WorldWideScience

Sample records for frequency soil decontamination

  1. Electrode design for soil decontamination with Radio-Frequency heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, U.; Holzer, F.; Kraus, M.; Trommler, U.; Kopinke, F.D. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Environmental Engineering, Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Radio-frequency heating to enhance soil decontamination requires adjusted solutions for the electrode design depending on scale and remediation technique. Parallel plate electrodes provide widely homogeneous field and temperature distributions and are, therefore, most suitable for supporting biodegradation processes. For thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction, certain temperature gradients can be accepted and, therefore, the less-demanding geometry of rod-shaped electrodes is usually applied. For electrode lengths of some meters, a design with an air gap has to be used in order to focus heating to the desired depth. Perforated rod electrodes may be simultaneously employed as extraction wells. Placing an oxidation catalyst in situ within the electrodes is an option for handling of highly loaded air flows. Coaxial antenna may be utilized to selectively heat soil compartments far from the surface of the soil. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Soil decontamination with Extraksol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquin, J.; Mourato, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Extraksol process is a mobile decontamination technology which treats unconsolidated materials by solvent extraction. Treatment with Extraksol involves material washing, drying and solvent regeneration. Contaminant removal is achieved through desorption/dissolution mechanisms. The treated material is dry and acceptable to be reinstalled in its original location. The process provides a fast, efficient and versatile alternative for decontamination of soil and sludge. The organic contaminants extracted from the matrix are transferred to the extraction fluids. These are thereafter concentrated in the residues of distillation after solvent regeneration. Removal and concentration of the contaminants ensures an important waste volume reduction. This paper presents the process is operational principles and the steps involved in Extraksol's development with results of the pilot tests and full-scale demonstrations

  3. Decontamination of Soil Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Brief This technical summary will provide decontamination personnel rapid access to information on which decontamination approaches are most effective for soils contaminated with B anthracis.

  4. Soil decontamination at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, R.L.; Hayden, J.A.; Alford, C.E.; Kochen, R.L.; Stevens, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    A soils decontamination project was initiated, to remove actinides from soils at Rocky Flats. Wet screening, attrition scrubbing with Calgon at high pH, attrition scrubbing at low pH, and cationic flotation were investigated. Pilot plant studies were carried out. Conceptual designs have been generated for mounting the process in semi-trailers

  5. Soil decontamination criteria report, November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riordan, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    A program to access the extent of transuranic soil contamination at DOE sites and to develop methods for their decontamination is underway at Rocky Flats. As part of this program, acceptable soil contamination levels for plutonium proposed by a number of authorities over the past couple of decades were reviewed. From this review, goals for soil decontamination work are proposed. These goals, which relate to the disposition of the products of a decontamination process, are summarized as follows (dpm/g will refer to disintegrations per minute of transuranic nuclides per gram of soil): soil fractions having less than 30 dpm can be disposed of as surface soil with unrestricted usage. Fine soil fractions (less than 100 μm) that have less than 500 dpm and coarse soil fractions that have less than 1000 dpm can be disposed of as subsurface soil as long as usage is controlled to ensure compliance with EPA dosage guidance. Soil concentrates that have an activity greater than the above values but less than 22,000 dpm should be interred in an approved, low level waste burial site. Soil concentrates that are greater than 22,000 dpm should be stored as retrievable waste. Changes in the technical and legal areas of soil decontamination are rapid. Permissible soil decontamination levels will change as will decontamination technology and the ability to monitor the effectiveness of the decontamination processes. As a result, annual updates of decontamination criteria, goals, and monitoring are expected

  6. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.; Tolt, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology

  7. Theory of soil decontamination in mixing liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.S.; Emets, E.P.; Poluehktov, P.P.; Rybakov, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    The theory of soil decontamination from radioactive pollution in mixing liquid flow is described. It is shown that there exists the threshold intensity of liquid mixing up to which there is no decontamination. Beyond the threshold and by increasing the mixing intensity the decontamination of large soil fractions is allowable whereby the higher is the mixing intensity and lower is the soil contamination, the laser is the characteristic decontamination time. The above theory is related to cases of uniform pollution of the particles surface

  8. Decontamination of hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes the method of treating hydrocarbon contaminated soil. It comprises forming the soil into a flowing particulate stream, forming an aqueous liquid mixture of water and treating substance that reacts with hydrocarbon to form CO 2 and water, dispersing the liquid mixture into the particulate soil stream to wet the particulate, allowing the substance to react with the wetted soil particulate to thereby form CO 2 and water, thereby the resultant soil is beneficially treated, the stream being freely projected to dwell at a level and then fall, and the dispersing includes spraying the liquid mixture into the projected stream at the dwell, the substance consisting of natural bacteria, and at a concentration level in the mixture of between 100 to 3,000 PPM of bacteria to water, the soil forming step including impacting the soil to reduce it to particles less than about 1 inches in cross dimension, and including forming the wetting particulate into a first layer on a surface to allow the substance to react

  9. Decontaminating soil organic pollutants with manufactured nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Organic pollutants in soils might threaten the environmental and human health. Manufactured nanoparticles are capable to reduce this risk efficiently due to their relatively large capacity of sorption and degradation of organic pollutants. Stability, mobility, and reactivity of nanoparticles are prerequisites for their efficacy in soil remediation. On the basis of a brief introduction of these issues, this review provides a comprehensive summary of the application and effectiveness of various types of manufactured nanoparticles for removing organic pollutants from soil. The main categories of nanoparticles include iron (oxides), titanium dioxide, carbonaceous, palladium, and amphiphilic polymeric nanoparticles. Their advantages (e.g., unique properties and high sorption capacity) and disadvantages (e.g., high cost and low recovery) for soil remediation are discussed with respect to the characteristics of organic pollutants. The factors that influence the decontamination effects, such as properties, surfactants, solution chemistry, and soil organic matter, are addressed.

  10. A study on Cs decontamination characterisitcs of radioactively contaminated soil using soil washing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Son, J. K.; Kim, K. D.; Kim, H. S.; Choi, Y. C.; Kang, K. D.; Sin, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    To decontaminate radioactively contaminated soil, various characteristics of soil were investigated, and applied for the best decontamination method and requirement. The effects of several conditions such as decontamination solutions, temperature and time was investigated. Na 2 CO 3 , which is not toxic to environment, was used as primary decontamination solution. The efficiency of decontamination was increased approximately 9% when decontamination time was increased from 30 min to 120 min. The efficiency of decontamination was increased approximately 10% when decontamination temperature was increased from 25 .deg. C to 70 .deg. C. The efficiency of decontamination was increased approximately 7% when the ratio of decontamination solution and soil was increased from 5:1 to 10:1

  11. Development of Decontamination Process for Soil Contaminated Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Park, Uk-Rang; Han, Gyu-Seong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Various experiments with full-scaled electrokinetic equipment, soil washing equipment, and gravel washing equipment were performed to remove 238 U from contaminated soils of below 0.4 Bq/g. The repetition number and the removal efficiencies of the soil and gravel washing equipment were evaluated. The decontamination periods by the soil and gravel electrokinetic equipment were evaluated. Finally, a work process of full-scaled decontamination equipment was developed. Contaminated soils were classified into soils and gravels using a 8.0 cm sieve. Soils were sent to the soil washing equipment, while gravels were sent to the gravel washing equipment. Soils sent to the soil washing equipment were sent to the soil electrokinetic equipment after soil washing. A repetition number of soil washing was two times. The washed gravels were sent to the gravel electrokinetic equipment. Gravel contaminated with a high concentration requires crushing after gravel washing

  12. Development of Decontamination Process for Soil Contaminated Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Park, Uk-Rang; Han, Gyu-Seong; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Various experiments with full-scaled electrokinetic equipment, soil washing equipment, and gravel washing equipment were performed to remove {sup 238}U from contaminated soils of below 0.4 Bq/g. The repetition number and the removal efficiencies of the soil and gravel washing equipment were evaluated. The decontamination periods by the soil and gravel electrokinetic equipment were evaluated. Finally, a work process of full-scaled decontamination equipment was developed. Contaminated soils were classified into soils and gravels using a 8.0 cm sieve. Soils were sent to the soil washing equipment, while gravels were sent to the gravel washing equipment. Soils sent to the soil washing equipment were sent to the soil electrokinetic equipment after soil washing. A repetition number of soil washing was two times. The washed gravels were sent to the gravel electrokinetic equipment. Gravel contaminated with a high concentration requires crushing after gravel washing.

  13. Application of Ultrasonic for Decontamination of Contaminated Soil - 13142

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, A.P.; Lebedev, N.M.; Savkin, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    The trials of soil decontamination were carried out with the help of a pilot ultrasonic installation in different modes. The installation included a decontamination bath equipped with ultrasonic sources, a precipitator for solution purification from small particles (less than 80 micrometer), sorption filter for solution purification from radionuclides washing out from soil, a tank for decontamination solution, a pump for decontamination solution supply. The trials were carried out on artificially contaminated sand with specific activity of 4.5 10 5 Bk/kg and really contaminated soil from Russian Scientific Center 'Kurchatovsky Institute' (RSC'KI') with specific activity of 2.9 10 4 Bk/kg. It was established that application of ultrasonic intensify the process of soil reagent decontamination and increase its efficiency. The decontamination factor for the artificially contaminated soil was ∼200 and for soil from RSC'KI' ∼30. The flow-sheet diagram has been developed for the new installation as well as determined the main technological characteristics of the equipment. (authors)

  14. Application of Ultrasonic for Decontamination of Contaminated Soil - 13142

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilyev, A.P. [JRC ' NIKIET' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Lebedev, N.M. [LLC ' Aleksandra-Plus' , Vologda (Russian Federation); Savkin, A.E. [SUE SIA ' Radon' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The trials of soil decontamination were carried out with the help of a pilot ultrasonic installation in different modes. The installation included a decontamination bath equipped with ultrasonic sources, a precipitator for solution purification from small particles (less than 80 micrometer), sorption filter for solution purification from radionuclides washing out from soil, a tank for decontamination solution, a pump for decontamination solution supply. The trials were carried out on artificially contaminated sand with specific activity of 4.5 10{sup 5} Bk/kg and really contaminated soil from Russian Scientific Center 'Kurchatovsky Institute' (RSC'KI') with specific activity of 2.9 10{sup 4} Bk/kg. It was established that application of ultrasonic intensify the process of soil reagent decontamination and increase its efficiency. The decontamination factor for the artificially contaminated soil was ∼200 and for soil from RSC'KI' ∼30. The flow-sheet diagram has been developed for the new installation as well as determined the main technological characteristics of the equipment. (authors)

  15. Heavy metal decontamination of sludges and soils. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, J.

    1993-06-01

    This research project deals with decontamination technology for contaminated soil and sediments. A pilot plant for the decontamination of soil contaminated with heavy metals has been erected and is operated. The process is arranged in two steps: - heavy metal contaminated solid is decontaminted with acidic extraction. - the heavy metals are separated in a recyclable formation from the process solution you gain in the first process step. Heavy metal contaminated soil, heavy metal contaminated sediments (habour sediments) as well as residue from a soil regeneration plant have been successfully decontaminated in the pilot plan. An adaption of the process is necessary for various materials. High rates of mobilisation of heavy metals (e.g. lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, zinc) were obtained, especially with soil which contains less organic matter. (orig.). 54 figs., 30 tabs., 45 refs [de

  16. Investigation of electro-kinetic methods for soil decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanova, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    The choices of effective methods for ecological system decontamination, their perfection and introduction into practical use have been actual tasks for the Ural region. The objective of this work has been to study the potentials of electrical kinetics method of ISOTRON Corporation (US) for decontamination of the Urals soils. Results obtained have shown the method proposed to be usable for decontaminating some types of soils from strontium and plutonium; it is low effective for decontamination in the area of South-Urals radioactive plume. Thus, a low effectiveness can be expected in podsolic and leached laterite characterized by a high content of loamy sand and sandy soils, as well as for sobby-podsolic ones. The method can be promising for decontamination of soils and wastes from chemical contaminants, such as Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Hg, and others. Important advantages of this method compared to others have been its simplicity, small amount of wastes, and feasibility of decontamination in areas difficult to access. (authors)

  17. [Thermodynamic forecasting of reagents composition for soils decontamination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, V P; Nikolaevskiĭ, V B; Chirkina, I V; Shcheglov, M Iu

    2009-01-01

    Based on thermodynamic studies, the authors conducted laboratory experiments on searching optimal composition of leaching reagents solution for soils decontamination, when contaminated with Cs-137, of activity coefficient for caesium sulfate microquantities in macrocomponents solutions. The method could be used for modelling the radionuclides phase equillibrium and relocations in soils.

  18. Soil surface decontamination and revegetation progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, A.W.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given of work by Rockwell Hanford Operations related to large-area decontamination efforts. Rockwell has a Program Office which manages the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) efforts. Part of the program is involved with large-surface area cleanup in conjunction with surveillance and maintenance of retired sites and facilities. The other part is the decontamination and decommissioning of structures. There are 322 surplus contaminated sites and facilities for which Rockwell has responsibility on the Hanford Site. A Program Office was established for a disciplined approach to cleanup of these retired sites. There are three major projects: the first is surveillance and maintenance of the sites prior to D and D, the project under which the radiation area cleanup is contained. Another project is for contaminated-equipment volume reduction; size reduction with arc saw cut-up and volume reduction with a vacuum furnace meltdown are being used. The third major project is structural D and D

  19. Pathogen Decontamination of Food Crop Soil: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtler, Joshua B

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to delineate means of decontaminating soil. This information might be used to mitigate soil-associated risks of foodborne pathogens. The majority of the research in the published literature involves inactivation of plant pathogens in soil, i.e., those pathogens harmful to fruit and vegetable production and ornamental plants. Very little has been published regarding the inactivation of foodborne human pathogens in crop soil. Nevertheless, because decontamination techniques for plant pathogens might also be useful methods for eliminating foodborne pathogens, this review also includes inactivation of plant pathogens, with appropriate discussion and comparisons, in the hopes that these methods may one day be validated against foodborne pathogens. Some of the major soil decontamination methods that have been investigated and are covered include chemical decontamination (chemigation), solarization, steaming, biofumigation, bacterial competitive exclusion, torch flaming, microwave treatment, and amendment with biochar. Other innovative means of inactivating foodborne pathogens in soils may be discovered and explored in the future, provided that these techniques are economically feasible in terms of chemicals, equipment, and labor. Food microbiology and food safety researchers should reach out to soil scientists and plant pathologists to create links where they do not currently exist and strengthen relationships where they do exist to take advantage of multidisciplinary skills. In time, agricultural output and the demand for fresh produce will increase. With advances in the sensitivity of pathogen testing and epidemiological tracebacks, the need to mitigate preharvest bacterial contamination of fresh produce will become paramount. Hence, soil decontamination technologies may become more economically feasible and practical in light of increasing the microbial safety of fresh produce.

  20. Possibilities of soil washing for decontamination at Belgoprocess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerts, Wouter [Belgoprocess, Dessel, Antwerp (Belgium); De Bruecker, Thomas; Lytek, Anna [DEC - DEME Environmental Contractor, Zwijndrecht, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Contaminated soils form a large part of the nuclear waste arising from decommissioning activities. The storage and disposal of these large volumes of waste is costly. For this reason techniques which can decontaminate this waste stream to free release levels are economically very interesting. A feasibility study of the possibilities of soil washing to decontaminate such soils was ordered by NIRAS/ONDRAF and performed at Belgoprocess in collaboration with DEC. Initial contamination level and particle size distributions of contaminated soils from three different sources were determined. The main isotopes detected with gamma spectrometry contained in the waste were {sup 241}Am, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 60}Co and {sup 232}Th. The particle size distribution revealed that more than half of the mass of the quartz sand that makes up the soil has a particle size between 125 and 212 μm. This fraction is less contaminated than the fractions containing smaller particles. However, separation of the fines fraction (< 125 μm) was not enough to achieve the free release limit. Soil attrition was tested as an extra decontamination step for the sand fraction. The removal efficiencies for the different radionuclides contained in the soil were measured. The process conditions were optimized to achieve maximum removal and a treatment method for the secondary waste coming from this process step was determined. The soil washing process was not only performed with water but also with nitric acid to assess the possibilities of a combination of a mechanical and a chemical decontamination process. Reduction efficiencies of 60-80% for the most relevant radionuclides were recorded. (authors)

  1. Utilization of microwave energy for decontamination of oil polluted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, Daniela; Niculae, Dumitru; Francisc, Ioan Hathazi

    2010-01-01

    Soil oil (petroleum) product pollution represents a great environmental threat as it may contaminate the neighboring soils and surface and underground water. Liquid fuel contamination may occur anywhere during oil (petroleum) product transportation, storing, handling and utilization. The polluted soil recovery represents a complex process due to the wide range of physical, chemical and biological properties of soils which should be analyzed in connection with the study of the contaminated soil behavior under the microwave field action. The soil, like any other non-metallic material, can be heated through microwave energy absorption due to the dielectric losses, expressed by its dielectric complex constant. Oil polluted soil behaves differently in a microwave field depending on the nature, structure and amount of the polluting fuel. Decontamination is performed through volatilization and retrieval of organic contaminant volatile components. After decontamination only a soil fixed residue remains, which cannot penetrate the underground anymore. In carrying out the soil recovery process by means of this technology we should also consider the soil characteristics such as: the soil type, temperature, moisture.The first part of the paper presents the theoretical aspects relating to the behavior of the polluted soil samples in the microwave field, as well as their relating experimental data. The experimental data resulting from the analysis of soils with a different level of pollution point out that the degree of pollutant recovery is high, contributing to changing the initial classification of soils from the point of view of pollution. The paper graphically presents the levels of microwave generated and absorbed power in soil samples, soil temperature during experimentations, specific processing parameters in a microwave field. It also presents the constructive solution of the microwave equipment designed for the contaminated soil in situ treatment.

  2. Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montford, B.

    1975-01-01

    Development of special techniques has permitted the use of mild decontamination processes for the CANDU type reactor primary coolant circuit, overcoming many of the problems associated with conventional decontamination processes, which use strong, acidic reagents. (Author)

  3. Soil removal as a decontamination practice and radiocesium accumulation in tadpoles in rice paddies at Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masaru; Gomi, Takashi; Nunokawa, Masanori; Wakahara, Taeko; Onda, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the biological accumulation of radiocesium in tadpoles [Rana (Pelophylax) porosa porosa] in rice paddies with and without decontamination practice at Fukushima. Radiocesium was accumulated in surface part of soils both in the control and decontaminated paddies one year after decontamination. Mean 134 Cs and 137 Cs concentrations in tadpoles in the control and decontaminated paddies were 3000 and 4500, and 600 and 890 Bq/kg dry weight, respectively. Radiocesium concentrations in surface soil (0–5 cm depth) and tadpoles in the decontaminated paddy were five times smaller than in the control paddy. These results suggest that decontamination practice can reduce radiocesium concentrations in both soil and tadpoles. However, at the decontaminated paddy, radiocesium concentrations in surface soils became 3.8 times greater one year after decontamination, which indicates that monitoring the subsequent movement of radiocesium in rice paddies and surrounding areas is essential for examining contamination propagation. - Highlights: • Surface soil removal in a rice paddy reduced the radiocesium concentration in soil. • The radiocesium concentration in tadpoles decreased following decontamination. • Radiocesium levels in soil increased at 1 year following decontamination practice. • Reduction of radiocesium of soil can propagate to biota in rice paddies. - Decontamination practice reduced radiocesium concentrations in both soil and tadpoles that suggests reduction of radiocesium of soil can propagate to biota in rice paddies

  4. Decontamination of polluted soils in the new Federal States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, K.

    1993-01-01

    In the course of the privatisation of companies by the Treuhandanstalt (THA), there is a financial risk involved for the property user which is hard to estimate, should the suspicion arise that the property is contaminated with soil pollutants of older origin. Both the Federal Government and the States are prepared to meet some of the costs of the required decontamination treatment in the new Federal States if certain conditions are fulfilled. The necessary inspection and decontamination measures must, in many cases, be cleared with the Treuhandanstalt beforehand. The experiences of the Thuga AG in the inspection and decontamination of pollutants of older origin, especially in the new Federal States, is introduced here. (orig.) [de

  5. Soil removal as a decontamination practice and radiocesium accumulation in tadpoles in rice paddies at Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masaru; Gomi, Takashi; Nunokawa, Masanori; Wakahara, Taeko; Onda, Yuichi

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the biological accumulation of radiocesium in tadpoles [Rana (Pelophylax) porosa porosa] in rice paddies with and without decontamination practice at Fukushima. Radiocesium was accumulated in surface part of soils both in the control and decontaminated paddies one year after decontamination. Mean (134)Cs and (137)Cs concentrations in tadpoles in the control and decontaminated paddies were 3000 and 4500, and 600 and 890 Bq/kg dry weight, respectively. Radiocesium concentrations in surface soil (0-5 cm depth) and tadpoles in the decontaminated paddy were five times smaller than in the control paddy. These results suggest that decontamination practice can reduce radiocesium concentrations in both soil and tadpoles. However, at the decontaminated paddy, radiocesium concentrations in surface soils became 3.8 times greater one year after decontamination, which indicates that monitoring the subsequent movement of radiocesium in rice paddies and surrounding areas is essential for examining contamination propagation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Comparison of Electrokinetic Method and Electrokinetic-electrodialytic Method for Soil Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyenam; Kim, Seungsoo; Park, Ukrang; Han, Gyuseong; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The electrokinetic decontamination equipment and electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment were manufactured to decontaminate the contaminated soil. The removal efficiency according to the lapsed time by the electrokinetic decontamination equipment and the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment was investigated through several experiments. The difference between the removal efficiency of the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination without anion exchange membrane and that of with anion exchange membrane was investigated through several experiments. In addition, the removal efficiency trend according to different cesium radioactivity of soil was drawn out through several experiments.

  7. A Comparison of Electrokinetic Method and Electrokinetic-electrodialytic Method for Soil Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gyenam; Kim, Seungsoo; Park, Ukrang; Han, Gyuseong; Moon, Jeikwon

    2014-01-01

    The electrokinetic decontamination equipment and electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment were manufactured to decontaminate the contaminated soil. The removal efficiency according to the lapsed time by the electrokinetic decontamination equipment and the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment was investigated through several experiments. The difference between the removal efficiency of the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination without anion exchange membrane and that of with anion exchange membrane was investigated through several experiments. In addition, the removal efficiency trend according to different cesium radioactivity of soil was drawn out through several experiments

  8. Sampling design for use by the soil decontamination project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, D.W.; Stevens, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    This report proposes a general approach to the problem and discusses sampling of soil to map the contaminated area and to provide samples for characterizaton of soil components and contamination. Basic concepts in sample design are reviewed with reference to environmental transuranic studies. Common designs are reviewed and evaluated for use with specific objectives that might be required by the soil decontamination project. Examples of a hierarchial design pilot study and a combined hierarchial and grid study are proposed for the Rocky Flats 903 pad area

  9. Electrodialytic decontamination of heavy metal polluted soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Henrik K.; Karlsmose, Bodil

    1996-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation of heavy metal polluted soil is a newly developed method, which combines the electrokinetic mevement of ions in soil with the principle of electrodialytis. The method has been proven to work in laboratory scale and at present two types of pilot plant tests are made....

  10. Particle Separation of Non-Decontamination Soil using Attrition and Washing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Daeseo; Sung, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Seung-Soo; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyoung; Choi, Jong-Won

    2017-01-01

    In this study, to improve the decontamination efficiency of uranium soil, a preliminary experiment on the particle separation of non-decontamination soil was carried out using attrition and washing. The characteristics of the attrition and washing system are investigated. A conditional experiment on particle separation of non-decontamination soil will be performed. A preliminary experiment on the particle separation of non-decontamination soil was carried out to improve the decontamination efficiency of uranium soil. This experiment was performed with the ratio of soil to water (1:4) for the particle separation of non-decontamination soil. The operations of all equipment such as attrition scrubber, ultrasonic reaction, vibrating screen, and hydro-cyclone were conducted and confirmed. In the future, the additional experiments will be conducted for optimal experimental condition.

  11. A study on implementation plan of decontamination and decommissioning R and D and evaluation of KAERI soil decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.

    2001-08-01

    A. Decontamination Technology Development of Uranium Conversion Facility. Understanding of uranium conversion facility and related decontamination technologies, and analysis of current status of decontamination technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion of the erformance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility B. Treatment Technology Development of Uranium Sludge Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status. Suggestion of treatment methodology of uranium slurry and cooperative R and D among industries, universities and research institute. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility C. Decommissioning Technology Development Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status and the overview of decommissioning technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of TRIGA decommissioning D. Evaluation of KAERI Soil Decontamination Technology. Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology. Performance of soil decontamination test using solvent flushing test equipment for evaluation of residual radioactivity after decontami- nation and modeling of the results

  12. A study on implementation plan of decontamination and decommissioning R and D and evaluation of KAERI soil decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N

    2001-08-01

    A. Decontamination Technology Development of Uranium Conversion Facility. Understanding of uranium conversion facility and related decontamination technologies, and analysis of current status of decontamination technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion of the erformance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility B. Treatment Technology Development of Uranium Sludge Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status. Suggestion of treatment methodology of uranium slurry and cooperative R and D among industries, universities and research institute. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility C. Decommissioning Technology Development Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status and the overview of decommissioning technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of TRIGA decommissioning D. Evaluation of KAERI Soil Decontamination Technology. Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology. Performance of soil decontamination test using solvent flushing test equipment for evaluation of residual radioactivity after decontami- nation and modeling of the results.

  13. Effects of soil stripping and dressing for decontamination of radioactive materials on soil fertility of agricultural land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Namiko; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Kunihito

    2015-01-01

    Farms that were highly contaminated with radioactive materials following the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident were decontaminated by removing topsoil and subsequently dressing with fresh soil. We investigated the chemical properties of soils following such decontamination on farms in Iitate village, Fukushima. The nitrogen content of dressed soil was considerably lower than that of the subsoil that was not stripped for decontamination, as a result of which the amount of dressed soil greatly affected the soil fertility of decontaminated farms. The potassium (K) content of soil differs markedly depending on the type of soil dressing material used; accordingly, the type of soil dressing material affected the soil K content on decontaminated farms. On most of the decontaminated farms where sandy soils were used as the soil dressing material, soil exchangeable K contents were less than 25 mg K_2O/100 g, which is the criterion value for inhibiting cesium absorption in rice and soybean cultivation. However, even in the soil dressing material from agricultural land, soil K content after soil dressing was generally lower than that before soil dressing. During fallow management and at the restart of cultivation on decontaminated farms, it is important to know in advance the chemical properties of soil and take the necessary measures based on this information. (author)

  14. Environmental decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  15. Environmental decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C.

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination

  16. Supercritical water decontamination of town gas soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, B.S.; Azzam, F.O.; Lee, S.

    1994-01-01

    Town gas sites represent a large environmental problem that exists in more than 2,000 sites across North America alone. The major contaminants in town gas sods are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These are stable compounds that migrate deep into the soil and are traditionally very difficult to remove by conventional remediation processes. Supercritical fluids offer enhanced solvating properties along with reduced mass transfer resistances that make them ideal for removing compounds that are difficult or impossible to remove by conventional processes. Supercritical water is ideal for removing PAHs and other hydrocarbons from soil due to its high solvating power towards most hydrocarbon species. Supercritical water was investigated for its ability to remediate two different town gas sods containing from 3--20 wt% contamination. The sod was remediated in a 300-cc semi-continuous system to a more environmentally acceptable level

  17. Micelles as Soil and Water Decontamination Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Shahzad, Suniya; Munir, Azeema; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Khan, Gul Shahzada; Shams, Dilawar Farhan; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Rana, Usman Ali

    2016-05-25

    Contaminated soil and water pose a serious threat to human health and ecosystem. For the treatment of industrial effluents or minimizing their detrimental effects, preventive and remedial approaches must be adopted prior to the occurrence of any severe environmental, health, or safety hazard. Conventional treatment methods of wastewater are insufficient, complicated, and expensive. Therefore, a method that could use environmentally friendly surfactants for the simultaneous removal of both organic and inorganic contaminants from wastewater is deemed a smart approach. Surfactants containing potential donor ligands can coordinate with metal ions, and thus such compounds can be used for the removal of toxic metals and organometallic compounds from aqueous systems. Surfactants form host-guest complexes with the hydrophobic contaminants of water and soil by a mechanism involving the encapsulation of hydrophobes into the self-assembled aggregates (micelles) of surfactants. However, because undefined amounts of surfactants may be released into the aqueous systems, attention must be paid to their own environmental risks as well. Moreover, surfactant remediation methods must be carefully analyzed in the laboratory before field implementation. The use of biosurfactants is the best choice for the removal of water toxins as such surfactants are associated with the characteristics of biodegradability, versatility, recovery, and reuse. This Review is focused on the currently employed surfactant-based soil and wastewater treatment technologies owing to their critical role in the implementation of certain solutions for controlling pollution level, which is necessary to protect human health and ensure the quality standard of the aquatic environment.

  18. Decontamination of soil from the research reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, H. Z.; Kim, K. N.; Choi, W. K.; Jeong, J. H.; Oh, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    The two research reactors (TRIGA MARK II and III) in Korea are to be decommissioned in the near future. When the reactors are completely dismantled, the site may remain contaminated due to the long period of operation. We assume that the site is radioactively contaminated by Co-60. Soils gathered from the research reactor site were artificially contaminated with Co 2+ ion. The desorption characteristics of Co 2+ ion from the soil surface by citric acid solution were investigated. Decontamination performances of citric acid and EDTA on soil stored in the radioactive waste drums was examined. The feasibility test of recycling the citric acid was also performed. We concluded that the radioactive waste volume could be reduced significantly by soil washing with a citric acid solution

  19. Removal of uranium from contaminated soil using indoor electrokinetic decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gye-Nam Kim; Ilgook Kim; Seung-Soo Kim; Jong-Won Choi

    2016-01-01

    Indoor electrokinetic decontamination equipment was manufactured to treat 1.2 tons of uranium-contaminated soil. For a reduction of waste electrolyte and metal oxide, waste electrolyte was reused and the optimum pH was adjusted to minimize metal oxide volume in the cathode chamber. It was found that the optimum pH of the waste electrolyte in a cathode chamber was below 2.35 at 25 deg C. When the initial uranium concentrations in the soils were 7.0-27.0 Bq/g, the reuse periods of waste electrolyte required for uranium concentrations in the soils to reach below 5.0 Bq/g were 5-25 days. In addition, when the initial concentrations in the soils were 7.0-20.0 Bq/g, the periods required to reach below the clearance concentration level were 25-40 days.

  20. Gamma radiation for the decontamination of soil containing dioxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhor, M.P.; Wethington, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Dioxin-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) contamination poses an environmental danger. Different methods for the cleanup of contaminated sites have been proposed. The G value for dioxin dispersed in soil wetted with ethanol is much greater than G values for typical aromatic hydrocarbons. Doses > 6.24 x 10 23 eV/kg lead to decreasing rates of destruction of TCDD, and doses > 24.97 x 10 23 eV/kg are not very effective. Gamma irradiation of contaminated soil apparently will not result in large (powers of 10) decontamination factor. The concept of using gamma radiation for the degradation of TCDD in contaminated soil is about as good or as bad as other methods being tested

  1. Texas market profile: soil and groundwater decontamination sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The soil and groundwater decontamination market in Texas generated $7 billion in earnings in 1997 and should reach almost $9 billion in 2002. While Texas has introduced voluntary clean-up programs, decontamination is required at more than 200,000 sites. Pollution has arisen from such industrial sectors as chemicals, crude oil and natural gas. In Texas, government agency decontamination activities provide major business opportunities. As in the base of the environmental sector as a whole, economic factors are gradually taking over from regulation as the prime demand drivers. Cost and risk are major concerns for clients. Because the incentive to reduce costs and the trend toward contracting out and privatization are becoming stronger, companies with specialized technologies have opportunities in this market. The government is the main client for environmental restoration services, but the private sector is accounting for an increased share of the market. Aspects of market access discussed include: implications of NAFTA and 'Buy America', ATA carnets, the Environmental Technology Verification Program, centralized database, federal government contracting announcements, partnerships, and payment conditions

  2. Agricultural soils decontamination techniques: methods and results of tests realized near Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maubert, H.; Jouve, A.; Mary, N.

    1992-01-01

    After a major nuclear accident, decontamination of agricultural soils would be necessary in order to reclaim the land. Specific techniques were studied in the framework of the European program for Rehabilitation of Soils and Surfaces after an Accident (RESSAC). Different ways to remove the top layer of soils are described, and especially the use of Decontaminating Vegetal Network (D.V.N.) combined with spraying of organic polymers. Real scale tests in the 30 km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant showed that it is possible to achieve an excellent decontamination of agricultural fields (decontamination factor greater than 95%. (author)

  3. Biocompatible metal decontamination from soil using Ageratum conyzoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virbala; Pant, Deepak

    2018-05-28

    Metal pollution in soil is a serious problem among waste landfill sites and associated environment all over the globe. Amelioration of contaminated soil by plant bioaccumulation is an important strategy to protect the soil environment. Ageratum conyzoides is a common weed species that can grow easily in any contaminating site and bioaccumulate heavy metals present in the e-waste dumping/recycling sites as a natural scavenger. Soil selected for the study was contaminated with waste cathode ray tube (CRT) and printed circuit board (PCB) powder in the concentration range of 1-10 g/kg. Soil decontamination was achieved by using weed plants with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, 0.1 g/kg) and kinetin (100 μM) combination in pot experiments. Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu accumulation was found to be highest in leaves (6.51-38.58; 0.14-73.12; 5.24-269.07; 9.38-116.59%); Pb and Cr in stem (22.83-113.41; 21.05-500%), respectively, as compared with blank. Ion chromatography was used as a tool for the measurement of essential ions present in plant under different conditions. Plants showed better growth in terms of shoot, root length, biomass weight, and chlorophyll content with the proposed combination. EDTA allows the metals available for the accumulation through possible complexation. Also, the compatibility of kinetin to manage stress in plant is found to be enhanced in the presence of EDTA due to possible π-π interaction. Metal stress condition causes the deficiency of essential ions in the plants thereby disturbing its biochemistry and results in its eventual death. EDTA-kinetin hybrid treatment was found to be compatible for metal decontamination from soil, its detoxification in plants by changing its environment and restoring the essential ions for the survival of plant.

  4. 40 CFR 265.114 - Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... decontamination of equipment, structures and soils. During the partial and final closure periods, all contaminated... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils. 265.114 Section 265.114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  5. Comparative scrub solution tests for decontamination of transuranic radionuclides from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.R.; Kochen, R.L.; Rutherford, D.W.; Riordan, G.A.; Delaney, I.C.

    1982-08-01

    Soil decontamination tests were done using three scrubbing solutions on five different transuranic-contaminated soils from Department of Energy sites. The soils came from Rocky Flats, Colorado; Hanford, Washington; Mound Facility, Ohio; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho; and Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. Decontamination was effected by physical and chemical means. A pH 12.5 scrub effected decontamination by serving as a hydraulic grading and attrition scrub medium; this solution did not solubilize the actinide contamination. A 2% HNO 3 , 0.2% HF, 2% pine oil, and 5% Calgon solution effected decontamination by physical and chemical means; this solution solubilized particulate actinide and actinide dispersed on the surface of soil particles. A 2N HCl scrub was also used to effect decontamination by physical and chemical means; this reagent solubilized soil constituents, removing contamination that had migrated into mineral surfaces. Only Rocky Flats soil was effectively decontaminated by the high pH solution although all soils had an enrichment of the activity in the -150 mesh fraction. Attrition scrubbing with both acid solutions had a better decontamination ability for the +150 mesh fraction for Hanford, INEL, and LANL soils. In addition, the acid solutions solubilized some of the plutonium and had a decontamination effect on the fine fractions

  6. Phytoremediation: an overview of metallic ion decontamination from soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, O.V.; Labana, S.; Pandey, G.; Budhiraja, R.; Jain, R.K. [Inst. of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh (India)

    2003-07-01

    In recent years, phytoremediation has emerged as a promising ecoremediation technology, particularly for soil and water cleanup of large volumes of contaminated sites. The exploitation of plants to remediate soils contaminated with trace elements could provide a cheap and sustainable technology for bioremediation. Many modern tools and analytical devices have provided insight into the selection and optimization of the remediation process by plant species. This review describes certain factors for the phytoremediation of metal ion decontamination and various aspects of plant metabolism during metallic decontamination. Metal-hyperaccumulating plants, desirable for heavily polluted environments, can be developed by the introduction of novel traits into high biomass plants in a transgenic approach, which is a promising strategy for the development of effective phytoremediation technology. The genetic manipulation of a phytoremediator plant needs a number of optimization processes, including mobilization of trace elements/metal ions, their uptake into the root, stem and other viable parts of the plant and their detoxification and allocation within the plant. This upcoming science is expanding as technology continues to offer new, low-cost remediation options. (orig.)

  7. Optimal systems of means and methods and universal algorithm of decontamination of radio nuclide's contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutlakhmedov, Y.; Zezina, N.; Micheev, A.; Jouve, A.; Perepelyatnikov, G.

    1996-01-01

    This paper represents our data of comparative analysis of efficacy of different countermeasures in decontamination of soils in Ukraine in total and in case study Milyachi. On this base it was created of optimal algorithm of strategy of decontamination of soils which is based on method of usage turf harvester for unploughed soils and method of phytodesactivation for ploughed soils of Ukraine after Chernobyl accident

  8. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif Javaid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontamination of agricultural soils. The agricultural crop fields are contaminated by the periodic applications of pesticides. Biodegradation is an ecofriendly, cost-effective, highly efficient approach compared to the physical and chemical methods which are expensive as well as unfriendly towards environment. Biodegradation is sensitive to the concentration levels of hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen along with microbial community, temperature, and pH changes. Experimental work for optimum conditions at lab scale can provide very fruitful results about specific bacterial, fungal strains. This study revealed an upper hand of bioremediation over physicochemical approaches. Further studies should be carried out to understand mechanisms of biotransformation.

  9. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Muhammad Kashif; Ashiq, Mehrban; Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontamination of agricultural soils. The agricultural crop fields are contaminated by the periodic applications of pesticides. Biodegradation is an ecofriendly, cost-effective, highly efficient approach compared to the physical and chemical methods which are expensive as well as unfriendly towards environment. Biodegradation is sensitive to the concentration levels of hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen along with microbial community, temperature, and pH changes. Experimental work for optimum conditions at lab scale can provide very fruitful results about specific bacterial, fungal strains. This study revealed an upper hand of bioremediation over physicochemical approaches. Further studies should be carried out to understand mechanisms of biotransformation.

  10. Decontamination of soils containing PAHs by electroremediation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, M; Rosales, E; Alcántara, T; Gómez, J; Sanromán, M A

    2010-05-15

    During the last years, the anthropogenic sources have contributed to organic compound penetration into the environment. One large group of persistent and toxic contaminants is the hydrophobic organic contaminants. Among them, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been recognized as a representative group of these pollutants with low solubility. In this paper, it is showed the electroremediation of soil contaminated with PAHs as an alternative, to organic compound removal. This technique, mainly used for heavy metal extraction, applies the electric current to promote the movement of contaminants. Nowadays the application of this technique alone or combined with other techniques as for example Fenton or bioremediation is taking fine results to PAHs removal. Although the PAHs soil decontamination by means of the electric field is in an initial stage, many researchers have demonstrated the treatment effectiveness. This paper describes the foremost principles to carry out the electroremediation of soils contaminated with PAHs, just like the different alternatives to improve the electroremediation of PAHs and also the new methodologies of PAHs removal by using hybrid technologies. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrokinetics and soil decontamination: concepts and overview (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Karim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrokinetic decontamination and extraction have been proven to be one of the most viable, cost effective and emerging techniques in removing contaminants, especially heavy metals from soils for about last five decades. Basic concepts and an overview of the electrokinetic extraction processes and their potential applications in geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering have been reviewed based on the literature and presented in this paper. Primarily, theoretical and laboratory experimental studies related to electroreclamation of soils are summarised in brief with basic concepts of electrokinetic processes. The paper has been divided into different sections that include history of electrokinetics, background and concepts, modelling, parameter effects, instrumentation, contaminant extraction, field applications, and summary and recommendation. Based on the review it is obvious that the field application of electrokinetic technology to remediate heavy metal contaminated soils /sediments is very limited and site specific. Additional laboratory studies and more pilot- and full-scale information from field applications are critical to the further understanding of the technology and to customize the process in different field conditions.

  12. PAHs soil decontamination in two steps: desorption and electrochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, M Teresa; Gómez, Jose; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, M Angeles

    2009-07-15

    The presence of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils poses a potential threat to human health if exposure levels are too high. Nevertheless, the removal of these contaminants presents a challenge to scientists and engineers. The high hydrophobic nature of PAHs enables their strong sorption onto soil or sediments. Thus, the use of surfactants could favour the release of sorbed hydrophobic organic compounds from contaminated soils. In this work, five surfactants, namely Brij 35, Tergitol NP10, Tween 20, Tween 80 and Tyloxapol, are evaluated on the desorption of PAHs [benzanthracene (BzA), fluoranthene (FLU), and pyrene (PYR), single and in mixture] from a model sample such as kaolin. In all cases, the best results were obtained when Tween 80 was employed. In order to obtain the global decontamination of PAHs, their electrochemical degradation is investigated. It is concluded that the order of increasing degradation for single compounds is BzA>FLU>PYR when they are subject to the same electrochemical treatment. In addition, there is a direct relationship between the ionization potential and the electrochemical degradation of PAH.

  13. 40 CFR 264.114 - Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils. 264.114 Section 264.114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Closure and Post-Closure § 264.114 Disposal or decontamination...

  14. Selective Decontamination Effect of Metal Ions in Soil Using Supercritical CO2 and TBP Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jihye; Park, Kwangheon; Jung, Wonyoung

    2014-01-01

    Decontamination of soil pollution is difficult because the type of contamination largely depends on the characteristics of the pollutant and the area. Also, existing soil decontamination methods generate large quantities of secondary waste and additional process costs. For this reason, new decontamination methods are always under active investigation. A method involving the use of supercritical carbon dioxide with excellent permeability in place of chemical solvents is currently being studied. Unlike other heavy metals in fission products, uranium is used as fuel, and must be handled carefully. Therefore, in this paper, we studied a supercritical carbon dioxide method for decontaminating heavy metal ions in soil using tri-n-butyl phosphate(TBP), which is well known as a ligand for the extraction of metal ions of actinium. We investigated the decontamination effect of heavy metal ions in the soil using TBP-HNO 3 Complex and supercritical carbon dioxide. The study results showed that when heavy metals in soil are extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide, the extraction efficiency is different according to the type of pollutant metal ions in the soil. When TBP-HNO 3 Complex is used with an extractant, uranium extraction is very effective, but lithium, strontium, and cesium extraction is not effective. Therefore, in the case of a mixture of uranium and other metals such as lithium, strontium, cesium, and so on in soil contaminated by fission product leaks from nuclear power plants, we can selectively decontaminate uranium with supercritical carbon dioxide and TBP-HNO 3 Complex

  15. Decontamination of Metal Ions in Soil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction with Crown Ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jihe; Park, Kwangheon [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Previous decontamination methods have shortcomings in that they produce additional waste due to the usage of solutions with chemical toxicity. Hence, demand is strong for new decontamination methods that can guarantee effective decontamination while decreasing the chemical solution. In particular, methods using supercritical CO2 as a means of decontamination are currently in progress. This study examines the method of decontaminating metallic ions inside soil using supercritical CO2. This paper examined the effects of extracting metallic ions inside soil using supercritical CO2 and crown ether as the ligand. It was confirmed that extraction effectiveness increases following greater usage of ligand and co-ligand, with a drastic increase in extraction effectiveness when using extracts over a certain dose. Moreover, it was shown that if the usage of ligand and additive decreases, the extraction ratio also decreases.

  16. Decontamination of Metal Ions in Soil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction with Crown Ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jihe; Park, Kwangheon

    2015-01-01

    Previous decontamination methods have shortcomings in that they produce additional waste due to the usage of solutions with chemical toxicity. Hence, demand is strong for new decontamination methods that can guarantee effective decontamination while decreasing the chemical solution. In particular, methods using supercritical CO2 as a means of decontamination are currently in progress. This study examines the method of decontaminating metallic ions inside soil using supercritical CO2. This paper examined the effects of extracting metallic ions inside soil using supercritical CO2 and crown ether as the ligand. It was confirmed that extraction effectiveness increases following greater usage of ligand and co-ligand, with a drastic increase in extraction effectiveness when using extracts over a certain dose. Moreover, it was shown that if the usage of ligand and additive decreases, the extraction ratio also decreases

  17. Study of Soil Decontamination Method Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jihye; Park, Kwangheon; Jung, Wonyoung

    2014-01-01

    The result of this study means that we have a possible new method for cheap and less wasteful nuclear waste decontamination. When severe accidents such as the incident at the Fukushima nuclear site occur, the soil near the power plant is contaminated with fission products or the activation metal structure of the power plant. The soil pollution form depends on the environment and soil characteristics of the contaminated areas. Thus, a- single-decontamination method is not effective for site cleanup. In addition, some soil decontamination methods are expensive and large amounts of secondary waste are generated. Therefore, we need new soil decontamination methods. In this study, instead of using a conventional solvent method that generates secondary waste, supercritical carbon dioxide was used to remove metal ions from the soil. Supercritical carbon dioxide is known for good permeation characteristics. We expect that we will reduce the cost of soil pollution management. Supercritical carbon dioxide can decontaminate soil easily, as it has the ability to penetrate even narrow gaps with very good moisture permeability. We used TBP, which is a known for extractant of actinium metal. TBP is usually used for uranium and strontium extraction. Using TBP-HNO 3 complex and supercritical carbon dioxide, we did extraction experiments for several heavy metals in contaminated soil

  18. Study of Soil Decontamination Method Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and TBP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jihye; Park, Kwangheon; Jung, Wonyoung [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The result of this study means that we have a possible new method for cheap and less wasteful nuclear waste decontamination. When severe accidents such as the incident at the Fukushima nuclear site occur, the soil near the power plant is contaminated with fission products or the activation metal structure of the power plant. The soil pollution form depends on the environment and soil characteristics of the contaminated areas. Thus, a- single-decontamination method is not effective for site cleanup. In addition, some soil decontamination methods are expensive and large amounts of secondary waste are generated. Therefore, we need new soil decontamination methods. In this study, instead of using a conventional solvent method that generates secondary waste, supercritical carbon dioxide was used to remove metal ions from the soil. Supercritical carbon dioxide is known for good permeation characteristics. We expect that we will reduce the cost of soil pollution management. Supercritical carbon dioxide can decontaminate soil easily, as it has the ability to penetrate even narrow gaps with very good moisture permeability. We used TBP, which is a known for extractant of actinium metal. TBP is usually used for uranium and strontium extraction. Using TBP-HNO{sub 3} complex and supercritical carbon dioxide, we did extraction experiments for several heavy metals in contaminated soil.

  19. Study on magnetic separation for decontamination of cesium contaminated soil by using superconducting magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Susumu, E-mail: igarashi@qb.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nomura, Naoki; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko, E-mail: yoko-ak@see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The method for the soil decontamination by the superconducting magnet is proposed. • Magnetic separation of clay minerals was performed by HGMS. • Soil separation ratio was evaluated by quantitative analysis using XRD. • It is expected that HGMS can be applied to the actual soil decontamination. - Abstract: The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant caused the diffusion of radioactive cesium over the wide area. We examined the possibility of applying magnetic separation method using the superconducting magnet, which can process a large amount of the soil in high speed, to the soil decontamination and volume reduction of the radioactive cesium contaminated soil. Clay minerals are classified as 2:1 and 1:1 types by the difference of their layer structures, and these types of minerals are respectively paramagnetic and diamagnetic including some exception. It is known that most of the radioactive cesium is strongly adsorbed on the clay, especially on 2:1 type clay minerals. It is expected that the method which can separate only 2:1 type clay minerals selectively from the mixture clay minerals can enormously contribute to the volume reduction of the contaminated soil. In this study, the components in the clay before and after separation were evaluated to estimate the magnetic separation efficiency by using X-ray diffraction. From the results, the decontamination efficiency and the volume reduction ratio were estimated in order to examine the appropriate separation conditions for the practical decontamination of the soil.

  20. The removal of Cs-137 from soil using washing-electrokinetic decontamination equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gyenam; Kim, Seungsoo; Kim, Geunho; Park, Hyemin; Kim, Wansuk; Park, Ukryang; Kwon, Hyeokju; Ryu, Ohha; Moon, Jeikwon

    2012-01-01

    The radioactive soil at the KAERI radioactive waste storage facility has slightly high hydro-conductivity, and was mainly contaminated with 137 Cs 30-35 years ago. Recently, a soil washing method has been applied to remove 137 Cs from radioactive soil, but it appears that the removal efficiency of 137 Cs had low and a lot of waste solution was generated. Meanwhile, an electrokinetic decontamination method provides high removal efficiency of 137 Cs and generates little waste effluent. Thus, it is suggested that an electrokinetic decontamination method is a suitable technology in consideration of the soil characteristics near South Korean nuclear facilities

  1. The removal of Cs-137 from soil using washing-electrokinetic decontamination equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyenam; Kim, Seungsoo; Kim, Geunho; Park, Hyemin; Kim, Wansuk; Park, Ukryang; Kwon, Hyeokju; Ryu, Ohha; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The radioactive soil at the KAERI radioactive waste storage facility has slightly high hydro-conductivity, and was mainly contaminated with {sup 137}Cs 30-35 years ago. Recently, a soil washing method has been applied to remove {sup 137}Cs from radioactive soil, but it appears that the removal efficiency of {sup 137}Cs had low and a lot of waste solution was generated. Meanwhile, an electrokinetic decontamination method provides high removal efficiency of {sup 137}Cs and generates little waste effluent. Thus, it is suggested that an electrokinetic decontamination method is a suitable technology in consideration of the soil characteristics near South Korean nuclear facilities.

  2. Coefficient of soil decontamination from strontium-90 at the territory of east Ural radioactive trace (EURT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazhenov, A.V.; Volobuev, P.V.; Isymov, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The knowledge of coefficient of soil decontamination is necessary for predictions the dynamics in development of radioactive situation, for retrospective estimation and reconstruction of the initial radioactive contamination levels of territories. By effective coefficient of soil decontamination from radionuclides (CSD) we mean the multiple of a nuclide completely removed from the soil as a result of its physical decay, active removal of radionuclides from the ground into water ecosystems, as well as biogeochemical and wind migration beyond KURT borders. Its dimension can be expressed in the divisible relation (in how many times?), in percentage, as well as in periods of half-desintegration, if the process of desintegration is the exponent. The calculation is made on a complete nuclides supply in soil. The objective of the study is to calculate the effective coefficient of soil decontamination from 90 Sr on the basis of the analyzis of the experimental materials received at KURT territories in Sverdlovsk region. (author)

  3. Development of complex electrokinetic decontamination method for soil contaminated with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Park, Hye-Min; Kim, Wan-Suk; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Hyeon, Jay-Hyeok

    2012-01-01

    520L complex electrokinetic soil decontamination equipment was manufactured to clean up uranium contaminated soils from Korean nuclear facilities. To remove uranium at more than 95% from the radioactive soil through soil washing and electrokinetic technology, decontamination experiments were carried out. To reduce the generation of large quantities of metal oxides in cathode, a pH controller is used to control the pH of the electrolyte waste solution between 0.5 and 1 for the formation of UO 2+ . More than 80% metal oxides were removed through pre-washing, an electrolyte waste solution was circulated by a pump, and a metal oxide separator filtered the metal oxide particles. 80–85% of the uranium was removed from the soil by soil washing as part of the pre-treatment. When the initial uranium concentration of the soil was 21.7 Bq/g, the required electrokinetic decontamination time was 25 days. When the initial concentration of 238 U in the soil was higher, a longer decontamination time was needed, but the removal rate of 238 U from the soil was higher.

  4. Process to decontaminate a superficial soil layer contaminated with radioactive particles and decontaminating solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, A.; Mary, N.

    1993-01-01

    The process consists to dissolve a micronised powder of anionic and crosslinked polyacrilamide, to spray the obtained decontamination solution on the floor to be traited allowing to dry to form a dry polyacrilamide film, to rehydrate the film by spraying with water and to recover the film bonded to the floor particles and the polluting particles by cleaning means. 1 fig

  5. Progress in decontamination by halophilic microorganisms in saline wastewater and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Xuliang; Han Zhen; Bai Zhihui; Zhuang Guoqiang; Shim Hojae

    2010-01-01

    Environments with high-salt concentrations are often populated by dense microbial communities. Halophilic microorganisms can be isolated from different saline environments and different strains even belonging to the same genus have various applications. Wastewater and soil rich in both organic matter and salt are difficult to treat using conventional microorganisms typically found in wastewater treatment and soil bioremediation facilities. Studies on decontaminative capabilities and decontamination pathways of organic contaminants (i.e., aromatic compounds benzoate, cinnamate, 3-phenylpropionate, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid), heavy metals (i.e., tellurium, vanadium), and nutrients in the biological treatment of saline wastewater and soil by halophilic microorganisms are discussed in this review. - Review on the decontaminative capabilities of halophilic microorganisms in saline wastewater and soil.

  6. Progress in decontamination by halophilic microorganisms in saline wastewater and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang Xuliang, E-mail: xlzhuang@rcees.ac.c [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Bureau of Science and Technology for Resources and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100864 (China); Han Zhen [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Bai Zhihui; Zhuang Guoqiang [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Shim Hojae [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China)

    2010-05-15

    Environments with high-salt concentrations are often populated by dense microbial communities. Halophilic microorganisms can be isolated from different saline environments and different strains even belonging to the same genus have various applications. Wastewater and soil rich in both organic matter and salt are difficult to treat using conventional microorganisms typically found in wastewater treatment and soil bioremediation facilities. Studies on decontaminative capabilities and decontamination pathways of organic contaminants (i.e., aromatic compounds benzoate, cinnamate, 3-phenylpropionate, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid), heavy metals (i.e., tellurium, vanadium), and nutrients in the biological treatment of saline wastewater and soil by halophilic microorganisms are discussed in this review. - Review on the decontaminative capabilities of halophilic microorganisms in saline wastewater and soil.

  7. A simplified in-situ electrochemical decontamination of lead from polluted soil (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, T.M.; Ahmad, I.; Khan, Q.M.; Chaudhry, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a simplified In-Situ electrochemical method for remediation of field soil contaminated with lead. A series of electrochemical decontamination experiments including variable conditions such as operating duration and application of enhancement reagent were performed to demonstrate the efficiency of lead removal from spiked and polluted soil samples collected from Lahore, Pakistan. The results showed that the efficiency of lead removal from the contaminated soil increased with increasing the operating duration under a set of experimental conditions. The reagent used as complexing and solubilizing agent i.e. EDTA was found to be efficient in removing lead from the polluted soil. After 15 days duration, 85 % lead removal efficiency was observed in spiked soil under enhanced conditions , however, 63 % lead removal was achieved from the polluted soil samples by the simplified In-situ electrochemical decontamination method. The method is simple, rapid, cheaper and suitable for soil remediation purposes. (author)

  8. Measures against radioactive contamination due to Fukushima First Nuclear Power Plant accidents. Part 3. Removing and decontamination of contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, K.; Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the structure of radioactive cesium distribution in soil and found the exponential dependence. This behavior could be explained theoretically. We developed a useful method to decontaminate the soil contaminated with radioactive cesium atoms. We applied our method to the contaminated school yards of elementary schools of Marumori town and decontaminated total area of about 7000 m"2. (author)

  9. The development in the in-situ decontamination technique for the large quantity of soils contaminated by radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubaki, Junichiro

    2012-01-01

    The new filtration and condensation techniques that decontaminate effectively the large quantity of contaminated soils, was developed. The facility treating the soils of 5 tons per day is being developed. (M.H.)

  10. Removal of Uranium in Soil Using Large-scale Electrokinetic Decontamination Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Kim, Il gook; Jeong, Jung Whan; Kim, Seung Soo; Choi, Jong Won [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A method to remediate a large volume of radioactive soil should be developed. Until now the soil washing method has been studied to remediate soil contaminated with uranium, cobalt, cesium, and so on. However, it has a lower removal efficiency of nuclide from soils and generated a large volume of waste-solution. In addition, its application to the soil composed of fine particle is impossible. Thus, the electrokinetic method has been studied as a new technology for soil remediation recently. In this study, for a reduction of the waste electrolyte volume, the reuse period of waste electrolyte in the electrokinetic decontamination experiment through several experiments with the manufactured 1.2 ton electrokinetic decontamination equipment. In addition, the time required to reach below the clearance concentration level for self- disposal was estimated through several experiments using the manufactured electrokinetic decontamination equipment. When the initial uranium concentrations in the soils were 7.0-20.0 Bq/g, the times required to reach below the clearance concentration level for self-disposal were 25-40 days with the waste and reclaimed electrolytes.

  11. Influence of temperature and hydraulic conductivity of soil on electrokinetic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Jeong, Jung-Whan; Choi, Jong-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The electrokinetic process holds great promise for the decontamination of contaminated soil because it has a high removal efficiency and is time-effective for low permeability. Electrokinetic decontamination can be used to treat soil contaminated with inorganic species and radionuclides. The main mechanisms of a contaminant's movement in an electrical field involved in electrokinetic technology are the electro-migration of the ionic species and electro-osmosis. Electro-migration probably contributes significantly to the removal of contaminants, especially at high concentrations of ionic contaminants and/or a high hydraulic permeability of soil. The cathode reaction should be depolarized to avoid the generation of hydroxides and their transport in soil. The selected liquid, also known as a purging reagent, should induce favorable pH conditions in soil, and/or interact with the incorporated heavy metals so that these heavy metals are removed from the soil. The removal efficiencies of uranium from contaminated soil in manufactured laboratory electrokinetic decontamination equipment were proportional to the elapsed time. The removal efficiencies of uranium for 2 days were 77-87%. In addition, the removal efficiencies according to the elapsed time after 2 days were reduced. When 75, 80, and 85℃ electrolyte temperatures in the cathode chamber were applied, the time required for the removal efficiency of uranium to reach 92% was 6, 5 and 4 days.

  12. Influence of temperature and hydraulic conductivity of soil on electrokinetic decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Jeong, Jung-Whan; Choi, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    The electrokinetic process holds great promise for the decontamination of contaminated soil because it has a high removal efficiency and is time-effective for low permeability. Electrokinetic decontamination can be used to treat soil contaminated with inorganic species and radionuclides. The main mechanisms of a contaminant's movement in an electrical field involved in electrokinetic technology are the electro-migration of the ionic species and electro-osmosis. Electro-migration probably contributes significantly to the removal of contaminants, especially at high concentrations of ionic contaminants and/or a high hydraulic permeability of soil. The cathode reaction should be depolarized to avoid the generation of hydroxides and their transport in soil. The selected liquid, also known as a purging reagent, should induce favorable pH conditions in soil, and/or interact with the incorporated heavy metals so that these heavy metals are removed from the soil. The removal efficiencies of uranium from contaminated soil in manufactured laboratory electrokinetic decontamination equipment were proportional to the elapsed time. The removal efficiencies of uranium for 2 days were 77-87%. In addition, the removal efficiencies according to the elapsed time after 2 days were reduced. When 75, 80, and 85℃ electrolyte temperatures in the cathode chamber were applied, the time required for the removal efficiency of uranium to reach 92% was 6, 5 and 4 days

  13. The action and problem of the decontamination work of the radioactive contamination soil starting in earnest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Tomomi

    2011-01-01

    At the stage of just eight months after the time when a large amount of radioactivity was discharged by the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Station of Tokyo Electric Power Company associated with the Great East Japan Earthquake, countermeasures for pollution due to radioactive substances have become the biggest challenge. The government made a cabinet decision on basic policy based on 'The Act on Special Measures concerning the Handling of Environmental Pollution by Radioactive Materials Discharged by the Nuclear Power Station Accident Associated with the Tohoku District - Off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake that Occurred on March 11, 2011 (The Act on Special Measures concerning the Handling of Radioactive Pollution).' By this, fiscal measures, regulatory measures, and role-sharing required for promoting the treatment of radioactivity-contaminated disaster waste and the decontamination measures of soil were clarified. At the same time as the enactment of the bill, 'Basic Policy for Emergency Response on Decontamination Work' and 'Guidelines for Municipal Decontamination Work' were issued, which helped a step toward full-scale decontamination activities with the backup of budgetary measures. This paper explains the following efforts of the government in implementing these actions. Installation of temporary storage sites for decontaminated soil, implementation of interim storage facilities, development of final disposal sites, and budgetary support. (O.A.)

  14. Evaluation of radioactive decontamination effect for paddy soil contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Masayuki; Yoshimoto, Shuhei; Ishida, Satoshi; Okushima, Shuji; Yuuki, Youichi; Hirata, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Rural Engineering performed decontamination of radioactivity at the experimental sites in Iitate Village where paddy fields were contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in March 2011 by means of three methods as follows; (1) topsoil removal using soil hardener, (2) removal of soil after paddling with water draining suspended contaminated soil by pumping without manual assistance, and (3) removal of soil after paddling with water draining suspended contaminated soil by pumping with manual assistance. The three methods were evaluated using decontamination factors (DFs) that were determined by applying a variant of inverse analysis using the calculation system for the estimation of decontamination effects (CDE). Input data were provided by surveys using a low-level balloon and a radio-controlled helicopter. The DF values of the three methods were determined on the basis of the Euclidean distances between the simulated and measured dose rates after decontamination. The resulting DFs were > 60 for topsoil removal using soil hardener, 1.4 for slurry pumping, and 2.2 for manually assisted slurry pumping. The area decontaminated by the soil hardening method may have been fully decontaminated, because the distribution of measured dose rates was consistent with the distribution of dose rates calculated for a fully decontaminated area within 20 m in radius. (author)

  15. Alpha-beta-gamma spectrometer as an aid in directing decontamination of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This technique permits rapid assessment of alpha-beta-gamma-emitter contamination in soils at sufficiently low concentrations to direct field operations. Of particular importance is its applicability during initial decommissioning and decontamination surveys when characterization of alpha and beta contamination in the presence of a high gamma background is necessary. This system has not yet been made portable for in-situ use, but it is expected that results willbe favorable when operated as a field instrument, resulting in simplified standard decontamination operation

  16. Decontamination of Metal Ions in Soil by Supercritical CO{sub 2} Extraction with Catecholamine Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jihye; Kim, Hakwon; Park, Kwangheon [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The role of fuel cladding and reactor vessels is to help prevent the leakage of radioactive materials, including the fission products. However, if these shielding materials are damaged by a severe disaster such as the Fukushima Accident, radioactive materials could leak outside of a power plant site. Indeed, after the Fukushima Accident, radioactive materials have been detected in air and water samples. The air and water pollution lead to soil pollution, which is particularly difficult to decontaminate, as soil pollution has several types that vary according to the characteristics of a pollutant or its area. The existing decontamination methods generate a secondary waste owing to use of chemical toxicity solvents. It is also disadvantageous due to the additional cost of handling them. Therefore, new effective decontamination methods that reduce the use of toxicity solvents are necessary. For example, using supercritical CO{sub 2} has been studied as a new decontamination method. This study examines the method of decontaminating metallic ions inside of the soil using supercritical CO{sub 2} and a catecholamine compound. This study examined the effects of extracting metallic ions inside the soil using supercritical CO{sub 2} and catecholamine as the ligand. Based on these results, it is evident that when only the extraction agent was used, there was no extraction effect and that only when the ligand, co-ligand, and additive were used together was there an extraction effect. Following this, the optimal extraction-agent ratio was confirmed using varying amounts of extraction agents. The most effective extraction ratio of ligand to co-ligand was 1:2 in E-9 when 0.3 ml of H{sub 2}O were added.

  17. Analysis on decontamination of contaminated soil with strontium using electrorestoration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. N.; Won, H. J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, W. J.

    1999-01-01

    The electrokinetic apparatus for remediation of the soil contaminated with Sr 2+ was designed. After kaolin clay compulsorily contaminated by Sr 2+ solution, the remediation characteristics by electrokinetic method were analyzed. Meanwhile, the numerical code for analysis of electrokinetic migration was developed for modelling of the soil remediation. And the input parameters needed for modelling were measured by laboratory experiment, or taken from literature. Experimental results are as follows : After 6 day remediation under 40 V, the front part of experimental cell was almost decontaminated, but the back part didn't almost be decontaminated. Consequently, the total remediation ratio of Sr 2+ from cell soil was about 84.8 %. The values calculated by the developed code almost agreed with experimental values. When voltages of electrode were increased by 10, 20, 40V, the total Sr 2+ remediation ratios were about 21.9%. 43.3%, 84.8 % , respectively, after 6 days

  18. Effect of decontamination of planting soil using zeolite slurry that inhibits transition of radioactive cesium from soil to plant bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yutaka; Akita, Hiroyuki; Kikawada, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear energy plant by the tsunami resulting from the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake in 2011 caused the radiation contamination of cultivated field in Fukushima Prefecture. Some decontamination techniques such as surface soil grab, deep cultivation, and adding zeolite to the soil were tested in the rice fields of Fukushima Prefecture. Zeolite is usually used in the form of particle. It inhibits the transition of radioactive cesium from soil to plant bodies. Here, zeolite slurry was also used. The inhibition effect of the zeolite slurry was checked not only in the field but also in a laboratory experiment using some vegetables. The laboratory test results proved the effect of decontamination for vegetable; however, the field test showed uncertainness owing to the low passage coefficient of rice. (author)

  19. Selective Decontamination Effect of Metal Ions in Soil Using Supercritical CO{sub 2} and TBP Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jihye; Park, Kwangheon; Jung, Wonyoung [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Decontamination of soil pollution is difficult because the type of contamination largely depends on the characteristics of the pollutant and the area. Also, existing soil decontamination methods generate large quantities of secondary waste and additional process costs. For this reason, new decontamination methods are always under active investigation. A method involving the use of supercritical carbon dioxide with excellent permeability in place of chemical solvents is currently being studied. Unlike other heavy metals in fission products, uranium is used as fuel, and must be handled carefully. Therefore, in this paper, we studied a supercritical carbon dioxide method for decontaminating heavy metal ions in soil using tri-n-butyl phosphate(TBP), which is well known as a ligand for the extraction of metal ions of actinium. We investigated the decontamination effect of heavy metal ions in the soil using TBP-HNO{sub 3} Complex and supercritical carbon dioxide. The study results showed that when heavy metals in soil are extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide, the extraction efficiency is different according to the type of pollutant metal ions in the soil. When TBP-HNO{sub 3} Complex is used with an extractant, uranium extraction is very effective, but lithium, strontium, and cesium extraction is not effective. Therefore, in the case of a mixture of uranium and other metals such as lithium, strontium, cesium, and so on in soil contaminated by fission product leaks from nuclear power plants, we can selectively decontaminate uranium with supercritical carbon dioxide and TBP-HNO{sub 3} Complex.

  20. BIOREMEDIATION - TECHNOLOGY FOR DECONTAMINATION OF SOILS POLLUTED WITH PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Ramona PECINGINĂ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of soil with petroleum hydrocarbons prevents unfolding processes ofwater infiltration in soil, its circulation and the exchanges of the gaseous substances with theatmosphere. The biodegradation speed of the pollutants by the microorganisms is influenced ofsome factors: nutrients, soil type, humidity, temperature, pH, the type and the metabolism of themicroorganisms. The spill of the crude oil in the soil results in numerical growth of bacteriapopulations, with a concomitant reduction in their diversity, respectively with the predominantspecies that degrade hydrocarbons to simpler compounds, determining their gradualdisappearance.

  1. Microbial decontamination of polluted soil in a slurry process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geerdink, M.J.; Kleijntjens, R.H.; Loosdrecht, M.C.M. van; Luyben, K.C.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Oil-contaminated soil (2.3--17 g/kg), even soil with high clay and silt content, was remediated microbiologically in a slurry reactor. The presence of soil, however, limits the degradation rate of oil. In contrast with results form experiments using oil dispersed in water, the relative composition of the oil components in a soil slurry after degradation was about the same as that of the original oil. Thus the composition of the degraded oil is the same as that of the original oil, which is indicative for a physical, rather than a (bio)chemical, limitation on the oil degradation rate. About 70% of the contaminant was readily available and was degraded in less than eight days. The dual injected turbulent suspension (DITS) reactor is able to combine remediation of part of the contaminated (polydisperse) soil with separation of the soil into a heavily and a lightly polluted fraction. In continuous operation, lowering the overall soil residence time from 200 to 100 h did not significantly increase the oil concentration in the effluent soil. Therefore a soil residence time of less than 100 h is feasible. With a residence time of 100 h, overall oil degradation rates at the steady state were more than 70 times faster than in a comparable land farm. After treatment in a DITS reactor, the remaining oil in the contaminated soil fraction is slowly released from the soil. From a batch experiment it was found that another 10 weeks were needed to reach the Dutch reference level of 50 mg/kg. This can be done in a process with a low energy input, such as a landfarm

  2. A thermodynamic study of decontamination of soils contaminated with 137Cs radionuclide as the results of accident at Chernobyl NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkst, D.Eh.; Chaliyan, K.N.; Chaliyan, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamic characteristics of the process of soil decontamination from 137 Cs by the their washing with eluting solution, Fe(3) and ammonium being included in its composition, have been determined. The decontamination process is 137 Cs desorption as a result of destruction of cesium chelate complexes with humic acids. Fe 3+ and Fe(OH) 2+ substitution for Cs + in the soils occurs spontaneously as a thermodynamically efficient process. 3 refs.; 1 fig

  3. Environmental monitoring (water, soil, air, food) and some methodological aspects of radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balanel, Vasile; Boldescu, Victoria; Mesina, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents research results of radiological samples taken from various media (water, soil, air and some food). The study showed that concentrations of radionuclides Cs 137 and Sr 90 did not exceed the maximum permissible. A high level of radionuclides but within the norm occurred in some imported food. The research describes methodology used in radioactive decontamination in practice of the modern world. (authors)

  4. Advanced oxidation for groundwater remediation and for soil decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehringer, P.; Eschweiler, H.

    2001-01-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP) used in this paper is based on EB irradiation of water in the presence and absence of ozone. The paper describes two distinct sets of experiments, one dealing with groundwater contaminated with perchloroethylene (PCE) and some genotoxic compounds, and the other dealing with soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The combination of ozone and EB irradiation has shown to be able to mineralize trace amounts of PCE contained in groundwater in a single stage process without formation of any by-product to be disposed of. Moreover, experiments performed with real groundwater have demonstrated that the combined ozone/EB irradiation process is also apt for total removal of some genotoxic compounds detected in groundwater contaminated with PCE. The design of an ozone/EB irradiation plant for treating 108 m 3 /h is presented. The issue concerning both the occurrences of genotoxic compounds in oxygen containing groundwater and possible processes for their removal is discussed. In the second part soil contaminated with PAHs has been treated in aqueous suspension using ozone and EB irradiation, respectively. Experiments were performed with low contaminated soil (total PAHs about 332 mg/kg soil). With an ozone consumption of 10 g C) 3 /kg soil a total PAH decomposition of about 21% was recorded. EB irradiation with a reasonable radiation dose of 100 kGy results in about 7% total PAH decomposition at room temperature and about 16%, respectively at 55-60 deg. C. It was recorded that almost no transfer of the PAH takes place from the soil into the water when soil is merely suspended in water. Ozone mainly attacked the high molecular fraction (i.e. consisting of 5 or 6 aromatic rings) of the PAHs investigated while EB irradiation of the aqueous soil suspension mostly decomposed the lower fraction (i.e. consisting up to 4 aromatic rings). (author)

  5. Influences of thermal decontamination on mercury removal, soil properties, and repartitioning of coexisting heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Tuan; Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    Thermal treatment is a useful tool to remove Hg from contaminated soils. However, thermal treatment may greatly alter the soil properties and cause the coexisting contaminants, especially trace metals, to transform and repartition. The metal repartitioning may increase the difficulty in the subsequent process of a treatment train approach. In this study, three Hg-contaminated soils were thermally treated to evaluate the effects of treating temperature and duration on Hg removal. Thermogravimetric analysis was performed to project the suitable heating parameters for subsequent bench-scale fixed-bed operation. Results showed that thermal decontamination at temperature>400°C successfully lowered the Hg content tosoil particle size was less significant, even when the soils were thermally treated to 550°C. Soil clay minerals such as kaolinite were shown to be decomposed. Aggregates were observed on the surface of soil particles after the treatment. The heavy metals tended to transform into acid-extractable, organic-matter bound, and residual forms from the Fe/Mn oxide bound form. These results suggest that thermal treatment may markedly influence the effectiveness of subsequent decontamination methods, such as acid washing or solvent extraction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Decontamination of radioactive cesium in soil using nano-size metallic calcium dispersing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Fukuoka, Takezo; Matsue, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Hidemasa; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Kajitani, Mikio

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, the major concern on radioactive cesium ( 134 Cs and 137 Cs) deposition and soil contamination due to the emission form the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant showed up after a massive quake on March 11, 2011. Soil contamination with radioactive cesium has a long-term radiological impact due to its long half-life (30 years for 137 Cs) and its high biological hazard. Therefore, much attention has been paid to decontaminate Cs-contaminated soil with washing and/or extraction by adopting solvents. However, such wet methods have some disadvantages, i.e. forming of secondary effluents and additional cost for their treatment. We have recently shown that the nano-size metallic calcium/calcium oxide/iron dispersing mixture (Fe-nCa) is most effective for heavy metals immobilization and volume reduction method under dry condition. Thus, we applied this method to treat real radioactive cesium contaminated soils in dry condition. Simple stirring of the contaminated soil with Fe-nCa achieved about above 90% of radioactive Cs decontamination rate and the volume reduction level also reached around 50-60%. In this paper, we showed the effectiveness of a Fe-nCa method for the rapid remediation and volume reduction method of real radioactive cesium contaminated soils under dry conditions and our challenges for sophistication applying machine and reagents. (author)

  7. Decontamination of soils by irrigation with solutions containing complexing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimpl, M.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments in laboratory scale were performed to increase the mobility of Pu, Am, and Cm in soil. Soil columns of 30 cm in diameter and 40 cm of length were contaminated on the surface with 5 μCi of Pu, Am, and Cm, applied as nitrates. By irrigation with 0.1 M DTPA-solution the actinides were mobilized and migrated with the irrigation solution through the columns. The migration velocity was measured and compared to the calculated one. Conclusions for the application of this procedure in field experiments are drawn. (author)

  8. Decontamination by replacing soil and soil cover with deep-level soil in flower beds and vacant places in Northern Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Hiroyuki; Kawano, Keisuke; Kayama, Yukihiko; Koube, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Radioactivity decontamination by replacing soil and soil cover with deep-level soil and soil cover in flower beds and a vacant place in Northern Fukushima Prefecture were studied, which experienced radioactive contamination due to the accident at the TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Radioactivity counting rate 1 cm above the soil surface after replacing surface soil with uncontaminated deep-level soil decreased to 13.7% of the control in gardens. The concentration of radioactive cesium in the cover soil increased after 132 days; however, it decreased in the old surface soil under the cover soil in flower beds. A 10 cm deep-level soil cover placed by heavy machinery decreased the radiation dose rate to 70.8% of the control and radioactivity counting rate to 24.6% in the vacant place. Replacing the radioactively contaminated surface soil and soil cover with a deep-level soil was a reasonable decontamination method for the garden and vacant place because it is quick, cost effective and labour efficient. (author)

  9. Prosopis juliflora--a green solution to decontaminate heavy metal (Cu and Cd) contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, P; Prince, W S P M; Sivakumar, S; Subbhuraam, C V

    2005-09-01

    Soil and plant samples (root and shoot) of Prosopis juliflora were collected in the vicinity of metal based foundry units in Coimbatore and assessed for their heavy metal content (Cu and Cd) to ascertain the use of P. juliflora as a green solution to decontaminate soils contaminated with Cu and Cd. The results showed that Cu and Cd content was much higher in plant components compared to their extractable level in the soil. Furthermore, there exist a strong correlation between the distance of the sources of industrial units and accumulation of heavy metals in plants. Accumulation of Cd in roots is comparatively higher than that of shoots. However, in case of Cu no such clear trend is seen. Considering the accumulation efficiency and tolerance of P. juliflora to Cd and Cu, this plant can be explored further for the decontamination of metal polluted soils. On the other hand, in view of heavy metal accumulate the practice of providing foliage and pods as fodder for live stock should be avoided.

  10. The experience of utilization of electro-migration technology for soil decontamination from cesium-137 under field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, I.A.; Prozorov, L.B.; Martyanov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    The essence of methods for soil decontamination based on electrokinetic processes is that, in the field of constant current, contaminated particles-ions, depending on their charge mark, move to anode or cathode sides. If such a field is created in the soil containing ions of radionuclides or heavy metals, those ions-contaminants will begin to concentrated in the cathode or anode zone, i.e. soil decontamination with ion electric migration process takes place. During the recent tour years specialists from Mos RPA (Moscow Research-and-Production Association) Radon (Russia) have been conducting an extensive investigation on the utilization of electrokinetic processes for decontamination of soils from radionuclides and heavy metals

  11. Treatment of Soil Decontamination Solution by the Cs{sup +} Ion Selective Ion Exchange Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam; Jung, Chung Hun; Oh, Won Zin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Occasionally, radioactively contaminated soils have been excavated and stored at the temporary storage facility. Cesium as a radionuclide is one of the most toxic elements and it has a long half decay life. During the operation of nuclear facility, soils near the facility would be contaminated with radioactive cesium and it will cause the deleterious effect to human body and environment. In this study, Cs{sup +} ion selective ion exchange resin was prepared by changing the functional group of commercial anion exchange resin for a ferrocyanide ion. Ion exchange capability of using the soil decontamination solution was investigated. We also performed the feasibility test of recycling the spent Cs ion selective ion exchange resin.

  12. Thermogravimetric study of thermal decontamination of soils polluted by hexachlorobenzene, 4-chlorobiphenyl, naphthalene, or n-decane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risoul, V; Pichon, C; Trouvé, G; Peters, W A; Gilot, P; Prado, G

    1999-02-15

    To determine decontamination behavior as affected by temperature, shallow beds of a clay-rich, a calcerous, and a sedimentary soil, artificially polluted with hexachlorobenzene, 4-chlorobiphenyl, naphthalene, or n-decane, were separately heated at 5 degrees C min-1 in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Temperatures for deep cleaning of the calcerous and the sedimentary soil increased with increasing boiling point (bp) of the aromatic contaminants, but removal efficiencies still approached 100% well below the bp. Decontamination rates were therefore modelled according to a pollutant evaporation-diffusion transport model. For the calcerous and sedimentary soils, this model reasonably correlated removal of roughly the first 2/3 of the naphthalene, but gave only fair predictions for hexachlorobenzene and 4-chlorobiphenyl. It was necessary to heat the clay soil above the aromatics bp to achieve high decontamination efficiencies. Weight loss data imply that for temperatures from near ambient to as much as 150 degrees C, interactions of each aromatic with the clay soil, or its decomposition products, result in lower net volatilization of the contaminated vs. neat clay. A similar effect was observed in heating calcerous soil polluted with hexachlorobenzene from near ambient to about 140 degrees C. Decontamination mechanisms remain to be established, although the higher temperatures needed to remove aromatics from the clay may reflect a more prominent role for surface desorption than evaporation. This would be consistent with our estimates that the clay can accommodate all of the initial pollutant loadings within a single surface monolayer, whereas the calcerous and sedimentary soils cannot.

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans Predation on Bacillus anthracis: Decontamination of Spore Contaminated Soil with Germinants and Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkle, Bettina; Choi, Young; Baillie, Leslie W; Richter, William; Buyuk, Fatih; Celik, Elif; Wendling, Morgan; Sahin, Mitat; Gallagher, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    Remediation of Bacillus anthracis -contaminated soil is challenging and approaches to reduce overall spore levels in environmentally contaminated soil or after intentional release of the infectious disease agent in a safe, low-cost manner are needed. B. anthracis spores are highly resistant to biocides, but once germinated they become susceptible to traditional biocides or potentially even natural predators such as nematodes in the soil environment. Here, we describe a two-step approach to reducing B. anthracis spore load in soil during laboratory trials, whereby germinants and Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes are applied concurrently. While the application of germinants reduced B. anthracis spore load by up to four logs depending on soil type, the addition of nematodes achieved a further log reduction in spore count. These laboratory based results suggest that the combined use of nematodes and germinants could represent a promising approach for the remediation of B. anthracis spore contaminated soil. Originality-Significance Statement: This study demonstrates for the first time the successful use of environmentally friendly decontamination methods to inactivate Bacillus anthracis spores in soil using natural predators of the bacterium, nematode worms.

  14. Decontamination of Soils Contaminated with Co and Cs by Using an Acid Leaching Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung-Joon, Lee; Gye-Nam, Kim; Jei-Kwon, Moon; Kune-Woo, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Acid leaching process has been adapted for the remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides. This method has been reported to be simple, and economically promising. Moreover it can be applicable for on-site and off-site remediations as well. Investigations were conducted on an acid leaching process using surrogate contaminated soils. Size sieving, agglomeration and column leaching were carried out with soils artificially contaminated with Co and Cs, respectively. Size distribution was analyzed for a determination of the particle size required to be agglomerated. Because of the low water permeability of the soils due to their fine particles, they were sieved by using a sieve with a 0.075 mm size (No. 200 mesh) for an agglomeration. The soils with a size smaller than 0.075 mm were agglomerated by using 2 % sodium silicate (Na 2 SiO 3 ), while the soils with a size larger than 0.075 mm were used directly for the column leaching test. From the preliminary test (the batch scale leaching test), 0.1 M of HCl was determined as the effective leaching agent for Co and Cs. Finally, the soils mixed with the coarse soil and the agglomerated soil were decontaminated with 0.1 M HCl within 11.3 days and the removal efficiencies of Co and Cs were 94.0 % and 82.8 %, respectively. In conclusion, an acid leaching process could be applied for a remediation of soils contaminated with radionuclides such as Co and Cs. (authors)

  15. Decontamination of metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from slag-polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisone, Sara; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Metallurgy is an industrial activity that is one of the largest contributors to soil contamination by metals. This contamination is often associated with organic compound contamination; however, little research has been aimed at the development of simultaneous processes for decontamination as opposed to treatments to heavy metals or organic compounds alone. This paper presents an efficient process to decontaminate the soils polluted with smelting by-products rich in Cu, Zn and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A simultaneous treatment for metals and PAHs was also tested. The process is mainly based on physical techniques, such as crushing, gravimetric separation and attrition. For the finest particle size fractions, an acid extraction with H2SO4 was used to remove metals. The PAH removal was enhanced by adding surfactant during attrition. The total metal removals varied from 49% to 73% for Cu and from 43% to 63% for Zn, whereas a removal yield of 92% was measured for total PAHs. Finally, a technical-economic evaluation was done for the two processes tested.

  16. Decontamination of contaminated soils by microwave heating; Dekontaminierung verseuchter Boeden durch Mikrowellenheizung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauli, Mario

    2011-07-01

    The paper describes a system for the thermal decontamination of contaminated soils by microwaves. In addition to the determination of the dielectric material parameters of different soils, a focus is on antennas for the efficient coupling of the microwaves into the ground. The developed simulation model takes into account the electromagnetic-thermal interaction and makes it possible to predict optimal plant configuration, duration and costs of a sanitation measure in advance. [German] Die Arbeit beschreibt ein System zur thermischen Dekontaminierung verseuchter Boeden durch Mikrowellen. Neben der Bestimmung der dielektrischen Materialparameter verschiedener Boeden liegt ein Schwerpunkt auf Antennen zur effizienten Einkopplung der Mikrowellen in den Boden. Das entwickelte Simulationsmodell beruecksichtigt die elektromagnetisch-thermische Wechselwirkung und ermoeglicht es, bereits im Vorfeld optimale Anlagenkonfiguration, Dauer und Kosten einer Sanierungsmassnahme vorherzusagen.

  17. Removal of radioactive cesium from surface soils solidified using polyion complex. Rapid communication for decontamination test at Iitate-mura in Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Hirochika; Yanase, Nobuyuki; Mitamura, Hisayoshi; Nagano, Tetsushi; Yoshida, Zenko; Kumazawa, Noriyuki; Saitoh, Hiroshi; Kashima, Kaoru; Fukuda, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    2011-01-01

    We tried the decontamination of surface soils for three types of agricultural land at Nagadoro district of Iitate-mura (village) in Fukushima Prefecture, which is highly contaminated by deposits of radionuclides from the plume released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The decontamination method consisted of the peeling of surface soils solidified using a polyion complex, which was formed from a salt solution of polycations and polyanions. Two types of polyion complex solution were applied to an upland field in a plastic greenhouse, a pasture, and a paddy field. The decontamination efficiency of the surface soils reached 90%, and dust release was effectively suppressed during the removal of surface soils. (author)

  18. Review of current research into soil decontamination and volume reduction techniques for purposes of transportation and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, a number of soil decontamination studies have been carried out by investigators in the US and Canada. These investigations have included the segregation of potentially hazardous chemicals from uranium mill tailings, the use of various leaching agents for the selective removal of radium, thorium, and uranium from mine and mill tailings, the study of neutralization, fixation, and conditioning processes for tailings, the separation and removal of transuranium elements from contaminated soil and sediment, and finally studies of the cost effectiveness of various decontamination approaches. Remedial action programs for which soil decontamination may be an attractive alternative are those which include the cleanup of large open land areas since thousands of cubic years of material are generally involved. The practice of decontaminating or otherwise segregating contaminated and uncontaminated soil fractions before shipment to a final disposal site can only be done if it is economical to do so. This paper considers several techniques which have been reported in unclassified literature and includes a comparison of the authors' conclusions regarding the effectiveness of their investigations. The manuscript will include a comprehensive bibliography of references to techniques which appear to be feasible alternatives in remedial action programs

  19. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION OF A THERMAL DESORPTION/UV PHOTOLYSIS PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING SOILS CONTAINING HERBICIDE ORANGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This treatability study report presents the results of laboratory and field tests on the effectiveness of a new decontamination process for soils containing 2,4-D/2,4,5-T and traces of dioxin. The process employs three operations, thermal desorption, condensation and absorp...

  20. Optimum Remediation Conditions of Vertical Electrokinetic-Flushing Equipment to Decontaminate a Radioactive Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Yang, Byeong IL; Moon, Jei Kwon; Lee, Kune Woo

    2009-01-01

    Vertical electrokintic-flushing remediation equipment was developed for the remediation of a radioactive soil near nuclear facilities. An optimum reagent was selected to decontaminate the radioactive soil near nuclear facilities with the developed vertical electrokintic-flushing remediation equipment, and the optimum remediation conditions were established to obtain a higher remediation efficiency. Namely, acetic acid was selected as an optimum reagent due to its higher remediation efficiency. When the electrokinetic remediation and the electrokinetic-flushing remediation results were compared, the removal efficiency of 4.6% and the soil waste solution volume of 1.5 times were increased in the electrokinetic remediation. When the potential gradient within an electrokinetic soil cell was increased by two times (4.0 V/cm), the removal efficiencies of Co 2+ and Cs + were increased by about 4.3%( Co 2+ : 98.9%, Cs + : 96.7%). Also, when the reagent concentration was increased from 0.01 M to 0.05 M, the removal efficiency of Co 2+ was increased but that of Cs + was decreased. Therefore, the optimum remediation conditions were that the acetic concentration was 0.01 M ∼ 0.05 M, the potential gradient was 4 V/cm, the injection of reagent 2.4 ml/g, and the remediation period was 20 days.

  1. Effects of remediation train sequence on decontamination of heavy metal-contaminated soil containing mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Huang, Yu-Tuan; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    When a contaminated site contains pollutants including both nonvolatile metals and Hg, one single remediation technology may not satisfactorily remove all contaminants. Therefore, in this study, chemical extraction and thermal treatment were combined as a remediation train to remove heavy metals, including Hg, from contaminated soil. A 0.2 M solution of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) was shown to be the most effective reagent for extraction of considerable amounts of Cu, Pb, and Zn (> 50%). Hg removal was ineffective using 0.2 M EDTA, but thermogravimetric analysis suggested that heating to 550 degrees C with a heating rate of 5 degrees C/min for a duration of 1 hr appeared to be an effective approach for Hg removal. With the employment of thermal treatment, up to 99% of Hg could be removed. However executing thermal treatment prior to chemical extraction reduced the effectiveness of the subsequent EDTA extraction because nonvolatile heavy metals were immobilized in soil aggregates after the 550 degrees C treatment. The remediation train of chemical extraction followed by thermal treatment appears to remediate soils that have been contaminated by many nonvolatile heavy metals and Hg. Implications: A remediation train conjoining two or more techniques has been initialized to remove multiple metals. Better understandings of the impacts of treatment sequences, namely, which technique should be employed first on the soil properties and the decontamination efficiency, are in high demand. This study provides a strategy to remove multiple heavy metals including Hg from a contaminated soil. The interactions between thermal treatment and chemical extraction on repartitioning of heavy metals was revealed. The obtained results could offer an integrating strategy to remediate the soil contaminated with both heavy metals and volatile contaminants.

  2. Treatment of Simulated Soil Decontamination Waste Solution by Ferrocyanide-Anion Exchange Resin Beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Min Gil; Kim, Gye Nam; Jung, Chung Hun; Park, Jin Ho; Oh, Won Zin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Preparation of ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin and adsorption test of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion were performed. Adsorption capability of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion in the simulated citric acid based soil decontamination waste solution was 4 times greater than that of the commercial cation exchange resin. Adsorption equilibrium of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion reached within 360 minutes. Adsorption capability on the Cs{sup -} ion became to decrease above the necessary Co{sup 2-} ion concentration in the experimental range. Recycling test of the spent ion exchange resin by the successive application of hydrogen peroxide and hydrazine was also performed. It was found that desorption of Cs{sup -} ion from the resin occurred to satisfy the electroneutrality condition without any degradation of the resin.

  3. Soil protection. Looseleaf manual of measures and recommendations for protection, maintenance and decontamination of soils, landscapes and groundwater; Bodenschutz. Ergaenzbares Handbuch der Massnahmen und Empfehlungen fuer Schutz, Pflege und Sanierung von Boeden, Landschaft und Grundwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Guenther; Koenig, Wilhelm; Utermann, Jens (eds.)

    2012-04-15

    The 52th supplement consists of three main chapters. The first chapter is concerned to soil in the environmental policy, scientific basis, investigation and evaluation of soils and adverse soil alterations. The second chapter reports on fundamentals for measures of soil protection and soil decontamination, execution questions of the soil protection legislation. The third chapter contains the actual legislative provisions.

  4. Decontamination of Uranium-Contaminated Soil Sand Using Supercritical CO2 with a TBP–HNO3 Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangheon Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An environmentally friendly decontamination process for uranium-contaminated soil sand is proposed. The process uses supercritical CO2 as the cleaning solvent and a TBP–HNO3 complex as the reagent. Four types of samples (sea sand and coarse, medium, and fine soil sand were artificially contaminated with uranium. The effects of the amount of the reagent, sand type, and elapsed time after the preparation of the samples on decontamination were examined. The extraction ratios of uranium in all of the four types of sand samples were very high when the time that elapsed after preparation was less than a few days. The extraction ratio of uranium decreased in the soil sand with a higher surface area as the elapsed time increased, indicating the possible formation of chemisorbed uranium on the surface of the samples. The solvent of supercritical CO2 seemed to be very effective in the decontamination of soil sand. However, the extraction of chemisorbed uranium in soil sand may need additional processes, such as the application of mechanical vibration and the addition of bond-breaking reagents.

  5. Time domain reflectometry-measuring dielectric permittivity to detect soil non-acqeous phase liquids contamination-decontamination processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Comegna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of soils with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL constitutes a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and high mobility of these organic compounds. To develop effective decontamination methods, characterisation and identification of contaminated soils are needed. The objective of this work is to explore the potential of dielectric permittivity measurements to detect the presence of NAPLs in soils. The dielectric permittivity was measured by Time Domain Reflectometry method (TDR in soil samples with either different volumetric content of water (w and NAPL (NAPL or at different stages during immiscible displacement test carried out with two different flushing solutions. A mixing model proposed by Francisca and Montoro, was calibrated to estimate the volume fraction of contaminant present in soil. Obtained results, showed that soil contamination with NAPL and the monitoring of immiscible fluid displacement, during soil remediation processes, can be clearly identified from dielectric measurements.

  6. Plutonium mobility studies in soil sediment decontaminated by means of a soil-washing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negri, M.C.; Orlandini, K.A.; Swift, N.; Carfagno, D.

    1995-01-01

    The ACT*DE*CON SM process extracts plutonium from contaminated soils/sediments by means of a series of washings with a blend of chemicals, that includes a chelating agent, an oxidant, and carbonates. At the end of the process, the Pu level in the soil is lowered to 25-30 pCi/g from an initial contamination level averaging 500 pCi/g. The radionuclide still present in the soil at the end of the treatment must be strongly immobilized in or onto the soil particles to minimize the risk of its percolation to the aquifer and/or uptake by vegetation. This paper reports the investigation of residual Pu mobility as K d (distribution coefficient) in the treated soil/sediment. Six batches of contaminated soil were treated simultaneously by means of the ACT*DE*CON SM process. Some batches of the treated soil were amended with a standard fertilizer treatment of compost and nutrient and brought to pH 8.5. The treated soil, treated and fertilized soil, and the untreated controls were then incubated at 18 degrees C for 90 days. At four different times, a small aliquot of soil was retrieved from each of the batches and contacted with rainwater for six days to determine the Pu solid/liquid distribution and K d . Results indicated that a higher total amount of Pu was leached from the untreated soil, probably as a consequence of the higher content of available/exchangeable Pu in this soil compared with the treated ones. Treated/fertilized soils showed Pu leaching at intermediate levels between those for treated and untreated soils, at least for the first 30 days of incubation. K d values at the beginning of the incubation period were significantly lower in the untreated and treated/fertilized soils compared with those for the treated-only, but at 90 days, these values were substantially equal among the three different soils. Traces of the chelant were detectable only in treated, unfertilized soil

  7. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  8. Soil decontamination at the Montevecchio-Levante mine site with experimental washing and leaching techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessi, R. [Progemisa SpA, Cagliari (Italy); Fadda, S.; Peretti, R.; Zucca, A. [CSGM, Centro Studi Germinerari e Mineralurgici del CNR, Cagliari (Italy); Serci, A. [Digita, Dipt. di Geoingegneria e Tecnologie Ambientali, Cagliari (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    The soils in the neighbourhood of the Rio Montevecchio-Sitzerri, a stream that flows in the valley below the tailings pond of the Montevecchio-Levante mineral processing plant (SW Sardinia, Italy) are severely contaminated by heavy metals, to the extent that traditional land uses are compromised. Consequently urgent measures are needed both to abate the pollution at source and rehabilitate the contaminated land. This paper is concerned with the problem of soil decontamination using washing and leaching techniques. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in mechanically agitated reactors, using citric acid and acetic acid solutions and brine of hydrochloric acid and calcium chloride. The influence of both reagent concentration and solid-to-liquid ratio has been assessed, and in the most significant cases, the attack kinetics has been determined. The tests showed the brine to be the most effective for removing metals from the soils. Based on the findings of the investigations, the possibility of decontamination by heap leaching has been simulated in the laboratory using the column technique. [Italian] I suoi circostanti il Rio Montevecchio-Sitzerri, che scorre a valle del bacino di decantazione degli sterili dell'impianto di trattamento dei minerali di Montevecchio-Levante (Sardegna Centro-Occidentale), sono caratterizzati da un elevato contenuto di metalli pesanti, che ne pregiudicano gli usi tradizionali. Si rende percio' improrogabile sia la necessita' di intervenire sulle cause all'origine della contaminazione, sia di bonificare i suoli in questione al fine di recuperarli a nuovi usi. La memoria intende portare un contributo alle relative problematiche affrontando la possibilita' di decontaminazione mediante tecniche di lavaggio e lisciviazione. La sperimentazione di laboratorio e' stata condotta in reattori ad agitazione meccanica, utilizzando soluzioni con acido citrico, acido acetico ed una salamoia costituita da acido

  9. Radiocesium concentrations in soil and leaf after decontamination practices in a forest plantation highly polluted by the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vicente, Manuel; Onda, Yuichi; Takahashi, Junko; Kato, Hiroaki; Chayama, Shinya; Hisadome, Keigo

    2018-08-01

    Owing to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident a vast amount of radiocesium was released polluting the land. Afterwards, a variety of decontamination practices has been done, reducing the ambient dose rates. In this study we evaluated the effectiveness of eight forest decontamination practices by means of monitoring the radiocesium ( 137 Cs) concentration in soil and leaf samples, and the daily discharge rates in ten plots during 27 months (May 2013-July 2015). A forest plantation located 16 km southwest to the FDNPP and within the exclusion area was selected. Radiocesium concentrations were analysed using a germanium gamma ray detector. The differences in radiocesium activities between the different plots were statistically significant (p soil and leaf fraction were 96.6% and 3.4%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fate of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) on soil following accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, M R; Hopkins, F B; Self, A J; Webb, A J; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    In the event of alleged use of organophosphorus nerve agents, all kinds of environmental samples can be received for analysis. These might include decontaminated and charred matter collected from the site of a suspected chemical attack. In other scenarios, such matter might be sampled to confirm the site of a chemical weapon test or clandestine laboratory decontaminated and burned to prevent discovery. To provide an analytical capability for these contingencies, we present a preliminary investigation of the effect of accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination on soil contaminated with the nerve agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). The objectives were (a) to determine if VX or its degradation products were detectable in soil after an accelerant-based fire promoted by aviation fuel, including following decontamination with Decontamination Solution 2 (DS2) or aqueous sodium hypochlorite, (b) to develop analytical methods to support forensic analysis of accelerant-soaked, decontaminated and charred soil and (c) to inform the design of future experiments of this type to improve analytical fidelity. Our results show for the first time that modern analytical techniques can be used to identify residual VX and its degradation products in contaminated soil after an accelerant-based fire and after chemical decontamination and then fire. Comparison of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiles of VX and its impurities/degradation products from contaminated burnt soil, and burnt soil spiked with VX, indicated that the fire resulted in the production of diethyl methylphosphonate and O,S-diethyl methylphosphonothiolate (by an unknown mechanism). Other products identified were indicative of chemical decontamination, and some of these provided evidence of the decontaminant used, for example, ethyl 2-methoxyethyl methylphosphonate and bis(2-methoxyethyl) methylphosphonate following decontamination with DS2. Sample preparation

  11. Decontamination of electronic waste-polluted soil by ultrasound-assisted soil washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Yang, Baodan; Ma, Jing; Qu, Junfeng; Liu, Gangjun

    2016-10-01

    Laboratorial scale experiments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of a washing process using the combination of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and tea saponin (TS) for simultaneous desorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and heavy metals from an electronic waste (e-waste) site. Ultrasonically aided mixing of the field contaminated soil with a combination of MCD and TS solutions simultaneously mobilizes most of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and the analyte metal (Pb, Cu, and Ni) burdens. It is found that 15 g/L MCD and 10 g/L TS is an efficient reagent combination reconciling extraction performance and reagent costs. Under these conditions, the removal efficiencies of HOCs and heavy metals are 93.5 and 91.2 %, respectively, after 2 cycles of 60-min ultrasound-assisted washing cycles. By contrast, 86.3 % of HOCs and 88.4 % of metals are removed from the soil in the absence of ultrasound after 3 cycles of 120-min washing. The ultrasound-assisted soil washing could generate high removal efficiency and decrease the operating time significantly. Finally, the feasibility of regenerating and reusing the spent washing solution in extracting pollutants from the soil is also demonstrated. By application of this integrated technology, it is possible to recycle the washing solution for a purpose to reduce the consumption of surfactant solutions. Collectively, it has provided an effective and economic treatment of e-waste-polluted soil.

  12. The Efficiency of Strontium-90 Desorption Using Iron (III) Solutions in the Decontamination Process of Radioactive Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Vladimirovna Cheremisina; Vasiliy Sergeev; Varvara Alabusheva; Alexander Fedorov; Alexandra Iliyna

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation on the estimated efficiency of iron (III) chloride solutions in the decontamination process of radioactive soils with 90 Sr, according to kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the desorption process. The specific 90 Sr radioactivity of soil samples was (3.9±0.3)·104 Bq·g. The adsorption isotherms of Sr 2+ and Fe 3+ are described with the Langmuir equation. The values of Gibbs energy G0298 = -4.65 kJ·mol -1 and equilibrium ion exchange constant ...

  13. Decontamination of soil containing POPs by the combined action of solid Fenton-like reagents and microwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotto, Giancarlo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Ondruschka, Bernd; Tumiatti, Vander; Roggero, Carlo Maria

    2007-10-01

    The effect on halogenated aromatics of solid, non-toxic oxidants such as sodium percarbonate and the urea/hydrogen peroxide complex (Fenton-like reagents) was investigated. A microwaves-assisted, solvent-free method for soil decontamination is presented. It marks a considerable advance in the search of more efficient, environment-friendly procedures for the degradative oxidation of persistent organic pollutants. Residual pollutants in treated soil samples were determined by GC/MS analysis after solvent extraction or direct thermal desorption. Results showed that 4-chloronaphthol, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and p-nonylphenol had been degraded completely, 2,4-dibromophenol to a large extent.

  14. Latest movements on soil contamination countermeasures and survey / decontamination methods. Idea of radioactivity decontamination dam in the Abukuma mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirei, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive substances were discharged from the catastrophe of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Company. With recognizing that scientific support is important to deal with reputational damage caused by this accident, the authors have been measuring the air dose rate of contaminated areas. Using a portable radiation dose / component measuring apparatus, gamma-ray spectrometer RT-30, coupled with GPS, measurement was continuously conducted during vehicle travels. The measurement is still being conducted, and this paper summarizes the measurement results between from October 2011, when the measurement was started, until March 2012. As a result, two huge plumes typically corresponding to the academic definition of geopollution (Nirei et al., 2010) that was caused by radioactive substances were observed. One is the Fukutogun (Fukushima, Tochigi, and Gunma) plume and the other is Chibarakito (Chiba, Ibaraki, and Tokyo) plume, and the flows of them were shown on the map. In addition, this paper introduces that the Commission on Geo-science for Environmental Management (GEM) of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) under the umbrella of the United Nations held an international workshop related to 'Manmade strata and Geopollution' in Japan in June 2011. Upon closing the meeting, 'International geological disaster prevention declaration in relation to the year of the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake' was issued. In addition, this paper poses questions about the current investigation and decontamination methods on unscientific basis, and introduces the idea of dam for the local governments suffered from radioactive contamination damage to generate electricity and sell it. (O.A.)

  15. Decontamination of soil washing wastewater using solar driven advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandala, Erick R; Velasco, Yuridia; Torres, Luis G

    2008-12-30

    Decontamination of soil washing wastewater was performed using two different solar driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): the photo-Fenton reaction and the cobalt/peroxymonosulfate/ultraviolet (Co/PMS/UV) process. Complete sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), the surfactant agent used to enhance soil washing process, degradation was achieved when the Co/PMS/UV process was used. In the case of photo-Fenton reaction, almost complete SDS degradation was achieved after the use of almost four times the actual energy amount required by the Co/PMS/UV process. Initial reaction rate in the first 15min (IR15) was determined for each process in order to compare them. Highest IR15 value was determined for the Co/PMS/UV process (0.011mmol/min) followed by the photo-Fenton reaction (0.0072mmol/min) and the dark Co/PMS and Fenton processes (IR15=0.002mmol/min in both cases). Organic matter depletion in the wastewater, as the sum of surfactant and total petroleum hydrocarbons present (measured as chemical oxygen demand, COD), was also determined for both solar driven processes. It was found that, for the case of COD, the highest removal (69%) was achieved when photo-Fenton reaction was used whereas Co/PMS/UV process yielded a slightly lower removal (51%). In both cases, organic matter removal achieved was over 50%, which can be consider proper for the coupling of the tested AOPs with conventional wastewater treatment processes such as biodegradation.

  16. Radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This Code of Practice covers: (a) the decontamination of plant items, buildings and associated equipment; (b) decontamination of protective clothing; (c) simple personal decontamination; and (d) the basic mechanisms of contamination and their influence on decontaminability. (author)

  17. Preparation of SiO2-KCoFC composite ion-exchanger for removal of Cs in the soil decontamination waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Joon; Moon, Jei kwon; Lee, Kune Woo

    2009-01-01

    The soil decontamination process has been developed for remediate the soil wastes excavated from the TRIGA research reactor sites. Even though the process was proven to be very effective for decontaminate the radioactive nuclides such as cesium and cobalt, the secondary spent solution should be treated with an appropriate method to minimize the waste volume. There are mainly two components in the spent decontamination solution of Cs and Co. The Co in the waste solution can be removed easily by precipitation under a basic condition. However, since the Cs is hardly removed by precipitation, an appropriate selective removal method should be employed. In this study, an inorganic composite ion exchanger of SiO 2 -KCoFC was prepared by sol-gel method for a removal of Cs in the decontamination waste solution. An optimum condition for a preparation of the composite ion exchanger and the adsorption performances of the prepared composite ion exchangers were evaluated

  18. Chemical dynamics of acidity and heavy metals in a mine water-polluted soil during decontamination using clean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A; Lin, C; Lu, W; Ma, Y; Bai, Y; Chen, H; Li, J

    2010-03-15

    A column leaching experiment was conducted to investigate the chemical dynamics of the percolating water and washed soil during decontamination of an acidic mine water-polluted soil. The results show that leaching of the contaminated soil with clean water rapidly reduced soluble acidity and ion concentrations in the soils. However, only soil column was eliminated after 30 leaching cycles. It is likely that the stored acidity continues to be released to the percolating water over a long period of time. During the column leaching, dissolved Cu and Pb were rapidly leached out, followed by mobilization of colloidal Cu and Pb from the exchangeable and the oxide-bound fractions as a result of reduced ionic strength in the soil solution. The soluble Fe contained in the soil was rare, probably because the soil pH was not sufficiently low; marked mobility of colloidal Fe took place after the ionic strength of the percolating water was weakened and the mobilized Fe was mainly derived from iron oxides. In contrast with Cu, Pb and Fe, the concentration of leachate Zn and Mn showed a continuously decreasing trend during the entire period of the experiment. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Limiting-dilution analysis for the determination of leukemic cell frequencies after bone marrow decontamination with mafosfamide or merocyanine 540

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcellini, A.; Talevi, N.; Marchetti-Rossi, M.T.; Palazzi, M.; Manna, A.; Sparaventi, G.; Delfini, C.; Valentini, M.

    1987-01-01

    To stimulate a leukemia remission marrow, cell suspensions of normal human bone marrow were mixed with human acute lymphoblastic or myelogenous leukemic cells of the CCRF-SF, Nalm-6, and K-562 lines. The cell mixtures were incubated in vitro with mafosfamide (AZ) or with the photoreactive dye merocyanine 540 (MC-540). A quantity of 10(4) cells of the treated suspensions was dispensed into microculture plates, and graded cell numbers of the line used to contaminate the normal marrow were added. Limiting-dilution analysis was used to estimate the frequency of leukemia cells persisting after treatment with the decontaminating agents. Treatment with AZ or MC-540 produced a total elimination (ie, 6 logs or 5.3 logs respectively) of B cell acute leukemia cells (CCRF-SB), whereas nearly 1.7 logs and 2 logs of K-562 acute myelogenous blasts were still present in the cell mixtures after treatment with MC-540 and AZ, respectively. Treatment of the Nalm-6-contaminated cell mixtures with AZ resulted in 100% elimination of clonogenic cells, whereas nearly 80% decontamination was obtained with MC-540. Our results suggest that treatment with AZ could be an effective method of eliminating clonogenic tumor cells from human bone marrow. MC-540, shown by previous studies to spare sufficient pluripotential stem cells to ensure hemopoietic reconstitution in the murine model and in clinical application, has comparable effects and merits trials for possible clinical use in autologous bone marrow transplantation

  20. Limiting-dilution analysis for the determination of leukemic cell frequencies after bone marrow decontamination with mafosfamide or merocyanine 540

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcellini, A.; Talevi, N.; Marchetti-Rossi, M.T.; Palazzi, M.; Manna, A.; Sparaventi, G.; Delfini, C.; Valentini, M.

    1987-11-01

    To stimulate a leukemia remission marrow, cell suspensions of normal human bone marrow were mixed with human acute lymphoblastic or myelogenous leukemic cells of the CCRF-SF, Nalm-6, and K-562 lines. The cell mixtures were incubated in vitro with mafosfamide (AZ) or with the photoreactive dye merocyanine 540 (MC-540). A quantity of 10(4) cells of the treated suspensions was dispensed into microculture plates, and graded cell numbers of the line used to contaminate the normal marrow were added. Limiting-dilution analysis was used to estimate the frequency of leukemia cells persisting after treatment with the decontaminating agents. Treatment with AZ or MC-540 produced a total elimination (ie, 6 logs or 5.3 logs respectively) of B cell acute leukemia cells (CCRF-SB), whereas nearly 1.7 logs and 2 logs of K-562 acute myelogenous blasts were still present in the cell mixtures after treatment with MC-540 and AZ, respectively. Treatment of the Nalm-6-contaminated cell mixtures with AZ resulted in 100% elimination of clonogenic cells, whereas nearly 80% decontamination was obtained with MC-540. Our results suggest that treatment with AZ could be an effective method of eliminating clonogenic tumor cells from human bone marrow. MC-540, shown by previous studies to spare sufficient pluripotential stem cells to ensure hemopoietic reconstitution in the murine model and in clinical application, has comparable effects and merits trials for possible clinical use in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  1. Rapid and effective decontamination of chlorophenol-contaminated soil by sorption into commercial polymers: concept demonstration and process modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Ademollo, Nicoletta; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    Solid phase extraction performed with commercial polymer beads to treat soil contaminated by chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) as single compounds and in a mixture has been investigated in this study. Soil-water-polymer partition tests were conducted to determine the relative affinities of single compounds in soil-water and polymer-water pairs. Subsequent soil extraction tests were performed with Hytrel 8206, the polymer showing the highest affinity for the tested chlorophenols. Factors that were examined were polymer type, moisture content, and contamination level. Increased moisture content (up to 100%) improved the extraction efficiency for all three compounds. Extraction tests at this upper level of moisture content showed removal efficiencies ≥70% for all the compounds and their ternary mixture, for 24 h of contact time, which is in contrast to the weeks and months, normally required for conventional ex situ remediation processes. A dynamic model characterizing the rate and extent of decontamination was also formulated, calibrated and validated with the experimental data. The proposed model, based on the simplified approach of "lumped parameters" for the mass transfer coefficients, provided very good predictions of the experimental data for the absorptive removal of contaminants from soil at different individual solute levels. Parameters evaluated from calibration by fitting of single compound data, have been successfully applied to predict mixture data, with differences between experimental and predicted data in all cases being ≤3%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Efficiency of Strontium-90 Desorption Using Iron (III Solutions in the Decontamination Process of Radioactive Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Cheremisina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the investigation on the estimated efficiency of iron (III chloride solutions in the decontamination process of radioactive soils with 90 Sr, according to kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the desorption process. The specific 90 Sr radioactivity of soil samples was (3.9±0.3·104 Bq·g. The adsorption isotherms of Sr 2+ and Fe 3+ are described with the Langmuir equation. The values of Gibbs energy G0298 = -4.65 kJ·mol -1 and equilibrium ion exchange constant Keq = 6,5 confirm the hypothesis of strontium removal from soils with iron (III cations. The effectiveness of the method is substantiated by experimental and calculated results of this study samples of radioactive soils are deactivated in 90% after 9.5 hours, whereas the kinetic constant is 6.77·10 s -1 . The suggested method of soil cleanup with 0.2 M Fe 3+ solutions is optimal and complies with the environmental requirements.

  3. Cleanup and treatment (CAT) test: a land-area decontamination project utilizing a vacuum method of soil removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orcutt, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    Areas 11 and 13 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are contaminated with varying concentrations of Pu-239, 240 and Am-241. An investigation of a vacuum method of soil removal, the Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test, was conducted over a 3-month period in the plutonium safety shot or Plutonium Valley portion of Area 11. Soil in Plutonium Valley is of the Aridisol Order. The surface 0 to 10 cm is a gravelly loam, and is strongly alkaline (pH 8.8). A large truck-mounted vacuum unit, rather than conventional earth-moving equipment, was used as the primary soil collection unit. Effectiveness of the vacuum method of soil removal was evaluated in relation to conventional earthmoving procedures, particularly in terms of volume reduction of removed soil achieved over conventional techniques. Radiological safety considerations associated with use of the vacuum unit were evaluated in relation to their impact on a full-scale land decontamination program. Environmental and operational impacts of devegetation with retention of root crowns or root systems were investigated. It is concluded that the CAT test was successful under difficult environmental conditions

  4. Potential for Phytoextraction of Cu by Sesamum indicum L. and Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L.: A Green Solution to Decontaminate Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hira; Arain, Basir Ahmed; Abbasi, Muhammad Sadiq; Jahangir, Taj Muhammad; Amin, Farah

    2018-02-01

    Phytoextraction is a plant based-technique for removing toxic heavy metals from polluted soil. The experiment reported in this paper was undertaken to study the basic Cu phytoextraction potential of Sesamum indicum in comparison with Cyamopsis tetragonoloba for remediation of Cu contaminated soil in the framework of a pot-experiment. Plants were subjected to seven Cu concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 300 mg kg-1 soil) for 12 weeks. The morphological (i.e. growth) and biochemical (i.e. chlorophyll) parameters of both the plant species were observed throughout the experimental period; the phytoextraction efficiency of S. indicum and C. tetragonoloba were also determined. Most growth parameters were reduced under high Cu stress. Our results shows that at low concentration (25 mg Cu kg-1) all the growth and biochemical parameters were increased but at elevated Cu concentrations, root length, shoot length, and biomass (fresh and dry) were all significantly decreased (p 1, bioaccumulation coefficient (BAC) > 1 and translocation factor (TF) > 1 established C. tetragonoloba as a potential candidate plant for the decontamination of slightly Cu-polluted soil where the growth of plants would not be impaired and the extraction of Cu could be maintained at satisfying levels. Therefore, the present study suggested that C. tetragonoloba could possibly be used as a viable tool for phytoextraction.

  5. Proposal of biostimulation for hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-decontamination and characterization of culturable bacterial community from high-dose point HCH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadhwal, M; Singh, A; Prakash, O; Gupta, S K; Kumari, K; Sharma, P; Jit, S; Verma, M; Holliger, C; Lal, R

    2009-02-01

    To locate a high-dose point hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-contaminated site, to identify HCH-degrading bacteria in it and assay HCH-decontamination by biostimulation. Bacteria were isolated by serial dilution method from HCH-contaminated soil samples collected from areas near an HCH-manufacturing unit and its dumpsite in North India. After confirming the presence of indigenous HCH-degraders (seven of 24 strains), an ex situ biostimulation experiment was conducted. For this, residue levels in soil were diluted by mixing with pristine garden soil and aeration, moisture and nutrients were provided intermittently. This soil was monitored for reduction in Sigma-HCH (sum of alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-HCH) levels and stimulation of HCH-degraders. Experiments were conducted twice, in March-April (c. 75 microg Sigma-HCH g(-1) soil) and October-November 2006 (c. 280 microg Sigma-HCH g(-1) soil) at 26-30 degrees C. Sigma-HCH levels were reduced to decontamination via aeration, addition of nutrients and moisture, of the indigenous population. The study demonstrates that biostimulation of indigenous HCH-degrading microbial population can be used for decontamination of chronically HCH-contaminated sites.

  6. Special zone territory decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Yu.N.; Golubev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Special zone is the Chernobyl' NPP operating site (OS). OS decontamination is described including reactor ruins from the accident moment. The process was begun from reactor bombardment with absorbing and filtering materials (sand, clay, lead, boron compounds). Then were produced soil shovelling, territory filling by dry concrete and laying concrete layer with thickness up to 300 mm. NPP room and equipment decontamination is described. 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Soil Chemistry Effect on Feasibility of Cr-decontamination by Acid-Washing

    OpenAIRE

    Isoyama, Masahiro; Wada, Shin-Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    Soil washing with sample acid jas been proven to be effective for removal of cationic heavy metals from contaminated soils. Since the obsorption of anitonic heavy metals is enhanced in acidic medium, the efficiency of acid-washing may not be guaranteed for soils that are doubly contaminated with cationic and anitonic heavy metals. To evaluate the efficiensy of acid-washing, nine soils are artifically contaminated with chromate and chromium was extracted with hydrochrolic acid of 0.5 mmol L[-1...

  8. Probabilistic frequency variations of structure-soil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.W.; Hadjian, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    During earthquakes, structure-soil systems act as filters greatly amplifying the response of equipment whose frequencies are at or near their natural frequencies. Thus, the estimation of these structure-soil system frequencies assumes significant importance both for safety and cost. Actual in-situ frequencies of structures differ from calculated frequencies due both to variations in mathematical modelling techniques and to variations of material properties. This paper studies the second source only. This variability is usually gauged by the 'worst case' analyses technique in which extreme high- and low- parameter values are assumed and the associated frequencies are used as upper and lower bounds. This approach is not entirely satisfactory because it does not provide any indication of the probability of these limits being exceeded, of the distribution between these limits, or of the level of conservation introduced into the design process. The present approach provides this additional information. The emphasis in this part is both on developing the methodology and on the results obtained. It covers both the fixed-base structure and the effects of soil-structure interaction. Empirical data on concrete proerties were obtained from previously published results. Much less is known about variability of soil properties, so the soil structure interaction coefficients are assumed to be normally distributed. As data on the variation of soil properties become available, they can be readily incorporated via the methodology developed here. (Auth.)

  9. The improvement of Pilot-scale Electrokinetic for Radioactive Soil Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Min; Kim, Gye Nam; Kim, Wan Suk; Moon, Jai Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Most nuclear facility sites have been contaminated by leakage of radioactive waste-solution due to corrosion of the waste-solution tanks and connection pipes by their long-term operation, set up around underground nuclear facilities. Therefore it was needed that the method to remediate a large volume of radioactive soil should be developed. Until now the soil washing method has studied to remediate soil contaminated with uranium, cobalt, cesium, and so on. But it has a lower removal efficiency of nuclide from soils and generated a large volume of waste-solution. And its application to the soil composed of fine particle is impossible. So, the electrokinetic method has been studied as a new technology for soil remediation recently. In this study, the original electrokinetic equipment of 50L suitable to soil contamination characteristics of Korean nuclear facility sites was manufactured for the remediation of soil contaminated with uranium. During experiment with the original electrokinetic equipment, many metal oxides were generated and were stuck on the cathod plate. Several methods to reduce the generation quantity of metal oxides in the electrokinetic equipment and to take off metal oxides from the cathod plate were improved. The soil with uranium was remediated with the improved electrokinetic equipment. The required time to remediate a radioactive soil to under a clearance concentration level was yielded through demonstration experiment with the improved electrokinetic equipment for its different radioactivity concentration

  10. The improvement of Pilot-scale Electrokinetic for Radioactive Soil Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hye Min; Kim, Gye Nam; Kim, Wan Suk; Moon, Jai Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Most nuclear facility sites have been contaminated by leakage of radioactive waste-solution due to corrosion of the waste-solution tanks and connection pipes by their long-term operation, set up around underground nuclear facilities. Therefore it was needed that the method to remediate a large volume of radioactive soil should be developed. Until now the soil washing method has studied to remediate soil contaminated with uranium, cobalt, cesium, and so on. But it has a lower removal efficiency of nuclide from soils and generated a large volume of waste-solution. And its application to the soil composed of fine particle is impossible. So, the electrokinetic method has been studied as a new technology for soil remediation recently. In this study, the original electrokinetic equipment of 50L suitable to soil contamination characteristics of Korean nuclear facility sites was manufactured for the remediation of soil contaminated with uranium. During experiment with the original electrokinetic equipment, many metal oxides were generated and were stuck on the cathod plate. Several methods to reduce the generation quantity of metal oxides in the electrokinetic equipment and to take off metal oxides from the cathod plate were improved. The soil with uranium was remediated with the improved electrokinetic equipment. The required time to remediate a radioactive soil to under a clearance concentration level was yielded through demonstration experiment with the improved electrokinetic equipment for its different radioactivity concentration

  11. Frequency of Hand Decontamination of Intraoperative Providers and Reduction of Postoperative Healthcare-Associated Infections: A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Novel Hand Hygiene System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koff, Matthew D; Brown, Jeremiah R; Marshall, Emily J; O'Malley, A James; Jensen, Jens T; Heard, Stephen O; Longtine, Karen; O'Neill, Melissa; Longtine, Jaclyn; Houston, Donna; Robison, Cindy; Moulton, Eric; Patel, Hetal M; Loftus, Randy W

    2016-08-01

    BACKGROUND Healthcare provider hands are an important source of intraoperative bacterial transmission events associated with postoperative infection development. OBJECTIVE To explore the efficacy of a novel hand hygiene improvement system leveraging provider proximity and individual and group performance feedback in reducing 30-day postoperative healthcare-associated infections via increased provider hourly hand decontamination events. DESIGN Randomized, prospective study. SETTING Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire and UMass Memorial Medical Center in Massachusetts. PATIENTS Patients undergoing surgery. METHODS Operating room environments were randomly assigned to usual intraoperative hand hygiene or to a personalized, body-worn hand hygiene system. Anesthesia and circulating nurse provider hourly hand decontamination events were continuously monitored and reported. All patients were followed prospectively for the development of 30-day postoperative healthcare-associated infections. RESULTS A total of 3,256 operating room environments and patients (1,620 control and 1,636 treatment) were enrolled. The mean (SD) provider hand decontamination event rate achieved was 4.3 (2.9) events per hour, an approximate 8-fold increase in hand decontamination events above that of conventional wall-mounted devices (0.57 events/hour); Phand hygiene system was not associated with a reduction in healthcare-associated infections (odds ratio, 1.07 [95% CI, 0.82-1.40], P=.626). CONCLUSIONS The hand hygiene system evaluated in this study increased the frequency of hand decontamination events without reducing 30-day postoperative healthcare-associated infections. Future work is indicated to optimize the efficacy of this hand hygiene improvement strategy. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:888-895.

  12. Biotechnological strategies applied to the decontamination of soils polluted with heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavamura, Vanessa Nessner; Esposito, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    Soils have been submitted to several contaminants that vary in concentration and composition. Heavy metals can be widely spread and accumulated in those environments due to some inappropriate actions. In this present review some remediation techniques to remediate soils are presented, focusing on the use of plants that are capable of surviving in soils with heavy metals along with the function of some microorganisms in the restoration process.

  13. Decontamination of soils and materials containing medium-fired PuO{sub 2} using inhibited fluorides with polymer filtration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temer, D.J.; Villarreal, R.; Smith, B.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination of soils and/or materials from medium-fired plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) with an effective and efficient decontamination agent that will not significantly dissolve the matrix requires a new and innovative technology. After testing several decontamination agents and solutions for dissolution of medium-fired PuO{sub 2}, the most successful decontamination solutions were fluoride compounds, which were effective in breaking the Pu-oxide bond but would not extensively dissolve soil constituents and other materials. The fluoride compounds, tetra fluoboric acid (HBF{sub 4}) and hydrofluorosilicic acid (H{sub 2}F{sub 6}Si), were effective in dissolving medium-fired PuO{sub 2}, and did not seem to have the potential to dissolve the matrix. In both compounds, the fluoride atom is attached to a boron or silicon atom that inhibits the reactivity of the fluoride towards other compounds or materials containing atoms less attracted to the fluoride atom in an acid solution. Because of this inhibition of the reactivity of the fluoride ion, these compounds are termed inhibited fluoride compounds or agents. Both inhibited fluorides studied effectively dissolved medium-fired PuO{sub 2} but exhibited a tendency to not attack stainless steel or soil. The basis for selecting inhibited fluorides was confirmed during leaching tests of medium-fired PuO{sub 2} spiked into soil taken from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When dissolved in dilute HNO{sub 3}, HCl, or HBr, both inhibited fluoride compounds were effective at solubilizing the medium-fired PuO{sub 2} from spiked INEL soil.

  14. Decontamination of Petroleum-Contaminated Soils Using The Electrochemical Technique: Remediation Degree and Energy Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streche, Constantin; Cocârţă, Diana Mariana; Istrate, Irina-Aura; Badea, Adrian Alexandru

    2018-02-19

    Currently, there are different remediation technologies for contaminated soils, but the selection of the best technology must be not only the treatment efficiency but also the energy consumption (costs) during its application. This paper is focused on assessing energy consumption related to the electrochemical treatment of polluted soil with petroleum hydrocarbons. In the framework of a research project, two types of experiments were conducted using soil that was artificially contaminated with diesel fuel at the same level of contamination. The experimental conditions considered for each experiment were: different amounts of contaminated soils (6 kg and 18 kg, respectively), the same current intensity level (0.25A and 0.5A), three different contamination degrees (1%, 2.5% and 5%) and the same time for application of the electrochemical treatment. The remediation degree concerning the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from soil increased over time by approximately 20% over 7 days. With regard to energy consumption, the results revealed that with an increase in the quantity of treated soil of approximately three times, the specific energy consumption decreased from 2.94 kWh/kg treated soil to 1.64 kWh/kg treated soil.

  15. Investigations into the application of a combination of bioventing and biotrickling filter technologies for soil decontamination processes--a transition regime between bioventing and soil vapour extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, S M C; Ferreira Jorge, R M; Castro, P M L

    2009-10-30

    Bioventing has emerged as one of the most cost-effective in situ technologies available to address petroleum light-hydrocarbon spills, one of the most common sources of soil pollution. However, the major drawback associated with this technology is the extended treatment time often required. The present study aimed to illustrate how an intended air-injection bioventing technology can be transformed into a soil vapour extraction effort when the air flow rates are pushed to a stripping mode, thus leading to the treatment of the off-gas resulting from volatilisation. As such, a combination of an air-injection bioventing system and a biotrickling filter was applied for the treatment of contaminated soil, the latter aiming at the treatment of the emissions resulting from the bioventing process. With a moisture content of 10%, soil contaminated with toluene at two different concentrations, namely 2 and 14 mg g soil(-1), were treated successfully using an air-injection bioventing system at a constant air flow rate of ca. 0.13 dm(3) min(-1), which led to the removal of ca. 99% toluene, after a period of ca. 5 days of treatment. A biotrickling filter was simultaneously used to treat the outlet gas emissions, which presented average removal efficiencies of ca. 86%. The proposed combination of biotechnologies proved to be an efficient solution for the decontamination process, when an excessive air flow rate was applied, reducing both the soil contamination and the outlet gas emissions, whilst being able to reduce the treatment time required by bioventing only.

  16. Changes in Soil Fungal Community Structure with Increasing Disturbance Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunjun; Kim, Mincheol; Tripathi, Binu; Adams, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    Although disturbance is thought to be important in many ecological processes, responses of fungal communities to soil disturbance have been little studied experimentally. We subjected a soil microcosm to physical disturbance, at a range of frequencies designed to simulate ecological disturbance events. We analyzed the fungal community structure using Illumina HiSeq sequencing of the ITS1 region. Fungal diversity was found to decline with the increasing disturbance frequencies, with no sign of the "humpback" pattern found in many studies of larger sedentary organisms. There is thus no evidence of an effect of release from competition resulting from moderate disturbance-which suggests that competition and niche overlap may not be important in limiting soil fungal diversity. Changing disturbance frequency also led to consistent differences in community composition. There were clear differences in OTU-level composition, with different disturbance treatments each having distinct fungal communities. The functional profile of fungal groups (guilds) was changed by the level of disturbance frequency. These predictable differences in community composition suggest that soil fungi can possess different niches in relation to disturbance frequency, or time since last disturbance. Fungi appear to be most abundant relative to bacteria at intermediate disturbance frequencies, on the time scale we studied here.

  17. Decontamination of soils polluted with heavy metals using plants as determined by nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfy, S.M

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this work were three folds. First, to study the mobility and fate of heavy metals in two polluted sites (Mostorud soil, irrigated with contaminated water for more than 30 years and El-Gabal EL-Asfar soil, subjected to sewage effluent irrigation for more than 50 years) utilizing a modified tessier's sequential extraction procedure to evaluate the effect of total metal concentrations on metal partitioning into different fractions. Second, to evaluate the efficiency of some plant species (sunflower, cotton, penakium, Napier grass, and Squash) to extract heavy metals out of polluted soils. Third, to enhance the phyto-extraction of heavy metals by sunflower plant using some chemical chelators (citric acids, EDTA, and Ammonium nitrate) in order to improve the remediation of pollutants as well as to protect soil quality.It was observed that the distribution of heavy metals in various chemical fractions depends on the total heavy metals content. The distribution of heavy metals forms in the studied soils was in the following decreasing order: residual > Fe-Mn oxides > carbonates > organic > exchangeable > water soluble.Either higher metal accumulation in shoots or enhanced metal accumulation in roots was mainly due to improved phyto-extraction or rhizo-filtration efficiency, respectively. Heavy metals accumulation in shoots and roots of the investigated plant species was as follow: sunflower > cotton > penakium > Napier grass > Squash with a lower order of magnitude. Sunflower showed superiority for heavy metals extraction.Application of chemical chelators (soil amendments) enhanced the phyto-extraction efficiency of heavy metals by sunflower in both Mostorud and El-Gabal El-Asfar soils. Citric acid enhanced metals accumulation in shoots and roots more than EDTA and ammonium nitrate. Citric acid with rate of 20 m mole/kg soil was the best chelators to enhance phyto- extraction of heavy metals by sunflower.

  18. Potential for Phytoextraction of Cu by Sesamum indicum L. and Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L.: A Green Solution to Decontaminate Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hira; Arain, Basir Ahmed; Abbasi, Muhammad Sadiq; Jahangir, Taj Muhammad; Amin, Farah

    2018-05-01

    Phytoextraction is a plant based-technique for removing toxic heavy metals from polluted soil. The experiment reported in this paper was undertaken to study the basic Cu phytoextraction potential of Sesamum indicum in comparison with Cyamopsis tetragonoloba for remediation of Cu contaminated soil in the framework of a pot-experiment. Plants were subjected to seven Cu concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 300 mg kg-1 soil) for 12 weeks. The morphological (i.e. growth) and biochemical (i.e. chlorophyll) parameters of both the plant species were observed throughout the experimental period; the phytoextraction efficiency of S. indicum and C. tetragonoloba were also determined. Most growth parameters were reduced under high Cu stress. Our results shows that at low concentration (25 mg Cu kg-1) all the growth and biochemical parameters were increased but at elevated Cu concentrations, root length, shoot length, and biomass (fresh and dry) were all significantly decreased ( p soil was noted for all tested treatments. In this study, both plant species showed quite high Cu tolerance and accumulation efficiency, even though C. tetragonoloba have higher Cu accumulation and tolerance indices than that of S . indicum. At 300 mg Cu kg-1, the highest Cu concentration was found in the root (282.08 mg Cu kg-1) followed by leaf (105.78 mg Cu kg-1), stem (65.30 mg Cu kg-1), and pod (8.13 mg Cu kg-1) of S. indicum. In contrast, C. tetragonoloba had highest Cu concentration primarily in the root (158.45 mg Cu kg-1) followed by the stem (154.73 mg Cu kg-1), leaf (152.32 mg Cu kg-1), and pod (8.13 mg Cu kg-1). Considering rapid growth, high biomass, tolerance, accumulation efficiency, bioconcentration factor (BCF) > 1, bioaccumulation coefficient (BAC) > 1 and translocation factor (TF) > 1 established C. tetragonoloba as a potential candidate plant for the decontamination of slightly Cu-polluted soil where the growth of plants would not be impaired and the extraction of Cu could

  19. Application of a biological process for decontamination of soils in the far north

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouliot, Y.; Sansregret, J.-L.

    1994-01-01

    The site of a diesel-fuelled power station in the extreme north of Quebec (62 degree latitude) was contaminated with hydrocarbons. The site was characterized by typical Arctic conditions: presence of permafrost, limited land transport facilities, restricted availability of machinery and equipment, and scarcity of skilled labor and specialized services. To remediate the site, it was decided to excavate the contaminated soil and subject it to a biological treatment process. The soil was piled on an impermeable base inside of the old power station building and the following parameters were controlled in order to optimize the biodegradation of the hydrocarbons: temperature, humidity, pH, presence of hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms, and concentrations of oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the soil. Samples were analyzed to monitor the performance of the biodegradation process. In less than 12 weeks, of treatment, an inital hydrocarbon content estimated at 6,400 mg/kg of oils and greases was reduced to 750 mg/kg, corresponding to a level acceptable for residential areas. Indigenous microorganisms capable of degrading hydrocarbons were already present in the native soil in sufficient quantity, and their performance improved when the soil conditions were optimized. 1 fig., 3 tabs

  20. Hazard perception, risk perception, and the need for decontamination by residents exposed to soil pollution: the role of sustainability and the limits of expert knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermoere, Frédéric

    2008-04-01

    This case study examines the hazard and risk perception and the need for decontamination according to people exposed to soil pollution. Using an ecological-symbolic approach (ESA), a multidisciplinary model is developed that draws upon psychological and sociological perspectives on risk perception and includes ecological variables by using data from experts' risk assessments. The results show that hazard perception is best predicted by objective knowledge, subjective knowledge, estimated knowledge of experts, and the assessed risks. However, experts' risk assessments induce an increase in hazard perception only when residents know the urgency of decontamination. Risk perception is best predicted by trust in the risk management. Additionally, need for decontamination relates to hazard perception, risk perception, estimated knowledge of experts, and thoughts about sustainability. In contrast to the knowledge deficit model, objective and subjective knowledge did not significantly relate to risk perception and need for decontamination. The results suggest that residents can make a distinction between hazards in terms of the seriousness of contamination on the one hand, and human health risks on the other hand. Moreover, next to the importance of social determinants of environmental risk perception, this study shows that the output of experts' risk assessments-or the objective risks-can create a hazard awareness rather than an alarming risk consciousness, despite residents' distrust of scientific knowledge.

  1. Electrochemical analysis of ion-exchange membranes with respect to a possible use in electrodialytic decontamination of soil polluted with heavy metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Laursen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Transport numbers in different metal chloride solutions were estimated using the emf method for two ion-exchange membranes: Ionics CR67 HMR412 (cation-exchange membrane) and Ionics AR204 SXRA 7639 (anion-exchange membrane). The cation-exchange membrane was found to work nearly ideally for Na...... experiments taken as a simplified simulation of the electrokinetic decontamination method showed that it was possible to remove all ions in the simulated soil volume, with a sharp increase in the potential difference over the soil volume as a result, and that it was possible to control the metal content...

  2. Decontamination of a polychlorinated biphenyls-contaminated soil by phytoremediation-assisted bioaugmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secher, C; Lollier, M; Jézéquel, K; Cornu, J Y; Amalric, L; Lebeau, T

    2013-07-01

    A 70 day pot experiment was conducted for the cleaning-up of a PCBs-contaminated soil (104 mg kg(-1) soil DW) using bioaugmentation with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (LB400) assisted or not by the use of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). The total cultivable bacteria of the soil were higher with the presence of plants. Real-time PCR showed that LB400 (targeting 16S-23S rRNA ITS) survived with abundance related to total bacteria (targeting 16S rRNA) being higher with fescue (up to a factor of three). Bioaugmentation had a positive effect on fescue biomass and more specifically on roots (by a factor of three). PCB dissipation (sum of congeners 28, 52, 101, 118, 153, 180) averaged 13 % (bioaugmented-planted) up to 32 % (non bioaugmented-planted), without any significant difference between treatments. Basically our results demonstrated that indigenous bacteria were able to dissipate PCBs (26.2 % dissipation). PCB dissipation was not related to the abundance of LB400 or to the total bacterial counts. Bioaugmentation or fescue altered the structure of the bacterial community of the soil, not the combination of both. Principal component analysis showed that bioaugmentation tended to improve the control of the process (lower variability in PCB dissipation). Opposite to that bioaugmentation increased the variability of the structure of the bacterial community.

  3. Decontamination of Heavy Metals in Polluted Soil by Phytoremediation Using Bryophyllum Pinnatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekwumemgbo P. A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation is the use of specially selected or engineered living green plants for in situ risk reduction and/or removal of pollutants from contaminated media. This process is one of the most rapidly developing components of environmentally friendly (green and cost-effective technology to abate environmental pollution. The risk reduction could be through the process of removal, degradation, containment of a contaminant or a combination of any of these factors. Bryophyllum pinnatum a herbally-accepted plant in some parts of the world was cultivated in ten different plastic buckets containing heavy metal polluted soil and nurtured for 20 months. The plants were left in ambient conditions and watered periodically. After the first 2 weeks, the plant and soil samples were collected and analysed for total concentration of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb V and Zn. Subsequently, the plant and soil samples were collected monthly and analysed for the total concentrations of these heavy metals, using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Maximum extracted heavy metals from soil by plant were Cd (3.12±1.03 mg/kg, Cr (32.48±3.21 mg/kg, Cu (81.01±2.3 mg/kg Ni (11.91±2.32 mg/kg, Pb (399.90 ±4.32 mg/kg V (5.81±0.08 mg/kg and Zn (150.51± 0.33 and this occurred in the 4th month of study. This study confirms B. pinnatum as one of the plants that could be employed in phytoremediation of soil polluted by heavy metals.

  4. Surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S. da; Teixeira, M.V.

    1986-06-01

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. A direct method for soil-structure interaction analysis based on frequency-dependent soil masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danisch, R.; Delinic, K.; Marti, J.; Trbojevic, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    In a soil-structure interaction analysis, the soil, as a subsystem of the global vibrating system, exerts a strong influence on the response of the nuclear reactor building to the earthquake excitation. The volume of resources required for dealing with the soil have led to a number of different types of frequency-domain solutions, most of them based on the impedance function approach. These procedures require coupling the soil to the lumped-mass finite-element model of the reactor building. In most practical cases, the global vibrating system is analysed in the time domain (i.e. modal time history, linear or non-linear direct time-integration). Hence, it follows that the frequency domain solution for soil must be converted to an 'equivalent' soil model in the time domain. Over the past three decades, different approaches have been developed and used for earthquake analysis of nuclear power plants. In some cases, difficulties experienced in modelling the soil have affected the methods of global analysis, thus leading to approaches like the substructuring technique, e.g. 3-step method. In the practical applications, the limitations of each specific method must be taken into account in order to avoid unrealistic results. The aim of this paper is to present the recent development on an equivalent SDOF system for soil including frequency-dependent soil masses. The method will be compared with the classical 3-step method. (author)

  6. Electrodialytic soil remediation enhanced by low frequency pulse current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian R.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Mortensen, John

    2013-01-01

    The effect of low frequency pulse current on decreasing the polarization and energy consumption during the process of electrodialytic soil remediation was investigated in the present work. The results indicated that the transportation of cations through the cation exchange membrane was the rate...

  7. Decontamination of PCBs-containing soil using subcritical water extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Park, Jeong-Hun; Shin, Moon-Su; Park, Ha-Seung

    2014-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are one of the excision compounds listed at the Stockholm convention in 2001. Although their use has been heavily restricted, PCBs can be found in some specific site-contaminated soils. Either removal or destruction is required prior to disposal. The subcritical water extraction (SCWE) of organic hazardous compounds from contaminated soils is a promising technique for hazardous waste contaminated-site cleanup. In this study, the removal of PCBs by the SCWE process was investigated. The effects of temperature and treatment time on removal efficiency have been determined. In the SCWE experiments, a removal percentage of 99.7% was obtained after 1h of treatment at 250°C. The mass removal efficiency of low-chlorinated species was higher than high-chlorinated congeners at lower temperatures, but it was oppositely observed at higher temperatures because the lower chlorinated congeners are formed by dechlorination of higher chlorinated congeners. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that the PCBs underwent partial degradation. Several degradation products including mono- and di-chlorinated biphenyls, oxygen-containing aromatic compounds, and small-size hydrocarbons were identified in the effluent water, which were not initially present in the contaminated soil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Studies concerning the decontamination of hydrocarbons- polluted soil areas using bioremediation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deac, C.; Barbulescu, A.; Gligor, A.; Bibu, M.; Petrescu, V.

    2016-11-01

    The accidental or historic contamination of soils with hydrocarbons, in areas crossed by oil pipelines or where oil- or gas-extraction installations are located, is a major concern and has significant financial and ecological consequences, both for the owners of those areas and for the oil transportation or exploitation companies. Therefore it is very important to find the optimal method for removing the pollution. The current paper presents measures, mainly involving bioremediation, recommended and applied for the depollution of a contaminated area in Romania. While the topic of dealing with polluted soils is well-established in the Romanian speciality literature, bioremediation is a relatively novel approach and this paper presents important considerations in this regard. Contaminated soil samples were taken from 10 different locations within the targeted area and subjected to a thorough physical and chemical analysis, which led to determining a specific scoring table for assessing the bioremediation potential of the various samples. This has allowed the authors to establish for each of the sampled areas the best mix of factors such as nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium), gypsum, microelements etc., that would lead to obtaining the best results in terms of the contaminants' biodegradation.

  9. Electrokinetic soil decontamination - summary of results of various studies in laboratory, bench-scale and field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutschan, B.; Wutzler, R.; Goldmann, T. [INTUS Inst. fuer Technologie und Umweltschutz e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    In electroremediation, contaminants are removed form soil and groundwater by the action of an electric potential applied across electrodes embedded in the contaminated medium. Driving the remediation are the electrokinetic phenomena of electro-osmosis, ion migration and electrophoresis. Other common physicochemical phenomena that are also present are diffusion, chemical reactions, hydrolysis (change of pH-value), ion exchange, complexation and others. The complex interactions between all these phenomena determine the processes. Important process parameters are transition rates, bulk liquid velocity, {zeta}-potential (Helmholtz-Smoluchowski-equation) and others. Some parameters are determined at laboratory-, bench- and field scale. (orig.)

  10. Estimation of Soil Moisture Under Vegetation Cover at Multiple Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadghuber, Thomas; Hajnsek, Irena; Weiß, Thomas; Papathanassiou, Konstantinos P.

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture under vegetation cover was estimated by a polarimetric, iterative, generalized, hybrid decomposition and inversion approach at multiple frequencies (X-, C- and L-band). Therefore the algorithm, originally designed for longer wavelength (L-band), was adapted to deal with the short wavelength scattering scenarios of X- and C-band. The Integral Equation Method (IEM) was incorporated together with a pedo-transfer function of Dobson et al. to account for the peculiarities of short wavelength scattering at X- and C-band. DLR's F-SAR system acquired fully polarimetric SAR data in X-, C- and L-band over the Wallerfing test site in Lower Bavaria, Germany in 2014. Simultaneously, soil and vegetation measurements were conducted on different agricultural test fields. The results indicate a spatially continuous inversion of soil moisture in all three frequencies (inversion rates >92%), mainly due to the careful adaption of the vegetation volume removal including a physical constraining of the decomposition algorithm. However, for X- and C-band the inversion results reveal moisture pattern inconsistencies and in some cases an incorrectly high inversion of soil moisture at X-band. The validation with in situ measurements states a stable performance of 2.1- 7.6vol.% at L-band for the entire growing period. At C- and X-band a reliable performance of 3.7-13.4vol.% in RMSE can only be achieved after distinct filtering (X- band) leading to a loss of almost 60% in spatial inversion rate. Hence, a robust inversion for soil moisture estimation under vegetation cover can only be conducted at L-band due to a constant availability of the soil signal in contrast to higher frequencies (X- and C-band).

  11. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  12. Soil Organic Matter Stabilization via Mineral Interactions in Forest Soils with Varying Saturation Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possinger, A. R.; Inagaki, T.; Bailey, S. W.; Kogel-Knabner, I.; Lehmann, J.

    2017-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) interaction with minerals and metals through surface adsorption and co-precipitation processes is important for soil organic C (SOC) stabilization. Co-precipitation (i.e., the incorporation of C as an "impurity" in metal precipitates as they form) may increase the potential quantity of mineral-associated C per unit mineral surface compared to surface adsorption: a potentially important and as yet unaccounted for mechanism of C stabilization in soil. However, chemical, physical, and biological characterization of co-precipitated SOM as such in natural soils is limited, and the relative persistence of co-precipitated C is unknown, particularly under dynamic environmental conditions. To better understand the relationships between SOM stabilization via organometallic co-precipitation and environmental variables, this study compares mineral-SOM characteristics across a forest soil (Spodosol) hydrological gradient with expected differences in co-precipitation of SOM with iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) due to variable saturation frequency. Soils were collected from a steep, well-drained forest soil transect with low, medium, and high frequency of water table intrusion into surface soils (Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Woodstock, NH). Lower saturation frequency soils generally had higher C content, C/Fe, C/Al, and other indicators of co-precipitation interactions resulting from SOM complexation, transport, and precipitation, an important process of Spodosol formation. Preliminary Fe X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic (XAS) characterization of SOM and metal chemistry in low frequency profiles suggest co-precipitation of SOM in the fine fraction (soils showed greater SOC mineralization per unit soil C for low saturation frequency (i.e., higher co-precipitation) soils; however, increased mineralization may be attributed to non-mineral associated fractions of SOM. Further work to identify the component of SOM contributing to rapid mineralization using 13C

  13. Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Newmark, Robin L.; Udell, Kent; Buetnner, Harley M.; Aines, Roger D.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process.

  14. Results from the preliminary conveyor evaluation of the high-energy beta scintillation sensor at the Fernald Soil Decontamination Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilk, A.J.; Knopf, M.A.

    1994-07-01

    W tested a high-energy beta scintillation sensor to evaluate its efficacy in continually characterizing washed soils moving on a conveyor belt at Fernald's Soil Decontamination Pilot Plant (SDPP). This sensor was originally developed for monitoring uranium-contaminated soils in the field. It has a multi-layer design that enables it to discriminate against lower-energy beta particles from natural sources. It can also distinguish, to some extent, gamma rays and cosmic-induced species. The sensor detects uranium activity indirectly, based on the assumption that secular equilibrium exists between the targeted radionuclide ( 234m Pa) and its parent ( 238 U). Several 1-h background counts were made at the SDPP each day of the evaluation period. The average background count rate was found to be comparable to that observed under previous laboratory conditions. Static runs were performed on soils from SDPP test runs No. 1 and No. 17 to determine the extent of any residual activity following the decontamination process. Soils were found to contain 158±30 pCi/g and 114±25 pCi/g of 234 Th- 234m Pa ( 238 U?), respectively. But the soils had considerable moisture, and concern existed that this moisture would act as an additional beta attenuator and thereby give results that were erroneously low. Therefore, a soil sample was baked overnight, and the hard-baked clay that resulted was ground into small fragments and counted. This sample was counted for 30 min as before, and the total activity was determined to be 313±44 pCi/g of 234 Th 234m Pa ( 238 U?). Based on the test No. 1 results, a dry-to-wet activity ratio of 1.98 has been established. Hence, if the moisture content of test No. 17 was equivalent to that of test No. 1, the actual 234 Th- 234m Pa ( 238 U?) activity level is expected to be approximately 226 pCi/g

  15. Decontamination technology verification test on scraping surface soil on the highway roadside slopes using unmanned scraping machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinaka, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Mitsuru; Shibuya, Susumu; Kasai, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    The restore the normal life in the contaminated area, reconstruction of the infrastructure is necessary and early decontamination of roads and roadside slopes of highway are required. Decontamination work of roadside slopes is conducted only by hand working so far, but on the high and steep roadside slopes it is desirable to carry out decontamination work by an unmanned scraping machine to reduce working hours and improve safety. In this verification test, decontamination work of the roadside slope of highway, of which area was 20m W x 15m L and divided into two sections, was implemented by the machine or by hand, and working hours and radiation exposure dose were measured. As the results of the test, working hours and radiation exposure dose by the machine were 49% and 63% respectively compared to those by hand. Based on the results, cost and radiation dose for decontamination work on larger slopes were evaluated. Cost by the machine is estimated to be less than that by hand where the area is over 4,000m 2 . It is confirmed that the decontamination work of roadside slopes by the machine can be done more quickly and safely in comparison with hand working. (author)

  16. Management of the post accidental situation applied to Nogent-Sur-Seine nuclear power plant environment. First results of the decontamination of soil and food chain working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, E.; Mignon, F.; Cessac, B.; Gallay, F.; Metivier, J.M.; Reales, N.; Gofette, R.; Mahot, M.

    2004-01-01

    From the beginning of 2002, Troyes prefecture has initiated a reflection about the management of a nuclear crisis caused by an accident at the Nogent-sur-Seine nuclear power plant. Five workshops have been created, dealing with the following themes: 'Administrative and economic organization', 'Health risk assessment and the epidemiology', 'Monitoring of environment', 'Movement in the contaminated area' and 'Decontamination of soil and Food chain'. The first results of the 'Decontamination of soil and Food chain' working group, which involves the District Agricultural and Forestry Department, the Farmer's Association, the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety and the Veterinary Division are presented in the poster. The scenario that had been developed for the accident considers the release of 3 radionuclides ( 131 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs) in the environment. The scale of the crisis didn't require the evacuation and the sheltering of the population during the emergency phase. The consequences on the local agricultural products (cereal, beetroot, vine, milk, cow meat...) have been assessed up to 50 km and different strategies of agricultural countermeasures have been studied regarding to the local constraints (soil types, surfaces and quantities concerned) and to the consequences of their implementation (waste types and quantities, costs). Then, decision-making diagrams summed up the technical results and allowed to deepen the global thought. (author)

  17. Decontamination sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Emiko; Kanesaki, Ken.

    1995-01-01

    The decontamination sheet of the present invention is formed by applying an adhesive on one surface of a polymer sheet and releasably appending a plurality of curing sheets. In addition, perforated lines are formed on the sheet, and a decontaminating agent is incorporated in the adhesive. This can reduce the number of curing operation steps when a plurality steps of operations for radiation decontamination equipments are performed, and further, the amount of wastes of the cured sheets, and operator's exposure are reduced, as well as an efficiency of the curing operation can be improved, and propagation of contamination can be prevented. (T.M.)

  18. Decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki; Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-01-01

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  19. Decontamination method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-10-27

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  20. Skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehrle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A general survey of skin decontamination is given. The success of every decontamination treatments depends mainly on the speed, but also on the care, with which the action is taken. The best way to remove the skin contaminants is thorough washing under lukewarm running water with mild soap and a soft brush. This washing is to be repeated several times for a period of several minutes. If results are not satisfactory, light duty detergents and wetting agents available commercially may also be used. Some solutions which have proved useful are mentioned. The decontamination solutions are best used in the order given. When one has no satisfactory decontamination effect, the next one is to be used. If necessary, these agents must be used several times in the stated order as long as this does not involve too much strain for the skin. All the decontamination measures mentioned refer, of course, to intact healthy skin. After decontamination has been completed, the skin should be treated with a protective cream

  1. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  2. Decontamination impacts on solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased occupational exposure resulting from the accumulation of activated corrosion products in the primary system of LWRs has led to the development of chemical methods to remove the contamination. In the past, the problem of enhanced migration of radionuclides away from trenches used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste, has been linked to the presence, at the disposal unit, of chelating or complexing agents such as those used in decontamination processes. These agents have further been found to reduce the normal sorptive capacity of soils for radionuclides. The degree to which these agents inhibit the normal sorptive processes is dependent on the type of complexing agent, the radionuclide of concern, the soil properties and whether the nuclide is present as a complex or is already sorbed to the soil. Since the quantity of reagent employed in a full system decontamination is large (200 to 25,000 kg), the potential for enhanced migration of radionuclides from a site used to dispose of the decontamination wastes should be addressed and guidelines established for the safe disposal of these wastes

  3. Geographic assistance of decontamination strategy elaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydchuk, V.; Arapis, G.

    1996-01-01

    Those who elaborates the strategy of decontamination of vast territories is to take into consideration the heterogeneity of such elements of landscape as relief, lithology, humidity and types of soils and, vegetation, both on local and regional level. Geographic assistance includes evaluation of efficacy of decontamination technologies in different natural conditions, identification of areas of their effective application and definition of ecological damage, estimation of balances of the radionuclides in the landscapes to create background of the decontamination strategy

  4. Site decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  5. Soil-structure interaction analysis of NPP containments: substructure and frequency domain methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venancio-Filho, F.; Almeida, M.C.F.; Ferreira, W.G.; De Barros, F.C.P.

    1997-01-01

    Substructure and frequency domain methods for soil-structure interaction are addressed in this paper. After a brief description of mathematical models for the soil and of excitation, the equations for dynamic soil-structure interaction are developed for a rigid surface foundation and for an embedded foundation. The equations for the frequency domain analysis of MDOF systems are provided. An example of soil-structure interaction analysis with frequency-dependent soil properties is given and examples of identification of foundation impedance functions and soil properties are presented. (orig.)

  6. Decontamination of metals, pentachlorophenol, and polychlorined dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans polluted soil in alkaline conditions using an amphoteric biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynier, Nicolas; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy; Besner, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, flotation in acidic conditions and alkaline leaching soil washing processes were compared to decontaminate four soils with variable contamination with metals, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and polychlorodibenzo dioxins and furans (PCDD/F). The measured concentrations of the four soils prior treatment were between 50 and 250 mg/kg for As, 35 and 220mg/kg for Cr, 80 and 350mg/kg for Cu, and 2.5 and 30mg/kg for PCP. PCDD/F concentrations reached 1394, 1375, 3730, and 6289ng/kg for F1, S1, S2, and S3 soils, respectively. The tests were carried out with masses of 100g of soil (fraction 0-2 mm) in a 2 L beaker or in a 1 L flotation cell. Soil flotation in sulphuric acid for 1 h at 60 degreeC with three flotation cycles using the surfactant cocamidopropyl betaine (BW) at 1% allows the solubilization of metals and PCP with average removal yields of 85%, 51%, 90%, and 62% for As, Cr, Cu, and PCP, respectively. The alkaline leaching for 2 h at 80 degreeC solubilizes As, Cr, Cu, and PCP with average removal yields of 60%, 32%, 77%, and 87%, respectively. Tests on PCDD/F solubilization with different surfactants were carried out in combination with the alkaline leaching process. PCDD/F removal yields of 25%, 72%, 70%, and 74% for F1, S1, S2, and S3 soils, respectively, were obtained using the optimized conditions.

  7. Decontamination and decommissioning techniques for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, K. W.

    2002-05-01

    Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology are investigation of organic acid as a decontamination agent, investigation of the liquid waste purification process and identification of recycling the decontamination agents. Participation on IAEA CRP meeting are preparation of IAEA technical report on 'studies on decommissioning of TRIGA reactors and site restoration technologies' and exchange the research result, technology, experience and safety regulation of the research reactor D and D of USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, Italy, India and so forth

  8. Decontamination of the site of an army gasoline service station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Katzer, W.; Scheidt, M.; Roll, S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report on the decontamination of the site of a gasoline service station at the Fuchsberg barracks at Salzwedel. Albeit that the accident is not spectacular for its magnitude, this case is interesting and exemplary because of the combined use of the most diverse decontamination methods. Soi air removal by suction, ground water decontamination, and microbiological soil decontamination were successfully used in conjunction. (orig.) [de

  9. Use of some inorganic and organic compounds as decontaminants for cobalt-60 and caesium-134 by clover plant grown on Inshas sandy soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Sabour, M.F.; El-Naggar, H.A.; Soliman, S.M. (Atomic Energy Establishment, Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Chemistry Dept.)

    1991-01-01

    Outdoor lysimeter experiments were carried out to elucidate the effect of 4 inorganic and 3 organic salts on {sup 60}Co and {sup 134}Cs uptake and dry matter yield of three cuts of clover in the soils of Inshas. A new concept was proposed for assessing the difference in capacity of soil to supply radionuclides to plants as affected by applied inorganic or organic compounds. A relation of plant tissue radionuclide content with time can be expressed in an exponential equation with corresponding regression coefficients. When the same plant species is grown on the same soil differing only in the applied compounds (e.g. Fe-EDDHA, Fe-DTPA, Fe-OAC, Fe(COO){sub 2}, Al(OH){sub 3}, Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) the derived equation will change. Differences of either Co or Cs accumulation with time between control and any other treatment were evaluated. The data also show that Fe-DTPA is preferred for {sup 60}Co as enhancing compound for plant uptake (for decontamination use), compared with other applied salts, on the other hand, any tested salts did not significantly effect {sup 134}Cs taken by clover. It was also found that more than 70% of the total cobalt uptake was accumulated in the roots which indicate that Co is less mobile in plants than Cs. (orig.).

  10. Use of some inorganic and organic compounds as decontaminants for cobalt-60 and caesium-134 by clover plant grown on Inshas sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Sabour, M.F.; El-Naggar, H.A.; Soliman, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Outdoor lysimeter experiments were carried out to elucidate the effect of 4 inorganic and 3 organic salts on 60 Co and 134 Cs uptake and dry matter yield of three cuts of clover in the soils of Inshas. A new concept was proposed for assessing the difference in capacity of soil to supply radionuclides to plants as affected by applied inorganic or organic compounds. A relation of plant tissue radionuclide content with time can be expressed in an exponential equation with corresponding regression coefficients. When the same plant species is grown on the same soil differing only in the applied compounds (e.g. Fe-EDDHA, Fe-DTPA, Fe-OAC, Fe(COO) 2 , Al(OH) 3 , Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 , Fe 2 O 3 ) the derived equation will change. Differences of either Co or Cs accumulation with time between control and any other treatment were evaluated. The data also show that Fe-DTPA is preferred for 60 Co as enhancing compound for plant uptake (for decontamination use), compared with other applied salts, on the other hand, any tested salts did not significantly effect 134 Cs taken by clover. It was also found that more than 70% of the total cobalt uptake was accumulated in the roots which indicate that Co is less mobile in plants than Cs. (orig.) [de

  11. Nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Decontamination may be accomplished by chemical, electrical, or mechanical means. Recently there have been significant developments in all three categories as well as an increased tendency to combine techniques, either simultaneously (e.g. by adding chemicals to water jets) or sequentially (e.g. by using a mechanical method to remove loose contamination, followed by a chemical method for more tightly bound activity). Some developments in the different techniques are discussed, together with typical applications of each. (author)

  12. Decontaminating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Toshiharu; Shibuya, Kiichiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of eliminating radioactive contaminations capable of ease treatment for decontaminated liquid wastes and grinding materials. Method: Those organic grinding materials such as fine wall nuts shell pieces cause no secondary contaminations since they are softer as compared with inorganic grinding materials, less pulverizable upon collision against the surface to be treated, being capable of reusing and producing no fine scattering powder. In addition, they can be treated by burning. The organic grinding material and water are sprayed by a nozzle to the surface to be treated, and decontaminated liquid wastes are separated into solid components mainly composed of organic grinding materials and liquid components mainly composed of water by filtering. The thus separated solid components are recovered in a storage tank for reuse as the grinding material and, after repeating use, subjected to burning treatment. While on the other hand, water is recovered into a storage tank and, after repeating use, purified by passing through an ion exchange resin-packed column and decontaminated to discharge. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Assessment of Multi-frequency Electromagnetic Induction for Determining Soil Moisture Patterns at the Hillslope Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp-van Meerveld, I.; McDonnell, J.

    2009-05-01

    We present an assessment of electromagnetic induction (EM) as a potential rapid and non-invasive method to map soil moisture patterns at the Panola (GA, USA) hillslope. We address the following questions regarding the applicability of EM measurements for hillslope hydrological investigations: (1) Can EM be used for soil moisture measurements in areas with shallow soils?; (2) Can EM represent the temporal and spatial patterns of soil moisture throughout the year?; and (3) can multiple frequencies be used to extract additional information content from the EM approach and explain the depth profile of soil moisture? We found that the apparent conductivity measured with the multi-frequency GEM-300 was linearly related to soil moisture measured with an Aqua-pro capacitance sensor below a threshold conductivity and represented the temporal patterns in soil moisture well. During spring rainfall events that wetted only the surface soil layers the apparent conductivity measurements explained the soil moisture dynamics at depth better than the surface soil moisture dynamics. All four EM frequencies (7290, 9090, 11250, and 14010 Hz) were highly correlated and linearly related to each other and could be used to predict soil moisture. This limited our ability to use the four different EM frequencies to obtain a soil moisture profile with depth. The apparent conductivity patterns represented the observed spatial soil moisture patterns well when the individually fitted relationships between measured soil moisture and apparent conductivity were used for each measurement point. However, when the same (master) relationship was used for all measurement locations, the soil moisture patterns were smoothed and did not resemble the observed soil moisture patterns very well. In addition, the range in calculated soil moisture values was reduced compared to observed soil moisture. Part of the smoothing was likely due to the much larger measurement area of the GEM-300 compared to the Aqua

  14. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions. This dataset is associated with the following...

  15. The relationship between brightness temperature and soil moisture. Selection of frequency range for microwave remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.S.; Chandra, G.; Rao, P.V.N.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of brightness temperature data acquired from field and aircraft experiments demonstrates a linear relationship between soil moisture and brightness temperature. However, the analysis of brightness temperature data acquired by the Skylab radiometer demonstrates a non-linear relationship between soil moisture and brightness temperature. In view of the above and also because of recent theoretical developments for the calculation of the dielectric constant and brightness temperature under varying soil moisture profile conditions, an attempt is made to study the theoretical relationship between brightness temperature and soil moisture as a function of frequency. Through the above analysis, the appropriate microwave frequency range for soil moisture studies is recommended

  16. Decontamination tests on cotton materials; Essais de decontamination sur tissus de coton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, P; Pelletier, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    It is shown that versene gives the best decontamination results on cotton materials soiled by a mixture of fission products. (author) [French] On a montre que le versene donne les meilleurs resultats de decontamination sur des tissus de coton souilles par un melange de produits de fission. (auteur)

  17. Radiological survey following decontamination activities near the TA-45 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, T.; Buhl, T.; Romero, R.; Salazar, J.

    1983-07-01

    Three areas at the site of a former radioactive liquid waste treatment plant at Los Alamos National Laboratory were decontaminated during 1982 by Bechtel Corporation, with health physics support provided by Eberline Instrument Corporation, under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Before decontamination, there were above-background concentrations of gross alpha, gross beta, 238 Pu, 239 240 Pu, 241 Am, 90 Sr, and 137 Cs in the surface soils. These combined concentrations were above operational decontamination guidelines for surface soil contamination. After cleanup operations, radionuclide concentrations in surface soils at all three sites were within decontamination guidelines

  18. Modeling for pipe decontamination by means of high-frequency percussive action; Modellerstellung fuer die Rohrdekontamination mittels hochfrequenter Schlagwirkung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aminy, Akramullah

    2014-07-30

    The formation of persistent scales in pipes causes lower flow rates and therefore represents an economic problem. The contamination of scales - which usually is the case in most industrial applications - also poses a problem with respect to the scales' environmental compatibility. The currently applied techniques for the removal of these scales involve the use of auxiliary materials which accumulate large quantities of secondary waste that is costly to be disposed of. In this research, an environmentally friendly removal method for tubing scales was developed and qualified. The analysis of the currently used technologies formed the basis for the analysis and systematic evaluation of different principles of removal action methods. Consequently, a concept for a new impact based removal method was established. The mechanism of this technique is the application of a high-frequency percussive action by a geometrically defined tool. The impact on the scales cracks their surface and causes their fracture and thus the detachment from the pipes. Compared to alternative removal methods this proposed technique works without any auxiliary material and thus prevents the production of secondary waste. The investigation of the impact process was carried out in a newly developed test rig. In this test rig, the maximum forces of the percussive tool were measured with shear force sensors on the tubing surface and the resulting stress on the tube was obtained. The evaluation of the measured values using the method of descriptive statistics demonstrated that the high dynamic stress of the tubing due to the complex tool motion is based on a normal distribution. Based on this evaluation, the effects of the influencing factors on the stress of the tubings were systematically measured and outlined in a mathematical model. This model describes the dependency of the tool and the process of related factors that influences the tubing stress. According to this model, this stress is

  19. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology

  20. Use of inorganic and organic compounds as decontaminates for cobalt T-60 and cesium-134 by clover plant grown on Inshas Sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Sabour, M.F.; El-naggr, H.A.; Soliman, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Out door lysimeter experiment was carried out to elucidate the effect of four inorganic and three organic salts on 60 Co and 134 Cs uptake and dry matter yield of three cuts of clover in the soil Inshas A new concept was proposed for assessing the difference in capacity of soil to supply radionuclides (i.e. 60 Co and 134 Cs) to plants as affected by applied inorganic or organic compounds. The relation of plant tissues (P c ) Co/IR Cs content with increasing time can be expressed as log (Pc) = A + B log time (T), where A and B the regression. When the same plant species is grown on the same soil differ only in the applied compound (e.g. Fe-EDDHA, Fe-DTPA, Fe-O A C, Fe(Coo)z, A1(OH)3, Ca(H2 P O 4 )2 and Fe 2 O 3 ) the equation will change to, log (P'c) = A + B' log (T) (I). Based on both equations, the relationship between (Pc) becomes; log (P'c) = [(A'B')/(A B + A B ) [ +[1/A'B + A B ) [ log (Pc) (II). The intercept (C) and slope (S) in Eq. (II) were determined among 7 treatments (for either 60 Co or 134 Cs). Then the difference of either Co or Cs accumulation with time between control and any other treatment was evaluated according to (C) and (S) values. The data also that Fe-DTPA is preferred for 60 Co as enhancing compound for plant uptake (for decontamination use); compared with other applied salts; on the other hand, any tested salts did not significantly effect 134 Cs taken by clover. Also, it was found that more than 70% of total cobalt uptake was accumulated in the roots which indicate that Co is less mobile in plants than Cs. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Phytoextraction. A new pilot-plant project for the soil decontamination; Fitodecontaminazione. Un sistema pilota per la fito-decontaminazione di suoli inquinati da piombo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregante, M.; Paganetto, A.; Magistrelli, P.; Martella, L.; Gambale, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Cibernetica e Biofisica, Genoa (Italy); Sacchi, G.A.; Rivetta, A.; Cocucci, R. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Produzione Vegetale

    2001-12-01

    The environmental pollution is continuously increasing owing to anthropic activity. High concentrations of heavy metals may have drastic consequences on human health, particularly on children development. Conventional approaches have high economical and environmental costs that do not allow soil decontamination unless sites are particularly valuable. Phytoextraction uses plants producing biomass to transfer metals from the soil to the aerial parts of the plants at the expenses of solar energy. This work illustrates the activity performed within a Life-Environment european project in order to verify whether phytoremediation can be transferred from the laboratory scale to the field scale. [Italian] L'inquinamento del suolo dovuto all'accumulo di metalli come conseguenza delle attivita' umane sta continuamente e drammaticamente aumentando. Principali cause di contaminazione sono l'accumulo di rifiuti urbani, l'utilizzo di fertilizzanti, il traffico motorizzato, gli inceneritori, le centrali termoelettriche, le emissiioni industriali nocive, lo sfruttamento e dismissione di miniere. La decontaminazione di suoli inquinati da metalli e' un problema estremamente difficile da trattare. La bonifica di suoli inquinati da metalli mediante l'utilizzo di piante metallofite e/o agronomiche (fitoestrazione) emerge quindi come una tecnica estremamente interessante. Viene percio' illustrato il progetto PhyLeS (Phytoextraction of Lead from Soil), un progetto pilota finanziato dal programma Europeo Life/Ambiente (DG XI), che si propone di verficare i potenziali vantaggi e la trasferibilita' della metodica di fitoestrazione assistita dalla scala di laboratorio a quella di campo.

  2. Successful full-scale deployments of advanced PGPR enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) for decontamination of petroleum and salt impacted soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.; Huang, X.D.; Gerhardt, K.; Yu, X.M.; Liddycoat, S.; Lu, X.; Nykamp, J.; McCallum, B.; MacNeill, G.; Mosley, P.; Gurska, J.; Knezevich, N.; Zhong, H.; Gerwing, P. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described a phytoremediation system designed to remediate salt and petroleum contaminated sites. Phytoremediation techniques are cheaper than traditional methods of remediating soils. The phytoremediation process is comprised of volatilization, phytodegradation, and chelation processes. Plants uptake contaminants via a rhizodegradation process. The plants provide biomass for rapid remediation with a restoration time frame of between 2 to 3 years. PGPR enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) have been studied over a 10 year period and successfully applied at polycyclic hydrocarbon (PHC) contaminated sites, gas stations, and salt-contaminated sites throughout Canada. Soils are tilled in order to expose contaminants to sunlight. hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are then applied, followed by the application of a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) phytoremediation system that is typically applied to grass species prior to planting. Case studies of full-scale sites used to prove the concept for both salt and hydrocarbon contaminated soils were presented. tabs., figs.

  3. Decontamination of PAH polluted soils by fungi. Subproject: PAH degradation balance and testing of the extended laboratory process. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, R.; Zadrazil, F.; Wolter, M.; Bahadir, M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the research project was first to select a fungus with a high potential for mineralization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and a good ability to colonize different soils. The application of this fungus for a degradation of PAH in soil had to be tested. In a screening of 57 white rot fungi the fungus Pleurotus sp. Florida fulfilled these requirements best. In pure culture it was able to metabolize and mineralize highly condensed 4-6 ring PAH to a great extent. For instance, up to 50% of 14 C-pyrene or 39% of 14 C-benzo(a)pyrene was mineralized to 14 CO 2 within 15 weeks. If different carriers for 14 C-pyrene were used the mineralization correlated with the bioavailability, which was characterized by the desorption of the compound from the carriers with water. The mineralization of 14 C-pyrene, 14 C-benz(a)anthracene; 14 C-benzo(a)-pyrene and 14 C-dibenz(a, h)anthracene in native soils showed that a colonization with Pl. sp Florida inhibited the degradation of the less recalcitrant 14 C-pyrene by the indigenous soil microflora. However, the mineralization of the carcinogenic, very recalcitrant and high condensed 14 C-PAH was considerably supported by the fungus. Therefore this capabilities of the fungus could not be proven in a joint medium-scale soil experiment (0.8 m 3 soil) which had been conducted within a parmership with scientists in Jena and an industriell firm. Because of safety aspects only the low condensed less recalcitrant PAH could be applied in this experiment. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Use of a multi-process phytoremediation system for decontamination of petroleum impacted soils : results of successful field trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Gurska, J.; Huang, X.D.; Gerhardt, K.E.; Yu, X.M.; Nykamp, J.; MacNeill, G.; Yang, S.; Lu, X.; Glick, B.; Wang, W.; Knezevich, N.; Reid, N.

    2008-01-01

    The multi-process phytoremediation system (MPPS) was developed to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) in impacted soils. Phytoremediation of persistent contaminants in soils holds significant promise for rapid remediation kinetics. MPPS effectively removes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) from soils. A plant growth promoting rhizobacteria interaction is the main element for success as it mitigates stress ethylene effects in plants, leading to high root biomass which, in turn, promotes growth of rhizosphere organisms. Field tests of the MPPS were initiated at a farm site in Sarnia, Ontario in the summer of 2004. The field was contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons from refinery oil sludge. The second field trial was performed for 3 consecutive years at a petroleum contaminated biopile in Turner Valley, Alberta. The paper presented the results of the successful field tests of the MPPS. It was concluded that increased root biomass is achieved in the contaminated soils, which leads to more efficient and complete removal of TPHs in the field. Three years of field trials of the MPPS showed that remediation continues with successive seasons. 28 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  5. Considerations about soil decontamination in Goiania: doses the population at the first year and at long date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, E.C.S.; Vianna, M.E.C.M.; Godoy, J.M.; Rochedo, E.R.R.; Campos, M.J.; Oliveira, J.P.; Reis, W.G.; Pires do Rio, M.A.; Pereira, J.C.A.; Romeiro, C.H.; Ramos Junior, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    Values of the order of 10 4 to 10 5 Bq/Kg for the Cs-137 specific activity were observed for soils from regions within a radius of about 50 meters around the main focus. The dissemination was done by the wind and further deposition. However, it was also observed the disposal of contaminated housewaste at unused gardens nearby. It was found the soil profiles as an adequated method for decision on the soil layer to be removed. The in-soil Cs-137 migration presented the same shape whatever the specific activity deposited at the surface and in average 30% of the total activity has remained at the upper 1.5 cm layer over the first five months after the accident. The limits and procedures that have been adopted ensure a total dose to the critical group below 4 mSv for the first year and 0.68 mSv/a in average over the life-time above background. (author) [pt

  6. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlquist, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    This discussion represents one part of a major effort in soil decontamination at the Los Alamos site. A contaminated industrial waste line in the Los Alamos townsite was removed, and a plutonium incineration facility, and a filter building contaminated with actinium-227 were dismantled. The former plutonium handling facility has been decontaminated, and canyons and an old firing site contaminated with strontium-90 have been surveyed

  7. Changes in soil chemical properties as affected by pyrogenic organic matter amendment with different intensity and frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ruzhen; Zhang, Yulan; Cerda Bolinches, Artemio; Cao, Mingming; Zhang, Yongyong; Yin, Jinfei; Jiang, Yong; Chen, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) has long been used as a soil amendment to improve soil physicochemical properties. However, few studies simultaneously investigated both intensities and frequencies of PyOM addition on soil chemical properties of soil base cations, soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC),

  8. Two approaches to biological decontamination of groundwater and soil polluted by aromatics-characterization of microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demnerová, Katerina; Mackova, Martina; Spevákova, Veronika; Beranova, Katarina; Kochánková, Lucie; Lovecká, Petra; Ryslavá, Edita; Macek, Tomas

    2005-09-01

    As part of the EU project MULTIBARRIERS, six new endogenous aerobic bacterial isolates able to grow in the presence of BTmX (benzene, toluene, m-xylene) were characterized with respect to their growth specificities. Preliminary analysis included restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles and 16S rDNA sequencing. The diversity of these strains was confirmed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Additional aerobic bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizospheres of plants grown in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soils. Pot experiments were designed to show the beneficial effect of plants on the bacterial degradation of PCBs. The effect of PCB removal from soil was evaluated and bacteria isolated from three different plant species were examined for the presence of the bph operon.

  9. Lentinus (Panus) tigrinus augmentation of a historically contaminated soil: matrix decontamination and structure and function of the resident bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, E; Giubilei, M A; Cajthaml, T; Petruccioli, M; D'Annibale, A

    2011-02-28

    The ability of Lentinus tigrinus to grow and to degrade persistent aromatic hydrocarbons in aged contaminated soil was assessed in this study. L. tigrinus extensively colonized the soil; its degradation activity after 60 d incubation at 28°C, however, was mostly limited to dichloroaniline isomers, polychlorinated benzenes and diphenyl ether while the fungus was unable to deplete 9,10-anthracenedione and 7-H-benz[DE]anthracene-7-one which were the major soil contaminants. Although clean-up levels were limited, both density of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and richness of the resident bacterial community in L. tigrinus microcosms (LtM) increased over time to a significantly larger extent than the respective amended incubation controls (1.9×10(9) CFU g(-1) vs. 1.0×10(9) CFU g(-1) and 37 vs. 16, respectively). Naphthalene- and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene copy numbers, however, decreased over time at a higher rate in LtM than in incubation controls likely due to a higher stimulation on heterotrophs than xenobiotics-degrading community members. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation and decontamination of crude oil-polluted soils using Centrosema pubescen Benth and amendment-support options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaichi, Eucharia O; Osuji, Leo C; Onyeike, Eugene N

    2011-04-01

    Growth performance and phytoremediation of soil of the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria artificially-contaminated with crude oil (up to 100 mL/2 kg soil) using centrosema pubescen Benth was investigated for 12 weeks. The soil samples in which the plants were established were either un-amended, or amended with NPK, or UREA or chicken manure. The extents of removal of PAHs and BTEX were measured as well as the rates of growth of the plants. Gas Chromatographic analysis confirmed the degradation of carcinogenic hydrocarbons like BTEXs and PAHs with this technique. At the highest dose of crude, the contaminant concentrations were 43 mg/kg PAHs, 10 mg/kg BTEX, and 5,613 mg/kg O&G. The greatest percent removal of BTEX was observed at the highest contaminant dose, and with the manure amendment. Similar trends were observed with PAHs and although they were less marked, the trends with PAHs may have been more highly statistically significant. There was no measurable plant uptake of contaminants. Inhibition of plant growth (measured as leaf area, shoot length and production of dry weight) was proportional to the dose of crude oil, but the manure amendment was very effective at reducing the growth inhibition. Interestingly, manure amendment reduced the phytotoxicity significantly in this study.

  11. Pathways and cost-risk-benefit analyses for INEL radioactively contaminated soil areas being evaluated for decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapin, J.A.

    1980-12-01

    Several radioactively contaminated soil areas exist at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; virtually all are contaminated with nuclides of cesium, strontium, and cobalt at low levels of activity. This study develops a method of analysis to determine cost effective alternatives for decommissioning these areas, considering risk to the workers and general public, as well as the benefits to be gained. Because much of the input data to the analysis is highly subjective and detailed radiological characterization of the soil areas is minimal, it was decided that an analysis based on a relative weighting method be employed. The results of this analysis constitute a relative prioritization list of the soil areas being considered for decommissioning as well as the recommended decommissioning alternatives. The results of this analysis indicate that, of the 46 areas considered, 11 should be left in place under protective storage and 16 should be left as is. Nineteen areas were not analyzed because they were either operational or characterization data were not available. These results are based on a maximum exposure to a member of the general population, through realistic exposure pathways, of 5 mrem/yr

  12. Successful field and laboratory tests of advanced phytoremediation systems for decontamination of petroleum and salt impacted soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.; Huang, X.D.; Gerhardt, K.; Gurska, J.; Yu, X.M.; MacNeill, G.; Lu, X.; Nykamp, J.; Glick, B.; Wang, W.; Wang, H.; Wu, S.; Knezevich, N.; Gerwing, P. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)]|[Earthmaster Environmental Strategies Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Waterloo Environmental Biotechnology Inc., Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation discussed the advantages of phytoremediation and provided an overview of a phytoremediation tests results for petroleum and salt remediation. Several examples of remediation methods were discussed, including the dig and dump method; soil incineration; chemical extraction; electrokinetic separation and land farming/natural attenuation. The advantages of phytoremediation include improved natural structure and texture of soil; suitability to most regions and climates because it is driven by solar energy; cost effectiveness and technically feasible; reasonable time frame for restoration; promotion of high rhizosphere activity by plants; and effective use at remote sites. The development and proof of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) enhanced phytoremediation systems (PEPS) was then addressed. A description of the PEPS was provided. This presentation also reviewed the interaction of a PGPR containing ACC deaminase with a plant seed or root; research and development of the PEPS for PHC remediation; the use of petroleum remediation on an Imperial Oil Sarnia land farm; proof of concept of the application of the PEPS for PHC remediation in Hinton, Alberta; and development of the PEPS for salt impacted sites. Field work and the characteristics of soils were also examined. It was concluded that the PEPS has great potential for efficient remediation of organic, salt and metal contaminated sites and that PGPR alleviates stress and promotes growth resulting in low ethylene and high auxin content. tabs., figs.

  13. Impact of soil-structure interaction on the probabilistic frequency variation of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjian, A.H.; Hamilton, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Earthquake response of equipment in nuclear power plants is characterized by floor response spectra. Since these spectra peak at the natural frequencies of the structure, it is important, both from safety and cost standpoints, to determine the degree of the expected variability of the calculated structural frequencies. A previous work is extended on the variability of the natural frequencies of structures due to the variations of concrete properties and a rigorous approach is presented to evaluate frequency variations based on the probability distributions of both the structural and soil parameters and jointly determine the distributions of the natural frequencies. It is assumed that the soil-structure interaction coefficients are normally distributed. With the proper choice of coordinates, the simultaneous random variations of both the structural properties and the interaction coefficients can be incorporated in the eigenvalue problem. The key methodology problem is to obtain the probability distribution of eigenvalues of matrices with random variable elements. Since no analytic relation exists between the eigenvalues and the elements, a numerical procedure had to be designed. It was found that the desired accuracy can be best achieved by splitting the joint variation into two parts: the marginal distribution of soil variations and the conditional distribution of structural variations at specific soil fractiles. Then after calculating the actual eigenvalues at judiciously selected paired values of soil and structure parameters, this information is recombined to obtain the desired cumulative distribution of natural frequencies

  14. An underestimated role of precipitation frequency in regulating summer soil moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chaoyang; Chen, Jing M; Pumpanen, Jukka; Cescatti, Alessandro; Marcolla, Barbara; Blanken, Peter D; Ardö, Jonas; Tang, Yanhong; Magliulo, Vincenzo; Georgiadis, Teodoro; Soegaard, Henrik; Cook, David R; Harding, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Soil moisture induced droughts are expected to become more frequent under future global climate change. Precipitation has been previously assumed to be mainly responsible for variability in summer soil moisture. However, little is known about the impacts of precipitation frequency on summer soil moisture, either interannually or spatially. To better understand the temporal and spatial drivers of summer drought, 415 site yr measurements observed at 75 flux sites world wide were used to analyze the temporal and spatial relationships between summer soil water content (SWC) and the precipitation frequencies at various temporal scales, i.e., from half-hourly, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h measurements. Summer precipitation was found to be an indicator of interannual SWC variability with r of 0.49 (p < 0.001) for the overall dataset. However, interannual variability in summer SWC was also significantly correlated with the five precipitation frequencies and the sub-daily precipitation frequencies seemed to explain the interannual SWC variability better than the total of precipitation. Spatially, all these precipitation frequencies were better indicators of summer SWC than precipitation totals, but these better performances were only observed in non-forest ecosystems. Our results demonstrate that precipitation frequency may play an important role in regulating both interannual and spatial variations of summer SWC, which has probably been overlooked or underestimated. However, the spatial interpretation should carefully consider other factors, such as the plant functional types and soil characteristics of diverse ecoregions. (letter)

  15. Combining different frequencies for electrical heating of saturated and unsaturated soil zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, U.; Holzer, F.; Kopinke, F.D. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Environmental Engineering, Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    In situ electrical heating of soil was studied applying different frequencies: low-frequency energy for resistive heating and radio-frequency energy for dielectric heating. Steep temperature gradients were observed for each heating mode under the condition of the coexistence of saturated and unsaturated soil zones. By combining the two heating modes, this undesired effect can be avoided, thus allowing efficient soil remediation especially when organic phases are accumulated at the capillary fringe. A parallel application of both frequencies was demonstrated as the most suitable method to reduce temperature gradients. By using electronic filters, both electric fields can be established by only one electrode array. This innovative concept is especially applicable for optimizing thermal remediation of light non-aqueous phase liquid contaminations or realizing thermally-enhanced electrokinetic removal of heavy metals. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology.

  17. Urban Decontamination Experience at Pripyat Ukraine - 13526

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paskevych, Sergiy [Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 36 a Kirova str. Chornobyl, Kiev region, 07200 (Ukraine); Voropay, Dmitry [Federal State Unitary Enterprise ' Russian State Center of Inventory and Registration and Real Estate - Federal Bureau of Technical Inventory' , 37-2 Bernadsky Prospekt, Moscow Russia 119415 (Russian Federation); Schmieman, Eric [Battelle Memorial Institute, PO Box 999 MSIN K6-90, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the efficiency of radioactive decontamination activities of the urban landscape in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. Different methods of treatment for various urban infrastructure and different radioactive contaminants are assessed. Long term changes in the radiation condition of decontaminated urban landscapes are evaluated: 1. Decontamination of the urban system requires the simultaneous application of multiple methods including mechanical, chemical, and biological. 2. If a large area has been contaminated, decontamination of local areas of a temporary nature. Over time, there is a repeated contamination of these sites due to wind transport from neighboring areas. 3. Involvement of earth-moving equipment and removal of top soil by industrial method achieves 20-fold reduction in the level of contamination by radioactive substances, but it leads to large amounts of waste (up to 1500 tons per hectare), and leads to the re-contamination of treated areas due to scatter when loading, transport pollutants on the wheels of vehicles, etc.. (authors)

  18. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, C S; Patterson, R W; Upton, M S [Chemistry and Metallurgy Department, Central Production Services, Ontario Hydro, ON (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  19. Reactive decontamination formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giletto, Anthony [College Station, TX; White, William [College Station, TX; Cisar, Alan J [Cypress, TX; Hitchens, G Duncan [Bryan, TX; Fyffe, James [Bryan, TX

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a universal decontamination formulation and method for detoxifying chemical warfare agents (CWA's) and biological warfare agents (BWA's) without producing any toxic by-products, as well as, decontaminating surfaces that have come into contact with these agents. The formulation includes a sorbent material or gel, a peroxide source, a peroxide activator, and a compound containing a mixture of KHSO.sub.5, KHSO.sub.4 and K.sub.2 SO.sub.4. The formulation is self-decontaminating and once dried can easily be wiped from the surface being decontaminated. A method for decontaminating a surface exposed to chemical or biological agents is also disclosed.

  20. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.; Patterson, R.W.; Upton, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  1. Calibration of a frequency-domain reflectometer for determining soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... Profile-probe versions using. FDR and capacitance ..... these low soil-water contents. The 300 to 450 mm layer had the .... r th. e s o il-e s tim a te. d p a ra m e te rs (. Y. ) fo r in d iv id u a l lay e rs a n d th. e e n tire s o il lay e r. C o lu m n 1. C o lu m n 2. C o lu m n 3. C o lu m n 4. C o lu m n 5. C o lu m n 6. C o.

  2. Development of Decontamination and Decommissioning Technologies for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jei Kwon; Lee, Kune Woo; Won, Hui Jun

    2010-04-01

    A laser ablation decontamination technology which is reportedly effective for a removal of fixed contaminants has been developed for three years as the first stage of the development. Lab scale experimental equipment was fabricated and the process variables have been assessed for determination of appropriate decontamination conditions at the laser wave lengths of 1,064 nm and 532 nm, respectively. The decontamination tests using radioactive specimens showed that the decontamination efficiency was about 100 which is quite a high value. An electrokinetic-flushing, an agglomeration leaching and a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology were development for a decontamination of radioactive soil wastes from the decommissioned sites of the TRIGA research reactor and the uranium conversion facilities. An electrokinetic-flushing process was found to be effective for soil wastes aged for a long time and an agglomeration leaching process was effective for soil wastes of surface contamination. On the other hand, a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology was found to be applicable for U or TRU bearing soil wastes. The remediation monitoring key technologies such as a representative sample taking and a measurement concept for the vertical distribution of radionuclides were developed for an assessment of the site remediation. Also an One-Dimensional Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in Unsaturated Zone (FTUNS) code was developed to interpretate the radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone

  3. Ultrasonic decontamination robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patenaude, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic decontamination robot removes radioactive contamination from the internal surface of the inlet and outlet headers, divider plate, tube sheet, and lower portions of tubes of a nuclear power plant steam generator. A programmable microprocessor controller guides the movement of a robotic arm mounted in the header manway. An ultrasonic transducer having a solvent delivery subsystem through which ultrasonic action is achieved is moved by the arm over the surfaces. A solvent recovery suction tube is positioned within the header to remove solvent therefrom while avoiding interference with the main robotic arm. The solvent composition, temperature, pressure, viscosity, and purity are controlled to optimize the ultrasonic scrubbing action. The ultrasonic transducer is controlled at a power density, frequency, and on-off mode cycle such as to optimize scrubbing action within the range of transducer-to-surface distance and solvent layer thickness selected for the particular conditions encountered. Both solvent and transducer control actions are optimized by the programmable microprocessor. (author)

  4. Some aspects of radioactive contamination and decontamination of the Chernobyl' NPP accident zone territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Yu.N.; Nad''yarnykh, G.V.; Teplitskij, A.L.; Shilin, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Data are presented on the radioactive contamination of the 30-km zone, on the radionuclide (RN) distribution in soils and on the RN migration in grounds. During 1986-1988 were tested over 20 techniques for territory decontamination and were found out the most optimal ones. The first stage of decontamination was removal of an upper contaminated soil layer. The second stage was prolonged chemical fixation of dusting decontaminated soil areas. 3 tabs

  5. Decontamination of radionuclides in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmomo, Yoichiro [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Aomori (Japan)

    1994-03-01

    The release of radionuclides arising from the Chernobyle accident led to widespread contamination of the northern hemisphere through fallout. This accident provided again an opportunity to investigate how and to what extent the radionuclides contamination in crops and animal derived foods could be reduced. The following topics are included in this paper. (1) How to reduce the transfer of radiostrontium and/or cesium from soil to crops: A pH increase of soil is effective for reducing their plant uptake. (2) How to reduce the transfer of radiocesium to animal derived foods: Ammonium-ferric-cyanoferrate (AFCF) should be the most effective compound for radiocesium excretion in the feces. Experiments with lactating cows and/or poultry gave extremely good results with respect to low radiocesium concentrations in milk, meat and eggs. (3) Removal coefficients of radiostrontium, cesium and iodine from contaminated leaf vegetables and cereals during food processing and culinary preparation: Though different by species, more than 80% of cesium and about 50% of strontium and iodine can be removed during culinary preparation of washing and boiling. (4) Simultaneous decontamination of radiocesium and iodine from drinking water and liquid milk: Metal ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin, specifically Fe ferrocyanide one, was successfully used for a rapid and simple decontamination of radiocesium and iodine in the liquid samples arising from the Chernobyle accident. (5) Removal of radiocesium from meat: The meat structurally contaminated with radiocesium is easily and very successfully decontaminated by pickling in NaCl solution and the decontamination is much speeded up by freezing meat before pickling. (author).

  6. Decontamination of radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmomo, Yoichiro

    1994-01-01

    The release of radionuclides arising from the Chernobyle accident led to widespread contamination of the northern hemisphere through fallout. This accident provided again an opportunity to investigate how and to what extent the radionuclides contamination in crops and animal derived foods could be reduced. The following topics are included in this paper. (1) How to reduce the transfer of radiostrontium and/or cesium from soil to crops: A pH increase of soil is effective for reducing their plant uptake. (2) How to reduce the transfer of radiocesium to animal derived foods: Ammonium-ferric-cyanoferrate (AFCF) should be the most effective compound for radiocesium excretion in the feces. Experiments with lactating cows and/or poultry gave extremely good results with respect to low radiocesium concentrations in milk, meat and eggs. (3) Removal coefficients of radiostrontium, cesium and iodine from contaminated leaf vegetables and cereals during food processing and culinary preparation: Though different by species, more than 80% of cesium and about 50% of strontium and iodine can be removed during culinary preparation of washing and boiling. (4) Simultaneous decontamination of radiocesium and iodine from drinking water and liquid milk: Metal ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin, specifically Fe ferrocyanide one, was successfully used for a rapid and simple decontamination of radiocesium and iodine in the liquid samples arising from the Chernobyle accident. (5) Removal of radiocesium from meat: The meat structurally contaminated with radiocesium is easily and very successfully decontaminated by pickling in NaCl solution and the decontamination is much speeded up by freezing meat before pickling. (author)

  7. The Frequency and Damping of Soil-Structure Systems with Embedded Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghannad, M. Ali; Rahmani, Mohammad T.; Jahankhah, Hossein

    2008-01-01

    The effect of foundation embedment on fundamental period and damping of buildings has been the title of several researches in three past decades. A review of the literature reveals some discrepancies between proposed formulations for dynamic characteristics of soil-embedded foundation-structure systems that raise the necessity of more investigation on this issue. Here, first a set of approximate polynomial equations for soil impedances, based on numerical data calculated from well known cone models, are presented. Then a simplified approach is suggested to calculate period and damping of the whole system considering soil medium as a viscoelastic half space. The procedure includes both material and radiation damping while frequency dependency of soil impedance functions is not ignored. Results show that soil-structure interaction can highly affect dynamic properties of system. Finally the results are compared with one of the commonly referred researches

  8. Chemical decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Hitoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Metal wastes contaminated by radioactive materials are contained in a rotational decontamination vessel, and the metal wastes are rotated therein while being in contact with a slight amount of a decontamination liquid comprising a mineral acid. As the mineral acid, a mixed acid of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and fluoric acid is preferably used. Alternatively, chemical decontamination can also be conducted by charging an acid resistant stirring medium in the rotational decontamination vessel. The surface of the metal wastes is uniformly covered by the slight amount of decontamination liquid to dissolve the surface layer. In addition, heat of dissolution generated in this case is accumulated in the inside of the rotational decontamination vessel, the temperature is elevated with no particular heating, thereby enabling to obtain an excellent decontamination effect substantially at the same level as in the case of heating the liquid to 70degC in a conventional immersion decontamination method. Further, although contact areas between the metal wastes and the immersion vessel are difficult to be decontaminated in the immersion decontamination method, all of areas can be dissolved uniformly in the present invention. (T.M.)

  9. Fire frequency drives decadal changes in soil carbon and nitrogen and ecosystem productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Adam F. A.; Ahlström, Anders; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Nieradzik, Lars P.; Staver, A. Carla; Scharenbroch, Bryant C.; Jumpponen, Ari; Anderegg, William R. L.; Randerson, James T.; Jackson, Robert B.

    2018-01-01

    Fire frequency is changing globally and is projected to affect the global carbon cycle and climate. However, uncertainty about how ecosystems respond to decadal changes in fire frequency makes it difficult to predict the effects of altered fire regimes on the carbon cycle; for instance, we do not fully understand the long-term effects of fire on soil carbon and nutrient storage, or whether fire-driven nutrient losses limit plant productivity. Here we analyse data from 48 sites in savanna grasslands, broadleaf forests and needleleaf forests spanning up to 65 years, during which time the frequency of fires was altered at each site. We find that frequently burned plots experienced a decline in surface soil carbon and nitrogen that was non-saturating through time, having 36 per cent (±13 per cent) less carbon and 38 per cent (±16 per cent) less nitrogen after 64 years than plots that were protected from fire. Fire-driven carbon and nitrogen losses were substantial in savanna grasslands and broadleaf forests, but not in temperate and boreal needleleaf forests. We also observe comparable soil carbon and nitrogen losses in an independent field dataset and in dynamic model simulations of global vegetation. The model study predicts that the long-term losses of soil nitrogen that result from more frequent burning may in turn decrease the carbon that is sequestered by net primary productivity by about 20 per cent of the total carbon that is emitted from burning biomass over the same period. Furthermore, we estimate that the effects of changes in fire frequency on ecosystem carbon storage may be 30 per cent too low if they do not include multidecadal changes in soil carbon, especially in drier savanna grasslands. Future changes in fire frequency may shift ecosystem carbon storage by changing soil carbon pools and nitrogen limitations on plant growth, altering the carbon sink capacity of frequently burning savanna grasslands and broadleaf forests.

  10. GARDEC, Estimation of dose-rates reduction by garden decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togawa, Orihiko

    2006-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: GARDEC estimates the reduction of dose rates by garden decontamination. It provides the effect of different decontamination Methods, the depth of soil to be considered, dose-rate before and after decontamination and the reduction factor. 2 - Methods: This code takes into account three Methods of decontamination : (i)digging a garden in a special way, (ii) a removal of the upper layer of soil, and (iii) covering with a shielding layer of soil. The dose-rate conversion factor is defined as the external dose-rate, in the air, at a given height above the ground from a unit concentration of a specific radionuclide in each soil layer

  11. Decontamination device for pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashina, Heihachi.

    1994-01-01

    Pipelines to be decontaminated are parts of pipelines contaminated with radioactive materials, and they are connected to a fluid transfer means (for example, a bladeless pump) and a ball collector by way of a connector. The fluid of a mixture of chemical decontaminating liquid and spheres is sent into pipelines to be decontaminated. The spheres are, for example, heat resistant porous hard or soft rubber spheres. The fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated are circulated by way of bypassing means. The inner surface of the pipelines is decontaminated by the circulation of the fluid. When the bypass means is closed, the fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated is sent to the ball collector, and the spheres are captured by a hopper. Further, the liquid is sent to the filtrating means to filter the chemical contaminating liquid, and sludges contained in the liquid are captured. (I.N.)

  12. Gross decontamination experiment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment

  13. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  14. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  15. Decontamination of body surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harase, Chieko.

    1989-01-01

    There are two important points for an effective application of decontamination procedures. One is the organizing method of responsible decontamination teams. The team should be directed by medical doctor with the knowledge of decontamination of radionuclides. The other point is the place of application of the decontamination. Hospitals and clinics, especially with a department of nuclear medicine, or specialized units such as an emergency medical center are preferable. Before decontamination procedures are initiated, adequate monitoring of the body surface should be undertaken by a competent person in order to demarcate the areas which are contaminated. There are fundamental principles which are applicable to all decontamination procedures. (1) Precautions must always be taken to prevent further spread of contamination during decontamination operations. (2) Mild decontamination methods should be tried before resorting to treatment which can damage the body surface. The specific feature of each contamination varies widely in radionuclides involved, place and area of the contamination, condition of the contaminated skin such as whether the skin is wounded or not, and others. Soap and water are usually good detergents in most cases. If they fail, orange oil cream (SUPERDECONCREAM, available from Tokyo Engineering Co.) specially prepared for decontamination of radionuclides of most fission and corrosion products may be used. Contaminated hair should be washed several times with an efficient shampoo. (author)

  16. Development of decontamination methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.; Dippel, T.; Hentschel, D.

    1976-01-01

    PVC floorings, fabricated by mixing of the basic components, showed no relation between content of fillers and decontamination results. Decontamination results are partly poorer, if the flooring contains a high concentration of the filler, especially if the latter consists mainly of hydrophilic materials. The coloring of the floorings seems to have no influence on the decontamination. Rubber floorings, fabricated by chemical reactions between polymers, vulcanization materials and fillers, show decontamination results depending definitely from the proper choice of the filler. Flooring types, containing lampblack, graphite, kaoline, barium sulfate and titanium oxide are easy to decontaminate. Increasing contents of hydrophilic filler cause a fall off in the decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness and the homogenity of cleaning pastes based on hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, titanium oxide and polyethylene powders is strongly depended on the content of hydrochloric acid. Reduction of the content of this component to less than 2 w/O remains the effectiveness unchanged only if the titanium oxide-polyethylene powder mixture is substituted by a high density, highly surface active powder material. This type of paste containing no hydrochloric acid shows nearly the same decontamination effectiveness as standard pickling pastes containing about 30% hydrochlorid acid. Properly prepared salt powder turn out to be easily and successfully applied to metal surfaces by a flame spray technique. The thin layer of molten salts is a very effective decontamination to samples contaminated in the primary loop of a PWR. (orig.) [de

  17. Diversity and frequency of Nocardia spp. in the soil of Isfahan province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuei, R; Emami, M; Mirnejad, R; Khoobdel, M

    2012-06-01

    To isolate and identify Nocardia spp. from soil in different regions of Isfahan province in the center of Iran. This study was conducted in 32 districts (16 cities and 16 villages) in Isfahan province during two years. A total of 800 soil samples from these regions were studied by using kanamycin. The isolated Nocardia species were examined by gram and acid-fast staining and were identified biochemically and morphologically. The frequency and distribution of Nocardia spp. were determined in relation to different factors such as soil pH and temperate climate. From 153 (19.1%) Nocardia isolates identified, Nocardia asteroids (N. asteroids) complex (45.5%) and Nocardia brasiliensis (N. brasiliensis) (24.7%) were the most frequently isolated species, followed by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum (2.2%), Nocardiopsis dassonvillei, Actinomadura actinomadura (each 1.7%) and Nocardia transvalensis (1.1%) and also unknown spp. (23.0%). In this study, most species (54.4%) of Nocardia, especially N. asteroides complex were isolated from soils with pH: 7.01-8, whereas in pH: 8.01-9 more N. brasiliensis was isolated. The most Nocardia spp. was detected from regions with semi-nomadic and temperate climate (41.1%). N. asteroids complex is more prevalent in Isfahan province and soil can be a potential source of nocardiosis infections. It is to be considering that climate and soil pH are involved in the frequency and diversity of aerobic Actinomycetes.

  18. Decontamination of floor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirous, F.

    1983-01-01

    Requirements are presented put on the surfaces of floors of radiochemical workplaces. The mechanism is described of retaining the contaminant in the surface of the flooring, ways of reducing the hazards of floor surface contamination, decontamination techniques and used decontamination agents. (J.P.)

  19. Fire Frequency and Vegetation Composition Influence Soil Nitrogen Cycling and Base Cations in an Oak Savanna Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauchlan, K. K.; Nelson, D. M.; Perakis, S.; Marcotte, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Fire frequency is crucial for maintaining savannas in the transition between forests and grasslands. In general, increasing fire frequency has two effects: it increases herbaceous plant cover more than woody plant cover, and it lowers soil organic matter stocks. These effects have been demonstrated at a long-term prescribed fire experiment in an oak savanna ecosystem at Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, Minnesota, U.S.A. The fire experiment began in 1964 and oak savannas are burned at various frequencies ranging from every year to not at all. This has led to changes in vegetation ranging from almost 100% grassland to 100% oak forest. Additionally, nitrogen stocks almost doubled in the sites that were not burned, as it accumulated in the trees, leaf litter, and soil. We addressed additional soil changes taking place at this experiment by asking the question: How have fire and oak-grass balance affected soil nutrients, specifically nitrogen and base cations? Surface soils were collected from 12 plots on the oak savanna burn experiment. Soils were collected in increments to 100 cm depth, from under grass-dominated vegetation and from under tree-dominated vegetation. We non-destructively estimated soil base cations by measuring elemental concentrations of dried soil subsamples with a handheld x-ray fluorescence analyzer. We also measured carbon and nitrogen concentrations and isotopic composition of the soil samples. Soils in plots with high fire frequency had higher concentrations of calcium than soils in unburned plots (low fire frequency). Similar trends were seen for soil potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus concentrations. In contrast, soils in plots with high fire frequency had dramatically lowered nitrogen cycling rates and stocks across the oak savanna. The contrast between the responses of different nutrients to changing fire frequency has important implications for the consequences of fire and tree-grass composition on nutrient cycling dynamics.

  20. Frequency distribution of Radium-226, Thorium-228 and Potassium-40 concentration in ploughed soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drichko, V.F.; Krisyuk, B.E.; Travnikova, I.G.; Lisachenko, E.P.; Dubenskaya, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of studying Ra-226, Th-228 and K-40 concentration distribution laws in podsol, chernozem and saline soils are considered. Radionuclide concentrations were determined by gamma-spectrometric method in the samples chosen from arable soil layer according to the generally accepted agrotechnical procedure. Measuring procedure is described. The results show that frequency distributions of radionuclide concentrations transform from asymmetric form in normal coordinates into symmetric form in logarithmic coordinates. The usage of the lognormal law to describe frequency concentration distributions is substantiated. The values of concentration distribution parameters are given. The analysis of the data obtained permits to establish that Ra-226 and Th-228 concentrations in soils distribute lognormally and K-40 concentrations - normally and lognormally. According to the degree of decreasing mean concentrations of Ra-226 and Th-228, soils lie in line: chernozems=chernozem salterns > podsols; and according to the degree of decreasing mean quadratic deviation - in line: podsols>chernozems=salterns. It is necessary to determine the value of mean quadratic deviation and distribution type for full characteristics of the studied soil radioactivity

  1. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon building so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered

  2. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-05-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon buildings so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered. (U.S.)

  3. Influence of Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of several decontamination techniques on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. There are different kinds of decontamination methods like mechanical and chemical processes. The techniques specified, and their potential to change measured characteristics like the isotope vector of the contamination is demonstrated. It is common for all these processes, that the contamination is removed from the surface. Slightly adhered nuclides can be removed more effectively than strongly sticking nuclides. Usually a mixture of these nuclides forms the contamination. Problematically any kind of decontamination will influence the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector. On the one hand it is helpful to know the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector for the radiological characterization of the nuclear facility and on the other hand this information will be changed in the decontamination process. This is important especially for free release procedures, radiation protection and waste management. Some questions on the need of decontamination have been discussed. (authors)

  4. DEMOS PLUS. Robot for decontaminating soils and cavity walls of the reactor and fuel pools NPP primarily during periods of recharging fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacalle Bayo, J.; Vaquer Perez, J. I.; Rosello Garcia, J. I.

    2014-01-01

    In this work the robot Plus Demos, equipment that has been developed by GD Energy Services from the redesign and development of robot Demos show, which took place on last year. This evolution has given the team greater capabilities, highlighting the decontamination of vertical surfaces. The main objective pursued is to minimize operational doses to workers operating in cavity as well as the risk of surface contamination during them. (Author)

  5. An approach for modeling the influence of wheel tractor loads and vibration frequencies on soil compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verotti, M.; Servadio, P.; Belfiore, N. P.; Bergonzoli, S.

    2012-04-01

    -man interaction. In particular, a model based on elasto-visco-plastic concentrated parameters, with multiple degrees of freedom, will be used in order to build a method for detecting a soil damage index, especially expressed in terms of increasing of soil compaction. Besides the axle load, the model will take into account the frequency of the vibrations that the vehicle is transmitting to the soil. Such model expresses a numerical value for the transmissibility coefficient and also allows evaluating the damage at the surface and on the bulk medium where the agricultural crops initially develop. Key words: vehicle-soil interaction, vibration, compaction, models. Acknowledgements This work was carried out under the auspices of the special project "Sceneries of adaptation of the Italian agriculture to the climatic changes" (AGROSCENARI) of the Agricultural Research Council, and Italian Ministry of the Agricultural and Forestry Politics.

  6. Dry decontamination for tritiated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhengkun; Wu Tao; Dan Guiping; Xie Yun

    2009-01-01

    To aim at decontamination of tritiated wastes, we have developed and fabricated a dry tritium decontamination system, which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination of various alloy by UV, ozone and heating. The result indicates that the elevation of temperature can obviously improve decontamination effect. With 3 h irradiation by 365 nm UV at 220 degree C, it has a decontamination rate of 99% to stainless steel surface. Ozone can more obviously improve decontamination effect when metal was heated. Ozone has a decontamination effect beyond 95% to stainless steel, aluminum and brass at 220 degree C. Tritium surface concentration of metal has a little increase after decontamination. (authors)

  7. Pulse frequency and soil-litter mixing alter the control of cumulative precipitation over litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, François-Xavier; Kurupas, Kelsey L; Throop, Heather L

    2017-09-01

    Macroclimate has traditionally been considered the predominant driver of litter decomposition. However, in drylands, cumulative monthly or annual precipitation typically fails to predict decomposition. In these systems, the windows of opportunity for decomposer activity may rather depend on the precipitation frequency and local factors affecting litter desiccation, such as soil-litter mixing. We used a full-factorial microcosm experiment to disentangle the relative importance of cumulative precipitation, pulse frequency, and soil-litter mixing on litter decomposition. Decomposition, measured as litter carbon loss, saturated with increasing cumulative precipitation when pulses were large and infrequent, suggesting that litter moisture no longer increased and/or microbial activity was no longer limited by water availability above a certain pulse size. More frequent precipitation pulses led to increased decomposition at high levels of cumulative precipitation. Soil-litter mixing consistently increased decomposition, with greatest relative increase (+194%) under the driest conditions. Collectively, our results highlight the need to consider precipitation at finer temporal scale and incorporate soil-litter mixing as key driver of decomposition in drylands. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  9. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  10. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  11. Frequency of interaction-mediated triggering of antibiotic production among soil bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eTyc

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Certain bacterial species produce antimicrobial compounds only in the presence of a competing species. However little is known on the frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antibiotic compound production in natural communities of soil bacteria. Here we developed a high-throughput method to screen for the production of antimicrobial activity by monocultures and pair-wise combinations of 146 phylogenetically different bacteria isolated from similar soil habitats. Growth responses of two human pathogenic model organisms, Escherichia coli WA321 and Staphylococcus aureus 533R4, were used to monitor antimicrobial activity. From all isolates, 33% showed antimicrobial activity only in monoculture and 42% showed activity only when tested in interactions. More bacterial isolates were active against S. aureus than against E. coli. The frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antimicrobial activity was 6% (154 interactions out of 2798 indicating that only a limited set of species combinations showed such activity. The screening revealed also interaction-mediated suppression of antimicrobial activity for 22% of all combinations tested. Whereas all patterns of antimicrobial activity (non-induced production, induced production and suppression were seen for various bacterial classes, interaction-mediated induction of antimicrobial activity was more frequent for combinations of Flavobacteria and alpha- Proteobacteria. The results of our study give a first indication on the frequency of interference competitive interactions in natural soil bacterial communities which may forms a basis for selection of bacterial groups that are promising for the discovery of novel, cryptic antibiotics.

  12. The dielectric calibration of capacitance probes for soil hydrology using an oscillation frequency response model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Robinson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitance probes are a fast, safe and relatively inexpensive means of measuring the relative permittivity of soils, which can then be used to estimate soil water content. Initial experiments with capacitance probes used empirical calibrations between the frequency response of the instrument and soil water content. This has the disadvantage that the calibrations are instrument-dependent. A twofold calibration strategy is described in this paper; the instrument frequency is turned into relative permittivity (dielectric constant which can then be calibrated against soil water content. This approach offers the advantages of making the second calibration, from soil permittivity to soil water content. instrument-independent and allows comparison with other dielectric methods, such as time domain reflectometry. A physically based model, used to calibrate capacitance probes in terms of relative permittivity (εr is presented. The model, which was developed from circuit analysis, predicts, successfully, the frequency response of the instrument in liquids with different relative permittivities, using only measurements in air and water. lt was used successfully to calibrate 10 prototype surface capacitance insertion probes (SCIPS and a depth capacitance probe. The findings demonstrate that the geometric properties of the instrument electrodes were an important parameter in the model, the value of which could be fixed through measurement. The relationship between apparent soil permittivity and volumetric water content has been the subject of much research in the last 30 years. Two lines of investigation have developed, time domain reflectometry (TDR and capacitance. Both methods claim to measure relative permittivity and should therefore be comparable. This paper demonstrates that the IH capacitance probe overestimates relative permittivity as the ionic conductivity of the medium increases. Electrically conducting ionic solutions were used to test the

  13. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  14. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  15. Recommendations for skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Further to the reecommendations for determining the surface contamination of the skin and estimating the radiation exposure of the skin after contamination (SAAS-Mitt--89-16), measures for skin decontamination are recommended. They are necessary if (1) after simple decontamination by means of water, soap and brush without damaging the skin the surface contamination limits are exceeded and the radiation exposure to be expected for the undamaged healthy skin is estimated as to high, and if (2) a wound is contaminated. To remove skin contaminations, in general universally applicable, non-aggressive decontamination means and methods are sufficient. In special cases, nuclide-specific decontamination is required taking into account the properties of the radioactive substance

  16. Some remarks about decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, A.

    1990-01-01

    Decontamination in itself is not the elimination of a problem, but corresponds to move that problem from one place to another. It is beneficial only if the contamination is less of a nuisance when moved to the ''other place''. Therefore any prospective decontamination process is to be considered essentially in terms of cost-benefit, and in particular in terms of reducing the burden on the waste management systems. The paper is not intended to deal with and to review critically the technical aspects of the various decontamination processes which are currently available. Its aim is to call the attention of those who may be faced with the problem of large-scale decontamination, so that this operation is carried out after all practical aspects have been examined. (author)

  17. Chemical decontamination: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.; Wood, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The source of radioactive contamination in various types of power reactors is discussed. The methods of chemical decontamination vary with the manner in which the radioactive contaminants are deposited on the surface. Two types of dilute decontamination systems are available. One system uses organic acids and chelating agents, which are mildly reducing in nature. In this process, the oxide contaminants are removed by simple acidic dissolution and reductive dissolution. The second type of decontamination process is based on low oxidation state metal ions, which are more strongly reducing and do not require a corrosion inhibitor. All processes commercially available for decontamination of power reactors are not detailed here, but a few key issues to be considered in the selection of a process are highlighted. 2 figures, 2 tables

  18. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  19. Decommissioning and Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised

  20. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted

  1. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  2. Coolant system decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution. (author)

  3. Lessons Learned from Decontamination Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, JH

    2000-11-16

    This interim report describes a DOE project currently underway to establish what is known about decontamination of buildings and people and the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  4. Effects of Grazing and Fire Frequency on Floristic Quality and its Relationship to Indicators of Soil Quality in Tallgrass Prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, George C; Baer, Sara G; Blair, John M

    2017-12-01

    Fire and grazing are widely used to manage grasslands for conservation purposes, but few studies have evaluated the effects of these drivers on the conservation value of plant communities measured by the floristic quality index (FQI). Further, the influence of fire and grazing on soil properties and functions are difficult for land managers and restoration practitioners to assess. The objectives of this study were to: (1) quantify the independent and interactive effects of grazing and fire frequency on floristic quality in native tallgrass prairie to provide potential benchmarks for community assessment, and (2) to explore whether floristic quality can serve as an indicator of soil structure and function for more holistic ecosystem assessments. A factorial combination of fire frequencies (1-2, 4, and 20 years return intervals) and grazing (by bison or ungrazed) treatments were sampled for plant species composition, and for several indicators of soil quality in lowland tallgrass prairie. Floristic quality, diversity, and richness were higher in grazed than ungrazed prairie over all fire frequencies (P soil bulk density were also higher in grazed prairie soil over all fire frequencies (P soil N were positively correlated with FQI (P soil N pools are more strongly influenced by grazing than fire and that floristic quality can be an indicator of total soil C and N stocks in never cultivated lowland prairie.

  5. Effects of Grazing and Fire Frequency on Floristic Quality and its Relationship to Indicators of Soil Quality in Tallgrass Prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, George C.; Baer, Sara G.; Blair, John M.

    2017-12-01

    Fire and grazing are widely used to manage grasslands for conservation purposes, but few studies have evaluated the effects of these drivers on the conservation value of plant communities measured by the floristic quality index (FQI). Further, the influence of fire and grazing on soil properties and functions are difficult for land managers and restoration practitioners to assess. The objectives of this study were to: (1) quantify the independent and interactive effects of grazing and fire frequency on floristic quality in native tallgrass prairie to provide potential benchmarks for community assessment, and (2) to explore whether floristic quality can serve as an indicator of soil structure and function for more holistic ecosystem assessments. A factorial combination of fire frequencies (1-2, 4, and 20 years return intervals) and grazing (by bison or ungrazed) treatments were sampled for plant species composition, and for several indicators of soil quality in lowland tallgrass prairie. Floristic quality, diversity, and richness were higher in grazed than ungrazed prairie over all fire frequencies ( P total N, and soil bulk density were also higher in grazed prairie soil over all fire frequencies ( P total organic C, and total soil N were positively correlated with FQI ( P quality and soil N pools are more strongly influenced by grazing than fire and that floristic quality can be an indicator of total soil C and N stocks in never cultivated lowland prairie.

  6. Decommissioning and decontamination (burial ground stabilization) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of retired Hanford facilities and the future use of surrounding landscapes require isolation of contaminated wastes from the biosphere. Burial ground stabilization studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of physical barriers for isolating contaminated wastes in shallow-land burial sites from plants and animals. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of using a layer of loose rock between the waste and the surface soil covering to prevent both plant root and animal penetrations

  7. Adult trees cause density-dependent mortality in conspecific seedlings by regulating the frequency of pathogenic soil fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Minxia; Liu, Xubing; Gilbert, Gregory S; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Shan; Huang, Fengmin; Yu, Shixiao

    2016-12-01

    Negative density-dependent seedling mortality has been widely detected in tropical, subtropical and temperate forests, with soil pathogens as a major driver. Here we investigated how host density affects the composition of soil pathogen communities and consequently influences the strength of plant-soil feedbacks. In field censuses of six 1-ha permanent plots, we found that survival was much lower for newly germinated seedlings that were surrounded by more conspecific adults. The relative abundance of pathogenic fungi in soil increased with increasing conspecific tree density for five of nine tree species; more soil pathogens accumulated around roots where adult tree density was higher, and this greater pathogen frequency was associated with lower seedling survival. Our findings show how tree density influences populations of soil pathogens, which creates plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to community-level and population-level compensatory trends in seedling survival. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  8. Development of Nuclear Decontamination Technology Using Supercritical Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Wonyoung; Park, Kwangheon; Park, Jihye; Lee, Donghee

    2014-01-01

    Soil cleaning technologies that have been developed thus far increase treatment costs in contaminated soil recovery processes because they generate large amounts of secondary wastes. In this respect, this study is intended to develop soil decontamination methods using CO 2 , which is a nontoxic, environmentally friendly substance, in order to fundamentally suppress the generation of secondary wastes from the decontamination process and to create high added values. In this study, to develop decontamination methods for uranium-contaminated soil using supercritical CO 2 , a soil decontamination system using supercritical CO 2 was constructed. In addition, the basic principle of supercritical CO 2 decontamination using a TBP-HNO3 complex was explained. According to the results of the study, sea-sand samples having the same degree of contamination showed different results of decontamination according to the quantities of the TBP-HNO3 complex used as an extraction agent, which resulted in high extraction rates. Thus far, a most widely used method of extracting uranium has been the dissolving of uranium in acids. However, this method has the large adverse effect of generating strong acidic wastes that cannot be easily treated. On the other hand, supercritical CO 2 requires critical conditions that are no more difficult to meet than those of other supercritical fluids, since its density can be changed from a very low state close to that of an ideal gas to a high state close to that of liquids. The critical gas conditions are a pressure of 71 bar and a temperature of 31 .deg. C, both of which are inexpensive to achieve. Moreover, CO 2 is a solvent that is not harmful to the human body and few effects on environmental pollution. Therefore, nontoxic and environment friendly processes can be developed using supercritical CO 2 . Supercritical CO 2 's advantages over prevailing methods suggest its potential for developing innovative decontamination methods, as demonstrated

  9. Gentilly 1: decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, H.; Denault, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Gentilly 1 station, a 250-MW(e) light-water-cooled and heavy-water-moderated nuclear reactor, is being decommissioned to a static state (variant of stage 1) condition by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). The scope of the decontamination program at the Gentilly 1 site includes the fuel pool and associated systems, the decontamination center, the laundry, the feedwater pumps and piping systems, the service building ventilation and drainage systems, and miscellaneous floor and wall areas. After an extensive literature review for acceptable decontamination methods, it was decided that the decontamination equipment used at Gentilly 1 during the program would include a hydrolaser, a scarifier, chipping hammers, a steam cleaner, an ultrasonic bath, and cutting tools. In addition, various foams, acids, detergents, surfactants, and abrasives are used alone and in tandem with the above equipment. This paper highlights the result of these decontaminations, their effectiveness, and the recommendation for future application. The methodology in performing these operations are also presented

  10. TMI-2 containment decontamination plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, F.

    1980-01-01

    Because of other priorities such as reentry, purging, and recovery, containment decontamination is only in the preliminary planning stages. This paper summarizes the study with emphasis on the remote decontamination techniques

  11. Situations of decontamination promotion activities. Efforts by Tokyo Electric Power Company, Fukushima Revitalization Headquarters, Decontamination Promotion Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Takahiko; Ito, Kei; Takizawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    As for the decontamination of the soil contaminated with radioactive materials, decontamination is on the way in compliance with the 'Act on Special Measures Concerning the Handling of Environmental Pollution by Radioactive Materials by the NPS Accident Associated with the Tohoku District - Off the Pacific Ocean' (hereinafter, the Act on Special Measures). Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), as the party concerned to the accident, is cooperating with decontamination activities conducted by countries and municipalities under the Act on Special Measures. Total number of people cooperated by the Decontamination Promotion Office amounts to about 120,000 people. The cooperation to the decontamination by countries and municipalities covers the following fields: provision of knowledge of radiation, training of site management and supervisors, and proposal such as the decontamination method suitable for the site. As cooperation to various monitoring, there is a traveling monitoring that performs radiation measurement from the vehicles. As cooperation in the farming and industrial resumption toward the reconstruction, the group has implemented support for the distribution promotion of the holdup that was stuck in distribution due to contamination with radioactive substances. As decontamination related technology, the following are performed: (1) preparation of radiation understanding promotion tool, (2) development of precise individual dose measurement technology, and (3) development and utilization of decontamination effect analysis program. In the future, this group will perform the follow-up for decontamination, and measures toward the lifting of evacuation order. It will install the basis to perform various technical analyses on decontamination, and will further intensify technical cooperation. (A.O.)

  12. Technology development and demonstration for TRIGA research reactor decontamination, decommissioning and site restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Ki Jung; Lee, Byung Jik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction to research reactor decommissioning plan at KAERI, the background of technology development and demonstration, and the current status of the system decontamination technology for TRIGA reactors, concrete decontamination and dust treatment technologies, wall ranging robot and graphic simulation of dismantling processes, soil decontamination and restoration technology, recycling or reuse technologies for radioactive metallic wastes, and incineration technology demonstration for combustible wastes. 9 figs

  13. Radioactive decontamination of equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    After a recall of some definitions relating to decontamination techniques and of the regulation into effect, the principles to be respected to arrange rationally work zones are quoted while insisting more particularly on the types of coatings which facilitate maintenance operations and the dismantling of these installations. Then, the processes and equipments to use in decontamination units for routine or particular operations are described; the list of recommended chemical products to decontaminate the equipment is given. The influence of these treatments on the state and the duration of life of equipments is studied, and some perfectible methods are quoted. In the appendix, are given: the limits of surface contamination accepted in the centers; a standard project which defines the criteria of admissible residual contamination in wastes considered as cold wastes; some remarks on the interest that certain special ventilation and air curtain devices for the protection of operators working on apparatus generating contaminated dusts [fr

  14. Decontamination of main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofthooft, R.

    1988-01-01

    Last year a number of main coolant pumps in Belgian nuclear power plants were decontaminated. A new method has been developed to reduce the time taken for decontamination and the volume of waste to be treated. The method comprises two phases: Oxidation with permanganate in nitric acid and dissolution in oxalic acid. The decontamination of main coolant pumps can now be achieved in less than one day. The decontamination factors attained range between 15 and 150. (orig.) [de

  15. Assessing cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Naito, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous cost of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, it is not clear what levels of reduction in external radiation exposure are possible in the Special Decontamination Area, the Intensive Contamination Survey Areas and the whole of Fukushima. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture in its entirety. Using a geographic information system, we calculated the costs of removal, storage containers, transport, and temporary and interim storage facilities as well as the reduction in air dose rate for a cumulative external exposure for 9000 1 km × 1 km mesh units incorporating 51 municipalities. The decontamination cost for the basic scenario, for which forested areas within 20 m of habitation areas were decontaminated, was JPY2.53-5.12 trillion; the resulting reduction in annual external dose was about 2500 person-Sv. The transport, storage, and administrative costs of decontamination waste and removed soil reached JPY1.55-2.12 trillion under this scenario. Although implementing decontamination of all forested areas provides some major reductions in the external radiation dose for the average inhabitant, decontamination costs could potentially exceed JPY16 trillion. These results indicate that technologies for reducing the volume of decontamination waste and removed soil should be considered to reduce storage costs and that further discussions about forest decontamination policies are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomasney, H. [ISOTRON Corp., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  17. Radiation decontamination of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, M.; Sattar, A.; Ahmad, W.A.; Khan, I.

    1990-06-01

    In this report radiation decontamination was initiated to investigate the red pepper, which is widely consumed in all parts of Pakistan. The samples were collected from local market and prepared for gamma radiation at dose level of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kGy. The measurement of total fungal count was carried out immediately after irradiation and the at two months storage interval. It was reported that radiation dose 10.0 kGy is suitable for complete decontamination of red pepper. (A.B.)

  18. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100 degrees to 400 degrees C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85 degrees to 95 degrees C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 degrees to 95 degrees C

  19. Simultaneous decontamination of cross-polluted soils with heavy metals and PCBs using a nano-metallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Tetsuji; Sakita, Shogo; Simion, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the use of nano-metallic calcium (Ca) and calcium oxide (CaO) dispersion mixture for the simultaneous remediation of contaminated soils with both heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, and Pb) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Regardless of soil moisture content, nano-metallic Ca/CaO dispersion mixture achieved about 95-99% of heavy metal immobilization by a simple grinding process. During the same treatment, reasonable PCB hydrodechlorination efficiencies were obtained (up to 97%), though higher hydrodechlorination efficiency by preliminary drying of soil was observed.

  20. Influence of in situ steam formation by radio frequency heating on thermodesorption of hydrocarbons from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Ulf; Bergmann, Sabine; Holzer, Frank; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2010-12-15

    Thermal desorption of a wide spectrum of organic contaminants, initiated by radio frequency (RF) heating, was studied at laboratory and pilot-plant scales for an artificially contaminated soil and for an originally contaminated soil from an industrial site. Up to 100 °C, moderate desorption rates were observed for light aromatics such as toluene, chlorobenzene, and ethylbenzene. Desorption of the less volatile contaminants was greatly enhanced above 100 °C, when fast evaporation of soil-water produced steam for hydrocarbon stripping (steam-distillation, desorption rates increased by more than 1 order of magnitude). For hydrocarbons with low water solubility (e.g., aliphatic hydrocarbons), the temperature increase above 100 °C after desiccation of soil again led to a significant increase of the removal rates, thus showing the impact of hydrocarbon partial pressure. RF heating was shown to be an appropriate option for thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction, leading to efficient cleaning of contaminated soils.

  1. Application of EDTA decontamination on soils affected by mining activities and impact of treatment on the geochemical partition of metal contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenbin; Gao, Hui; Wang, Xianhai; Zhou, Chunhua; Liu, Yunguo; Fan, Ting; Wang, Xin

    2009-05-30

    Two soil samples were collected at mining areas located in southern Hunan Province, China. EDTA extraction of Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd from these two tailing soils was studied using column leaching experiments. The redistributions of heavy metals (HMs) were determined using the modified BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure, before and after EDTA extraction. The results indicated that EDTA was an effective extractant because of its strong chelating ability for various HMs. The proportions of Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd in the four fractions varied largely after EDTA extraction. The extraction efficiency of EDTA of the acid-extractable fraction (AEX) was significant in shallow soil column, while in deeper soil column, decrease of the extraction efficiency of reduced (RED), oxidizable (OX) and residual fractions (RES) was obtained, which was mainly due to the decrease of EDTA concentration.

  2. Community Structure of Active Aerobic Methanotrophs in Red Mangrove (Kandelia obovata) Soils Under Different Frequency of Tides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Yo-Jin; Cai, Yuanfeng; Lin, Yu-Te; Jia, Zhongjun; Chiu, Chih-Yu

    2018-04-01

    Methanotrophs are important microbial communities in coastal ecosystems. They reduce CH 4 emission in situ, which is influenced by soil conditions. This study aimed to understand the differences in active aerobic methanotrophic communities in mangrove forest soils experiencing different inundation frequency, i.e., in soils from tidal mangroves, distributed at lower elevations, and from dwarf mangroves, distributed at higher elevations. Labeling of pmoA gene of active methanotrophs using DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) revealed that methanotrophic activity was higher in the dwarf mangrove soils than in the tidal mangrove soils, possibly because of the more aerobic soil conditions. Methanotrophs affiliated with the cluster deep-sea-5 belonging to type Ib methanotrophs were the most dominant methanotrophs in the fresh mangrove soils, whereas type II methanotrophs also appeared in the fresh dwarf mangrove soils. Furthermore, Methylobacter and Methylosarcina were the most important active methanotrophs in the dwarf mangrove soils, whereas Methylomonas and Methylosarcina were more active in the tidal mangrove soils. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene also confirmed similar differences in methanotrophic communities at the different locations. However, several unclassified methanotrophic bacteria were found by 16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing in both fresh and incubated mangrove soils, implying that methanotrophic communities in mangrove forests may significantly differ from the methanotrophic communities documented in previous studies. Overall, this study showed the feasibility of 13 CH 4 DNA-SIP to study the active methanotrophic communities in mangrove forest soils and revealed differences in the methanotrophic community structure between coastal mangrove forests experiencing different tide frequencies.

  3. Sustainable decontamination of an actual-site aged PCB-polluted soil through a biosurfactant-based washing followed by a photocatalytic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occulti, Fabio; Roda, Giovanni Camera; Berselli, Sara; Fava, Fabio

    2008-04-15

    A two phases process consisting of a soya lecithin (SL)-based soil washing process followed by the photocatalytic treatment of resulting effluents was developed and applied at the laboratory scale in the remediation of an actual-site soil historically contaminated by 0.65 g/kg of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Triton X-100 (TX) was employed in the same process as a control surfactant. SL and TX, both applied as 2.25 g/L aqueous solutions, displayed a comparable ability to remove PCBs from the soil. However, SL solution displayed a lower ecotoxicity, a lower ability to mobilize soil constituents and a higher soil detoxification capacity with respect to the TX one. The photocatalytic treatment resulted in marked depletions (from 50% to 70%) of total organic carbon (TOC) and PCBs initially occurring in the SL and TX contaminated effluents. Despite the ability of SL to adversely affect the rate of TOC and PCB photodegradation, higher PCB depletion and dechlorination yields along with lower increases of ecotoxicity were observed in SL-containing effluents with respect to the TX ones at the end of 15 days of treatment. The two phases process developed and tested for the first time in this study seems to have the required features to become, after a proper optimization and scale up, a challenging procedure for the sustainable remediation of actual site, poorly biotreatable PCB-contaminated soils. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Assessing cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Naito, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous cost of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, it is not clear what levels of reduction in external radiation exposure are possible in the Special Decontamination Area, the Intensive Contamination Survey Areas and the whole of Fukushima. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture in its entirety. Using a geographic information system, we calculated the costs of removal, storage containers, transport, and temporary and interim storage facilities as well as the reduction in air dose rate for a cumulative external exposure for 9000 1 km × 1 km mesh units incorporating 51 municipalities. The decontamination cost for the basic scenario, for which forested areas within 20 m of habitation areas were decontaminated, was JPY2.53–5.12 trillion; the resulting reduction in annual external dose was about 2500 person-Sv. The transport, storage, and administrative costs of decontamination waste and removed soil reached JPY1.55–2.12 trillion under this scenario. Although implementing decontamination of all forested areas provides some major reductions in the external radiation dose for the average inhabitant, decontamination costs could potentially exceed JPY16 trillion. These results indicate that technologies for reducing the volume of decontamination waste and removed soil should be considered to reduce storage costs and that further discussions about forest decontamination policies are needed. - Highlights: • Evaluation of cost and effectiveness of decontaminating Fukushima Prefecture. • Reductions in external exposure under various decontamination scenarios were similar. • Decontamination costs for the basic scenario were estimated at JPY2.53–5.12 trillion.

  5. 1995 Phase 1 concrete sampling at the decontaminated 183-H basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, C.D.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a consolidated reference for 1995 concrete sampling data associated with the Hanford Site's 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins (located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington). In 1995, the basins were decontaminated and dismantled. Sampling efforts began after completion of concrete decontamination efforts. Soil and water samples were collected and are described in chronological order in this report

  6. Transformation and fate of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in anaerobic bioslurry reactors under various aeration schemes: implications for the decontamination of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, David A; Crawford, Ronald L

    2007-12-01

    Energetic compounds have been used in a variety of industrial and military applications worldwide leading to widespread environmental contamination. Many of these compounds are toxic and resist degradation by oxidative enzymes resulting in a need for alternative remediation methods. It has been shown that trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil subjected to treatment in strictly anaerobic bioreactors results in tight binding of TNT transformation products to soil organic matter. The research presented here examined the fate of TNT and its metabolites in bioreactors under three different aeration regimes. In all treatment regimes, the typical metabolites of aminodinitrotoluenes and diaminonitrotoluenes were observed prior to irreversible binding into the soil fraction of the slurry. Significant transformation of TNT into organic acids or simple diols, as others report in prior work, was not observed in any of the treatments and is an unlikely fate of TNT in anaerobic soil slurries. These results indicate that aeration does not dramatically affect transformation or fate of TNT in reactor systems that receive a rich carbon source but does affect the rate at which metabolites become tightly bound to the soil. The most rapid transformations and lowest redox potentials were observed in reactors in which an aerobic headspace was maintained suggesting that aerobes play a role in establishing conditions that are most conducive to TNT reduction.

  7. PCB in the environment: bio-based processes for soil decontamination and management of waste from the industrial production of Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siracusa, Giovanna; Becarelli, Simone; Lorenzi, Roberto; Gentini, Alessandro; Di Gregorio, Simona

    2017-10-25

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are hazardous soil contaminants for which a bio-based technology for their recovery is essential. The objective of this study was to validate the exploitation of spent mushroom substrate (SMS), a low or null cost organic waste derived from the industrial production of P. ostreatus, as bulking agent in a dynamic biopile pilot plant. The SMS shows potential oxidative capacity towards recalcitrant compounds. The aim was consistent with the design of a process of oxidation of highly chlorinated PCBs, which is independent from their reductive dehalogenation. Feasibility was verified at a mesocosm scale and validated at pilot scale in a dynamic biopile pilot plant treating ten tons of a historically contaminated soil (9.28±0.08mg PCB/kg soil dry weight). Mixing of the SMS with the soil was required for the depletion of the contaminants. At the pilot scale, after eight months of incubation, 94.1% depletion was recorded. A positive correlation between Actinobacteria and Firmicutes active metabolism, soil laccase activity and PCB removal was observed. The SMS was found to be exploitable as a versatile low cost organic substrate capable of activating processes for the oxidation of highly chlorinated PCBs. Moreover, its exploitation as bulking agent in biopiles is a valuable management strategy for the re-utilisation of an organic waste deriving from the industrial cultivation of edible mushrooms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Decontamination of polypropylene fabrics by dry cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Knajfl, J.

    1983-01-01

    Polypropylene fabrics can efficiently be decontaminated by dry cleaning in benzine or perchloroethylene, this also in case the fabric was greased in addition to radioactive contamination. For heavily soiled fabric, it is advantageous to first dry clean it and then wash it. The positive effect was confirmed of intensifiers on the cleaning process, especially of benzine soap. In practice, its concentration should be selected within 1 and 10 g.dm - 3 . Decontamination by dry cleaning and subsequent washing is advantageous in that that the resulting activity of waste water from the laundry is low. Radioactive wastes from the dry cleaning process have a low weight and can be handled as solid waste. (M.D.)

  9. Soil compaction related to grazing and its effects on herbaceous roots frequency and soil organic matter content in rangelands of SW Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Manuel; Schnabel, Susanne; Francisco Lavado Contador, Joaquín; Miralles Mellado, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Rangelands in SW Spain occupy a total surface area of approximately 6 million ha and constitute the most representative extensive ranching system of the Iberian Peninsula gathering more than 13 million livestock heads. They are characterised by an herbaceous layer, mostly composed of therophytic species, with a disperse tree cover, mainly holm oak and cork oak (Quercus ilex rotundifolia and Q. suber), interspersed with shrubs in many places. This type of land system is of ancient origin and experienced frequent changes in land use in the past, since agricultural, livestock and forestry activities have coexisted within the same farms. In recent decades, livestock farming has become dominant due, in part, to the subsidies of the Common Agriculture Policy. Since Spain joined the European Union in 1986 until the year 2000, the number of domestic animals doubled, particularly cattle, and consequently animal stocking rates have increased on average from 0.40 AU ha-1 up to 0.70 AU ha-1. This increase in animal stocking rates, along with a progressive substitution of cattle instead of sheep in many farms, has led to the occurrence of land degradation processes such as the reduction of grass cover or soil compaction in heavily grazed areas. Previous research has evidenced higher values of soil bulk density and resistance to penetration as well as larger bare surface areas in spring in fenced areas with animal stocking rates above 1 AU ha-1. However, a better understanding of how increasing bulk density or resistance to penetration influence the frequency of herbaceous roots and how a reduction in the frequency of roots affects soil organic matter content in rangelands is still unknown. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine possible relationships between the frequencies of herbaceous roots and soil organic matter content in order to understand the effect of excessive animal numbers on the depletion of soil fertility by reducing progressively the quantity of

  10. Soil protection. Looseleaf manual of measures and recommendations for protection, maintenance and decontamination of soils, landscapes and groundwater; Bodenschutz. Ergaenzbares Handbuch der Massnahmen und Empfehlungen fuer Schutz, Pflege und Sanierung von Boeden, Landschaft und Grundwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Guenther; Koenig, Wilhelm; Utermann, Jens (eds.)

    2012-12-15

    The additional supplement 2/2012 under consideration contains a specialist article dealing with the soil protection law in Poland. This article presents the main aspects of environmental policy, sustainability policy, sustainable land management, soil protection policy as well as permissible valid limiting values of concentrations in soil. Another specialist article reports on the impacts of soil injection agents for sealing of buildings on soil and ground water. Especially within the sealing and stabilization of buildings the natural resources soil and ground water can be affected due to the contact with the injection agent.

  11. Soil moisture inversion from aircraft passive microwave observations during SMEX04 using a single-frequency algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, J Y; Li, Z; Chen, Q; Bi, H Y

    2014-01-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role in global water cycles. In the study, soil moisture retrievals from airborne microwave radiometer observations using a single-frequency algorithm were presented. The algorithm is based on a simplified radiative transfer (tau-omega) model and the influence of both the roughness and vegetation is combined into a single parameter in the algorithm. The microwave polarization difference index (MPDI) is used to eliminate the effects of temperature. Then soil moisture is obtained through a nonlinear iterative procedure by making the absolute value of the differences between the simulated and observed MPDI minimum. The algorithm was validated with aircraft passive microwave data from the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) at the Arizona during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2004 (SMEX04). The results show that the soil moisture retrieved by the algorithm is in good agreement with ground measurements with a small bias and an overall accuracy of 0.037m 3 m −3

  12. Monitoring of electrokinetic in-situ-decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldmann, T. [INTUS Inst. fuer Technologie und Umweltschutz e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The need for a monitoring system for in-situ soil decontamination is two-fold: Firstly, to ensure that remediation is attained and secondly to minimize costs and treatment time. A further reason is the potential risk of unexpected mobilization or chemical generation of hazardous compounds which could result in an extension of the contamination into other regions of soil, the ground water or the atmosphere. Electrokinetic in-situ decontamination is based on transport processes in the ground that proceed with relatively low velocity. This results in treatment times of several months. Since the transport processes can be described by a mathematical model, monitoring should always be combined with qualified mathematical processing. This makes it possible to estimate treatment time and costs to be expected. The challenge of in-situ monitoring is to identify relevant parameters describing the state of the ground. These parameters must be independent from influences like weather but they must be sensitive to changes of soil characteristics. In the case of electrokinetic soil remediation, probes and sensors must be resistant to influences of electric fields. The function of sensors or measuring systems can be disturbed or even damaged or destroyed by electric fields (for example by electro-corrosion). (orig.)

  13. Statistical sampling method for releasing decontaminated vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lively, J.W.; Ware, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Earth moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method (MIL-STD-105E, open-quotes Sampling Procedures and Tables for Inspection by Attributesclose quotes) for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium mill site in Monticello, Utah (a CERCLA regulated clean-up site). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello Projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site

  14. A decontamination technique for decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Hosaka, K.; Kuribayashi, N.; Ishikura, T.

    1993-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive metallic waste is generated from decommissioned commercial nuclear reactors. It is necessary from the point of environmental protection and resource utilization to decontaminate the contaminated metallic waste. A decommissioning waste processing system has been previously proposed considering such decommissioning waste characteristics as its large quantity, large radioactivity range, and various shapes and materials. The decontamination process in this system was carried out by abrasive blasting as pretreatment, electrochemical decontamination as the main process, and ultrasonic cleaning in water as post-treatment. For electrochemical decontamination, electrolytic decontamination for simple shaped waste and REDOX decontamination for complicated shaped waste were used as effective decontamination processing. This time, various kinds of actual radioactive contaminated samples were taken from operating power plants to simulate the decontamination of decommissioning waste. After analyzing the composition, morphogenesis and surface observation, electrolytic decontamination, REDOX decontamination, and ultrasonic cleaning experiments were carried out by using these samples. As a result, all the samples were decontaminated below the assumed exemption level(=4 x 10 -2 Bq/g). A maximum decontamination factor of over 104 was obtained by both electrolytic and REDOX decontamination. The stainless steel sample was easy to decontaminate in both electrochemical decontaminations because of its thin oxidized layer. The ultrasonic cleaning process after electrochemical decontamination worked effectively for removing adhesive sludge and the contaminated liquid. It has been concluded from the results mentioned above that electrolytic decontamination and REDOX decontamination are effective decontamination process for decontaminating decommissioning waste

  15. Decontamination for free release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, K A; Elder, G R [Bradtec Ltd., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    Many countries are seeking to treat radioactive waste in ways which meet the local regulatory requirements, but yet are cost effective when all contributing factors are assessed. In some countries there are increasing amounts of waste, arising from nuclear plant decommissioning, which are categorized as low level waste: however with suitable treatment a large part of such wastes might become beyond regulatory control and be able to be released as non-radioactive. The benefits and disadvantages of additional treatment before disposal need to be considered. Several processes falling within the overall description of decontamination for free release have been developed and applied, and these are outlined. In one instance the process seeks to take advantage of techniques and equipment used for decontaminating water reactor circuits intermittently through reactor life. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Sunflowers to decontaminate water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Sunflowers offer a new method of decontamination. 55 kilograms (dry weight) of sunflowers are able to decontaminate all the cesium 137 and the strontium 90 polluting a pond situated at one kilometer from Tchernobyl. These flowers are able to decrease 95% in 24 hours the uranium concentration in the american site of Ashtabula in Ohio getting this water from 350 parts by milliards to less than 5 parts by milliards. The radioactivity should stocked in the roots at concentrations 5 000 to 10 000 times higher than water concentration. The cost is cheaper than micro filtration and precipitation (2-6 dollars for 4 000 liters of water against 80 dollars for others technologies). when sunflowers are radioactive they can be reduced in dust and vitrified and stocked as solid radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  17. OPO fabric decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Bar, J.; Grujbar, V.

    1978-01-01

    Samples of five polypropylene-based man-made fabrics were studied with regard to the degree of contamination and possibilities of decontamination in order to assess their suitability as material for protective clothing in the nuclear industry. The contamination degree of the fabrics in an aqueous solution of a fission product mixture was found to be low. Soaking in a mixture of the Sapon detergent and sodium hexametaphosphate at a concentration of both materials of 1 g/l with subsequent washing in a solution of the Zenit detergent at a concentration of 3 g/l was suggested as the most suitable decontamination procedure. It reduces the initial contamination by almost 99%. (Z.M.)

  18. Effects of fire frequency on litter decomposition as mediated by changes to litter chemistry and soil environmental conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cari D Ficken

    Full Text Available Litter quality and soil environmental conditions are well-studied drivers influencing decomposition rates, but the role played by disturbance legacy, such as fire history, in mediating these drivers is not well understood. Fire history may impact decomposition directly, through changes in soil conditions that impact microbial function, or indirectly, through shifts in plant community composition and litter chemistry. Here, we compared early-stage decomposition rates across longleaf pine forest blocks managed with varying fire frequencies (annual burns, triennial burns, fire-suppression. Using a reciprocal transplant design, we examined how litter chemistry and soil characteristics independently and jointly influenced litter decomposition. We found that both litter chemistry and soil environmental conditions influenced decomposition rates, but only the former was affected by historical fire frequency. Litter from annually burned sites had higher nitrogen content than litter from triennially burned and fire suppression sites, but this was correlated with only a modest increase in decomposition rates. Soil environmental conditions had a larger impact on decomposition than litter chemistry. Across the landscape, decomposition differed more along soil moisture gradients than across fire management regimes. These findings suggest that fire frequency has a limited effect on litter decomposition in this ecosystem, and encourage extending current decomposition frameworks into disturbed systems. However, litter from different species lost different masses due to fire, suggesting that fire may impact decomposition through the preferential combustion of some litter types. Overall, our findings also emphasize the important role of spatial variability in soil environmental conditions, which may be tied to fire frequency across large spatial scales, in driving decomposition rates in this system.

  19. Effects of fire frequency on litter decomposition as mediated by changes to litter chemistry and soil environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficken, Cari D; Wright, Justin P

    2017-01-01

    Litter quality and soil environmental conditions are well-studied drivers influencing decomposition rates, but the role played by disturbance legacy, such as fire history, in mediating these drivers is not well understood. Fire history may impact decomposition directly, through changes in soil conditions that impact microbial function, or indirectly, through shifts in plant community composition and litter chemistry. Here, we compared early-stage decomposition rates across longleaf pine forest blocks managed with varying fire frequencies (annual burns, triennial burns, fire-suppression). Using a reciprocal transplant design, we examined how litter chemistry and soil characteristics independently and jointly influenced litter decomposition. We found that both litter chemistry and soil environmental conditions influenced decomposition rates, but only the former was affected by historical fire frequency. Litter from annually burned sites had higher nitrogen content than litter from triennially burned and fire suppression sites, but this was correlated with only a modest increase in decomposition rates. Soil environmental conditions had a larger impact on decomposition than litter chemistry. Across the landscape, decomposition differed more along soil moisture gradients than across fire management regimes. These findings suggest that fire frequency has a limited effect on litter decomposition in this ecosystem, and encourage extending current decomposition frameworks into disturbed systems. However, litter from different species lost different masses due to fire, suggesting that fire may impact decomposition through the preferential combustion of some litter types. Overall, our findings also emphasize the important role of spatial variability in soil environmental conditions, which may be tied to fire frequency across large spatial scales, in driving decomposition rates in this system.

  20. Sensitive Equipment Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    a ceramic-like material Polonium - 210 Metallic foil Radium-226 Radium bromide or radium chloride Strontium-90 Metallic strontium, strontium...extremely toxic toxins. 3.1.1.5 Routes of Infection Pathogenic microorganisms are transferred to human beings largely via air and food (including...regularly in the pharmaceutical industry to decontaminate manufacturing clean rooms. It is also used to sterilize packages used to store foods . It has

  1. Decommissioning and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadoumont, J.; Cantrel, E.; Valenduc, P.; Noynaert, L.

    2009-01-01

    The SCK-CEN has built a large know-how in decommissioning and decontamination, thanks to its BR3 decommissioning project. In 2007, the decommissioning activities at BR3 have been continued according to the strategy. This article discusses main realisations the following domains: decommissioning of the neutron shield tank and installation of new ventilation for the controlled area, dismantling of the former one and characterization of the stack

  2. Local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, P [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Ramzaev, V [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Novozybkov, Bryansk region (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G [Chernnobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Sobotovich, E [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here.

  3. Local strategies for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Ramzaev, V.; Antsypov, G.; Sobotovich, E.; Anisimova, L.

    1996-01-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here

  4. Laser decontamination device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michishita, Shizuo; Akagawa, Katsuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    One end of an optical fiber inserted into an inner cylinder is opposed to a wall surface to be decontaminated, and an opened top end of an intermediate cylinder circumferentially surrounding the inner cylinder is tightly in contact with the wall surface to be decontaminated, an open end of an outer cylinder circumferentially surrounding the intermediate cylinder is tightly in contact with the wall surface to be decontaminated. Dust removing holes are perforated in the vicinity of the top end of the intermediate cylinder while being in communication with the inside and the outside of the intermediate cylinder, and one end of an air supply tube is in communication with the space between the outer circumferential surface of the inner cylinder and the inner circumferential surface of the intermediate cylinder. The other end of the air supply tube is connected to an air supply device, one end of a sucking tube is in communication with the space between the outer circumferential surface of the intermediate cylinder and the inner circumferential surface of the outer cylinder, the other end of the sucking tube is connected to a sucking device, and the other end of the optical fiber is connected to a laser generation device. The laser generation device is operated while determining the air sucking amount increased than the air supply amount, the materials deposited on the wall surface are crushed and peeled off, and the peeled off materials are transferred by air flow to a filter and collected. (N.H.)

  5. Excimer laser decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentis, Marc L.; Delaporte, Philippe C.; Marine, Wladimir; Uteza, Olivier P.

    2000-04-01

    The application of excimer laser ablation process to the decontamination of radioactive surfaces is discussed. This technology is very attractive because it allows to efficiently remove the contaminated particles without secondary waste production. To demonstrate the capability of such technology to efficiently decontaminate large area, we studied and developed a prototype which include a XeCl laser, an optical fiber delivery system and an ablated particles collection cell. The main physical processes taking place during UV laser ablation will be explained. The influence of laser wavelength, pulse duration and absorption coefficient of material will be discussed. Special studies have been performed to understand the processes which limit the transmission of high average power excimer laser through optical fiber, and to determine the laser conditions to optimize the value of this transmission. An in-situ spectroscopic analysis of laser ablation plasma allows the real time control of the decontamination. The results obtained for painting or metallic oxides removal from stainless steel surfaces will be presented.

  6. The costs and effectiveness of various decontamination procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, C.A.; Haywood, S.M.; Brown, J.

    1991-01-01

    Knowledge of the cost and effectiveness of decontamination techniques is necessary to optimise the implementation of this countermeasure. These factors vary depending upon the nature of the land affected. There is a great deal of data available on the cost and efficacy of specific decontamination techniques on particular surfaces, but little information for combinations of techniques in real environments. This paper describes the preliminary stages of a project, in progress at the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), aimed at providing this information, for inner city, residential and rural areas. The efficacies of individual decontamination processes on specific surfaces were from the available literature. The NRPB EXPURT (EXPosure from Urban Radionuclide Transfer) compartmental model was used to determine the effectiveness of a number of representative decontamination programmes; each programme represents a combination of common decontamination techniques which may be applied to the various surfaces comprising an inner-city, residential or rural environment, ie, paving, walls, roofs and soil. The effectiveness of each programme was measured in terms of the reduction in dose, or dose rate, to an individual in that environment, taking account of the building characteristics, and the occupancy of the population in these buildings. The costs of each programme were derived, based on data available in current literature on the cost of the constituent decontamination techniques. Representative cost and effectiveness data are presented and their application is discussed

  7. Overview of nonchemical decontamination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.

    1984-09-01

    The decontamination techniques summarized in this paper represent a variety of surface cleaning methods developed or adapted for component and facility-type decontamination applications ranging from small hand tools to reactor cavities and other large surface areas. The major conclusion is that decontamination is a complex, demanding technical discipline. It requires knowledgeable, experienced and well-trained personnel to select proper techniques and combinations of techniques for the varied plant applications and to realize their full performance potential. Unfortunately, decontamination in many plants has the lowest priority of almost any activity. Operators are unskilled and turnover is so frequent that expensive decontamination capabilities remain unused while decontamination operations revert to the most rudimentary type of hand scrubbing and water spray cleaning

  8. Development and successful field tests of a multi-process phytoremediation system for decontamination of persistent petroleum and organic contaminants in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Huang, X.-D.; Gurska, Y.; Gerhardt, K.E.; Lampi, M.A.; Khalid, A.; Isherwood, D.; Chang, P.; Wang, W.; Wang, H.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    2006-07-01

    If efficient systems with rapid remediation kinetics can be realized, phytoremediation of persistent contaminants from soils holds great promise. A multi-process phytoremediation system (MPPS) with accelerated remediation kinetics that effectively removes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) from soils has been developed. A plant growth promoting rhizobacteria interaction is the main element for success as it mitigates stress ethylene effects in plants, leading to high root biomass which, in turn, promotes growth of rhizosphere organisms. Based on the success of greenhouse experiments, field tests of the MPPS were initiated at an Imperial Oil land farm site in Sarnia, Ontario in the summer of 2004, followed by 127 field tests at the same site in the summer of 2005 and 2006. In addition, a total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) contaminated site in Alberta was used in 2005 and 2006. The study presented and discussed selected results of successful greenhouse, pilot field tests and field tests of the MPPS. It was concluded that increased root biomass is achieved in the contaminated soils, which leads to more efficient and complete removal of TPHs in the field. Three years of field trials of the MPPS showed that remediation continues with successive seasons. 27 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  9. Soil protection. Looseleaf manual of measures and recommendations for protection, maintenance and decontamination of soils, landscapes and groundwater; Bodenschutz. Ergaenzbares Handbuch der Massnahmen und Empfehlungen fuer Schutz, Pflege und Sanierung von Boeden, Landschaft und Grundwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkranz, Dietrich; Bachmann, Guenther; Koenig, Wilhelm; Einsele, Gerhard (eds.)

    2010-09-15

    Among other things, the 49th supplement of the manual 'soil protection' includes the second soil protection report of the Federal Government from the year 2009 as a substitute for the first soil protection report from 2002. The interpretations for the Environmental Damage Act within the realms of soil protection are attached as a supplement of the execution recommendations of the Bund-Laender-Arbeitsgemeinschaft Bodenschutz (LABO) (Duesseldorf, Federal Republic of Germany). Furthermore, the 49th supplement includes an actual contribution on the consideration of the soil protection in the approval of building products.

  10. Solid Waste Decontamination by Thermal Desorption and Catalytic Oxidation Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolcová, Olga; Topka, Pavel; Soukup, Karel; Jirátová, Květa; Váňová, H.; Kaštánek, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 9 (2014), s. 1279-1282 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/059 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thermal desorption * catalytic oxidation * soil decontamination Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2014

  11. Study on LOMI decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Fuduan; Yu Degui; Lu Jingju; Xie Yinyan

    1993-10-01

    The results of decontamination technique of Low-Oxidation-State Metal-Ion (LOMI) reagents developed from 1986 to 1991 in the laboratory are introduced. The experiments included preparation of LOMI reagents, de-filming efficiency, corrosion behavior of typical alloys, decontamination factors of reagents for contaminated materials and components have proved that the NP/LOMI decontamination method and treatment technique of waste water are feasible and have some advantages. The preparation of LOMI reagent with low concentration of formic acid by reduced pressure distilling technique and the utilization ratio of vanadium reached to 95% by second electrolysis are the main contributions of the study to the decontamination technique

  12. Decontamination of radioisotope production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daryoko, M.; Yatim, S.; Suseno, H.; Wiratmo, M.

    1998-01-01

    The strippable coating method use phosphoric glycerol and irradiated latex as supporting agents have been investigated. The investigation used some decontaminating agents: EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid and potassium permanganate were combined with phosphoric glycerol supporting agent, then EDTA Na 2 , sodium citric, sodium oxalic and potassium permanganate were combined with irradiated latex supporting agent. The study was needed to obtain the representative operating data, will be implemented to decontamination the Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The experiment used 50x50x1 mm stainless steel samples and contaminated by Cs-137 about 1.1x10 -3 μCi/cm 2 . This samples according to inner cover of Hot Cell material, and Hot Cell activities. The decontamination factor results of the investigation were: phosphoric glycerol as supporting agent, about 20 (EDTA as decontaminating agent) to 47 (oxalic acid as decontaminating agent), and irradiated latex as supporting agent, about 11.5 (without decontamination agent) to 27 (KMnO 4 as decontaminating agent). All composition of the investigation have been obtained the good results, and can be implemented for decontamination of Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The irradiated latex could be recommended as supporting agent without decontaminating agent, because it is very easy to operate and very cheap cost. (author)

  13. Manual on decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The manual is intended for those who are responsible for the organization and implementation of decontamination programmes for facilities where radioactive materials are handled mainly on a laboratory scale. It contains information and guidelines on practical methods for decontaminating working spaces, equipment, laboratory benches and protective clothing. Useful information is also provided on the removal of loose skin contamination from personnel by mild, non-medical processes. Methods of removing skin contamination needing medical supervision, or of internal decontamination, which is entirely a medical process, are not covered in this manual. Large-scale decontamination of big nuclear facilities is also considered as outside its scope

  14. Decontamination of TRU glove boxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.H.

    1978-03-01

    Two glove boxes that had been used for work with transuranic nuclides (TRU) for about 12 years were decontaminated in a test program to collect data for developing a decontamination facility for large equipment highly contaminated with alpha emitters. A simple chemical technique consisting of a cycle of water flushes and alkaline permanganate and oxalic acid washes was used for both boxes. The test showed that glove boxes and similar equipment that are grossly contaminated with transuranic nuclides can be decontaminated to the current DIE nonretrievable disposal guide of <10 nCi TRU/g with a moderate amount of decontamination solution and manpower. Decontamination of the first box from an estimated 1.3 Ci to about 5 mCi (6 nCi/g) required 1.3 gallons of decontamination solution and 0.03 man-hour of work for each square foot of surface area. The second box was decontaminated from an estimated 3.4 Ci to about 2.8 mCi (4.2 nCi/g) using 0.9 gallon of decontamination solution and 0.02 man-hour for each square foot of surface area. Further reductions in contamination were achieved by repetitive decontamination cycles, but the effectiveness of the technique decreased sharply after the initial cycle

  15. Increased frequency of drought reduces species richness of enchytraeid communities in both wet and dry heathland soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Martin; Sørensen, Jesper G.; Maraldo, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    providing an opportunity to study biological responses on a local (within sites) and regional scale. Warming treatments increasing night-time temperature (0.5–1 °C higher than ambient at 5 cm soil depth) had no detectable effects on the enchytraeid communities. Increased intensity and frequency of drought...

  16. Development of a new medium frequency EM device: Mapping soil water content variations using electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessouri, P.; Buvat, S.; Tabbagh, A.

    2012-12-01

    Both electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of soil are influenced by its water content. Dielectric permittivity is usually measured in the high frequency range, using GPR or TDR, where the sensitivity to water content is high. However, its evaluation is limited by a low investigation depth, especially for clay rich soils. Electrical conductivity is closely related not only to soil water content, but also to clay content and soil structure. A simultaneous estimation of these electrical parameters can allow the mapping of soil water content variations for an investigation depth close to 1m. In order to estimate simultaneously both soil electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity, an electromagnetic device working in the medium frequency range (between 100 kHz and 10 MHz) has been designed. We adopted Slingram geometry for the EM prototype: its PERP configuration (vertical transmission loop Tx and horizontal measuring loop Rx) was defined using 1D ground models. As the required investigation depth is around 1m, the coil spacing was fixed to 1.2m. This prototype works in a frequency range between 1 and 5 MHz. After calibration, we tested the response of prototype to objects with known properties. The first in situ measurements were led on experimental sites with different types of soils and different water content variations (artificially created or natural): sandy alluvium on a plot of INRA (French National Institute for Agricultural Research) in Orléans (Centre, France), a clay-loam soil on an experimental site in Estrée-Mons (Picardie, France) and fractured limestone at the vicinity of Grand (Vosges, France). In the case of the sandy alluvium, the values of dielectric permittivity measured are close to those of HF permittivity and allow the use of existing theoretical models to determine the soil water content. For soils containing higher amount of clay, the coupled information brought by the electrical conductivity and the dielectric

  17. Full system decontamination. AREVAs experience in decontamination prior to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topf, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Minimizing collective radiation exposure and producing free-release material are two of the highest priorities in the decommissioning of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Full System Decontamination (FSD) is the most effective measure to reduce source term and remove oxide layer contamination within the plant systems. FSD is typically a decontamination of the primary coolant circuit and the auxiliary systems. In recent years AREVA NP has performed several FSDs in PWRs and BWRs prior to decommissioning by applying the proprietary CORD copyright family and AMDA copyright technology. Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination or CORD represents the chemical decontamination process while AMDA stands for Automated Mobile Decontamination Appliance, AREVA NPs decontamination equipment. Described herein are the excellent results achieved for the FSDs applied at the German PWRs Stade in 2004 and Obrigheim in 2007 and for the FSDs performed at the Swedish BWRs, Barsebaeck Unit 1 in 2007 and Barsebaeck Unit 2 in 2008. All four FSDs were performed using the AREVA NP CORD family decontamination technology in combination with the AREVA NP decontamination equipment, AMDA. (orig.)

  18. Soil protection. Looseleaf manual of measures and recommendations for protection, maintenance and decontamination of soils, landscapes and groundwater; Bodenschutz. Ergaenzbares Handbuch der Massnahmen und Empfehlungen fuer Schutz, Pflege und Sanierung von Boeden, Landschaft und Grundwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Guenther; Koenig, Wilhelm; Utermann, Jens (eds.)

    2011-11-15

    The 51th supplement includes a technical contribution to sustainable land management reporting on a new focus on environmental research. A relationship to soil protection, water conservation and climate protection is established. It follows a report on archive soils as a commented author version based on a position paper of the Government/State Working Group soil protection LABO. In addition, this supplement contains the actual legislative provisions.

  19. Assessment of soil water use by grassland by frequency domain reflectometry in the humid area of Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestas Valero, R. M.; Báez Bernal, D.; García Pomar, M. I.; Paz González, A.

    2009-04-01

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is becoming increasingly used for indirect water content determination in soils. In Galica, located in NW Spain, the humid region of this country, annual precipitation exceeds evapotranspiration. However, the yearly distribution of rainfall is irregular, so that supplementary irrigation during the dry warm summer is required often. This study aims to evaluate soil water use by grasslands and soil water regime patterns during the warm season from soil moisture measured at successive depths using FDR. The study sity is located at the experimental field of the Centre for Agricultural Research (CIAM) in Mabegondo, latitude 43°14' N and longitude 08°15' W. Soil moisture was monitored at six experimental plots from July to October 2008 two times per week using a portable FDR sensor. Measurements were made from 10 to 160 cm depth at 10 cm intervals. Moreover one of the plots was equipped with a continuous recording FDR-EnviroSCAN probe. Crop potential evapotranspiration (ETc) was estimated according to the of FAO version of the Penman-Monteith equation and the meteorological information required to apply this method was provided by a station located in the place experimental field. Cumulative rainfall along the study period was 195 mm, which is above the long-term mean and cumulative potential evapotranspiration was 264.7 mm. Using the water balance method the total value of actual evapotranspiration was estimated at 205.2 mm. Analysis of soil moisture content profiles allowed a description of soil water regime and main soil water withdrawal patterns under grassland. In general, grassland roots extracted most soil water from the 0-40 cm depth. In contrast, moisture content at the bottom of the profile was close to saturation, even the driest weeks of the study period. Continuous monitoring of soil water content allowed a more detailed characterization of dry and wet periods during the study season. The study data set may be useful

  20. Unit for air decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano H, E.

    1991-02-01

    To fulfill the applicable requirements of safety to the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities, it is necessary to make a cleaning of the air that hurtles to the atmosphere. For that which was designed and it manufactured an unit for decontamination of the air for the Pilot plant of production of Nuclear Fuel that this built one with national parts, uses Hepa national filters and the design can adapt for different dimensions of filters, also can be added a lodging for a prefilter or to adopt two Hepa filters. (Author)

  1. Decontamination solution development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement

  2. Development of Decontamination Methods using Liquid/Supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwang Heon; Koh, Moon Sung; Yoon, Chung Hyun; Kim, Hong Doo; Kim, Hak Won

    1994-01-01

    A major problem of nuclear energy is the production of radioactive wastes. Needs for more environmentally favorable method to decontaminate radioactive contaminants make the use of liquid/supercritical CO2 as a solvent medium. In removing radioactive metallic contaminants under CO2 solvent, two methods - use of chelating ligands and that of water in CO2 emulsion - are possible. In the chelating ligand method, a combination of ligands that can make synergistic effects seems important. We discuss about the properties of microemulsion formed by F-AOT. By adding acid in water core, decontamination of metallic parts, soils were possible

  3. Decontamination of radioactive contaminated protective wear using dry cleaning solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthiah, Pushpa; Chitra, S.; Paul, Biplob

    2013-01-01

    Liquid waste generated by conventional decontamination of radioactive contaminated cotton protective wear using detergent affects the chemical treatment of the plant. To reduce the generation of aqueous detergent waste, dry cleaning of cotton protective wear, highly soiled with oil and grease towards decontamination was tried with organic solvents. Mineral turpentine oil (MTO) among various other organic solvents was identified as a suitable organic solvent. As MTO leaves characteristic odour on the cloth, various commercial fragrances for the removal of the odour were tried. Application of the optimised dry cleaning solvent and commercial fragrance was adopted in plant scale operation. (author)

  4. Nitrogen supply modulates the effect of changes in drying-rewetting frequency on soil C and N cycling and greenhouse gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Lourdes; Durán, Jorge; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Roales, Javier; Gallardo, Antonio; Lovett, Gary M; Groffman, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    Climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition are two of the most important global change drivers. However, the interactions of these drivers have not been well studied. We aimed to assess how the combined effect of soil N additions and more frequent soil drying-rewetting events affects carbon (C) and N cycling, soil:atmosphere greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange, and functional microbial diversity. We manipulated the frequency of soil drying-rewetting events in soils from ambient and N-treated plots in a temperate forest and calculated the Orwin & Wardle Resistance index to compare the response of the different treatments. Increases in drying-rewetting cycles led to reductions in soil NO3- levels, potential net nitrification rate, and soil : atmosphere GHG exchange, and increases in NH4+ and total soil inorganic N levels. N-treated soils were more resistant to changes in the frequency of drying-rewetting cycles, and this resistance was stronger for C- than for N-related variables. Both the long-term N addition and the drying-rewetting treatment altered the functionality of the soil microbial population and its functional diversity. Our results suggest that increasing the frequency of drying-rewetting cycles can affect the ability of soil to cycle C and N and soil : atmosphere GHG exchange and that the response to this increase is modulated by soil N enrichment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Decontamination and decommissioning technology tree and the current status of the technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H.J.; Kim, G.N.; Lee, K.W.; Chol, W.K.; Jung, C.H.; Kim, C.J.; Kim, S.H.; Kwon, S.O.; Chung, C.M

    2001-03-01

    A technology tree diagram was developed on the basis of the necessary technologies applicable to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technology tree diagram is consist of 6 main areas such as characterization, decontamination, decommissioning and remote technology, radwaste management, site restoration, and decommissioning plan and engineering. Characterization is divided into 4 regions such as sampling and data collection, general characterization, chemical analysis and radiological analysis. Decontamination is also divided into 4 regions such as chemical decontamination, mechanical decontamination, the other decontamination technologies and new decontamination technologies. Decommissioning and remote technology area is divided into 4 regions such as cutting techniques, decommissioning technologies, new developing technologies and remote technologies. Radwaste management area is divided into 5 regions such as solid waste treatment, sludge treatment, liquid waste treatment, gas waste treatment and thermal treatment. Site restoration area is divided into 3 regions such as the evaluation of site contamination, soil decontamination and ground water decontamination. Finally, permission, decommissioning process, cost evaluation, quality assurance and the estimation of radionuclide inventory were mentioned in the decommissioning plan and engineering area. The estimated items for each technology are applicable domestic D and D facilities, D and D problem area and contamination/requirement, classification of D and D technology, similar technology, principle and overview of technology, status, science technology needs, implementation needs, reference and contact point.

  6. Decontamination and decommissioning technology tree and the current status of the technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, K. W.; Chol, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Kim, C. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kwon, S. O.; Chung, C. M.

    2001-03-01

    A technology tree diagram was developed on the basis of the necessary technologies applicable to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technology tree diagram is consist of 6 main areas such as characterization, decontamination, decommissioning and remote technology, radwaste management, site restoration, and decommissioning plan and engineering. Characterization is divided into 4 regions such as sampling and data collection, general characterization, chemical analysis and radiological analysis. Decontamination is also divided into 4 regions such as chemical decontamination, mechanical decontamination, the other decontamination technologies and new decontamination technologies. Decommissioning and remote technology area is divided into 4 regions such as cutting techniques, decommissioning technologies, new developing technologies and remote technologies. Radwaste management area is divided into 5 regions such as solid waste treatment, sludge treatment, liquid waste treatment, gas waste treatment and thermal treatment. Site restoration area is divided into 3 regions such as the evaluation of site contamination, soil decontamination and ground water decontamination. Finally, permission, decommissioning process, cost evaluation, quality assurance and the estimation of radionuclide inventory were mentioned in the decommissioning plan and engineering area. The estimated items for each technology are applicable domestic D and D facilities, D and D problem area and contamination/requirement, classification of D and D technology, similar technology, principle and overview of technology, status, science technology needs, implementation needs, reference and contact point

  7. Impact of rainfall patterns and frequency on the export of pesticides and heavy-metals from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meite, Fatima; Alvarez-Zaldívar, Pablo; Crochet, Alexandre; Wiegert, Charline; Payraudeau, Sylvain; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2018-03-01

    The combined influence of soil characteristics, pollutant aging and rainfall patterns on the export of pollutants from topsoils is poorly understood. We used laboratory experiments and parsimonious modeling to evaluate the impact of rainfall characteristics on the ponding and the leaching of a pollutant mixture from topsoils. The mixture included the fungicide metalaxyl, the herbicide S-metolachlor, as well as copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). Four rainfall patterns, which differed in their durations and intensities, were applied twice successively with a 7days interval on each soil type. To evaluate the influence of soil type and aging, experiments included crop and vineyard soils and two stages of pollutant aging (0 and 10days). The global export of pollutants was significantly controlled by the rainfall duration and frequency (Pexport of metalaxyl (44.5±21.5% of the initial mass spiked in the soils), S-metolachlor (8.1±3.1%) and Cu (3.1±0.3%). Soil compaction caused by the first rainfall reduced in the second rainfall the leaching of remaining metalaxyl, S-metolachlor, Cu and Zn by 2.4-, 2.9-, 30- and 50-fold, respectively. In contrast, soil characteristics and aging had less influence on pollutant mass export. The soil type significantly influenced the leaching of Zn, while short-term aging impacted Cu leaching. Our results suggest that rainfall characteristics predominantly control export patterns of metalaxyl and S-metolachlor, in particular when the aging period is short. We anticipate our study to be a starting point for more systematic evaluation of the dissolved pollutant ponding/leaching partitioning and the export of pollutant mixtures from different soil types in relation to rainfall patterns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dilute chemical decontamination program review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; Blomgren, J.C.; Pettit, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Dilute Chemical Decontamination Program is to develop and evaluate a process which utilizes reagents in dilute concentrations for the decontamination of BWR primary systems and for the maintenance of dose rates on the out-of-core surfaces at acceptable levels. A discussion is presented of the process concept, solvent development, advantages and disadvantages of reagent systems, and VNC loop tests. Based on the work completed to date it is concluded that (1) rapid decontamination of BWRs using dilute reagents is feasible; (2) reasonable reagent conditions for rapid chemical decontamination are: 0.01M oxalic acid + 0.005M citric acid, pH3.0, 90/degree/C, 0.5 to 1.0 ppm dissolved oxygen; (3) control of dissolved oxygen concentration is important, since high levels suppress the rate of decontamination and low levels allow precipitation of ferrous oxalate. 4 refs

  9. Chemical decontamination of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, J.A.; Lerch, R.E.

    1979-10-01

    A metal decontamination process based upon removal of contamination by treatment with a cerium (IV)-nitric acid solution (or other redox agent in nitric acid) is feasible and highly promising. The technique is effective in dissolving the surface layer of stainless steel. Dissolution rates of approximately 1.5 mils/h were demonstrated with cerium (IV)-nitric acid solutions. Removal of plutonium contamination from stainless steel was demonstrated in laboratory tests, in which activity levels were reduced from greater than 5 x 10 5 counts per minute to nondetectable levels in approximately one hour at 90 0 C. Removal of paint from stainless steel surfaces was also demonstrated. Advantages of this process over other chemical solutions include: (1) The solutions are not high salt systems; therefore, there is potentially less waste generated. (2) Cerium(IV) in nitric acid is a good dissolution agent for plutonium oxide. (3) Regeneration of Ce(IV) during the decontamination is accomplished by electrolysis. (4) The process should be effective for irregularly shaped equipment. (5) It could be effective as a spray or a flow-through system. 13 figures

  10. Electroleaching for a decontamination of mercury polluted soils and residues. Development of a hydrometallurgical cyclic process; Elektrolaugung zur Dekontamination quecksilberbelasteter Boeden und Reststoffe. Entwicklung eines hydrometallurgischen Kreislaufprozesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoeming, J. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung Technikum

    1998-12-31

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of a hydrometallurgical clean-up technique are shown for treating mercury contaminated solids. The principles of the technique were described by models that derived from theoretical considerations. These models were experimentally examined, tested with realcontaminated solids and used to design a new process, the electroleaching. Two variants of this cyclic process were developed. They differ in the combination of a chloridic oxidative leaching step, a cathodic mercury deposition and an anodic leachate regeneration. All steps were analysed thermodynamically and kinetically. Treating highly contaminated soils residual concentrations of mercury below 1 mg kg{sup -1} were achieved. It was also possible to separate simultaneously traces of gold from mercury containing gold mining residues and to lower contents of chlorinated hydrocarbons a well. (orig.) [Deutsch] In dieser Arbeit werden die Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen einer hydrometallurgischen Reinigungstechnik fuer Feststoffe aufgezeigt, die mit Quecksilber kontaminiert sind. Dazu wurden aus theoretischen Ueberlegungen heraus entwickelte Modellierungen experimentell abgeprueft, verfahrenstechnisch umgesetzt und an realkontaminierten Feststoffen erprobt. So wurde ein neues Kreislaufverfahren entwickelt, die Elektrolaugung. Die zwei vorgestellten Prozessvarianten unterscheiden sich durch die jeweilige Kombination von chloridisch-oxidierender Laugung, kathodischer Quecksilberabscheidung und anodischer Laugungsmittel-Regenerierung. Alle Teilprozesse wurden sowohl thermodynamisch als auch kinetisch analysiert. Bei Behandlung industrieller Altlasten konnten Quecksilber-Restgehalte unter 1 mg kg{sup -1} erreicht werden. Ebenso konnten Goldspuren aus quecksilberhaltigen Abgaengen brasilianischer Goldgewinnung abgetrennt sowie Gehalte an chlorierten Kohlenwasserstoffen verringert werden. (orig.)

  11. Soil protection. Looseleaf manual of measures and recommendations for protection, maintenance and decontamination of soils, landscapes and groundwater; Bodenschutz. Ergaenzbares Handbuch der Massnahmen und Empfehlungen fuer Schutz, Pflege und Sanierung von Boeden, Landschaft und Grundwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Guenther; Koenig, Wilhelm; Utermann, Jens (eds.)

    2013-07-15

    This supplement contains a technical paper on background values of trace elements in soils. Background values were compiled in topsoils, subsoils and subsurface of sixteen trace elements. The evaluations are based on data from the Geological Surveys, Land environmental Authorities and the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources. Another new technical paper is concerned with the maintenance of the productivity of forest soils with the use of wood and biomass. While the demand for wood increases, the technical possibilities of harvesting and processing have evolved. The contribution under consideration provides recommendations for maintaining the productivity of forest soils. In addition, the update of laws will continue.

  12. In-Situ Measurement of Soil Permittivity at Various Depths for the Calibration and Validation of Low-Frequency SAR Soil Moisture Models by Using GPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian N. Koyama

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available At radar frequencies below 2 GHz, the mismatch between the 5 to 15 cm sensing depth of classical time domain reflectometry (TDR probe soil moisture measurements and the radar penetration depth can easily lead to unreliable in situ data. Accurate quantitative measurements of soil water contents at various depths by classical methods are cumbersome and usually highly invasive. We propose an improved method for the estimation of vertical soil moisture profiles from multi-offset ground penetrating radar (GPR data. A semi-automated data acquisition technique allows for very fast and robust measurements in the field. Advanced common mid-point (CMP processing is applied to obtain quantitative estimates of the permittivity and depth of the reflecting soil layers. The method is validated against TDR measurements using data acquired in different environments. Depth and soil moisture contents of the reflecting layers were estimated with root mean square errors (RMSE on the order of 5 cm and 1.9 Vol.-%, respectively. Application of the proposed technique for the validation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR soil moisture estimates is demonstrated based on a case study using airborne L-band data and ground-based P-band data. For the L-band case we found good agreement between the near-surface GPR estimates and extended integral equation model (I2EM based SAR retrievals, comparable to those obtained by TDR. At the P-band, the GPR based method significantly outperformed the TDR method when using soil moisture estimates at depths below 30 cm.

  13. Development of Nuclear Decontamination Technology Using Supercritical Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Wonyoung; Park, Kwangheon; Park, Jihye; Lee, Donghee [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Soil cleaning technologies that have been developed thus far increase treatment costs in contaminated soil recovery processes because they generate large amounts of secondary wastes. In this respect, this study is intended to develop soil decontamination methods using CO{sub 2}, which is a nontoxic, environmentally friendly substance, in order to fundamentally suppress the generation of secondary wastes from the decontamination process and to create high added values. In this study, to develop decontamination methods for uranium-contaminated soil using supercritical CO{sub 2}, a soil decontamination system using supercritical CO{sub 2} was constructed. In addition, the basic principle of supercritical CO{sub 2} decontamination using a TBP-HNO3 complex was explained. According to the results of the study, sea-sand samples having the same degree of contamination showed different results of decontamination according to the quantities of the TBP-HNO3 complex used as an extraction agent, which resulted in high extraction rates. Thus far, a most widely used method of extracting uranium has been the dissolving of uranium in acids. However, this method has the large adverse effect of generating strong acidic wastes that cannot be easily treated. On the other hand, supercritical CO{sub 2} requires critical conditions that are no more difficult to meet than those of other supercritical fluids, since its density can be changed from a very low state close to that of an ideal gas to a high state close to that of liquids. The critical gas conditions are a pressure of 71 bar and a temperature of 31 .deg. C, both of which are inexpensive to achieve. Moreover, CO{sub 2} is a solvent that is not harmful to the human body and few effects on environmental pollution. Therefore, nontoxic and environment friendly processes can be developed using supercritical CO{sub 2}. Supercritical CO{sub 2}'s advantages over prevailing methods suggest its potential for developing innovative

  14. Soil protection. Looseleaf manual of measures and recommendations for protection, maintenance and decontamination of soils, landscapes and groundwater; Bodenschutz. Ergaenzbares Handbuch der Massnahmen und Empfehlungen fuer Schutz, Pflege und Sanierung von Boeden, Landschaft und Grundwasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Guenther; Koenig, Wilhelm; Utermann, Jens (eds.)

    2011-05-15

    The 50th supplement includes a technical contribution to background values of dissolved trace elements in the aqueous effluent for soils of rural areas. It follows a report on the reduction of land use in which the Ministers of Environment see suitable approaches to reduce land use. In addition to the position paper of LABO on climate change and soil protection the 50th supplement also includes the last part of the second floor protection report of the Federal Government.

  15. Species and rotation frequency influence soil nitrogen in simplified tropical plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewel, John J

    2006-04-01

    Among the many factors that potentially influence the rate at which nitrogen (N) becomes available to plants in terrestrial ecosystems are the identity and diversity of species composition, frequency of disturbance or stand turnover, and time. Replicated suites of investigator-designed communities afforded an opportunity to examine the effects of those factors on net N mineralization over a 12-year period. The communities consisted of large-stature perennial plants, comprising three tree species (Hyeronima alchorneoides, Cedrela odorata, and Cordia alliodora), a palm (Euterpe oleracea), and a large, perennial herb (Heliconia imbricata). Trees were grown in monoculture and in combination with the other two life-forms; tree monocultures were subjected to rotations of one or four years, or like the three-life-form systems, left uncut. The work was conducted on fertile soil in the humid lowlands of Costa Rica, a site with few abiotic constraints to plant growth. Rates of net N mineralization and nitrification were high, typically in the range of 0.2-0.8 microg x g(1) x d(-1), with net nitrification slightly higher than net mineralization, indicating preferential uptake of ammonium (NH4+) by plants and microbes. Net rates of N mineralization were about 30% lower in stands of one of the three tree species, Hyeronima, than in stands of the other two. Contrary to expectations, short-rotation management (one or four years) resulted in higher net rates of N mineralization than in uncut stands, whether the latter were composed of a single tree species or a combination of life-forms. Neither additional species richness nor replenishment of leached N augmented mineralization rates. The net rate at which N was supplied tended to be lowest in stands where demand for N was highest. Careful choice of species, coupled with low frequency of disturbance, can lead to maintenance of N within biomass and steady rates of within-system circulation, whereas pulses, whether caused by cutting

  16. Chemical decontamination method in nuclear facility system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Hitoshi; Oka, Shigehiro.

    1996-01-01

    Pumps and valves in a closed recycling loop system incorporating materials to be chemically decontaminated are decomposed, a guide plate having the decomposed parts as an exit/inlet of a decontaminating liquid is formed, and a decontaminating liquid recycling loop comprising a recycling pump and a heater is connected to the guide plate. Decontaminating liquid from a decontaminating liquid storage tank is supplied to the decontaminating liquid recycling loop. With such constitutions, the decontaminating liquid is filled in the recycling closed loop system incorporating materials to be decontaminated, and the materials to be decontaminated are chemically decontaminated. The decontaminating liquid after the decontamination is discharged and flows, if necessary, in a recycling system channel for repeating supply and discharge. After the decontamination, the guide plate is removed and returned to the original recycling loop. When pipelines of a reactor recycling system are decontaminated, the amount of decontaminations can be decreased, and reforming construction for assembling the recycling loop again, which requires cutting for pipelines in the system is no more necessary. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased, and therefore, the decontamination operation is facilitated and radiation dose can be reduced. (T.M.)

  17. Influence of high-frequency ambient pressure pumping on carbon dioxide efflux from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene S. Takle; William J. Massman; James R. Brandle; R. A. Schmidt; Xinhua Zhou; Irina V. Litvina; Rick Garcia; Geoffrey Doyle; Charles W. Rice

    2004-01-01

    We report measurements at 2Hz of pressure fluctuations at and beneath the soil in an agricultural field with dry soil and no vegetation. The objective of our study was to examine the possible role of pressure fluctuations produced by fluctuations in ambient wind on the efflux of CO2 at the soil surface.We observed that pressure fluctuations penetrate to 50 cm in the...

  18. Decontamination process development for gravels contaminated with uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Park, Uk Ryang; Kim, Seung Su; Kim, Won Suk; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    It is impossible to scrub gravels in a washing tank, because gravels sinks to the bottom of the washing tank. In addition, when electrokinetic decontamination technology is applied to gravels larger than 10 cm, the removal efficiency of uranium from the gravels is reduced, because electro-osmotic flux at the surface of the gravel in electrokinetic cell reduces owing to a reduction of the particle surface area attributable to large-sized gravel. The volume ratio of gravel larger than10 cm in total volume of the soil in KAERI was about 20%. Therefore, it is necessary to study the decontamination process of gravels contaminated with radionuclides. The optimum number of washings for contaminated gravels is considered to be two. In addition, the removal efficiency of contaminated gravel was not related to its weight. For an electrokinetic-electrodialytic decontamination period of 5 days, 10 days, 15 days, and 20 days, {sup 238}U in gravel was removed by about 42%, 64%, 74%, and 80%, respectively. The more the decontamination time elapsed, the greater the reduction of the removal efficiency ratio of {sup 238}U. The decontamination process for gravels was generated on the basis of the results of washing and electrokinetic electrodialtic experiments.

  19. Electrochemical Decontamination of Painted and Heavily Corroded Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczak, S.; Anderson, J.; Dziewinski, J.

    1998-01-01

    The radioactive metal wastes that are generated from nuclear fuel plants and radiochemical laboratories are mainly contaminated by the surface deposition of radioactive isotopes. There are presently several techniques used in removing surface contamination involving physical and chemical processes. However, there has been very little research done in the area of soiled, heavily oxidized, and painted metals. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been developing electrochemical procedures for the decontamination of bare and painted metal objects. These methods have been found to be effective on highly corroded as well as relatively new metals. This study has been successful in decontaminating projectiles and shrapnel excavated during environmental restoration projects after 40+ years of exposure to the elements. Heavily corroded augers used in sampling activities throughout the area were also successfully decontaminated. This process has demonstrated its effectiveness and offers several advantages over the present metal decontamination practices of media blasting and chemical solvents. These advantages include the addition of no toxic or hazardous chemicals, low operating temperature and pressure, and easily scaleable equipment. It is in their future plans to use this process in the decontamination of gloveboxes destined for disposal as TRU waste

  20. Decontamination of transvaginal ultrasound probes: Review of national practice and need for national guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.A.; Williams, P.L.; Dubbins, P.A.; Jenks, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To determine the national practice of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) probe decontamination in English hospitals and to develop recommendations for guidance. Materials and methods: A literature review was undertaken to clarify best practice and evaluate methods of decontamination of TVUS probes. A questionnaire was developed to ascertain TVUS probe decontamination programmes in current use within English hospitals. This was sent to ultrasound leads of 100 English hospitals; 68 hospitals responded. Results: There is a wide variation in TVUS probe decontamination across English hospitals. Although the majority of respondents (87%, 59/68) reported having clear and practical written guidelines for TVUS decontamination, the frequency, methods, and types of decontamination solutions utilized were widely variable and none meet the standards required to achieve high-level disinfection. Conclusion: While the decontamination of other endoluminal medical devices (e.g., flexible endoscopes) is well defined and regulated, the decontamination of TVUS probes has no such guidance. There appears to be incomplete understanding of the level of risk posed by TVUS probes, and in some cases, this has resulted in highly questionable practices regarding TVUS hygiene. There is an urgent need to develop evidence-based national guidance for TVUS probe decontamination.

  1. Microwave-Based Water Decontamination System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor); Sognier, Marguerite (Inventor); Dusl, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system for decontaminating a medium. The system can include a medium having one or more contaminants disposed therein. The contaminants can be or include bacteria, fungi, parasites, viruses, and combinations thereof. A microwave energy radiation device can be positioned proximate the medium. The microwave energy radiation device can be adapted to generate a signal having a frequency from about 10 GHz to about 100 GHz. The signal can be adapted to kill one or more of the contaminants disposed within the medium while increasing a temperature of the medium by less than about 10 C.

  2. Decontamination of some urban surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, E.W.

    1988-04-01

    The long-term consequences of external radiation dose to the public could be a cause for concern in the event of a severe accident at a nuclear power plant leading to the release of fission products to the atmosphere and subsequent contamination of buildings, roads and other components of the urban environment. This study has concentrated on the decontamination of building materials contaminated under wet conditions with soluble, ionic radiocaesium. Results are given on the decontamination of building materials contaminated without run-off, on the effects of waiting between contamination and decontamination and on the effect of pre-treatment with an ammonium salt solution. (author)

  3. Nova target chamber decontamination study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    An engineering study was performed to determine the most effective method for decontamination of the Nova target chamber. Manual and remote decontamination methods currently being used were surveyed. In addition, a concept that may not require in-situ decontamination was investigated. Based on the presently available information concerning material and system compatibility and particle penetration, it is recommended that a system of removable aluminum shields be considered. It is also recommended that a series of tests be performed to more precisely determine the vacuum compatibility and penetrability of other materials discussed in this report

  4. Skin decontamination: principles and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Heidi P; Zhai, Hongbo; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-11-01

    Skin decontamination is the primary intervention needed in chemical, biological and radiological exposures, involving immediate removal of the contaminant from the skin performed in the most efficient way. The most readily available decontamination system on a practical basis is washing with soap and water or water only. Timely use of flushing with copious amounts of water may physically remove the contaminant. However, this traditional method may not be completely effective, and contaminants left on the skin after traditional washing procedures can have toxic consequences. This article focuses on the principles and practices of skin decontamination.

  5. Organic decontamination by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study has successfully identified ion exchanger media suitable for decontaminating the 5500-gallon organic layer in Tank 241-C-103. Decontamination of radionuclides is necessary to meet shipping, incinerator site storage, and incineration feed requirements. The exchanger media were identified through a literature search and experiments at the Russian Institute for Physical Chemistry. The principal radionuclides addressed are Cs-137 and Sr-90. Recommendations for an experimental program plan conclude the discussion. The experimental program would provide the data necessary for plant design specifications for a column and for ion exchange media to be used in decontaminating the organic layer

  6. Decontamination and coating of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.; Bush, S.P.; Lyon, C.E.; Walker, V.

    1988-01-01

    Technology is being developed to decontaminate lead used in shielding applications in contaminated environments for recycle as shieldings. Technology is also being developed to coat either decontaminated lead or new lead before it is used in contaminated environments. The surface of the coating is expected to be much easier to decontaminate than the original lead surface. If contamination becomes severely embedded in the coating and cannot be removed, it can be easily cut with a knife and removed from the lead. The used coating can be disposed of as radioactive (hot hazardous) waste. The lead can then be recoated for further use as a shielding material

  7. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Microwave Radiometer Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation: Initial On-Orbit Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Johnson, Joel T.; Aksoy, Mustafa; Bringer, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched in January 2015, provides global measurements of soil moisture using a microwave radiometer. SMAPs radiometer passband lies within the passive frequency allocation. However, both unauthorized in-band transmitters as well as out-of-band emissions from transmitters operating at frequencies adjacent to this allocated spectrum have been documented as sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) to the L-band radiometers on SMOS and Aquarius. The spectral environment consists of high RFI levels as well as significant occurrences of low level RFI equivalent to 0.1 to 10 K. The SMAP ground processor reports the antenna temperature both before and after RFI mitigation is applied. The difference between these quantities represents the detected RFI level. The presentation will review the SMAP RFI detection and mitigation procedure and discuss early on-orbit RFI measurements from the SMAP radiometer. Assessments of global RFI properties and source types will be provided, as well as the implications of these results for SMAP soil moisture measurements.

  8. Decontamination of surfaces (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestre, E.

    1961-01-01

    The continued expansion of atomic Energy has led the S.C.R.G.R. to extend simultaneously the recovery of materials contaminated by use in radio-active media. The importance of this aspect of atomic Energy was not immediately obvious to those concerned but is now fully recognized due to the cost of the materials and installations, and also to the time required for the construction of special equipment for the C.E.A. Another very important reason is the dangers associated with the handling of contaminated material. The S.C.R.G.R. attacked this problem from the point of view of these dangers. It later became apparent to the users, once the decontamination methods had proved their worth, that the process presented advantages from the material and cost-saving point of view. (author) [fr

  9. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  10. Decontamination technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.R.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-10-01

    This study identifies and technically assesses foreign decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technology developments that may represent significant improvements over D and D technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water reactor (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign D and D technologies of potential interest to the US were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of D and D literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in D and D costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to US needs. 4 refs

  11. Granulated decontamination formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2007-10-02

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  12. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  13. Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, Charles A.; Parker, John J.; Guttadora, Gregory L.; Ciebiera, Lloyd P.

    2002-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Tritium Systems Group has developed and fabricated an Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System (OTDS), which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination on various components and items. The system is configured to introduce gaseous ozone into a reaction chamber containing tritiated items that require a reduction in tritium surface contamination. Tritium surface contamination (on components and items in the reaction chamber) is removed by chemically reacting elemental tritium to tritium oxide via oxidation, while purging the reaction chamber effluent to a gas holding tank or negative pressure HVAC system. Implementing specific concentrations of ozone along with catalytic parameters, the system is able to significantly reduce surface tritium contamination on an assortment of expendable and non-expendable items. This paper will present the results of various experimentation involving employment of this system

  14. Decontamination of organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.

    1977-01-01

    Decontamination stands for the sack collecting of wc-waste water of nuclear-medical tracts and especially the collecting of primary urine and primary faeces of patients after application of radio-isotopes (e.g. iodine 131). They are tied up in the sacks, treated with antiseptic and decomposition-preventing agents, and finally stored in a decupation depot over the time constant. The decupation depot can, for example, be a deep-freezor with separations and clocks, which is radiation-isolated. After the time constant a chemical and/or physical destruction (e.g. comminution) takes place, with simultaneous disinfection and thawing (vapour heating) and the transfer to the canalization. (DG) [de

  15. Glovebox decontamination technology comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Reconfiguration of the CMR Building and TA-55 Plutonium Facility for mission requirements will require the disposal or recycle of 200--300 gloveboxes or open front hoods. These gloveboxes and open front hoods must be decontaminated to meet discharge limits for Low Level Waste. Gloveboxes and open front hoods at CMR have been painted. One of the deliverables on this project is to identify the best method for stripping the paint from large numbers of gloveboxes. Four methods being considered are the following: conventional paint stripping, dry ice pellets, strippable coatings, and high pressure water technology. The advantages of each technology will be discussed. Last, cost comparisons between the technologies will be presented

  16. Soil moisture and temperature profile effects on microwave emission at low frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, S.; Chanzy, A.; Wigneron, J.P.; Calvet, J.C.; Kerr, Y.; Laguerre, L.

    1995-01-01

    Soil moisture and temperature vertical profiles vary quickly during the day and may have a significant influence on the soil microwave emission. The objective of this work is to quantify such an influence and the consequences in soil moisture estimation from microwave radiometric information. The analysis is based on experimental data collected by the ground-based PORTOS radiometer at 1.4, 5.05, and 10.65 GHz and data simulated by a coherent model of microwave emission from layered media [Wilheit model (1978)]. In order to simulate diurnal variations of the brightness temperature (TB), the Wilheit model is coupled to a mechanistic model of heat and water flows in the soil. The Wilheit model is validated on experimental data and its performances for estimating TB are compared to those of a simpler approach based on a description of the soil media as a single layer (Fresnel model). When the depth of this single layer (hereafter referred to as the sampling depth) is determined to fit the experimental data, similar accuracy in TB estimation is found with both the Wilheit and Fresnel models. The soil microwave emission is found to be strongly affected by the diurnal variations of soil moisture and temperature profiles. Consequently, the TB sensitivity to soil moisture and temperature profiles has an influence on the estimation, from microwave observations, of the surface soil moisture in a surface layer with a fixed depth (05): the accuracy of θs retrievals and the optimal sampling depth depends both on the variation in soil moisture and temperature profile shape. (author)

  17. Decontamination laboratory design for iron pipes contaminated with uranium and thorium series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahyun, Adelia; Sordi, Gian M.; Ghobril, Carlos N.; Puga Sanches, Matias; Rodrigues, Demerval L.

    2008-01-01

    The Brazilian soil is very rich in the ore processing, after some time, the pipes are contaminated with trace levels of uranium and thorium. When the pipes are exchanged, to recovery the funds, the best is to sell them as scrap, however, because they are contaminated and present a considerable amount of dose can not be marketed until they are decontaminated. The question is that the tube is incrusted with the contaminated material, and is difficult to remove it. For the removal this material, that comes to be 2 inches thick, for the larger pipes diameter, requires special equipment as a motor-pump units with ultra high pressure water jetting, of the order of 40000 psi. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a design of one laboratory able to perform the decontamination avoiding large scale production of radioactive wastes. The solids and liquids wastes produced during the process of decontamination will be collected in different containers and classified according to their contamination level. The laboratory was designed to facilitate its decontamination with a minimum dose for their operators. The most difficult question to be solved during the project, was to perform the laboratory decontamination during the pipe decontamination in continuous operation since we can't stop the process for the reason of it expensive cost. The paper will show how will be made all the steps of the tubes decontamination and the laboratory decontamination. It will be shown how we collect the liquids and solids wastes, separate, for their classification. After the pipe, decontamination we show as will be measure the dose to release or to return for the laboratory to development a further decontamination. At last, it will show the temporary storage place for the decontaminated pipes that will be later collected as scrap. (author)

  18. Decontamination of abandoned sites. An introduction into the problems of land decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundt, K.

    1991-01-01

    Starting from a brief overview of the history of origin of soil and ground water pollution in Berlin and its surroundings by gas, chemical, and petroleum works, old landfills, manufactories of arms and ammunition as well as gasoline depots or sites of gasoline depots, the brochure describes the legal situation and procedure (list of 'intervention' values) and goes on to outline the situation regarding the ground under Berlin, existing pollutants, and methods for dealing with land contamination. In five abandoned sites (waste oil refinery, copper refinery, waste solvent treatment plant, asphalt factory and drugs factory), different methods for eliminating soil and ground water contamination were used. Their efficacy is assessed on the basis of their soil and pollutant-specific suitability; the decontamination achieved is indicated. (BBR) [de

  19. Decontamination of a canyon crane at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.A.; Moore, D.B.; Bowers, J.W.; Brown, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination of the crane is reviewed in terms of the health physics aspects, controls during decontamination efforts, and the resultant radiation exposure rates for decontamination efforts. 17 figs.,

  20. Decontamination strategies in contaminated settlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Jouve, A.; Tallec, V. Le

    1996-01-01

    Six years after the Chernobyl accident, decontamination actions had been completed in many places, the contamination could be considered as fixed, especially on urban surfaces and the social situation was felt to be stabilized. Under those conditions the efficiency of the 'classical' decontamination techniques was under question, it was worthwhile to look at new specific techniques. Besides it was necessary to discuss the interest of new decontamination actions in settlements. The European Union (EU) sponsored a project ECP 4 in order to look at the opportunities for further dose reduction actions in the contaminated territories of the three republics affected by the accident. The objective was to provide a local decision maker, faced with many alternatives for decontamination, with all the elements for determining what to do according to the various objectives he might pursue. The main results are presented here. (author)

  1. Contamination and decontamination of skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Knajfl, J.

    1983-01-01

    In external contamination the beta radiation dose is the prevalent component of the total dose absorbed by the skin. There exist four types of radionUclide bonds to the skin: mechanical retention of solid particles or solution on the surface and in the pores, physical adsorption of nondissociated molecules or colloids, the ion exchange effect, and chemisorption. Radionuclides then penetrate the skin by transfollicular transfer. The total amount of radioactive substances absorbed into the skin depends on the condition of the skin. Skin is decontaminated by washing with lukewarm water and soap or with special decontamination solutions. The most widely used components of decontamination solutions are detergents, chelaton, sodium hexametaphosphate, oxalic acid, citric acid. The main principles of the decontamination of persons are given. (M.D.)

  2. BR-5 primary circuit decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, I.A.; Nikulin, M.P.; Smirnov-Averin, A.P.; Tymosh, B.S.; Shereshkov, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    Results and methodology of steam-water and acid decontamination of the primary coolant circuit SBR-5 reactor in 1971 are discussed. Regeneration process in a cold trap of the primary coolant circuit is discussed

  3. Decontaminating method for radioactive contaminant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    After decontamination of radioactive contaminates with d-limonene, a radioactive material separating agent not compatible with liquid wastes caused by decontamination is added to the liquid wastes. Then after stirring, they are stood still to be separated into two phases, and the radioactive materials in the liquid waste phase caused by decontamination are transferred to the phase of the radioactive material separating agent. With such procedures, they can satisfactorily be separated into two phases of d-limonene and the radioactive material separating agent. Further, d-limonene remaining after the separation can be used again as a decontaminating agent for radioactive contaminates. Therefore, the amount of d-limonene to be used can be reduced, to lower the cost for cleaning, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes formed. (T.M.)

  4. Evaluation of the efficacy of decontamination methods examined at Japanese garden located in Chiba Prefectural Kashiwa-no-ha Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yujiro; Inoue, Tomohiro; Naito, Suekazu; Takahashi, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of decontamination methods was evaluated with the measurement of 1cm dose equivalent rate and concentration of radioactive caesium in the soil, plants and water of the pond before and after decontamination at Japanese garden located in Chiba Prefectural Kashiwa-no-ha Park. Examined decontamination methods were: 1) The topsoil of walkway was stripped and removed to the depth of 10mm. 2) Washing the stone pavement walkway using high-pressure water jet washer. At the height of 50cm, we observed 45% and 36% of 1cm dose rate equivalent dose reduction rate (the natural dose rate derived from the ground was subtracted) for 1) and 2) decontamination methods respectively. Due to the decontamination process, the measurement value of 1cm equivalent dose rate decreased below 0.23μSv/h at most of the examined sites, which showed significant efficacy of decontamination methods performed at this Japanese garden. (author)

  5. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system

  6. Decontamination of radioactively contaminated surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    By this standard objective conditions to evaluate and test the ease of decontamination of surfaces under laboratory conditions are to be laid down. Ease of decontamination in this context denotes the summed-up effect of two material properties: a) the capacity of the material for retaining radioactive substances at its surface; b) the ease with which these substances are given off again in the course of cleaning processes. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Evaluation of a decontamination model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippin, D.W.T.; Hanulik, J.; Schenker, E.; Ullrich, G.

    1981-02-01

    In the scale-up of a laboratory decontamination process difficulties arise due to the limited understanding of the mechanisms controlling the process. This paper contains some initial proposals which may contribute to the quantitative understanding of the chemical and physical factors which influence decontamination operations. General features required in a mathematical model to describe a fluid-solid reaction are discussed, and initial work is presented with a simple model which has had some success in describing the observed laboratory behaviour. (Auth.)

  8. Presolidification treatment of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habayeb, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    Unsatisfactory leaching performance of several solidified decontamination solutions indicated a need for presolidification treatments to reduce the water sensitivity of the active chemicals. Chemical treatments examined in this work include pH adjustment, precipitation and oxidation-reduction reactions. The reactions involved in these treatments are discussed. The most suitable presolidification treatment for each decontamination solution has been identified. Further research is needed to test the effectivenss of these treatments

  9. Dwell time considerations for large area cold plasma decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konesky, Gregory

    2009-05-01

    Atmospheric discharge cold plasmas have been shown to be effective in the reduction of pathogenic bacteria and spores and in the decontamination of simulated chemical warfare agents, without the generation of toxic or harmful by-products. Cold plasmas may also be useful in assisting cleanup of radiological "dirty bombs." For practical applications in realistic scenarios, the plasma applicator must have both a large area of coverage, and a reasonably short dwell time. However, the literature contains a wide range of reported dwell times, from a few seconds to several minutes, needed to achieve a given level of reduction. This is largely due to different experimental conditions, and especially, different methods of generating the decontaminating plasma. We consider these different approaches and attempt to draw equivalencies among them, and use this to develop requirements for a practical, field-deployable plasma decontamination system. A plasma applicator with 12 square inches area and integral high voltage, high frequency generator is described.

  10. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  11. Chemical Gel for Surface Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, J. K.; Won, H. J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical decontamination processes operate by immersing components in aggressive chemical solutions. In these applications chemical decontamination technique produce large amounts of radioactive liquid waste. Therefore it is necessary to develop processes using chemical gels instead of chemical solutions, to avoid the well-known disadvantages of chemical decontamination techniques while retaining their high efficiency. Chemical gels decontamination process consists of applying the gel by spraying it onto the surface of large area components (floors, walls, etc) to be decontaminated. The gel adheres to any vertical or complex surface due to their thixotropic properties and operates by dissolving the radioactive deposit, along with a thin layer of the gel support, so that the radioactivity trapped at the surface can be removed. Important aspects of the gels are that small quantities can be used and they show thixitropic properties : liquid during spraying, and solid when stationary, allowing for strong adherence to surfaces. This work investigates the decontamination behaviors of organic-based chemical gel for SS 304 metallic surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials

  12. Random Vibration Analysis of the XM2l Decontaminant Pumper Module of the Modular Decontamination System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colclough, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The XM21 Decontaminant Pumper module of the Modular Decontamination System was analyzed using finite element analysis techniques to show why the first design iteration passed transportation vibration...

  13. Soil burden by radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.E.H.; Wenzel, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    Natural radioactivity - half-lifes and radiation type of man-made nuclides, radionuclide behaviour in soils, effects on soil condition and soil functions are described. The only mode of decontamination is by decay and thus primarily dependent on the half-life of nuclides

  14. Radiological decontamination, survey, and statistical release method for vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwill, M.E.; Lively, J.W.; Morris, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Earth-moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah (a cleanup site regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site

  15. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Amlôt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS. The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit.

  16. Impacts of Different Hiking-trail Use Frequency on Soil Erosion: a Case of Mt. Mudeng National Park, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Kim, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    Mountain National Parks have been suffered serious soil erosion by hiking in Korea. To identify the impacts of different human's trampling intensities, a comparative study was conducted in Mt. Mudeungsan National Park where has been very intensive recreational activities. For this study, trail-conditions and soil properties were discovered on the 1.9km trail of high traffic (A) and 3.8km trail of low traffic (B) in the study area. Width was significantly wider on the A than B, but there was no significant difference in the values of other factors. With compaction and erosion of topsoil on the trail, penetration resistance and bulk density were significantly higher, but water content and the ratio of silt and clay were significantly lower than those of undisturbed areas around the trails. These were not statistically significant spatial difference from the use frequency of the trails. This result implies that the characteristics of surface soil on trails were not largely affected by use frequency, and the evolution of cross-section form of trails would be dominated by widening. This study will help in managing trail system and establishing conservation policy sustainably.

  17. Japan, one year after. In Fukushima, a decontamination by forced march; Japon, un an apres. A Fukushima, une decontamination a marche forcee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leglu, D.; Mulot, R.; Khalathari, A.; Lafon, B.; Stanley, T.; Linton, M.

    2012-03-15

    In a first part, the author describes how people living in the contaminated area around Fukushima try to deal with the difficult and almost impossible decontamination of their houses, gardens, schools, and so on. The destruction of forests is planned as they concentrate radioactivity. Thousands of inhabitants must wear dosimeters. An article comments the caesium activity measurements. Several data and figures are presented: evacuation areas, radioactive emissions and releases, doses received by emergency personnel, size of areas to be decontaminated, impact on the Japanese energy sector, contamination rates for soils and seawater, decontamination and dismantling costs, health impacts. An article proposes an overview of the different methods which are implemented and tested by the Japanese for large scale decontamination

  18. Decontamination and winter conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenild, C.; Tveten, U.

    1984-12-01

    The report deals with two decontamonation experiments under winter conditions. A snow-covered parking lot was contaminated, and the snow was subsequently removed using standard snow-moving equipment. The snow left behind was collected and the content of contaminant was determined. A non-radioactive contaminant was used. A decontamination factor exceeding 100 was obtained. Although the eksperimental conditions were close to ideal, it is reason to believe that extremely efficient removal of deposited materials on a snow surface is achivable. In another investigation, run-off from agricultural surface, contaminated while covered with snow, was measured A lycimeter was used in this experiment. A stable layer of ice and snow was allowed to form before contamination. The run-off water was collected at each thaw period until all snow and ice was gone. Cs-134 was used as contaminant. Roughly 30% of the Cs-134 with which the area was contaminated ran off with the melt water. Following a reactor accident situation, this would have given a corresponding reduction in the long term doses. Both of these experiments show that consequence calculation assumptions, as they are currently applied to large accident assessment, tend to overestimate the consequences resulting from accidents taking place under winter conditions

  19. Solving decontaminable flooring problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Pennsylvania Power and Light wanted to cover deteriorating concrete in unit 2 of its Susquehanna BWR with a smooth, durable, decontaminable coating. Traditionally, floors in the plant had been coated with epoxy paint, but many of these floors suffered delamination, and failed in three to five years. Painting with epoxy would also interrupt operations for as much as three days while the floor dried, yet critical instruments in some areas had to be monitored at least once per shift. In addition, conventional floor surface preparation produced dust and vibration around sensitive equipment. The solution was a dustless scabbling system for surface preparation, followed by the installation of a high-strength acrylic industrial floor known as Silakal. The work was carried out by Pentek. Silikal bonds to the underlying concrete, so that delamination of the floor will not occur even under severe traffic conditions. Another advantage of this type of flooring is that it cures in one hour, so floor resurfacing has only minimal impact on plant operations. (author)

  20. Decontamination technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-01-01

    This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technology developments that may represent significant improvements over D and D technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water rector (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign D and D technologies of potential interest to the U.S. were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of D and D literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in D and D costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to U.S. needs

  1. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M.; Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of 99 Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying 2 )

  2. New decontamination technologies for environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; McCoy, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    The technologies discussed represent a versatile collection of tools and approaches for environmental decontamination applications. The fixatives provide a means for gaining and maintaining control of large contaminated areas, for decontaminating large surface areas, and for protecting equipment and supplies used in decontamination operations. The other decontamination techniques together provide a method for removing loose surface contamination from almost all classes of materials and surfaces. These techniques should have wide application both as direct decontamination processes and for the cleaning of tools and equipment used in the decontamination operations

  3. CB decontamination for first responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, M.D.G.; Purdon, J.G.; Burczyk, A. [Defence Research and Development Canada Suffield, Ralston, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The Universal Containment System (UCS) is designed to contain, mitigate and decontaminate chemical, biological and radiological warfare agents. The UCS consists of a lightweight, tent-like enclosure filled with a water-based surface decontaminating foam (SDF). The Canadian government funded a project to advance the understanding of the behaviour of the UCS. This paper described the success of the project as well as the technological advances in the UCS formulation and equipment. Vapour desorption experiments were conducted in which SDF was applied onto 12 surfaces found in a typical office environment. Both mustard and nerve agent were studied on the test surfaces. Both scrubbing and non-scrubbing decontamination methods were tested. SDF effectively decontaminated the non-porous substances, particularly when the scrubbing procedure was used. Results were more complicated for the non-porous samples. A dye added to the agent was useful for determining the fate of the agent. Liquid phase studies were conducted in which the reaction between SDF and various agents were studied in the liquid phase in order to estimate the rate of reaction, the stoichiometry and the reaction products formed. Both SDF and the commercial decontamination agent CASCAD were found to effectively kill 100 per cent of anthrax spores. The significance of this project to first responders was considerable. Changes to the formulation and equipment of UCS will increase its usefulness and safety. Users will also have a better knowledge of the amount of decontamination needed for complete effectiveness in specific situations. Recommendations have been made for use of the product on a range of indoor surfaces. Field trials have shown the blast mitigation and agent decontamination ability of the foam under explosive situations. 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  5. Estimating decontamination efficiency of territory, adjoining to the Chernobyl' NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, E.A.; Sanitarov, V.A.; Stepanov, I.K.; Senin, E.V.; Filippov, E.M.; Shiraj, A.P.; Umanets, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The NPP territory decontamination was fulfilled according to the next scheme: 1) removal of the soil upper layer and its moving avay for burial; 2) concrete plate laying; 3) concreting seams between plates and piling up polymer coatings. The conclusion is made that substantial improvement of radiation situation at the operating site is possible only after removal of radiation sources at the machine room roofing. 1 ref.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Radiation survey and decontamination of cape Arza from depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukotić Perko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the action of NATO A-10 airplanes in 1999, the cape Arza, Serbia and Montenegro was contaminated by depleted uranium. The clean-up operations were undertaken at the site, and 242 uranium projectiles and their 49 larger fragments were removed from the cape. That is about 85% of the total number of projectiles by which Arza was contaminated. Here are described details of the applied procedures and results of the soil radioactivity measurements after decontamination.

  7. Toshiba's decontamination technologies for the decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yuki; Yaita, Yumi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    For the decommissioning, two types of decontamination process are necessary, 1) system decontamination before dismantling and 2) decontamination of dismantling waste. Toshiba has been developing the decontamination technologies for the both purposes from the viewpoint of minimizing the secondary waste. For the system decontamination before dismantling, chemical decontamination process, such as T-OZON, can be applicable for stainless steel or carbon steel piping. For the decontamination of dismantling waste, several types of process have been developed to apply variety of shapes and materials. For the simple shape materials, physical decontamination process, such as blast decontamination, is effective. We have developed new blast decontamination process with highly durable zirconia particle. It can be used repeatedly and secondary waste can be reduced compared with conventional blast particle. For the complex shape materials, chemical decontamination process can be applied that formic acid decontamination process for carbon steel and electrolytic reduction decontamination process with organic acid for stainless steel. These chemicals can be decomposed to carbon dioxide and water and amount of secondary waste can be small. (author)

  8. Decontaminating products for routine decontamination in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    Routine decontamination work that has to be carried out in practical operation includes the cleaning of all kinds of surfaces such as floors, walls and apparatus, the decontamination of professional clothes and of the personnel. In order to ensure a trouble-free functioning of plants for the treatment of waste water and concentrate in nuclear power plants, radioactive liquid wastes appearing in the controlled area should be compatible with the treatment methods in practice. Radioactive concentrates and resides obtained from the treatment methods are mixed with matrix materials like cement or bitumen or treated by roller frame drying and thus are conditioned for intermediate or final storage. Several requirements should be made on decontaminating agents used in the controlled area. Some of these physical-chemical criteria will be described in detail. (R.P.)

  9. Decontamination work in the area surrounding Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant: another occupational health challenge of the nuclear disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koji; Yoshikawa, Toru; Murata, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    This article describes occupational health measures for workers involved in decontamination of radioactive material discharged around Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant after the explosions in 2011. Decontamination is performed by removing radioactive particles (mainly cesium) from surfaces of soil, grass and trees, and buildings. Measurement of radiation doses is necessary to reduce exposure, and to determine whether workers can work below dose limits. Protective equipment for decontamination is determined based on the concentration of radiation in contaminated soil and the exposure to dust. Health examinations by physicians are mandated for decontamination workers upon hiring and every 6 months. While there is no possibility of acute radiation injury from decontamination, workers may be anxious about the unclear effects of chronic low level radiation exposure on health. Measures to protect the decontamination workers are the top priority.

  10. Assessment of natural frequency of installed offshore wind turbines using nonlinear finite element model considering soil-monopile interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djillali Amar Bouzid

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear finite element model is developed to examine the lateral behaviors of monopiles, which support offshore wind turbines (OWTs chosen from five different offshore wind farms in Europe. The simulation is using this model to accurately estimate the natural frequency of these slender structures, as a function of the interaction of the foundations with the subsoil. After a brief introduction to the wind power energy as a reliable alternative in comparison to fossil fuel, the paper focuses on concept of natural frequency as a primary indicator in designing the foundations of OWTs. Then the range of natural frequencies is provided for a safe design purpose. Next, an analytical expression of an OWT natural frequency is presented as a function of soil-monopile interaction through monopile head springs characterized by lateral stiffness KL, rotational stiffness KR and cross-coupling stiffness KLR, of which the differences are discussed. The nonlinear pseudo three-dimensional finite element vertical slices model has been used to analyze the lateral behaviors of monopiles supporting the OWTs of different wind farm sites considered. Through the monopiles head movements (displacements and rotations, the values of KL, KR and KLR were obtained and substituted in the analytical expression of natural frequency for comparison. The comparison results between computed and measured natural frequencies showed an excellent agreement for most cases. This confirms the convenience of the finite element model used for the accurate estimation of the monopile head stiffness. Keywords: Nonlinear finite element analysis, Vertical slices model, Monopiles under horizontal loading, Natural frequency, Monopile head stiffness, Offshore wind turbines (OWTs

  11. Testing of multistep soil washing for radiocesium-contaminated soil containing plant matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funakawa, Masafumi; Tagawa, Akihiro; Okuda, Nobuyasu

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination work following radiocesium exposure requires a vast reduction in the amount of contaminated soil generated. The current study subjected 4 types of contaminated soil with different properties to multistep soil washing under the same conditions. This study also determined the effectiveness of radiocesium decontamination and the extent to which the amount of contaminated soil was reduced. In addition, the effectiveness of plant matter separation, adsorbent addition, and grinding as part of multistep soil washing was determined using the same contaminated soil. Results of testing indicated that the rate of radiocesium decontamination ranged from 73.6 to 89.2% and the recovery rate ranged from 51.5 to 84.2% for twice-treated soil, regardless of the soil properties or cesium level. Plant matter in soil had a high radiocesium level. However, there was little plant matter in our soil sample. Therefore, plant matter separation had little effect on the improvement in the percentage of radiocesium decontamination of twice-treated soil. Soil surface grinding improved the rate of radiocesium decontamination of twice-treated soil. However, radiocesium in soil tightly bound with minerals in the soil; thus, the addition of an adsorbent also failed to improve the rate of radiocesium decontamination. (author)

  12. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  13. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  14. Liquid decontaminants for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Decontaminants used in the nuclear field must meet a variety of requirements. On the one hand, the washing process must remove radioactive contamination and conventional dirt from the items washed. On the other hand, subsequent disposal of the washing water arisings must be feasible by the usual waste disposal pathway. One aspect of particular importance is unproblematic treatment of the radioactively contaminated waste water, as a rule low to medium active, whose final storage must be ensured. Decontaminants must not impair waste treatment processes, such as evaporation, filtration, and centrifuging, as well as further treatment of the concentrates and residues arising which are worked into matrix materials (cementation, bituminization), in drum drying or roller mill drying. For reasons of safety at work and environmental quality, also aspects of human toxicology and ecotoxicology must be taken into account. In this way, handling decontaminants will not jeopardize the health of personnel or cause potential long-term environmental damage. Liquid decontaminants, compared to powders, offer the advantage of automatic dosage. The liquid product is dosed accurately as a function of the washing program used. Liquid decontaminants can be handled safely in hot laundries without causing skin and eye contacts. (orig.)

  15. Salt decontamination demonstration test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, E.B.; Heng, C.J.

    1983-06-01

    The Salt Decontamination Demonstration confirmed that the precipitation process could be used for large-scale decontamination of radioactive waste sale solution. Although a number of refinements are necessary to safely process the long-term requirement of 5 million gallons of waste salt solution per year, there were no observations to suggest that any fundamentals of the process require re-evaluation. Major accomplishments were: (1) 518,000 gallons of decontaminated filtrate were produced from 427,000 gallons of waste salt solution from tank 24H. The demonstration goal was to produce a minimum of 200,000 gallons of decontaminated salt solution; (2) cesium activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 43,000 below the cesium activity in the tank 24 solution. This decontamination factor (DF) exceeded the demonstration goal of a DF greater than 10,000; (3) average strontium-90 activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 26 to less than 10 3 d/m/ml versus a goal of less than 10 4 d/m/ml; and (4) the concentrated precipitate was washed to a final sodium ion concentration of 0.15 M, well below the 0.225 M upper limit for DWPF feed. These accomplishments were achieved on schedule and without incident. Total radiation exposure to personnel was less than 350 mrem and resulted primarily from sampling precipitate slurry inside tank 48. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  16. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-01-01

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials

  17. Full system decontamination feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denault, R.P.; LeSurf, J.E.; Walschot, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Many chemical decontaminations have been performed on subsystems in light water reactors (BWRs and PWRs) but none on the full system (including the fuel) of large, (>500 MWe) investor owned reactors. Full system decontaminations on pressure-tubed reactors have been shown to facilitate maintenance, inspection, repair and replacement of reactor components. Further advantages are increased reactor availability and plant life extension. A conceptual study has been performed for EPRI (for PWRs) and Commonwealth Edison Co (for BWRs) into the applicability and cost benefit of full system decontaminations (FSD). The joint study showed that FSDs in both PWRs and BWRs, with or without the fuel included in the decontamination, are feasible and cost beneficial provided a large amount of work is to be done following the decontamination. The large amounts of radioactive waste generated can be managed using current technologies. Considerable improvements in waste handling, and consequent cost savings, can be obtained if new techniques which are now reaching commercial application are used. (author)

  18. Radioactive Decontamination by Strippable Paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantaraparprachoom, N.; Mishima, K.

    1998-01-01

    The strippable paint, one of the adhesion method, is to decontaminate solid surface of materials or/and a large area. Two kinds of specimen planchet, SUS 304 stainless steel and polycarbonate plastic, contaminated with radioactive 137 Cs were studied under various conditions. It included surface bottom types, the flat and convex concentric circle type, normal condition at room temperature and overheat condition (∼80 degree celsius). This method used coating paints which contains some elements to have a reaction with radioactive materials selectively. ALARA-Decon clear, Rempack-X200 clear, JD-P5-Mrs.Coat and Pro-Blue-color guard were selected to use as the coating paints. The contaminated surface was coated by the strippable paint under the optimum time, followed by peeling the paint seal. The Rempack-X200 showed the best result, the highest decontamination efficiency which are about 99-100% for all conditions of specimens. The JD-P5 and ALARA-Decon showed good results, which are 98-99% decontamination efficiency for the normal condition set of specimens and about 94-97% for the overheat set of specimens. They can decontaminate polycarbonate specimens better than stainless steel specimens. The Pro-Blue-color guard showed the lowest decontamination efficiency of which 60% for polycarbonate specimens at normal condition and 40%, 30% for stainless steel specimens at normal and overheat conditions respectively. There was no effects of surface bottom types significantly

  19. Comparison Extraction Rates by Supercritical CO2 Decontamination According to Elapsed Time after Heavy Metal Ions were Adsorbed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ken; Park, Kwang Heon

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increasing price of oil and coal and the tightening of regulations on greenhouse gases, nuclear power plants will become a more important source of electricity. Therefore, the number of nuclear power plants will constantly increase over the world. However, nuclear power plants have a disadvantage: they generate radioactive waste. Among radioactive waste, heavy metals in soil have a special feature: they change the form of contamination depending on the types and sizes of the soil. Therefore, diverse methods have to be used for decontamination. The current methods used for decontaminating heavy metals in soil are the electrokinetic method, the biodegradation method, and soil washing. Since soil washing in particular creates many secondary wastes, the cost of decontaminating soil has increased. In this case supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2 ) was used to reduce the secondary waste, and is expected to lower the cost as well

  20. Natural Frequencies of Wind Turbines on Monopile Foundations in Clayey Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Vahdatirad, Mohammadjavad; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive study is performed on the stiffness of a monopile foundation supporting an offshore wind turbine in undrained, over-consolidated clay having a spatial variation of the soil properties. The undrained shear strength is considered as a stochastic field with increasing mean value over...

  1. Chemical decontaminating method for stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive metal wastes comprising passivated stainless steels are chemically decontaminated to such a radioactivity level as that of usual wastes. The present invention for chemically decontaminating stainless steels comprises a first step of immersing decontaminates into a sulfuric acid solution and a second step of immersing them into an aqueous solution prepared by adding oxidative metal salts to sulfuric acid, in which a portion of the surface of stainless steels as decontaminates are chemically ground to partially expose substrate materials and then the above-mentioned decontamination steps are applied. More than 90% of radioactive materials are removed in this method by the dissolution of the exposed substrate materials and peeling of cruds secured to the surface of the materials upon dissolution. This method is applicable to decontamination of articles having complicate shapes, can reduce the amount of secondary wastes after decontamination and also remarkably shorten the time required for decontamination. (T.M.)

  2. Precipitation process for supernate decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-11-01

    A precipitation and adsorption process has been developed to remove cesium, strontium, and plutonium from water-soluble, high-level radioactive waste. An existing waste tank serves as the reaction vessel and the process begins with the addition of a solution of sodium tetraphenylborate and a slurry of sodium titanate to the contained waste salt solution. Sodium tetraphenylborate precipitates the cesium and sodium titanate adsorbs the strontium and plutonium. The precipitate/adsorbate is then separated from the decontaminated salt solution by crossflow filtration. This new process offers significant capital savings over an earlier ion exchange process for salt decontamination. Chemical and small-scale engineering studies with actual waste are reported. The effect of many variables on the decontamination factors and filter performance are defined

  3. A scaffold easy to decontaminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourek, D.

    1992-01-01

    The conventional scaffold used in the assembling work and in revisions of technological facilities at nuclear power plants has many drawbacks. The most serious of them are a high amount of radioactive waste arising from the decontamination (planing) of the floor timber and from the discarding of damaged irreparable parts, and a considerable corrosion of the carbon steel supporting structure after the decontamination. A detailed description is given of a novel scaffold assembly which can be decontaminated and which exhibits many assets, in particular a good mechanical resistance (also to bad weather), a lower weight, and the use of prepreg floor girders for the construction of service platforms or scaffold bridges which can readily be assembled from the pressed pieces in a modular way. (Z.S.). 4 figs., 4 refs

  4. Chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method for chemical decontamination of radioactive metal waste materials contaminated with radioactive materials on the surface, generated in radioactive materials-handling facilities. The invention is comprised of a method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel, characterized by comprising a first process of immersing a stainless steel-based metal waste material contaminated by radioactive materials on the surface in a sulfuric acid solution and second process of immersing in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing metal salt, in which a portion of the surface of the stainless steel to be decontaminated is polished mechanically to expose a portion of the base material before the above first and second processes. 1 figs., 2 tabs

  5. History of decontamination after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Takashi; Onodera, Hideaki; Morishita, Satoru; Kato, Sei

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude 9.0 earthquake (the Great East Japan Earthquake) hit Japan on March 11, 2011 brought tsunami hazard as well as a nuclear accident in addition to the seismic hazard. A wide area of the eastern Japan was contaminated by radioactive materials released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. In response to the unprecedented situation of the radioactive pollution after the accident, the Act on Special Measures Concerning the Handling of Radioactive Pollution was enacted in August 2011. The Ministry of the Environment (MOE) has formulated a set of guidelines by the end of 2011 to provide information on how to store and manage contaminated waste. In addition, the MOE established 'The Policies for the Decontamination of Specific Areas (Decontamination Roadmap)' in January 2012. As a result, the radiation dose rate has decreased by approximately 46% in the residential area of Naraha town. The MOE will have been promoting decontamination and construction of interim storage facilities which are able to store and manage the removed soils and incineration ashes generated from decontamination works. (author)

  6. In situ radio-frequency heating for soil remediation at a former service station: case study and general aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huon, G.; Simpson, T.; Maini, G. [Ecologia Environmental Solutions Ltd., Sittingbourne, Kent (United Kingdom); Holzer, F.; Kopinke, F.D.; Roland, U. [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Environmental Engineering, Leipzig (Germany); Will, F. [Total UK, Watford (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    In situ radio-frequency heating (ISRFH) was successfully applied during remediation of a former petrol station. Using a three-electrode array in combination with extraction wells for soil vapor extraction (SVE), pollution consisting mainly of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and mineral oil hydrocarbons (in total about 1100 kg) was eliminated from a chalk soil in the unsaturated zone. Specially designed rod electrodes allowed selective heating of a volume of approximately 480 m{sup 3}, at a defined depth, to a mean temperature of about 50 C. The heating drastically increased the extraction rates. After switching off ISRFH, SVE remained highly efficient for some weeks due to the heat-retaining properties of the soil. Comparison of an optimized regime of ISRFH/SVE with conventional ''cold'' SVE showed a reduction of remediation time by about 80 % while keeping the total energy consumption almost constant. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Detection of superparamagnetic particles in soils developed on basalts using frequency- and amplitude-dependent magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, H.; Petrovsky, E.; Kapicka, A.

    2016-12-01

    In rock, soil and environmental studies dealing with magnetic methods, the frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility (κFD%) is parameter generally accepted as a tool for identification of ultrafine superparamagnetic (SP) particles. This parameter became an indicator of pedogenic magnetic fraction (increased pedogenesis). Despite the number of studies using this parameter, knowledge about threshold values of κFD% is not clear enough and this parameter may be misinterpreted. Moreover, in strongly magnetic soils, magnetic signal of the SP (mostly pedogenic) minerals may be masked by dominant lithological signal, carried by coarse-grain mineral fraction; therefore, influence of pedogenesis is hard to detect. The aim of this contribution is to compare results in determination of ultrafine SP magnetic particles in soils determined using different instruments: (a) Bartington MS2B dual-frequency meter, and (b) more sensitive AGICO Kappameter MFK1-FA. The values of the κFD % obtained by the Bartington MS2B varied from 0.9 to 5.8% (mass-specific magnetic susceptibility from 119 to 1533 × 10-8 m3/kg) while the AGICO MFK1-FA varied from 3.7 to 8.2% (mass-specific magnetic susceptibility from 295 to 1843 × 10-8 m3/kg). Although both instruments suggest significant portion of SP magnetic particles, the results can't be interpreted using the generally accepted threshold values based on Bartington data. However, our results suggest that relation between the mass-specific magnetic susceptibility and κFD% along whole soil profile may serve as suitable tool in discriminating between lithogenic and pedogenic control of magnetic fraction in the soil profile. Moreover, we propose new concept of identification of SP particles, based on field-dependent magnetic susceptibility. Its behaviour shows distinct features with significant change at amplitudes of about 100 A/m. Below this value, susceptibility decreases with increasing amplitude, reflecting saturation of magnetization due

  8. Control of soil moisture with radio frequency in a photovoltaic-powered drip irrigation system

    OpenAIRE

    DURSUN, Mahir; ÖZDEN, Semih

    2015-01-01

    Solar-powered irrigation systems are becoming increasingly widespread. However, the initial setup costs of these systems are very high. To reduce these costs, both the energy usage and the prevention of losses from irrigation systems are very important. In this study, a drip irrigation control system of 1000 dwarf cherry trees was controlled using soil moisture sensors in order to prevent excessive water consumption and energy losses in a solar-powered irrigation system. The control sys...

  9. A study on the decontamination of the gravels contaminated by uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ukryang; Kim, Gyenam; Kim, Seungsoo; Moon, Jaikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The amount of gravels contaminated by uranium is usually about 10% of the contaminated soil. Since such contaminated gravels show different kinds and volumes, it would cost a considerable amount of money if they are to be disposed of without going through any special process. Also, there has not been any particular way or technology for processing the gravels contaminated by uranium. Therefore, various fundamental experiments and researches have been carried out for the decontamination of the gravels contaminated by uranium. Through such experiments and researches, it has been possible to obtain some significant results. The acid cleaning process, which is based on the application of the soil cleaning method, can be regarded as one of the major ways used for decontamination. When the gravels contaminated by uranium are cleaned as they are, most of them tend to show an extremely-low level of decontamination. Therefore, it could be said that the inside of each gravel is also contaminated by uranium. As a result, the gravels contaminated by uranium need to be crushed before being cleaned, which would result in a higher level of efficiency for decontamination compared to the previous way. Therefore, it is more effective to crush the subject gravels before cleaning them in terms of decontamination. However, such test results can only be applied to the gravels contaminated by an average level of uranium concentration. Regarding the gravels showing a higher level of uranium concentration than the average, it is still necessary to carry out more researches. Therefore, this study focused on the level of efficiency for decontamination after the contaminated gravels were crushed before being cleaned, in order to find a way to effectively dispose of the gravels contaminated by high-concentration uranium and secure a high level of efficiency for decontamination. In order to decontaminate the gravels which were contained in the soil contaminated by uranium and showed a higher

  10. Japan, one year after. In Fukushima, a decontamination by forced march

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leglu, D.; Mulot, R.; Khalathari, A.; Lafon, B.; Stanley, T.; Linton, M.

    2012-01-01

    In a first part, the author describes how people living in the contaminated area around Fukushima try to deal with the difficult and almost impossible decontamination of their houses, gardens, schools, and so on. The destruction of forests is planned as they concentrate radioactivity. Thousands of inhabitants must wear dosimeters. An article comments the caesium activity measurements. Several data and figures are presented: evacuation areas, radioactive emissions and releases, doses received by emergency personnel, size of areas to be decontaminated, impact on the Japanese energy sector, contamination rates for soils and seawater, decontamination and dismantling costs, health impacts. An article proposes an overview of the different methods which are implemented and tested by the Japanese for large scale decontamination

  11. Phytoremediation of Soil Trace Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytoremediation includes several distinct approaches to using plants to achieve soil remediation goals. Phytoextraction uses rare hyperaccumulator plants to accumulate in their shoots enough metals per year to achieve decontamination goals. Phytomining uses hyperaccumulators and biomass burn to pro...

  12. ORNL decontamination and decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A program has been initiated at ORNL to decontaminate and decommission surplus or abandoned nuclear facilities. Program planning and technical studies have been performed by UCC-ND Engineering. A feasibility study for decommissioning the Metal Recovery Facility, a fuel reprocessing pilot plant, has been completed

  13. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Barkovsky, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Decontamination was carried out in an area with three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Bryansk region, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a controlled cleaning is undertake...

  14. Decontaminating reagents for radioactive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    A decontaminating reagent composition has been developed comprising EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid, and formic acid. Formic acid inhibits the decomposition of both EDTA and citric acid, and yields oxalic acid as a result of its own radiolysis. The invention includes the improvement of initially incorporating formic acid in the mixture and maintaining the presence of formic acid by at least one further addition

  15. Nuclear reactor vessel decontamination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    There is disclosed in the present application, a decontamination system for reactor vessels. The system is operatable without entry by personnel into the contaminated vessel before the decontamination operation is carried out and comprises an assembly which is introduced into the vertical cylindrical vessel of the typical boiling water reactor through the open top. The assembly includes a circular track which is centered by guideways permanently installed in the reactor vessel and the track guides opposed pairs of nozzles through which water under very high pressure is directed at the wall for progressively cutting and sweeping a tenacious radioactive coating as the nozzles are driven around the track in close proximity to the vessel wall. The whole assembly is hoisted to a level above the top of the vessel by a crane, outboard slides on the assembly brought into engagement with the permanent guideways and the assembly progressively lowered in the vessel as the decontamination operation progresses. The assembly also includes a low pressure nozzle which forms a spray umbrella above the high pressure nozzles to contain radioactive particles dislodged during the decontamination

  16. Radioactive decontamination through UV laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Gastaud, M.; Sentis, M.; Uteza, O.; Marine, W.; Thouvenot, P.; Alcaraz, J.L.; Le Samedy, J.M.; Blin, D.

    2003-01-01

    A device allowing the radioactive decontamination of metal surfaces through the use of a pulsed UV laser has been designed and tested. This device is composed of a 1 kW excimer laser linked to a bundle of optic fibers and of a system to recover particles and can operate in active zones. Metal surfaces have the peculiarities to trap radio-elements in a superficial layer of oxide that can be eaten away by laser radiation. Different contaminated metals (stainless steels, INCONEL and aluminium) issued from the nuclear industry have been used for the testing. The most important contaminants were 60 Co, 137 Cs, 154-155 Eu and 125 Sb. The ratio of decontamination was generally of 10 and the volume of secondary wastes generating during the process was very low compared with other decontamination techniques. A decontamination speed of 1 m 2 /h has been reached for aluminium. The state of the surface is an important parameter because radio-elements trapped in micro-cracks are very difficult to remove. (A.C.)

  17. Pipe and hose decontamination apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    A pipe and hose decontamination apparatus is disclosed using freshly filtered high pressure Freon solvent in an integrated closed loop to remove radioactive particles or other contaminants from items having a long cylindrical geometry such as hoses, pipes, cables and the like. The pipe and hose decontamination apparatus comprises a chamber capable of accomodating a long cylindrical work piece to be decontaminated. The chamber has a downward sloped bottom draining to a solvent holding tank. An entrance zone, a cleaning zone and an exit drying zone are defined within the chamber by removable partitions having slotted rubber gaskets in their centers. The entrance and exit drying zones contain a horizontally mounted cylindrical housing which supports in combination a plurality of slotted rubber gaskets and circular brushes to initiate mechanical decontamination. Solvent is delivered at high pressure to a spray ring located in the cleaning zone having a plurality of nozzles surrounding the work piece. The solvent drains into a solvent holding tank located below the nozzles and means are provided for circulating the solvent to and from a solvent cleaning, distilling and filter unit

  18. Radiocesium decontamination of a riverside in Fukushima, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikiori, Tatsuhiro; Suzuki, Satoshi

    2017-10-01

    Extensive decontamination measures have been implemented in the area affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear disaster. Typical decontamination measures, such as removing topsoil of several centimeters in depth, are not suitable for rivers where contaminated sediments have been deposited. A decontamination measure was tested that considered the spatial distribution of radiocesium at the lower part of a tributary of the Abukuma River in Fukushima. The radiocesium distribution in the flood channel was vertically and horizontally highly heterogeneous. In some parts, the activity concentration was high (>10 kBq/kg for 137 Cs) even at depths of 25 cm in the sediment. This may be due to plant growth in the flood channel favoring the deposition of sediment with high activity concentration. On the basis of the radiocesium distribution, the flood channel sediment was removed to a depth of 15-35 cm, which accumulated the most radiocesium (>3.0 kBq/kg for the sum of 134 Cs and 137 Cs). The upper 5 cm of soil was removed from the dike slopes. The river bed was not decontaminated because the activity concentration was low (decontamination measure reduced the air dose rate by a factor of approximately two, demonstrating the effectiveness of our measures. Annual external doses were calculated for when this part of the dike and the flood channel is used for commuting to school and outdoor education. The doses during the activities at the test site accounted for only 1-2% of the value during daily life in the surrounding area, indicating that radiation exposure during riverside activities is limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-06-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  20. Decontamination in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsipov, G.V.; Matveenko, S.A.; Mirkhaidarov, A.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    To continue the decontamination work in the Republic of Belarus, which was carried out by the military troops, the state specialized enterprises were formed in Gomel and Mogilev in 1991. The organization and regulations were developed inside the country: instructions, rules, radiological and hygienic criteria and norms. The enterprises concentrated on decontamination of the most socially significant facilities: kindergartens, schools, medical institutions and industrial enterprises. During 9 years Gomel State Specialized Enterprise 'Polessje' decontaminated 130 kindergartens, schools and hospitals. The total decontaminated area was 450 000 m 2 . The ventilation systems and equipment at 27 industrial enterprises in Gomel were decontaminated. The practical decontamination methods for areas, buildings, roofs, industrial equipment, ventilation systems were developed and tested. The special rules for handling wastes contaminated with Cs were elaborated. The paper analyzes and sums up the acquired experience which is important for implementation of rehabilitation programs and improvement of decontamination methods. (author)

  1. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  2. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.

    1994-08-16

    Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100{degrees} to 400{degrees}C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C.

  3. Solidification of metal oxide from electrokinetic-electrodialytic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination technology reduced 80% of the concentration of the uranium soil waste to below the concentration of self-disposal. After conducting electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination, more than 10% of the remainder of radioactive waste from the cathodes of electrokinectic-electrodialytic equipment were produced. To dispose of such waste, it is necessary to solidify second radioactive waste owing to the requirements of radioactive waste from public corporations. In this study, a solidification experiment was carried out using a polymer. At first, a sampling of second radioactive waste was conducted. Then, second radioactive waste and a polymer were mixed. Third, the solidified state between the second radioactive waste and polymer was checked. In our next study, an experiment for the requirements of a public radioactive waste corporation will be conducted.

  4. Biofilm mediated decontamination of pollutants from the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we highlight beneficial use of microbial biofilms in remediation of environmental pollutants by bioremediation. Bioremediation is an environment friendly, cost effective, sustainable technology that utilizes microbes to decontaminate and degrade a wide variety of pollutants into less harmful products. Relative to free-floating planktonic cells, microbes existing in biofilm mode are advantageous for bioremediation because of greater tolerance to pollutants, environmental stress and ability to degrade varied harsh pollutants via diverse catabolic pathways. In biofilm mode, microbes are immobilized in a self-synthesized matrix which offers protection from stress, contaminants and predatory protozoa. Contaminants ranging from heavy metals, petroleum, explosives, pesticides have been remediated using microbial consortia of biofilms. In the industry, biofilm based bioremediation is used to decontaminate polluted soil and groundwater. Here we discuss conventional and newer strategies utilizing biofilms in environmental remediation.

  5. RMDF leach-field decontamination. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, J.W.; Marzec, J.M.; Stelle, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the decontamination effort was to place the Radioactive Materials Disposal Facility (RMDF) leach field in a condition suitable for release for unrestricted use. Radioactively contaminated soil was excavated from the leach field to produce a condition of contamination as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The contaminated soil was boxed and shipped to an NRC-licensed burial site at Beatty, Nevada, and to the DOE burial site at Hanford, Washington. The soil excavation project successfully reduced the contamination level in the leach field to background levels, except for less than 0.6 mCi of Sr-90 and trace amounts of Cs-137 that are isolated in cracks in the bedrock. The cracks are greater than 10 ft below the surface and have been sealed with a bituminous asphalt mastic. A pathways analysis for radiation exposure to humans from the remaining radionuclides was performed, assuming intensive home gardening, and the results show that the total first year whole body dose equivalent would be about 0.1 mrem/year. This dose equivalent is a projection for the hypothetical ingestion of vegetables grown on the site. Assuming that an average adult consumes 64 kg of green leafy vegetables per year and that the entire yearly supply could be grown on the site, the amount of ingested Sr-90 and Cs-137 is calculated to be 1100 pCi/year and 200 pCi/year. This ingested quantity would produce a total first year whole body dose equivalent of 0.10 mrem, using the accepted soil-to-plant transfer factors of 0.0172 and 0.010 for Sr-90 and Cs-137, respectively. The whole body dose equivalent exposure value of 0.1 mrem/year is far below the tentative limit established by NRC of 5 mrem/year for areas released for unrestricted use

  6. Few apparent short-term effects of elevated soil temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation on the abundance and taxonomic diversity of desert soil micro- and meso-fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, B.J.; Neher, D.A.; Housman, D.C.; Belnap, J.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent hydration and drying of soils in arid systems can accelerate desert carbon and nitrogen mobilization due to respiration, microbial death, and release of intracellular solutes. Because desert microinvertebrates can mediate nutrient cycling, and the autotrophic components of crusts are known to be sensitive to rapid desiccation due to elevated temperatures after wetting events, we studied whether altered soil temperature and frequency of summer precipitation can also affect the composition of food web consumer functional groups. We conducted a two-year field study with experimentally-elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation in the Colorado Plateau desert, measuring the change in abundance of nematodes, protozoans, and microarthropods. We hypothesized that microfauna would be more adversely affected by the combination of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than either effect alone, as found previously for phototrophic crust biota. Microfauna experienced normal seasonal fluctuations in abundance, but the effect of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation was statistically non-significant for most microfaunal groups, except amoebae. The seasonal increase in abundance of amoebae was reduced with combined elevated temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation compared to either treatment alone, but comparable with control (untreated) plots. Based on our findings, we suggest that desert soil microfauna are relatively more tolerant to increases in ambient temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than the autotrophic components of biological soil crust at the surface.

  7. Separation of radiocaesium in soil using electric osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Yoshinori; Satou, Yukihiko; Sueki, Keisuke; Nakatani, Kiyoharu

    2012-01-01

    The environmental soil in central east Japan had been contaminated with radioactive nuclide by the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident. The contaminated soil has been a target for decontamination work. In this work, we attempted to decontaminate in soil using an electroendosmose phenomenon which applied direct-current in soil include heavy metals such as cadmium and nickel. We performed which the rates of migrations for non-radioactive Cs in bentonite were measured with ICP-MS and for radioactive Cs in soil were measured germanium semiconductor detector, respectively. It is obtained which performance of separation was achieved 85-90% of decontamination rate in varied bentonite with the concentration of caesium nitrate solution. However, it was found slightly decontamination from contaminated Fukushima soil. We were obtained which it was hardly the movement of Cs in actual soil. It will improve the method for Cs movement in an actual soil and consider the mechanism of Cs adsorption in bentonite and soil. (author)

  8. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Sachito; Murayama, Kazunari; Yoshida, Hirohisa; Igei, Shigemitsu; Izumida, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  9. Non-destructive decontamination of building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Josef; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    For nondestructive radiation decontamination of surfaces it is necessary to use varnishes, such as ARGONNE, DG1101, DG1108, etc. This text evaluates the use of manufactured strippable coatings for radiation decontamination. To evaluate decontamination capability of such coatings the following varnishes were selected and subsequently used: AZ 1-700 and AXAL 1807S. The varnishes were tested on different building materials surfaces contaminated by short-term radioisotopes of Na-24 or La-140, in water soluble or water insoluble forms. Decontamination quality was assessed by the decontamination efficiency value, defined as the proportion of removed activity to the applied activity. It was found that decontamination efficiency of both used varnishes depends not only on the form of contaminant, but in the case of application of AXAL 1807S varnish it also depends on the method of its application on the contaminated surface. The values of the decontamination efficiency for AZ1-700 varnish range from 46% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 98% for the decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. The decontamination efficiency values determined for AXAL 1807S varnish range from 48% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 96% for decontamination of an insoluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. Comparing these values to the values given for the decontaminating varnishes we can conclude that AXAL 1807S varnish is possible to use on all materials, except highly porous materials, such as plasterboard or breeze blocks, or plastic materials. AZ 1-700 varnish can be used for all dry materials except plasterboard.

  10. Identification of hydrologic and geochemical pathways using high frequency sampling, REE aqueous sampling and soil characterization at Koiliaris Critical Zone Observatory, Crete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraetis, Daniel, E-mail: moraetis@mred.tuc.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, 73100 Chania (Greece); Stamati, Fotini; Kotronakis, Manolis; Fragia, Tasoula; Paranychnianakis, Nikolaos; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, 73100 Chania (Greece)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Identification of hydrological and geochemical pathways within a complex watershed. > Water increased N-NO{sub 3} concentration and E.C. values during flash flood events. > Soil degradation and impact on water infiltration within the Koiliaris watershed. > Analysis of Rare Earth Elements in water bodies for identification of karstic water. - Abstract: Koiliaris River watershed is a Critical Zone Observatory that represents severely degraded soils due to intensive agricultural activities and biophysical factors. It has typical Mediterranean soils under the imminent threat of desertification which is expected to intensify due to projected climate change. High frequency hydro-chemical monitoring with targeted sampling for Rare Earth Elements (REE) analysis of different water bodies and geochemical characterization of soils were used for the identification of hydrologic and geochemical pathways. The high frequency monitoring of water chemical data highlighted the chemical alterations of water in Koiliaris River during flash flood events. Soil physical and chemical characterization surveys were used to identify erodibility patterns within the watershed and the influence of soils on surface and ground water chemistry. The methodology presented can be used to identify the impacts of degraded soils to surface and ground water quality as well as in the design of methods to minimize the impacts of land use practices.

  11. Development and assessment of two decontamination processes: closed electropolishing system for decontamination of underwater surfaces -vibratory decontamination with abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides, E.; Fajardo, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two decontamination processes have been developed to decontaminate the stainless steel components of nuclear power plants. The first process uses an underwater closed electropolishing system for the decontamination of large stainless steel surfaces in flooded systems without loss of electrolyte. Large underwater contaminated areas can be treated with an electropolishing head covering an area of 2 m 2 in one step. The decontamination factors achieved with this technique range between 100 and 1000. The second process consists in the decontamination of nuclear components using vibratory equipment with self-cleaning abrasives generating a minimum quantity of waste. This technique may reach contamination factors similar to those obtained with other abrasive methods (brush abrasion, abrasive blasting, etc...). The obtained decontamination factors range between 5 and 50. Only a small quantity of waste is generated, which is treated and reduced in volume by filtration and evaporation

  12. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  13. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  14. Controlling Hospital-Acquired Infection: Focus on the Role of the Environment and New Technologies for Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY There is increasing interest in the role of cleaning for managing hospital-acquired infections (HAI). Pathogens such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), multiresistant Gram-negative bacilli, norovirus, and Clostridium difficile persist in the health care environment for days. Both detergent- and disinfectant-based cleaning can help control these pathogens, although difficulties with measuring cleanliness have compromised the quality of published evidence. Traditional cleaning methods are notoriously inefficient for decontamination, and new approaches have been proposed, including disinfectants, steam, automated dispersal systems, and antimicrobial surfaces. These methods are difficult to evaluate for cost-effectiveness because environmental data are not usually modeled against patient outcome. Recent studies have reported the value of physically removing soil using detergent, compared with more expensive (and toxic) disinfectants. Simple cleaning methods should be evaluated against nonmanual disinfection using standardized sampling and surveillance. Given worldwide concern over escalating antimicrobial resistance, it is clear that more studies on health care decontamination are required. Cleaning schedules should be adapted to reflect clinical risk, location, type of site, and hand touch frequency and should be evaluated for cost versus benefit for both routine and outbreak situations. Forthcoming evidence on the role of antimicrobial surfaces could supplement infection prevention strategies for health care environments, including those targeting multidrug-resistant pathogens. PMID:25278571

  15. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  16. Chemical decontamination of reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, R.; Berthold, H.O.

    1977-08-01

    A solution for the decontamination of reactor components of the primary system was developed. This solution is a modification of the APAC- (Alkaline Permanganate Ammonium Citrate) system described in the literature. The most important advantage of the present solution over the APAC-method is that it does not induce any selective corrosion attack on materials like stainless steel (austenitic), Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiation decontamination of poultry viscera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamdar, S.N.; Harikumar, P.

    2008-01-01

    Application of gamma radiation for decontamination of poultry viscera was examined. Exposure to a dose of 20 kGy rendered the viscera sterile ( 10 cycles, respectively, eliminating the coliforms to o C) produced enhanced levels of TVBN and TCA soluble products accompanied by higher drip loss. Activities of proteolytic enzymes, except acid protease, did not show any significant change during post-irradiation storage at either temperature

  18. Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental soil surveys in each province of Austria have been performed, soils of about 5,000 sites were described and analyzed for nutrients and pollutants, the majority of these data are recorded in the soil information system of Austria (BORIS) soil database, http://www.ubavie.gv.at/umweltsituation/boden/boris), which also contains a soil map of Austria, data from 30 specific investigations mainly in areas with industry and results from the Austria - wide cesium investigation. With respect to the environmental state of soils a short discussion is given, including two geographical charts, one showing which sites have soil data (2001) and the other the cadmium distribution in top soils according land use (forest, grassland, arable land, others). Information related to the soil erosion, Corine land cover (Europe-wide land cover database), evaluation of pollutants in soils (reference values of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, Pb, Tl, Va, Zn, AOX, PAH, PCB, PCDD/pcdf, dioxin), and relevant Austrian and European standards and regulations is provided. Figs. 2, Tables 4. (nevyjel)

  19. Inhibiting Inosine Hydrolase and Alanine Racemase to Enhance the Germination of Bacillus anthracis Sterne Spores: Potential Spore Decontamination Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-19

    decontamination strategies>> Maryline DEFEZ 1𔃼, Melissa HUNTER3J Susan WELKOS :~J Christopher COTE3 1 University Grenoble-Alpes, Grenoble, France. 1...inosine hydrolase and alanine racemase to enhance the germination of Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores potential spore decontamination strategies 5a...8217 • Accidentally in Humans • Natural reservoir is soil • Anthrax Disease Cycle: - animals infected by soilborne spores in food and water or bites from certain

  20. Chemical decontamination and melt densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.L.; Griggs, B.; Kemper, R.S.; Nelson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary studies on the chemical decontamination and densification of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel undissolved residues remaining after dissolution of the UO 2 --PuO 2 spent fuel material from sheared fuel bundles are reported. The studies were made on cold or very small samples to demonstrate the feasibility of the processes developed before proceeding to hot cell demonstrations with kg level of the sources. A promising aqueous decontamination method for Zr alloy cladding was developed in which oxidized surfaces are conditioned with HF prior to leaching with ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. Feasibility of molten salt decontamination of oxidized Zircaloy was demonstrated. A low melting alloy of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel was obtained in induction heated graphite crucibles. Segregated Zircaloy cladding sections were directly melted by the inductoslag process to yield a metal ingot suitable for storage. Both Zircaloy and Zircaloy--stainless steel--Inconel alloys proved to be highly satisfactory getters and sinks for recovered tritium

  1. ORO scrap metal decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jugan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has approximately 80,000 tons of contaminated scrap metal at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio; and the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio. After unsuccessful in-house attempts to eliminate/recycle the contaminated metal, DOE is allowing private enterprise the opportunity to participate in this program. DOE is making this opportunity available under a two-phase approach, which is being supported by two separate and corresponding Request for Proposals. Phase I, which is nearing completion, is a demonstration phase to establish a group of companies that the DOE will consider qualified to eliminate the scrap at one or more sites. In Phase I, the companies decontaminated 25-50 tons of scrap to demonstrate capabilities to DOE and to gain the knowledge required to plan/bid on elimination of the scrap at one or more sites. Phase II will request proposals for elimination of the total scrap at one or more of the above noted sites. Multiple awards for Phase II are also anticipated. Companies participating in Phase II will be required to take title to the contaminated scrap and decontaminate/process the scrap for beneficial reuse. Radioactive wastes and metal that cannot be successfully decontaminated/processed will be returned to DOE

  2. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. New techniques available for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, J.R.; Cochaux, C.

    1996-01-01

    As nuclear industry dismantling operations become more widespread, one naturally sees the growth of specific needs in decontamination techniques. In this paper, the authors present two applications involving the decategorization of wastes from dismantling. Decategorization means using decontamination to transform the wastes into a lower, and thus cheaper, category. The first application is in decategorizing large mild steel pipes, which come from the stage decommissioning of the G2/G3 graphite gas reactors at Marcoule. A large number of these pipes (4000 t) have been contaminated by deposits and encrustations of 60 Co (95%) and 137 Cs (5%) to the extent of 200 Bq/cm 2 . The objective was to avoid having to store them on surface sites for 300 yr. This is achieved by decontaminating them to a level that enables the metal to be reused. The other application involves stainless steel waste cut into small sections, which comes from the stage decommissioning of a radiometallurgy laboratory (RM2) at Fontenay aux Roses. This waste was not acceptable to the surface storage center due to high levels of alpha contamination. A decategorization technique has been developed for part of the 13 tonnes of waste concerned, which avoids the need for it to be disposed of in extremely costly geologic repositories

  4. Specific decontamination methods: water nozzle, cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulitrop, D.; Gauchon, J.P.; Lecoffre, Y.

    1984-05-01

    The erosion and decontamination tests carried out in the framework of this study, allowed to specify the fields favourable to the use of the high pressure jet taking into account the determinant parameters that are the pressure and the target-nozzle distance. The previous spraying of gels with chemical reagents (sulfuric acid anf hydrazine) allows to get better decontamination factors. Then, the feasibility study of a decontamination method by cavitation erosion is presented. Gelled compounds for decontamination have been developed; their decontamination quality has been evaluated by comparative contamination tests in laboratory and decontamination tests of samples of materials used in nuclear industry; this last method is adapted to remote handling devices and produces a low quantity of secondary effluents, so it allows to clean high contaminated installation on the site without additional exposure of the personnel [fr

  5. Decontamination of polyvinylchloride- and rubber type flooring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.

    1975-01-01

    These types, fabricated by mixing of the basic components, showed no relation between content of fillers and decontamination results. Decontamination results are partly poorer, if the flooring contains a high concentration of the filler, especially if the latter consists mainly of hydrophilic materials. The coloring of the floorings seems to have no influence on the decontamination but floorings with clearly separated patterns can not be recommended for nuclear facilities. Fabricated by chemical reactions between polymeres, vulcanization materials and fillers, the decontamination results depend definitely from the proper choice of the filler. Flooring types, containing lampblack, graphite, kaoline, barium sulfate and titanium oxide are easy to decontamine. Again, increasing contents of hydrophilic filler cause a fall off in the decontamination results. (orig.) [de

  6. Decontamination of burns contaminated with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vykouril, L.

    1986-01-01

    The suitability of various solutions for the decontamination of burnt skin and their efficiency were tested by experiments on rats. Tested was the decontamination of undisturbed skin, second degree skin burns and third degree skin burns. Decontamination solutions used included: distilled water, jodonal (an aqueous solution of iodine, ethoxylated nonylphenols, the copolymer of ethylene oxide with propylene oxide, and phosphoric acid) and a decontamination mixture of Sapon, Komplexon (trade names of detergents) and sodium hexametaphosphate. Decontamination efficiency was 68.4% for second degree burns and 47.1% for third degree burns. Most effective was the decontamination solution with an efficiency of 72%; the efficiency of jodonal was 67% and of water - 54%. Jodonal is the most suitable: in addition, it acts as a disinfectant and antiseptic. (M.D.)

  7. EDF/CIDEN - ONECTRA: PWR decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Orcel, H.; Wertz, L.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of PWR circuit renewal (expected in 2011) and their decontamination, an analysis of data coming from cartography and on site decontamination measurements as well as from premise modelling by means of the PANTHERE radioprotection code, is presented. Several French PWRs have been studied. After a presentation of code principles and operation, the authors discuss the radiological context of a workstation, and give an assessment of the annual dose associated with maintenance operations with or without decontamination

  8. Fluxes of radionuclides in the agricultural production after a nuclear accident: countermeasures and decontamination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, A.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis deals with the radiological consequences of a nuclear accident through the radioactive contamination of the food chain and the subsequent countermeasures for decreasing the fluxes of radionuclides and decontaminating agricultural lands. After a brief summary of the radioprotection ground and context in case of a nuclear accident, this work surveys existing data on the fluxes of radionuclides in soils and from soil to plants. The research work focuses on both the prediction of the fluxes of radionuclides and possible countermeasures: the measurement of the bioavailability of radionuclides in the soil solution, its use in a mathematical expression to quantify the soil-to-plant transfer of caesium and strontium, and the perspectives of an innovative technique of soil decontamination. The obtained results show that based on 4 coefficients, it is possible to predict crop contamination within a 3 % confidence interval: the fluid solid distribution coefficient of radionuclides kd, the amount of chemical analogues of caesium and strontium, i.e. potassium and calcium, respectively, soil pH and a constant characterising the plant species that is concerned. However, it generally appears from soil to plant transfer studies that the reduction of the fluxes of radionuclides is not a promising way of radiological exposure mitigation after a nuclear accident. The work performed shows that it is more efficient to tackle the source of the contamination, i.e. decontaminate the soil. The proposed technique of soil scraping using a turf harvester appears to be the most advantageous among the tested options, for the decontamination of peat-bog meadows. (author)

  9. Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2001-01-01

    For Austria there exists a comprehensive soil data collection, integrated in a GIS (geographical information system). The content values of pollutants (cadmium, mercury, lead, copper, mercury, radio-cesium) are given in geographical charts and in tables by regions and by type of soil (forests, agriculture, greenland, others) for the whole area of Austria. Erosion effects are studied for the Austrian region. Legal regulations and measures for an effective soil protection, reduction of soil degradation and sustainable development in Austria and the European Union are discussed. (a.n.)

  10. Screening for the next generation heavy metal hyperaccumulators for dryland decontamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravanbakhsh, Mohammadhossein; Ronaghi, Abdol Majid; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen; Jousset, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal removal by plants bears a great potential to decontaminate soils. A major challenge remains to find plant species that accumulate heavy metal, harbor a sufficient biomass and grow in the desired environmental conditions. Here we present candidate plants for phytoremediation in arid

  11. Properties and solidification of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.; Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.

    1983-01-01

    LWRs will require one or more chemical decontaminations to achieve their designed lifetimes. Primary system decontamination is designed to lower radiation fields in areas where plant maintenance personnel must work. Chemical decontamination methods are either hard (concentrated chemicals, approximately 5 to 25 weight percent) or soft (dilute chemicals less than 1 percent by weight). These methods may have different chemical reagents, some tailor-made to the crud composition and many methods are and will be proprietary. One factor common to most commercially available processes is the presence of organic acids and chelates. These types of organic reagents are known to enhance the migration of radionuclides after disposal in a shallow land burial site. The NRC sponsors two programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory that are concerned with the management of decontamination wastes which will be generated by the full system decontamination of LWRs. These two programs focus on potential methods for degrading or converting decontamination wastes to more acceptable forms prior to disposal and the impact of disposing of solidified decontamination wastes. The results of the solidification of simulated decontamination resin wastes will be presented. Recent results on combustion of simulated decontamintion wastes will be described and procedures for evaluating the release of decontamination reagents from solidified wastes will be summarized

  12. Method for decontaminating radiation metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Akio; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a method for decontaminating radiation metal waste characterized by the following properties: in order to decontaminate radiation metal waste of various shapes produced by facilities involved with radioactive substances, non-complex shapes are decontaminated by electropolishing the materials in a neutral saline solution. Complex shapes are chemically decontaminated by means of an acid solution containing permanganic acid or an alkaline solution and a mineral acid solution. After neutralizing the solutions used for chemical decontamination, the radioactive material is separated and removed. Further, in the decontamination method for radioactive metal waste, a supernatant liquid is reused as the electrolyte in electropolishing decontamination. Permanganic ions (MnO 4 - ) are reduced to manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) and deposited prior to neutralizing the solution used for chemical decontamination. Once manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) has been separated and removed, it is re-used as the electrolyte in electropolishing decontamination by means of a process identical to the separation process for radioactive substances. 3 figs

  13. Proceedings of the concrete decontamination workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halter, J.M.; Sullivan, R.G.; Currier, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen papers were presented. These papers describe concrete surface removal methods and equipment, as well as experiences in decontaminating and removing both power and experimental nuclear reactors

  14. Local mat-forming cyanobacteria effectively facilitate decontamination of radioactive cesium in rice fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shigeru; Okumura, Hiroshi; Inagaki, Masayo; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Ito, Tetsuo; Furukawa, Michio

    2015-01-01

    The most effective and widespread method to decontaminate radioactive cesium from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster was peeling topsoil. But the method had problems, such as large amounts of discarded soil and large-scale work. In nature, cyanobacteria formed biomats on the ground surface and facilitated peeling topsoil when the biomats dried. The cyanobacteria-facilitating peeling decontamination method utilized these cyanobacterial properties. Cyanobacteria are located all over Japan and 'local' cyanobacteria could be used for decontamination without introducing new species. Utilizing cyanobacteria could decrease the amount of discarded soil to about 30% and downsize the execution-scale to individual locations. Cyanobacterial biomats were easily cultivated, especially in rice fields, by maintaining wet conditions and exposure to 100 - 83% solar radiation. Shading by a thin net was helpful in maintaining an environment suitable for cyanobacteria. Nowadays, to prevent uptake of radioactive cesium into rice, K + is usually added to fertilizer in rice fields. The K + fertilization in rice fields might also enhance cyanobacterial capture of radioactive cesium, because high concentrations of K + enhanced cyanobacterial uptake of Cs + . Cyanobacteria could also mitigate the risk of radioactive cesium moving away from a decontaminating rice field. Therefore, the cyanobacteria-facilitating peeling decontamination method was proposed as an easy and safe 'D.I.Y.' method for both farmers and the environment. Besides, plowing rice fields with water before peeling improved the efficiency of this method, because plowing increased the radioactive cesium concentration in the topsoil. (author)

  15. Report on the Decontamination Site Tour in Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knezevic, Z.; Miljanic, S.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Milkovic, D; Osvay, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of Japanese-Croatian scientific-technical cooperation, our team visited Minamisoma city in Fukushima prefecture, Japan on Dec 3, 2012. The visit was organized for the foreign participants at the 8th International Workshop on Ionizing Radiation Monitoring held in Oarai, Japan. Minamisoma city is about 25 kilometres north from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. The city belonged to the evacuation zone and most of the residents were forced to leave immediately after the accident in 2011. In spring 2012 most of the people were able to return to their homes since dose rates were less than 20 mSv/y, the standard that Japanese government set as a temporary maximum radiation limit. Recently, a project of 'Decontaminating the Living Areas in Minamisoma City' was established. Enormous job has been carried out at the decontamination site (washing the houses, collection of soil, cutting trees, collecting the waste, etc). However, according to some experts, the cost-benefit effect of applied radiation protection principle is questionable. Our team with other participants visited one decontamination site and one temporary waste disposal site. After that a Satellite Meeting entitled 'What can be done for the reconstruction of Fukushima' was organized. In the discussion special attention was given to the public information and communication considering well known fear from radiation and its influence to the future of nuclear power program.(author)

  16. Gamma exposure rate reduction and residual radium-226 concentrations resulting from decontamination activities conducted at the former uranium millsite in Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hans, J.M. Jr.; Hurst, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma radiation surveys and residual radium 226 soil samples were taken as part of the decontamination activities of the former Shiprock uranium mill site in New Mexico. In order to facilitate the decontamination activities, the mill site and its contaminated environs were divided into 6 major areas. Extensive data are presented in 2 appendices of the pre- and post-decontamination gamma ray exposure rates made on mill site, and of radium 226 concentrations in surface soil samples. A training program established on the mill site by the Navajo Engineering and Construction Authority is described

  17. Effects of ground surface decontamination on the air radiation dose rate. Results of a decontamination trial at a playground lot in a Fukushima residential area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency decontaminated schools, playgrounds, swimming pools, and houses in nonevacuated, less-contaminated areas in Fukushima for environmental restoration. A small, 150 m 2 playground lot in the residential area was chosen for decontamination demonstration, which used routinely available tools and commodities to carry out the work. The surfaces of playground lot equipment, such as swings, slides, and horizontal iron bars, were completely decontaminated by brushing with water and/or detergent. Side gutters around the playground lot were cleaned by removing the mud and then brushed and washed with a high-pressure water jet (7 MPa). The air dose rate at the playground lot was dominated by radiation from the ground surface and adjacent surroundings, such as apartments and rice fields. Two or three centimeters of the surface soil contaminated with cesium was removed manually with shovels, hoes, and other gardening tools. This significantly reduced the average air dose rate of the entire playground lot from 1.5 μSv/h before decontamination to 0.6 μSv/h. These results showed that ground surface decontamination can contribute measurably to the reduction in air dose rate in relatively small areas in residential areas. (author)

  18. Decontamination of surfaces (1961); La decontamination des surfaces (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestre, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The continued expansion of atomic Energy has led the S.C.R.G.R. to extend simultaneously the recovery of materials contaminated by use in radio-active media. The importance of this aspect of atomic Energy was not immediately obvious to those concerned but is now fully recognized due to the cost of the materials and installations, and also to the time required for the construction of special equipment for the C.E.A. Another very important reason is the dangers associated with the handling of contaminated material. The S.C.R.G.R. attacked this problem from the point of view of these dangers. It later became apparent to the users, once the decontamination methods had proved their worth, that the process presented advantages from the material and cost-saving point of view. (author) [French] Le developpement toujours croissant de l'Energie atomique a conduit le S.C.R.G.R. a developper parallelement la recuperation des materiels contamines par leur emploi en milieu radioactif. Cet aspect de l'Energie atomique n'est pas apparu des le debut aux utilisateurs mais s'est tres vite impose etant donne, d'une part, le cout des installations et du materiel, d'autre part le temps necessaire a la fabrication d'un materiel special aux travaux du C.E.A., enfin et surtout, les risques associes a la manipulation d'un materiel contamine. Les risques seuls ont ete pris comme point de depart a l'examen de ce probleme par le S.C.R.G.R. puis avec le temps, les methodes de decontamination ayant fait leur preuve, les utilisateurs ont alors apercu les aspects materiels et la rentabilite de la decontamination. (auteur)

  19. Electrodialytic Remediation of Soil Polluted with Copper from Wood Preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Henrik; Laursen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    The principle of electrodialytic soil remediation was tested in six experiments on a copper polluted loamy sand. It was possible to decontaminate from 1360 to below 40 mg of Cu/kg of dry soil......The principle of electrodialytic soil remediation was tested in six experiments on a copper polluted loamy sand. It was possible to decontaminate from 1360 to below 40 mg of Cu/kg of dry soil...

  20. Decontaminating agents and decontamination processes for nuclear industry and for plant demolition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination of surfaces of materials in nuclear facilities or in nuclear power plants under demolition can be carried out successfully if surface treatment is performed by dipping or in an ultrasonic bath by alternating between alkaline and acid baths with intermediate rinsing in demineralized water. Decontaminating aluminium surfaces sensitive to corrosion requires further treatment in an ultrasonic bath, after the first 2 ultrasonic baths, with a weak alkaline decontaminating agent. This applies alike to components to be decontaminated for re-use and parts of materials to be disposed of. The decontamination action depends on the surfaces either being free from corrosion or else showing pronounced corrosion. (orig.)

  1. Decontamination of latex gloves; Decontamination de gants en latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutot, P; Schipfer, P; Blachere, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1969-07-01

    Initially the latex gloves used in controlled zones were processed after use as radioactive waste. In view of the continually increasing number used, however, the persons in charge of the SPRAR have considered the possibility of decontaminating the gloves and using them again after control. The recovery installations which have been developed were initially designed rather crudely and operated irregularly; they have been progressively improved as a result of the experience acquired; today they are more really an industrial concern, equipped with automatic machinery. In 1967 it has been possible with this set-up to recover 247000 pairs of gloves, representing nearly 70 per cent of the number treated. (author) [French] Initialement, les gants de latex utilises dans les zones controlees etaient conditionnes apres emploi comme dechets radioactifs. Mais, devant l'augmentation sans cesse croissante des quantites employees, les responsables du SPRAR ont envisage leur decontamination et leur recyclage apres controles. Les installations de recuperation mises au point, de conception artisanale et fonctionnant de maniere episodique au depart, se sont progressivement ameliorees au fur et a mesure de l'experience acquise; elles revetent aujourd'hui le caractere d'une exploitation industrielle equipee de machines automatiques. En 1967, ces nouvelles installations ont permis de recuperer 247000 paires de gants, ce qui represente pres de 70 pour cent des quantites traitees. (auteur)

  2. Radiation decontamination of frozen chicks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Akhtar, T.; Sattar, A.; Khan, I.

    1992-07-01

    In this report decontamination of frozen chicken has been discussed. The pathogenic bacteria present in poultry meats causes food infectious diseases. The spoilage microorganisms in poultry meat quickly render the meat unacceptable due to decomposition of the products resulting in off-odour and development of slime. Irradiation (2-5 kGy) and freezing has been found effective in eliminating various pathogens. These combination treatments were tested in local environment. The results indicated that radiation followed by freezing greatly protected quality of poultry meat during storage for 6 months. (A.B.)

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1982-11-01

    This bibliography contain information on decontamination and decommissioning included in the Department of Energy's Data Base from January 1981 through October 1982. The abstracts are grouped by subject category. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: corporate author, personal author, subject, contract number, and report umber. (468 abstracts)

  4. Chemical decontamination process and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Hitoshi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a process and a device for chemical decontamination, which can suppress corrosion of low corrosion resistant materials, keep decontamination properties substantially as same as before and further, reduce the volume of secondary wastes. In a step of reductively melting oxide membranes on an objective material to be decontaminated, a mixture of oxalic acid and a salt thereof is used as a reducing agent, and the reductive melting is conducted while suppressing hydrogen ion concentration of an aqueous liquid system. In order to enhance the reducibility of the oxalic acid ions, it is desirable to add a cyclic hetero compound thereto. The device of the present invention comprises, a decontamination loop including a member to be decontaminated, a heater and a pH meter, a medical injection pump for injecting a reducing agent to the decontamination loop, a metal ion recovering loop including an ion exchange resin tower, a reducing agent decomposing loop including an electrolytic vessel and/or a UV ray irradiation cell, a circulation pump for circulating the decontamination liquid to each of the loops and a plurality of opening/closing valves for switching the loop in which the decontamination liquid is circulated. (T.M.)

  5. INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities performed during FY98 and describes the planned activities for FY99. Accomplishments for FY98 include identifying and selecting decontamination, the screening of potential characterization technologies, development of minimum performance factors for the decontamination technology, and development and identification of Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Regulations (ARARs).

  6. Decontamination around the site of Chernobylsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manesse, D.; Rzepka, J.P.; Maubert, H.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the decontamination of the site around the nuclear plant of Chernobylsk after the reactor accident of 1986. The work of decontamination in urban areas, buildings, fields and vegetation are detailed. The interventions to reduce the contamination of surface waters and to protect ground waters are also given. (N.C.)

  7. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL's Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused

  8. The 3rd power unit roofing decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Yu.N.; Golubev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The most features of the 3rd power unit (PU) roofing decontamination are described: 1) the most active materials were thrown into the 4th PU ruins before the Ukrytie construction completion; 2) the decontamination was fulfilled using remote-controlled mechanisms and manual devices (the main part). 6 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Testing and evaluation of eight decontamination chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.

    1994-09-01

    This report covers experimental work comparing eight different decontamination chemicals. Seven of these chemicals have some novelty, or are not currently in use at the ICPP. The eighth is a common ICPP decontamination reagent used as a baseline for effective comparison. Decontamination factors, waste generation values, and corrosion rates are tabulated for these chemicals. Recommendations are given for effective methods of non-sodium or low-sodium decontamination chemicals. The two most effective chemical for decontamination found in these test were a dilute hydrofluoric and nitric acid (HF/HNO 3 ) mixture and a fluoroboric acid solution. The fluoroboric acid solution (1 molar) was by far the most effective decontamination reagent, but suffered the problem of generating significant final calcine volume. The HF/HNO 3 solution performed a very good decontamination of the SIMCON coupons while generating only small amounts of calcine volume. Concentration variables were also tested, and optimized for these two solutions. Several oxidation/reduction decon chemical systems were also tested. These systems were similar to the TURCO 4502 and TURCO 4521 solutions used for general decontamination at the ICPP. A low sodium alternative, nitric acid/potassium permanganate, to the ''high sodium'' TURCO 4502 was tested extensively, optimized and recommended for general ICPP use. A reductive chemical solution, oxalic acid/nitric acid was also shown to have significant advantages

  10. INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities performed during FY98 and describes the planned activities for FY99. Accomplishments for FY98 include identifying and selecting decontamination, the screening of potential characterization technologies, development of minimum performance factors for the decontamination technology, and development and identification of Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Regulations (ARARs)

  11. Recent developments in chemical decontamination technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Chemical decontamination of parts of reactor coolant systems is a mature technology, used routinely in many BWR plants, but less frequently in PWRs. This paper reviews recent developments in the technology - corrosion minimization, waste processing and full system decontamination, including the fuel. Earlier work was described in an extensive review published in 1990.

  12. PND fuel handling decontamination: facilities and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, R.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The use of various decontamination techniques and equipment has become a critical part of Fuel Handling maintenance work at Ontario Hydro's Pickering Nuclear Division. This paper presents an overview of the set up and techniques used for decontamination in the PND Fuel Handling Maintenance Facility and the effectiveness of each. (author). 1 tab., 9 figs

  13. Decontamination manual of RI handling laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadachi, Yoshiki

    2004-01-01

    Based on experiences in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), the essential and practical knowledge of radioactive contamination and its decontamination, and the method and procedure of floor decontamination are described for researcher and managing person in charge of handling radioisotopes (RI) in RI handling laboratories. Essential knowledge concerns the uniqueness of solid surface contamination derived from RI half lives and quantities, surface contamination density limit, and mode/mechanism of contamination. The principle of decontamination is a single conduct with recognition of chemical form of the RI under use. As the practical knowledge, there are physical and chemical methods of solid surface decontamination. The latter involves use of inorganic acids, chelaters and surfactants. Removal and replacement of contaminated solid like floor material are often effective. Distribution mapping of surface contamination can be done by measuring the radioactivity in possibly contaminated areas, and is useful for planning of effective decontamination. Floor surface decontamination is for the partial and spread areas of the floor. It is essential to conduct the decontamination with reagent from the highly to less contaminated areas. Skin decontamination with either neutral detergent or titanium oxide is also described. (N.I.)

  14. [Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWA's) are diverse in nature; volatile acute low-molecular-weight toxic compounds, chemical warfare agents (CWA's, gaseous choking and blood agents, volatile nerve gases and blister agents, nonvolatile vomit agents and lacrymators), biological toxins (nonvolatile low-molecular-weight toxins, proteinous toxins) and microbes (bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae). In the consequence management against chemical and biological terrorism, speedy decontamination of victims, facilities and equipment is required for the minimization of the damage. In the present situation, washing victims and contaminated materials with large volumes of water is the basic way, and additionally hypochlorite salt solution is used for decomposition of CWA's. However, it still remains unsolved how to dispose large volumes of waste water, and the decontamination reagents have serious limitation of high toxicity, despoiling nature against the environments, long finishing time and non-durability in effective decontamination. Namely, the existing decontamination system is not effective, nonspecifically affecting the surrounding non-target materials. Therefore, it is the urgent matter to build up the usable decontamination system surpassing the present technologies. The symposiast presents the on-going joint project of research and development of the novel decontamination system against CBWA's, in the purpose of realizing nontoxic, fast, specific, effective and economical terrorism on-site decontamination. The projects consists of (1) establishment of the decontamination evaluation methods and verification of the existing technologies and adaptation of bacterial organophosphorus hydrolase, (2) development of adsorptive elimination technologies using molecular recognition tools, and (4) development of deactivation technologies using photocatalysis.

  15. PND fuel handling decontamination: facilities and techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, R Y [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The use of various decontamination techniques and equipment has become a critical part of Fuel Handling maintenance work at Ontario Hydro`s Pickering Nuclear Division. This paper presents an overview of the set up and techniques used for decontamination in the PND Fuel Handling Maintenance Facility and the effectiveness of each. (author). 1 tab., 9 figs.

  16. Project gnome decontamination and decommissioning plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    The document presents the operational plan for conducting the final decontamination and decommissioning work at the site of the first U.S. nuclear detonation designed specifically for peaceful purposes and the first underground event on the Plowshare Program to take place outside the Nevada Test Site. The plan includes decontamination and decommissioning procedures, radiological guidelines, and the NV concept of operations

  17. Chemically reducing decontamination method for radioactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Sato, Hitoshi.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of electrolytically reducing radioactive metal wastes, then chemically dissolving the surface thereof with a strong acid decontaminating solution. This method utilizes dissolving characteristics of stainless steels in the strong acid solution. That is, in the electrolytic reduction operation, a portion of the metal wastes is brought into contact with a strong acid decontaminating solution, and voltage and current are applied to the portion and keep it for a long period of time so as to make the potential of the immersed portion of the metal wastes to an active soluble region. Then, the electrolytic reduction operation is stopped, and the metal wastes are entirely immersed in the decontaminating solution to decontaminate by chemical dissolution. As the decontaminating solution, strong acid such as sulfuric acid, nitric acid is used. Since DC current power source capacity required for causing reaction in the active soluble region can be decreased, the decontamination facility can be minimized and simplified, and necessary electric power can be saved even upon decontamination of radioactive metal wastes made of stainless steels and having a great area. Further, chemical dissolution can be conducted without adding an expensive oxidizing agent. (N.H.)

  18. Cost effectiveness of dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.; Weyman, G.D.

    The basic principles of dilute chemical decontamination are described, as well as the method of application. Methods of computing savings in radiation dose and costs are presented, with results from actual experience and illustrative examples. It is concluded that dilute chemical decontamination is beneficial in many cases. It reduces radiation exposure of workers, saves money, and simplifies maintenance work

  19. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA's hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R ampersand D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required

  20. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  1. Estimation and characterization of decontamination and decommissioning solid waste expected from the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Stratton, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose of the study was to estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant is decontaminated and decommissioned. (Building structure and soil are not covered.) Results indicate that ∼5,500 m 3 of solid waste is expected to result from the decontamination and decommissioning of the Pu Finishing Plant. The breakdown of the volumes and percentages of waste by category is 1% dangerous solid waste, 71% low-level waste, 21% transuranic waste, 7% transuranic mixed waste

  2. Comparison of skin decontamination efficacy of commercial decontamination products following exposure to VX on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thors, L; Koch, M; Wigenstam, E; Koch, B; Hägglund, L; Bucht, A

    2017-08-01

    The decontamination efficacy of four commercially available skin decontamination products following exposure to the nerve agent VX was evaluated in vitro utilizing a diffusion cell and dermatomed human skin. The products included were Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), the Swedish decontamination powder 104 (PS104), the absorbent Fuller's Earth and the aqueous solution alldecontMED. In addition, various decontamination procedures were assessed to further investigate important mechanisms involved in the specific products, e.g. decontamination removal from skin, physical removal by sponge swabbing and activation of degradation mechanisms. The efficacy of each decontamination product was evaluated 5 or 30 min after dermal application of VX (neat or diluted to 20% in water). The RSDL-lotion was superior in reducing the penetration of VX through human skin, both when exposed as neat agent and when diluted to 20% in water. Swabbing with the RSDL-sponge during 2 min revealed decreased efficacy compared to applying the RSDL-lotion directly on the skin for 30 min. Decontamination with Fuller's Earth and alldecontMED significantly reduced the penetration of neat concentration of VX through human skin. PS104-powder was insufficient for decontamination of VX at both time-points, independently of the skin contact time of PS104. The PS104-slurry (a mixture of PS104-powder and water), slightly improved the decontamination efficacy. Comparing the time-points for initiated decontamination revealed less penetrated VX for RSDL and Fuller's Earth when decontamination was initiated after 5 min compared to 30 min post-exposure, while alldecontMED displayed similar efficacy at both time-points. Decontamination by washing with water only resulted in a significant reduction of penetrated VX when washing was performed 5 min after exposure, but not when decontamination was delayed to 30 min post-exposure of neat VX. In conclusion, early initiated decontamination with the

  3. Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, Helen C; Richardson, Patricia R; Campbell, Gaynor A; Jones, Anita C; Baxter, Robert L; Kovalev, Valeri I; Maier, Robert; Barton, James S; DeLarge, Greg; Casey, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The development of methods for measuring the efficiency of gas-plasma decontamination has lagged far behind application. An approach to measuring the efficiency of protein removal from solid surfaces using fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin and epifluorescence scanning (EFSCAN) is described. A method for fluorescently labelling proteins, which are adsorbed and denatured on metal surfaces, has been developed. Both approaches have been used to evaluate the efficiency of radio frequency (RF) gas-plasma decontamination protocols. Examples with 'real' surgical instruments demonstrate that an argon-oxygen RF gas-plasma treatment can routinely reduce the protein load by about three orders of magnitude beyond that achieved by current decontamination methods.

  4. NRC regulations and positions concerning decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, C.

    1982-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission encourages the use of decontamination to reduce man-rem exposure. The Commission feels that there are several processes developed to the point where soft decontamination can be applied to an entire plant in the near future. A utility can do a decontamination under its own licence without coming in for regulatory review if the process does not involve a change in technical specifications for the plant or does not involve unreviewed safety questions. Prior verbal notification is required for some steam generator secondary side cleaning or for decontamination of individual components that have not been removed from the reactor using chemicals not normally added to the reactor coolant. Prior written notification is required for steam generator secondary side crevice cleaning or sludge removal at a dented unit, or for chemical decontamination of reactor coolant systems or safety-related systems using chemicals not normally added to the coolant

  5. Distribution Of 15N Fertilizer Added To Sandy Soil Under Drip Irrigation System As Affected By Irrigation Frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GADALLA, A.M.; GALAL, Y.G.M.; EL-GENDY, R.W.; ISMAIL, M.M.; EL-DEGWY, S.M.; KASSAB, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron moisture meter and stable nitrogen isotope ( 15 N) were used to follow horizontal and vertical water movement and N-fertilizer added to soil before and after irrigation. The data indicated that soil moisture distribution and values of total hydraulic potential depend on soil moisture content. Characterization of nitrogen in soil for all sites around the emitter indicated spatial variability with different soil depths due to leaching and volatilization processes. Moreover, water movement and flow direction greatly were characterized by active evaporation depth which was 30 cm.

  6. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

    2007-06-01

    The originative CO 2 pellet blasting equipment was developed by improving additional components such as feed screw, idle roller and air-lock feeder to clear up the problems of freezing and discontinuity of blasting and by adopting pneumatically operated vacuum suction head and vacuum cup to prevent recontamination by collecting contaminant particulates simultaneously with the decontamination. The optimum decontamination process was established according to the kind of materials such as metal, concrete and plastic and the type of contaminants such as particulate, fixed chemical compound and oil. An excellent decontamination performances were verified by means of the lab-scale hot test with radioactive specimen and the technology demonstration in IMEF hot cell. The PFC dry decontamination equipment applicable to the surface contaminated with high radioactive particulate was developed. This equipment consists of the unit processes such as spray, collection, filtration and dry distillation designed originatively applicable to inside of dry hot cell. Through the demonstration of PFC spray decontamination process in IMEF hot cell, we secured on-site applicability and the decontamination efficiency more than 90 %. We investigated the characteristics of dismantled metal waste melting and the radionuclide(Co, Cs, U) distribution into ingot and slag by melting decontamination experiments using electric arc melter. We obtained the decontamination factors greater than 100 for Cs and of 10∼100 for uranium. The pilot scale(200 kg/batch) demonstration for melting decontamination was carried out successfully using high temperature melting facility at KAERI. The volume reduction factor of 1/7 and the economical feasibility of the melting decontamination were verified.

  7. Detection of the pedogenic magnetic fraction in volcanic soils developed on basalts using frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility: comparison of two instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Hana; Petrovsky, Eduard; Kapicka, Ales; Hanzlikova, Hana

    2017-05-01

    In studies of the magnetic properties of soils, the frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility percentage (χFD%) is often used for the identification of ultrafine magnetically superparamagnetic/stable single-domain (SP/SSD) particles. This parameter is commonly used as an indicator for increased pedogenesis. In strongly magnetic soils, the SP/SSD magnetic signal (mostly bio-pedogenic) may be masked by lithological signals; making pedogenesis hard to detect. In this study, we compare results for the detection of ultrafine SP/SSD magnetic particles in andic soils using two instruments: a Bartington MS2B dual-frequency meter and an AGICO Kappabridge MFK1-FA. In particular, the study focuses on the effect of pedogenesis by investigating the relationship between specific soil magnetic and chemical properties (soil organic carbon and pHH2O). The values of χFD% obtained with the MS2B varied from 2.4 to 5.9 per cent, and mass-specific magnetic susceptibility (χLF) from 283 to 1688 × 10-8 m3 kg-1, while values of χFD% and χLF obtained with the MFK1-FA varied from 2.7 to 8.2 per cent and from 299 to 1859 × 10-8 m3 kg-1, respectively. Our results suggest that the detection of the SP/SSD magnetic fraction can be accomplished by comparing relative trends of χFD% along the soil profile. Moreover, the discrimination between bio-pedogenic and lithogenic magnetic contributions in the SP/SSD fraction is possible by comparing the χFD% and χLF data determined in the fine earth (<2 mm) and the coarse fraction (4-10 mm) samples down the soil profile.

  8. Concrete decontamination and demolition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, T.S.

    1980-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Environmental Control Technology, requested Nuclear Energy Services to prepare a handbook for the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of DOE-owned and commercially-owned radioactive facilities. the objective of the handbook is to provide the nuclear industry with guidance on the state-of-the-art methods and equipment available for decommissioning and to provide the means to estimate decommissioning costs and environmental impact. The methods available for concrete decontamination and demolition are summarized to provide an overview of some of the state-of-the-art techniques to be discussed at this workshop. The pertinent information on each method will include the selection factors such as the rate of performance in terms of concrete removal per unit time (cubic yards per day), manpower required by craft, unit cost (dollars per cubic yard) and the advantages and disadvantages. The methods included in this overview are those that have been routinely used in nuclear and nonnuclear applications or demonstrated in field tests. These methods include controlled blasting, wrecking ball or slab, backhoe mounted ram, flame torch, thermic lance, rock splitter, demolition compound, sawing, core stitch drilling, explosive cutting, paving breaker and power chisel, drill and spall, scarifying, water cannon and grinding

  9. Psychosocial considerations for mass decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemyre, L.; Johnson, C.; Corneil, W.

    2010-01-01

    Mass exposure to explosions, infectious agents, food-borne illnesses, chemicals or radiological materials may require mass decontamination that have critical psychosocial implications for the public and for both traditional and non-traditional responders in terms of impact and of response. Five main issues are common to mass decontamination events: (i) perception, (ii) somatisation, (iii) media role and communication, (iv) information sharing, (v) behavioural guidance and (vi) organisational issues. Empirical evidence is drawn from a number of cases, including Chernobyl; Goiania, Brazil; the sarin gas attack in Tokyo; the anthrax attacks in the USA; Three Mile Island; and by features of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome pandemic. In this paper, a common platform for mass casualty management is explored and suggestions for mass interventions are proposed across the complete event timeline, from pre-event threat and warning stages through to the impact and reconstruction phases. Implication for responders, health care and emergency infrastructure, public behaviour, screening processes, risk communication and media management are described. (authors)

  10. Decontamination liquid waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enda, Masami; Hosaka, Katsumi.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid wastes after electrolytic reduction are caused to flow through an anionic exchange membrane in a diffusion dialysis step, and liquid wastes and dialyzed water are passed in a countercurrent manner. Since acids in the liquid wastes transfer on the side of the dialyzed water due to the difference of concentration between the liquid wastes and the dialyzed water, acids can be easily recovered from the liquid wastes. If the acid-removed liquid wastes are put to electrodeposition in an electrodepositing step, the electrodepositing reactions between radioactive materials such as Co ion, Mn ion and leached metals such as Fe ions and Cr ions are caused preferentially to hydrogen generation reaction on a metal deposition cathode. Accordingly, metal ions can be easily separated from the liquid wastes. Since the separated liquid wastes are an aqueous solution in which cerium ions as a decontaminant and an acid at low concentration are dissolved, the concentration thereof is controlled by mixing them to acid recovering water after the diffusion dialysis and they can be reused as the decontaminant. (T.M.)

  11. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obi, C.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of 1996. CAU 254 was used primarily to perform radiological decontamination and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding soil within an existing perimeter fence. The site was used to decontaminate nuclear rocket test-car hardware and tooling from the early 1960s through the early 1970s, and to decontaminate a military tank in the early 1980s. The site characterization results indicate that, in places, the surficial soil and building materials exceed clean-up criteria for organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides. Closure activities are expected to generate waste streams consisting of nonhazardous construction waste. petroleum hydrocarbon waste, hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Some of the wastes exceed land disposal restriction limits and will require off-site treatment before disposal. The recommended corrective action was revised to Alternative 3- ''Unrestricted Release Decontamination, Verification Survey, and Dismantle Building 3126,'' in an addendum to the Correction Action Decision Document

  12. Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1997-01-01

    OAK A271 Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996. The Rockwell International Hot Laboratory (RIHL) is one of a number of former nuclear facilities undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The RIHL facility is in the later stages of dismantlement, with the final objective of returning the site location to its original natural state. This report documents the decontamination and dismantlement activities performed at the facility over the time period 1988 through 1996. At this time, the support buildings, all equipment associated with the facility, and the entire above-ground structure of the primary facility building (Building 020) have been removed. The basement portion of this building and the outside yard areas (primarily asphalt and soil) are scheduled for D and D activities beginning in 1997

  13. Personnel protective equipment total-encapsulating suit decontamination study using shower systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menkhaus, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report documents an experimental evaluation, conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, of a shower-based decontamination station for personnel wearing a Level A, total- encapsulating, chemical-protective suit. The decontamination station is used by personnel when egressing a dry, dusty environment contaminated with transuranic radionuclides. This system has the potential to minimize the risk of spreading the contaminants to clean areas. Two types of shower systems were evaluated, a drench shower and a multi-nozzle shower. A total-encapsulating suit, worn by personnel. was contaminated with soil containing 239 Pu. Pre- shower and post-shower contamination samples were collected and visual observations were made to evaluate the ability of the shower system to remove the contaminated dust and to obtain baseline data useful in designing a shower-based personnel decontamination system. 12 figs., 7 tabs

  14. Finding radiation hot-spots for a private residence/decontamination manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2012-01-01

    Since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, the radio-iodine and cesium analysis group of ad hoc committee of safety measures has investigated initial screening monitor of the soils and examined contamination and experienced decontamination works. Existence of hot-spots where Cs 137 is concentrated is confirmed. The report makes a manual to find such a hot-spot in a private residence and how the decontamination should be carried out. Particularly, the report provides the definite examples of hot-spots, for instances, a roof, an eaves trough (a gutter), a side drain (a ditch), dead leaves (withered grass), surface land, a wood block, etc. and how the decontamination should be confirmed and the dusts be collected and kept. (S. Ohno)

  15. Decontamination of Surfaces by Ultrasonics; La decontamination des surfaces par l'emploi des ultra-sons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerre, P; Mestre, E; Kerdelleau, J de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique. Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1962-07-01

    A study was made of factors such as frequency, intensity, and time in the case of steel and of cotton cloth contaminated by fission products. Results show that the method is only of value in the case of steel and that it is necessary to operate at an optimum frequency of 80 khz and with an intensity of at least 4 W/cm{sup 2}. The difficulty of proposing a valid explanation for the decontamination mechanism is discussed. (authors) [French] Apres un examen des donnees theoriques du probleme, les auteurs font une etude systematique des facteurs frequence, intensite et temps dans le cas de l'acier et des tissus de coton contamines par des produits de fission. Ils montrent que la methode n'est interessante que pour l'acier qu'il faut operer a la frequence optimale de 80 kHz avec une intensite d'au moins 4 W/cm{sup 2}. Ils concluent en insistant sur la difficulte de proposer une explication valable pour le mecanisme de decontamination. (auteurs)

  16. Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.A.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Riemath, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples

  17. Summary of decontamination cover manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, G.B.; Berry, H.W.

    1995-02-01

    Decontamination cover forming cracks and vent cup assembly leaks through the decontamination covers were early manufacturing problems. The decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield was as low as 55%. Applicable tooling and procedures were examined. All manufacturing steps from foil fabrication to final assembly leak testing were considered as possible causes or contributing factors to these problems. The following principal changes were made to correct these problems: (1) the foil annealing temperature was reduced from 1375 degrees to 1250 degrees C, (2) the decontamination cover fabrication procedure (including visual inspection for surface imperfections and elimination of superfluous operations) was improved, (3) the postforming dye penetrant inspection procedure was revised for increased sensitivity, (4) a postforming (prewelding) 1250 degrees C/1 h vacuum stress-relief operation was added, (5) a poststress relief (prewelding) decontamination cover piece-part leak test was implemented, (6) the hold-down fixture used during the decontamination cover-to-cup weld was modified, and concomitantly, and (7) the foil fabrication process was changed from the extruding and rolling of 63-mm-diam vacuum arc-remelted ingots (extrusion process) to the rolling of 19-mm-square arc-melted drop castings (drop cast process). Since these changes were incorporated, the decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield has been 91 %. Most importantly, more than 99% of the decontamination covers welded onto vent cup assemblies were acceptable. The drastic yield improvement is attributed primarily to the change in the foil annealing temperature from 1375 degrees to 1250 degrees C and secondarily to the improvements in the decontamination cover fabrication procedure

  18. Decontamination of large horizontal concrete surfaces outdoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, M.M.; Chester, C.V.

    1980-01-01

    A study is being conducted of the resources and planning that would be required to clean up an extensive contamination of the outdoor environment. As part of this study, an assessment of the fleet of machines needed for decontaminating large outdoor surfaces of horizontal concrete will be attempted. The operations required are described. The performance of applicable existing equipment is analyzed in terms of area cleaned per unit time, and the comprehensive cost of decontamination per unit area is derived. Shielded equipment for measuring directional radiation and continuously monitoring decontamination work are described. Shielding of drivers' cabs and remote control vehicles is addressed

  19. Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David Shane; Webber, Frank Laverne

    2001-07-01

    This report is a compilation of summary descriptions of Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Surveillance and Maintenance projects planned for inactive facilities and sites at the INEEL from FY-2002 through FY-2010. Deactivations of contaminated facilities will produce safe and stable facilities requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance pending further decontamination and decommissioning. Decontamination and decommissioning actions remove contaminated facilities, thus eliminating long-term surveillance and maintenance. The projects are prioritized based on risk to DOE-ID, the public, and the environment, and the reduction of DOE-ID mortgage costs and liability at the INEEL.

  20. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  1. Mechanical and chemical decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienhoefer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Decontamination does not mean more than a special technique of cleaning surfaces by methods well known in the industry. The main difference consists in the facts that more than just the visible dirt is to be removed and that radioactive contamination cannot be seen. Especially, intensive mechanical and chemical carry-off methods are applied to attack the surfaces. In order to minimize damages caused to the surfaces, the decontamination method is to adapt to the material and the required degree of decontamination. The various methods, their advantages and disadvantages are described, and the best known chemical solutions are shown. (orig./RW)

  2. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-15

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  3. Performance test of wet type decontamination device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. P.; Kim, E. G.; Min, D. K.; Jun, Y. B.; Lee, H. K.; Seu, H. S.; Kwon, H. M.; Hong, K.P.

    2003-01-01

    The intervention area located at rear hot cell can be contaminated by hot cell maintenance work. For effective decontamination of the intervention floor a wet type decontamination device was developed. The device was assembled with a brush rotating part, a washing liquid supplying part, an intake part for recovering contaminated liquid and a device moving cart part. The device was made of stainless steel for easy decontamination and corrosion resistance. The function test carried out at intervention area of the PIE facility showed good performance

  4. Foam process for application of decontamination agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.M.; Miller, J.R.; Frazier, R.S.; Walter, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the results and observations of a study performed by the authors to parametrically evaluate the performance characteristics of a foam process for application of decontamination agents. The initial tests were established to assess foam quality. Subsequent tests determined the ability of the foam as a carrier of chemical systems, and established system operating parameters. The technique was then applied in an actual decontamination task to verify effectiveness of these established parameters and to determine decontamination reduction factors. 4 figures, 5 tables

  5. Decontamination of CANDU primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettit, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Decontamination of radioactive systems is necessary to reduce personnel radiation exposures and also to reduce exposure during special work. Mechanical decontamination methods are sometimes useful, but most contaminated surfaces are inaccessible, so chemical decontamination often is preferred. The A-P Citrox method will remove most contaminants from CANDU systems, but is costly and long, damages components, and produces large quantities of radioactive liquid waste. The Redox cycling process is fast and inexpensive, produces only solid wastes, but removes small quantities of deposit from Monel only. The CAN-DECON process removes deposits from most materials including fuel cladding and has many other advantages. (author)

  6. Method of bituminization equipment decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexa, J.

    1982-01-01

    Overheated water vapour is fed into the contaminated area containing substances insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents. Prior to entry into the decontaminated area the vapour bubbles through the aqueous solution layer of suitable detergents and a layer of suitable organic solvent. In this process the distillation takes place of the solvent and the aerosols of the aqueous solution are carried away with the vapour stream, condense on the inner surface of the vessel and thus wash it. The condensate flows down the walls and in its place condense other fractions of pure solvent and the aqueous solution. The walls of the vessel are slowly heated and the liquid waste is discharged via a mud discharge pipe. (J.B.)

  7. Decontamination of Rooibostea by radurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzapfel, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The microbiological quality of a 'raw' agricultural commodity such as Rooibos tea is determined by a set of factors during harvesting and processing. Results suggest that a fermentation process takes place during processing, with members of the Enterobacteriaceae playing a dominant role. Against this background, as well as fluctuating hygienic conditions during processing, the high microbial population (10 7 to 5 x 10 8 /g) and even the possible presence of food-borne pathogens such as salmonellae, may be explaned. No real quarantee for the microbiological status of the product can be given, unless it is subjected to a terminal decontamination process (preferably after final packaging). Radurisation appears to be an ideal process for this purpose, and treatment at 8 kGy resulted in more than a 5000-fold (>99,9%) reduction of the microbial population. This was sufficient to eliminate all pathogens without harming the organoleptic quality of the product

  8. Archives decontamination by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratu, E.; Moise, I.V.; Cutrubinis, M.; Negut, D.C.; Virgolici, Marian

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of archives with gamma irradiation is an efficient and environmental friendly alternative for biological decontamination of large volume of archives. It substitutes the use of chemicals for conservation and contributes to safer workplaces. This work is targeting documents from recent archives where the value of information is not obsolete and may become an important historical and cultural testimony. For a successful treatment, an optimal absorbed dose has to be established. An excessive dose may damage papers and an insufficient one will not reduce bioburden to the desired level. An interdisciplinary team was performing various physical and chemical tests in order to evaluate deterioration of paper at high doses. In the case of natural disaster, it is not excluded the '' emergency '' treatment for documents in immediate danger of total destruction. (authors)

  9. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  10. Radioactive decontamination apparatus and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, O.L.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus for removing radioactive contamination from metal objects is disclosed, consisting of three of three separate pieces. The first is an electro- polishing tank, pump and filter assembly, ventilation duct and filter assembly, and DC power supply. The second is a rinse tank and a pump and filter assembly therefor. The third is a divot crane. The electro-polishing tank assembly and the rinse tank assembly are each separately mounted on pallets to facilitate moving. The filter systems of the electro-polishing tank and the rinse tank are designed to remove the radioactive contamination from the fluids in those tanks. Heavy items or highly contaminated items are handled with the divot crane constructed of stainless steel. The electro- polishing tank and the rinse tank are also made of stainless steel. The ventilation system on the electro- polishing tank exhausts acid fumes resulting from the tank heaters and the electro-polishing process. Inside the electro-polishing tank are two swinging arms that carry two stainless steel probes that hang down in the electrolyte fluid. These negative DC probes and are electrically isolated from the tank and the rest of the system. Across the top center of the tank is a copper pipe, which is also electrically isolated from the tank. This is the positive side of the DC system. To decontaminate a metal object, it is suspended from the positive copper pipe, with good electrical contact, into the electrolyte fluid. The negative probes are then moved on their swinging arms to a close proximity to the object being decontaminated, without making contact

  11. Effects of local-scale decontamination in a secondary forest contaminated after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayabe, Yoshiko; Hijii, Naoki; Takenaka, Chisato

    2017-09-01

    We investigated whether local-scale decontamination (removal of the litter layer, superficial soil layer, and understory) in a secondary forest contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident reduced 137 Cs contamination of the soil and litter. We also measured 137 Cs concentrations in plants and in the web-building spider Nephila clavata (Nephilidae: Arachnida), as an indicator species, to examine 137 Cs contamination in arthropods. One month after decontamination, the total 137 Cs contamination (soil + litter) was reduced by 20% (100 kBq·m -2 ) relative to that in an adjacent untreated (i.e., contaminated) area, which was however not statistically significant. Four months after decontamination, 137 Cs in the decontaminated area had increased to a level similar to those in the untreated area, and the air radiation dose in the decontaminated area was about 2.1 μSv·h -1 , significantly higher than that in the untreated area (1.9 μSv·h -1 ). This may have been attributed to a torrential rain event. Although no statistically significant reduction was observed, most spiders had a lower 137 Cs contamination than that before the decontamination. This implied that the decontamination may have reduced 137 Cs transfer from soil via litter to N. clavata through the detrital food chains, but may not have reduced the amount of 137 Cs transfer through grazing food chains because the concentration of 137 Cs in living tree leaves was not reduced by the decontamination. In autumn, about 2 kBq·m -2 of 137 Cs was supplied from foliage to the ground by litterfall. The results suggested that removal of the litter and superficial soil layers in a contaminated forest may be ineffective. The present study suggests that the local-scale decontamination in a secondary forest had no effect on the reduction of 137 Cs contamination in the treated area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Current status and problems of decontamination by municipalities in Fukushima Prefecture. Records from four and a half years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Kota

    2016-01-01

    This study discusses the current status and problems of decontamination by 52 municipalities out of 59 municipalities in Fukushima Prefecture, four and a half years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, mainly based on the results of a questionnaire survey. The area corresponds to in all municipalities except for the 7 whose entire administrative area has been designated as Special Decontamination Area. This study reveals that (1) the number of municipalities which planned, ordered and implemented decontamination work has peaked although decontamination work of public facilities, housing, roads, farmland and forests has been still carried out in many municipalities, (2) about half of the municipalities have not secured enough temporary storage sites for contaminated soil and waste, (3) many municipalities recognize that construction of interim storage facilities, transfer of contaminated soil and waste from each municipality to interim storage facilities, and maintenance of temporary storage sites are major challenges concerning decontamination work, (4) about half of the municipalities regard efforts concerning decontamination work by the national government and the Fukushima prefectural government office as inadequate, (5) not a few municipalities recognize that residents cannot live their lives with a sense of safety and security unless air radiation dose is reduced to the level before the accident, and (6) most municipalities recognize that safe living environments can be recovered by decontamination work. Finally, based on these results, this study points out early completion of interim storage facilities and development of conditions to maintain and manage temporary storage sites, the end of decontamination work based on the air radiation dose rate, and establishment of decontamination policies concerning forests, rivers and waterways, as main future challenges concerning decontamination work by municipalities. (author)

  13. Frequency, diversity and activity of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas spp. in Dutch take-all decline soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.; Weller, D.M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Natural suppressiveness of soils to take-all disease of wheat, referred to as take-all decline (TAD), occurs worldwide, It has been postulated that different microbial genera and mechanisms are responsible for TAD in soils from different geographical regions. In growth chamber experiments,,we

  14. Cost Savings through Innovation in Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancey, Neal A.

    2003-01-01

    /or safer. The technologies evaluated through the LSDDP have provided improvements in the following D and D areas: robotic underwater characterization of fuel storage pools, characterization of scrap metal for recycle, PCB and RCRA metals analysis in soil, water, paint, or sludge, subsurface characterization, personnel safety, waste disposal, scaffolding use, and remote radiation characterization of buildings and soil. It is estimated that the technologies demonstrated and deployed through this program will save more than $50 million dollars over the next 10 years at the INEEL alone. Of the $50 million estimated dollars saved, about 75% of the savings will come from characterization technologies, 11% from technologies associated with material dispositioning, 10% are associated with dismantlement technologies and the balance split between safety and decontamination

  15. Laboratory Experiment on Electrokinetic Remediation of Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed-Ali, Alya H.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is a method of decontaminating soil containing heavy metals and polar organic contaminants by passing a direct current through the soil. An undergraduate chemistry laboratory is described to demonstrate electrokinetic remediation of soil contaminated with copper. A 30 cm electrokinetic cell with an applied voltage of 30…

  16. Cs+ and Sr2+ adsorption selectivity of zeolites in relation to radioactive decontamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.W. Munthali

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are used as adsorbents of cationic elements in the radioactive decontamination process of water, soil and others. We determined Cs+ and Sr2+ adsorption selectivity of some zeolites to know effective zeolite species for the decontamination of radioactive Cs and Sr. A 30 mL mixed solution containing up to 15 mg L−1 of non-radioactive Cs+ or Sr+ and up to 0.50 M of Na+ or K+ was mixed with 0.5 g of Linde-type A, Na-P1, faujasite X, faujasite Y and mordenite. Among the zeolites, mordenite had the highest Cs+ adsorption selectivity, and the selectivity had no correlation to the cation exchange capacity (CEC of the zeolites. In contrast, Sr2+ adsorption selectivity of the zeolites positively correlated with the CEC of the zeolites; Linde-type A with the highest CEC showed the highest adsorption selectivity, and its adsorption rate was more than 99.9% even in the presence of 0.5 M K+. A simulated soil decontamination experiment of Cs from a Cs-retaining vermiculite by using mordenite and that of Sr from a Sr-retaining vermiculite by using Linde-type A showed decontamination rates of more than 90%.

  17. Cost studies of thermally enhanced in situ soil remediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremser, J.; Booth, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes five thermally enhanced technologies that may be used to remediate contaminated soil and water resources. The standard methods of treating these contaminated areas are Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE), Excavate ampersand Treat (E ampersand T), and Pump ampersand Treat (P ampersand T). Depending on the conditions at a given site, one or more of these conventional alternatives may be employed; however, several new thermally enhanced technologies for soil decontamination are emerging. These technologies are still in demonstration programs which generally are showing great success at achieving the expected remediation results. The cost savings reported in this work assume that the technologies will ultimately perform as anticipated by their developers in a normal environmental restoration work environment. The five technologies analyzed in this report are Low Frequency Heating (LF or Ohmic, both 3 and 6 phase AC), Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS), Radio Frequency Heating (RF), Radio Frequency Heating using Dipole Antennae (RFD), and Thermally Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES). In all of these technologies the introduction of heat to the formation raises vapor pressures accelerating contaminant evaporation rates and increases soil permeability raising diffusion rates of contaminants. The physical process enhancements resulting from temperature elevations permit a greater percentage of volatile organic compound (VOC) or semi- volatile organic compound (SVOC) contaminants to be driven out of the soils for treatment or capture in a much shorter time period. This report presents the results of cost-comparative studies between these new thermally enhanced technologies and the conventional technologies, as applied to five specific scenarios

  18. Disposal of decontaminated salts at the Savannah River Plant by solidification and burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukes, M.D.; Wolf, H.C.; Langton, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current plan for disposal of waste salt at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) is to immobilize the decontaminated salt solution by mixing with cement and SRP soil, and bury the resulting grout (saltstone) in a landfill. The grout which contains 37.8 wt % salt solution, 22.8 wt % Portland I-P cement, and 39.2 wt % SRP soil, was specially formulated to have a low permeability ( -10 cm/sec). This material will be mixed and placed in trenches. After setting, the saltstone will be covered with a clay cap, and an overburden of compacted native soil will be replaced. 6 references

  19. Method of processing decontaminating liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusaka, Ken-ichi

    1989-01-01

    When decontaminating liquid wastes are processed by ion exchange resins, radioactive nuclides, metals, decontaminating agents in the liquid wastes are captured in the ion exchange resins. When the exchange resins are oxidatively deomposed, most of the ingredients are decomposed into water and gaseous carbonic acid and discharged, while sulfur ingredient in the resins is converted into sulfuric acid. In this case, even less oxidizable ingredients in the decontaminating agent made easily decomposable by oxidative decomposition together with the resins. The radioactive nuclides and a great amount of iron dissolved upon decontamination in the liquid wastes are dissolved in sulfuric acid formed. When the sulfuric acid wastes are nuetralized with sodium hydroxide, since they are formed into sodium sulfate, which is most popular as wastes from nuclear facilities, they can be condensated and solidified by existent waste processing systms to thereby facilitate the waste processing. (K.M.)

  20. Method of decontaminating radioactive-contaminated instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Fujii, Masaaki; Kitaguchi, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safety processing of liquid wastes by recovering radioactive metal ions remaining in the electrolytes after the decontamination procedure thereby decreasing the radioactivity. Method: In a decontamination tank containing electrolytes consisting of diluted hydrochloric acid and diluted sulfuric acid, are provided a radioactive contaminated instrument connected to an anode and a collector electrode made of stainless steel connected to a cathode respectively. Upon applying electrical current, the portion of the mother material to be decontaminated is polished electrolytically into metal ions and they are deposited as metal on the collection electrode. After completion of the decontamination, an ultrasonic wave generator is operated to strip and remove the oxide films. Thereafter, the anode is replaced with the carbon electrode and electrical current is supplied continuously, whereby the remaining metal ions are deposited and recovered as the metal on the collection electrode. (Yoshino, Y.)