribution was observed in approximately half of the cases which showed qualitative redistribution. 3. The incidence of crossed cerebellar diaschiasis was high among patients with significant cerebral disease (8 cases/10 cases). (author)

  14. Processing of MRI images weighted in TOF for blood vessels analysis: 3-D reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez D, J.; Cordova F, T. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Leon, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cruz A, I., E-mail: hernandezdj.gto@gmail.com [CONACYT, Centro de Investigacion en Matematicas, A. C., Jalisco s/n, Col. Valenciana, 36000 Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a novel presents an approach based on differences of intensities for the identification of vascular structures in medical images from MRI studies of type time of flight method (TOF). The plating method hypothesis gave high intensities belonging to the vascular system image type TOF can be segmented by thresholding of the histogram. The enhanced vascular structures is performed using the filter Vesselness, upon completion of a decision based on fuzzy thresholding minimizes error in the selection of vascular structures. It will give a brief introduction to the vascular system problems and how the images have helped diagnosis, is summarized the physical history of the different imaging modalities and the evolution of digital images with computers. Segmentation and 3-D reconstruction became image type time of flight; these images are typically used in medical diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases. The proposed method has less error in segmentation and reconstruction of volumes related to the vascular system, clear images and less noise compared with edge detection methods. (Author)

  15. Processing of MRI images weighted in TOF for blood vessels analysis: 3-D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez D, J.; Cordova F, T.; Cruz A, I.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel presents an approach based on differences of intensities for the identification of vascular structures in medical images from MRI studies of type time of flight method (TOF). The plating method hypothesis gave high intensities belonging to the vascular system image type TOF can be segmented by thresholding of the histogram. The enhanced vascular structures is performed using the filter Vesselness, upon completion of a decision based on fuzzy thresholding minimizes error in the selection of vascular structures. It will give a brief introduction to the vascular system problems and how the images have helped diagnosis, is summarized the physical history of the different imaging modalities and the evolution of digital images with computers. Segmentation and 3-D reconstruction became image type time of flight; these images are typically used in medical diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases. The proposed method has less error in segmentation and reconstruction of volumes related to the vascular system, clear images and less noise compared with edge detection methods. (Author)

  16. Microcirculatory Imaging in Cardiac Anesthesia: Ketanserin Reduces Blood Pressure But Not Perfused Capillary Density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, Paul W. G.; Ozdemir, Alaattin; van Iterson, Mat; van Dongen, Eric P. A.; Ince, Can

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: It has become possible to image the human microcirculation at the bedside using sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging. This may help the clinician when correlation between global and microvascular hemodynamics may not be straightforward. Ketanserin, a serotonin and alpha-1 adrenoceptor

  17. Megalophallus as a sequela of priapism in sickle cell anemia: use of blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, A A; Umans, H; Nagel, R L; Fabry, M E

    2000-09-01

    Priapism is a common complication of sickle cell anemia. We report a little known sequela of priapism: painless megalophallus, with significant penile enlargement. The patient had had an intense episode of priapism 9 years previously and his penis remained enlarged. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging revealed enlarged, hypoxic corpora cavernosa. Megalophallus probably resulted from permanent loss of elasticity of the tunica albuginea due to severe engorgement during the episode of priapism. This sequela needs to be recognized by physicians because no intervention is necessary and sexual function seems to remain intact.

  18. Effect of Post-Reconstruction Gaussian Filtering on Image Quality and Myocardial Blood Flow Measurement with N-13 Ammonia PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Sik Kim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In order to evaluate the effect of post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering on image quality and myocardial blood flow (MBF measurement by dynamic N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography (PET, we compared various reconstruction and filtering methods with image characteristics. Methods: Dynamic PET images of three patients with coronary artery disease (male-female ratio of 2:1; age: 57, 53, and 76 years were reconstructed, using filtered back projection (FBP and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM methods. OSEM reconstruction consisted of OSEM_2I, OSEM_4I, and OSEM_6I with 2, 4, and 6 iterations, respectively. The images, reconstructed and filtered by Gaussian filters of 5, 10, and 15 mm, were obtained, as well as non-filtered images. Visual analysis of image quality (IQ was performed using a 3-grade scoring system by 2 independent readers, blinded to the reconstruction and filtering methods of stress images. Then, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was calculated by noise and contrast recovery (CR. Stress and rest MBF and coronary flow reserve (CFR were obtained for each method. IQ scores, stress and rest MBF, and CFR were compared between the methods, using Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: In the visual analysis, IQ was significantly higher by 10 mm Gaussian filtering, compared to other sizes of filter (PP=0.923 and 0.855 for readers 1 and 2, respectively. SNR was significantly higher in 10 mm Gaussian filter. There was a significant difference in stress and rest MBF between several vascular territories. However CFR was not significantly different according to various filtering methods. Conclusion: Post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering with a filter size of 10 mm significantly enhances the IQ of N-13 ammonia PET-CT, without changing the results of CFR calculation. .

  19. Effect of Post-Reconstruction Gaussian Filtering on Image Quality and Myocardial Blood Flow Measurement with N-13 Ammonia PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeon Sik; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Ju Han; Kwon, Seong Young; Lee, Byeong-il; Bom, Hee-Seung

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering on image quality and myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurement by dynamic N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography (PET), we compared various reconstruction and filtering methods with image characteristics. Dynamic PET images of three patients with coronary artery disease (male-female ratio of 2:1; age: 57, 53, and 76 years) were reconstructed, using filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) methods. OSEM reconstruction consisted of OSEM-2I, OSEM-4I, and OSEM-6I with 2, 4, and 6 iterations, respectively. The images, reconstructed and filtered by Gaussian filters of 5, 10, and 15 mm, were obtained, as well as non-filtered images. Visual analysis of image quality (IQ) was performed using a 3-grade scoring system by 2 independent readers, blinded to the reconstruction and filtering methods of stress images. Then, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated by noise and contrast recovery (CR). Stress and rest MBF and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were obtained for each method. IQ scores, stress and rest MBF, and CFR were compared between the methods, using Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. In the visual analysis, IQ was significantly higher by 10 mm Gaussian filtering, compared to other sizes of filter (P<0.001 for both readers). However, no significant difference of IQ was found between FBP and various numbers of iteration in OSEM (P=0.923 and 0.855 for readers 1 and 2, respectively). SNR was significantly higher in 10 mm Gaussian filter. There was a significant difference in stress and rest MBF between several vascular territories. However CFR was not significantly different according to various filtering methods. Post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering with a filter size of 10 mm significantly enhances the IQ of N-13 ammonia PET-CT, without changing the results of CFR calculation

  20. Visualization of latent blood stains using visible reflectance hyperspectral imaging and chemometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, Gerda J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of latent traces is an important aspect of crime scene investigation. Blood stains on black backgrounds can be visualized using chemiluminescence, which is invasive and requires a darkened room, or near-infrared photography, for which investigators need to change filters manually to

  1. Combination probe for optically assisted ultrasonic velocity-change imaging aimed at detecting unstable blood vessel plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Shohei; Mano, Kazune; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-04-01

    Blood vessel plaque with a large lipid core is at risk of becoming thrombus and is likely to induce acute heart disease. To prevent this, it is necessary to determine not only the plaque's size but also its chemical composition. We, therefore, made the prototype of a combination probe to diagnose carotid artery plaque. It is used to differentiate propagation characteristics between light spectra and ultrasonic images. By propagating light and ultrasound along a common direction, it is possible to effectively warm the diagnosis domain. Moreover, the probe is thought to be compact and be easy to use for diagnosing human carotid artery plaque. We applied the combination probe to a carotid artery phantom with a lipid area and obtained an image of the ultrasonic velocity change in the fatty area.

  2. Demonstration of the blood-ocular barrier integrity by contrast-enhanced MR imaging: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, J.A.; Dwyer, A.J.; Girton, M.; Sank, V.; Knop, R.H.; Gansow, O.A.; Brechbiel, M.W.; Doppman, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    In five Rhesus monkeys we assessed the potential for monitoring the blood-ocular barrier (BOB) with Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging. Unilateral opening of the BOB was achieved by infusion of mannitol into the internal carotid artery. This was followed immediately by Gd-DTPA, 0.2 mmol/kg, given intravenously. T-l weighted MR images (Picken unit, 0.5 T, SE 500/40, 5-mm thickness, 15cm FOV) obtained before and within one-half hour after injection of Gd-DTPA demonstrated marked enhancement (2-to 17-fold) of the anterior and posterior chambers of the challenged eye, representing leakage of Gd-DTPA into those chambers. Animals remained free of ocular side effects

  3. A multivariate shape quantification approach for sickle red blood cell in patient-specific microscopy image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengjia; Yang, Jinzhu; Zhao, Hong

    2017-07-01

    The morphological change of red blood cells(RBCs) plays an important role in revealing the biomechanical and biorheological characteristics of RBCs. Aiming to extract the shape indices for the sickle RBCs, an automated ex-vivo RBC shape quantification method is proposed. First, single RBC regions (ROIs) are extracted from raw microscopy image via an automatic hierarchical ROI extraction method. Second, an improved random walk method is used to detect the RBC outline. Finally, three types of RBC shape factors are calculated based on the elliptical fitting RBC contour. Experiments indicate that the proposed method can accurately segment the RBCs from the microscopy images with low contrast and prevent the disturbance of artifacts. Moreover, it can provide an efficient shape quantification means for diverse RBC shapes in a batch manner.

  4. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt, E-mail: zszabo@jhmi.edu [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The radioligand {sup 11}C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. Methods: The experimental animals were injected with [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. Results: In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent

  5. Breath-hold dark-blood T{sub 2}-weighted MR imaging of the heart. Estimation of optimum preset repetition time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Toshiharu; Yamada, Naoaki; Yamasaki, Hidetoshi; Kita, Yoshinobu; Fujii, Hiroshi [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    It has recently become possible to obtain T{sub 2}-weighted images using turbo spin echo with a preparation pulse to inhibit the signal from flowing blood (dark blood turbo spin echo: DB-TSE) during breath holding. In order to obtain higher-quality T{sub 2}-weighted images of the heart, we assessed the optimum preset repetition time (TR preset), the interval between the dark blood preparation pulse and the end of data acquisition on DB-TSE. DB-TSE left ventricular short-axis images were obtained with varying TR presets in eight volunteers. Signal intensity was measured for the myocardium and blood in the left ventricular cavity, and the signal intensity ratio of myocardium to blood was calculated. The optimum TR preset was determined so as to give the highest signal intensity ratio of myocardium to blood. A comparison was made of the myocardium-to-blood ratios between the eight volunteers and nine patients. The optimum TR preset changed according to the cardiac cycle. By using the optimum TR preset, we obtained the peak signal intensity ratios in the volunteers and the patients. By using DB-TSE with the optimum TR preset for the cardiac cycle, we can obtain better quality T{sub 2}-weighted images of the heart. (author)

  6. A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Rattigan, Stephen; Hiscock, Natalie J

    2011-01-01

    We employed and evaluated a new application of contrast enhanced ultrasound for real time imaging of changes in microvascular blood volume (MVB) in tissues in females, males and rat. Continuous real time imaging was performed using contrast enhanced ultrasound to quantify infused gas filled micro...

  7. Immersion technique as a tool for in-depth OCT imaging through human blood and body's interior tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Tuchin, Valery V.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2001-05-01

    The concept of refractive index matching used for the enhancement of optical penetration depth of the whole blood is discussed on the basis of in vitro studies using optical coherence tomography technique. It was found that blood optical clearing is defined not only by refractive index matching effect, but also by changes of RBC size and their aggregation ability when chemicals are added. Chemical agents studied include glycerol, propylene glycol, trazograph, and dextrans. For the hyperosmotic agents, the application of 6.5% glycerol into twice diluted blood reduces the total attenuation coefficient from 4.2/mm to 2.0/mm, and correspondingly increases the optical penetration at 820 nm up to 117%. Similar effects of increase in transmittance and decrease in light scattering are also demonstrated by various molecular detrans with the light penetration enhancement within a range between 52.1% and 150.5%. We also demonstrate that the use of biocompatible agents could enhance in-depth imaging of the human esophagus and stomach tissues.

  8. Pre-trained convolutional neural networks as feature extractors toward improved malaria parasite detection in thin blood smear images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaramakrishnan Rajaraman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a blood disease caused by the Plasmodium parasites transmitted through the bite of female Anopheles mosquito. Microscopists commonly examine thick and thin blood smears to diagnose disease and compute parasitemia. However, their accuracy depends on smear quality and expertise in classifying and counting parasitized and uninfected cells. Such an examination could be arduous for large-scale diagnoses resulting in poor quality. State-of-the-art image-analysis based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx methods using machine learning (ML techniques, applied to microscopic images of the smears using hand-engineered features demand expertise in analyzing morphological, textural, and positional variations of the region of interest (ROI. In contrast, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN, a class of deep learning (DL models promise highly scalable and superior results with end-to-end feature extraction and classification. Automated malaria screening using DL techniques could, therefore, serve as an effective diagnostic aid. In this study, we evaluate the performance of pre-trained CNN based DL models as feature extractors toward classifying parasitized and uninfected cells to aid in improved disease screening. We experimentally determine the optimal model layers for feature extraction from the underlying data. Statistical validation of the results demonstrates the use of pre-trained CNNs as a promising tool for feature extraction for this purpose.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of blood brain/nerve barrier dysfunction and leukocyte infiltration: closely related or discordant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa eWeise

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other organs the nervous system is secluded from the rest of the organism by the blood brain (BBB or blood nerve barrier (BNB preventing passive influx of fluids from the circulation. Similarly, leukocyte entry to the nervous system is tightly controlled. Breakdown of these barriers and cellular inflammation are hallmarks of inflammatory as well as ischemic neurological diseases and thus represent potential therapeutic targets. The spatiotemporal relationship between BBB/BNB disruption and leukocyte infiltration has been a matter of debate. We here review contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a non-invasive tool to depict barrier dysfunction and its relation to macrophage infiltration in the central and peripheral nervous system under pathological conditions. Novel experimental contrast agents like Gadofluorine M (Gf allow more sensitive assessment of BBB dysfunction than conventional Gadolinium (Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI. In addition, Gf facilitates visualization of functional and transient alterations of the BBB remote from lesions. Cellular contrast agents such as superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO and perfluorocarbons (PFC enable assessment of leukocyte (mainly macrophage infiltration by MR technology. Combined use of these MR contrast agents disclosed that leukocytes can enter the nervous system independent from a disturbance of the BBB, and vice versa, a dysfunctional BBB/BNB by itself is not sufficient to attract inflammatory cells from the circulation. We will illustrate these basic imaging findings in animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS, cerebral ischemia and traumatic nerve injury and review corresponding findings in patients.

  10. Accurate measurement of peripheral blood mononuclear cell concentration using image cytometry to eliminate RBC-induced counting error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Laverty, Daniel J; Smith, Tim; Nejad, Parham; Hei, Hillary; Gandhi, Roopali; Kuksin, Dmitry; Qiu, Jean

    2013-02-28

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have been widely researched in the fields of immunology, infectious disease, oncology, transplantation, hematological malignancy, and vaccine development. Specifically, in immunology research, PBMCs have been utilized to monitor concentration, viability, proliferation, and cytokine production from immune cells, which are critical for both clinical trials and biomedical research. The viability and concentration of isolated PBMCs are traditionally measured by manual counting with trypan blue (TB) using a hemacytometer. One of the common issues of PBMC isolation is red blood cell (RBC) contamination. The RBC contamination can be dependent on the donor sample and/or technical skill level of the operator. RBC contamination in a PBMC sample can introduce error to the measured concentration, which can pass down to future experimental assays performed on these cells. To resolve this issue, RBC lysing protocol can be used to eliminate potential error caused by RBC contamination. In the recent years, a rapid fluorescence-based image cytometry system has been utilized for bright-field and fluorescence imaging analysis of cellular characteristics (Nexcelom Bioscience LLC, Lawrence, MA). The Cellometer image cytometry system has demonstrated the capability of automated concentration and viability detection in disposable counting chambers of unpurified mouse splenocytes and PBMCs stained with acridine orange (AO) and propidium iodide (PI) under fluorescence detection. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of Cellometer image cytometry system to accurately measure PBMC concentration, despite RBC contamination, by comparison of five different total PBMC counting methods: (1) manual counting of trypan blue-stained PBMCs in hemacytometer, (2) manual counting of PBMCs in bright-field images, (3) manual counting of acetic acid lysing of RBCs with TB-stained PBMCs, (4) automated counting of acetic acid lysing of RBCs with PI-stained PBMCs

  11. Immediate renal imaging and renography with /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate to assess renal blood flow, excretory function, and anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, E.C.; DeNardo, G.L.; Hines, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate (/sup 99m/Tc MDP) was evaluated as a clinical renal imaging agent in 20 patients referred for bone scintigraphy. Sequential scintigraphy, which was started immediately after injection, yielded blood flow studies of high quality, and subsequent images accurately delineated renal anatomy and excretion in nonazotemic patients. In comparison with delayed images, early images were vastly superior in quality and demonstrated improved target-to-nontarget activity ratios (p < 0.001) and improved lesion detectability (p < 0.01). Renal imaging performed incidental to bone scintigraphy with MDP can be greatly enhanced by initiating sequential scintigraphy immediately after injection

  12. Ammonia blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003506.htm Ammonia blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Encephalopathy - ammonia; Cirrhosis - ammonia; Liver failure - ammonia Images Blood test References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Ammonia (NH3) - blood ...

  13. High spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral venous thrombosis with a blood pool contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuentrup, E.; Wiethoff, A.J.; Parsons, E.C.; Spangenberg, P.; Stracke, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of clot visualization in small sinus and cortical veins with contrast enhanced MRA in a cerebral venous thrombosis animal model using a blood pool contrast agent, Gadofosveset, and high spatial resolution imaging. Material and methods: For induction of cerebral venous thrombosis a recently developed combined interventional and microsurgical model was used. Cerebral sinus and cortical vein thrombosis was induced in six pigs. Two further pigs died during the procedure. Standard structural, time-of-flight- and phase contrast-angiograms were followed by fast time resolved high resolution 3D MRA (4D MRA) and subsequent high spatial resolution 3D MRA in the equilibrium phase with and without addition of parallel imaging. Visualization of the clots using the different sequences was subjectively compared and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was assessed. Results: In the remaining six animals the procedure and MR-imaging protocol including administration of Gadofosveset was successfully completed. The 3D high resolution MRA in the equilibrium phase without the addition of parallel imaging was superior to all the other applied MR measurement techniques in terms of visualization of the clots. Only applying this sequence bridging vein thromboses were also seen as a small filling defect with a high CNR of >18. Conclusion: Only the non-accelerated high spatial resolution 3D MRA in the equilibrium in conjunction with the blood pool agent Gadofosveset allows for high-contrast visualization of very small clots in the cerebral sinus and cortical veins. Statement clinical impact: Detection of cortical vein thrombosis is of high clinical impact. Conventional MRI sequences often fail to visualize the clot. We could demonstrate that, in contrast to conventional sequences, with high spatial resolution 3D MRA in the equilibrium in conjunction with the blood pool agent Gadofosveset very small clots in the cerebral sinus and

  14. Analyzing the blood-brain barrier: the benefits of medical imaging in research and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassidim, Yoash; Vazana, Udi; Prager, Ofer; Veksler, Ronel; Bar-Klein, Guy; Schoknecht, Karl; Fassler, Michael; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Shelef, Ilan

    2015-02-01

    A dysfunctional BBB is a common feature in a variety of brain disorders, a fact stressing the need for diagnostic tools designed to assess brain vessels' permeability in space and time. Biological research has benefited over the years various means to analyze BBB integrity. The use of biomarkers for improper BBB functionality is abundant. Systemic administration of BBB impermeable tracers can both visualize brain regions characterized by BBB impairment, as well as lead to its quantification. Additionally, locating molecular, physiological content in regions from which it is restricted under normal BBB functionality undoubtedly indicates brain pathology-related BBB disruption. However, in-depth research into the BBB's phenotype demands higher analytical complexity than functional vs. pathological BBB; criteria which biomarker based BBB permeability analyses do not meet. The involvement of accurate and engineering sciences in recent brain research, has led to improvements in the field, in the form of more accurate, sensitive imaging-based methods. Improvements in the spatiotemporal resolution of many imaging modalities and in image processing techniques, make up for the inadequacies of biomarker based analyses. In pre-clinical research, imaging approaches involving invasive procedures, enable microscopic evaluation of BBB integrity, and benefit high levels of sensitivity and accuracy. However, invasive techniques may alter normal physiological function, thus generating a modality-based impact on vessel's permeability, which needs to be corrected for. Non-invasive approaches do not affect proper functionality of the inspected system, but lack in spatiotemporal resolution. Nevertheless, the benefit of medical imaging, even in pre-clinical phases, outweighs its disadvantages. The innovations in pre-clinical imaging and the development of novel processing techniques, have led to their implementation in clinical use as well. Specialized analyses of vessels' permeability

  15. Fundamental supply of skin blood flow in the Chinese Han population: Measurements by a full-field laser perfusion imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, W; Xu, S; Ma, J; Zhai, W; Cheng, S; Chang, Y; Wang, X; Gao, J; Tang, H; Yang, S; Zhang, X

    2018-05-08

    Skin blood flow is believed to link with many diseases, and shows a significant heterogeneity. There are several papers on basal cutaneous microcirculation perfusion in different races, while the data in Chinese is vacant. The aim was to establish the database of absolute fundamental supply of skin blood flow in the Chinese Han population. With a full-field laser perfusion imager (FLPI), the skin blood flow can be quantified. Cutaneous perfusion values were determined in 17 selected skin areas in 406 healthy participants aged between 20 and 80 years (mean 35.05 ± 11.33). Essential parameters such as weight, height were also measured and values of BMI were calculated. The perfusion values were reported in Arbitrary Perfusion Units (APU). The highest cutaneous perfusion value fell on eyelid (931.20 ± 242.59 in male and 967.83 ± 225.49 in female), and pretibial had the lowest value (89.09 ± 30.28 in male and 85.08 ± 33.59 in female). The values were higher in men than women on the bank of fingertips, nose, forehead, cheek, neck and earlobe (P < .05). Perfusion values on stretch and flexion side of forearm had negative correlation with age (P = .01 and P = 4.88 × 10 -3 , respectively) in male. Abdomen was negatively correlated with BMI in both gender (P = .02, respectively). Skin blood flow values vary with skin regions. There is a tendency to measure higher perfusion values in men than in women. And the values are irrelevant with age or BMI. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Development of a system for measuring wall shear stress in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Keita; Nagao, Taisuke; Okada, Kouji; Miyazaki, Shohei; Yang, Xiaomei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-01-01

    We developed a system for measuring the wall shear stress (WSS) in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The time-dependent velocity at the center of the blood vessel was measured by phase-contrast MRI and was approximated by finite Fourier series, which was used for generating the velocity profile at the inlet for the boundary condition to the CFD method. To validate the CFD method, we compared the WSS obtained by the CFD method with the theoretical value in a straight cylinder with various radii for both steady and pulsatile flows. We also investigated the dependence of the WSS on the inlet velocity profile incorporated into the CFD method. For steady flow, there was a good agreement between the WSS obtained by the CFD method and the theoretical value. For pulsatile flow, there was a relatively good agreement between them when the radius of the cylinder was 2.5 mm and the inlet velocity profile was given by the Womersley solution for fully developed pulsatile flow in a straight circular cylinder. When the radius of the cylinder was 5 mm and/or the inlet velocity profile was assumed to be parabolic, large differences were observed between them, suggesting that the assumption of fully developed flow does not hold true in these cases. In human studies, the vortex due to the secondary blood flow in the carotid arterial sinus was clearly observed. The WSS in the bifurcation was the highest, while that in the carotid arterial sinus was the smallest. In conclusion, the system presented here appears to be useful for measuring the WSS in blood vessels and for analyzing the cause and/or extent of atherosclerosis, and our results suggest that the inlet velocity profile should be carefully considered. (author)

  17. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... freezing will not preclude use of the term “fresh frozen” to describe the food. “Quickly frozen” means... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen fresh.â 101.95 Section 101.95 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  18. An automated and robust image processing algorithm for glaucoma diagnosis from fundus images using novel blood vessel tracking and bend point detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Soorya; Issac, Ashish; Dutta, Malay Kishore

    2018-02-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease which can cause irreversible blindness. The disease is currently identified using specialized equipment operated by optometrists manually. The proposed work aims to provide an efficient imaging solution which can help in automating the process of Glaucoma diagnosis using computer vision techniques from digital fundus images. The proposed method segments the optic disc using a geometrical feature based strategic framework which improves the detection accuracy and makes the algorithm invariant to illumination and noise. Corner thresholding and point contour joining based novel methods are proposed to construct smooth contours of Optic Disc. Based on a clinical approach as used by ophthalmologist, the proposed algorithm tracks blood vessels inside the disc region and identifies the points at which first vessel bend from the optic disc boundary and connects them to obtain the contours of Optic Cup. The proposed method has been compared with the ground truth marked by the medical experts and the similarity parameters, used to determine the performance of the proposed method, have yield a high similarity of segmentation. The proposed method has achieved a macro-averaged f-score of 0.9485 and accuracy of 97.01% in correctly classifying fundus images. The proposed method is clinically significant and can be used for Glaucoma screening over a large population which will work in a real time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Repeatability of Bolus Kinetics Ultrasound Perfusion Imaging for the Quantification of Cerebral Blood Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinke, Elisabeth J.; Eyding, Jens; de Korte, Chris L.; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W.E.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound perfusion imaging (UPI) can be used for the quantification of cerebral perfusion. In a neuro-intensive care setting, repeated measurements are required to evaluate changes in cerebral perfusion and monitor therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the repeatability of UPI in

  20. Automated detection of kinks from blood vessels for optic cup segmentation in retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D. W. K.; Liu, J.; Lim, J. H.; Li, H.; Wong, T. Y.

    2009-02-01

    The accurate localization of the optic cup in retinal images is important to assess the cup to disc ratio (CDR) for glaucoma screening and management. Glaucoma is physiologically assessed by the increased excavation of the optic cup within the optic nerve head, also known as the optic disc. The CDR is thus an important indicator of risk and severity of glaucoma. In this paper, we propose a method of determining the cup boundary using non-stereographic retinal images by the automatic detection of a morphological feature within the optic disc known as kinks. Kinks are defined as the bendings of small vessels as they traverse from the disc to the cup, providing physiological validation for the cup boundary. To detect kinks, localized patches are first generated from a preliminary cup boundary obtained via level set. Features obtained using edge detection and wavelet transform are combined using a statistical approach rule to identify likely vessel edges. The kinks are then obtained automatically by analyzing the detected vessel edges for angular changes, and these kinks are subsequently used to obtain the cup boundary. A set of retinal images from the Singapore Eye Research Institute was obtained to assess the performance of the method, with each image being clinically graded for the CDR. From experiments, when kinks were used, the error on the CDR was reduced to less than 0.1 CDR units relative to the clinical CDR, which is within the intra-observer variability of 0.2 CDR units.

  1. Added value of lung perfused blood volume images using dual-energy CT for assessment of acute pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Munemasa; Kunihiro, Yoshie; Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Nomura, Takafumi; Kudomi, Shohei; Yonezawa, Teppei; Suga, Kazuyoshi; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the added value of lung perfused blood volume (LPBV) using dual-energy CT for the evaluation of intrapulmonary clot (IPC) in patients suspected of having acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Eighty-three patients suspected of having PE who underwent CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) using a dual-energy technique were enrolled in this study. Two radiologists who were blinded retrospectively and independently reviewed CTPA images alone and the combined images with color-coded LPBV over a 4-week interval, and two separate sessions were performed with a one-month interval. Inter- and intraobserver variability and diagnostic accuracy were evaluated for each reviewer with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: Values for inter- and intraobserver agreement, respectively, were better for CTPA combined with LPBV (ICC = 0.847 and 0.937) than CTPA alone (ICC = 0.748 and 0.861). For both readers, diagnostic accuracy (area under the ROC curve [A z ]) were also superior, when CTPA alone (A z = 0.888 [reader 1] and 0.912 [reader 2]) was compared with that after the combination with LPBV images (A z = 0.966 [reader 1] and 0.959 [reader 2]) (p < 0.001). However, A z values of both images might not have significant difference in statistics, because A z value of CTPA alone was high and 95% confidence intervals overlapped in both images. Conclusion: Addition of dual-energy perfusion CT to CTPA improves detection of peripheral IPCs with better interobserver agreement

  2. Fresh vegetables from the desert

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    In the Middle East, food security and food safety are high on the agenda since
    the food crisis of 2007-2008. Food is mainly imported from nearby countries.
    Especially during the summer the prices of fresh produce are high, because
    there is not much production in the region itself.

  3. Pre-clinical evaluation of a nanoparticle-based blood-pool contrast agent for MR imaging of the placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaghada, Ketan B; Starosolski, Zbigniew A; Bhayana, Saakshi; Stupin, Igor; Patel, Chandreshkumar V; Bhavane, Rohan C; Gao, Haijun; Bednov, Andrey; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Belfort, Michael; George, Verghese; Annapragada, Ananth V

    2017-09-01

    Non-invasive 3D imaging that enables clear visualization of placental margins is of interest in the accurate diagnosis of placental pathologies. This study investigated if contrast-enhanced MRI performed using a liposomal gadolinium blood-pool contrast agent (liposomal-Gd) enables clear visualization of the placental margins and the placental-myometrial interface (retroplacental space). Non-contrast MRI and contrast-enhanced MRI using a clinically approved conventional contrast agent were used as comparators. Studies were performed in pregnant rats under an approved protocol. MRI was performed at 1T using a permanent magnet small animal scanner. Pre-contrast and post-liposomal-Gd contrast images were acquired using T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences. Dynamic Contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was performed using gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem ® ). Visualization of the retroplacental clear space, a marker of normal placentation, was judged by a trained radiologist. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both single and averaged acquisitions. Images were reviewed by a radiologist and scored for the visualization of placental features. Contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) imaging using a liposomal CT agent was performed for confirmation of the MR findings. Transplacental transport of liposomal-Gd was evaluated by post-mortem elemental analysis of tissues. Ex-vivo studies in perfused human placentae from normal, GDM, and IUGR pregnancies evaluated the transport of liposomal agent across the human placental barrier. Post-contrast T1w images acquired with liposomal-Gd demonstrated significantly higher SNR (p = 0.0002) in the placenta compared to pre-contrast images (28.0 ± 4.7 vs. 6.9 ± 1.8). No significant differences (p = 0.39) were noted between SNR in pre-contrast and post-contrast liposomal-Gd images of the amniotic fluid, indicating absence of transplacental passage of the agent. The placental margins were

  4. Arterial Transit Time-corrected Renal Blood Flow Measurement with Pulsed Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Tsuchiyama, Katsuki; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Hirohiko

    2017-01-10

    The importance of arterial transit time (ATT) correction for arterial spin labeling MRI has been well debated in neuroimaging, but it has not been well evaluated in renal imaging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of pulsed continuous arterial spin labeling (pcASL) MRI with multiple post-labeling delay (PLD) acquisition for measuring ATT-corrected renal blood flow (ATC-RBF). A total of 14 volunteers were categorized into younger (n = 8; mean age, 27.0 years) and older groups (n = 6; 64.8 years). Images of pcASL were obtained at three different PLDs (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 s), and ATC-RBF and ATT were calculated using a single-compartment model. To validate ATC-RBF, a comparative study of effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) measured by 99m Tc-MAG3 scintigraphy was performed. ATC-RBF was corrected by kidney volume (ATC-cRBF) for comparison with ERPF. The younger group showed significantly higher ATC-RBF (157.68 ± 38.37 mL/min/100 g) and shorter ATT (961.33 ± 260.87 ms) than the older group (117.42 ± 24.03 mL/min/100 g and 1227.94 ± 226.51 ms, respectively; P renal ASL-MRI as debated in brain imaging.

  5. Image-Based Modeling of Blood Flow and Oxygen Transfer in Feto-Placental Capillaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Pearce

    Full Text Available During pregnancy, oxygen diffuses from maternal to fetal blood through villous trees in the placenta. In this paper, we simulate blood flow and oxygen transfer in feto-placental capillaries by converting three-dimensional representations of villous and capillary surfaces, reconstructed from confocal laser scanning microscopy, to finite-element meshes, and calculating values of vascular flow resistance and total oxygen transfer. The relationship between the total oxygen transfer rate and the pressure drop through the capillary is shown to be captured across a wide range of pressure drops by physical scaling laws and an upper bound on the oxygen transfer rate. A regression equation is introduced that can be used to estimate the oxygen transfer in a capillary using the vascular resistance. Two techniques for quantifying the effects of statistical variability, experimental uncertainty and pathological placental structure on the calculated properties are then introduced. First, scaling arguments are used to quantify the sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the geometry and the parameters. Second, the effects of localized dilations in fetal capillaries are investigated using an idealized axisymmetric model, to quantify the possible effect of pathological placental structure on oxygen transfer. The model predicts how, for a fixed pressure drop through a capillary, oxygen transfer is maximized by an optimal width of the dilation. The results could explain the prevalence of fetal hypoxia in cases of delayed villous maturation, a pathology characterized by a lack of the vasculo-syncytial membranes often seen in conjunction with localized capillary dilations.

  6. Blood Capillary Length Estimation from Three-Dimensional Microscopic Data by Image Analysis and Stereology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubínová, Lucie; Mao, X. W.; Janáček, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2013), s. 898-906 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME09010; GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0794 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : capillaries * confocal microscopy * image analysis * length * rat brain * stereology Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.757, year: 2013

  7. Blood capillary length estimation from three-dimensional microscopic data by image analysis and stereology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubínová, Lucie; Mao, Xiao Wen; Janáček, Jiří

    2013-08-01

    Studies of the capillary bed characterized by its length or length density are relevant in many biomedical studies. A reliable assessment of capillary length from two-dimensional (2D), thin histological sections is a rather difficult task as it requires physical cutting of such sections in randomized directions. This is often technically demanding, inefficient, or outright impossible. However, if 3D image data of the microscopic structure under investigation are available, methods of length estimation that do not require randomized physical cutting of sections may be applied. Two different rat brain regions were optically sliced by confocal microscopy and resulting 3D images processed by three types of capillary length estimation methods: (1) stereological methods based on a computer generation of isotropic uniform random virtual test probes in 3D, either in the form of spatial grids of virtual "slicer" planes or spherical probes; (2) automatic method employing a digital version of the Crofton relations using the Euler characteristic of planar sections of the binary image; and (3) interactive "tracer" method for length measurement based on a manual delineation in 3D of the axes of capillary segments. The presented methods were compared in terms of their practical applicability, efficiency, and precision.

  8. Off-axis holographic laser speckle contrast imaging of blood vessels in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurashitov, Arkady; Bragina, Olga; Sindeeva, Olga; Sergey, Sindeev; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2017-09-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has become one of the most common tools for functional imaging in tissues. Incomplete theoretical description and sophisticated interpretation of measurement results are completely sidelined by a low-cost and simple hardware, fastness, consistent results, and repeatability. In addition to the relatively low measuring volume with around 700 μm of the probing depth for the visible spectral range of illumination, there is no depth selectivity in conventional LSCI configuration; furthermore, in a case of high NA objective, the actual penetration depth of light in tissues is greater than depth of field (DOF) of an imaging system. Thus, the information about these out-of-focus regions persists in the recorded frames but cannot be retrieved due to intensity-based registration method. We propose a simple modification of LSCI system based on the off-axis holography to introduce after-registration refocusing ability to overcome both depth-selectivity and DOF problems as well as to get the potential possibility of producing a cross-section view of the specimen.

  9. High PRF ultrafast sliding compound doppler imaging: fully qualitative and quantitative analysis of blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinbum; Jang, Won Seuk; Yoo, Yangmo

    2018-02-09

    Ultrafast compound Doppler imaging based on plane-wave excitation (UCDI) can be used to evaluate cardiovascular diseases using high frame rates. In particular, it provides a fully quantifiable flow analysis over a large region of interest with high spatio-temporal resolution. However, the pulse-repetition frequency (PRF) in the UCDI method is limited for high-velocity flow imaging since it has a tradeoff between the number of plane-wave angles (N) and acquisition time. In this paper, we present high PRF ultrafast sliding compound Doppler imaging method (HUSDI) to improve quantitative flow analysis. With the HUSDI method, full scanline images (i.e. each tilted plane wave data) in a Doppler frame buffer are consecutively summed using a sliding window to create high-quality ensemble data so that there is no reduction in frame rate and flow sensitivity. In addition, by updating a new compounding set with a certain time difference (i.e. sliding window step size or L), the HUSDI method allows various Doppler PRFs with the same acquisition data to enable a fully qualitative, retrospective flow assessment. To evaluate the performance of the proposed HUSDI method, simulation, in vitro and in vivo studies were conducted under diverse flow circumstances. In the simulation and in vitro studies, the HUSDI method showed improved hemodynamic representations without reducing either temporal resolution or sensitivity compared to the UCDI method. For the quantitative analysis, the root mean squared velocity error (RMSVE) was measured using 9 angles (-12° to 12°) with L of 1-9, and the results were found to be comparable to those of the UCDI method (L  =  N  =  9), i.e.  ⩽0.24 cm s -1 , for all L values. For the in vivo study, the flow data acquired from a full cardiac cycle of the femoral vessels of a healthy volunteer were analyzed using a PW spectrogram, and arterial and venous flows were successfully assessed with high Doppler PRF (e.g. 5 kHz at L

  10. High PRF ultrafast sliding compound doppler imaging: fully qualitative and quantitative analysis of blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinbum; Jang, Won Seuk; Yoo, Yangmo

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast compound Doppler imaging based on plane-wave excitation (UCDI) can be used to evaluate cardiovascular diseases using high frame rates. In particular, it provides a fully quantifiable flow analysis over a large region of interest with high spatio-temporal resolution. However, the pulse-repetition frequency (PRF) in the UCDI method is limited for high-velocity flow imaging since it has a tradeoff between the number of plane-wave angles (N) and acquisition time. In this paper, we present high PRF ultrafast sliding compound Doppler imaging method (HUSDI) to improve quantitative flow analysis. With the HUSDI method, full scanline images (i.e. each tilted plane wave data) in a Doppler frame buffer are consecutively summed using a sliding window to create high-quality ensemble data so that there is no reduction in frame rate and flow sensitivity. In addition, by updating a new compounding set with a certain time difference (i.e. sliding window step size or L), the HUSDI method allows various Doppler PRFs with the same acquisition data to enable a fully qualitative, retrospective flow assessment. To evaluate the performance of the proposed HUSDI method, simulation, in vitro and in vivo studies were conducted under diverse flow circumstances. In the simulation and in vitro studies, the HUSDI method showed improved hemodynamic representations without reducing either temporal resolution or sensitivity compared to the UCDI method. For the quantitative analysis, the root mean squared velocity error (RMSVE) was measured using 9 angles (-12° to 12°) with L of 1-9, and the results were found to be comparable to those of the UCDI method (L  =  N  =  9), i.e.  ⩽0.24 cm s-1, for all L values. For the in vivo study, the flow data acquired from a full cardiac cycle of the femoral vessels of a healthy volunteer were analyzed using a PW spectrogram, and arterial and venous flows were successfully assessed with high Doppler PRF (e.g. 5 kHz at L

  11. Rodent Plasmodium-infected red blood cells: imaging their fates and interactions within their hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claser, Carla; Malleret, Benoit; Peng, Kaitian; Bakocevic, Nadja; Gun, Sin Yee; Russell, Bruce; Ng, Lai Guan; Rénia, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    Malaria, a disease caused by the Plasmodium parasite, remains one of the most deadly infectious diseases known to mankind. The parasite has a complex life cycle, of which only the erythrocytic stage is responsible for the diverse pathologies induced during infection. To date, the disease mechanisms that underlie these pathologies are still poorly understood. In the case of infections caused by Plasmodium falciparum, the species responsible for most malaria related deaths, pathogenesis is thought to be due to the sequestration of infected red blood cells (IRBCs) in deep tissues. Other human and rodent malaria parasite species are also known to exhibit sequestration. Here, we review the different techniques that allow researchers to study how rodent malaria parasites modify their host cells, the distribution of IRBCs in vivo as well as the interactions between IRBCs and host tissues. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [The heterogeneity of blood flow on magnetic resonance imaging: a biomarker for grading cerebral astrocytomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revert Ventura, A J; Sanz Requena, R; Martí-Bonmatí, L; Pallardó, Y; Jornet, J; Gaspar, C

    2014-01-01

    To study whether the histograms of quantitative parameters of perfusion in MRI obtained from tumor volume and peritumor volume make it possible to grade astrocytomas in vivo. We included 61 patients with histological diagnoses of grade II, III, or IV astrocytomas who underwent T2*-weighted perfusion MRI after intravenous contrast agent injection. We manually selected the tumor volume and peritumor volume and quantified the following perfusion parameters on a voxel-by-voxel basis: blood volume (BV), blood flow (BF), mean transit time (TTM), transfer constant (K(trans)), washout coefficient, interstitial volume, and vascular volume. For each volume, we obtained the corresponding histogram with its mean, standard deviation, and kurtosis (using the standard deviation and kurtosis as measures of heterogeneity) and we compared the differences in each parameter between different grades of tumor. We also calculated the mean and standard deviation of the highest 10% of values. Finally, we performed a multiparametric discriminant analysis to improve the classification. For tumor volume, we found statistically significant differences among the three grades of tumor for the means and standard deviations of BV, BF, and K(trans), both for the entire distribution and for the highest 10% of values. For the peritumor volume, we found no significant differences for any parameters. The discriminant analysis improved the classification slightly. The quantification of the volume parameters of the entire region of the tumor with BV, BF, and K(trans) is useful for grading astrocytomas. The heterogeneity represented by the standard deviation of BF is the most reliable diagnostic parameter for distinguishing between low grade and high grade lesions. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Accelerated whole brain intracranial vessel wall imaging using black blood fast spin echo with compressed sensing (CS-SPACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Tian, Bing; Chen, Luguang; Eisenmenger, Laura; Raithel, Esther; Forman, Christoph; Ahn, Sinyeob; Laub, Gerhard; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Jing; Hess, Christopher; Saloner, David

    2018-06-01

    Develop and optimize an accelerated, high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic) 3D black blood MRI technique to reduce scan time for whole-brain intracranial vessel wall imaging. A 3D accelerated T 1 -weighted fast-spin-echo prototype sequence using compressed sensing (CS-SPACE) was developed at 3T. Both the acquisition [echo train length (ETL), under-sampling factor] and reconstruction parameters (regularization parameter, number of iterations) were first optimized in 5 healthy volunteers. Ten patients with a variety of intracranial vascular disease presentations (aneurysm, atherosclerosis, dissection, vasculitis) were imaged with SPACE and optimized CS-SPACE, pre and post Gd contrast. Lumen/wall area, wall-to-lumen contrast ratio (CR), enhancement ratio (ER), sharpness, and qualitative scores (1-4) by two radiologists were recorded. The optimized CS-SPACE protocol has ETL 60, 20% k-space under-sampling, 0.002 regularization factor with 20 iterations. In patient studies, CS-SPACE and conventional SPACE had comparable image scores both pre- (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 3.54 ± 0.65, p = 0.13) and post-contrast (3.72 ± 0.58 vs. 3.53 ± 0.57, p = 0.15), but the CS-SPACE acquisition was 37% faster (6:48 vs. 10:50). CS-SPACE agreed with SPACE for lumen/wall area, ER measurements and sharpness, but marginally reduced the CR. In the evaluation of intracranial vascular disease, CS-SPACE provides a substantial reduction in scan time compared to conventional T 1 -weighted SPACE while maintaining good image quality.

  14. Development of an SPR imaging biosensor for determination of cathepsin G in saliva and white blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkiewicz, E.; Wojtulewski, K.; Regulska, E.

    2011-01-01

    Cathepsin G (CatG) is an endopeptidase that is associated with the early immune response. The synthetic compound cathepsin G inhibitor I (CGI-I) was tested for its ability to inhibit the activity of CatG via a new surface plasmon resonance imaging assay. CGI-I was immobilized on the gold surface of an SPR sensor that was first modified with 1-octadecanethiol. A concentration of CGI-I equal to 4.0 μg.mL -1 and a pH of 8.0 were found to give the best results. The dynamic response of the sensor ranges from 0. 25 to 1. 5 ng.mL -1 , and the detection limit is 0. 12 ng.mL -1 . The sensor was applied to detect CatG in human saliva and white blood cells. (author)

  15. A new Python library to analyse skeleton images confirms malaria parasite remodelling of the red blood cell membrane skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Nunez-Iglesias

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present Skan (Skeleton analysis, a Python library for the analysis of the skeleton structures of objects. It was inspired by the “analyse skeletons” plugin for the Fiji image analysis software, but its extensive Application Programming Interface (API allows users to examine and manipulate any intermediate data structures produced during the analysis. Further, its use of common Python data structures such as SciPy sparse matrices and pandas data frames opens the results to analysis within the extensive ecosystem of scientific libraries available in Python. We demonstrate the validity of Skan’s measurements by comparing its output to the established Analyze Skeletons Fiji plugin, and, with a new scanning electron microscopy (SEM-based method, we confirm that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum remodels the host red blood cell cytoskeleton, increasing the average distance between spectrin-actin junctions.

  16. A new Python library to analyse skeleton images confirms malaria parasite remodelling of the red blood cell membrane skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Blanch, Adam J; Looker, Oliver; Dixon, Matthew W; Tilley, Leann

    2018-01-01

    We present Skan (Skeleton analysis), a Python library for the analysis of the skeleton structures of objects. It was inspired by the "analyse skeletons" plugin for the Fiji image analysis software, but its extensive Application Programming Interface (API) allows users to examine and manipulate any intermediate data structures produced during the analysis. Further, its use of common Python data structures such as SciPy sparse matrices and pandas data frames opens the results to analysis within the extensive ecosystem of scientific libraries available in Python. We demonstrate the validity of Skan's measurements by comparing its output to the established Analyze Skeletons Fiji plugin, and, with a new scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-based method, we confirm that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum remodels the host red blood cell cytoskeleton, increasing the average distance between spectrin-actin junctions.

  17. Radiolabeled white blood cells and direct targeting of micro-organisms for infection imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    2005-01-01

    Infection imaging is complicated due to multitude of factors interfering with the design of radiopharmaceuticals. More than 3 decades ago, labeled leukocytes have been introduced for infection imaging and new radiopharmaceuticals have been emerging on regular basis. However, labeled leukocytes by in vivo and in vitro methods are very effective for diagnosing various lesions such as osteomyelitis, cellulitis, diabetic foot, Crohn's disease, inflammatory bowel disease and in distinguishing prosthetic infection from loosening of prosthesis. But in vitro labeling method using 1 11I n-oxine, 9 9mT c-HMPAO or 9 9mT c-stannous colloid have the inherent limitation of personnel safety risks of infection and cross contamination. To overcome these problems, attempts have been made to directly target leukocytes by in vivo labeling techniques. There are several receptors present on the leukocytes and the granulocytes, which can be targeted with suitable ligands. These will include anti-NCA90-Fab, murine MoAb IgG 1 that is cross-reactive to antigen 95 on neutrophils, anti-CD15 antigen and DPC-11870 that targets the leukotriene B4 receptors of granulocytes. In a new approach, 9 9mT c-labeled ciprofloxacin has been developed to directly target live bacteria to detect infection by in vivo method. This approach showed considerable promise in the preliminary studies but clinical trials showed limitations. Analogs of a natural mammalian antimicrobial agents, such as Ubiquicidin were successful in animal studies and have now entered clinical trials. 9 9mT c-labeled fluconazole (a fungal antibiotic) and labeled Chitinase (1 23I -ChiB E144Q), have been developed to detect fungal infection. The ability to distinguish between fungal and bacterial infection is considered important, as patients undergoing chemotherapy are prone to fungal infection. Undoubtedly, the new trends and new radiopharmaceuticals developed for infection and inflammation imaging have contributed towards a better

  18. Three-dimensional whole-brain perfused blood volume imaging with multimodal CT for evaluation of acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.; Zhang, M.; Cao, Y.; Ma, Q.; Chen, J.; Ji, X.; Li, K.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the diagnostic value of integrating three-dimensional perfused blood volume (3D PBV) with multimodal computed tomography (CT) [non-enhanced CT (NECT), CT perfusion (CTP), and CT angiography (CTA)] in acute ischaemic stroke. Materials and methods: NECT, CTP, and CTA were performed in 25 acute ischaemic stroke patients. The ischaemia detection rate of 3D PBV was compared with the results of baseline NECT and CTP. The correlation of ischaemic lesion volume between 3D PBV, CTP images, and follow-up NECT were analysed. Results: NECT demonstrated ischaemic signs in 12 of 25 patients with proven infarction. CTP maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and time to peak (TTP) all demonstrated perfusion deficits in 21 of 25 patients. However, 3D PBV demonstrated perfusion deficits in all of the 25 patients. Among the 25 patients, a strong correlation was found between PBV and the follow-up NECT infarct (r = 0.858). The correlation between CTP and the follow-up NECT infarct as following: CBF (r = 0.718), CBV (r = 0.785), and TTP (r = 0.569). In 14 thrombolytic patients, strong correlation was found between the ischaemic volume on 3D PBV and follow-up NECT (r = 0.798). Conclusion: In acute stroke patients, the combination of 3D PBV and multimodal CT (NECT, CTP, and CTA) can improve the detection rate of ischaemia and enable assessment of the full extent of ischaemia, which correlates well with follow-up NECT.

  19. Balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery with stable xenon/CT cerebral blood flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erba, S.M.; Horton, J.A.; Latchaw, R.E.; Yonas, H.; Sekhar, L.; Schramm, V.; Pentheny, S.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a technique to predict preoperatively the safety of permanently occluding an internal carotid artery. The method was performed by imaging stable xenon cerebral blood flow (CBF) with the internal carotid artery both open and temporarily occluded with a nondetachable balloon on a double lumen Swan-Ganz catheter. Patients were those in whom we planned to sacrifice the internal carotid artery (those with giant or inaccessible aneurysms) or those in whom such a sacrifice was at least likely (those with skull base tumors). Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of a comparison of occluded and nonoccluded CBF values. Group-I patients had no significant change in CBF with internal carotid artery occlusion; group-II patients showed a symmetric decrease in CBF; and group-III patients had an asymmetric decrease in CBF, always greater on the occluded side. A fourth group clinically failed to tolerate even brief carotid occlusion. The internal carotid artery in one patients from group III was sacrificed at surgery: the size and shape of his postoperative infarct corresponded almost exactly to the area of asymmetrically decreased CBF on his occluded study. The data suggest that if surgery is likely to result in permanent occlusion of the internal carotid artery, then patients who are at risk for delayed neurologic injury due to a compromised cerebral blood flow should have arterial bypass grafts before such surgery is performed

  20. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Demonstrates Reduced Periventricular Cerebral Blood Flow in Dogs with Ventriculomegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Schmidt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature of ventriculomegaly in dogs is still a matter of debate. Signs of increased intraventricular pressure and atrophy of the cerebral white matter have been found in dogs with ventriculomegaly, which would imply increased intraventricular pressure and, therefore, a pathological condition, i.e., to some extent. Reduced periventricular blood flow was found in people with high elevated intraventricular pressure. The aim of this study was to compare periventricular brain perfusion in dogs with and without ventriculomegaly using perfusion weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging to clarify as to whether ventriculomegaly might be associated with an increase in intraventricular pressure. Perfusion was measured in 32 Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCS with ventriculomegaly, 10 CKCSs were examined as a control group. Cerebral blood flow (CBF was measured using free-hand regions of interest (ROI in five brain regions: periventricular white matter, caudate nucleus, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. CBF was significantly lower in the periventricular white matter of the dogs with ventriculomegaly (p = 0.0029 but not in the other ROIs. Reduction of periventricular CBF might imply increase of intraventricular pressure in ventriculomegaly.

  1. Investigation of Hepatic Blood Perfusion by Laser Speckle Imaging and Changes of Hepatic Vasoactive Substances in Mice after Electroacupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-jing Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA on hepatic blood perfusion (HBP and vascular regulation. We investigated 60 male anesthetized mice under the following 3 conditions: without EA stimulation (control group; EA stimulation at Zusanli (ST36 group; EA stimulation at nonacupoint (NA group during 30 min. The HBP was measured using the laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI. The level of nitric oxide (NO, endothelin-1 (ET-1, and noradrenaline (NE in liver tissue was detected by biochemical methods. Results were as follows. At each time point, HBP increase in ST36 group was higher than that in the NA group in anesthetized mice. HBP gradually decreased during 30 min in control group. The level of NO in ST36 group was higher than that in NA group. The level of both ET-1 and NE was the highest in control group, followed by NA group and ST36 group. It is concluded that EA at ST36 could increase HBP possibly by increasing the blood flow velocity (BFV, changing vascular activity, increasing the level of NO, and inhibiting the level of ET-1 in liver tissue.

  2. Direct bolus imaging of cervical blood vessels by means of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Toshihiko; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa; Watari, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Gen; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Washiya, Sumio; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Horita, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Kohji.

    1991-01-01

    Direct bolus imaging (DBI) is one of the non-invasive method for flow measurements which is based on the bolus tracking technique. DBI permits the direct visualization of flow velocity profiles and vessel band width. We performed screening for cervical vessel disease in patients with vertigo by means of DBI. MR system used here was 0.5 T superconducting imager-SMT-50A (Shimazu Co. Ltd). Pulse sequence parameters were TR= 60 ms, TE= 50 ms, NEX= 1, acquisition matrix; 128 x 256, slice thickness= 5 mm, with cardiac gating. Pulse sequence employed a slice selective RF pulse at the level of C5 vertebral body to tag a disk of fluid perpendicular to the direction of flow, followed by a gradient reforcussed echo. We evaluated each peak high and band width of the common-carotid arteries and the vertebral arteries. Seventy nine of 83 cases had optimal examinations. Abnormal findings of DBI were seen in 15 of 79 cases, (including 2 of subclavian steal syndrome, 1 of carotid obstruction, 5 of vertebral obstruction, 1 of basilar artery obstruction, and 6 of hypoplasia of vertebral artery). The abnormal findings of DBI were well correlated with those of angiographic examinations. We concluded that DBI was suitable to the screening for cervical vessel diseases in patients with vertigo, and should be added to the routine MR studies. (author)

  3. I-123 hydroxyiodobenzyl propanediamine (HIPDM) cerebral blood flow imaging demonstrating transtentorial diaschisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, W.J.; Dekosky, S.T.; Coupal, J.J.; Simmons, G.; Pulmano, C.; Kung, H.F.; Ryo, U.Y.; Clark, D.B. (Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Lexington, KY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    To assess the clinical significance of transtentorial diaschisis (TTD) as demonstrated by I-123 HIPDM brain imaging, SPECT and/or planar images of 35 patients with stroke, 26 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 2 patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and 1 patient with a schizoaffective disorder were analyzed. TTD was observed in 21 of the 35 patients with strokes. In 13 stroke patients, TTD was associated with large infarcts in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory; in the remaining 8 stroke patients, TTD was associated with internal capsule and/or basal ganglia infarcts. TTD was not associated with small occipital or parietal infarcts. Despite cortical perfusion decrements, TTD was not seen in the AD patients, the CJD patients, or the patient with schizoaffective disorder. It is concluded that (1) TTD frequently occurs following cerebral infarct of the MCA territory (60% of the patients in this sample); (2) absence of TTD in the presence of a large cerebral perfusion abnormality may represent neuronal dysfunction of the cerebral cortex; and (3) the presence of TTD without a significant cortical perfusion abnormality may indicate basal ganglia and/or internal capsule infarct.

  4. I-123 hydroxyiodobenzyl propanediamine (HIPDM) cerebral blood flow imaging demonstrating transtentorial diaschisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, W.J.; Dekosky, S.T.; Coupal, J.J.; Simmons, G.; Pulmano, C.; Kung, H.F.; Ryo, U.Y.; Clark, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    To assess the clinical significance of transtentorial diaschisis (TTD) as demonstrated by I-123 HIPDM brain imaging, SPECT and/or planar images of 35 patients with stroke, 26 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 2 patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and 1 patient with a schizoaffective disorder were analyzed. TTD was observed in 21 of the 35 patients with strokes. In 13 stroke patients, TTD was associated with large infarcts in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory; in the remaining 8 stroke patients, TTD was associated with internal capsule and/or basal ganglia infarcts. TTD was not associated with small occipital or parietal infarcts. Despite cortical perfusion decrements, TTD was not seen in the AD patients, the CJD patients, or the patient with schizoaffective disorder. It is concluded that (1) TTD frequently occurs following cerebral infarct of the MCA territory (60% of the patients in this sample); (2) absence of TTD in the presence of a large cerebral perfusion abnormality may represent neuronal dysfunction of the cerebral cortex; and (3) the presence of TTD without a significant cortical perfusion abnormality may indicate basal ganglia and/or internal capsule infarct

  5. R and G color component competition of RGB image decomposition as a criterion to register RBC agglutinates for blood group typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubrovski, Valeri A; Ganilova, Yuliya A; Zabenkov, Igor V

    2014-03-01

    A new approach of the criterion assignment for registration of erythrocyte agglutinates to instrumentally determine blood group type is suggested. The criterion is based on comparison of R and G components of RGB decomposition of microscopy digital image taken for the blood-serum mixture sample. For the chosen experimental conditions, the minimal size (area) of RBC agglutinate to be registered by the criterion suggested is estimated theoretically. The proposed method was tested experimentally on the example of monitoring agglutinates in flow. The encouraging experimental results were obtained for improvement of the resolving power of the method; the optimal experimental conditions were revealed for maximum resolution. Though the suggested method was realized for dynamic (flow) blood group determination, it could also be applied for diagnostics in a stationary environment. This approach increases the reliability of RBC agglutinates registration and, hence, blood group typing. The results may be used to develop the apparatus for automated determination of human blood group.

  6. Quantitative versus semiquantitative MR imaging of cartilage in blood-induced arthritic ankles: preliminary findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, Andrea S.; Zhang, Ningning; Lundin, Bjorn; Hilliard, Pamela; Man, Carina; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Blanchette, Victor; Moineddin, Rahim; Eckstein, Felix; Sussman, Marshall S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in hemophilia prophylaxis have raised the need for accurate noninvasive methods for assessment of early cartilage damage in maturing joints to guide initiation of prophylaxis. Such methods can either be semiquantitative or quantitative. Whereas semiquantitative scores are less time-consuming to be performed than quantitative methods, they are prone to subjective interpretation. To test the feasibility of a manual segmentation and a quantitative methodology for cross-sectional evaluation of articular cartilage status in growing ankles of children with blood-induced arthritis, as compared with a semiquantitative scoring system and clinical-radiographic constructs. Twelve boys, 11 with hemophilia (A, n = 9; B, n = 2) and 1 with von Willebrand disease (median age: 13; range: 6-17), underwent physical examination and MRI at 1.5 T. Two radiologists semiquantitatively scored the MRIs for cartilage pathology (surface erosions, cartilage loss) with blinding to clinical information. An experienced operator applied a validated quantitative 3-D MRI method to determine the percentage area of denuded bone (dAB) and the cartilage thickness (ThCtAB) in the joints' MRIs. Quantitative and semiquantitative MRI methods and clinical-radiographic constructs (Hemophilia Joint Health Score [HJHS], Pettersson radiograph scores) were compared. Moderate correlations were noted between erosions and dAB (r = 0.62, P = 0.03) in the talus but not in the distal tibia (P > 0.05). Whereas substantial to high correlations (r range: 0.70-0.94, P < 0.05) were observed between erosions, cartilage loss, HJHS and Pettersson scores both at the distal tibia and talus levels, moderate/borderline substantial (r range: 0.55-0.61, P < 0.05) correlations were noted between dAB/ThCtAB and clinical-radiographic constructs. Whereas the semiquantitative method of assessing cartilage status is closely associated with clinical-radiographic scores in cross-sectional studies of blood-induced arthropathy

  7. Quantitative versus semiquantitative MR imaging of cartilage in blood-induced arthritic ankles: preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Zhang, Ningning [Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Lundin, Bjorn [Skaane University Hospital and Lund University, University Hospital of Lund, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Hilliard, Pamela [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Rehabilitation Services, Toronto, ON (Canada); Man, Carina; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Blanchette, Victor [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Hematology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); Eckstein, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal Research, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ainring (Germany); Sussman, Marshall S. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Recent advances in hemophilia prophylaxis have raised the need for accurate noninvasive methods for assessment of early cartilage damage in maturing joints to guide initiation of prophylaxis. Such methods can either be semiquantitative or quantitative. Whereas semiquantitative scores are less time-consuming to be performed than quantitative methods, they are prone to subjective interpretation. To test the feasibility of a manual segmentation and a quantitative methodology for cross-sectional evaluation of articular cartilage status in growing ankles of children with blood-induced arthritis, as compared with a semiquantitative scoring system and clinical-radiographic constructs. Twelve boys, 11 with hemophilia (A, n = 9; B, n = 2) and 1 with von Willebrand disease (median age: 13; range: 6-17), underwent physical examination and MRI at 1.5 T. Two radiologists semiquantitatively scored the MRIs for cartilage pathology (surface erosions, cartilage loss) with blinding to clinical information. An experienced operator applied a validated quantitative 3-D MRI method to determine the percentage area of denuded bone (dAB) and the cartilage thickness (ThCtAB) in the joints' MRIs. Quantitative and semiquantitative MRI methods and clinical-radiographic constructs (Hemophilia Joint Health Score [HJHS], Pettersson radiograph scores) were compared. Moderate correlations were noted between erosions and dAB (r = 0.62, P = 0.03) in the talus but not in the distal tibia (P > 0.05). Whereas substantial to high correlations (r range: 0.70-0.94, P < 0.05) were observed between erosions, cartilage loss, HJHS and Pettersson scores both at the distal tibia and talus levels, moderate/borderline substantial (r range: 0.55-0.61, P < 0.05) correlations were noted between dAB/ThCtAB and clinical-radiographic constructs. Whereas the semiquantitative method of assessing cartilage status is closely associated with clinical-radiographic scores in cross-sectional studies of blood

  8. A Giant Hepatic Hemangioma Complicated by Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome: Findings of Tc-99m RBC Scintigraphy and SPECT Including a Total Body Blood Pool Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Myung Hee; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Kim, Dong Wook; Yim, Chang Yeol [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Kasabach-Merritt syndrome (KMS) consists of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and localized consumption coagulopathy that develops within vascular hemangioma. This syndrome may also be associated with occult hemangiomas located at various sites. Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy and SPECT have proven to be reliable for confirming or excluding hemangioma. Total body blood pool imaging study during the scintigraphy also provides a means of screening for occult lesions. The authors report the case of a 29-year-old man who presented with a giant hepatic hemangioma complicated by KMS, and underwent Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy and SPECT including a total body blood pool imaging study.

  9. Myocardial blood flow assessment with {sup 82}rubidium-PET imaging in patients with left bundle branch block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Andrea; Chalela, William; Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Imada, Rodrigo; Soares Junior, Jose; Do Val, Renata; Oliveira, Marco Antonio; Izaki, Marisa; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Meneghetti, Jose C., E-mail: andrea.falcao@incor.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (InCor/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Instituto do Coracao

    2015-11-15

    Objectives: Perfusion abnormalities are frequently seen in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) when a left bundle branch block is present. A few studies have shown decreased coronary flow reserve in the left anterior descending territory, regardless of the presence of coronary artery disease. Objective: we sought to investigate rubidium-82 ({sup 82}Rb) positron emission tomography imaging in the assessment of myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve in patients with left bundle branch block. Methods: thirty-eight patients with left bundle branch block (GI), median age 63.5 years, 22 (58%) female, 12 with coronary artery disease (≥70%; GI-A) and 26 with no evidence of significant coronary artery disease (GI-B), underwent rest-dipyridamole stress {sup 82}Rb-positron emission tomography with absolute quantitative flow measurements using Cedars-Sinai software (mL/min/g). The relative myocardial perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction were assessed in 17 segments. These parameters were compared with those obtained from 30 patients with normal {sup 82}Rb-positron emission tomography studies and without left bundle branch block (GII). Results: stress myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve were significantly lower in GI than in GII (p>0.05). The comparison of coronary flow reserve between GI-A and GI-B showed that it was different from the global coronary flow reserve (p<0.05) and the stress flow was significantly lower in the anterior than in the septal wall for both groups. Perfusion abnormalities were more prevalent in GI-A (p=0.06) and the left ventricular ejection fraction was not different between GI-A and GI-B, whereas it was lower in GI than in GII (p<0.001). Conclusion: the data confirm that patients with left bundle branch block had decreased myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve and coronary flow reserve assessed by {sup 82}Rb-positron emission tomography imaging may be useful in identifying coronary artery

  10. Myocardial blood flow assessment with 82rubidium-PET imaging in patients with left bundle branch block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcao, Andrea; Chalela, William; Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Imada, Rodrigo; Soares Junior, Jose; Do Val, Renata; Oliveira, Marco Antonio; Izaki, Marisa; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Meneghetti, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Perfusion abnormalities are frequently seen in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) when a left bundle branch block is present. A few studies have shown decreased coronary flow reserve in the left anterior descending territory, regardless of the presence of coronary artery disease. Objective: we sought to investigate rubidium-82 ( 82 Rb) positron emission tomography imaging in the assessment of myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve in patients with left bundle branch block. Methods: thirty-eight patients with left bundle branch block (GI), median age 63.5 years, 22 (58%) female, 12 with coronary artery disease (≥70%; GI-A) and 26 with no evidence of significant coronary artery disease (GI-B), underwent rest-dipyridamole stress 82 Rb-positron emission tomography with absolute quantitative flow measurements using Cedars-Sinai software (mL/min/g). The relative myocardial perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction were assessed in 17 segments. These parameters were compared with those obtained from 30 patients with normal 82 Rb-positron emission tomography studies and without left bundle branch block (GII). Results: stress myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve were significantly lower in GI than in GII (p>0.05). The comparison of coronary flow reserve between GI-A and GI-B showed that it was different from the global coronary flow reserve (p<0.05) and the stress flow was significantly lower in the anterior than in the septal wall for both groups. Perfusion abnormalities were more prevalent in GI-A (p=0.06) and the left ventricular ejection fraction was not different between GI-A and GI-B, whereas it was lower in GI than in GII (p<0.001). Conclusion: the data confirm that patients with left bundle branch block had decreased myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve and coronary flow reserve assessed by 82 Rb-positron emission tomography imaging may be useful in identifying coronary artery disease in patients

  11. Study Impact of Gas Delivery Systems on Imaging Studies of Human Cerebral Blood Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, J.R.; Parkes, L.M.; Jackson, A.; Parkes, L.M.; Eadsforth, P.; Beards, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    To compare a semiopen breathing circuit with a non-rebreathing (Hudson mask) for MRI experiments involving gas delivery. Methods and Materials. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by quantitative phase contrast angiography of the internal carotid and basilar arteries in 18 volunteers (20-31 years). In 8 subjects, gases were delivered via a standard non-re breathing (Hudson mask). In 10 subjects, gases were delivered using a modified “Mapleson A” semiopen anesthetic gas circuit and mouthpiece. All subjects were given 100% O 2 , medical air, and carbogen gas (95% O 2 and 5% CO 2 ) delivered at 15 L/min in a random order. Results. The Hudson mask group showed significant increases in CBF in response to increased FiCO 2 compared to air (+9.8%). A small nonsignificant reduction in CBF (-2.4%) was seen in response to increased inspired concentrations of oxygen (FiO 2 ). The Mapleson A group showed significantly larger changes in CBF in response to both increased inspired concentrations of carbon dioxide (FiCO 2 ) (+32.2%, Ρ<0.05) and FiO 2 (-14.6%, Ρ<0.01). Conclusions. The use of an anaesthetic gas delivery circuit avoids entrainment of room air and re breathing effects that may otherwise adversely affect the experimental results.

  12. Quantification of blood flow in the middle cerebral artery with phase-contrast MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, K.W.; Wetzel, S.G.; Radue, E.W. [Dept. of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Basel (Switzerland); Lyrer, P.A. [Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital of Basel (Switzerland)

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess blood flow in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) according to age, gender, and side. Eighty-eight subjects without carotid obstruction were measured for mean velocity, vessel area, and volume flow rates of both MCA with phase-contrast MR. A high-resolution sequence with a matrix of 300 x 512 and a double oblique localizing strategy was used for measurement. A mean velocity of 33 {+-} 6.8 cm/s, a mean vessel area of 6.2 {+-} 1.2 mm{sup 2} and a mean flow rate of 121 {+-} 28 ml/min were measured in the MCA. Lower volume flow rates were seen in subjects aged over 50 years (p < 0.01). When comparing women with men, a lower vessel area (p < 0.05) of the MCA was counterbalanced by a higher velocity, resulting in no significant difference of the volume flow rate. No difference occurred between the right and the left side. Flow reduction occurs in the elderly. A lower vessel area of the MCA in women is compensated by a higher velocity. (orig.)

  13. Quantification of blood flow in the middle cerebral artery with phase-contrast MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, K.W.; Wetzel, S.G.; Radue, E.W.; Lyrer, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess blood flow in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) according to age, gender, and side. Eighty-eight subjects without carotid obstruction were measured for mean velocity, vessel area, and volume flow rates of both MCA with phase-contrast MR. A high-resolution sequence with a matrix of 300 x 512 and a double oblique localizing strategy was used for measurement. A mean velocity of 33 ± 6.8 cm/s, a mean vessel area of 6.2 ± 1.2 mm 2 and a mean flow rate of 121 ± 28 ml/min were measured in the MCA. Lower volume flow rates were seen in subjects aged over 50 years (p < 0.01). When comparing women with men, a lower vessel area (p < 0.05) of the MCA was counterbalanced by a higher velocity, resulting in no significant difference of the volume flow rate. No difference occurred between the right and the left side. Flow reduction occurs in the elderly. A lower vessel area of the MCA in women is compensated by a higher velocity. (orig.)

  14. Enhanced visuomotor processing of phobic images in blood-injury-injection fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkamp, Anke; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Numerous studies have identified attentional biases and processing enhancements for fear-relevant stimuli in individuals with specific phobias. However, this has not been conclusively shown in blood-injury-injection (BII) phobia, which has rarely been investigated even though it has features distinct from all other specific phobias. The present study aims to fill that gap and compares the time-course of visuomotor processing of phobic stimuli (i.e., pictures of small injuries) in BII-fearful (n=19) and non-anxious control participants (n=23) by using a response priming paradigm. In BII-fearful participants, phobic stimuli produced larger priming effects and lower response times compared to neutral stimuli, whereas non-anxious control participants showed no such differences. Because these effects are fully present in the fastest responses, they indicate an enhancement in early visuomotor processing of injury pictures in BII-fearful participants. These results are comparable to the enhanced processing of phobic stimuli in other specific phobias (i.e., spider phobia). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The preliminary study of the blood perfusion and ammonia metabolism of pituitary using dynamic 13N-NH3 PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; Tang Anwu; Qiao Suixian; Chen Liguang; Luo Yaowu; Liu Bin; Xu Weiping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To preliminarily study the blood perfusion and ammonia metabolism of pituitary using dynamic 13 N-NH 3 PET imaging. Methods: 13 N-NH 3 PET imaging was performed on 21 subjects without pituitary diseases, 6 of them underwent dynamic PET imaging, and 8 of them underwent brain MRI in addition to PET. PET images were registered with MRI. Results: The pituitary could be clearly seen in 13 N-NH 3 PET images, and being confirmed by PET/MRI image fusion. The size of pituitary was (1.07 +- 0.17) cm x (1.09 +- 0.15) cm x (1.14 +- 0.17) cm, the standard uptake value (SUV) was 3.84 +- 1.75, and the radioactivity ratio of pituitary to thalamus was 1.35 +- 0.63. Pituitary image was seen at 10 s after the internal carotid was seen in dynamic 13 N-NH 3 PET imaging. 13 N-NH 3 was retained in pituitary, and was hardly cleaned out within 20 min. The radioactivity ratio of pituitary to internal carotid was 0.75 +- 0.13 when the radioactivity of internal carotid was at its highest level. Conclusions: The blood flow and ammonia metabolism of pituitary can be observed with dynamic 13 N-NH 3 PET imaging. Ammonia is highly extracted by pituitary, and metabolized in pituitary cells

  16. Quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow velocity and intracellular motility using dynamic light scattering-optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Wu, Weicheng; Daneshmand, Ali; Climov, Mihail; Ayata, Cenk; Boas, David A

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a novel optical method for label-free quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and intracellular motility (IM) in the rodent cerebral cortex. This method is based on a technique that integrates dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT), named DLS-OCT. The technique measures both the axial and transverse velocities of CBF, whereas conventional Doppler OCT measures only the axial one. In addition, the technique produces a three-dimensional map of the diffusion coefficient quantifying nontranslational motions. In the DLS-OCT diffusion map, we observed high-diffusion spots, whose locations highly correspond to neuronal cell bodies and whose diffusion coefficient agreed with that of the motion of intracellular organelles reported in vitro in the literature. Therefore, the present method has enabled, for the first time to our knowledge, label-free imaging of the diffusion-like motion of intracellular organelles in vivo. As an example application, we used the method to monitor CBF and IM during a brief ischemic stroke, where we observed an induced persistent reduction in IM despite the recovery of CBF after stroke. This result supports that the IM measured in this study represent the cellular energy metabolism-related active motion of intracellular organelles rather than free diffusion of intracellular macromolecules.

  17. Monitoring dynamic reactions of red blood cells to UHF electromagnetic waves radiation using a novel micro-imaging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Ping; Yong, Junguang; Shen, Hongtao; Zheng, Xianrong

    2012-12-01

    Multiple state-of-the-art techniques, such as multi-dimensional micro-imaging, fast multi-channel micro-spetrophotometry, and dynamic micro-imaging analysis, were used to dynamically investigate various effects of cell under the 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Cell changes in shape, size, and parameters of Hb absorption spectrum under different power density electromagnetic waves radiation were presented in this article. Experimental results indicated that the isolated human red blood cells (RBCs) do not have obviously real-time responses to the ultra-low density (15 μW/cm(2), 31 μW/cm(2)) electromagnetic wave radiation when the radiation time is not more than 30 min; however, the cells do have significant reactions in shape, size, and the like, to the electromagnetic waves radiation with power densities of 1 mW/cm(2) and 5 mW/cm(2). The data also reveal the possible influences and statistical relationships among living human cell functions, radiation amount, and exposure time with high-frequency electromagnetic waves. The results of this study may be significant on protection of human being and other living organisms against possible radiation affections of the high-frequency electromagnetic waves.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of Gadolinium-Lectin conjugates as selective blood-vessel contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashkunova-Martic, I.

    2004-11-01

    Molecular imaging without use of ionizing radiation has recently been developed for both magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging (MRI, US) and is expected to play a major future role in diagnosis and monitoring of tumours. In MRI, targeted nanoparticle contrast media (CM) with high relaxivities are required in order to obtain adequate signal-to-noise ratios, due to the low number of target sites. The size, charge and chemical constitution of the targeted nanoparticle CM are expected to influence nanoparticle interactions with cells and tissue elements significantly, and hence the targeting, the accumulation and dwell time at the targeted site, and the type and rate of clearance of the nanoparticles. The work reported here aims to characterise and optimise these parameters in mouse and human models, using nanoparticles targeted to a major carbohydrate determinant of the endothelial cell surface which is present in all blood vessels. Specific binding to the endothelium was demonstrated in both living and chemically fixed human vessels and in mice. Long-standing spin-echo and FLASH-3D images were obtained in the vasculature of living mice, in strong contrast to the rapid renal clearance of gadolinium-DTPA chelates which are widely used in the clinic. Nanoparticle size was found to be a major determinant of the biological response, and our data indicate that an optimal nanoparticle size lies between 50-100 nm diameter. We expect that hyperpermeable vessels present in tumours will permit targeting of optimised nanoparticles to the tumour cells, permitting MRI monitoring of the tumour. (author)

  19. Monitoring scanner calibration using the image-derived arterial blood SUV in whole-body FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Jens; Hofheinz, Frank; Apostolova, Ivayla; Kreissl, Michael C; Kotzerke, Jörg; van den Hoff, Jörg

    2018-05-15

    The current de facto standard for quantification of tumor metabolism in oncological whole-body PET is the standardized uptake value (SUV) approach. SUV determination requires accurate scanner calibration. Residual inaccuracies of the calibration lead to biased SUV values. Especially, this can adversely affect multicenter trials where it is difficult to ensure reliable cross-calibration across participating sites. The goal of the present work was the evaluation of a new method for monitoring scanner calibration utilizing the image-derived arterial blood SUV (BSUV) averaged over a sufficiently large number of whole-body FDG-PET investigations. Data of 681 patients from three sites which underwent routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT or PET/MR were retrospectively analyzed. BSUV was determined in the descending aorta using a three-dimensional ROI concentric to the aorta's centerline. The ROI was delineated in the CT or MRI images and transferred to the PET images. A minimum ROI volume of 5 mL and a concentric safety margin to the aortic wall was observed. Mean BSUV, standard deviation (SD), and standard error of the mean (SE) were computed for three groups of patients at each site, investigated 2 years apart, respectively, with group sizes between 53 and 100 patients. Differences of mean BSUV between the individual groups and sites were determined. SD (SE) of BSUV in the different groups ranged from 14.3 to 20.7% (1.7 to 2.8%). Differences of mean BSUV between intra-site groups were small (1.1-6.3%). Only one out of nine of these differences reached statistical significance. Inter-site differences were distinctly larger (12.6-25.1%) and highly significant (PPET investigations is a viable approach for ensuring consistent scanner calibration over time and across different sites. We propose this approach as a quality control and cross-calibration tool augmenting established phantom-based procedures.

  20. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats I: Magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Otte, Willem M; Wadman, Wytse J; Aronica, Eleonora; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Gorter, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has received increasing attention as a potential antiepileptogenic target. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin after status epilepticus reduces the development of epilepsy in a rat model. To study whether rapamycin mediates this effect via restoration of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) was used to determine BBB permeability throughout epileptogenesis. Imaging was repeatedly performed until 6 weeks after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rapamycin (6 mg/kg for 6 weeks starting 4 h after SE) and vehicle-treated rats, using gadobutrol as contrast agent. Seizures were detected using video monitoring in the week following the last imaging session. Gadobutrol leakage was widespread and extensive in both rapamycin and vehicle-treated epileptic rats during the acute phase, with the piriform cortex and amygdala as the most affected regions. Gadobutrol leakage was higher in rapamycin-treated rats 4 and 8 days after status epilepticus compared to vehicle-treated rats. However, during the chronic epileptic phase, gadobutrol leakage was lower in rapamycin-treated epileptic rats along with a decreased seizure frequency. This was confirmed by local fluorescein staining in the brains of the same rats. Total brain volume was reduced by this rapamycin treatment regimen. The initial slow recovery of BBB function in rapamycin-treated epileptic rats indicates that rapamycin does not reduce seizure activity by a gradual recovery of BBB integrity. The reduced BBB leakage during the chronic phase, however, could contribute to the decreased seizure frequency in post-status epilepticus rats treated with rapamycin. Furthermore, the data show that CE-MRI (using step-down infusion with gadobutrol) can be used as biomarker for monitoring the effect of drug therapy in rats. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging of the brain: feasibility of cerebral blood flow measurements with FAIR-TrueFISP arterial spin labeling MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegger, Lars; Martirosian, Petros; Schwenzer, Nina; Bisdas, Sotirios; Kolb, Armin; Pfannenberg, Christina; Claussen, Claus D; Pichler, Bernd; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) with simultaneous data acquisition promises a comprehensive evaluation of cerebral pathophysiology on a molecular, anatomical, and functional level. Considering the necessary changes to the MR scanner design the feasibility of arterial spin labeling (ASL) is unclear. To evaluate whether cerebral blood flow imaging with ASL is feasible using a prototype PET/MRI device. ASL imaging of the brain with Flow-sensitive Alternating Inversion Recovery (FAIR) spin preparation and true fast imaging in steady precession (TrueFISP) data readout was performed in eight healthy volunteers sequentially on a prototype PET/MRI and a stand-alone MR scanner with 128 × 128 and 192 × 192 matrix sizes. Cerebral blood flow values for gray matter, signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative signal change were compared. Additionally, the feasibility of ASL as part of a clinical hybrid PET/MRI protocol was demonstrated in five patients with intracerebral tumors. Blood flow maps showed good delineation of gray and white matter with no discernible artifacts. The mean blood flow values of the eight volunteers on the PET/MR system were 51 ± 9 and 51 ± 7 mL/100 g/min for the 128 × 128 and 192 × 192 matrices (stand-alone MR, 57 ± 2 and 55 ± 5, not significant). The value for signal-to-noise (SNR) was significantly higher for the PET/MRI system using the 192 × 192 matrix size (P change (δS) was significantly lower for the 192 × 192 matrix size (P = 0.02). ASL imaging as part of a clinical hybrid PET/MRI protocol could successfully be accomplished in all patients in diagnostic image quality. ASL brain imaging is feasible with a prototype hybrid PET/MRI scanner, thus adding to the value of this novel imaging technique.

  2. High spatial resolution and high contrast visualization of brain arteries and veins. Impact of blood pool contrast agent and water-selective excitation imaging at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuentrup, E.; Jacobs, J.E.; Kleimann, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a blood pool contrast agent and water-selective excitation imaging at 3 T for high spatial and high contrast imaging of brain vessels including the veins. Methods and Results: 48 clinical patients (47 ± 18 years old) were included. Based on clinical findings, twenty-four patients received a single dose of standard extracellular Gadoterate-meglumine (Dotarem registered ) and 24 received the blood pool contrast agent Gadofosveset (Vasovist registered ). After finishing routine MR protocols, all patients were investigated with two high spatial resolution (0.15 mm 3 voxel size) gradient echo sequences in random order in the equilibrium phase (steady-state) as approved by the review board: A standard RF-spoiled gradient-echo sequence (HR-SS, TR/TE 5.1 / 2.3 msec, FA 30 ) and a fat-suppressed gradient-echo sequence with water-selective excitation (HR-FS, 1331 binominal-pulse, TR/TE 8.8 / 3.8 msec, FA 30 ). The images were subjectively assessed (image quality with vessel contrast, artifacts, depiction of lesions) by two investigators and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were compared using the Student's t-test. The image quality and CNR in the HR-FS were significantly superior compared to the HR-SS for both contrast agents (p < 0.05). The CNR was also improved when using the blood pool agent but only to a minor extent while the subjective image quality was similar for both contrast agents. Conclusion: The utilized sequence with water-selective excitation improved image quality and CNR properties in high spatial resolution imaging of brain arteries and veins. The used blood pool contrast agent improved the CNR only to a minor extent over the extracellular contrast agent. (orig.)

  3. Relationship between signal intensity of blood flow in the pulmonary artery obtained by magnetic resonance imaging and results of right cardiac catheterization in patients with pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuguchi, Yasutoshi; Nagao, Keiichi; Kouno, Norihiro; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Okita, Shinya; Tojima, Hirokazu; Okada, Osamu; Kuriyama, Takayuki [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo

    1992-08-01

    Electrocardiogram-gated spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) images of the chest were obtained in five normal controls and 35 patients with pulmonary disease (11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 6 pulmonary thromboembolism, 5 primary pulmonary hypertension, 4 interstitial pulmonary disease, 4 pulmonary hypertension with disturbance of portal circulation, and 5 other diseases) who underwent right cardiac catheterization. In transverse images at the level of the right main pulmonary artery (rPA) and sagittal images at the level through the midsternal line and the spinal cord, the signal intensity of blood flow in the rPA was quantitatively evaluated, and the correlations with the MR signal intensity of intravascular flow and the parameters of hemodynamics were studied. In diastole MR images of both normal controls and patients mostly showed a significant signal and visible flow images. In systolic MR images, the mean values of hemodynamic parameters (mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), pulmonary arteriolar resistance (PAR), and cardiac index (CI)) were abnormal in patients with significant signal intensity of flow compared with those in patients without sufficient MR signal. The signal intensity was not correlated with mPAP; however, it significantly increased as PAR increased, and it increased as CI decreased both in diastole and in systole. Especially in systole, there was good correlation between the signal intensity in transverse MR images and CI and between signal intensity in sagittal MR images and PAR . These results suggest that the signal intensity of blood flow in the rPA on MR images can be used as an index of the severity of right heart failure associated with pulmonary disease. MR imaging is a useful modality to evaluate pulmonary circulation disturbance because of its ability to assess blood flow in the pulmonary artery noninvasively without interference from other structures such as bone and normal lung. (J.P.N.).

  4. [Prospects in blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, P

    2003-04-01

    What will be the evolution of blood transfusion in the next 10 years? What are the scientific and medical arguments to help the decision makers to propose the developments? Many scientific and clinical studies show that blood substitutes are not ready for use in man. So, for a long time, blood collection in man will still be a necessity to prepare cell concentrates (red blood cells and platelets) and fresh frozen plasma. During this period, blood safety will be based on development of testing technics and preparation processes of blood products. Another major point will be a better clinical use of blood derivates. Cellular therapy will be probably only a way of diversification in blood transfusion centers in partnership with hospitals.

  5. Toward a patient-based paradigm for blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert; Vamvakas, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    The current "manufacturing paradigm" of transfusion practice has detached transfusion from the clinical environment. As an example, fresh whole blood in large-volume hemorrhage may be superior to whole blood reconstituted from multiple components. Multicomponent apheresis can overcome logistical difficulties in matching patient needs with fresh component availability and can deliver the benefits of fresh whole blood. Because of the different transfusion needs of patients in emerging economies and the vulnerability of these blood systems to emerging infections, fresh whole blood and multicomponent apheresis can better meet patient needs when compared with transplants of the "manufacturing paradigm". We propose that patient blood management, along with panels of repeat, paid, accredited apheresis and fresh whole-blood donors can be used in emerging economies to support decentralized blood services. This alternative transfusion-medicine paradigm could eventually also be adopted by established economies to focus transfusion medicine on local patient needs and to alleviate the problem of the aging volunteer donor base.

  6. Antimicrobial packaging for fresh-cut fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh-cut fruits are minimally processed produce which are consumed directly at their fresh stage without any further kill step. Microbiological quality and safety are major challenges to fresh-cut fruits. Antimicrobial packaging is one of the innovative food packaging systems that is able to kill o...

  7. Technetium-99m-labelled red blood cell imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic haemangiomas: the role of SPECT/CT with a hybrid camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillaci, Orazio; Danieli, Roberta; Manni, Carlo; Capoccetti, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    Delayed liver single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after {sup 99m}Tc red blood cell (RBC) labelling is helpful in detecting hepatic haemangiomas; however, diagnosis can be difficult when lesions are situated adjacent to structures like the inferior vena cava, the heart or hepatic vessels, where blood activity persists. The aims of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of RBC SPECT and transmission computed tomography (RBC SPECT/CT) performed simultaneously with a hybrid imaging system for correct characterisation of hepatic lesions in patients with suspected haemangioma, and to assess the additional value of fused images compared with SPECT alone. Twelve patients with 24 liver lesions were studied. The acquisitions of both anatomical (CT) and functional (SPECT) data were performed during a single session. SPECT images were first interpreted alone and then re-evaluated after adding the transmission anatomical maps. Image fusion was successful in all patients, with perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data, allowing the precise anatomical localisation of sites of increased blood pool activity. SPECT/CT had a significant impact on results in four patients (33.3%) with four lesions defined as indeterminate on SPECT images, accurately characterising the hot spot foci located near vascular structures. In conclusion, RBC SPECT/CT imaging using this hybrid SPECT/CT system is feasible and useful in the identification or exclusion of suspected hepatic haemangiomas located near regions with high vascular activity. (orig.)

  8. Automatic segmentation of myocardium from black-blood MR images using entropy and local neighborhood information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zheng

    Full Text Available By using entropy and local neighborhood information, we present in this study a robust adaptive Gaussian regularizing Chan-Vese (CV model to segment the myocardium from magnetic resonance images with intensity inhomogeneity. By utilizing the circular Hough transformation (CHT our model is able to detect epicardial and endocardial contours of the left ventricle (LV as circles automatically, and the circles are used as the initialization. In the cost functional of our model, the interior and exterior energies are weighted by the entropy to improve the robustness of the evolving curve. Local neighborhood information is used to evolve the level set function to reduce the impact of the heterogeneity inside the regions and to improve the segmentation accuracy. An adaptive window is utilized to reduce the sensitivity to initialization. The Gaussian kernel is used to regularize the level set function, which can not only ensure the smoothness and stability of the level set function, but also eliminate the traditional Euclidean length term and re-initialization. Extensive validation of the proposed method on patient data demonstrates its superior performance over other state-of-the-art methods.

  9. Estimating blood and brain concentrations and blood-to-brain influx by magnetic resonance imaging with step-down infusion of Gd-DTPA in focal transient cerebral ischemia and confirmation by quantitative autoradiography with Gd-[14C]DTPA

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Robert A; Karki, Kishor; Ewing, James R; Divine, George W; Fenstermacher, Joseph D; Patlak, Clifford S; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N

    2009-01-01

    An intravenous step-down infusion procedure that maintained a constant gadolinium-diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) blood concentration and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to localize and quantify the blood–brain barrier (BBB) opening in a rat model of transient cerebral ischemia (n = 7). Blood-to-brain influx rate constant (Ki) values of Gd-DTPA from such regions were estimated using MRI–Patlak plots and compared with the Ki values of Gd-[14C]DTPA, determined minutes l...

  10. Initial data release of regular blood drip stain created by varying fall height, angle of impact and source dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita Basu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dataset developed consists of 108 blood drip stains developed with fresh porcine blood, blood admixed with different dosage of Warfarin and Heparin, respectively. For each particular blood type (i.e. fresh blood, blood admixed with Warfarin at different dosage and blood admixed with Heparin at varied dosage stain patterns were created by passive dripping of blood from a 2.5 cm3 subcutaneous syringe with needle filled to capacity, at 30°, 60° and 90° angle of impact with corresponding fall height of 20, 40 and 60 cm respectively. In the other dataset of 162 datapoints, 81 regular drip stains were formed from blood that had dripped passively from a subcutaneous syringe without needle at the aforementioned angle of impact and fall height, while the other stains were formed as a result of dripping of blood from a subcutaneous syringe with needle. In order to compare stains formed, all stains were recorded on the same representative, non-porous, smooth target surface under similar physical conditions. The interpretations relevant to the dataset are available in the article titled ‘2D Source Area prediction based on physical characteristics of a regular, passive blood drip stain’ (Basu and Bandyopadhyay, 2016 [7]. An image pre-processing algorithm for extracting ROI has also been incorporated in this article. Keywords: Drip stain, Bloodstain Pattern Analysis, Source Dimension prediction

  11. Cardiac cine MRI: Comparison of 1.5 T, non-enhanced 3.0 T and blood pool enhanced 3.0 T imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerretsen, S.C.; Versluis, B.; Bekkers, S.C.A.M.; Leiner, T.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac cine imaging using balanced steady state free precession sequences (bSSFP) suffers from artefacts at 3.0 T. We compared bSSFP cardiac cine imaging at 1.5 T with gradient echo imaging at 3.0 T with and without a blood pool contrast agent. Materials and methods: Eleven patients referred for cardiac cine imaging underwent imaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. At 3.0 T images were acquired before and after administration of 0.03 mmol/kg gadofosveset. Blood pool signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), temporal variations in SNR, ejection fraction and myocardial mass were compared. Subjective image quality was scored on a four-point scale. Results: Blood pool SNR increased with more than 75% at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T (p < 0.001); after contrast administration at 3.0 T SNR increased with 139% (p < 0.001). However, variations in blood pool SNR at 3.0 T were nearly three times as high versus those at 1.5 T in the absence of contrast medium (p < 0.001); after contrast administration this was reduced to approximately a factor 1.4 (p = 0.21). Saturation artefacts led to significant overestimation of ejection fraction in the absence of contrast administration (1.5 T: 44.7 ± 3.1 vs. 3.0 T: 50.7 ± 4.2 [p = 0.04] vs. 3.0 T post contrast: 43.4 ± 2.9 [p = 0.55]). Subjective image quality was highest for 1.5 T (2.8 ± 0.3), and lowest for non-enhanced 3.0 T (1.7 ± 0.6; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GRE cardiac cine imaging at 3.0 T after injection of the blood pool agent gadofosveset leads to improved objective and subjective cardiac cine image quality at 3.0 T and to the same conclusions regarding cardiac ejection fraction compared to bSSFP imaging at 1.5 T

  12. SU-F-J-222: Using PET Imaging to Evaluate Proliferation and Blood Flow in Irradiated and Non-Irradiated Bone Marrow 1 Year After Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S; Ponto, L; Menda, Y [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare proliferation and blood flow in pelvic and thoracic bone marrow 1 year after pelvic chemoradiation. Methods: Sixteen pelvic cancer patients were enrolled in an IRB-approved protocol to acquire FLT PET images during radiation therapy simulation (baseline) and 1 year after chemoradiation therapy. Three subjects also had optional O-15 water PET images acquired 1 year after chemoradiation therapy. Baseline FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans to spare pelvic bone marrow identified as regions with FLT SUV ≥ 2 without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing. Marrow VOIs were defined using a 50% maximum pixel value threshold on baseline FLT PET images (VIEW, PMOD version 3.5) in the sacrum and thoracic spine representing irradiated and non-irradiated regions, respectively. FLT PET and O-15 water PET images acquired 1 year after therapy were co-registered to baseline images (FUSION PMOD) and the same VOIs were used to measure proliferation (FLT SUV) and blood flow (O-15 water uptake). Separate image-based input functions were used for blood flow quantitation in each VOI. Results: Mean 1 year FLT SUV in sacral and thoracic VOIs for were 1.1 ± 0.4 and 6.5 ± 1.7, respectively for N = 16 subjects and were 1.2 ± 0.2 and 5.6 ± 1.6, respectively for N = 3 subjects who also underwent O-15 water imaging. Blood flow measures in equivalent sacral and thoracic marrow regions (N = 3) were 21.3 ± 8.7 and 18.3 ± 4.9 mL/min/100mL respectively. Conclusion: Decreased bone marrow proliferation measured by FLT SUV does not appear to correspond to decreased blood flow as measured by O-15 water PET imaging. Based on this small sample at a single time point, reduced blood supply does not explain reductions in bone marrow proliferative activity 1 year after chemoradiation therapy.

  13. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbour, Maya [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Schnell, Susanne [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Jarvis, Kelly [Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  14. Remote non-invasive stereoscopic imaging of blood vessels: first in-vivo results of a new multispectral contrast enhancement technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, F.P.; Mastik, F.; Cate, F.J. ten; Neumann, H.A.M.; Steen, A.F.W. van der

    2006-01-01

    We describe a contactless optical technique selectively enhancing superficial blood vessels below variously pigmented intact human skin by combining images in different spectral bands. Two CMOS-cameras, with apochromatic lenses and dual-band LED-arrays, simultaneously streamed Left (L) and Right (R)

  15. Image acquisition and interpretation criteria for Tc-99m-HMPAO-labelled white blood cell scintigraphy : results of a multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erba, Paola A.; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Veltman, Niels C.; Sollini, Martina; Pacilio, Marta; Galli, Filippo; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Signore, Alberto

    Purpose There is no consensus yet on the best protocol for planar image acquisition and interpretation of radiolabelled white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy. This may account for differences in reported diagnostic accuracy amongst different centres. Methods This was a multicentre retrospective study

  16. Comparison of early thallium-201 scintigraphy and gated blood pool imaging for predicting mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, L.C.; Silverman, K.J.; Bulkley, B.H.; Kallman, C.H.; Mellits, E.D.; Weisfeldt, M.

    1983-01-01

    The extent of abnormality in early thallium-201 and gated cardiac blood pool scintigrams has been reported to be useful for predicting mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To compare the two techniques, 91 patients admitted consecutively with evident or strongly suspected AMI underwent both imaging studies within 15 hours of the onset of symptoms. Patients with pulmonary edema or shock were excluded. AMI developed in 84% of patients, and 6-month mortality for the entire group was 16%. A thallium defect score of 7.0 or greater identified a subgroup of 14 patients with 64% 6-month mortality rate. Similarly, a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% or less identified a high-risk subgroup of 10 patients with a 6-month mortality of 60%. Mortality in the remaining patients was 8% for thallium score less than 7 and 11% for ejection fraction greater than 35%. The mortality rate was highest among patients who had concordant high-risk scintigrams (five of six, 83%), lowest in those with concordant low-risk studies (five of 64, 8%) and intermediate in those with discordant results (four of 11, 36%). Of a number of clinical variables, only the appearance of Q waves, peak creatine kinase greater than 1000 IU/I, and history of infarction were significantly associated with mortality. High-risk thallium or blood pool scintigraphic results were significantly more predictive and a thallium score of 7 or greater was more sensitive for detecting nonsurvivors than ejection fraction 35% or less at a similar level of specificity

  17. Rapid computation of single PET scan rest-stress myocardial blood flow parametric images by table look up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehl, Nicolas J; Normandin, Marc D; Wooten, Dustin W; Rozen, Guy; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Shoup, Timothy M; Woo, Jonghye; Ptaszek, Leon M; Fakhri, Georges El; Alpert, Nathaniel M

    2017-09-01

    We have recently reported a method for measuring rest-stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) using a single, relatively short, PET scan session. The method requires two IV tracer injections, one to initiate rest imaging and one at peak stress. We previously validated absolute flow quantitation in ml/min/cc for standard bull's eye, segmental analysis. In this work, we extend the method for fast computation of rest-stress MBF parametric images. We provide an analytic solution to the single-scan rest-stress flow model which is then solved using a two-dimensional table lookup method (LM). Simulations were performed to compare the accuracy and precision of the lookup method with the original nonlinear method (NLM). Then the method was applied to 16 single scan rest/stress measurements made in 12 pigs: seven studied after infarction of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) territory, and nine imaged in the native state. Parametric maps of rest and stress MBF as well as maps of left (f LV ) and right (f RV ) ventricular spill-over fractions were generated. Regions of interest (ROIs) for 17 myocardial segments were defined in bull's eye fashion on the parametric maps. The mean of each ROI was then compared to the rest (K 1r ) and stress (K 1s ) MBF estimates obtained from fitting the 17 regional TACs with the NLM. In simulation, the LM performed as well as the NLM in terms of precision and accuracy. The simulation did not show that bias was introduced by the use of a predefined two-dimensional lookup table. In experimental data, parametric maps demonstrated good statistical quality and the LM was computationally much more efficient than the original NLM. Very good agreement was obtained between the mean MBF calculated on the parametric maps for each of the 17 ROIs and the regional MBF values estimated by the NLM (K 1map LM  = 1.019 × K 1 ROI NLM  + 0.019, R 2  = 0.986; mean difference = 0.034 ± 0.036 mL/min/cc). We developed a table lookup method for fast

  18. Relationship between SPECT regional cerebral blood flow imaging and cognitive function in school-age children with epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiangyan; Chen Xuehong; Wang Zhengjiang; Hu Jingui; Feng Jianzhong; Li Yimin; Lu Xiujuan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feature of SPECT regional cerebral blood flow(rCBF) imaging, the cognitive functions and the relationship between them in school-age children with primary epilepsy. Methods: 99 Tc m -ethylene cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain imaging was performed on 32 school-age children with primary generalized tonic and (or) clonic seizures(GTCS). Cognitive functions were also evaluated in all patients and normal children. Relationship between cognitive function and rCBF was compared. Results: (1) Thirty of 32 (93.8%) patients were abnormal on SPECT imaging. Fifty areas of 29 cases showed decreased rCBF, the percentage of decreased rCBF was (21.07 ± 7.09)%; 2 areas of 1 case showed increased rCBF, the percentage of increased rCBF was (32.22 ± 4.31)%. 92.3% of the epileptic foci were located in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortexes. (2) Verbal intelligence quotient (VIQ), performance intelligence quotient (PIQ) and full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) of children with epilepsy were significantly lower than those of the controls, and there were some cognitive skewnesses in children with epilepsy (VIQ >PIQ). (3)There was negative correlation between the number of foci and VIQ, PIQ, FIQ, the correlation coefficients were -0.543 (P=0.002), -0.469 (P=0.009), -0.578 (P=0.001); there was negative correlation between the extent of foci and VIQ, PIQ, FIQ, the correlation coefficients were -0.560 (P=0.003), -0.142 (P=0.016), -0.582 (P=0.001); there was no significant correlation between all the IQ of cognitive test and the percentage of changed rCBF. Conclusions: SPECT rCBF imaging may be useful for the localization of epileptic focus. Some of school-age children with epilepsy have impairment of the cognitive function, its magnitude is negative correlated with the number and extent of epileptic foci. (authors)

  19. Phase contrast MR imaging measurements of blood flow in healthy human cerebral vessel segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Matthew Ethan; Frayne, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging was used to obtain velocity measurements in 30 healthy subjects to provide an assessment of hemodynamic parameters in cerebral vessels. We expect a lower coefficient-of-variation (COV) of the volume flow rate (VFR) compared to peak velocity (v_p_e_a_k) measurements and the COV to increase in smaller caliber arteries compared to large arteries.PC velocity maps were processed to calculate v_p_e_a_k and VFR in 26 vessel segments. The mean, standard deviation and COV, of v_p_e_a_k and VFR in each segment were calculated. A bootstrap-style analysis was used to determine the minimum number of subjects required to accurately represent the population. Significance of v_p_e_a_k and VFR asymmetry was assessed in 10 vessel pairs.The bootstrap analysis suggested that averaging more than 20 subjects would give consistent results. When averaged over the subjects, v_p_e_a_k and VFR ranged from 5.2 ± 7.1 cm s"−"1, 0.41 ± 0.58 ml s"−"1 (in the anterior communicating artery; mean ± standard deviation) to 73 ± 23 cm s"−"1, 7.6 ± 1.7 ml s"−"1 (in the left internal carotid artery), respectively. A tendency for VFR to be higher in the left hemisphere was observed in 88.8% of artery pairs, while the VFR in the right transverse sinus was larger. The VFR COV was larger than v_p_e_a_k COV in 57.7% of segments, while smaller vessels had higher COV.Significance and potential impact: VFR COV was not generally higher than v_p_e_a_k COV. COV was higher in smaller vessels as expected. These summarized values provide a base against which v_p_e_a_k and VFR in various disease states can be compared. (paper)

  20. Gd-DTPA L-cystine bisamide copolymers as novel biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents for MR blood pool imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshiro, Todd L; Ke, Tianyi; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Parker, Dennis L; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize biodegradable Gd-DTPA L-cystine bisamide copolymers (GCAC) as safe and effective, macromolecular contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate their biodegradability and efficacy in MR blood pool imaging in an animal model. Three new biodegradable GCAC with different substituents at the cystine bisamide [R = H (GCAC), CH2CH2CH3 (Gd-DTPA L-cystine bispropyl amide copolymers, GCPC), and CH(CH3)2 (Gd-DTPA cystine bisisopropyl copolymers, GCIC)] were prepared by the condensation copolymerization of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride with cystine bisamide or bisalkyl amides, followed by complexation with gadolinium triacetate. The degradability of the agents was studied in vitro by incubation in 15 microM cysteine and in vivo with Sprague-Dawley rats. The kinetics of in vivo contrast enhancement was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats on a Siemens Trio 3 T scanner. The apparent molecular weight of the polydisulfide Gd(III) chelates ranged from 22 to 25 kDa. The longitudinal (T1) relaxivities of GCAC, GCPC, and GCIC were 4.37, 5.28, and 5.56 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3 T, respectively. The polymeric ligands and polymeric Gd(III) chelates readily degraded into smaller molecules in incubation with 15 microM cysteine via disulfide-thiol exchange reactions. The in vitro degradation rates of both the polymeric ligands and macromolecular Gd(III) chelates decreased as the steric effect around the disulfide bonds increased. The agents readily degraded in vivo, and the catabolic degradation products were detected in rat urine samples collected after intravenous injection. The agents showed strong contrast enhancement in the blood pool, major organs, and tissues at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg. The difference of their in vitro degradability did not significantly alter the kinetics of in vivo contrast enhancement of the agents. These novel GCAC are promising contrast agents for cardiovascular and tumor MRI

  1. Comparison of the image-derived radioactivity and blood-sample radioactivity for estimating the clinical indicators of the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): 4-borono-2-18F-fluoro-phenylalanine (FBPA) PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isohashi, Kayako; Shimosegawa, Eku; Naka, Sadahiro; Kanai, Yasukazu; Horitsugi, Genki; Mochida, Ikuko; Matsunaga, Keiko; Watabe, Tadashi; Kato, Hiroki; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-12-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), positron emission tomography (PET) with 4-borono-2- 18 F-fluoro-phenylalanine (FBPA) is the only method to estimate an accumulation of 10 B to target tumor and surrounding normal tissue after administering 10 B carrier of L-paraboronophenylalanine and to search the indication of BNCT for individual patient. Absolute concentration of 10 B in tumor has been estimated by multiplying 10 B concentration in blood during BNCT by tumor to blood radioactivity (T/B) ratio derived from FBPA PET. However, the method to measure blood radioactivity either by blood sampling or image data has not been standardized. We compared image-derived blood radioactivity of FBPA with blood sampling data and studied appropriate timing and location for measuring image-derived blood counts. We obtained 7 repeated whole-body PET scans in five healthy subjects. Arterialized venous blood samples were obtained from the antecubital vein, heated in a heating blanket. Time-activity curves (TACs) of image-derived blood radioactivity were obtained using volumes of interest (VOIs) over ascending aorta, aortic arch, pulmonary artery, left and right ventricles, inferior vena cava, and abdominal aorta. Image-derived blood radioactivity was compared with those measured by blood sampling data in each location. Both the TACs of blood sampling radioactivity in each subject, and the TACs of image-derived blood radioactivity showed a peak within 5 min after the tracer injection, and promptly decreased soon thereafter. Linear relationship was found between blood sampling radioactivity and image-derived blood radioactivity in all the VOIs at any timing of data sampling (p radioactivity measured in the left and right ventricles 30 min after injection showed high correlation with blood radioactivity. Image-derived blood radioactivity was lower than blood sampling radioactivity data by 20 %. Reduction of blood radioactivity of FBPA in left ventricle after 30 min of FBPA

  2. Noninvasive parametric blood flow imaging of head and neck tumours using [15O]H2O and PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Gaber; Oikonen, Vesa; Sipilä, Hannu; Seppänen, Marko; Minn, Heikki

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple noninvasive method for measuring blood flow using [15O]H2O PET/CT for the head and neck area applicable in daily clinical practice. Fifteen dynamic [15O]H2O PET emission scans with simultaneous online radioactivity measurements of radial arterial blood [Blood-input functions (IFs)] were performed. Two noninvasively obtained population-based input functions were calculated by averaging all Blood-IF curves corrected for patients' body mass and injected dose [standardized uptake value (SUV)-IF] and for body surface area (BSA-IF) and injected dose. Parametric perfusion images were calculated for each set of IFs using a linearized two-compartment model, and values for several tissues were compared using Blood-IF as the gold standard. On comparing all tissues, the correlation between blood flow obtained with the invasive Blood-IF and both SUV-IF and BSA-IF was significant (R2=0.785 with P<0.001 and R2=0.813 with P<0.001, respectively). In individual tissues, the performance of the two noninvasive methods was most reliable in resting muscle and slightly less reliable in tumour and cerebellar regions. In these two tissues, only BSA-IF showed a significant correlation with Blood-IF (R2=0.307 with P=0.032 in tumours and R2=0.398 with P<0.007 in the cerebellum). The BSA-based noninvasive method enables clinically relevant delineation between areas of low and high blood flow in tumours. The blood flow of low-perfusion tissues can be reliably quantified using either of the evaluated noninvasive methods.

  3. Blood Perfusion in Human Eyelid Skin Flaps Examined by Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging-Importance of Flap Length and the Use of Diathermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cu Dinh; Hult, Jenny; Sheikh, Rafi; Tenland, Kajsa; Dahlstrand, Ulf; Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin

    2017-10-11

    It is well known that blood perfusion is important for the survival of skin flaps. As no study has been conducted to investigate how the blood perfusion in human eyelid skin flaps is affected by the flap length and diathermy, the present study was carried out to investigate these in patients. Fifteen upper eyelids were dissected as part of a blepharoplastic procedure, releasing a 30-mm long piece of skin, while allowing the 5 mm wide distal part of the skin to remain attached, to mimic a skin flap (hereafter called a "skin flap"). Blood perfusion was measured before and after repeated diathermy, using laser speckle contrast imaging. Blood perfusion decreased from the base to the tip of the flap: 5 mm from the base, the perfusion was 69%, at 10 mm it was 40%, at 15 mm it was 20%, and at 20 mm it was only 13% of baseline values. Diathermy further decreased blood perfusion (measured 15 mm from the base) to 13% after applying diathermy for the first time, to 6% after the second and to 4% after the third applications of diathermy. Blood perfusion falls rapidly with distance from the base of skin flaps on the human eyelid, and diathermy reduces blood perfusion even further. Clinically, it may be advised that flaps with a width of 5 mm be no longer than 15 mm (i.e., a width:length ratio of 1:3), and that the use of diathermy should be carefully considered.

  4. SPR imaging biosensor for the 20S proteasome: Sensor development and application to measurement of proteasomes in human blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkiewicz, E.; Sankiewicz, A.; Ostrowska, H.

    2011-01-01

    The 20S proteasome is a multicatalytic enzyme complex responsible for intracellular protein degradation in mammalian cells. Its antigen level or enzymatic activity in blood plasma are potentially useful markers for various malignant and nonmalignant diseases. We have developed a method for highly selective determination of the 20S proteasome using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging (SPRI) technique. It is based on the highly selective interaction between the proteasome's catalytic β5 subunit and immobilized inhibitors (the synthetic peptide PSI and epoxomicin). Inhibitor concentration and pH were optimized. Analytical responses, linear ranges, accuracy, precision and interferences were investigated. Biosensors based on either PSI and epoxomicin were found to be suitable for quantitative determination of the proteasome, with a precision of ±10% for each, and recoveries of 102% and 113%, respectively, and with little interference by albumin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, cathepsin B and papain. The proteasome also was determined in plasma of healthy subjects and of patients suffering from acute leukemia. Both biosensors gave comparable results (2860 ng.mL -1 on average for control, and 42300 ng.mL -1 on average for leukemia patients). (author)

  5. ACE blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003567.htm ACE blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Alternative Names Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme; SACE Images Blood test References Carty RP, Pincus MR, Sarafraz-Yazdi E. ...

  6. LDH isoenzyme blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003499.htm LDH isoenzyme blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Names LD; LDH; Lactic (lactate) dehydrogenase isoenzymes Images Blood test References Carty RP, Pincus MR, Sarafraz-Yazdi E. ...

  7. Aldolase blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003566.htm Aldolase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... risk any time the skin is broken) Images Blood test References Berridge BR, Van Vleet JF, Herman E. ...

  8. Leucine aminopeptidase blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003559.htm Leucine aminopeptidase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Alternative Names Serum leucine aminopeptidase; LAP - serum Images Blood test References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) - ...

  9. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to top How are Blood Clots in Pregnant Women Treated? Typically, blood clots are treated with an ... Image Bank Advocacy Action Alerts Policy News Advocacy Leadership Institute Policy Statements Testimony & Correspondence Meetings ASH Annual ...

  10. [Value of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant hepatic lesions and blood perfusion evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, M L; Xiao, W W; Xu, S L; Shu, J E; Pan, J F; Fu, J F; Lu, J H; Pan, Y H; Jiang, Y

    2016-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the value of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging (IVIM-DWI) in the differential diagnosis and blood perfusion evaluation of benign and malignant hepatic lesions. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for 86 patients (96 lesions) with pathologically or clinically confirmed hepatic lesions or hepatic lesions diagnosed based on follow-up results, among whom 48 had malignant lesions (53 lesions) and 38 had benign lesions (43 lesions). The patients underwent conventional magnetic resonance (MR) plain scan, contrast-enhanced scan, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with different b values (b = 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1 000, and 1 200 s/mm 2 ) to determine the parameters of the double exponential model for intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM): fast diffusion coefficient Dfast, slow diffusion coefficient Dslow, and percentage of fast-diffusion constituent F value. The patients were divided into groups according to the blood supply to lesions on conventional MR plain scan and contrast-enhanced scan, and there were 47 lesions in abundant blood supply group and 49 in poor blood supply group. The data for analysis were Dfast, Dslow, and F values of benign/malignant lesion groups and abundant/poor blood supply groups. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis; the independent samples non-parametric test Mann-Whitney U test was used for the comparison of F value; the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the value of above parameters in the differentiation of benign and malignant lesions and blood supply evaluation. Results: Compared with the malignant lesion group, the benign lesion group had significantly higher Dslow, and F values ( P benign and malignant hepatic lesions, and F value can show blood perfusion in benign and malignant hepatic lesions without the need for contrast-enhanced scan, which provides a reference for the qualitative diagnosis of liver

  11. Dynamic changes in the distribution and time course of blood-brain barrier-permeative nitroxides in the mouse head with EPR imaging: visualization of blood flow in a mouse model of ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, Miho C; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Hirata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hirotada G

    2014-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging using nitroxides as redox-sensitive probes is a powerful, noninvasive method that can be used under various physiological conditions to visualize changes in redox status that result from oxidative damage. Two blood-brain barrier-permeative nitroxides, 3-hydroxymethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (HMP) and 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-yloxy (MCP), have been widely used as redox-sensitive probes in the brains of small animals, but their in vivo distribution and properties have not yet been analyzed in detail. In this study, a custom-made continuous-wave three-dimensional (3D) EPR imager was used to obtain 3D EPR images of mouse heads using MCP or HMP. This EPR imager made it possible to take 3D EPR images reconstructed from data from 181 projections acquired every 60s. Using this improved EPR imager and magnetic resonance imaging, the distribution and reduction time courses of HMP and MCP were examined in mouse heads. EPR images of living mice revealed that HMP and MCP have different distributions and different time courses for entering the brain. Based on the pharmacokinetics of the reduction reactions of HMP and MCP in the mouse head, the half-lives of HMP and MCP were clearly and accurately mapped pixel by pixel. An ischemic mouse model was prepared, and the half-life of MCP was mapped in the mouse head. Compared to the half-life in control mice, the half-life of MCP in the ischemic model mouse brain was significantly increased, suggesting a shift in the redox balance. This in vivo EPR imaging method using BBB-permeative MCP is a useful noninvasive method for assessing changes in the redox status in mouse brains under oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematic Study of the Content of Phytochemicals in Fresh and Fresh-Cut Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Alarcón-Flores

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vegetables and fruits have beneficial properties for human health, because of the presence of phytochemicals, but their concentration can fluctuate throughout the year. A systematic study of the phytochemical content in tomato, eggplant, carrot, broccoli and grape (fresh and fresh-cut has been performed at different seasons, using liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. It was observed that phenolic acids (the predominant group in carrot, eggplant and tomato were found at higher concentrations in fresh carrot than in fresh-cut carrot. However, in the case of eggplant, they were detected at a higher content in fresh-cut than in fresh samples. Regarding tomato, the differences in the content of phenolic acids between fresh and fresh-cut were lower than in other matrices, except in winter sampling, where this family was detected at the highest concentration in fresh tomato. In grape, the flavonols content (predominant group was higher in fresh grape than in fresh-cut during all samplings. The content of glucosinolates was lower in fresh-cut broccoli than in fresh samples in winter and spring sampling, although this trend changes in summer and autumn. In summary, phytochemical concentration did show significant differences during one-year monitoring, and the families of phytochemicals presented different behaviors depending on the matrix studied.

  13. Assessment of early renal allograft dysfunction with blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Yoon [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo, E-mail: chankyokim@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung Kwan [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ju; Lee, Sanghoon [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Wooseong [Department of Nephrology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • R2* and ADC in renal allografts are moderately correlated with eGFR. • R2* and ADC are lower in early allograft dysfunction than normal allograft function. • No significant difference between AR and ATN was found in both R2* and ADC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 3 T for assessment of early renal allograft dysfunction. Materials and methods: 34 patients with a renal allograft (early dysfunction, 24; normal, 10) were prospectively enrolled. BOLD MRI and DWI were performed at 3 T. R2* and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured in cortex and medulla of the allografts. Correlation between R2* or ADC values and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was investigated. R2* or ADC values were compared among acute rejection (AR), acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and normal function. Results: In all renal allografts, cortical or medullary R2* and ADC values were moderately correlated with eGFR (P < 0.05). Early dysfunction group showed lower R2* and ADC values than normal function group (P < 0.05). AR or ATN had lower R2* values than normal allografts (P < 0.05), and ARs had lower cortical ADC values than normal allografts (P < 0.05). No significant difference of R2* or ADC values was found between AR and ATN (P > 0.05). Conclusion: BOLD MRI and DWI at 3 T may demonstrate early functional state of renal allografts, but may be limited in characterizing a cause of early renal allograft dysfunction. Further studies are needed.

  14. Intracranial arterial wall enhancement using gadolinium-enhanced 3D black-blood T1-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Koichi, E-mail: k-takano@fukuoka-u.ac.jp; Hida, Kosuke; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Yoshimitsu, Kengo

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: We investigated the enhancement of the intracranial arterial walls with gadolinium-enhanced, black-blood three-dimensional T1-weighted imaging (Gd-3DBB) by using an improved motion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (iMSDE)—prepared volumetric isotropic turbo spin-echo acquisition (VISTA). Methods: A total of 115 patients underwent FLAIR, 3D-TOF-MRA and Gd-3DBB with a 1.5-T scanner. The degree and distribution of the arterial wall enhancement on Gd-3DBB was assessed. The association of the degree of wall enhancement with brain infarction/ischemic lesions on FLAIR, luminal changes on 3D-TOF-MRA, and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) was investigated by univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results: Strong enhancement of the arterial walls was observed in 77 vertebral arteries (33.5%), 4 basilar arteries (3.5%), 31 supraclinoid internal carotid arteries (ICAs) (13.5%) and 8 middle cerebral arteries (3.5%). In addition, 221 intrapetrous ICAs (96.1%) showed strong enhancement. After adjusting for confounding factors, multivariate analyses showed that the patient age was independently associated with the strong wall enhancement of the arteries for both the posterior (OR, 1.088; 95% CI, 1.034–1.146) and the anterior circulation (OR, 1.098, 95% CI 1.029–1.172). In addition, the presence of the supratentorial brain infarctions was independently associated with the strong wall enhancement in the anterior circulation excluding the intrapetrous ICAs (OR, 4.097; 95% CI, 1.483–11.319). Conclusions: Although the arterial wall enhancement on the Gd-3DBB probably reflects normal aging, the enhancement in the anterior circulation might be related to brain infarctions. On the other hand, the intrapetrous ICA enhancement is considered a nonspecific finding and should not be mistaken for arterial pathologies such as atherosclerosis or arteritis.

  15. Effects of Ginkgo biloba on cerebral blood flow assessed by quantitative MR perfusion imaging: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashayekh, Ameneh; Pham, Dzung L.; Yousem, David M.; Dizon, Mercedes; Barker, Peter B.; Lin, Doris D.M. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb), a dietary supplement used for a number of conditions including dementia, has been suggested to increase cerebral blood flow (CBF). The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in CBF could be detected by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in elderly human subjects taking EGb. DSC-MRI was performed in nine healthy men (mean age 61 {+-} 10 years) before and after 4 weeks of 60 mg EGb taken twice daily. One subject underwent six consecutive scans to evaluate intrasubject reproducibility. CBF values were computed before and after EGb, and analyzed at three different levels of spatial resolution, using voxel-based statistical parametric mapping (SPM), and regions of interest in different lobes, and all regions combined. Normalized intrasubject CBF (nCBF) measurements had a standard deviation of 7% and 4% in gray and white matter (WM) regions, respectively. SPM using an uncorrected, voxel-level threshold of P {<=} 0.001 showed a small CBF increase in the left parietal-occipital region. CBF in individual lobar regions did not show any significant change post-EGb, but all regions combined showed a significant increase of non-normalized CBF after EGb (15% in white and 13% in gray matter, respectively, P {<=} 0.0001). nCBF measured by DSC-MRI has good intrasubject reproducibility. In this small cohort of normal elderly individuals, a mild increase in CBF is found in the left parietal-occipital WM after EGb, as well as a small but statistically significant increase in global CBF. (orig.)

  16. Intracranial arterial wall enhancement using gadolinium-enhanced 3D black-blood T1-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Koichi; Hida, Kosuke; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Yoshimitsu, Kengo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the enhancement of the intracranial arterial walls with gadolinium-enhanced, black-blood three-dimensional T1-weighted imaging (Gd-3DBB) by using an improved motion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (iMSDE)—prepared volumetric isotropic turbo spin-echo acquisition (VISTA). Methods: A total of 115 patients underwent FLAIR, 3D-TOF-MRA and Gd-3DBB with a 1.5-T scanner. The degree and distribution of the arterial wall enhancement on Gd-3DBB was assessed. The association of the degree of wall enhancement with brain infarction/ischemic lesions on FLAIR, luminal changes on 3D-TOF-MRA, and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) was investigated by univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results: Strong enhancement of the arterial walls was observed in 77 vertebral arteries (33.5%), 4 basilar arteries (3.5%), 31 supraclinoid internal carotid arteries (ICAs) (13.5%) and 8 middle cerebral arteries (3.5%). In addition, 221 intrapetrous ICAs (96.1%) showed strong enhancement. After adjusting for confounding factors, multivariate analyses showed that the patient age was independently associated with the strong wall enhancement of the arteries for both the posterior (OR, 1.088; 95% CI, 1.034–1.146) and the anterior circulation (OR, 1.098, 95% CI 1.029–1.172). In addition, the presence of the supratentorial brain infarctions was independently associated with the strong wall enhancement in the anterior circulation excluding the intrapetrous ICAs (OR, 4.097; 95% CI, 1.483–11.319). Conclusions: Although the arterial wall enhancement on the Gd-3DBB probably reflects normal aging, the enhancement in the anterior circulation might be related to brain infarctions. On the other hand, the intrapetrous ICA enhancement is considered a nonspecific finding and should not be mistaken for arterial pathologies such as atherosclerosis or arteritis.

  17. Visualization of hypertrophied papillary muscle mimicking left ventricular mass on gated blood pool and T1-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunko, H.; Nakajima, K.; Tonami, N.; Asanoi, H.; Hisada, K.

    1981-01-01

    A sixty-year old man with acute myocardial infarction was incidentally found to have a hypertrophied anterolateral papillary muscle (ALPPM) of the left ventricle on gated blood pool (GBP) and T1-201 myocardial perfusion images. Hypertrophy of the ALPPM was visualized as a movable defect in the lateral basal area on GBP imaging throughout the cardiac cycle and on the TI-201 study as a radionuclide accumulating structure, consistent with the defect in the GBP. A combination of these findings may suggest the presence of a hypertrophied papillary muscle of the left ventricle

  18. Myocardial blood flow quantification for evaluation of coronary artery disease by positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Alfonso H; Blankstein, Ron; Kwong, Raymond Y; Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2014-05-01

    The noninvasive detection of the presence and functional significance of coronary artery stenosis is important in the diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion can provide an objective and reproducible estimate of myocardial ischemia and risk prediction. Positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography perfusion are modalities capable of measuring myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. In this review, we will discuss the technical aspects of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography, and its emerging clinical applications.

  19. Rapid MR venography in children using a blood pool contrast agent and multi-station fat-water-separated volumetric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanouni, Pejman; Walters, Shannon G.; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid, reliable radiation-free method of pediatric body venography might complement US by evaluating veins in the abdomen and pelvis and by providing a global depiction of venous anatomy. We describe a MR venography technique utilizing gadofosveset, a blood pool contrast agent, in children. The technique allows high-spatial-resolution imaging of the veins from the diaphragm to the knees in less than 15 min of total exam time. (orig.)

  20. Noninvasive determination of myocardial blood flow, oxygen consumption and efficiency in normal humans by carbon-11 acetate positron emission tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porenta, G.; Cherry, S.; Czernin, J.; Brunken, R.; Kuhle, W.; Hashimoto, T.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to measure noninvasively and near simultaneously myocardial blood flow, oxygen consumption, and contractile function and (2) to analyze myocardial energy expenditure and efficiency at rest and during dobutamine stress in normal humans. Dynamic and gated carbon-11 acetate positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in 11 normal subjects. The initial uptake of 11 C-acetate was measured to estimate myocardial blood flow. Oxygen consumption was derived from the monoexponential slope of the 11 C-clearance curve recorded during myocardial washout. ECG-gated systolic and diastolic images were acquired during the peak myocardial 11 C activity to measure left ventricular radius, myocardial wall thickness, and long axis length. Myocardial oxygen consumption and parameters of cardiac geometry were used to determine myocardial energetics and cardiac efficiency by tension-area area analysis. Myocardial blood flow averaged 0.8±0.06 ml min -1 g -1 at rest and 1.48±0.15 ml min -1 g -1 during dobutamine stress. Oxygen delivery and consumption were 151±13 and 88±15 μl O 2 min -1 g -1 at rest and increased to 291±31 and 216±31 μl O 2 min -1 g -1 , respectively, during pharmacological stress (P 11 C acetate imaging provides the unique capability to study noninvasively determinants of myocardial energy delivery, expenditure, and efficiency. (orig.)

  1. Apparent brain temperature imaging with multi-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy compared with cerebral blood flow and metabolism imaging on positron emission tomography in patients with unilateral chronic major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanba, Takamasa; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Murakami, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Ogasawara, Kuniaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate (Japan); Yoshioka, Yoshichika [Osaka University, Open and Transdisciplinary Research Initiatives, Osaka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Uwano, Ikuko [Iwate Medical University, Institute for Biomedical Science, Iwate (Japan); Terasaki, Kazunori [Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Iwate (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether apparent brain temperature imaging using multi-voxel proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy correlates with cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism imaging in the deep white matter of patients with unilateral chronic major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease. Apparent brain temperature and CBF and metabolism imaging were measured using proton MR spectroscopy and {sup 15}O-positron emission tomography (PET), respectively, in 35 patients. A set of regions of interest (ROIs) of 5 x 5 voxels was placed on an MR image so that the voxel row at each edge was located in the deep white matter of the centrum semiovale in each cerebral hemisphere. PET images were co-registered with MR images with these ROIs and were re-sliced automatically using image analysis software. In 175 voxel pairs located in the deep white matter, the brain temperature difference (affected hemisphere - contralateral hemisphere: ΔBT) was correlated with cerebral blood volume (CBV) (r = 0.570) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) ratios (affected hemisphere/contralateral hemisphere) (r = 0.641). We excluded voxels that contained ischemic lesions or cerebrospinal fluid and calculated the mean values of voxel pairs in each patient. The mean ΔBT was correlated with the mean CBF (r = - 0.376), mean CBV (r = 0.702), and mean OEF ratio (r = 0.774). Apparent brain temperature imaging using multi-voxel proton MR spectroscopy was correlated with CBF and metabolism imaging in the deep white matter of patients with unilateral major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease. (orig.)

  2. Fresh-keeping of mushroom by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chao; Xu Hongqing; Wang Hong; Cai Jian

    2003-01-01

    The effect of 60 Co γ irradiation on the preservation of Agaricus bisporus were studied. The results showed that after irradiation the mushroom had lower rates of membrane split, opening of pilei, browning, decomposition and lose of fresh weight. The fresh keeping period of mushroom irradiated with 1.2 kGy and stored at 4 degree C was prolonged to 30 days

  3. Fresh fruit: microstructure, texture and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh-cut produce has a huge following in today’s supermarkets. The trend follows the need to decrease preparation time as well as the desire to follow the current health guidelines for consumption of more whole “heart-healthy” foods. Additionally, consumers are able to enjoy a variety of fresh prod...

  4. What determines fresh fish consumption in Croatia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Marina; Matulić, Daniel; Jelić, Margareta

    2016-11-01

    Although fresh fish is widely available, consumption still remains below the recommended intake levels among the majority of European consumers. The economic crisis affects consumer food behaviour, therefore fresh fish is perceived as healthy but expensive food product. The aim of this study was to determine the factors influencing fresh fish consumption using an expanded Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1991) as a theoretical framework. The survey was conducted on a heterogeneous sample of 1151 Croatian fresh fish consumers. The study investigated the relationship between attitudes, perceived behavioural control, subjective norm, moral obligation, involvement in health, availability, intention and consumption of fresh fish. Structural Equation Modeling by Partial Least Squares was used to analyse the collected data. The results indicated that attitudes are the strongest positive predictor of the intention to consume fresh fish. Other significant predictors of the intention to consume fresh fish were perceived behavioural control, subjective norm, health involvement and moral obligation. The intention to consume fresh fish showed a strong positive correlation with behaviour. This survey provides valuable information for food marketing professionals and for the food industry in general. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Consumers' store choice behavior for fresh food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, M.T.G.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Consumers' preference for fresh food stores is analyzed. In particular the choice between supermarkets and specialized shops for purchasing fresh food is analyzed. Attention is given to the factors influencing this choice. For this purpose a number of research questions with respect to store choice

  6. Simultaneous assessment of cerebral blood volume and diffusion heterogeneity using hybrid IVIM and DK MR imaging: initial experience with brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-Chau [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Oncology, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Yang, Shun-Chung; Chen, Ya-Fang; My, Pei-Chi [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Tseng, Han-Min [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Taipei (China)

    2017-01-15

    To investigate the feasibility of simultaneously assessing cerebral blood volume and diffusion heterogeneity using hybrid diffusion-kurtosis (DK) and intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) MR imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers and 30 patients with histologically proven brain tumours (25 WHO grade II-IV gliomas and five metastases) were recruited. On a 3-T system, diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with six b-values ranging from 0 to 1,700 s/mm{sup 2}. Nonlinear least-squares fitting was employed to extract diffusion coefficient (D), diffusion kurtosis coefficient (K, a measure of the degree of non-Gaussian and heterogeneous diffusion) and intravascular volume fraction (f, a measure proportional to cerebral blood volume). Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed to assess the ability of D/K/f in differentiating contrast-enhanced tumour from peritumoral oedema and normal-appearing white matter. Based on our imaging setting (baseline signal-to-noise ratio = 32-128), coefficient of variation was 14-20 % for K, ∝6 % for D and 26-44 % for f. The indexes were able to differentiate contrast-enhanced tumour (Wilks' λ = 0.026, p < 10{sup -3}), and performance was greatest with K, followed by f and D. Hybrid DK IVIM imaging is capable of simultaneously measuring cerebral perfusion and diffusion indexes that together may improve brain tumour diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Gordura protegida na dieta de vacas de alta produção a campo, em alfafa verde ou pré-secada, na fase inicial da lactação: parâmetros plasmáticos Protected fat to high producing dairy cows, under grazing, supplemented with fresh or haylage alfalfa, in early lactation: blood parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Fôlha Bermudes

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho foi desenvolvido na Estação Experimental Agropecuária do Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuária (EEA-INTA, Rafaela da Argentina. Foram utilizadas 32 vacas da raça Holando-Argentina, de alta produção (média de 36 litros de leite por dia e na fase inicial da lactação, com o objetivo de avaliar os parâmetros plasmáticos (ácidos graxos, glicose, triglicerídeos e a enzima hepática gama-glutamiltransferase. Foram comparados dois níveis de gordura protegida (0 e 400 gramas e duas formas de oferecimento de alfafa (verde e pré-secada. Todos os animais foram submetidos a um período pré-experimental de 15 dias, quando receberam ou não suplementação de gordura. Após o parto os animais foram distribuídos em piquetes com alfafa verde ou alfafa pré-secada, constituindo quatro tratamentos. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente ao acaso em fatorial 2x2, utilizando-se dias pós-parto e ordem de lactação como covariâncias. A interpretação estatística foi feita pela análise da variância e teste F e os resultados mostraram que não houve diferenças significativas entre os tratamentos experimentais.This trial was run at Estación Experiment Agropecuária of INTA (EEA-INTA, Rafaela, Argentina. Thirty-two high producing Hostein-Argentina dairy cows were used in early lactation, aiming to evaluate blood parameters at two levels of protected fat (0 and 400 g/cow/day and two types of alfalfa (fresh or haylage. All cows were submitted to a pre-trial period of fifteen day in two groups: with and without fat supplementation. The animals, post-partum, were allocated to paddocks with green or pre-dried alfalfa, comprising, then, four experimental treatments. A completely randomized design with a 2x2 factorial, using days post-partum and lactation order as covariates, was used. The statistical analysis was performed by using the analysis of variance and F-test. There were no differences among experimental treatments.

  8. Cerebral blood flow and related factors in hyperthyroidism patients by SPECT imaging and statistical parametric mapping analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu Yan; Shi Hongcheng; Liu Wenguan; Chen Xuefen; Gu Yushen; Chen Shuguang; Yu Haojun; Yu Yiping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cerebral blood flow (CBF) perfusion patterns and related factors in hyperthyroidism patients. Methods: Twenty-five patients with hyperthyroidism and twenty-two healthy controls matched for age, sex, education were enrolled. 99 Tc m -ethylene cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT CBF perfusion imaging was performed at rest. Statistical parametric mapping 5.0 software (SPM5) was used and a statistical threshold of P 3 , FT 4 ), thyroid autoimmune antibodies: sensitive thyroid stimulating hormone (sTSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) and TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) by Pearson analysis, with disease duration by Spearman analysis. Results: rCBF was decreased significantly in limbic system and frontal lobe, including parahippocampal gyrus, uncus (posterior entorhinal cortex, posterior parolfactory cortex, parahippocampal cortex, anterior cingulate, right inferior temporal gyrus), left hypothalamus and caudate nucleus (P 3 (r=-0.468, -0.417, both P 4 (r=-0.4M, -0.418, -0.415, -0.459, all P 4 (r=0.419, 0.412, both P<0.05). rCBF in left insula was negatively correlated with concentration of sTSH, and right auditory associated cortex was positively correlated with concentration of sTSH (r=-0.504, 0.429, both P<0.05). rCBF in left middle temporal gyrus, left angular gyrus was positively correlated with concentration of TRAb while that in right thalamus, right hypothalamus, left anterior nucleus,left ventralis nucleus was negatively correlated with concentration of TRAb (r=0.750, 0.862, -0.691, -0.835, -0.713, -0.759, all P<0.05). rCBF in right anterior cingulate, right cuneus, right rectus gyrus, right superior marginal gyrus was positively correlated with concentration of TPOAb (r=0.696, 0.581, 0.779, 0.683, all P<0.05). rCBF in postcentral gyrus, temporal gyrus, left superior marginal gyrus and auditory associated cortex was positively correlated with disease duration (r=0.502, 0.457, 0.524, 0.440, all P<0.05). Conclusion: Hypoperfusions in

  9. 99mTc-MDP combined blood pool and bone phase radionuclide imaging in papain-injected carpal joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, M.R.; Twardock, A.R.; Sanecki, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Scintigraphic changes, i.e., increased activity, were induced by 1% papain, dissolved in phosphate-buffered physiologic saline (pH 7.4), injected into one antebrachiocarpal joint in each of eight dogs. Scintigraphic evaluation was by the use of combined blood pool and bone phase scintigraphy of affected and normal carpi over a 28-day period. The qualitative and quantitative scintigraphic appearance in injected carpal joints were very similar in both blood pool and bone phases. The clinical use of combined blood pool and bone phase scintigraphy to diagnose early inflammatory joint changes appears limited

  10. Can echocardiographic particle image velocimetry correctly detect motion patterns as they occur in blood inside heart chambers? A validation study using moving phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prinz Christian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To validate Echo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV Methods High fidelity string and rotating phantoms moving with different speed patterns were imaged with different high-end ultrasound systems at varying insonation angles and frame rates. Images were analyzed for velocity and direction and for complex motion patterns of blood flow with dedicated software. Post-processing was done with MATLAB-based tools (Dflow, JUV, University Leuven. Results Velocity estimation was accurate up to a velocity of 42 cm/s (r = 0.99, p  Conclusion Echo-PIV appears feasible. Velocity estimates are accurate, but the maximal detectable velocity depends strongly on acquisition parameters. Direction estimation works sufficiently, even at higher velocities. Echo-PIV appears to be a promising technical approach to investigate flow patterns by echocardiography.

  11. Diagnostic examination performance by using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3-T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Nakstad, Per H.; Orheim, Tone E.D.; Graff, Bjoern A.; Josefsen, Roger; Kumar, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has limited capacity to differentiate between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and metastasis. The purposes of this study were: (1) to compare microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and blood flow (CBF) in the distinction of metastasis from GBM using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MRI), and (2) to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion and permeability MR imaging. A prospective study of 61 patients (40 GBMs and 21 metastases) was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI. Normalized rCBV and rCBF from tumoral (rCBVt, rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe, rCBFe), and by dividing the value in the tumor by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e, rCBFt/e), as well as MVL were calculated. Hemodynamic and histopathologic variables were analyzed statistically and Spearman/Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed for each of the variables. The rCBVe, rCBFe, and MVL were significantly greater in GBMs compared with those of metastases. The optimal cutoff value for differentiating GBM from metastasis was 0.80 which implies a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 86%, and a negative predictive value of 97% for rCBVe ratio. We found a modest correlation between rCBVt and rCBFt ratios. MVL measurements in GBMs are significantly higher than those in metastases. Statistically, both rCBVe, rCBVt/e and rCBFe, rCBFt/e were useful in differentiating between GBMs and metastases, supporting the hypothesis that perfusion MR imaging can detect infiltration of tumor cells in the peri-enhancing region. (orig.)

  12. Diagnostic examination performance by using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3-T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in the differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme and brain metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Server, Andres; Nakstad, Per H. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Orheim, Tone E.D. [Oslo University Hospital, Interventional Centre, Oslo (Norway); Graff, Bjoern A. [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Josefsen, Roger [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo (Norway); Kumar, Theresa [Oslo University Hospital-Ullevaal, Department of Pathology, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-05-15

    Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has limited capacity to differentiate between glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and metastasis. The purposes of this study were: (1) to compare microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and blood flow (CBF) in the distinction of metastasis from GBM using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MRI), and (2) to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion and permeability MR imaging. A prospective study of 61 patients (40 GBMs and 21 metastases) was performed at 3 T using DSC-MRI. Normalized rCBV and rCBF from tumoral (rCBVt, rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe, rCBFe), and by dividing the value in the tumor by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e, rCBFt/e), as well as MVL were calculated. Hemodynamic and histopathologic variables were analyzed statistically and Spearman/Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed for each of the variables. The rCBVe, rCBFe, and MVL were significantly greater in GBMs compared with those of metastases. The optimal cutoff value for differentiating GBM from metastasis was 0.80 which implies a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 86%, and a negative predictive value of 97% for rCBVe ratio. We found a modest correlation between rCBVt and rCBFt ratios. MVL measurements in GBMs are significantly higher than those in metastases. Statistically, both rCBVe, rCBVt/e and rCBFe, rCBFt/e were useful in differentiating between GBMs and metastases, supporting the hypothesis that perfusion MR imaging can detect infiltration of tumor cells in the peri-enhancing region. (orig.)

  13. Amide proton transfer imaging to discriminate between low- and high-grade gliomas: added value to apparent diffusion coefficient and relative cerebral blood volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Ahn, Sung Soo; Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee; Kang, Seok-Gu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the added value of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging to the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) from perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for discriminating between high- and low-grade gliomas. Forty-six consecutive adult patients with diffuse gliomas who underwent preoperative APT imaging, DTI and perfusion MRI were enrolled. APT signals were compared according to the World Health Organization grade. The diagnostic ability and added value of the APT signal to the ADC and rCBV for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses and integrated discrimination improvement. The APT signal increased as the glioma grade increased. The discrimination abilities of the APT, ADC and rCBV values were not significantly different. Using both the APT signal and ADC significantly improved discrimination vs. the ADC alone (area under the ROC curve [AUC], 0.888 vs. 0.910; P = 0.007), whereas using both the APT signal and rCBV did not improve discrimination vs. the rCBV alone (AUC, 0.927 vs. 0.923; P = 0.222). APT imaging may be a useful imaging biomarker that adds value to the ADC for discriminating between low- and high-grade gliomas. (orig.)

  14. Citrus fruits freshness assessment using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvapil, Fran; Brezestean, Ioana; Barchewitz, Daniel; Glamuzina, Branko; Chiş, Vasile; Cintă Pinzaru, Simona

    2018-03-01

    The freshness of citrus fruits commonly available in the market was non-destructively assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Intact clementine, mandarin and tangerine species were characterised concerning their carotenoids skin Raman signalling in a time course from the moment they were acquired as fresh stock, supplying the market, to the physical degradation, when they were no longer attractive to consumers. The freshness was found to strongly correlate to the peel Raman signal collected from the same area of the intact fruits in a time course of a maximum of 20days. We have shown that the intensity of the carotenoid Raman signal is indeed a good indicator of fruit freshness and introduced a Raman coefficient of freshness (C Fresh ), whose time course is linearly decreasing, with different slope for different citrus groups. Additionally, we demonstrated that the freshness assessment could be achieved using a portable Raman instrument. The results could have a strong impact for consumer satisfaction and the food industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer.A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4 was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography.Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide.4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  16. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Johannes; Hofmann, Martin; Jung, Caroline; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Werner, Franziska; Them, Kolja; Reimer, Rudolph; Nielsen, Peter; Vom Scheidt, Annika; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4) was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography. Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide. 4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  17. Effects of breathing a hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture on blood oxygenation and vascularity of head-and-neck tumors as measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijpkema, Mark; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Joosten, Frank; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Heerschap, Arend

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: For head-and-neck tumors, breathing a hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture and administration of nicotinamide has been shown to result in a significantly improved tumor response to accelerated radiotherapy (ARCON, Accelerated Radiotherapy with CarbOgen and Nicotinamide). This may be caused by improved tumor oxygenation, possibly mediated by vascular effects. In this study, both blood oxygenation and vascular effects of breathing a hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture (98% O 2 +2% CO 2 ) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with head-and-neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Tumor vascularity and oxygenation were investigated by dynamic gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MRI, respectively. Eleven patients with primary head-and-neck tumors were each measured twice; with and without breathing the hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture. Results: BOLD MR imaging revealed a significant increase of the MRI time constant of transverse magnetization decay (T 2 *) in the tumor during hypercapnic hyperoxygenation, which correlates to a decrease of the deoxyhemoglobin concentration. No changes in overall tumor vascularity were observed, as measured by the gadolinium contrast uptake rate in the tumor. Conclusion: Breathing a hyperoxic hypercapnic gas mixture improves tumor blood oxygenation in patients with head-and-neck tumors, which may contribute to the success of the ARCON therapy

  18. Silole-Based Red Fluorescent Organic Dots for Bright Two-Photon Fluorescence In vitro Cell and In vivo Blood Vessel Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Feng, Guangxue; He, Bairong; Goh, Chiching; Xu, Shidang; Ramos-Ortiz, Gabriel; Aparicio-Ixta, Laura; Zhou, Jian; Ng, Laiguan; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-02-10

    Robust luminescent dyes with efficient two-photon fluorescence are highly desirable for biological imaging applications, but those suitable for organic dots fabrication are still rare because of aggregation-caused quenching. In this work, a red fluorescent silole, 2,5-bis[5-(dimesitylboranyl)thiophen-2-yl]-1-methyl-1,3,4-triphenylsilole ((MesB)2 DTTPS), is synthesized and characterized. (MesB)2 DTTPS exhibits enhanced fluorescence efficiency in nanoaggregates, indicative of aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE). The organic dots fabricated by encapsulating (MesB)2 DTTPS within lipid-PEG show red fluorescence peaking at 598 nm and a high fluorescence quantum yield of 32%. Upon excitation at 820 nm, the dots show a large two-photon absorption cross section of 3.43 × 10(5) GM, which yields a two-photon action cross section of 1.09 × 10(5) GM. These (MesB)2 DTTPS dots show good biocompatibility and are successfully applied to one-photon and two-photon fluorescence imaging of MCF-7 cells and two-photon in vivo visualization of the blood</