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Sample records for frequency response measurements

  1. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.; Christophersen, Jon P.; Motloch, Chester G.

    2013-01-08

    Methods of rapidly measuring an impedance spectrum of an energy storage device in-situ over a limited number of logarithmically distributed frequencies are described. An energy storage device is excited with a known input signal, and a response is measured to ascertain the impedance spectrum. An excitation signal is a limited time duration sum-of-sines consisting of a select number of frequencies. In one embodiment, magnitude and phase of each frequency of interest within the sum-of-sines is identified when the selected frequencies and sample rate are logarithmic integer steps greater than two. This technique requires a measurement with a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. In another embodiment, where selected frequencies are distributed in octave steps, the impedance spectrum can be determined using a captured time record that is reduced to a half-period of the lowest frequency.

  2. Newton algorithm for fitting transfer functions to frequency response measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, J. T.; Mingori, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the problem of synthesizing transfer functions from frequency response measurements is considered. Given a complex vector representing the measured frequency response of a physical system, a transfer function of specified order is determined that minimizes the sum of the magnitude-squared of the frequency response errors. This nonlinear least squares minimization problem is solved by an iterative global descent algorithm of the Newton type that converges quadratically near the minimum. The unknown transfer function is expressed as a sum of second-order rational polynomials, a parameterization that facilitates a numerically robust computer implementation. The algorithm is developed for single-input, single-output, causal, stable transfer functions. Two numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  3. The Synthesis of Structural Responses Using Experimentally Measured Frequency Response Functions and Field Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAP,JEROME S.; NELSON,CURTIS F.

    2000-11-17

    This paper presents an analysis technique used to generate the structural response at locations not measured during the ejection of a captive-carried store. The ejection shock event is complicated by the fact that forces may be imparted to the store at eight distinct locations. The technique derives forcing functions by combining the initial field test data for a limited number of measurement locations with Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) measured using a traditional modal-type impact (tap) test at the same locations. The derived forcing functions were then used with tap test FRFs measured at additional locations of interest to produce the desired response data.

  4. Ultra-wide frequency response measurement of an optical system with a DC photo-detector

    KAUST Repository

    Kuntz, Katanya B.

    2017-01-09

    Precise knowledge of an optical device\\'s frequency response is crucial for it to be useful in most applications. Traditional methods for determining the frequency response of an optical system (e.g. optical cavity or waveguide modulator) usually rely on calibrated broadband photo-detectors or complicated RF mixdown operations. As the bandwidths of these devices continue to increase, there is a growing need for a characterization method that does not have bandwidth limitations, or require a previously calibrated device. We demonstrate a new calibration technique on an optical system (consisting of an optical cavity and a high-speed waveguide modulator) that is free from limitations imposed by detector bandwidth, and does not require a calibrated photo-detector or modulator. We use a low-frequency (DC) photo-detector to monitor the cavity\\'s optical response as a function of modulation frequency, which is also used to determine the modulator\\'s frequency response. Knowledge of the frequency-dependent modulation depth allows us to more precisely determine the cavity\\'s characteristics (free spectral range and linewidth). The precision and repeatability of our technique is demonstrated by measuring the different resonant frequencies of orthogonal polarization cavity modes caused by the presence of a non-linear crystal. Once the modulator has been characterized using this simple method, the frequency response of any passive optical element can be determined to a fine resolution (e.g. kilohertz) over several gigahertz.

  5. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  6. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etingov, Pavel V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kosterev, Dmitry [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dai, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  7. Liquid-filled transient pressure measuring systems: A method for determining frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. C.; Englund, D. R., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    An equation is given and experimentally verified for computing the resonant frequency of liquid-filled transient pressure measuring systems. Resonant frequencies of 100 to 1000 Hz are typical of those systems tested. The effect of noncondensable gas bubbles on system response is described. A method for determining transducer volumetric compliance is presented. An example system is described and analyzed to demonstrate the use of the theory.

  8. Open Photoacoustic Cell for Blood Sugar Measurement: Numerical Calculation of Frequency Response

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Bernd; Teschner, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A new approach for continuous and non-invasive monitoring of the glucose concentration in human epidermis has been suggested recently. This method is based on photoacoustic (PA) analysis of human interstitial fluid. The measurement can be performed in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, may form the basis for a non-invasive monitoring of the blood sugar level for diabetes patients. It requires a windowless PA cell with an additional opening that is pressed onto the human skin. Since signals are weak, advantage is taken of acoustic resonances of the cell. Recently, a numerical approach based on the Finite Element (FE) Method has been successfully used for the calculation of the frequency response function of closed PA cells. This method has now been adapted to obtain the frequency response of the open cell. Despite the fact that loss due to sound radiation at the opening is not included, fairly good accordance with measurement is achieved.

  9. Measuring the neck frequency response function of laryngectomy patients: Implications for the design of electrolarynx devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzner, Geoffrey S.; Kobler, James B.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2003-08-01

    Measurements of the neck frequency response function (NFRF), defined as the ratio of the spectrum of the estimated volume velocity that excites the vocal tract to the spectrum of the acceleration delivered to the neck wall, were made at three different positions on the necks of nine laryngectomized subjects (five males and four females) and four normal laryngeal speakers (two males and two females). A minishaker driven by broadband noise provided excitation to the necks of subjects as they configured their vocal tracts to mimic the production of the vowels /aye/, /æ/, and /I/. The sound pressure at the lips was measured with a microphone and an impedance head mounted on the shaker measured the acceleration. The neck wall passed low-frequency sound energy better than high-frequency sound energy, and thus the NFRF was accurately modeled as a low-pass filter. The NFRFs of the different subject groups (female laryngeal, male laryngeal speakers, laryngectomized males, and laryngectomized females) differed from each other in terms of corner frequency and gain, with both types of male subjects presenting NFRFs with larger overall gains. In addition, there was a notable amount of intersubject variability within groups. Because the NFRF is an estimate of how sound energy passes through the neck wall, these results should aid in the design of improved neck-type electrolarynx devices.

  10. Measurement of the frequency response of the electrostrictive nonlinearity in optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, E L; Boyd, R W

    1997-05-15

    The electrostrictive contribution to the nonlinear refractive index is investigated by use of frequency-dependent cross-phase modulation with a weak unpolarized cw probe wave and a harmonically modulated pump copropagating in optical fibers. Self-delayed homodyne detection is used to measure the amplitude of the sidebands imposed upon the probe wave as a function of pump intensity for pump modulation frequencies from 10 MHz to 1 GHz. The ratio of the electrostrictive nonlinear coefficient to the cross-phase-modulation Kerr coefficient for unpolarized light is measured to be 1.58:1 for a standard step-index single-mode fiber and 0.41:1 for dispersion-shifted fibers, indicating a larger electrostrictive response in silica fibers than previously expected.

  11. Ultra-wide frequency response measurement of an optical system with a DC photo-detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntz, Katanya B; Song, Hongbin; Webb, James G; Mabrok, Mohamed A; Huntington, Elanor H; Yonezawa, Hidehiro

    2016-01-01

    Precise knowledge of an optical device's frequency response is crucial for it to be useful in most applications. Traditional methods for determining the frequency response of an optical system (e.g. optical cavity or waveguide modulator) usually rely on calibrated broadband photo-detectors or complicated RF mixdown operations. As the bandwidths of these devices continue to increase, there is a growing need for a characterization method that does not have bandwidth limitations, or require a previously calibrated device. We demonstrate a new calibration technique on an optical system (consisting of an optical cavity and a high-speed waveguide modulator) that is free from limitations imposed by detector bandwidth, and does not require a calibrated photo-detector or modulator. We use a low-frequency (DC) photo-detector to monitor the cavity's optical response as a function of modulation frequency, which is also used to determine the modulator's frequency response. Knowledge of the frequency-dependent modulation d...

  12. The non-equilibrium response of a superconductor to pair-breaking radiation measured over a broad frequency band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, P. J. de, E-mail: p.j.devisser@tudelft.nl [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Yates, S. J. C. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747AD Groningen (Netherlands); Guruswamy, T.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Neto, A.; Llombart, N. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Terahertz Sensing Group, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Baryshev, A. M. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747AD Groningen (Netherlands); Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Klapwijk, T. M. [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Baselmans, J. J. A. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Terahertz Sensing Group, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-06-22

    We have measured the absorption of terahertz radiation in a BCS superconductor over a broad range of frequencies from 200 GHz to 1.1 THz, using a broadband antenna-lens system and a tantalum microwave resonator. From low frequencies, the response of the resonator rises rapidly to a maximum at the gap edge of the superconductor. From there on, the response drops to half the maximum response at twice the pair-breaking energy. At higher frequencies, the response rises again due to trapping of pair-breaking phonons in the superconductor. In practice, this is a measurement of the frequency dependence of the quasiparticle creation efficiency due to pair-breaking in a superconductor. The efficiency, calculated from the different non-equilibrium quasiparticle distribution functions at each frequency, is in agreement with the measurements.

  13. First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier's beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRuiter, Stacy L; Southall, Brandon L; Calambokidis, John; Zimmer, Walter M X; Sadykova, Dinara; Falcone, Erin A; Friedlaender, Ari S; Joseph, John E; Moretti, David; Schorr, Gregory S; Thomas, Len; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-23

    Most marine mammal- strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded animal movement and acoustic data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-min playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant naval exercises. Whales responded strongly to playbacks at low received levels (RLs; 89-127 dB re 1 µPa): after ceasing normal fluking and echolocation, they swam rapidly, silently away, extending both dive duration and subsequent non-foraging interval. Distant sonar exercises (78-106 dB re 1 µPa) did not elicit such responses, suggesting that context may moderate reactions. The observed responses to playback occurred at RLs well below current regulatory thresholds; equivalent responses to operational sonars could elevate stranding risk and reduce foraging efficiency.

  14. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D' Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  15. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  16. Measurement of the frequency response of a bench-top quantum speed meter interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Glenn de; Gray, Malcolm; McClelland, David E.; Chen Yanbei; Whitcomb, Stan

    2003-09-15

    A simplified 'quantum speed meter' interferometer configuration, a candidate for future gravitational-wave (GW) detectors, was constructed and locked using a radio frequency (RF) locking scheme for length control. Employing a signal-laser-injection technique, we obtain the experimental frequency response, which shows good agreement with theoretical modeling.

  17. The Tracking Resonance Frequency Method for Photoacoustic Measurements Based on the Phase Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchenek, Mariusz

    2017-04-01

    One of the major issues in the use of the resonant photoacoustic cell is the resonance frequency of the cell. The frequency is not stable, and its changes depend mostly on temperature and gas mixture. This paper presents a new method for tracking resonance frequency, where both the amplitude and phase are calculated from the input samples. The stimulating frequency can be adjusted to the resonance frequency of the cell based on the phase. This method was implemented using a digital measurement system with an analog to digital converter, field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a microcontroller. The resonance frequency was changed by the injection of carbon dioxide into the cell. A theoretical description and experimental results are also presented.

  18. Feasibility demonstration of a variable frequency driver-microwave transient regression rate measurement system. [for solid propellant combustion response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of a system capable of rapidly and directly measuring the low-frequency (motor characteristics length bulk mode) combustion response characteristics of solid propellants has been investigated. The system consists of a variable frequency oscillatory driver device coupled with an improved version of the JPL microwave propellant regression rate measurement system. The ratio of the normalized regression rate and pressure amplitudes and their relative phase are measured as a function of varying pressure level and frequency. Test results with a well-characterized PBAN-AP propellant formulation were found to compare favorably with the results of more conventional stability measurement techniques.

  19. Determining generator parameters of Camargos hydroelectric power plant through frequency response measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Sebastiao E.M. de; Padua Guarini, Antonio de [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Joao A. de; Valgas, Helio M.; Pinto, Roberto del Giudice R. [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This work describes the results of the set frequency response tests performed in the generator number 2, 6.9 kV, 25 MVA, of Camargos hydroelectric power plant, CEMIG, and the parameters relatives to determined structures of model. This tests are unpublished in Brazil. (author) 7 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Two-dimensional optical coherence vibration tomography for low-frequency vibration measurement and response-only modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianfeng; Zhong, Shuncong; Zhang, Qiukun

    2016-10-01

    A high-speed camera-based two-dimensional optical coherence vibration tomography (2DOCVT) system with a subnanometre displacement resolution was developed and employed for low-frequency vibration measurement and modal analysis. Experimental results demonstrated the ability of low-frequency absolute displacement measurement of structural line vibrations without scanning. Three-dimensional (3D) surface displacement of a vibrating structure could also be obtained using the developed 2DOCVT by scanning the structure. The scanning 2DOCVT system acted like a 3D optical coherence vibration tomography system. The developed 2DOCVT system could capture structural modal parameters without vibration excitation input information, and therefore, it is a response-only method. The 2DOCVT could be recommended in the application of low-frequency vibration measurement and modal analysis of beam and plate structures, especially when the vibration amplitude is at nanometre or micrometre scale.

  1. Measurement of respiratory mechanics in a mechanically ventilated infant lung simulator: effects of variations in the frequency response of the flow measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M J; MacLeod, I M; Rothberg, A D

    1994-01-01

    The frequency responses of systems used to measure flow and pressure in ventilated infants may differ, and hence affect estimates of resistance and compliance. We estimated resistance and compliance in 16 ventilated mechanical lung models using linear regression while varying the frequency response of the flow measurement system. Lung models comprised combinations of four sections of tubing and four bottles filled with steel wool. The cut-off frequencies of a filter in the flow measurement system were chosen to yield time delays of 0, +/-3, +/-6, and +/-9 ms relative to the pressure signal. When the phase lags in the measurement systems were not equal at 10 Hz, a bias in resistance approximately (relative delay) x (elastance) ensued. The bias in the resistance estimate when resistance is 5 Pa ml-1 s and compliance is 2 ml kPa-1 is approximately 28% per ms of delay mismatch. Time-shifting the flow data to eliminate the phase discrepancy reduced the resistance bias by 85%. The residual resistance bias was assumed to be due to inappropriate amplitude response. Compliance measurements were affected by less than 8% and less than 2% after time correction of the flow data. Pressure and flow signals must be synchronized to within 1 ms at 10 Hz and the amplitude responses of the measurement systems must be adequate for reliable resistance measurement.

  2. Prediction of Nociceptive Responses during Sedation by Linear and Non-Linear Measures of EEG Signals in High Frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Melia

    Full Text Available The level of sedation in patients undergoing medical procedures evolves continuously, affected by the interaction between the effect of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and the pain stimuli. The monitors of depth of anesthesia, based on the analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG, have been progressively introduced into the daily practice to provide additional information about the state of the patient. However, the quantification of analgesia still remains an open problem. The purpose of this work is to improve the prediction of nociceptive responses with linear and non-linear measures calculated from EEG signal filtered in frequency bands higher than the traditional bands. Power spectral density and auto-mutual information function was applied in order to predict the presence or absence of the nociceptive responses to different stimuli during sedation in endoscopy procedure. The proposed measures exhibit better performances than the bispectral index (BIS. Values of prediction probability of Pk above 0.75 and percentages of sensitivity and specificity above 70% were achieved combining EEG measures from the traditional frequency bands and higher frequency bands.

  3. Field Coil Constant Frequency Response Measurement%磁场线圈常数的频率响应测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 汤元会

    2016-01-01

    线圈常数是磁场线圈的重要技术指标。分析了线圈常数的频率响应产生原因,提出基于感应线圈法的测量方法,并运用测量相对比值以消除测量误差。通过对三段巴凯尔圆环磁场线圈的频率响应测量结果表明,该方法的理论分析结果与实际测量结果基本一致。%The coil constant is an important parameter of field coil. Analysis of the causes of coil constant frequency response,puts forward measurement method based on the induction coil,and uses the measurement of relative ratio to eliminate the measurement error. The three section of the Bakel ring magnetic field frequency response measurement results show that,the results of theoretical analysis of the method is consistent with the actual measured results.

  4. Cyclic loading experiments to measure material response over a broad frequency range: from tickling of rocks to squeezing of moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C.; Takei, Y.; Cooper, R. F.; Savage, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    Seismology provides powerful methods for imaging the interior of the Earth, not only through differences in seismic velocities, but also through attenuation contrasts. As seismic waves travel through the Earth they are attenuated in accordance with the viscoelastic properties of the material through which they pass. With proper constraints, we will someday be able to use seismic attenuation data as a prospecting tool to determine the grain size, temperature, pressure, melt content, and water content of the material along the ray path. Furthermore, it should be possible to determine active deformation structure, such as crystallographic preferred orientations that form in response to far-field natural tectonic loading. Laboratory studies are striving to provide these needed constraints. Using analogues to mantle rock, we isolate and scrutinize the physics of how microstructural elements affect macroscopic properties of attenuation and steady-state viscosity. An organic analogue, borneol, was used to measure the effects of grain size, temperature, and melt content over a broad frequency range. In these experiments, grain boundary processes were found to play a major role. Polycrystalline ice, which can be considered a rock analogue, has been used to explore the effect of accumulated strain on attenuation, particularly in material that is actively deforming via dislocation creep. Here, defect concentration and substructure are important. I will discuss the use of cyclic loading experiments on borneol and on polycrystalline ice to probe material response from seismic to tidal frequencies, from 10 Hz to 10-4 Hz respectively. These experiments, then, inform our knowledge of viscoelastic behavior of geologic materials at not only seismic frequencies, but also the tidal forcing frequencies experienced by tidewater glaciers and icy satellites.

  5. Diurnal and Seasonal Responses of High Frequency Chlorophyll Fluorescence and PRI Measurements to Abiotic Stress in Almonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambach-Ortiz, N. E.; Paw U, K. T.

    2016-12-01

    Plants have evolved to efficiently utilize light to synthesize energy-rich carbon compounds, and at the same time, dissipate absorbed but excessive photon that would otherwise transfer excitation energy to potentially toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nevertheless, even the most rapidly growing plants with the highest rates of photosynthesis only utilize about half of the light their leaves absorb during the hours of peak irradiance in sun-exposed habitats. Usually, that daily peak of irradiance coincides with high temperature and a high vapor pressure deficit, which are conditions related to plant stomata closure. Consequently, specially in water stressed environments, plants need to have mechanisms to dissipate most of absorbed photons. Plants avoid photo-oxidative damage of the photosynthetic apparatus due to the formation of ROS under excess light using different mechanisms in order to either lower the amount of ROS formation or detoxify already formed ROS. Photoinhibition is defined as a reduction in photosynthetic activity due largely to a sustained reduction in the photochemical efficiency of Photosystem II (PSII), which can be assessed by monitoring Chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF). Alternatively, monitoring abiotic stress effects upon photosynthetic activity and photoinhibition may be possible using high frequency spectral reflectance sensors. We aim to find the potential relationships between high frequency PRI and ChlF as indicators of photoinhibition and permanent photodamage at a seasonal scale. Preliminary results show that PRI responses are sensitive to photoinhibition, but provide a poor representation of permanent photodamage observed at a seasonal scale.

  6. Terahertz-frequency dielectric response of liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Møller, Uffe; Cooke, David

    -induced dipole moments. In the polar liquid water the fastest relaxational dynamics is found at terahertz frequencies, just below the first intermolecular vibrational and librational modes. In this presentation we will discuss optical terahertz spectroscopic techniques for measurement of the full dielectric......The dielectric response of liquids spans many decades in frequency. The dielectric response of a polar liquid is typically determined by relaxational dynamics of the dipolar moments of the liquid. In contrast, the dielectric response of a nonpolar liquid is determined by much weaker collision...

  7. Terahertz-frequency dielectric response of liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Møller, Uffe; Cooke, David

    -induced dipole moments. In the polar liquid water the fastest relaxational dynamics is found at terahertz frequencies, just below the first intermolecular vibrational and librational modes. In this presentation we will discuss optical terahertz spectroscopic techniques for measurement of the full dielectric......The dielectric response of liquids spans many decades in frequency. The dielectric response of a polar liquid is typically determined by relaxational dynamics of the dipolar moments of the liquid. In contrast, the dielectric response of a nonpolar liquid is determined by much weaker collision...

  8. 一种新的测量系统频率响应的方法%A New Way for Measuring System Frequency Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张三宝; 刘文江; 和旬涛; 聂泽昆

    2001-01-01

    The system output is real-time sampled by taking the exponentialdescent sine combined signal as the system input.Based on the known system input and output,the system frequency response is obtained through using the discrete Fourier transform and processed by the frequency domain compensation,so resolving the problem of inaccuracy of the frequency response of the system at the high frequency end and thus getting a measuring method of high applicable value for the single input and single output system frequency response.%以指数衰减的组合正弦信号作为系统输入信号,同时实时采集系统输出,在已知系统输入及输出的基础上,运用离散傅立叶变换求得系统频率响应,并采用频域补偿法对所求得的系统频率响应进行处理,解决了系统的频率响应在高频端不准确这一特殊问题,从而得到了一套对单输入单输出系统频率响应的测量方法,具有较大的实用价值。

  9. Loads as a Resource: Frequency Responsive Demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalsi, Karanjit [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lian, Jianming [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Marinovici, Laurentiu D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elizondo, Marcelo A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moya, Christian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-10-08

    Frequency control plays an important role in preserving the power balance of a multi-machine power system. Generators modify their power output when a non-zero frequency deviation is presented in order to restore power balance across the network. However, with plans for large-scale penetration of renewable energy resources, performing primary frequency control using only supply-side resources becomes not only prohibitively expensive, but also technically difficult. Frequency control from the demand side or load control presents a novel and viable way for providing the desired frequency response. Loads can measure frequency locally and change their power consumption after a non-zero frequency deviation is presented in order to achieve power balance between generation and consumption. The specific objectives of this project are to: •Provide a framework to facilitate large-scale deployment of frequency responsive end-use devices •Systematically design decentralized frequency-based load control strategies for enhanced stability performance •Ensure applicability over wide range of operating conditions while accounting for unpredictable end-use behavior and physical device constraints •Test and validate control strategy using large-scale simulations and field demonstrations •Create a level-playing field for smart grid assets with conventional generators

  10. Step response and frequency response of an air conditioning system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crommelin, R.D.; Jackman, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    A system of induction units of an existing air conditioning system has been analyzed with respect to its dynamic properties. Time constants were calculated and measured by analogue models. Comparison with measurements at the installation itself showed a reasonable agreement. Frequency responses were

  11. Frequency Responses Of Hot-Wire Anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes theoretical study of frequency response of constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer, with view toward increasing frequency response while maintaining stable operation in supersonic flow. Effects of various circuit parameters discussed.

  12. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Stephen M., E-mail: durbin@purdue.edu; Liu, Shih-Chieh [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-08-06

    A simple frequency domain technique for determining the time delay between laser pump and X-ray probe pulses achieves 1 ps resolution even for ∼100 ps synchrotron pulses, permitting improved pump–probe characterization of ultrafast processes. Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (∼100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ∼1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time.

  13. The Assessment of Protective Behavioral Strategies: Comparing the Absolute Frequency and Contingent Frequency Response Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Kite, Benjamin A.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Henson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present studies was to examine the effects of response scale on the observed relationships between protective behavioral strategies (PBS) measures and alcohol-related outcomes. We reasoned that an ‘absolute frequency’ scale (stem: “how many times…”; response scale: 0 times to 11+ times) conflates the frequency of using PBS with the frequency of consuming alcohol; thus, we hypothesized that the use of an absolute frequency response scale would result in positive relationship...

  14. Research on Frequency Response Characteristics of Rolling Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaiZhengguo; ZhangKenan

    2005-01-01

    The measurement method of frequency response characteristics for rolling mill is established by imposing different signal excitation on PID input of rolling mill under the different rolling conditions. The analysis results declare that sweep sine signal was relative efficient to evaluation for the frequency response character of hydraulic system. The practical application shows that the corresponding relationship between the parameters and the frequency response range of the rolling mill is helpful for parameters verification of process control and condition monitoring of hydraulic system.

  15. The assessment of protective behavioral strategies: comparing the absolute frequency and contingent frequency response scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Benjamin A; Pearson, Matthew R; Henson, James M

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present studies was to examine the effects of response scale on the observed relationships between protective behavioral strategies (PBS) measures and alcohol-related outcomes. We reasoned that an "absolute frequency" scale (stem: "how many times …"; response scale: 0 times to 11+ times) conflates the frequency of using PBS with the frequency of consuming alcohol; thus, we hypothesized that the use of an absolute frequency response scale would result in positive relationships between types of PBS and alcohol-related outcomes. Alternatively, a "contingent frequency" scale (stem: "When drinking … how often …"; response scale: never to always) does not conflate frequency of alcohol use with use of PBS; therefore, we hypothesized that use of a contingent frequency scale would result in negative relationships between use of PBS and alcohol-related outcomes. Two published measures of PBS were used across studies: the Protective Behavioral Strategies Survey (PBSS) and the Strategy Questionnaire (SQ). Across three studies, we demonstrate that when measured using a contingent frequency response scale, PBS measures relate negatively to alcohol-related outcomes in a theoretically consistent manner; however, when PBS measures were measured on an absolute frequency response scale, they were nonsignificantly or positively related to alcohol-related outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for the assessment of PBS.

  16. Experimental model updating using frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yu; Liu, Xi; Dong, Xinjun; Wang, Yang; Pu, Qianhui

    2016-04-01

    In order to obtain a finite element (FE) model that can more accurately describe structural behaviors, experimental data measured from the actual structure can be used to update the FE model. The process is known as FE model updating. In this paper, a frequency response function (FRF)-based model updating approach is presented. The approach attempts to minimize the difference between analytical and experimental FRFs, while the experimental FRFs are calculated using simultaneously measured dynamic excitation and corresponding structural responses. In this study, the FRF-based model updating method is validated through laboratory experiments on a four-story shear-frame structure. To obtain the experimental FRFs, shake table tests and impact hammer tests are performed. The FRF-based model updating method is shown to successfully update the stiffness, mass and damping parameters of the four-story structure, so that the analytical and experimental FRFs match well with each other.

  17. Absolute frequency measurement of unstable lasers with optical frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverini, N.; Poli, N.; Sutyrin, D.; Wang, F.-Y.; Schioppo, M.; Tarallo, M. G.; Tino, G. M.

    2010-09-01

    Here we report on absolute frequency measurements of a commercial high power CW diode-pumped solid-state laser (Coherent Verdi-V5). This kind of lasers usually presents large frequency jitter (up to 50 MHz) both in the short term (1 ms time scale) and in the long term (>10 s time scale). A precise measurement of absolute frequency deviations in both temporal scales should require a set of different devices (optical cavities, optical wave-meters), each suited for measurements only at a specific integration time. Here we demonstrate how a frequency comb can be used to overcome this difficulty, allowing in a single step a full characterization of both short ( 103 s) absolute frequency jitter with a resolution better than 1 MHz. We demonstrate in this way the flexibility of optical frequency combs for absolute frequency measurements not only of ultra-stable lasers but also of relatively unstable lasers. The absolute frequency calibration of the Verdi laser that we have obtained have been used in order to improve the accuracy of the measurements of the local gravitational acceleration value with 88Sr atoms trapped in 1D vertical lattices.

  18. Time delay measurement in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Dufresne, Eric M.; Li, Yuelin; Wen, Haidan

    2015-01-01

    Pump–probe studies at synchrotrons using X-ray and laser pulses require accurate determination of the time delay between pulses. This becomes especially important when observing ultrafast responses with lifetimes approaching or even less than the X-ray pulse duration (∼100 ps). The standard approach of inspecting the time response of a detector sensitive to both types of pulses can have limitations due to dissimilar pulse profiles and other experimental factors. Here, a simple alternative is presented, where the frequency response of the detector is monitored versus time delay. Measurements readily demonstrate a time resolution of ∼1 ps. Improved precision is possible by simply extending the data acquisition time. PMID:26289282

  19. Primary Frequency Response with Aggregated DERs: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggilam, Swaroop S.; Dhople, Sairaj V.; Zhao, Changhong; Dall' Anese, Emiliano; Chen, Yu Christine

    2017-03-03

    Power networks have to withstand a variety of disturbances that affect system frequency, and the problem is compounded with the increasing integration of intermittent renewable generation. Following a large-signal generation or load disturbance, system frequency is arrested leveraging primary frequency control provided by governor action in synchronous generators. In this work, we propose a framework for distributed energy resources (DERs) deployed in distribution networks to provide (supplemental) primary frequency response. Particularly, we demonstrate how power-frequency droop slopes for individual DERs can be designed so that the distribution feeder presents a guaranteed frequency-regulation characteristic at the feeder head. Furthermore, the droop slopes are engineered such that injections of individual DERs conform to a well-defined fairness objective that does not penalize them for their location on the distribution feeder. Time-domain simulations for an illustrative network composed of a combined transmission network and distribution network with frequency-responsive DERs are provided to validate the approach.

  20. Primary Frequency Response with Aggregated DERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhao, Changhong [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Guggilam, Swaroop [University of Minnesota; Chen, Yu Christine [University of British Columbia; Dhople, Sairaj [University of Minnesota

    2017-07-03

    Power networks have to withstand a variety of disturbances that affect system frequency, and the problem is compounded with the increasing integration of intermittent renewable generation. Following a large-signal generation or load disturbance, system frequency is arrested leveraging primary frequency control provided by governor action in synchronous generators. In this work, we propose a framework for distributed energy resources (DERs) deployed in distribution networks to provide (supplemental) primary frequency response. Particularly, we demonstrate how power-frequency droop slopes for individual DERs can be designed so that the distribution feeder presents a guaranteed frequency-regulation characteristic at the feeder head. Furthermore, the droop slopes are engineered such that injections of individual DERs conform to a well-defined fairness objective that does not penalize them for their location on the distribution feeder. Time-domain simulations for an illustrative network composed of a combined transmission network and distribution network with frequency-responsive DERs are provided to validate the approach.

  1. Precision frequency measurements with interferometric weak values

    CERN Document Server

    Starling, David J; Jordan, Andrew N; Howell, John C; 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.063822

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an experiment which utilizes a Sagnac interferometer to measure a change in optical frequency of 129 kHz per root Hz with only 2 mW of continuous wave, single mode input power. We describe the measurement of a weak value and show how even higher frequency sensitivities may be obtained over a bandwidth of several nanometers. This technique has many possible applications, such as precision relative frequency measurements and laser locking without the use of atomic lines.

  2. A Hardware Transverse Beam Frequency Response Simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Ning, Jia

    2005-01-01

    We build an electronical instrument to get the frequency response close to the pattern of transverse beam frequency response. The method is to apply 1)a time delay circuit with ADC, FIFO RAM and DAC; 2)a phase shift circuit which is an all pass filter with adjustable phase shift in the frequency range of 25kHz to 30kHz; in a feedback loop of 3)a commutating filter which is a high Q band pass filter. We can dynamically adjust the center frequency, the side band distance during the testing. With this instrument, some beam instruments can be tested without using the real beam.

  3. Operational amplifier with adjustable frequency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulisek, D; Hencek, M

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe an operational amplifier with an adjustable frequency response and its use in membrane physiology, using the voltage clamp and current clamp method. The amplifier eliminates feedback poles causing oscillation. It consists of a follower with a high input resistance in the form of a tube and of an actual amplifier with an adjustable frequency response allowing the abolition of clicks by one pole and of oscillation by two poles in the 500 Hz divided by infinity range. Further properties of the amplifier: a long-term voltage drift of 1 mv, a temperature voltage drift of 0.5 mv/degrees K, input resistance greater than 1 GOhm, amplification greater than 80 dB, output +/- 12 v, 25 ma, noise, measured from the width of the oscilloscope track in the presence of a ray of normal brightness, not exceeding 50 muv in the 0-250 kHz band, f1 = 1 MHz. A short report on the amplifier was published a few years ago (Gulísek and Hencek 1973).

  4. Loads as a Resource: Frequency Responsive Demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalsi, Karanjit [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hansen, Jacob [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fuller, Jason C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Marinovici, Laurentiu D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elizondo, Marcelo A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Tess L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lian, Jianming [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sun, Yannan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Current power grid operation predominantly relies on scheduling and regulating generation resources to supply loads and balance load changes. Due to the inherent intermittency of renewable energy, more flexible and fast ramping capacity is required to compensate for the uncertainty and variability introduced by renewable energy resources. With the advancement of information technologies, power system end-use loads are becoming more agile and can participate in provision of balancing energy and other grid services. The use of demand response can greatly reduce the required generation reserve in a clean and environmentally friendly way. In this report, a new frequency responsive load (FRL) controller was proposed based on the GFA controller, which can respond to both over and under-frequency events. A supervisory control was introduced to coordinate the autonomous response from FRLs in order to overcome the issues of excessive system response due to high penetration of FRLs. The effectiveness of the proposed FRL controller was demonstrated by large-scale simulation studies on the WECC system. Specifically, the FRLs were deployed in the WECC system at different penetration levels to analyze the performance of the proposed strategy both with and without supervisory level control. While both methods have their own advantages, the case without supervisory control could lead to system-wide instability depending on the size of the contingency and the number of FRLs deployed in the system. In addition, the voltage impacts of this controller on distribution system were also carefully investigated. Finally, a preliminary measurement and verification approach was also developed.

  5. Slot Machine Response Frequency Predicts Pathological Gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Møller, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Slot machines are among the most addictive forms of gambling, and pathological gambling slot machine players represent the largest group of treatment seekers, accounting for 35% to 93% of the population. Pathological gambling sufferers have significantly higher response frequency (games / time......) on slot machines compared with non-problem gamblers, which may suggest increased reinforcement of the gambling behavior in pathological gambling. However, to date it is unknown whether or not the increased response frequency in pathological gambling is associated with symptom severity of the disorder....... This study tested the hypothesis that response frequency is associated with symptom severity in pathological gambling. We tested response frequency among twenty-two pathological gambling sufferers and twenty-one non-problem gamblers on a commercially available slot machine, and screened for pathological...

  6. Precision frequency measurements with interferometric weak values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, David J.; Dixon, P. Ben; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate an experiment which utilizes a Sagnac interferometer to measure a change in optical frequency of 129 ± 7 kHz/Hz with only 2 mW of continuous-wave, single-mode input power. We describe the measurement of a weak value and show how even higher-frequency sensitivities may be obtained over a bandwidth of several nanometers. This technique has many possible applications, such as precision relative frequency measurements and laser locking without the use of atomic lines.

  7. No correlation between headphone frequency response and retail price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breebaart, Jeroen

    2017-06-01

    This study quantifies variability of measured headphone response patterns and aims to uncover any correlations between headphone type, retail price, and frequency response. For this purpose, the mean, variance, and covariance of the frequency magnitude responses were analyzed and correlated with headphone type and retail value. The results indicate that neither the measured response nor an attempt to objectively quantify perceived quality is related to price. On average, in-ear headphones have a slightly higher measured bass response than circumaural and supra-aural headphones. Furthermore, in-ear and circumaural headphones have a slightly lower deviation from an assumed target curve than supra-ear models. Ninety percent of the variance across all headphone measurements can be described by a set of six basis functions. The first basis function is similar to published target responses, while the second basis function represents a spectral tilt.

  8. The Jovian S-bursts. II - Frequency drift measurements at different frequencies throughout several storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Y.; Aubier, M. G.; Rosolen, C.; Genova, F.; de La Noe, J.

    1980-06-01

    The frequency drift measurements performed at different frequencies throughout several storms to test the hypothesis of trapped electrons accelerated at Io are presented. The observations were made in the 20-40 MHz range with high time and frequency resolutions; the measurements show that the average value of the drift-rate at a fixed frequency varies all along a given storm. The measured drift-rate of a storm cannot be fitted by a set of curves deduced from the trapped electrons hypothesis; at the maximum frequency of emission, very high drift-rates are measured for most cases, which contradicts this hypothesis. It is concluded that the electrons responsible for the S-burst emission are more likely accelerated in the ionosphere of Jupiter than at Io.

  9. Loads as a Resource: Frequency Responsive Demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalsi, Karanjit [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Tess L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Marinovici, Laurentiu D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Elizondo, Marcelo A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lian, Jianming [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Demand-side frequency control can complement traditional generator controls to maintain the stability of large electric systems in the face of rising uncertainty and variability associated with renewable energy resources. This report presents a hierarchical frequency-based load control strategy that uses a supervisor to flexibly adjust control gains that a population of end-use loads respond to in a decentralized manner to help meet the NERC BAL-003-1 frequency response standard at both the area level and interconnection level. The load model is calibrated and used to model populations of frequency-responsive water heaters in a PowerWorld simulation of the U.S. Western Interconnection (WECC). The proposed design is implemented and demonstrated on physical water heaters in a laboratory setting. A significant fraction of the required frequency response in the WECC could be supplied by electric water heaters alone at penetration levels of less than 15%, while contributing to NERC requirements at the interconnection and area levels.

  10. Low frequency signal in the GOLF measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grec, G; Provost, J; Renaud, C, E-mail: grec@obs-nice.fr [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS UMR 6202 Cassiopee, OCA (France)

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows the results obtained using a revisited method to normalize the velocity evaluation extracted from the measurements, for roughly 14 years of GOLF data. For the search of g modes, we calculate the low frequency power spectrum of the signal with 2 different approaches: - . The classical calculation of the power spectrum of the velocity signal. - . An alternative calculation, extracting first the variations along the time of the p-mode; frequencies, then calculating the power spectrum of those frequency modulation. Both spectra are compared to the g-mode frequency spectrum calculated for a solar model. Several observed frequencies are in close agreement with the calculated g modes. A careful statistical analysis of this result should now follow.

  11. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  12. Measuring Auditory Selective Attention using Frequency Tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari M Bharadwaj

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Frequency tagging of sensory inputs (presenting stimuli that fluctuate periodically at rates to which the cortex can phase lock has been used to study attentional modulation of neural responses to inputs in different sensory modalities. For visual inputs, the visual steady-state response (VSSR at the frequency modulating an attended object is enhanced, while the VSSR to a distracting object is suppressed. In contrast, the effect of attention on the auditory steady-state response (ASSR is inconsistent across studies. However, most auditory studies analyzed results at the sensor level or used only a small number of equivalent current dipoles to fit cortical responses. In addition, most studies of auditory spatial attention used dichotic stimuli (independent signals at the ears rather than more natural, binaural stimuli. Here, we asked whether these methodological choices help explain discrepant results. Listeners attended to one of two competing speech streams, one simulated from the left and one from the right, that were modulated at different frequencies. Using distributed source modeling of magnetoencephalography results, we estimate how spatially directed attention modulates the ASSR in neural regions across the whole brain. Attention enhances the ASSR power at the frequency of the attended stream in the contralateral auditory cortex. The attended-stream modulation frequency also drives phase-locked responses in the left (but not right precentral sulcus (lPCS, a region implicated in control of eye gaze and visual spatial attention. Importantly, this region shows no phase locking to the distracting stream suggesting that the lPCS in engaged in an attention-specific manner. Modeling results that take account of the geometry and phases of the cortical sources phase locked to the two streams (including hemispheric asymmetry of lPCS activity help partly explain why past ASSR studies of auditory spatial attention yield seemingly contradictory

  13. 78 FR 45479 - Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 40 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability...: The Commission proposes to approve Reliability Standard BAL- 003-1 (Frequency Response and Frequency... of frequency response needed for reliable operations for each Balancing Authority within...

  14. Uncertainty Measures of Regional Flood Frequency Estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan; Madsen, Henrik

    1995-01-01

    Regional flood frequency models have different assumptions regarding homogeneity and inter-site independence. Thus, uncertainty measures of T-year event estimators are not directly comparable. However, having chosen a particular method, the reliability of the estimate should always be stated, e...

  15. Uncertainty Measures of Regional Flood Frequency Estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan; Madsen, Henrik

    1995-01-01

    Regional flood frequency models have different assumptions regarding homogeneity and inter-site independence. Thus, uncertainty measures of T-year event estimators are not directly comparable. However, having chosen a particular method, the reliability of the estimate should always be stated, e...

  16. Bench Measurements of Low Frequency Transverse Impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Mostacci, A

    2003-01-01

    For frequencies below 10 MHz the classical two wire transmission line method is subject to difficulties in sensitivity and measurement uncertainties. Thus for evaluation of the low frequency transverse impedance properties of the LHC dump kicker a modified version of the two wire transmission line has been used. It consists, in the present case, of a 10 turn loop of approximately 1 meter length and 2 cm width. The change of input impedance of the loop is measured as a function of the surroundings and by using a proper reference (metallic beampipe) these changes are converted into a meaningful transverse beam coupling impedance. Measurements of several calibration objects have shown close agreement with theoretical results.

  17. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonca, A.; Roucaries, B.; Williams, B.; Rubin, I.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Meinhold, P.; Lubin, P.; Franceschet, C.; Jahn, S.; Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.

    2010-12-01

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  18. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonca, A; Williams, B; Rubin, I; Meinhold, P; Lubin, P [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Roucaries, B [Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussees, 75732 Paris (France); D' Arcangelo, O [IFP-CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Franceschet, C; Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jahn, S, E-mail: zonca@deepspace.ucsb.edu [Infineon Technologies AG, Am Campeon 1-12, 85579 Neubiberg, Munich (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  19. Measurement Duration and Frequency Impact Objective Light Exposure Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaganathan, Sekar; Read, Scott A; Collins, Michael J; Vincent, Stephen J

    2017-05-01

    To determine the measurement duration and frequency required to reliably quantify the typical personal light exposure patterns of children and young adults. Ambient light exposure data were obtained from 31 young adults and 30 children using a wrist-worn light sensor configured to measure ambient light exposure every 30 seconds for 14 days. To examine the influence of measurement duration upon light exposure, the daily time exposed to outdoor light levels (>1000 lux) was initially calculated based upon data from all 14 days and then recalculated from 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 randomly selected days. To examine the influence of measurement frequency, the outdoor exposure time was calculated for a 30-second sampling rate and again after resampling at 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 10-minute sampling rates. Children spent significantly greater time outdoors (44 minutes higher [95% CI: 26, 62]) compared to adults (P = .001). Children spent more time outdoors during the weekdays (13 minutes higher [-7, 32]) and adults spent more time outdoors during the weekends (24 minutes higher [7, 40]) (P = .005). Calculating light exposure using a lower number of days and coarser sampling frequencies did not significantly alter the group mean light exposure (P > .05). However, a significant increase in measurement variability occurred for outdoor light exposure derived from less than 8 days and 3 minutes or coarser measurement frequencies in adults, and from less than 8 days and 4 minutes or coarser frequencies in children (all P light exposure measures in children and young adults.

  20. Measuring low-frequency noise indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    that is exceeded in 10% of the volume of a room (L10) is proposed as a rational and objective target for a measurement method. In Sweden and Denmark rules exist for measuring low-frequency noise indoors. The performance of these procedures was investigated in three rooms. The results from the Swedish method were...... close to the L10 target, but, due to a doubtful use of C-weighting in the scanning, it may give too low results in case of complex sounds. The Danish method was found to have a high risk of giving results substantially below the target, unless complainants can precisely appoint measurement positions...

  1. Unrecorded wideband instrumentation reference tape feasibility study: Frequency response results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hust, D. R.

    1980-03-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine signal response variations when a variety of wideband instrumentation magnetic tapes is used on a cross section of recorder/reproducer systems. Data for the investigation were collected by transmitting a set of eight sample test tapes to participating data recording/reproducing facilities for the purpose of making data measurements. Data collected represent measurements made with 16 different recorder/reproducer systems at 11 different testing facilities located throughout the United States. The data-collection process involved approximately 2 years of testing. The originating/coordinating facility was the Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Mugu, California. The test results indicated the following: all of the sample test tapes exhibited bidirectional performance within the limits of measurement repeatability; overall system stability was better in the low-band regions than in the upper-band regions; and the overall relative frequency response of the sample test tapes did not change appreciably during the 2 year investigative period. The most significant result of the test measurements is that at least 90% of the frequency response values were within + or - 2.0 dB at all frequencies. Machine stability factors such as azimuth, equalizer, and gain changes had more effect on data variability than did magnetic tape or tape speed. The use of a reference tape system is recommended as a method to assure that relative frequency response variations will be less than or equal to + or - 2.0 dB.

  2. Nonlinear frequency response analysis of structural vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeger, Oliver; Wever, Utz; Simeon, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for nonlinear frequency response analysis of mechanical vibrations of 3-dimensional solid structures. For computing nonlinear frequency response to periodic excitations, we employ the well-established harmonic balance method. A fundamental aspect for allowing a large-scale application of the method is model order reduction of the discretized equation of motion. Therefore we propose the utilization of a modal projection method enhanced with modal derivatives, providing second-order information. For an efficient spatial discretization of continuum mechanics nonlinear partial differential equations, including large deformations and hyperelastic material laws, we employ the concept of isogeometric analysis. Isogeometric finite element methods have already been shown to possess advantages over classical finite element discretizations in terms of higher accuracy of numerical approximations in the fields of linear vibration and static large deformation analysis. With several computational examples, we demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the modal derivative reduction method for nonlinear static computations and vibration analysis. Thus, the presented method opens a promising perspective on application of nonlinear frequency analysis to large-scale industrial problems.

  3. Frequency response of Lamb-Oseen vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Rodríguez, F. J.; Parras, L.; del Pino, C.

    2016-12-01

    In this numerical study we present the frequency response of the Lamb-Oseen (Gaussian) vortex for two synthetic jet configurations. The first one consists of an annular axial jet that is superimposed on the Gaussian vortex. The other configuration deals with an off-axis, single-point, axial jet (SPI). We detect that the system responds to the forcing for a given axial wavenumber, k, exciting natural modes of the vortex by a resonance mechanism. We propose an explanation for the physical mechanism responsible for the maximum energy gain obtained by comparing our results with the different branches found theoretically by Fabre et al (2006 J. Fluid Mech. 551 235-74). We find high energy gains in both cases ({G}∞ ≃ {10}3 for the annular jet and {G}∞ ≃ {10}4 for the SPI jet), so these types of forcing are able to produce responses of the system strong enough to reach a non-linear state. Axisymmetric modes, with azimuthal wavenumber m = 0, produce the highest energy gain while applying an annular forcing. However, other modes, such as the helical one m = 1 and also double helix modes with m = 2, contribute in the SPI configuration. We find that the best region to be tested experimentally in both cases is the region that corresponds to the L2 branch described by Fabre and his collaborators. Furthermore, and whenever using these L2 branch frequencies, the response of the system is always axisymmetric, independently of the type of excitation. Finally, we conclude that the energy gain with the SPI jet is one order of magnitude greater than for the annular jet, so that the single-point off-axis jet is a feasible candidate to design a control device.

  4. Frequency Response of Modulated Electroluminescence of Light-Emitting Diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Lie-Feng; LI Yang; LI Ding; WANG Cun-Da; ZHANG Guo-Yi; YAO Dong-Sheng; LIU Wei-Fang; XING Peng-Fei

    2011-01-01

    Frequency responses of modulated electroluminescence (EL) of light-emitting diodes were measured using a testing setup.With increasing frequency of the ac signal,the relative light intensity (RLI) clearly decreases.Furthermore,a peculiar asynchrony between the RLI and ac small-signal is observed.At frequencies higher than 10kHz,the RLI clearly lags behind the ac signal and the absolute value of the lagging angle is nearly proportional to the signal frequency.Using the classical recombination model of light-emitting diodes under ac small-signal modulation,these abnormal characteristics of modulated EL can be clearly explained.High-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have received great attention recently owing to their applications in energy-saving lights,display items and many other fields;therefore,the optical and electrical characteristics of LEDs at forward bias hold significant potential for research.[1-4] However,for a new kind of light emission device,the general research on its performance focuses on the light emission and dc currentvoltage (I-V) characteristics.%Frequency responses of modulated electroluminescence (EL) of light-emitting diodes were measured using a testing setup. With increasing frequency of the ac signal, the relative light intensity (RLI) clearly decreases. Furthermore, a peculiar asynchrony between the RLI and ac small-signal is observed. At frequencies higher than 10kHz, the RLI clearly lags behind the ac signal and the absolute value of the lagging angle is nearly proportional to the signal frequency. Using the classical recombination model of light-emitting diodes under ac small-signal modulation, these abnormal characteristics of modulated EL can be clearly explained.

  5. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    CERN Document Server

    Zonca, Andrea; Williams, Brian; Rubin, Ishai; D'Arcangelo, Ocleto; Meinhold, Peter; Lubin, Philip; Franceschet, Cristian; Yahn, Stefan; Mennella, Aniello; Bersanelli, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measureme...

  6. Automation of measurement frequency SVCh kolebany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Parfenov

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available The functional diagram of the frequency meter, comprising a microprocessor controller and commercially available devices. An algorithm for calculating the frequency of the microprocessor used in determining the frequency SVChgeneratora. In the range of 52-79 GHz frequency provides direct reading with an absolute error of less than 2 MHz.

  7. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Vian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc. are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor, and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight after low power (i.e., nonthermal HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism.

  8. Mean frequency and relative fluorescence intensity measurement of γ-H2AX foci dose response in PBL exposed to γ-irradiation: An inter- and intra-laboratory comparison and its relevance for radiation triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, Raavi; Tamizh, Selvan G; Bhavani, Manivannan; Kumar, Arun; Alok, Amit; Karthik, Kanagaraj; Kalra, Namita; Vijayalakshmi, J; Paul, Solomon F D; Chaudhury, N K; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of γ-H2AX protein changes in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation is a simple, sensitive, and rapid assay for radiation triage and early marker of dose estimation. The qualitative and quantitative measurements of the protein changes were examined using flow cytometry and microscopy. Whole blood and isolated lymphocytes were exposed in vitro between 0.1 and 5 Gy doses of (60) Co γ-radiation at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min. Radiation induced γ-H2AX foci frequency (n = 3) and relative fluorescence intensity (n = 7) in PBL was measured at 0.5 and 2 hrs postexposure. The observed dose response for γ-H2AX foci frequency at both time points, for whole blood and isolated lymphocytes did not show any significant (P > 0.05) differences. However, when compared with γ-H2AX foci frequency scored manually (microscopy), the semiautomated analysis (captured images) showed a better correlation (r(2) = 0.918) than that obtained with automated (Metafer) scoring (r(2) = 0.690). It is noteworthy to mention that, the γ-H2AX foci frequency quantified using microscopy showed a dose dependent increase up to 2 Gy and the relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) measured with flow cytometry revealed an increase up to 5 Gy in the PBL exposed in vitro. Moreover, a better correlation was observed between the γ-H2AX foci frequency obtained by manual scoring and RFI (r(2) = 0.910). Kinetic studies showed that the γ-H2AX foci remain more or less unchanged up to 4 hrs and reduces gradually over 48 hrs of postexposure at 37°C. Further, inter and intra-laboratory comparisons showed consistency in the scoring of γ-H2AX foci frequency by manual and semiautomated scoring. The overall results suggest that measurement of γ-H2AX (microscopy and flow cytometry) should be employed within 4 to 6 hrs for a reliable dosimetry either by sharing the work load between the laboratories or investing more manpower; however, triage can be possible even up

  9. Measurement of ventilatory threshold by respiratory frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabetani, Teru; Ueda, Takeshi; Teramoto, Keisuke

    2002-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether respiratory frequency can be used as a valid parameter for estimating ventilatory threshold and for examining differences in exercise modes such as a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. 24 men and 12 women performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer and on a treadmill. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, pulmonary ventilation, ventilatory frequency, and heart rate were measured continuously every 30 sec. during the test. Three different and independent reviewers detected the ventilatory threshold point and break point of respiratory rate, which were then compared. Analysis indicated that (1) ventilatory threshold was well correlated with break point of respiratory rate for both cycle (r=.88, pcycle) or 88% (treadmill) of break point of respiratory rate. (2) The regression equation for treadmill exercise was more accurate than that for cycling, but the detected data samples were smaller. The break point of respiratory rate was more easily detected for the cycle ergometer test 33 of 36 subjects) than for the treadmill test (only 15 of 36). The cycle ergometer test identified the break point of respiratory rate more easily than did the treadmill test. (3) There was an association between physical fitness and whether the break point of respiratory rate was detectable, and the more fit the subject (above average), the more likely the break point was to be undetected. Our study demonstrates that the break point of respiratory rate is closely associated with ventilatory threshold and that the cycle ergometer test is more conducive than the treadmill test to the detectability of break point of respiratory rate.

  10. Noise and frequency response of silicon photodiode operational amplifier combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstra, R H; Wendland, P

    1972-07-01

    The noise in dark and illuminated Schottky barrier and diffused PIN non-guard-ring photodiodes has been measured between 0.1 Hz and 10 kHz and compared to theory with an excellent fit. It is shown that diodes used photovoltaically are free of 1/f noise in the dark. It is also demonstrated that there is an optimum bias (ca. 100 mV) for minimum noise equivalent power. When only a resistive load is used with a detector, it often determines the frequency response and noise of the detector circuit. We develop and demonstrate equations for the major improvements in both noise and frequency response that can be obtained using a current mode (inverting) operational amplifier.

  11. Multiple and broad frequency response Gunn diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, N. J.; Macpherson, R. F.; Khalid, A.; Dunn, G. M.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2009-10-01

    Gunn diodes, operating in transit time mode, are usually thought of as incapable of generating power at multiple frequencies or over a broad frequency range. In this paper, we report experimental results showing that these diodes can generate power at several frequencies and, using Monte Carlo simulations of both planar and vertical devices, we offer an explanation of how this unusual behaviour may come into being and suggest possible applications for this novel device.

  12. 常压下基于频率响应测量声速的改进方法%Improved method for sound velocity measurement with frequency response under atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文杰; 王同庆; 唐俊

    2013-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of frequency responses at different positions , a new method of sound velocity measurement in a sound tube is suggested to get more stable sound velocity .Two hydrophones with moderate dis-tance are adopted for measuring sensors , and it does not need to change the position of the water surface and the sensor position .The operation of the experiment is simple , and the data processing is easy .The fluctuation of fre-quency differences is small .It can be used in the condition that pressure exists .The influence of the reflection coef-ficient of the transmitting transducer on the bottom of the sound tube is eliminated .As a result , more accurate sound velocity is obtained .Simulation results demonstrate the periodicity of the function and the stability of the frequency differences.The accuracy and reliability of this method are proved by the experiment's results.The local sound ve-locity can be measured correctly with the frequency response .This method offers an accurate reference for the sound tube measurement system .The precision of the measurement can be ensured .%为了得到更稳定的声速,提出了一种根据声管中不同位置处声压的频率响应特点测量声速的新方法。本方法选取2个距离适中的水听器为测量传感器,不需要改变水面位置和传感器位置,操作简单、数据处理方便、测量误差很小。可以应用于有压力的工况。消除了位于声管底部声源发射换能器处反射系数对声速测量的影响。仿真结果说明了函数的周期性以及频差的稳定性。通过实验测量,验证了方法的正确和可靠。根据频率响应精确测量水声声管中的声速,为声管测量系统提供准确的参考,保证了测量精度。

  13. A New Quartz Crystal Microbalance Measuring Method with Expansive Frequency Range and Broadband Adaptive Response Capacity%新型宽频自适应石英晶体微天平测量方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周俊鹏; 包宇; 林青; 逄仁山; 王连明; 牛利

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve the problems of present quartz crystal microbalance ( QCM ) measuring instruments, such as high demand for crystal cutting technology and uncomprehensive measurements for crystal parameters, a modified quadrature demodulation-based method was proposed with broadband adaptive response capacity and high frequency resolution. Moreover, it is also capable of measuring both resonant frequencies and dissipation factor D synchronously and continuously. Experimental results at room temperature indicated that the adaptive frequency range was 1-9 MHz while the frequency resolution was less than 1 Hz, measured resonance frequency shifts of crystals in the range scale linearly with the equal thickness increments of poly acrylic acid ( PAA) membrane on the working electrode, and with the volatilization of different solvent factor D is measured continuously and effectively along the time axis. To sum up, compared with traditional ones, this new method has lower material cost and more obtained parameters.%针对目前石英晶体微天平( Quartz crystal microbalance,QCM)仪器所存在的对晶体切割工艺要求过高,测量参数不够全面等问题,在正交解调法的基础上,提出了一种在较宽频率范围内具有自适应功能,测量频率分辨率高,并且可同时连续获取谐振频率和耗散因子D的测试方法。实验表明:室温下,频率测量自适应范围在1~9 MHz且频率分辨率小于1 Hz;随着工作电极聚丙烯酸( Poly acrylic acid,PAA)膜厚度的均匀叠加,测得范围内各晶体频率偏移呈线性变化;随着不同溶剂挥发,D因子测量结果在时间轴上连续有效。与传统方法相比,本方法具有耗材成本低,获取参数丰富等优点。

  14. Contact resistance measurement structures for high frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; Pijper, Ralf M.T.; Tiemeijer, Luuk F.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the interfacial contact impedance offered by the device at its operating frequency range is crucial for accurate modelling and understanding of the device. In this article, a novel modified TLM test-structure has been devised to extract interfacial contact parameters at frequencies upto

  15. Response growth using a low-frequency suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanni, Jeffrey J; Nair, Padmaja

    2007-12-01

    Numerous psychophysical studies on two-tone suppression have been carried out. More recently, researchers have attempted to relate the magnitude of suppression to the level of suppressee. [Wojtczak, M., Viemeister, N.F., 2005. Psychophysical response growth under suppression. In: Pressnitzer, D., de Cheveigne, A., McAdams, S., Collet, L. (Eds.), Auditory Signal Processing: Physiology, Psychoaccoustics, and Models. Springer, New York, pp. 67-74] demonstrated that the magnitude of suppression for a higher-frequency, fixed-level suppressor decreases with increasing level of the suppressee. This suggests a linearization of the basilar membrane response in presence of a high-frequency suppressor. The present study expands these results to a low-frequency suppressor of varying intensity levels. Detection of a 10-ms, 4.0-kHz probe was measured under different forward-masking conditions: one with a 200-ms, 4.0-kHz masker (suppressee) presented with no suppressor and another with the same masker paired with a 2.2-kHz, 200-ms suppressor. The 4.0-kHz masker level was varied adaptively and a range of probe levels was used to measure the growth of suppression. Results indicate that (1) the magnitude of suppression increases with increasing suppressor level and (2) generally, the probe level was not related to the magnitude of suppression.

  16. Alternative Approaches for Incentivizing the Frequency Responsive Reserve Ancillary Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Tuohy, A.; Brooks, D.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency responsive reserve is the autonomous response of generators and demand response to deviations of system frequency, usually as a result of the instantaneous outage of a large supplier. Frequency responsive reserve arrests the frequency decline resulting in the stabilization of system frequency, and avoids the triggering of under-frequency load-shedding or the reaching of unstable frequencies that could ultimately lead to system blackouts. It is a crucial service required to maintain a reliable and secure power system. Regions with restructured electricity markets have historically had a lack of incentives for frequency responsive reserve because generators inherently provided the response and on large interconnected systems, more than sufficient response has been available. This may not be the case in future systems due to new technologies and declining response. This paper discusses the issues that can occur without proper incentives and even disincentives, and proposes alternatives to introduce incentives for resources to provide frequency responsive reserve to ensure an efficient and reliable power system.

  17. Open-loop frequency response for a chaotic masking system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xian-Gao; Yu Pei; Huang Wei

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new numerical simulation approach is proposed for the study of open-loop frequency response of a chaotic masking system. Using Chua's circuit and the Lorenz system as illustrative examples, we have shown that one can employ chaos synchronization to separate the feedback network from a chaotic masking system, and then use numerical simulation to obtain the open-loop synchronization response, the phase response, and the amplitude response of a chaotic masking system. Based on the analysis of the frequency response, we have also proved that changing the amplitude of the exciting (input) signal within normal working domain does not influence the frequency response of the chaotic masking system. The new numerical simulation method developed in this paper can be extended to consider the open-loop frequency response of other systems described by differential or difference equations.

  18. Condenser Microphone Protective Grid Correction for High Frequency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erik; Bennett, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    Use of a protective grid on small diameter microphones can prolong the lifetime of the unit, but the high frequency effects can complicate data interpretation. Analytical methods have been developed to correct for the grid effect at high frequencies. Specifically, the analysis pertains to quantifying the microphone protective grid response characteristics in the acoustic near field of a rocket plume noise source. A frequency response function computation using two microphones will be explained. Experimental and instrumentation setup details will be provided. The resulting frequency response function for a B&K 4944 condenser microphone protective grid will be presented, along with associated uncertainties

  19. Application of the Frequency Spectrum to Spectral Similarity Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Several frequency-based spectral similarity measures, derived from commonly-used ones, are developed for hyperspectral image classification based on the frequency domain. Since the frequency spectrum (magnitude spectrum of the original signature for each pixel from hyperspectral data can clearly reflect the spectral features of different types of land covers, we replace the original spectral signature with its frequency spectrum for calculating the existing spectral similarity measure. The frequency spectrum is symmetrical around the direct current (DC component; thus, we take one-half of the frequency spectrum from the DC component to the highest frequency component as the input signature. Furthermore, considering the fact that the low frequencies include most of the frequency energy, we can optimize the classification result by choosing the ratio of the frequency spectrum (from the DC component to the highest frequency component involved in the calculation. In our paper, the frequency-based measures based on the spectral gradient angle (SAM, spectral information divergence (SID, spectral correlation mapper (SCM, Euclidean distance (ED, normalized Euclidean distance (NED and SID × sin(SAM (SsS measures are called the F-SAM, F-SID, F-SCM, F-ED, F-NED and F-SsS, respectively. In the experiment, three commonly-used hyperspectral remote sensing images are employed as test data. The frequency-based measures proposed here are compared to the corresponding existing ones in terms of classification accuracy. The classification results by parameter optimization are also analyzed. The results show that, although not all frequency-based spectral similarity measures are better than the original ones, some frequency-based measures, such as the F-SsS and F-SID, exhibit a relatively better performance and have more robust applications than the other spectral similarity measures.

  20. Aircraft Fault Detection Using Real-Time Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.

    2016-01-01

    A real-time method for estimating time-varying aircraft frequency responses from input and output measurements was demonstrated. The Bat-4 subscale airplane was used with NASA Langley Research Center's AirSTAR unmanned aerial flight test facility to conduct flight tests and collect data for dynamic modeling. Orthogonal phase-optimized multisine inputs, summed with pilot stick and pedal inputs, were used to excite the responses. The aircraft was tested in its normal configuration and with emulated failures, which included a stuck left ruddervator and an increased command path latency. No prior knowledge of a dynamic model was used or available for the estimation. The longitudinal short period dynamics were investigated in this work. Time-varying frequency responses and stability margins were tracked well using a 20 second sliding window of data, as compared to a post-flight analysis using output error parameter estimation and a low-order equivalent system model. This method could be used in a real-time fault detection system, or for other applications of dynamic modeling such as real-time verification of stability margins during envelope expansion tests.

  1. Root responses to nitrogen pulse frequency under different nitrogen amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing-Ye; Wang, Pu; Liu, Lu; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2017-04-01

    Responses of morphology and biomass allocation of roots to frequency of nitrogen (N) pulse potentially influence the fitness of plants, but such responses may be determined by root size. We grew 12 plant species of three functional groups (grasses, forbs, and legumes) under two N pulse frequencies (high vs. low supply frequency) and two N amounts (high vs. low supply amount). Compared to low-amount N supply, high-amount N supply stimulated biomass accumulation and root growth by either increasing the thickness and length of roots or decreasing the root mass fraction. Compared to low-frequency N supply, high-frequency N supply improved biomass accumulation and root growth in forbs or grasses, but not in legumes. Furthermore, the magnitude of the response to N frequency was significantly negatively correlated with root size at the species scale, but this was only true when the N amount was high. We conclude that root responses to N frequency are related to plant functional types, and non-legume species is more sensitive to N frequency than legume species. Our results also suggest that root size is a determinant of root responses to N frequency when N supply amount is high.

  2. Voice Pitch Elicited Frequency Following Response in Chinese Elderlies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Perceptual and electrophysiological studies have found reduced speech discrimination in quiet and noisy environment, delayed neural timing, decreased neural synchrony, and decreased temporal processing ability in elderlies, even those with normal hearing. However, recent studies have also demonstrated that language experience and auditory training enhance the temporal dynamics of sound encoding in the auditory brainstem response. The purpose of this study was to explore the pitch processing ability at the brainstem level in an aging population that has a tonal language background.Method: Mandarin speaking younger (n=12 and older (n=12 adults were recruited for this study. All participants had normal audiometric test results and normal suprathreshold click-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABR. To record Frequency Following Responses (FFR elicited by Mandarin lexical tones, two Mandarin Chinese syllables with different fundamental frequency pitch contours (Flat Tone and Falling Tone were presented at 70 dB SPL. Fundamental frequencies (f0 of both the stimulus and the responses were extracted and compared to individual brainstem responses. Two indices were used to examine different aspects of pitch processing ability at the brainstem level: Pitch Strength and Pitch Correlation. Results: Lexical tone elicited FFR were overall weaker in the older adult group compared to their younger adult counterpart. Measured by Pitch Strength and Pitch Correlation, statistically significant group differences were only found when the tone with a falling f0 (Falling Tone were used as the stimulus.Conclusion: Results of this study demonstrated that in a tonal language speaking population, pitch processing ability at the brainstem level of older adults are not as strong and robust as their younger counterparts. Findings of this study are consistent with previous reports on brainstem responses of older adults whose native language is English. On the

  3. Ultrasonographic Measures of Volume Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2017-0005 Ultrasonographic Measures of Volume Responsiveness Sarah B. Murthi, MD February 2017...use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. Qualified requestors may obtain copies of this report from the Defense Technical...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultrasonographic Measures of Volume Responsiveness 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-13-2-6D10 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  4. Test method of frequency response based on diamond surface acoustic wave devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-ming; YANG Bao-he; WU Xiao-guo; WU Yi-zhuo

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce the noises affixed to the signals when testing high frequency devices, a single-port test mode (S11) is used to test frequency response of high frequency (GHz) and dual-port surface acoustic wave devices (SAWDs) in this paper.The feasibility of the test is proved by simulating the Fabry-Perot model. The frequency response of the high-frequency dual-port resonant-type diamond SAWD is measured by S11 and the dual-port test mode (S21), respectively. The results show that the quality factor of the device is 51.29 and the 3 dB bandwidth is 27.8 MHz by S11 -mode measurement, which is better than the S21 mode, and is consistent with the frequency response curve by simulation.

  5. High Precision Measurements Using High Frequency Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Aohan; Sakurai, Atsunori; Liu, Liang; Edman, Fredrik; Öwall, Viktor; Pullerits, Tonu; Karki, Khadga J

    2014-01-01

    Generalized lock-in amplifiers use digital cavities with Q-factors as high as 5X10^8. In this letter, we show that generalized lock-in amplifiers can be used to analyze microwave (giga-hertz) signals with a precision of few tens of hertz. We propose that the physical changes in the medium of propagation can be measured precisely by the ultra-high precision measurement of the signal. We provide evidence to our proposition by verifying the Newton's law of cooling by measuring the effect of change in temperature on the phase and amplitude of the signals propagating through two calibrated cables. The technique could be used to precisely measure different physical properties of the propagation medium, for example length, resistance, etc. Real time implementation of the technique can open up new methodologies of in-situ virtual metrology in material design.

  6. Low-frequency measurements of the CMB spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; Amici, G.D.; Levin, S.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. (U. C. Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (USA) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (USA) Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (USA)); Sironi, G. (Physics Department, University of Milano (Italy)); Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G. (IFCTR/CNR-Milano (Italy))

    1990-01-15

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in Calfornia. On average, these measurements suggests a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amundsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82, 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements possible from a polar observing site.

  7. Low-Frequency Measurements of the CMB Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Levin, S.; Limon,M.; Smoot, George F.; Sironi, G.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G.

    1989-10-01

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in California. On average, these measurements suggest a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amundsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82, 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements possible from a polar observing site.

  8. Low-frequency versus high-frequency synchronisation in chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Gøtsche-Rasmussen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the frequency specific contribution to the auditory brainstem response (ABR) of chirp stimuli. Frequency rising chirps were designed to compensate for the cochlear traveling wave delay, and lead to larger wave-V amplitudes than for click stimuli as more auditory nerve fibr...

  9. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  10. Free-field calibration of measurement microphones at high frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Torras Rosell, Antoni;

    2011-01-01

    Measurement microphones are typically calibrated in a free field at frequencies up to 50 kHz. This is a sufficiently high frequency for the most of sound measurement applications related with noise assessment. However, other applications such as assessment of the noise emitted by ultrasound clean...

  11. 47 CFR 18.309 - Frequency range of measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency range of measurements. 18.309 Section 18.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.309 Frequency range of measurements. (a) For field...

  12. Measurement of high-degree solar oscillation frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, K. T.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Hill, F.

    1995-01-01

    We present m-averaged solar p- and f-mode oscillation frequencies over the frequency range nu greater than 1.8 and less than 5.0 mHz and the spherical harmonic degree range l greater than or equal to 100 and less than or equal to 1200 from full-disk, 1000 x 1024 pixel, Ca II intensity images collected 1993 June 22-25 with a temporal cadence of 60 s. We itemize the sources and magnitudes of statistical and systematic uncertainties and of small frequency corrections, and we show that our frequencies represent an improvement in accuracy and coverage over previous measurements. Our frequencies agree at the 2 micro Hz level with Mount Wilson frequencies determined for l less than or equal to 600 from full-disk images, and we find systematic offsets of 10-20 micro Hz with respect to frequencies measured from Big Bear and La Palma observations. We give evidence that these latter offsets are indicative of spatial scaling uncertainties associated with the analysis of partial-disk images. In comparison with theory, our p-mode frequencies agree within 10 micro Hz of frequencies predicted by the Los Alamos model but are as much as 100 micro Hz smaller than frequencies predicted by the Denmark and Yale models at degrees near 1000. We also find systematic differences between our n = 0 frequencies and the frequencies closely agreed upon by all three models.

  13. Absolute distance measurement using frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer calibrated by an optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuejian; Wei, Haoyun; Zhang, Hongyuan; Ren, Libing; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jitao

    2013-04-01

    We present a frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer to measure an absolute distance based on a frequency-tunable diode laser calibrated by an optical frequency comb (OFC) and an interferometric phase measurement system. The laser frequency-sweeping process is calibrated by the OFC within a range of 200 GHz and an accuracy of 1.3 kHz, which brings about a precise temporal synthetic wavelength of 1.499 mm. The interferometric phase measurement system consisting of the analog signal processing circuit and the digital phase meter achieves a phase difference resolution better than 0.1 deg. As the laser frequency is sweeping, the absolute distance can be determined by measuring the phase difference variation of the interference signals. In the laboratory condition, our experimental scheme realizes micrometer accuracy over meter distance.

  14. Swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement of microstrip lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    1987-01-01

    Microstrip lines used in microwave integrated circuits are dispersive. Because a microstrip line is an open structure, the dispersion can not be derived with pure TEM, TE, or TM mode analysis. Dispersion analysis has commonly been done using a spectral domain approach, and dispersion measurement has been made with high Q microstrip ring resonators. Since the dispersion of a microstrip line is fully characterized by the frequency dependent phase velocity of the line, dispersion measurement of microstrip lines requires the measurement of the line wavelength as a function of frequency. In this paper, a swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement is described.

  15. Research on influencing factors of LED frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Tianyu; Qian, Keyuan

    2017-08-01

    In LED-based visible light communication, the choice of light source device is an important issue. In this paper, the frequency response (FR) of different types of blue LEDs and phosphors is measured. On the basis of that, this paper proposes the FR model of phosphor and supplements the FR model of blue LED. And also, a method is proposed to calculate the FR of phosphor coated LEDs using FR of blue LED and that of phosphor. On this basis, this paper analyses the influencing factors of the FR of blue LED and FR of phosphor respectively. It provides guidance for not only selecting the light source device but also selecting and blending phosphor in visible light communication based on LED.

  16. Regional frequency response analysis under normal and emergency conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevrani, Hassan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj, PO Box 416 (Iran); Ledwich, Gerard; Ford, Jason J. [School of Engineering Systems, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4001 (Australia); Dong, Zhao Yang [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (China)

    2009-05-15

    This paper presents a frequency response analysis approach suitable for a power system control area in a wide range of operating conditions. The analytic approach uses the well-known system frequency response model for the turbine-governor and load units to obtain the mathematical representation of the basic concepts. Primary and supplementary frequency controls are properly considered and the effect of emergency control/protection schemes is included. Therefore, the proposed analysis/modeling approach could be grainfully used for the power system operation during the contingency and normal conditions. Time-domain nonlinear simulations with a power system example showed that the results agree with those predicted analytically. (author)

  17. Advanced two-way satellite frequency transfer by carrier-phase and carrier-frequency measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujieda, Miho; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Amagai, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Carrier-phase measurement is one of the ways to improve the measurement resolution of two-way satellite frequency transfer. We introduce two possible methods for carrier-phase measurement: direct carrier-phase detection identified by Two-Way Carrier-Phase (TWCP) and the use of carrier-frequency information identified by Two-Way Carrier Frequency (TWCF). We performed the former using an arbitrary waveform generator and an analog-to-digital sampler and the latter using a conventional modem. The TWCF measurement using the modem had a resolution of 10-13 and the result agreed with that obtained by GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer in a 1500 km baseline. The measurement accuracy may have been limited by the poor frequency resolution of the modem; however, the TWCF measurement was able to improve the stability of conventional two-way satellite frequency transfer. Additionally, we show that the TWCP measurement system has the potential to achieve a frequency stability of 10-17.

  18. Constant-Frequency Pulsed Phase-Locked-Loop Measuring Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Kushnick, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    Constant-frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop measuring device is sensitive to small changes in phase velocity and easily automated. Based on use of fixed-frequency oscillator in measuring small changes in ultrasonic phase velocity when sample exposed to such changes in environment as changes in pressure and temperature. Automatically balances electrical phase shifts against acoustical phase shifts to obtain accurate measurements of acoustical phase shifts.

  19. Phase responses of harmonics reflected from radio-frequency electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaro, Gregory J.; McGowan, Sean F.; Gallagher, Kyle A.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Martone, Anthony F.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    The phase responses of nonlinear-radar targets illuminated by stepped frequencies are studied. Data is presented for an experimental radar and two commercial electronic targets at short standoff ranges. The amplitudes and phases of harmonics generated by each target at each frequency are captured over a 100-MHz-wide transmit band. As in the authors' prior work, target detection is demonstrated by receiving at least one harmonic of at least one transmit frequency. In the present work, experiments confirm that the phase of a harmonic reflected from a radio-frequency electronic target at a standoff distance is linear versus frequency. Similar to traditional wideband radar, the change of the reflected phase with respect to frequency indicates the range to the nonlinear target.

  20. TOPOLOGY OPTIMIZATION OF TRUSS STRUCTURE WITH FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY AND FREQUENCY DOMAIN DYNAMIC RESPONSE CONSTRAINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jin; Wang De-yu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA) is applied to topology optimization of truss structure with frequency domain excitations. The optimization constraints include fundamental frequency, displacement responses under force excitations and acceleration responses under foundation acceleration excitations. The roulette wheel selection operator, adaptive crossover and mutation operators are used as genetic operators. Some heuristic strategies are put forward to direct the deletion of the extra bars and nodes on truss structures. Three examples demonstrate that the proposed method can yield the optimum structure form and the lightest weight of the given ground structure while satisfying dynamic response constraints.

  1. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  2. Collective Thomson scattering measurements with high frequency resolution at TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the development and first results of a receiver system for the collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic at TEXTOR with frequency resolution in the megahertz range or better. The improved frequency resolution expands the diagnostic range and utility of CTS measurements in general...

  3. Precision frequency measurement of visible intercombination lines of strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, G; Cancio, P; Drullinger, R; Giusfredi, G; Poli, N; Prevedelli, M; Toninelli, C; Tino, G M

    2003-12-12

    We report the direct frequency measurement of the visible 5s(2) 1S0-5s5p 3P1 intercombination line of strontium that is considered a possible candidate for a future optical-frequency standard. The frequency of a cavity-stabilized laser is locked to the saturated fluorescence in a thermal Sr atomic beam and is measured with an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through a global positioning system signal. The 88Sr transition is measured to be at 434 829 121 311 (10) kHz. We measure also the 88Sr-86Sr isotope shift to be 163 817.4 (0.2) kHz.

  4. Measuring the Corticosteroid Responsiveness Endophenotype in Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmer, George L.; Wu, Ann Chen; Rosner, Bernard; McGeachie, Michael J.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inhaled corticosteroids are the most commonly used controller therapies for asthma, producing treatment responses in six clinical phenotypes; lung function, bronchodilator response, airway responsiveness, symptoms, need for oral steroids and frequency of emergency department visits and hospitalizations. We hypothesize that treatment response in all of these phenotypes is modulated by a single, quantative corticosteroid responsiveness endophenotype. Objective To develop a composite phenotype that combines multiple clinical phenotypes to measure corticosteroid responsiveness with high accuracy, high stability across populations, and high robustness to missing data. Methods We employed principal component analysis (PCA) to determine a composite corticosteroid responsiveness phenotype that we tested in four replication populations. We evaluated the relative accuracy with which the composite and clinical phenotypes measure the endophenotype using treatment effect area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results In the study population, the composite phenotype measured the endophenotype with an AUC of 0.74, significantly exceeding the AUCs of the six individual clinical phenotypes, which ranged from 0.56 (p-value <.001) to 0.67 (p-value 0.015). In four replication populations with a total of 22 clinical phenotypes available, the composite phenotype AUC ranged from 0.69 to 0.73, significantly exceeded the AUCs of 14 phenotypes, and was not significantly exceeded by any single phenotype. Conclusion The composite phenotype measured the endophenotype with higher accuracy, higher stability across populations, and higher robustness to missing data than any clinical phenotype. This should provide the capability to model corticosteroid pharmacologic response and resistance with increased accuracy and reproducibility. PMID:25951964

  5. Dynamic frequency tuning of electric and magnetic metamaterial response

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, John F; Averitt, Richard; Padilla, Willie; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2014-09-16

    A geometrically modifiable resonator is comprised of a resonator disposed on a substrate, and a means for geometrically modifying the resonator. The geometrically modifiable resonator can achieve active optical and/or electronic control of the frequency response in metamaterials and/or frequency selective surfaces, potentially with sub-picosecond response times. Additionally, the methods taught here can be applied to discrete geometrically modifiable circuit components such as inductors and capacitors. Principally, controlled conductivity regions, using either reversible photodoping or voltage induced depletion activation, are used to modify the geometries of circuit components, thus allowing frequency tuning of resonators without otherwise affecting the bulk substrate electrical properties. The concept is valid over any frequency range in which metamaterials are designed to operate.

  6. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked loop measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Kushnick, Peter W. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A measuring apparatus is presented that uses a fixed frequency oscillator to measure small changes in the phase velocity ultrasonic sound when a sample is exposed to environmental changes such as changes in pressure, temperature, etc. The invention automatically balances electrical phase shifts against the acoustical phase shifts in order to obtain an accurate measurement of electrical phase shifts.

  7. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked loop measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Cantrell, John H.

    1993-06-01

    A measuring apparatus is presented that uses a fixed frequency oscillator to measure small changes in the phase velocity ultrasonic sound when a sample is exposed to environmental changes such as changes in pressure, temperature, etc. The invention automatically balances electrical phase shifts against the acoustical phase shifts in order to obtain an accurate measurement of electrical phase shifts.

  8. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked loop measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Cantrell, John H.

    1991-08-01

    A measuring apparatus is presented that uses a fixed frequency oscillator to measure small changes in the phase velocity ultrasonic sound when a sample is exposed to environmental changes such as changes in pressure, temperature, etc. The invention automatically balances electrical phase shifts against the acoustical phase shifts in order to obtain an accurate measurement of electrical phase shifts.

  9. Radio-frequency measurement in semiconductor quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, TianYi; Chen, MingBo; Cao, Gang; Li, HaiOu; Xiao, Ming; Guo, GuoPing

    2017-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted wide interest for the potential realization of quantum computation. To realize efficient quantum computation, fast manipulation and the corresponding readout are necessary. In the past few decades, considerable progress of quantum manipulation has been achieved experimentally. To meet the requirements of high-speed readout, radio-frequency (RF) measurement has been developed in recent years, such as RF-QPC (radio-frequency quantum point contact) and RF-DGS (radio-frequency dispersive gate sensor). Here we specifically demonstrate the principle of the radio-frequency reflectometry, then review the development and applications of RF measurement, which provides a feasible way to achieve high-bandwidth readout in quantum coherent control and also enriches the methods to study these artificial mesoscopic quantum systems. Finally, we prospect the future usage of radio-frequency reflectometry in scaling-up of the quantum computing models.

  10. Instantaneous frequency measurement based on transversal microwave filters with high resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaji Dong; Yuan Yu; Xinliang Zhang; Dexiu Huang

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel photonic technique for microwave frequency measurement based on transversal microwave filters with high resolution. Two parallel microwave filters with sine and cosine frequency responses are obtained by cross gain modulation in a single semiconductor optical amplifier, which introduces two different frequency responses to achieve an amplitude comparison function. We also demonstrate a proofof-concept experiment. The measurement error is less than ±0.04 GHz for the first band range of 0-3.45 GHz and less than ±0.03 GHz for the second band range of 3.45-5.8 GHz. Our scheme is found to be capable of being extended for larger frequency range measurements using a shorter fiber length.%@@ We propose a novel photonic technique for microwave frequency measurement based on transversal microwave filters with high resolution.Two parallel microwave filters with sine and cosine frequency responses are obtained by cross gain modulation in a single semiconductor optical amplifier, which introduces two different frequency responses to achieve an amplitude comparison function.We also demonstrate a proofof-concept experiment.

  11. An Analytic Method for Measuring Accurate Fundamental Frequency Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Soon Ryul; Park Jong Keun [Seoul National University, Seoul(Korea); Kang, Sang Hee [Myongji University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    This paper proposes an analytic method for measuring the accurate fundamental frequency component of a fault current signal distorted with a DC-offset, a characteristic frequency component, and harmonics. The proposed algorithm is composed of four stages: sine filer, linear filter, Prony's method, and measurement. The sine filter and the linear filter eliminate harmonics and the fundamental frequency component, respectively. Then Prony's method is used to estimate the parameters of the DC-offset and the characteristic frequency component. Finally, the fundamental frequency component is measured by compensating the sine-filtered signal with the estimated parameters. The performance evaluation of the proposed method is presented for a-phase to ground faults on a 345 kV 200 km overhead transmission line. The EMTP is used to generate fault current signals under different fault locations and fault inception angles. It is shown that the analytic method accurately measures the fundamental frequency component regardless of the characteristic frequency component as well as the DC-offset.(author). 19 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    to the highest level present in a room, rather than a room average level. In order to ensure representative noise measurements, different positions were investigated based on theoretical considerations and observations from numerical room simulations. In addition measurements were performed in three different......Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms is problematic due to standing wave patterns. The spatial variation in the sound pressure level can typically be as much as 20-30 dB. For assessment of annoyance from low-frequency noise in dwellings, it is important to measure a level close...... rooms. The sound pressure level was measured 1) in three-dimensional corners and 2) according to current Swedish and Danish measurement methods. Furthermore, the entire sound pressure distributions were measured by scanning. The Swedish and Danish measurement methods include a corner measurement...

  13. Frequency- dependent cell responses to an electromagnetic stimulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    External electric field (EF) acting on cells in the ionic environment can trigger a variety of mechanical and chemical cell responses that regulate cell functions, such as adhesion, migration and cell signaling; thus manipulation of EF can be used in therapeutic applications. To optimize this process, realistic studies of EF interaction with cells are essential. We have developed a combined theoretical-experimental approach to study cell response to the external EF in the native configuration. The cell is modeled as a membrane-enclosed hemisphere which is cultured on a substrate and is surrounded by electrolyte. Maxwell's equations are solved numerically (ANSYS-HFSS) to obtain 3D EF distribution inside and near the cell subjected to an external EF. Theoretical results indicate that the cell response is frequency dependent, where at low frequency EF is excluded from the cell interior while EF penetration into the cell increases for higher frequencies. In both regimes the spatial distribution and strength of induced EF in membrane varies with frequency. Experimental results are consistent with theoretical predictions and show frequency-dependent cell response, including both membrane-initiated and intracellular pathway activation and growth factor release. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  14. Characterizing Fracture Property Using Resistivity Measured at Different Frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, Roland N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Li, Kewen [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The objective was to develop geophysical approaches to detecting and evaluating the fractures created or existing in EGS and other geothermal reservoirs by measuring the resistivity at different frequencies. This project has been divided into two phases: Phase I (first year): Proof of Concept – develop the resistivity approach and verify the effect of frequency on the resistivity in rocks with artificial or natural fractures over a wide range of frequencies. Phase II: Prototyping Part 1 (second year): measure the resistivity in rocks with fractures of different apertures, different length, and different configurations at different frequencies. Part 2 (third year): develop mathematical models and the resistivity method; infer the fracture properties using the measured resistivity data.

  15. Frequency Dependence of Measured Massive MIMO Channel Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveras Martínez, Àlex; Carvalho, Elisabeth De; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum;

    2016-01-01

    A multi-user massive MIMO measurement campaign is conducted to study the channel propagation characteristics (e.g. user correlation, sum of eigenvalues and condition number), focusing on the stability over frequencies and the impact of the array aperture. We use 3 arrays with 64 antennas (6m linear...... array, 2m linear array and 25cm by 28cm squared 2D array) serving 8 users holding a handset with 2 antennas. The study of the measurements shows that the propagation characteristics of the channel are stable for all the measured frequencies. We also observe that user proximity and user handgrip...... stabilize the studied properties of the channel across the frequencies, and in such case the larger the aperture of the array the more stable the properties. The number of base station antennas improves the propagation characteristics of the channel and stabilizes the properties in the frequency domain....

  16. Prestress Force Identification for Externally Prestressed Concrete Beam Based on Frequency Equation and Measured Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luning Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A prestress force identification method for externally prestressed concrete uniform beam based on the frequency equation and the measured frequencies is developed. For the purpose of the prestress force identification accuracy, we first look for the appropriate method to solve the free vibration equation of externally prestressed concrete beam and then combine the measured frequencies with frequency equation to identify the prestress force. To obtain the exact solution of the free vibration equation of multispan externally prestressed concrete beam, an analytical model of externally prestressed concrete beam is set up based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and the function relation between prestress variation and vibration displacement is built. The multispan externally prestressed concrete beam is taken as the multiple single-span beams which must meet the bending moment and rotation angle boundary conditions, the free vibration equation is solved using sublevel simultaneous method and the semi-analytical solution of the free vibration equation which considered the influence of prestress on section rigidity and beam length is obtained. Taking simply supported concrete beam and two-span concrete beam with external tendons as examples, frequency function curves are obtained with the measured frequencies into it and the prestress force can be identified using the abscissa of the crosspoint of frequency functions. Identification value of the prestress force is in good agreement with the test results. The method can accurately identify prestress force of externally prestressed concrete beam and trace the trend of effective prestress force.

  17. Estimation of Frequency Response Functions by Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    1996-01-01

    A method for estimating frequency response functions by the Random Decrement technique is investigated in this paper. The method is based on the auto and cross Random Decrement functions of the input process and the output process of a linear system. The Fourier transformation of these functions...... is used to calculate the frequency response functions. The Random Decrement functions are obtained by averaging time segments of the processes under given initial conditions. The method will reduce the leakage problem, because of the natural decay of the Random Decrement functions. Also, the influence...

  18. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  19. High‐frequency induced polarization measurements of hydrocarbon‐bearing rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burtman, Vladimir; Endo, Masashi; Zhdanov, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated induced polarization (IP) effects in hydrocarbon‐bearing artificial rocks at frequencies greater than 100 Hz. We have examined the instrumental and electrode phase responses of Zonge International's complex resistivity (CR) system, and optimized the performance of the Zonge...... system for IP measurements over the 1 mHz to 10 kHz frequency range. The reliability of the high‐frequency IP measurements were confirmed by independent measurement of the same samples using the Novocontrol BDS 80 system. Our results confirm the presence of IP effects in hydrocarbon‐bearing rocks...

  20. Measurements and modelling of low-frequency disturbances in induction machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiringer, T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Electric Power Engineering

    1996-12-01

    The thesis deals with the dynamic response of the induction machine to low frequency perturbations in the shaft torque, supply voltage and supply frequency. Also the response of a two-machine group connected to a weak grid is investigated. The results predicted by various induction models are compared with measurements performed on a laboratory set-up. Furthermore, the influence of machine and grid parameters, machine temperature, phase compensating capacitors, skin effect, saturation level and operating points is studied. The results predicted by the fifth-order non-linear Park model agree well with the measured induction machine responses to shaft torque, supply frequency and voltage magnitude perturbations. To determine the electric power response to very low-frequency perturbations in the magnitude of the supply voltage, the Park model must be modified to take varying iron losses into account. The temperature and supply frequency affect the low frequency dynamics of the induction machine significantly. The static shaft torque is, however, of importance for determining the responses to voltage magnitude perturbations. The performance of reduced-order induction machine models depends on the type of induction machine investigated. Best suited to be represented by reduced-order models are high-slip machines as well as machines that have a low ratio between the stator resistance and leakage reactances. A first-order model can predict the rotor speed, electrodynamic torque and electric power responses to shaft torque and supply frequency perturbations up to a perturbation frequency of at least 1 Hz. A second-order model can determine the same responses also for higher perturbation frequencies, at least up to 3 Hz. Using a third-order model all the responses can be determined up to at least 10 Hz. 48 refs, 45 figs, 14 tabs

  1. A Survey of Advanced Microwave Frequency Measurement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Swaroop Khare

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwaves are radio waves with wavelengths ranging from as long as one meter to as short as one millimeter, or equivalently, with frequencies between 300 MHz and 300 GHz. The science of photonics includes the generation, emission, modulation, signal processing, switching, transmission, amplification, detection and sensing of light. Microwave photonics has been introduced for achieving ultra broadband signal processing. Instantaneous Frequency Measurement (IFM receivers play an important role in electronic warfare. Technologies used for signal processing, include conventional direct Radio Frequency (RF techniques, digital techniques, intermediate frequency (IF techniques and photonic techniques. Direct RF techniques suffer an increased loss, high dispersion, and unwanted radiation problems in high frequencies. The systems that use traditional RF techniques can be bulky and often lack the agility required to perform advanced signal processing in rapidly changing environments. In this paper we discussed a survey of Microwave Frequency Measurement Techniques. The microwaves techniques are categorized based upon different approaches. This paper provides the major advancement in the Microwave Frequency MeasurementTechniques research; using these approaches the features and categories in the surveyed existing work.

  2. Measurement of background translocation frequencies in individuals with clones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    In the leukemia case the unseparated B and T lymphocytes had a high translocation frequency even after 0.0014, respectively. After purging all clones from the data, the translocation frequencies for Bio 8 and Bio 23 were 0.00750.0014 and 0.0073 metaphases were scored for chromosomal aberrations,, specifically reciprocal translocations, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Metaphase spreads were used from two healthy, unexposed individuals (not exposed to radiation, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) and one early B- precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patient (metaphase spreads from both separated T lymphocytes and unseparated B and T lymphocytes were scored). All three individuals had an abnormally high translocation frequency. The high translocation frequencies resulted from clonal expansion of specific translocated chromosomes. I show in this thesis that by purging (discounting or removing) clones from the data of unexposed individuals, one can obtain true background translocation frequencies. In two cases, Bio 8 and Bio 23, the measured translocation frequency for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 was 0.0124 purging all of the clones from the data. This high translocation frequency may be due to a low frequency of some clones and may not be recognized. The separated T lymphocytes had a higher translocation frequency than expected.

  3. Electrode Response in Seismo-Electric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, M.; Devi, M. S.; Cougoulat, G.; Garambois, S.

    2014-12-01

    Seismo-electric measurements consist in recording the transient electric fields generated by seismic waves propagating in fluid-filled porous or fractured media. These electric fields are usually measured by voltage differences between two electrodes. Unfortunately, the electrode spacing and their locations on the ground surface have a direct influence on the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements, on the recorded waveforms and on their arrival times. Using a filter theory approach and full waveform numerical simulations of the coupled seismic and electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in porous media, we show that the co-seismic electric arrivals and the small-amplitude EM interface response can be severely distorted and/or attenuated by conventional surface electrode layouts. To this end, we have computed synthetic electrograms providing the electric potential, to allow us to determine voltage differences between two arbitrary locations of electrodes. Unlike the low-pass filter obtained by connecting two geophones in series, the filter associated with a voltage difference is shown to be a band-pass filter. As a result, not only horizontally and obliquely propagating waves but also vertically propagating waves undergo selective frequency attenuation in the 0-150 Hz frequency band used in field measurements. It also turns out that electrode spacing cannot be optimized to enhance the electric signature of typical seismic reflections and EM interface response, neither with horizontal dipoles nor with reasonably sized vertical dipoles. To circumvent this problem, we consider arrangements of 3 and 5 electrodes analogous to multilayer capacitors in electronics. We show that such arrangements are ideally described by low-pass filters preserving the quasi-plane waves corresponding to the EM interface response. However, in reality, these benefits are challenged by the imperfect coupling between the electrodes and the ground, represented by an electrode contact resistance

  4. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyu; Ji, Shengchang; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jinyu; Liu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF) is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  5. Control and Coordination of Frequency Responsive Residential Water Heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Tess L.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Pratt, Richard M.

    2016-07-31

    Demand-side frequency control can complement traditional generator controls to maintain the stability of large electric systems in the face of rising uncertainty and variability associated with renewable energy resources. This paper presents a hierarchical frequency-based load control strategy that uses a supervisor to flexibly adjust control gains that a population of end-use loads respond to in a decentralized manner to help meet the NERC BAL-003-1 frequency response standard at both the area level and interconnection level. The load model is calibrated and used to model populations of frequency-responsive water heaters in a PowerWorld simulation of the U.S. Western Interconnection (WECC). The proposed design is implemented and demonstrated on physical water heaters in a laboratory setting. A significant fraction of the required frequency response in the WECC could be supplied by electric water heaters alone at penetration levels of less than 15%, while contributing to NERC requirements at the interconnection and area levels.

  6. Neuromagnetic responses to frequency modulation of a continuous tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, R; Mäkelä, J P

    1986-01-01

    Neuromagnetic responses to frequency modulation of a continuous tone were studied in nine subjects. The latencies of the transient responses increased and the amplitudes decreased with decreasing speed of modulation. The equivalent dipoles for modulation of a 1,000 Hz tone were slightly but statistically significantly anterior to the dipoles activated by modulation of a 500 Hz tone. The generation mechanisms of N100m are discussed.

  7. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  8. Responsiveness of Clinical Outcome Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    to condition alterations in PrS patients and should be added as an outcome measure to standard questionnaires used serially. The prospective acceptable outcome method offers a benchmark by which clinicians can balance any mismatch between what are acceptable outcomes to the patient with what is realistically......, the most commonly used retrospective method to establish the MCID has inherent methodological flaws. Perhaps it would be more prudent to ask LBP patients what is an acceptable result of the treatment before it begins? Objectives The overall objective was to establish the responsiveness and MCID in specific...... subgroups of patients with LBP. In addition, we explored whether low back pain patients were able to determine an acceptable treatment outcome before it began. Methods The responsiveness in subgroups study. An extensive cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the ODI was carried out on patients seen...

  9. Modal Identification from Ambient Responses Using Frequency Domain Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Zhang, Lingmi; Andersen, Palle

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a new frequency domain technique is introduced for the modal identification from ambient responses, i.e. in the case where the modal parameters must be estimated without knowing the input exciting the system. By its user friendliness the technique is closely related to the classical...

  10. Modal Identification from Ambient Responses using Frequency Domain Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Zhang, L.; Andersen, P.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a new frequency domain technique is introduced for the modal identification from ambient responses, ie. in the case where the modal parameters must be estimated without knowing the input exciting the system. By its user friendliness the technique is closely related to the classical...

  11. Frequency response as a surrogate eigenvalue problem in topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Ferrari, Federico; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the use of frequency response surrogates for eigenvalue optimization problems in topology optimization that may be used to avoid solving the eigenvalue problem. The motivation is to avoid complications that arise from multiple eigenvalues and the computational complexity as...

  12. Estimation of Frequency Response Functions by Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Asmussen, J. C.

    A method for estimating frequency response functions by the random decrement technique is investigated in this paper. The method is based on the auto and cross Random Decrement functions of the input process and the output process of a linear system. The Fourier transformation of these functions...

  13. Understanding Inertial and Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze and quantify the inertia and frequency responses of wind power plants with different wind turbine technologies (particularly those of fixed speed, variable slip with rotor-resistance controls, and variable speed with vector controls).

  14. A Survey of Advanced Microwave Frequency Measurement Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Anand Swaroop Khare,

    2012-01-01

    Microwaves are radio waves with wavelengths ranging from as long as one meter to as short as one millimeter, or equivalently, with frequencies between 300 MHz and 300 GHz. The science of photonics includes the generation, emission, modulation, signal processing, switching, transmission, amplification, detection and sensing of light. Microwave photonics has been introduced for achieving ultra broadband signal processing. Instantaneous Frequency Measurement (IFM) receivers play an important ro...

  15. Assessing the high frequency behavior of non-polarizable electrodes for spectral induced polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsamad, Feras; Florsch, Nicolas; Schmutz, Myriam; Camerlynck, Christian

    2016-12-01

    During the last decades, the usage of spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements in hydrogeology and detecting environmental problems has been extensively increased. However, the physical mechanisms which are responsible for the induced polarization response over the usual frequency range (typically 1 mHz to 10-20 kHz) require better understanding. The phase shift observed at high frequencies is sometimes attributed to the so-called Maxwell-Wagner polarization which takes place when charges cross an interface. However, SIP measurements of tap water show a phase shift at frequencies higher than 1 kHz, where no Maxwell-Wagner polarization may occur. In this paper, we enlighten the possible origin of this phase shift and deduce its likely relationship with the types of the measuring electrodes. SIP Laboratory measurements of tap water using different types of measuring electrodes (polarizable and non-polarizable electrodes) are carried out to detect the origin of the phase shift at high frequencies and the influence of the measuring electrodes types on the observed complex resistivity. Sodium chloride is used to change the conductivity of the medium in order to quantify the solution conductivity role. The results of these measurements are clearly showing the impact of the measuring electrodes type on the measured phase spectrum while the influence on the amplitude spectrum is negligible. The phenomenon appearing on the phase spectrum at high frequency (> 1 kHz) whatever the electrode type is, the phase shows an increase compared to the theoretical response, and the discrepancy (at least in absolute value) increases with frequency, but it is less severe when medium conductivity is larger. Additionally, the frequency corner is shifted upward in frequency. The dependence of this phenomenon on the conductivity and the measuring electrodes type (electrode-electrolyte interface) seems to be due to some dielectric effects (as an electrical double layer of small

  16. Wind Generation Participation in Power System Frequency Response: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, Vahan; Zhang, Yingchen

    2017-01-01

    The electrical frequency of an interconnected power system must be maintained close its nominal level at all times. Excessive under- and overfrequency excursions can lead to load shedding, instability, machine damage, and even blackouts. There is a rising concern in the electric power industry in recent years about the declining amount of inertia and primary frequency response (PFR) in many interconnections. This decline may continue due to increasing penetrations of inverter-coupled generation and the planned retirements of conventional thermal plants. Inverter-coupled variable wind generation is capable of contributing to PFR and inertia with a response that is different from that of conventional generation. It is not yet entirely understood how such a response will affect the system at different wind power penetration levels. The modeling work presented in this paper evaluates the impact of wind generation's provision of these active power control strategies on a large, synchronous interconnection. All simulations were conducted on the U.S. Western Interconnection with different levels of instantaneous wind power penetrations (up to 80%). The ability of wind power plants to provide PFR - and a combination of synthetic inertial response and PFR - significantly improved the frequency response performance of the system.

  17. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DISPERSION MEASURES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PULSAR TIMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Shannon, R. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Stinebring, D. R., E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au, E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH 44074 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency{sup 2}). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ∼ 4 × 10{sup −5} pc cm{sup −3} for pulsars at ∼1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm{sup −3} but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  18. Conventional frequency ultrasonic biomarkers of cancer treatment response in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Tadayyon, Hadi; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William; Papanicolau, Naum; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2013-06-01

    Conventional frequency quantitative ultrasound in conjunction with textural analysis techniques was investigated to monitor noninvasively the effects of cancer therapies in an in vivo preclinical model. Conventional low-frequency (∼7 MHz) and high-frequency (∼20 MHz) ultrasound was used with spectral analysis, coupled with textural analysis on spectral parametric maps, obtained from xenograft tumor-bearing animals (n = 20) treated with chemotherapy to extract noninvasive biomarkers of treatment response. Results indicated statistically significant differences in quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers in both low- and high-frequency ranges between untreated and treated tumors 12 to 24 hours after treatment. Results of regression analysis indicated a high level of correlation between quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers and tumor cell death estimates from histologic analysis. Applying textural characterization to the spectral parametric maps resulted in an even stronger correlation (r (2) = 0.97). The results obtained in this research demonstrate that quantitative ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency can monitor tissue changes in vivo in response to cancer treatment administration. Using higher order textural information extracted from quantitative ultrasound spectral parametric maps provides more information at a high sensitivity related to tumor cell death.

  19. Frequency response of electrolyte-gated graphene electrodes and transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieschner, Simon; Guimerà, Anton; Cortadella, Ramon G.; Viana, Damià; Makrygiannis, Evangelos; Blaschke, Benno M.; Vieten, Josua; Garrido, Jose A.

    2017-03-01

    The interface between graphene and aqueous electrolytes is of high importance for applications of graphene in the field of biosensors and bioelectronics. The graphene/electrolyte interface is governed by the low density of states of graphene that limits the capacitance near the Dirac point in graphene and the sheet resistance. While several reports have focused on studying the capacitance of graphene as a function of the gate voltage, the frequency response of graphene electrodes and electrolyte-gated transistors has not been discussed so far. Here, we report on the impedance characterization of single layer graphene electrodes and transistors, showing that due to the relatively high sheet resistance of graphene, the frequency response is governed by the distribution of resistive and capacitive circuit elements along the graphene/electrolyte interface. Based on an analytical solution for the impedance of the distributed circuit elements, we model the graphene/electrolyte interface both for the electrode and the transistor configurations. Using this model, we can extract the relevant material and device parameters such as the voltage-dependent intrinsic sheet and series resistances as well as the interfacial capacitance. The model also provides information about the frequency threshold of electrolyte-gated graphene transistors, above which the device exhibits a non-resistive response, offering an important insight into the suitable frequency range of operation of electrolyte-gated graphene devices.

  20. Noise Measurement and Frequency Analysis of Commercially Available Noisy Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise measurement and frequency analysis of commercially available noisy toys were the main purposes of the study. Materials and Methods: 181 noisy toys commonly found in toy stores in different zones of Tehran were selected and categorized into 10 groups. Noise measurement were done at 2, 25, and 50 cm from toys in dBA. The noisiest toy of each group was frequency analyzed in octave bands. Results: The highest and the lowest intensity levels belonged to the gun (mean=112 dBA and range of 100-127 dBA and to the rattle-box (mean=84 dBA and range of 74-95 dBA, respectively. Noise intensity levels significantly decreased with increasing distance except for two toys. Noise frequency analysis indicated energy in effective hearing frequencies. Most of the toys energies were in the middle and high frequency region. Conclusion: As intensity level of the toys is considerable, mostly more than 90 dBA, and also their energy exist in the middle and high frequency region, toys should be considered as a cause of the hearing impairment.

  1. High-precision Absolute Coordinate Measurement using Frequency Scanned Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Tianxiang; Riles, Keith; Li, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report high-precision absolute position measurement performed with frequency scanned interferometry (FSI). We reported previously on measurement of absolute distance with FSI [1]. Absolute position is determined by several related absolute distances measured simultaneously. The achieved precision of 2-dimensional measurements is better than 1 micron, and in 3-dimensional measurements, the precision on X and Y is confirmed to be below 1 micron, while the confirmed precision on Z is about 2 microns, where the confirmation is limited by the lower precision of the moving stage in Z direction.

  2. High Frequency Modulation Method for Measuring of Birefringence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šulc M.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A method of optical birefringence measurement is presented. It uses an el ectro-optic modulator for the high frequency modulation of polarization of the laser beam. The developed optical apparatus exhibits high sensitivity. It is able to measure very small birefringence of samples down to 10-3 rad. The accuracy and sensitivity of the method was checked by measurement of calibrated Sol eil – Babi net compensator. Method can be also used for online and accurate measurement of an optical components birefringence. This application was developed with the aim to measure Cotton-Mouton effect in air and nitrogen.

  3. Determining low-frequency source location from acoustic phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Travis L.; Frisk, George V.

    2002-11-01

    For low-frequency cw sound sources in shallow water, the time rate-of-change of the measured acoustic phase is well approximated by the time rate-of-change of the source-receiver separation distance. An algorithm for determining a locus of possible source locations based on this idea has been developed. The locus has the general form of a hyperbola, which can be used to provide a bearing estimation at long ranges, and an estimate of source location at short ranges. The algorithm uses only acoustic phase data and receiver geometry as input, and can be used even when the source frequency is slightly unstable and/or imprecisely known. The algorithm has been applied to data from low-frequency experiments (20-300 Hz), both for stable and unstable source frequencies, and shown to perform well. [Work supported by ONR and WHOI Academic Programs Office.

  4. An analysis of boundary-effects in obtaining the frequency dependent specific heat by effusivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Behrens, Claus

    The frequency dependent specific heat is a significant response function characterizing the glass transition. Contrary to the dielectric response it is not easily measured over many decades. The introduction of the 3-omega method, where the temperature oscillations at a planar oscillatoric heat...... generator is measured, made this possible. The method relied on a 1-d solution to the heat diffusion equation. There have been attempts to invoke the boundary effects to first order. However we present the fully 3-d solution to the problem including these effects. The frequency range can hereby...

  5. Hierarchical Decentralized Control Strategy for Demand-Side Primary Frequency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Jianming; Hansen, Jacob; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2016-07-21

    The Grid Friendly$^\\textrm{TM}$ Appliance~(GFA) controller, developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was designed for the purpose of autonomously switching off appliances by detecting under-frequency events. In this paper, a new frequency responsive load~(FRL) controller is first proposed by extending the functionality of the original GFA controller. The proposed FRL controller can autonomously switch on (or off) end-use loads by detecting over-frequency (or under-frequency) events through local frequency measurement. Then, a hierarchical decentralized control framework is developed for engaging the end-use loads to provide primary frequency response with the proposed FRL controller. The developed framework has several important features that are desirable in terms of providing primary frequency control. It not only exclusively maintains the autonomous operation of the end-use loads, but also effectively overcomes the stability issue associated with high penetration of FRLs. The simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the developed hierarchical control framework for providing primary frequency response with the proposed FRL controller.

  6. Filling the gap between low frequency measurements with their estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Kostić, D.; Jansen, S.T.H.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2014-01-01

    The use of redundant sensors brings a rich diversity of information, nevertheless fusing different sensors that run at vastly different frequencies into a proper estimate is still a challenging sensor fusion problem. Instead of using the size-varying measurements and thereby the size-varying filters

  7. Frequency swept fibre laser for wind speed measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier

    This PhD thesis builds around a light source forming the basis for a novel type of wind measuring lidar. The lidar emits a train of laser pulses with each pulse being separated from its neighbours in frequency, while being closely spaced in time, thus combining the advantages of conventional cont...

  8. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... measurement. The short term transient effects on the frequency of the transmitter due to keying (except for... requested after March 25, 1974, except for battery powered, hand carried, portable equipment having less... the nominal value for other than hand carried battery equipment. (2) For hand carried, battery...

  9. MEASUREMENT OF FORMANT FREQUENCIES AND BANDWIDTHS IN SINGING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUTTE, HK; MILLER, DG; SVEC, JG

    That singers under certain circumstances adjust the articulation of the vocal tract (formant tuning) to enhance acoustic output is both apparent from measurements and understood in theory. The precise effect of a formant on an approaching (retreating) harmonic as the latter varies in frequency

  10. Frequency-independent response of self-complementary checkerboard screens

    CERN Document Server

    Urade, Yoshiro; Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kitano, Masao

    2015-01-01

    This research resolves a long-standing problem on the electromagnetic response of self-complementary metallic screens with checkerboard-like geometry. Although Babinet's principle implies that they show a frequency-independent response, this unusual characteristic has not been observed yet due to the singularities of the metallic point contacts in the checkerboard geometry. We overcome this difficulty by replacing the point contacts with resistive sheets. The proposed structure is prepared and characterized by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. It is experimentally confirmed that the resistive checkerboard structures exhibit a flat transmission spectrum over 0.1--1.1 THz. It is also demonstrated that self-complementarity can eliminate even the frequency-dependent transmission characteristics of resonant metamaterials.

  11. Doping dependent frequency response of MQW infrared photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaha, Md. Aref; Das, Mukul K.; Kumar, S.

    2017-04-01

    This work is to study the effect of doping concentration in the active layer on the performance of multiple quantum well (MQW) infrared photodetector based on inter sub-band transitions. A theoretical model for the photocurrent and hence, responsivity of the detector in frequency domain is developed considering the effect of doping dependent absorption and carrier capture at the hetero-interfaces. Transit time and capture time limited bandwidth of the detector is computed from the frequency dependent photocurrent. Results show that, besides the usual effect of capture time, doping concentration in the active layer has an important effect on the bandwidth and responsivity of the device particularly for high value of capture time.

  12. Dynamic modelling of an electromechanical valve using frequency response data

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, R L; Smith, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic modelling of electromechanical parts is often accomplished by conducting an analysis from first physical principles. While this is always a useful effort for physical insight, it may lead to transfer function models which are unnecessarily complex. This paper presents a supplementary dynamic modelling method based on frequency response data. The method is applied to modelling of a globe valve use for water flow control Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. http://archive.org/...

  13. Task-Related Suppression of the Brainstem Frequency following Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-18

    related mediation of the FFR in both amplitude and latency [28–30]. For example, attending to vowels leads to an amplitude increase of the fundamental...10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3900–09.2009. 4. Krishnan A (2002) Human frequency-following responses: representation of steady-state synthetic vowels . Hear Res 166: 192...Ashley R (2009) Musical experience and neural efficiency: effects of training on subcortical processing of vocal expressions of emotion . Eur J

  14. Measurement of carbonaceous aerosol with different sampling configurations and frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosol in Beijing, China was measured with different sampling configurations (denuded vs. un-denuded and frequencies (24 vs. 48 h averaged. Our results suggest that the negative sampling artifact of a bare quartz filter could be remarkably enhanced due to the uptake of water vapor by the filter medium, indicating that the positive sampling artifact tends to be underestimated under high humidity conditions. It was also observed that the analytical artifact (i.e., the underestimation of elemental carbon by the operationally defined value of the thermal-optical method was more apparent for the low frequency samples such that their elemental carbon (EC concentrations were about 15% lower than the reference values measured by the high-frequency, denuded filters. Moreover, EC results of the low frequency samples were found to exhibit a stronger dependence on the charring correction method. In addition, optical attenuation (ATN of EC was retrieved from the carbon analyzer, and the low frequency samples were shown to be more significantly biased by the shadowing effect.

  15. Combining agreement and frequency rating scales to optimize psychometrics in measuring behavioral health functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Ni, Pengsheng; Chan, Leighton; Rasch, Elizabeth K; Jette, Alan M

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this article was to investigate optimal functioning of using frequency vs. agreement rating scales in two subdomains of the newly developed Work Disability Functional Assessment Battery: the Mood & Emotions and Behavioral Control scales. A psychometric study comparing rating scale performance embedded in a cross-sectional survey used for developing a new instrument to measure behavioral health functioning among adults applying for disability benefits in the United States was performed. Within the sample of 1,017 respondents, the range of response category endorsement was similar for both frequency and agreement item types for both scales. There were fewer missing values in the frequency items than the agreement items. Both frequency and agreement items showed acceptable reliability. The frequency items demonstrated optimal effectiveness around the mean ± 1-2 standard deviation score range; the agreement items performed better at the extreme score ranges. Findings suggest an optimal response format requires a mix of both agreement-based and frequency-based items. Frequency items perform better in the normal range of responses, capturing specific behaviors, reactions, or situations that may elicit a specific response. Agreement items do better for those whose scores are more extreme and capture subjective content related to general attitudes, behaviors, or feelings of work-related behavioral health functioning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Flextensional fiber Bragg grating-based accelerometer for low frequency vibration measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghua Zhang; Xueguang Qiao; Manli Hu; Zhongyao Feng; Hong Gao; Yang Yang; Rui Zhou

    2011-01-01

    @@ The intelligent structural health monitoring method,which uses a fiber Bragg grating(FBG)sensor,is a new approach in the field of civil engineering.However,it lacks a reliable FBG-based accelerometer for taking structural low frequency vibration measurements.In this letter,a flextensional FBG-based accelerometer is proposed and demonstrated.The experimental results indicate that the natural frequency of the developed accelerometer is 16.7 Hz,with a high sensitivity of 410.7 pm/g.In addition,it has a broad and flat response over low frequencies ranging from 1 to 10 Hz.The natural frequency and sensitivity of the accelerometer can be tuned by adding mass to tailor the sensor performance to specific applications.Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the proposed FBG-based accelerometer.These results show that the proposed accelerometer is satisfactory for low frequency vibration measurements.%The intelligent structural health monitoring method, which uses a fiber Bragg grating {FBG} sensor, ie a new approach in the field of civil engineering. However, it lacks a reliable FBG-based accelerometer for taking structural low frequency vibration measurements. In this letter, a flextensional FBG-based accelerometer is proposed and demonstrated. The experimental results indicate that the natural frequency of the developed accelerometer is 16.7 Hz, with a high sensitivity of 410.7 pm/g. In addition, it has a broad and flat response over low frequencies ranging from 1 to 10 Hz. The natural frequency and sensitivity of the accelerometer can be tuned by adding mass to tailor the sensor performance to specific applications. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the proposed FBG-based accelerometer. These results show that the proposed accelerometer is satisfactory for low frequency vibration measurements.

  17. Memory-based mismatch response to frequency changes in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piia Astikainen

    Full Text Available Any occasional changes in the acoustic environment are of potential importance for survival. In humans, the preattentive detection of such changes generates the mismatch negativity (MMN component of event-related brain potentials. MMN is elicited to rare changes ('deviants' in a series of otherwise regularly repeating stimuli ('standards'. Deviant stimuli are detected on the basis of a neural comparison process between the input from the current stimulus and the sensory memory trace of the standard stimuli. It is, however, unclear to what extent animals show a similar comparison process in response to auditory changes. To resolve this issue, epidural potentials were recorded above the primary auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats. In an oddball condition, tone frequency was used to differentiate deviants interspersed randomly among a standard tone. Mismatch responses were observed at 60-100 ms after stimulus onset for frequency increases of 5% and 12.5% but not for similarly descending deviants. The response diminished when the silent inter-stimulus interval was increased from 375 ms to 600 ms for +5% deviants and from 600 ms to 1000 ms for +12.5% deviants. In comparison to the oddball condition the response also diminished in a control condition in which no repetitive standards were presented (equiprobable condition. These findings suggest that the rat mismatch response is similar to the human MMN and indicate that anesthetized rats provide a valuable model for studies of central auditory processing.

  18. High frequency microphone measurements for transition detection on airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Mads

    Time series of pressure fluctuations has been obtained using high frequency microphones distributed over the surface of airfoils undergoing wind tunnel tests in the LM Windtunnel, owned by ’LM Glasfiber’, Denmark. The present report describes the dataanalysis, with special attention given...... pressure) and Tollmien-Schlichting frequencies. The tests were made at Reynolds and Mach numbers corresponding to the operating conditions of a typical horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The Risø B1-18, Risø C2-18 and NACA0015 profiles were tested and the measured transition points are reported....

  19. First Measurements of High Frequency Cross-Spectra from a Pair of Large Michelson Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Aaron S.; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Waldman, Samuel; Weiss, Rainer; Holometer Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are reported of the cross-correlation of spectra of differential position signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of colocated 39 m long, high power Michelson interferometers with flat broadband frequency response in the MHz range. The instrument obtains sensitivity to high frequency correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending beyond the 3.8 MHz inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. The dominant but uncorrelated shot noise is averaged down over 2 ×1 08 independent spectral measurements with 381 Hz frequency resolution to obtain 2.1 ×10-20m /√{Hz } sensitivity to stationary signals. For signal bandwidths Δ f >11 kHz , the sensitivity to strain h or shear power spectral density of classical or exotic origin surpasses a milestone PSDδ h

  20. On the quantification of SSVEP frequency responses in human EEG in realistic BCI conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Kuś

    Full Text Available This article concerns one of the most important problems of brain-computer interfaces (BCI based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEP, that is the selection of the a-priori most suitable frequencies for stimulation. Previous works related to this problem were done either with measuring systems that have little in common with actual BCI systems (e.g., single flashing LED or were presented on a small number of subjects, or the tested frequency range did not cover a broad spectrum. Their results indicate a strong SSVEP response around 10 Hz, in the range 13-25 Hz, and at high frequencies in the band of 40-60 Hz. In the case of BCI interfaces, stimulation with frequencies from various ranges are used. The frequencies are often adapted for each user separately. The selection of these frequencies, however, was not yet justified in quantitative group-level study with proper statistical account for inter-subject variability. The aim of this study is to determine the SSVEP response curve, that is, the magnitude of the evoked signal as a function of frequency. The SSVEP response was induced in conditions as close as possible to the actual BCI system, using a wide range of frequencies (5-30 Hz, in step of 1 Hz. The data were obtained for 10 subjects. SSVEP curves for individual subjects and the population curve was determined. Statistical analysis were conducted both on the level of individual subjects and for the group. The main result of the study is the identification of the optimal range of frequencies, which is 12-18 Hz, for the registration of SSVEP phenomena. The applied criterion of optimality was: to find the largest contiguous range of frequencies yielding the strong and constant-level SSVEP response.

  1. Measuring the Bunch Frequency Multiplication at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Bettoni, S; Corsini, R; Dabrowski, A; Doebert, S; Egger, D; Ferrari, A; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Skowronski, PK; Soby, L; Tecker, F; Welsch, CP

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) is being built and commissioned by an international collaboration to test the feasibility of the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) drive beam generation scheme. Central to this scheme is the use of RF deflectors to inject bunches into a delay loop and a combiner ring, in order to transform the initial bunch frequency of 1.5 GHz from the LINAC to a final bunch frequency of 12 GHz. The optimization procedure relies on several steps. The active length of each ring is carefully adjusted to within less than millimetre accuracy using a wiggler magnet. The transverse optics of the machine must be set up in a way to ensure beam isochronicity. Diagnostics based on optical Streak camera and RF power measurements have been designed to measure the longitudinal behaviour of the beam during the combination. This paper presents their performance and recent measurements

  2. Frequency Domain Storage Ring Method for Electric Dipole Moment Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Precise measurement of the electric dipole moments (EDM) of fundamental charged particles would provide a significant probe of physics beyond the standard model. Any measurably large EDM would imply violation of both time reversal and parity conservation, with implications for the matter/anti-matter imbalance of the universe, not currently understood within the standard model. A frequency domain (i.e. difference of frequencies) method is proposed for measuring the EDM of electrons or protons or, with modifications, deuterons. Anticipated precision (i.e. reproducibility) is $10^{-30}\\,$e-cm for the proton EDM, with comparable accuracy (i.e. including systematic error). This would be almost six orders of magnitude smaller than the present upper limit, and will provide a stringent test of the standard model. Resonant polarimetry, made practical by the large polarized beam charge, is the key (most novel, least proven) element of the method. Along with the phase-locked, rolling polarization "Koop spin wheel," reso...

  3. Mid frequency shallow water fine-grained sediment attenuation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Charles W; Dosso, Stan E

    2013-07-01

    Attenuation is perhaps the most difficult sediment acoustic property to measure, but arguably one of the most important for predicting passive and active sonar performance. Measurement techniques can be separated into "direct" measurements (e.g., via sediment probes, sediment cores, and laboratory studies on "ideal" sediments) which are typically at high frequencies, O(10(4)-10(5)) Hz, and "indirect" measurements where attenuation is inferred from long-range propagation or reflection data, generally O(10(2)-10(3)) Hz. A frequency gap in measurements exists in the 600-4000 Hz band and also a general acknowledgement that much of the historical measurements on fine-grained sediments have been biased due to a non-negligible silt and sand component. A shallow water measurement technique using long range reverberation is critically explored. An approximate solution derived using energy flux theory shows that the reverberation is very sensitive to depth-integrated attenuation in a fine-grained sediment layer and separable from most other unknown geoacoustic parameters. Simulation using Bayesian methods confirms the theory. Reverberation measurements across a 10 m fine-grained sediment layer yield an attenuation of 0.009 dB/m/kHz with 95% confidence bounds of 0.006-0.013 dB/m/kHz. This is among the lowest values for sediment attenuation reported in shallow water.

  4. Time-frequency representation measurement based on temporal Fourier transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Yifan; Xiao, Shaoqiu; Hao, Sumin; Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Xiong, Yigao; Liu, Shenye

    2016-10-01

    We propose a new scheme to physically realize the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) of chirped optical pulse using time-lens array that enables us to get time-frequency representation without using FFT algorithm. The time-lens based upon the four-wave mixing is used to perform the process of temporal Fourier transformation. Pump pulse is used for both providing the quadratic phase and being the window function of STFT. The idea of STFT is physically realized in our scheme. Simulations have been done to investigate performance of the time-frequency representation scheme (TFRS) in comparison with STFT using FFT algorithm. Optimal measurement of resolution in time and frequency has been discussed.

  5. Delphinid behavioral responses to incidental mid-frequency active sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, E Elizabeth; Smith, Michael H; Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Douglas, Annie B; Hildebrand, John A

    2014-10-01

    Opportunistic observations of behavioral responses by delphinids to incidental mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar were recorded in the Southern California Bight from 2004 through 2008 using visual focal follows, static hydrophones, and autonomous recorders. Sound pressure levels were calculated between 2 and 8 kHz. Surface behavioral responses were observed in 26 groups from at least three species of 46 groups out of five species encountered during MFA sonar incidents. Responses included changes in behavioral state or direction of travel, changes in vocalization rates and call intensity, or a lack of vocalizations while MFA sonar occurred. However, 46% of focal groups not exposed to sonar also changed their behavior, and 43% of focal groups exposed to sonar did not change their behavior. Mean peak sound pressure levels when a behavioral response occurred were around 122 dB re: 1 μPa. Acoustic localizations of dolphin groups exhibiting a response gave insight into nighttime movement patterns and provided evidence that impacts of sonar may be mediated by behavioral state. The lack of response in some cases may indicate a tolerance of or habituation to MFA sonar by local populations; however, the responses that occur at lower received levels may point to some sensitization as well.

  6. The optimization of super-high resolution frequency measurement techniques based on phase quantization regularities between any frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqi; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Xueping; Zhao, Jie

    2013-02-01

    Step phase quantization regularity between different nominal frequency signals is introduced in this paper. Based on this regularity, an optimized high resolution frequency measurement technique is presented. The key features and issues of phase quantization characteristics and measurements are described. Based on the relationship between the same or multiple nominal signals with a certain differences, the resolution of frequency measurements is developed and the range is widened. Several measurement results are provided to support the concepts with experimental evidence. The resolution of frequency measurement can reach 10(-12) (s(-1)) over a wide range or higher for specific frequency signals.

  7. Calibration scheme for large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays based on Readout Frequency Response

    CERN Document Server

    Bisigello, L; Murugesan, V; Baselmans, J J A; Baryshev, A M

    2016-01-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal with respect to the KID resonant circle. Fundamentally, this phase change is due to a shift in the KID resonance frequency, in turn due to a radiation induced change in the quasiparticle number in the superconducting resonator. We show that shift in resonant frequency can be determined from the phase shift by using KID phase versus frequency dependence using a previously measured resonant frequency. Working in this calculated resonant frequency, we gain near linearity and constant calibration to a constant optical signal ap...

  8. Frequency Response and Gap Tuning for Nonlinear Electrical Oscillator Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Harish S.; Vaz, Garnet J.

    2013-01-01

    We study nonlinear electrical oscillator networks, the smallest example of which consists of a voltage-dependent capacitor, an inductor, and a resistor driven by a pure tone source. By allowing the network topology to be that of any connected graph, such circuits generalize spatially discrete nonlinear transmission lines/lattices that have proven useful in high-frequency analog devices. For such networks, we develop two algorithms to compute the steady-state response when a subset of nodes are driven at the same fixed frequency. The algorithms we devise are orders of magnitude more accurate and efficient than stepping towards the steady-state using a standard numerical integrator. We seek to enhance a given network's nonlinear behavior by altering the eigenvalues of the graph Laplacian, i.e., the resonances of the linearized system. We develop a Newton-type method that solves for the network inductances such that the graph Laplacian achieves a desired set of eigenvalues; this method enables one to move the eigenvalues while keeping the network topology fixed. Running numerical experiments using three different random graph models, we show that shrinking the gap between the graph Laplacian's first two eigenvalues dramatically improves a network's ability to (i) transfer energy to higher harmonics, and (ii) generate large-amplitude signals. Our results shed light on the relationship between a network's structure, encoded by the graph Laplacian, and its function, defined in this case by the presence of strongly nonlinear effects in the frequency response. PMID:24223751

  9. Identification of damage based on frequency response function (FRF data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman M. S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical joints, particularly fasteners such as bolted joints have a complex non-linear behaviour. The non-linearity might emerge from the material, geometry or by the contacts in the joints. However, damage to a structure can be happened either their connections or the material of components. The effect of damage can change the dynamic properties of the structure such as natural frequencies and mode shapes and structural performance and can cause premature failure to structure. This paper presents a damage detection method using a vibration based damage detection method based on the frequency response function (FRF data. A combination of numerical model and physical bolted jointed structure of damaged and undamaged structure will be investigated. The validation is employed to detect the presence of damage in the structure based on the frequency response function (FRF data from the parameter values used in the benchmark model and damaged model. The comparisons of the undamaged and damaged structure of the FRF have revealed the damaged structure was shifted from the undamaged structure. The effect of the FRF between undamaged and damaged structure is clearly affected by the reduction of stiffness for the damaged structure.

  10. A diode laser spectrometer at 634 nm and absolute frequency measurements using optical frequency comb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Lin; Yuan Jie; Qi Xiang-Hui; Chen Wen-Lan; Zhou Da-Wei; Zhou Tong; Zhou Xiao-Ji; Chen Xu-Zong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports that two identical external-cavity-diode-laser(ECDL)based spectrometers are constructed at 634 nm referencing on the hyperfine B-X transition a(80)8-4 of 127I2.The lasers are stabilized on the Doppler-free absorption signals using the third-harmonic detection technique.The instability of the stabilized laser is measured to be 2.8×10-12(after 1000 s)by counting the beat note between the two lasers.The absolute optical frequency of the transition is,for the first time,determined to be 472851936189.5 kHz by using an optical frequency comb referenced on the microwave caesium atomic clock.The uncertainty of the measurement is less than 4.9 kHz.

  11. Frequency Response Function Based Damage Identification for Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joseph Acton

    Structural health monitoring technologies continue to be pursued for aerospace structures in the interests of increased safety and, when combined with health prognosis, efficiency in life-cycle management. The current dissertation develops and validates damage identification technology as a critical component for structural health monitoring of aerospace structures and, in particular, composite unmanned aerial vehicles. The primary innovation is a statistical least-squares damage identification algorithm based in concepts of parameter estimation and model update. The algorithm uses frequency response function based residual force vectors derived from distributed vibration measurements to update a structural finite element model through statistically weighted least-squares minimization producing location and quantification of the damage, estimation uncertainty, and an updated model. Advantages compared to other approaches include robust applicability to systems which are heavily damped, large, and noisy, with a relatively low number of distributed measurement points compared to the number of analytical degrees-of-freedom of an associated analytical structural model (e.g., modal finite element model). Motivation, research objectives, and a dissertation summary are discussed in Chapter 1 followed by a literature review in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 gives background theory and the damage identification algorithm derivation followed by a study of fundamental algorithm behavior on a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with generalized damping. Chapter 4 investigates the impact of noise then successfully proves the algorithm against competing methods using an analytical eight degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with non-proportional structural damping. Chapter 5 extends use of the algorithm to finite element models, including solutions for numerical issues, approaches for modeling damping approximately in reduced coordinates, and analytical validation using a composite

  12. High-frequency radio polarization measurements of WMAP point sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, N; Battye, R A; Gabuzda, D; Taylor, A C

    2009-01-01

    We present polarization measurements at 8.4, 22, and 43 GHz made with the VLA of a complete sample of extragalactic sources stronger than 1 Jy in the 5-year WMAP catalogue and with declinations north of -34 degrees. The observations were motivated by the need to know the polarization properties of radio sources at frequencies of tens of GHz in order to subtract polarized foregrounds for future sensitive Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. The total intensity and polarization measurements are generally consistent with comparable VLA calibration measurements for less-variable sources, and within a similar range to WMAP fluxes for unresolved sources. A further paper will present correlations between measured parameters and derive implications for CMB measurements.

  13. Measurements Of High Frequency Electromagnetic Waves In Center Of Mus

    OpenAIRE

    etem, taha; ABBASOV, Teymuraz

    2016-01-01

    All electrically powered devices cause electromagnetic wave exposure onhuman body and we use them nearly every moment in a day. Mobile phones,computers, televisions, hair dryers, lighting systems, etc. they all useelectricity and naturally radiate electromagnetic waves. Effects ofelectromagnetic waves are not clear but international organizations definelimit values depending on epidemiological studies in this field. In this studywe measure high frequency electromagnetic waves in city center o...

  14. Radio Frequency Radiation (RFR) Measurements in Operational Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    1NURAT0 OF -HSAG Deport No. 84-028CV111ARA USAF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH LABORATORY Brooks AFB, Texas 78235 RADIO FREQUENCY RADIATION (RFR...with a 60 Watt/cm3 peak power burnout rating. First attempts to use these early instruments (Model 8300). in the investigation of an alleged...an aside, Narda also makes several other probe series for measurements to as low as 300 Kiz. All Narda probes are susceptible to burnout when exposed

  15. Technique for Performing Dielectric Property Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Jackson, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    A paper discusses the need to perform accurate dielectric property measurements on larger sized samples, particularly liquids at microwave frequencies. These types of measurements cannot be obtained using conventional cavity perturbation methods, particularly for liquids or powdered or granulated solids that require a surrounding container. To solve this problem, a model has been developed for the resonant frequency and quality factor of a cylindrical microwave cavity containing concentric cylindrical samples. This model can then be inverted to obtain the real and imaginary dielectric constants of the material of interest. This approach is based on using exact solutions to Maxwell s equations for the resonant properties of a cylindrical microwave cavity and also using the effective electrical conductivity of the cavity walls that is estimated from the measured empty cavity quality factor. This new approach calculates the complex resonant frequency and associated electromagnetic fields for a cylindrical microwave cavity with lossy walls that is loaded with concentric, axially aligned, lossy dielectric cylindrical samples. In this approach, the calculated complex resonant frequency, consisting of real and imaginary parts, is related to the experimentally measured quantities. Because this approach uses Maxwell's equations to determine the perturbed electromagnetic fields in the cavity with the material(s) inserted, one can calculate the expected wall losses using the fields for the loaded cavity rather than just depending on the value of the fields obtained from the empty cavity quality factor. These additional calculations provide a more accurate determination of the complex dielectric constant of the material being studied. The improved approach will be particularly important when working with larger samples or samples with larger dielectric constants that will further perturb the cavity electromagnetic fields. Also, this approach enables the ability to have a

  16. Measuring response styles in Likert items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckenholt, Ulf

    2017-03-01

    The recently proposed class of item response tree models provides a flexible framework for modeling multiple response processes. This feature is particularly attractive for understanding how response styles may affect answers to attitudinal questions. Facilitating the disassociation of response styles and attitudinal traits, item response tree models can provide powerful process tests of how different response formats may affect the measurement of substantive traits. In an empirical study, 3 response formats were used to measure the 2-dimensional Personal Need for Structure traits. Different item response tree models are proposed to capture the response styles for each of the response formats. These models show that the response formats give rise to similar trait measures but different response-style effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Measuring absolute frequencies beyond the GPS limit via long-haul optical frequency dissemination

    CERN Document Server

    Clivati, C; Livi, L; Poggiali, F; de Cumis, M Siciliani; Mancini, M; Pagano, G; Frittelli, M; Mura, A; Costanzo, G A; Levi, F; Calonico, D; Fallani, L; Catani, J; Inguscio, M

    2015-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) dissemination of frequency standards is ubiquitous at present, providing the most widespread time and frequency reference for the majority of industrial and research applications worldwide. On the other hand, the ultimate limits of the GPS presently curb further advances in high-precision, scientific and industrial applications relying on this dissemination scheme. Here, we demonstrate that these limits can be reliably overcome even in laboratories without a local atomic clock by replacing the GPS with a 642-km-long optical fiber link to a remote primary caesium frequency standard. Through this configuration we stably address the $^1$S$_0$---$^3$P$_0$ clock transition in an ultracold gas of $^{173}$Yb, with a precision that exceeds the possibilities of a GPS-based measurement, dismissing the need for a local clock infrastructure to perform high-precision tasks beyond GPS limit. We also report an improvement of two orders of magnitude in the accuracy on the transition frequency ...

  18. A precise measurement of the $B^0$ meson oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The oscillation frequency, $\\Delta m_d$, of $B^0$ mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a $D^-$ or $D^{*-}$ meson in the final state, in a data sample of $pp$ collisions collected by the LHCb detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0$\\mbox{fb}^{-1}$. A combination of the two decay modes gives $\\Delta m_d = (505.0 \\pm 2.1 \\pm 1.0) \\rm \\,ns^{-1}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is compatible with the current world average and has similar precision.

  19. A precise measurement of the $B^0$ meson oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Vecchi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The oscillation frequency of $B^0$ mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a charged $D$ or $D^*$ meson in the final state, on a data sample collected by the LHCb detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions. A combination of the two decay modes gives $\\Delta m_d = (503.6 \\pm 2.0 \\pm 1.3)$ ns$^{-1}$ , where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is compatible with the current world average and has comparable precision

  20. Frequency Response Adaptive Control of a Refrigeration Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens G. Balchen

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the adaptation of controller parameters in a single control loop based upon the estimation of frequency response parameters has been presented in an earlier paper. This paper contains an extension and a generalization of the first method and results in a more versatile solution which is applicable to a wider range of process characteristics. The application of this adaptive control technique is illustrated by a laboratory refrigeration cycle in which the evaporator pressure controls the speed of the compressor.

  1. Guitar Chords Classification Using Uncertainty Measurements of Frequency Bins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Guerrero-Turrubiates

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method to perform chord classification from recorded audio. The signal harmonics are obtained by using the Fast Fourier Transform, and timbral information is suppressed by spectral whitening. A multiple fundamental frequency estimation of whitened data is achieved by adding attenuated harmonics by a weighting function. This paper proposes a method that performs feature selection by using a thresholding of the uncertainty of all frequency bins. Those measurements under the threshold are removed from the signal in the frequency domain. This allows a reduction of 95.53% of the signal characteristics, and the other 4.47% of frequency bins are used as enhanced information for the classifier. An Artificial Neural Network was utilized to classify four types of chords: major, minor, major 7th, and minor 7th. Those, played in the twelve musical notes, give a total of 48 different chords. Two reference methods (based on Hidden Markov Models were compared with the method proposed in this paper by having the same database for the evaluation test. In most of the performed tests, the proposed method achieved a reasonably high performance, with an accuracy of 93%.

  2. Frequency-Dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Cordes, J M; Stinebring, D R

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the frequency dependence of the dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, caused by multipath scattering from small scale electron-density fluctuations. The DM is slightly different along each propagation path and the transverse spread of paths varies greatly with frequency, yielding time-of-arrival (TOA) perturbations that scale differently than the inverse square of the frequency, the expected dependence for a cold, unmagnetized plasma. We quantify DM and TOA perturbations analytically for thin phase screens and extended media and verify the results with simulations of thin screens. The rms difference between DMs across an octave band near 1.5~GHz $\\sim 4\\times10^{-5}\\,{\\rm pc\\ cm^{-3}}$ for pulsars at $\\sim 1$~kpc distance. TOA errors from chromatic DMs are of order a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for pulsars with DM $\\lesssim 30$~pc~cm$^{-3}$ observed across an octave band but increase rapidly to microseconds or larger for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges....

  3. Estimation of bending wave intensity in beams using the frequency response technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linjama, J.; Lahti, T.

    1992-02-01

    The frequency response approach is applied to the measurement of bending wave intensity, with two or four accelerometers being used. Based on the known structural intensity equations, a comprehensive set of frequency domain expressions is derived for power measurements in a beam. A practical procedure is developed for the general four-transducer method, which allows a usual dual channel FFT analyzer to be employed in multi-channel measurements. The procedure uses the sequential frequency response technique, and is applicable if the situation remains stationary during the data acquisition. In addition, expressions are derived for the determination of the force- and moment-related bending wave power components separately. In a laboratory experiment, the power carried by bending waves was measured in a simple beam, and the methods developed were tested and compared. The frequency response approach was shown to work well in detecting the total power. The estimation of the two bending wave power components, both in the near and the far field, was also demonstrated.

  4. Bruel and Kjaer 4944 Microphone Grid Frequency Response Function System Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Reginald; Lee, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Br el & Kjaer (B&K) 4944B pressure field microphone was judiciously selected to measure acoustic environments, 400Hz 50kHz, in close proximity of the nozzle during multiple firings of solid propellant rocket motors. It is well known that protective grids can affect the frequency response of microphones. B&K recommends operation of the B&K 4944B without a protective grid when recording measurements above 10 to 15 kHz.

  5. Vibration frequency measurement using a local multithreshold technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Belen; Espinosa, Julian; Roig, Ana B; Perez, J; Mas, D

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a video camera for measuring the frequency of small-amplitude vibration movements. The method is based on image acquisition and multilevel thresholding and it only requires a video camera with high enough acquisition rate, not being necessary the use of targets or auxiliary laser beams. Our proposal is accurate and robust. We demonstrate the technique with a pocket camera recording low-resolution videos with AVI-JPEG compression and measuring different objects that vibrate in parallel or perpendicular direction to the optical sensor. Despite the low resolution and the noise, we are able to measure the main vibration modes of a tuning fork, a loudspeaker and a bridge. Results are successfully compared with design parameters and measurements with alternative devices.

  6. Radar and Laser Sensors for High Frequency Ocean Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental measurement of air-sea fluxes invariably take place using shipbourne instrumentation and simultaneous measurement of wave height and direction is desired. A number of researchers have shown that range measuring sensors combined with inertial motion compensation can be successful on board stationary or very slowly moving ships. In order to measure wave characteristics from ships moving at moderate to full speed the sensors are required to operate at higher frequency so as to overcome the Doppler shift caused by ship motion. This work presents results from some preliminary testing of laser, radar and ultrasonic range sensors in the laboratory and on board ship. The characteristics of the individual sensors are discussed and comparison of the wave spectra produced by each is presented.

  7. Inner detached frequency response curves: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Gianluca; Brennan, Michael J.

    2017-05-01

    Certain nonlinear vibrating systems have frequency response curves (FRCs), in which isolated detached curves exist inside the main continuous FRC. The behavior of these systems has hitherto been studied analytically and numerically, but to the authors' knowledge, there is no record of an inner detached FRC being detected experimentally. These curves may be hidden by numerical or experimental analysis, particularly when a system is subject to swept or stepped-sine excitation. Their existence may thus lead to unexpected dramatic changes in the amplitude of the system response. This paper presents an experimental study that involves the design, construction and testing of a specific system that has an isolated detached FRC inside the main continuous FRC. The experimental design of the test rig is supported by multibody dynamic simulations, and in the experimental tests the existence of a detached FRC was verified.

  8. Effect of geometry in frequency response modeling of nanomechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, M. Nasr; Yilmaz, M.; Sonne, M. R.; Hattel, J. H.; Alaca, B. Erdem

    2016-06-01

    The trend towards nanomechanical resonator sensors with increasing sensitivity raises the need to address challenges encountered in the modeling of their mechanical behavior. Selecting the best approach in mechanical response modeling amongst the various potential computational solid mechanics methods is subject to controversy. A guideline for the selection of the appropriate approach for a specific set of geometry and mechanical properties is needed. In this study, geometrical limitations in frequency response modeling of flexural nanomechanical resonators are investigated. Deviation of Euler and Timoshenko beam theories from numerical techniques including finite element modeling and Surface Cauchy-Born technique are studied. The results provide a limit beyond which surface energy contribution dominates the mechanical behavior. Using the Surface Cauchy-Born technique as the reference, a maximum error on the order of 50 % is reported for high-aspect ratio resonators.

  9. Frequency and phase synchronization in neuromagnetic cortical responses to flickering-color stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timashev, S. F.; Polyakov, Yu. S.; Yulmetyev, R. M.; Demin, S. A.; Panischev, O. Yu.; Shimojo, S.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2010-03-01

    In our earlier study dealing with the analysis of neuromagnetic responses (magnetoencephalograms—MEG) to flickering-color stimuli for a group of control human subjects (9 volunteers) and a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (a 12-year old girl), it was shown that Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) was able to identify specific differences in the responses of each organism. The high specificity of individual MEG responses manifested itself in the values of FNS parameters for both chaotic and resonant components of the original signal. The present study applies the FNS cross-correlation function to the analysis of correlations between the MEG responses simultaneously measured at spatially separated points of the human cortex processing the red-blue flickering color stimulus. It is shown that the cross-correlations for control (healthy) subjects are characterized by frequency and phase synchronization at different points of the cortex, with the dynamics of neuromagnetic responses being determined by the low-frequency processes that correspond to normal physiological rhythms. But for the patient, the frequency and phase synchronization breaks down, which is associated with the suppression of cortical regulatory functions when the flickering-color stimulus is applied, and higher frequencies start playing the dominating role. This suggests that the disruption of correlations in the MEG responses is the indicator of pathological changes leading to photosensitive epilepsy, which can be used for developing a method of diagnosing the disease based on the analysis with the FNS cross-correlation function.

  10. Energy dissipation measurements in frequency-modulated scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Kalinin, Sergei V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-11-12

    Local dissipation measurements by scanning probe microscopy have attracted increasing interest as a method for probing energy losses and hysteretic phenomena due to magnetic, electrical, and structural transformations at the tip-surface junction. One challenge of this technique is the lack of a standard for ensuring quantification of the dissipation signal. In the following, we explored magnetic dissipation imaging of an yttrium-iron garnet (YIG) sample, using a number of similar but not identical cantilever probes. Typical frequency-dependent dispersion of the actuator-probe assembly commonly approached {+-} 1 part in 10{sup 3} Hz{sup -1}, much larger than the minimum detectable level of {+-} 1 part in 10{sup 5} Hz{sup -1}. This cantilever-dependent behavior results in a strong crosstalk between the conservative (frequency) and dissipative channels. This crosstalk was very apparent in the YIG dissipation images and in fact should be an inherent feature of single-frequency heterodyne detection schemes. It may also be a common effect in other dissipation imaging, even down to the atomic level, and in particular may be a significant issue when there are correlations between the conservative and dissipative components. On the other hand, we present a simple method for correcting for this effect. This correction technique resulted in self-consistent results for the YIG dissipation measurements and would presumably be effective for other systems as well.

  11. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-08

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  12. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  13. Frequency response function-based model updating using Kriging model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. T.; Wang, C. J.; Zhao, J. P.

    2017-03-01

    An acceleration frequency response function (FRF) based model updating method is presented in this paper, which introduces Kriging model as metamodel into the optimization process instead of iterating the finite element analysis directly. The Kriging model is taken as a fast running model that can reduce solving time and facilitate the application of intelligent algorithms in model updating. The training samples for Kriging model are generated by the design of experiment (DOE), whose response corresponds to the difference between experimental acceleration FRFs and its counterpart of finite element model (FEM) at selected frequency points. The boundary condition is taken into account, and a two-step DOE method is proposed for reducing the number of training samples. The first step is to select the design variables from the boundary condition, and the selected variables will be passed to the second step for generating the training samples. The optimization results of the design variables are taken as the updated values of the design variables to calibrate the FEM, and then the analytical FRFs tend to coincide with the experimental FRFs. The proposed method is performed successfully on a composite structure of honeycomb sandwich beam, after model updating, the analytical acceleration FRFs have a significant improvement to match the experimental data especially when the damping ratios are adjusted.

  14. Instantaneous frequency measurement of dissipative soliton resonant light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Armas-Rivera, I; Carrascosa, A; Kuzin, E A; Beltrán-Pérez, G; Díez, A; Andrés, M V

    2016-12-15

    We measured the instantaneous frequency profile of two different dissipative soliton resonant (DSR) light pulses, the usual flat-top and less-common trapezoid-shaped light pulses. The DSR light pulses were provided by an ytterbium-doped polarization-maintaining fiber ring passively mode-locked laser using the adequately selected amount of net-normal dispersion. We confirmed that the DSR light pulses have a (moderately) low linear chirp across the pulse, except at the edges, where the chirp changes exponentially. This unique instantaneous frequency behavior can be succinctly resumed by the following parameters: linear chirp slope and leading and trailing chirp lifetimes. As the pump power increases, the linear chirp slope decreases, whereas the leading and trailing chirp lifetimes do not show an appreciable change. The results are compared with previous theoretical works.

  15. Fizeau Interferometery for THz-Waves' Frequency and Intensity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SIDDIQUE Muhammad; YANG Su-hui; LI Zhuo; LI Ping

    2007-01-01

    A terahertz-wave generator based on optical parametric oscillator principle, detection based on combination of Fizeau wedged interferometer and an electro-optical crystal ZnTe has been studied. The analytical solution based on the basic principle of operation of solid wedge Fizeau interferometer has been realized. The mathematical calculations for THz frequency and intensity measurement dependent on wedge angle and fringe spacing have been considered. The efficiency of THz wave detection depends upon optimized wedge angle has been also realized. The feasibility of detection of THz waves' frequency and intensity by solid Fizeau interferometer (THz-waves' range of 1-3THz) has been studied. By optimization of other parameters like thickness of Fizeau film, refractive index, material of Fizeau film, we can proceed towards the design of Fizeau interferometer for required research plans as it is a simple and inexpensive interferometer.

  16. Digital instantaneous frequency measurement technique utilising high-speed ADC’s and FPGA’s

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, PL

    2006-02-27

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Digital Instantaneous Frequency Measurement (DIFM) technique, which can measure the carrier frequency of a received waveform within a fraction of a microsecond. The resulting frequency range, resolution and accuracy...

  17. Design and characterization of a multi-frequency bioimpedance measurement prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia Neto, O. E.; Porto, R. W.; Aya, J. C. C.

    2012-12-01

    A multi-frequency bioimpedance measurement prototype is proposed, validated and characterized. It consists of an Improved Howland Current Source controlled by voltage, a load voltage sensing scheme through a discrete 3-opamp instrumentation amplifier, a phase and quadrature demodulation setup through analog multipliers, and digitization and processing of the signals using a digital benchtop multimeter. The electrical characterization of the measurement channel was done for resistive loads only, on four different circuits. Measurements were made on 10 frequencies, from 100 kHz to 1 MHz, with 10 load resistances, from 100 Ω to 1 kΩ, to obtain linearity, absolute error and frequency response. The best performance among the four circuits was a maximum absolute error of 5.55 %, and -1.93 % of load current variation at the worst case scenario.

  18. Main meal frequency measures in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Trine Pagh; Holstein, Bjørn E; Laursen, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate agreement between questionnaire-based frequency measures from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study (HBSC) and 7-day 24-h recall measures of breakfast, lunch and evening meals among 11-15-year-olds, and examine whether disagreement between the two methods varied...... by socio-demographic factors. METHODS: In one week 11-15-year-old Danish students completed HBSC questionnaires including meal frequency items. The following week they completed daily 24-h recall questionnaire about their meals (response rate 88.4 %, n = 412). RESULTS: Good to moderate agreement...... methods for week day breakfast OR (95 % CI) 2.17 (1.16-4.04) and lunch 2.44 (1.33-4.48). CONCLUSIONS: We found good to moderate agreement between frequency and 7-day 24-h recall measures for breakfast, a fair agreement for lunch and for evening meal the two agreement methods provided different results...

  19. A Novel Frequency Measurement Method Suitable for a Large Frequency Ratio Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wei; XUAN Zong-Qiang; YU Jian-Guo; WANG Hai; ZHOU Hui; LI Zhi-Qi

    2004-01-01

    @@ As for the obstacles to direct comparison between superhigh and lower frequencies, we accomplish the accurate comparison between low and microwave frequencies with the 105 ratios of the operating frequencies on the basis of phase comparison between the signals whose frequencies are related by an arbitrary integer. This method is simple and accurate, and will be widely used as a special frequency comparison approach.

  20. Noninvasive measurement of conductivity anisotropy at larmor frequency using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonsung; Song, Yizhuang; Choi, Narae; Cho, Sungmin; Seo, Jin Keun; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Anisotropic electrical properties can be found in biological tissues such as muscles and nerves. Conductivity tensor is a simplified model to express the effective electrical anisotropic information and depends on the imaging resolution. The determination of the conductivity tensor should be based on Ohm's law. In other words, the measurement of partial information of current density and the electric fields should be made. Since the direct measurements of the electric field and the current density are difficult, we use MRI to measure their partial information such as B1 map; it measures circulating current density and circulating electric field. In this work, the ratio of the two circulating fields, termed circulating admittivity, is proposed as measures of the conductivity anisotropy at Larmor frequency. Given eigenvectors of the conductivity tensor, quantitative measurement of the eigenvalues can be achieved from circulating admittivity for special tissue models. Without eigenvectors, qualitative information of anisotropy still can be acquired from circulating admittivity. The limitation of the circulating admittivity is that at least two components of the magnetic fields should be measured to capture anisotropic information.

  1. Measuring finite-frequency body-wave amplitudes and traveltimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigloch, Karin; Nolet, Guust

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a method to measure finite-frequency amplitude and traveltime anomalies of teleseismic P waves. We use a matched filtering approach that models the first 25 s of a seismogram after the P arrival, which includes the depth phases pP and sP. Given a set of broad-band seismograms from a teleseismic event, we compute synthetic Green's functions using published moment tensor solutions. We jointly deconvolve global or regional sets of seismograms with their Green's functions to obtain the broad-band source time function. The matched filter of a seismogram is the convolution of the Green's function with the source time function. Traveltimes are computed by cross-correlating each seismogram with its matched filter. Amplitude anomalies are defined as the multiplicative factors that minimize the RMS misfit between matched filters and data. The procedure is implemented in an iterative fashion, which allows for joint inversion for the source time function, amplitudes, and a correction to the moment tensor. Cluster analysis is used to identify azimuthally distinct groups of seismograms when source effects with azimuthal dependence are prominent. We then invert for one source time function per group. We implement this inversion for a range of source depths to determine the most likely depth, as indicated by the overall RMS misfit, and by the non-negativity and compactness of the source time function. Finite-frequency measurements are obtained by filtering broad-band data and matched filters through a bank of passband filters. The method is validated on a set of 15 events of magnitude 5.8 to 6.9. Our focus is on the densely instrumented Western US. Quasi-duplet events (`quplets') are used to estimate measurement uncertainty on real data. Robust results are achieved for wave periods between 24 and 2 s. Traveltime dispersion is on the order of 0.5 s. Amplitude anomalies are on the order of 1 db in the lowest bands and 3 db in the highest bands, corresponding to

  2. Depth measurement using structured light and spatial frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shih-Yu; Shih, Hsi-Fu; Chen, Jenq-Shyong

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel design of an optical system for depth measurement, adopting a computer-generated hologram to project a periodic line pattern from which a coaxial triangulation is performed. The spatial periodicity of diffraction images captured in the system is converted to the frequency domain, and the relative depth of the plane of interest is acquired. The experimental results show that the system could achieve resolution in the range of 1 mm over a relative depth range of ∼300-600  mm from the camera. The standard deviations are 0.71 and 0.46 mm for two experiments.

  3. Bite frequency measured by head pitch movements in grazing experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudshoorn, Frank W.; S. Nadimi, Esmaeil; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    2010-01-01

    bite frequency variation related to grass length and grass quality (Pulido & Leaver 2001; Barrett et al. 2003). .   Head movements and bite frequency were registered in spring and autumn in 2009, with 2x10 cows grazing two weeks in two stocking densities.  Head movements were measured by activity...... and  grass offer and  grass growth during the trial by interval harvesting using a Haldrup grass harvester. Cows biting frequency for the same paddock, the same day were found to be cow specific and correlation with milk yield level and barn feed intake was investigated.   Barrett, P.D., McGilloway, D....... ECPLF      2007 Skiathos, Greece. p 111-116 Pulido, R.G. & Leaver, J.D., 2001. Quantifying the influence of sward height, concentrate level and initial      milk yield on the milk production and grazing behaviour of continuously stocked dairy cows. Grass      and Forage Science 56, 57-67.    ...

  4. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Stone

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46 and healthy controls (N = 57 using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Measurement of the B d0 meson oscillation frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alpat, B.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Antreasyan, D.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Baschirotto, A.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boucham, A.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brock, I. C.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Cai, X. D.; Campanelli, M.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Castello, R.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chan, A.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A. P.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; De Boeck, H.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dorne, I.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Dutta, S.; Easo, S.; Efremenko, Yu.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S. N.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gerald, J.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldstein, J.; Gong, Z. F.; Gougas, A.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hartmann, B.; Hasan, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Hu, G.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirkby, J.; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Korolko, I.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krenz, W.; Kuijten, H.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Landi, G.; Lapoint, C.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurikainen, P.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lieb, E.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, W.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangla, S.; Marchesini, P.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNally, D.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; von der Mey, M.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; van Mil, A. J. W.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Monteleoni, B.; Moore, R.; Morganti, S.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Muheim, F.; Nagy, E.; Nahn, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Park, H. K.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Peach, D.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petrak, S.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Pinto, J. C.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Produit, N.; Prokofiev, D.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Rind, O.; Ro, S.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosselet, Ph.; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sarkar, S.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schoeneich, B.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shukla, J.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Soulimov, V.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Strauch, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Tang, X. W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonisch, F.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tully, C.; Tuchscherer, H.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Völkert, R.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xu, J.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yao, X. Y.; Ye, J. B.; Yeh, S. C.; You, J. M.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; L3 Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Time-dependent B d0- overlineBd0 mixing is studied using 1.5 million hadronic Z decays collected by L3. Semileptonic B decays are selected by requiring at least one reconstructed lepton in both thrust hemispheres. Charge correlations between the tagged leptons are studied as a function of proper time. The proper time of the b-hadron decay is measured by reconstructing the production and decay vertices using a silicon microvertex detector. The measured B d0 meson oscillation frequency corresponds to a mass difference Δmd between the two B d0 mass eigenstates of Δmd = (0.496 -0.051+0.055 (stat) ± 0.043 (syst)) ps -1.

  6. A precise measurement of the B^0 meson oscillation frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; C. Forshaw, D.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; K. Kuonen, A.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.

    2016-07-01

    The oscillation frequency, Δ m_d, of B^0 mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a D^- or D^{*-} meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 3.0fb^{-1} of pp collisions, collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV. A combination of the two decay modes gives Δ m_d = (505.0 ± 2.1 ± 1.0) ns^{-1}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is consistent with the current world average and has similar precision.

  7. Dream recall frequency: impact of prospective measures and motivational factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadra, Antonio; Robert, Geneviève

    2012-12-01

    Significant individual differences exist in dream recall frequency (DRF) but some variance is likely attributable to instrument choice in measuring DRF. Three hundred and fifty eight participants estimated their weekly DRF and recorded their dreams in either a narrative log (n = 165) or checklist log (n = 193) for 2-5 weeks. There was an early peak in DRF within the first week of both types of prospective logs after which DRF remained relatively stable. Although the two groups did not differ in their estimated DRF, significantly fewer dreams were reported per week on the narrative logs and only checklist logs yielded significantly higher DRF than participants' questionnaire estimates. The interactions between DRF measures did not vary across groups with low, medium or high baseline levels of DRF. Keeping a dream log does not necessarily increase DRF and narrative logs' time consuming nature can impact subjects' motivation to report all of their dreams over time.

  8. Measurement of the B$_{d}^{0}$ meson oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Brambilla, Elena; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Castello, R; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hangarter, K; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Ilyas, M M; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapinos, P; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Kramer, T; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Lenti, M; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Ludovici, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Macchiolo, A; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Raghavan, R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Rind, O; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Röhner, S; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Schöneich, B; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Sticozzi, F; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonisch, F; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino

    1996-01-01

    Time-dependent \\Bd-\\Bbd\\ mixing is studied using 1.5 million hadronic Z decays collected by L3. Semileptonic B decays are selected by requiring at least one reconstructed lepton in both thrust hemispheres. Charge correlations between the tagged leptons are studied as a function of proper time. The proper time of the b-hadron decay is measured by reconstructing the production and decay vertices using a silicon microvertex detector. The measured \\Bd\\ meson oscillation frequency corresponds to a mass difference \\Dmd\\ between the two \\Bd\\ mass eigenstates of \\begin{displaymath} \\Dmd = \\left( 0.496 ^{+ 0.055}_{- 0.051}\\ \\mathrm{(stat)} \\pm{ 0.043}\\ \\mathrm{(syst)} \\right)\\ \\mathrm{ps}^{-1}. \\end{displaymath}

  9. Magnetic-Field-Response Measurement-Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Stanley E.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2006-01-01

    A measurement-acquisition system uses magnetic fields to power sensors and to acquire measurements from sensors. The system alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement-acquisition systems, which include a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with wires, use limited to a single type of measurement, wire degradation due to wear or chemical decay, and the logistics needed to add new sensors. Eliminating wiring for acquiring measurements can alleviate potential hazards associated with wires, such as damaged wires becoming ignition sources due to arcing. The sensors are designed as electrically passive inductive-capacitive or passive inductive-capacitive-resistive circuits that produce magnetic-field-responses. One or more electrical parameters (inductance, capacitance, and resistance) of each sensor can be variable and corresponds to a measured physical state of interest. The magnetic-field- response attributes (frequency, amplitude, and bandwidth) of the inductor correspond to the states of physical properties for which each sensor measures. For each sensor, the measurement-acquisition system produces a series of increasing magnetic-field harmonics within a frequency range dedicated to that sensor. For each harmonic, an antenna electrically coupled to an oscillating current (the frequency of which is that of the harmonic) produces an oscillating magnetic field. Faraday induction via the harmonic magnetic fields produces an electromotive force and therefore a current in the sensor. Once electrically active, the sensor produces its own harmonic magnetic field as the inductor stores and releases magnetic energy. The antenna of the measurement- acquisition system is switched from a transmitting to a receiving mode to acquire the magnetic-field response of the sensor. The rectified amplitude of the received response is compared to previous responses to prior transmitted harmonics, to ascertain if the measurement system has detected a

  10. Measurements of resonance frequencies of clarinet reeds and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Taillard, Pierre-André; Gross, Michel; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre; Kergomard, Jean

    2012-01-01

    A set of 55 clarinet reeds is observed by holography, collecting 2 series of measurements made under 2 different moisture contents, from which the resonance frequencies of the 15 first modes are deduced. A statistical analysis of the results reveals good correlations, but also significant differences between both series. Within a given series, flexural modes are not strongly correlated. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) shows that the measurements of each series can be described with 3 factors capturing more than 90% of the variance: the first is linked with transverse modes, the second with flexural modes of high order and the third with the first flexural mode. A forth factor is necessary to take into account the individual sensitivity to moisture content. Numerical 3D simulations are conducted by Finite Element Method, based on a given reed shape and an orthotropic model. A sensitivity analysis revels that, besides the density, the theoretical frequencies depend mainly on 2 parameters: $E_L$ and $G_{LT}...

  11. The Response of Long-Span Bridges to Low Frequency, Near-Fault Earthquake Ground Motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, David; Astaneh-Asl, A.; Larsen, S.C.; Hutchings, Larry

    2009-02-27

    Historical seismic hazard characterizations did not include earthquake ground motion waveforms at frequencies below approximately 0.2 Hz (5 seconds period). This resulted from limitations in early strong motion instrumentation and signal processing techniques, a lack of measurements in the near-field of major earthquakes and therefore no observational awareness, and a delayed understanding in the engineering community of the potential significance of these types of motions. In recent years, there is a growing recognition of the relevance of near-fault, low frequency motions, particularly for long-period structures such as large bridges. This paper describes a computationally based study of the effects of low frequency (long-period) near-fault motions on long-span bridge response. The importance of inclusion of these types of motions for long span cable supported bridges is demonstrated using actual measured broad-band, near-fault motions from large earthquakes.

  12. High frequency electric field levels: An example of determination of measurement uncertainty for broadband measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulević Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining high frequency electromagnetic field levels in urban areas represents a very complex task, having in mind the exponential growth of the number of sources embodied in public cellular telephony systems in the past twenty years. The main goal of this paper is a representation of a practical solution in the evaluation of measurement uncertainty for in-situ measurements in the case of spatial averaging. An example of the estimation of the uncertainty for electric field strength broadband measurements in the frequency range from 3 MHz to 18 GHz is presented.

  13. Individual brain-frequency responses to self-selected music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höller, Yvonne; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Schmid, Elisabeth Verena; Höller, Peter; Crone, Julia Sophia; Trinka, Eugen

    2012-12-01

    Music is a stimulus which may give rise to a wide range of emotional and cognitive responses. Therefore, brain reactivity to music has become a focus of interest in cognitive neuroscience. It is possible that individual preference moderates the effectof music on the brain. In the present study we examined whether there are common effects of listening to music even if each subject in a sample chooses their own piece of music. We invited 18 subjects to bring along their favorite relaxing music, and their favourite stimulating music. Additionally, a condition with tactile stimulation on the foot and a baseline condition (rest) without stimulation were used. The tactile stimulation was chosen to provide a simple, non-auditory condition which would be identical for all subjects. The electroencephalogram was recorded for each of the 3 conditions and during rest. We found responses in the alpha range mainly on parietal and occipital sites that were significant compared to baseline in 13 subjects during relaxing music, 15 subjects during activating music, and 16 subjects during tactile stimulation. Most subjects showed an alpha desynchronization in a lower alpha range followed by a synchronization in an upper frequency range. However, some subjects showed an increase in this area, whereas others showed a decrease only. In addition, many subjects showed reactivity in the beta range. Beta activity was especially increased while listening to activating music and during tactile stimulation in most subjects. We found interindividual differences in the response patterns even though the stimuli provoked comparable subjective emotions (relaxation, activation), and even if the stimulus was the same for all subjects (somatosensory stimulation). We suggest that brain responsivity to music should be examined individually by considering individual characteristics.

  14. Simultaneous and accurate measurement of the dielectric constant at many frequencies spanning a wide range

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Aparicio, Roberto; Cottinet, Denis; Tanase, Marius; Metz, Pascal; Bellon, Ludovic; Naert, Antoine; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We present an innovative technique which allows the simultaneous measurement of the dielectric constant of a material at many frequencies, spanning a four orders of magnitude range chosen between 10 --2 Hz and 10 4 Hz. The sensitivity and accuracy are comparable to those obtained using standard single frequency techniques. The technique is based on three new and simple features: a) the precise real time correction of the amplication of a current amplier; b) the specic shape of the excitation signal and its frequency spectrum; and c) the precise synchronization between the generation of the excitation signal and the acquisition of the dielectric response signal. This technique is useful in the case of relatively fast dynamical measurements when the knowledge of the time evolution of the dielectric constant is needed.

  15. Temporal accommodation response measured by photorefractive accommodation measurement device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Byoungsub; Leportier, Thibault; Park, Min-Chul

    2017-02-01

    Although accommodation response plays an important role in the human vision system for perception of distance, some three-dimensional (3D) displays offer depth stimuli regardless of the accommodation response. The consequence is that most observers watching 3D displays have complained about visual fatigue. The measurement of the accommodation response is therefore necessary to develop human-friendly 3D displays. However, only few studies about accommodation measurement have been reported. Most of the investigations have been focused on the measurement and analysis of monocular accommodation responses only because the accommodation response works individually in each eye. Moreover, a main eye perceives dominantly the object distance. However, the binocular accommodation response should be examined because both eyes are used to watch the 3D display in natural conditions. The ophthalmic instrument that we developed enabled to measure changes in the accommodation response of the two eyes simultaneously. Two cameras acquired separately the infrared images reflected from each eyes after the reflected beams passed through a cylindrical lens. The changes in the accommodation response could then be estimated from the changes in the astigmatism ratio of the infrared images that were acquired in real time. In this paper, we compared the accommodation responses of main eye between the monocular and the binocular conditions. The two eyes were measured one by one, with only one eye opened, during measurement for monocular condition. Then the two eyes were examined simultaneously for binocular condition. The results showed similar tendencies for main eye accommodation response in both cases.

  16. Notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps for objective audiometry using auditory brainstem responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah I. Corona-Strauss

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown recently that chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs show better performance than click stimulations, especially at low intensity levels. In this paper we present the development, test, and evaluation of a series of notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps. ABRs were collected in healthy young control subjects using the developed stimuli. Results of the analysis of the corresponding ABRs using a time-scale phase synchronization stability (PSS measure are also reported. The resultant wave V amplitude and latency measures showed a similar behavior as for values reported in literature. The PSS of frequency specific chirp-evoked ABRs reflected the presence of the wave V for all stimulation intensities. The scales that resulted in higher PSS are in line with previous findings, where ABRs evoked by broadband chirps were analyzed, and which stated that low frequency channels are better for the recognition and analysis of chirp-evoked ABRs. We conclude that the development and test of the series of notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps allowed the assessment of frequency specific ABRs, showing an identifiable wave V for different intensity levels. Future work may include the development of a faster automatic recognition scheme for these frequency specific ABRs.

  17. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Zhu

    Full Text Available The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  18. Bias Errors due to Leakage Effects When Estimating Frequency Response Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Josefsson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency response functions are often utilized to characterize a system's dynamic response. For a wide range of engineering applications, it is desirable to determine frequency response functions for a system under stochastic excitation. In practice, the measurement data is contaminated by noise and some form of averaging is needed in order to obtain a consistent estimator. With Welch's method, the discrete Fourier transform is used and the data is segmented into smaller blocks so that averaging can be performed when estimating the spectrum. However, this segmentation introduces leakage effects. As a result, the estimated frequency response function suffers from both systematic (bias and random errors due to leakage. In this paper the bias error in the H1 and H2-estimate is studied and a new method is proposed to derive an approximate expression for the relative bias error at the resonance frequency with different window functions. The method is based on using a sum of real exponentials to describe the window's deterministic autocorrelation function. Simple expressions are derived for a rectangular window and a Hanning window. The theoretical expressions are verified with numerical simulations and a very good agreement is found between the results from the proposed bias expressions and the empirical results.

  19. Cancelation of transducer effects from frequency response functions: Experimental case study on the steel plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Zamani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Modal analysis is a progressive science in the experimental evaluation of dynamic properties of the structures. Mechanical devices such as accelerometers are one of the sources of lack of quality in measuring modal testing parameters. In this article, elimination of the accelerometer’s mass effect of the frequency response of the structure is studied. So, a strategy is used for eliminating the mass effect using sensitivity analysis. In this method, the amount of mass change and the place to measure the structure’s response with least error in frequency correction is chosen. Experimental modal testing is carried out on a steel plate, and the effect of accelerometer’s mass is omitted using this strategy. Finally, a good agreement is achieved between numerical and experimental results.

  20. Measuring of the maximum measurable velocity for dual-frequency laser interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiping Zhang; Zhaogu Cheng; Zhaoyu Qin; Jianqiang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    There is an increasing demand on the measurable velocity of laser interferometer in manufacturing technologies. The maximum measurable velocity is limited by frequency difference of laser source, optical configuration, and electronics bandwidth. An experimental setup based on free falling movement has been demonstrated to measure the maximum easurable velocity for interferometers. Measurement results show that the maximum measurable velocity is less than its theoretical value. Moreover, the effect of kinds of factors upon the measurement results is analyzed, and the results can offer a reference for industrial applications.

  1. Accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, J W; Gao, C; Wang, L J

    2016-01-01

    An accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement method is demonstrated. As a key technique, a simple ambiguity resolving process based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement is used to overcome the contradiction between measurement accuracy and system complexity. The optimized system achieves a high accuracy of 0.3 ps with a 0.1 ps resolution, and a large dynamic range up to 50 km as well as no dead zone.

  2. Direct frequency comb measurement of OD + CO → DOCO kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, B J; Bui, T Q; Heckl, O H; Changala, P B; Spaun, B; Heu, P; Follman, D; Deutsch, C; Cole, G D; Aspelmeyer, M; Okumura, M; Ye, J

    2016-10-28

    The kinetics of the hydroxyl radical (OH) + carbon monoxide (CO) reaction, which is fundamental to both atmospheric and combustion chemistry, are complex because of the formation of the hydrocarboxyl radical (HOCO) intermediate. Despite extensive studies of this reaction, HOCO has not been observed under thermal reaction conditions. Exploiting the sensitive, broadband, and high-resolution capabilities of time-resolved cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy, we observed deuteroxyl radical (OD) + CO reaction kinetics and detected stabilized trans-DOCO, the deuterated analog of trans-HOCO. By simultaneously measuring the time-dependent concentrations of the trans-DOCO and OD species, we observed unambiguous low-pressure termolecular dependence of the reaction rate coefficients for N2 and CO bath gases. These results confirm the HOCO formation mechanism and quantify its yield.

  3. Measuring amplitudes of harmonics and combination frequencies in variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, E. P.; Wysocki, D.; Kanbur, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Discoveries of RR Lyrae and Cepheid variable stars with multiple modes of pulsation have increased tremendously in recent years. The Fourier spectra of these stars can be quite complicated due to the large number of combination frequencies that can exist between their modes. As a result, light- curve fits to these stars often suffer from undesirable ringing effects that arise from noisy observations and poor phase coverage. These non-physical overfitting artifacts also occur when fitting the harmonics of single-mode stars. Here we present a new method for fitting light curves that is much more robust against these effects. We prove that the amplitude measurement problem is very difficult (NP-hard) and provide a heuristic algorithm for solving it quickly and accurately.

  4. Measuring amplitudes of harmonics and combination frequencies in variable stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bellinger, Earl P; Kanbur, Shashi M

    2015-01-01

    Discoveries of RR Lyrae and Cepheid variable stars with multiple modes of pulsation have increased tremendously in recent years. The Fourier spectra of these stars can be quite complicated due to the large number of combination frequencies that can exist between their modes. As a result, light-curve fits to these stars often suffer from undesirable ringing effects that arise from noisy observations and poor phase coverage. These non-physical overfitting artifacts also occur when fitting the harmonics of single-mode stars as well. Here we present a new method for fitting light curves that is much more robust against these effects. We prove that the amplitude measurement problem is very difficult (NP-hard) and provide a heuristic algorithm for solving it quickly and accurately.

  5. Direct Frequency Comb Measurement of OD + CO -> DOCO Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bjork, Bryce J; Heckl, Oliver H; Changala, P Bryan; Spaun, Ben; Heu, Paula; Follman, David; Deutsch, Christoph; Cole, Garrett D; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Okumura, Mitchio; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of the OH + CO reaction, fundamental to both atmospheric and combustion chemistry, are complex due to the formation of the HOCO intermediate. Despite extensive studies on this reaction, HOCO has not been observed at thermal reaction conditions. Exploiting the sensitive, broadband, and high-resolution capabilities of time-resolved cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy, we observe OD + CO reaction kinetics with the detection of stabilized trans-DOCO, the deuterated analogue of trans-HOCO, and its yield. By simultaneously measuring the time-dependent concentrations of both trans-DOCO and OD species, we observe unambiguous low-pressure termolecular dependence on the reaction rate coefficients for both N2 and CO bath gases. These results confirm the HOCO formation mechanism and quantify its yield.

  6. Measurement of the Bs-Bsbar Oscillation Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca-Almenar, C; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Di Turo, P; Dorr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H J; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; García, J E; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P F; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Van Remortel, N; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A W; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the Bs-Bsbar oscillation frequency Delta m_s. We use 1 fb^-1 of data from p-pbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The sample contains signals of 3,600 fully reconstructed hadronic Bs decays and 37,000 partially reconstructed semileptonic Bs decays. We measure the probability as a function of proper decay time that the Bs decays with the same, or opposite, flavor as the flavor at production, and we find a signal consistent with Bs-Bsbar oscillations. The probability that random fluctuations could produce a comparable signal is 0.2%. Under the hypothesis that the signal is due to Bs-Bsbar oscillations, we measure Delta m_s = 17.31^{+0.33}_{-0.18} (stat.) +- 0.07 (syst.) ps^-1 and determine |Vtd/Vts| = 0.208^{+0.001}_{-0.002} (exp.) ^{+0.008}_{-0.006} (theo.).

  7. Measurement of the Bs0-Bs0 oscillation frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H J; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-08-11

    We present the first precise measurement of the Bs0-Bs0 oscillation frequency Deltams. We use 1 fb-1 of data from pp collisions at sqrts=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The sample contains signals of 3600 fully reconstructed hadronic Bs decays and 37,000 partially reconstructed semileptonic Bs decays. We measure the probability as a function of proper decay time that the Bs decays with the same, or opposite, flavor as the flavor at production, and we find a signal consistent with Bs0-Bs0 oscillations. The probability that random fluctuations could produce a comparable signal is 0.2%. Under the hypothesis that the signal is due to Bs0-Bs0 oscillations, we measure Deltams=17.31(-0.18)+0.33(stat)+/-0.07(syst) ps-1 and determine |Vtd/Vts|=0.208(-0.002)+0.001(expt)-0.006(+0.008)(theor).

  8. Frequency and Phase Synchronization in Neuromagnetic Cortical Responses to Flickering-Color Stimuli

    CERN Document Server

    Timashev, S F; Yulmetyev, R M; Demin, S A; Panischev, O Yu; Shimojo, S; Bhattacharya, J

    2009-01-01

    In our earlier study dealing with the analysis of neuromagnetic responses (magnetoencephalograms - MEG) to flickering-color stimuli for a group of control human subjects (9 volunteers) and a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (a 12-year old girl), it was shown that Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) was able to identify specific differences in the responses of each organism. The high specificity of individual MEG responses manifested itself in the values of FNS parameters for both chaotic and resonant components of the original signal. The present study applies the FNS cross-correlation function to the analysis of correlations between the MEG responses simultaneously measured at spatially separated points of the human cortex processing the red-blue flickering color stimulus. It is shown that the cross-correlations for control (healthy) subjects are characterized by frequency and phase synchronization at different points of the cortex, with the dynamics of neuromagnetic responses being determined by the low-fr...

  9. Atmospheric Electric Field Measurements at 100 Hz and High Frequency Electric Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Ricardo; Gonçalves da Silva, Hugo; Matthews, James; Bennett, Alec; Chubb, John

    2016-04-01

    Spectral response of Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient (PG), symmetric to the Atmospheric Electric Field, gives important information about phenomena affecting these measurements with characteristic time-scales that appear in the spectra as specific periodicities. This is the case of urban pollution that has a clear weekly dependence and reveals itself on PG measurements by a ~7 day periodicity (Silva et al., 2014). While long-term time-scales (low frequencies) have been exhaustively explored in literature, short-term time-scales (high frequencies), above 1 Hz, have comparatively received much less attention (Anisimov et al., 1999). This is mainly because of the technical difficulties related with the storage of such a huge amount of data (for 100 Hz sampling two days of data uses a ~1 Gb file) and the response degradation of the field-meters at such frequencies. Nevertheless, important Electric Phenomena occurs for frequencies above 1 Hz that are worth pursuing, e.g. the Schumann Resonances have a signature of worldwide thunderstorm activity at frequencies that go from ~8 up to ~40 Hz. To that end the present work shows preliminary results on PG measurements at 100 Hz that took place on two clear-sky days (17th and 18th June 2015) on the South of Portugal, Évora (38.50° N, 7.91° W). The field-mill used is a JCI 131F installed in the University of Évora campus (at 2 m height) with a few trees and two buildings in its surroundings (~50 m away). This device was developed by John Chubb (Chubb, 2014) and manufactured by Chilworth (UK). It was calibrated in December 2013 and recent work by the author (who is honored in this study for his overwhelming contribution to atmospheric electricity) reveals basically a flat spectral response of the device up to frequencies of 100 Hz (Chubb, 2015). This makes this device suitable for the study of High Frequency Electric Phenomena. Anisimov, S.V., et al. (1999). On the generation and evolution of aeroelectric structures

  10. Phase retrieval and time-frequency methods in the measurement of ultrashort laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    Recently several techniques have become available to measure the time- (or frequency-) dependent intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses. One of these, Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG), is rigorous and has achieved single-laser-shot operation. FROG combines the concepts of time-frequency analysis in the form of spectrogram generation (in order to create a two-dimensional problem), and uses a phase-retrieval-based algorithm to invert the experimental data to yield the intensity and phase of the laboratory laser pulse. In FROG it is easy to generate a spectrogram of the unknown signal, and inversion of the spectrogram to recover the signal is the main goal. Because the temporal width of a femtosecond laser pulse is much shorter than anything achievable by electronics, FROG uses the pulse to measure itself. In FROG, the laser pulse is split into two replicas of itself by a partially reflecting beamsplitter, and the two replicas interact with each other in a medium with an instantaneous nonlinear-optical response. This interaction generates a signal field that is then frequency-resolved using a spectrometer. The spectrum of the signal field is measured for all relevant values of the temporal delay between the two pulses. Here, the authors employ FROG and FROG related techniques to measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of an ultrashort laser pulse.

  11. Estimation of Transformer Winding Capacitances through Frequency Response Analysis - An Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Krupa; Ragavan, K.

    2013-10-01

    This article focuses on developing a non-invasive method for determining capacitances using frequency response data. The proposed methodology involves acquiring driving-point impedance of the winding under consideration over wide frequency range. With certain terminal conditions and using the terminal impedance measured at specific frequencies, input and shunt capacitances are determined. For the purpose of estimating series capacitance of the winding, an algorithm is proposed. To demonstrate the capability of the method, initially model coils that have provisions for connecting external capacitances are considered. Then, it is found that the estimated values of capacitances are nearly same as those of connected capacitances. The method is, then, extended to transformer winding, and a capacitive ladder network is constructed. To assess the accuracy of estimation, capacitive voltage distribution is utilized. That is, the voltage distribution in the winding is compared with that of synthesized circuit. A good agreement between those data reveals that the estimated capacitance values are accurate.

  12. High frequency strain measurements with fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J.; Angelmahr, M.; Schade, W.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years fiber Bragg grating sensors gained interest in structural health monitoring and concepts for smart structures. They are small, lightweight, and immune to electromagnetic interference. Using multiplexing techniques, several sensors can be addressed by a single fiber. Therefore, well-established structures and materials in industrial applications can be easily equipped with fiber optical sensors with marginal influence on their mechanical properties. In return, critical components can be monitored in real-time, leading to reduced maintenance intervals and a great reduction of costs. Beside of generally condition monitoring, the localization of failures in a structure is a desired feature of the condition monitoring system. Detecting the acoustic emission of a sudden event, its place of origin can be determined by analyzing the delay time of distributed sensor signals. To achieve high localization accuracies for the detection of cracks, breaks, and impacts high sampling rates combined with the simultaneous interrogation of several fiber Bragg grating sensors are required. In this article a fiber Bragg grating interrogator for high frequency measurements up to the megahertz range is presented. The interrogator is based on a passive wavelength to intensity conversion applying arrayed waveguide gratings. Light power fluctuations are suppressed by a differential data evaluation, leading to a reduced signal-to-noise ratio and a low strain detection limit. The measurement system is used to detect, inter alia, wire breaks in steel wire ropes for dockside cranes.

  13. Physically based analysis of electrical frequency response of passive microelectronic circuits by heterodyne lock-in thermal means

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, J.; Perpiñà, X.; Altet, J.; Vellvehi, M.; Jordà, X.

    2013-11-01

    This paper combines the heterodyne modulation technique with lock-in detection approaches to characterize the electrical behaviour of electronic systems in the frequency domain by thermal means. A thermal test chip (TTC), featuring a heating resistor and an embedded thermal sensor, is used as a test vehicle to assess this approach. The frequency response of the heating resistor has been first characterized by electrical measurements, yielding to a suitable TTC equivalent circuit which qualitatively explains its behaviour. Then, in order to infer this behaviour by thermal means, the heating resistor temperature has been heterodynally detected by on-chip local sensing (embedded thermal sensor) and off-chip spatially resolved (infrared lock-in thermography) techniques. The results of this paper show that from low-frequency temperature measurements it is possible to obtain the electrical frequency response of the TTC and to detect and locate capacitive coupling that disturbs the high-frequency operation of the device.

  14. High-resolution temperature sensor through measuring the frequency shift of single-frequency Erbium-doped fiber ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiwei; Shi, Wei; Duan, Liangcheng; Fu, Shijie; Sheng, Quan; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-02-01

    We propose a principle to achieve a high-resolution temperature sensor through measuring the central frequency shift in the single-frequency Erbium-doped fiber ring laser induced by the thermal drift via the optical heterodyne spectroscopy method. We achieve a temperature sensor with a sensitivity about 9.7 pm/°C and verify the detection accuracy through an experiment. Due to the narrow linewidth of the output singlefrequency signal and the high accuracy of the optical heterodyne spectroscopy method in measuring the frequency shift in the single-frequency ring laser, the temperature sensor can be employed to resolve a temperature drift up to 5.5×10-6 °C theoretically when the single-frequency ring laser has a linewidth of 1 kHz and 10-kHz frequency shift is achieved from the heterodyne spectra.

  15. Study of the frequency response of the mutual coupling between overhead lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selivanov V. N.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the frequency response of the mutual coupling between multi-wire overhead lines with length comparable to the wavelengths of the highest power frequency harmonics. Deenergized overhead transmission lines are influenced by electromagnetic interference from neighboring in-service overhead lines, railway traction lines, as well as other extended conductors with currents. The voltages induced on the overhead lines are dangerous to life or health of maintenance personnel. The values of the induced voltages can be determined either by direct measurement or by calculation. The paper presents the results of experimental studies of double-circuit overhead lines of the Kola energy system. It has been shown that the frequency spectrum of the induced voltage is different from the spectrum of the source of interference, and this difference has a resonant nature. The amplitude of the voltage induced by higher harmonics can be comparable with the amplitude of the voltage induced by the power frequency. The similar results have been received in studies of influence of the AC railway traction line on adjacent overhead transmission lines. ATP-EMTP numerical analysis has been performed to receive the frequency characteristics that explain the experimental results. Preliminary estimates indicate that the cause of the phenomenon is most likely due to the resonant nature of the frequency response of the mutual coupling. The resonant nature is characterized by the interrelation of the length of overhead lines and the wavelength of the higher harmonics. A wave resonance of currents and voltages that appears in the lines lead to the "magnification" of the individual induced voltage harmonics falling in the maxima of the frequency characteristics of mutual coupling.

  16. Real-time frequency-domain fiber optic sensor for intra-arterial blood oxygen measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala, J. R.; Scott, Ian L.; Parker, Jennifer W.; Atwater, Beauford W.; Yu, Clement; Fischer, Russell; Bellingrath, K.

    1993-05-01

    A real time frequency domain phosphorimeter capable of measuring precise and accurate excited state lifetimes for determining oxygen is described. This frequency domain instrument does not make use of cross correlation techniques traditionally used in frequency domain fluorometers. Instead, the electrical signal from the detector is filtered to contain only the first several harmonics. This filtered signal is then sampled and averaged over a few thousand cycles. The absolute phase and absolute modulation of each sampled harmonic of the excitation and of the luminescence is computed by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio is then calculated at each harmonic frequency. A least squares fit is performed in the frequency domain to obtain the lifetimes of discrete exponentials. Oxygen concentrations are computed from these lifetimes. Prototypes based on these techniques were built employing commercially available components. Results from measurements in saline solution and in the arterial blood of dogs show that oxygen concentrations can be determined reproducibly. The system drift is less than 1% in over 100 hours of continuous operation. The performance of fiber optic sensors was evaluated in dogs over a period of 10 hours. The sensors tracked changes in arterial oxygen tension over the course of the experiment without instabilities. The overall response of the system was about 90 seconds. The update time was 3 seconds.

  17. Orthogonally Linearly Polarized Dual Frequency Nd:YAG Lasers with Tunable Frequency Difference and Its Application in Precision Angle Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Yi-Dong; ZHANG Shu-Lian

    2007-01-01

    The orthogonally linearly polarized dual frequency Nd:YAG lasers with two quarter wave plates in laser resonator are proposed. The intra-cavity variable birefringence, which is caused by relative rotation of these two wave plates in laser inner cavity, results in the frequency difference of the dual frequency laser also changeable. The theory model based on the Jones matrix is presented, as well as experimental results. The potential application of this phenomenon in precision roll-angle measurement is also discussed.

  18. High Frequency Acoustic Response Characterization and Analysis of the Deep Throttling Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiano, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Common Extensive Cryogenic Engine program demonstrated the operation of a deep throttling engine design. The program, spanning five years from August 2005 to July 2010, funded testing through four separate engine demonstration test series. Along with successful completion of multiple objectives, a discrete response of approximately 4000 Hz was discovered and explored throughout the program. The typical low-amplitude acoustic response was evident in the chamber measurement through almost every operating condition; however, at certain off-nominal operating conditions, the response became discrete with higher amplitude. This paper summarizes the data reduction, characterization, and analysis of the 4,000 Hz response for the entire program duration, using the large amount of data collected. Upon first encountering the response, new objectives and instrumentation were incorporated in future test series to specifically collect 4,000 Hz data. The 4,000 Hz response was identified as being related to the first tangential acoustic mode by means of frequency estimation and spatial decomposition. The latter approach showed that the effective node line of the mode was aligned with the manifold propellant inlets with standing waves and quasi-standing waves present at various times. Contour maps that contain instantaneous frequency and amplitude trackings of the response were generated as a significant improvement to historical manual approaches of data reduction presentation. Signal analysis and dynamic data reduction also uncovered several other features of the response including a stable limit cycle, the progressive engagement of subsequent harmonics, the U-shaped time history, an intermittent response near the test-based neutral stability region, other acoustic modes, and indications of modulation with a separate subsynchronous response. Although no engine damage related to the acoustic mode was noted, the peak-to-peak fluctuating pressure amplitude achieved 12.1% of the

  19. Cropping frequency and area response to climate variability can exceed yield response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Avery S.; Vanwey, Leah K.; Spera, Stephanie A.; Mustard, John F.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of agricultural output to climate change has often been estimated by modelling crop yields under climate change scenarios or with statistical analysis of the impacts of year-to-year climatic variability on crop yields. However, the area of cropland and the number of crops harvested per growing season (cropping frequency) both also affect agricultural output and both also show sensitivity to climate variability and change. We model the change in agricultural output associated with the response of crop yield, crop frequency and crop area to year-to-year climate variability in Mato Grosso (MT), Brazil, a key agricultural region. Roughly 70% of the change in agricultural output caused by climate was determined by changes in frequency and/or changes in area. Hot and wet conditions were associated with the largest losses and cool and dry conditions with the largest gains. All frequency and area effects had the same sign as total effects, but this was not always the case for yield effects. A focus on yields alone may therefore bias assessments of the vulnerability of agriculture to climate change. Efforts to reduce climate impacts to agriculture should seek to limit production losses not only from crop yield, but also from changes in cropland area and cropping frequency.

  20. Low frequency steady-state brain responses modulate large scale functional networks in a frequency-specific means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Long, Zhiliang; Cui, Qian; Liu, Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Heng; Guo, Xiao-Nan; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Neural oscillations are essential for brain functions. Research has suggested that the frequency of neural oscillations is lower for more integrative and remote communications. In this vein, some resting-state studies have suggested that large scale networks function in the very low frequency range (brain networks because both resting-state studies and conventional frequency tagging approaches cannot simultaneously capture multiple large scale networks in controllable cognitive activities. In this preliminary study, we aimed to examine whether large scale networks can be modulated by task-induced low frequency steady-state brain responses (lfSSBRs) in a frequency-specific pattern. In a revised attention network test, the lfSSBRs were evoked in the triple network system and sensory-motor system, indicating that large scale networks can be modulated in a frequency tagging way. Furthermore, the inter- and intranetwork synchronizations as well as coherence were increased at the fundamental frequency and the first harmonic rather than at other frequency bands, indicating a frequency-specific modulation of information communication. However, there was no difference among attention conditions, indicating that lfSSBRs modulate the general attention state much stronger than distinguishing attention conditions. This study provides insights into the advantage and mechanism of lfSSBRs. More importantly, it paves a new way to investigate frequency-specific large scale brain activities.

  1. Dynamic Response to Pedestrian Loads with Statistical Frequency Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Pedestrian loads depend on the regularity and frequency of the footfall process. Traditionally, pedestrian loads have been represented by one or more specific harmonic components with a well-defined frequency, and light footbridges have been investigated for resonance vibration generated by the h......Pedestrian loads depend on the regularity and frequency of the footfall process. Traditionally, pedestrian loads have been represented by one or more specific harmonic components with a well-defined frequency, and light footbridges have been investigated for resonance vibration generated...

  2. Non-contact precision profile measurement to rough-surface objects with optical frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoe, Taro; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2016-12-01

    In this research, we developed a new method for the high precision and contactless profile measurement of rough-surfaced objects using optical frequency combs. The uncertainty of the frequency beats of an optical frequency comb is very small (relative uncertainty is 10-10 in our laboratory). In addition, the wavelengths corresponding to these frequency beats are long enough to measure rough-surfaced objects. We can conduct high-precision measurement because several GHz frequency beats can be used if the capability of the detector permits. Moreover, two optical frequency combs with Rb-stabilized repetition frequencies are used for the measurement instead of an RF frequency oscillator; thus, we can avoid the cyclic error caused by the RF frequency oscillator. We measured the profile of a wood cylinder with a rough surface (diameter is approximately 113.2 mm) and compared the result with that of coordinate measuring machine (CMM).

  3. Stability of the translocation frequency following whole-body irradiation measured in rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, J. N.; Hill, F. S.; Burk, C. E.; Cox, A. B.; Straume, T.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are persistent indicators of prior exposure to ionizing radiation and the development of 'chromosome painting' to efficiently detect translocations has resulted in a powerful biological dosimetry tool for radiation dose reconstruction. However, the actual stability of the translocation frequency with time after exposure must be measured before it can be used reliably to obtain doses for individuals exposed years or decades previously. Human chromosome painting probes were used here to measure reciprocal translocation frequencies in cells from two tissues of 8 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) irradiated almost three decades previously. Six of the monkeys were exposed in 1965 to whole-body (fully penetrating) radiation and two were unexposed controls. The primates were irradiated as juveniles to single doses of 0.56, 1.13, 2.00, or 2.25 Gy. Blood lymphocytes (and skin fibroblasts from one individual) were obtained for cytogenetic analysis in 1993, near the end of the animals' lifespans. Results show identical dose-response relationships 28 y after exposure in vivo and immediately after exposure in vitro. Because chromosome aberrations are induced with identical frequencies in vivo and in vitro, these results demonstrate that the translocation frequencies induced in 1965 have not changed significantly during the almost three decades since exposure. Finally, our emerging biodosimetry data for individual radiation workers are now confirming the utility of reciprocal translocations measured by FISH in radiation dose reconstruction.

  4. Time and frequency response of a resistance-wire aircraft atmospheric temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, G. A.; Friehe, C. A.; Edwards, D. K.

    1994-04-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of an aircraft-mounted resistance-wire atmospheric temperature sensor are modeled to determine the time and frequency responses. The sensor element (Rosemount 102E4AL) consists of a 25-micron-diameter platinum wire wound around a cruciform mica support with approximately 143 diameters of wire between contacts with the mica. A longitudinally distributed, radially lumped capacitance model provided for the convective heat transfer to the wire and the transient heat conduction along it. Similarly, the temperature gradient across the thin dimension of the mica support was neglected, and a radially distributed model provided for the convective heat transfer to the mica and the transient conduction within it. The two solutions are coupled by the boundary conditions at the wire-mica contact. The equations were solved to produce the temperature distribution along the wire and in the mica support as a function of the frequency of a free-stream sinusoidal temperature fluctuation. The frequency response transfer function was determined and fit to a two-time-constant transfer function by regression analysis. The two-time-constant model fits the general solution very well. The small (fast response) time constant is essentially determined by the wire itself. The larger (slow response) time constant is due to conduction into and out of the mica supports. The model predicts that the effects of the mica supports are important for frequencies greater than about 0.1 Hz. The responses to five different temperature waveform inputs (sinusoid, step, pulse, ramp, and ramp level) are derived using the two-time-constant model with Laplace transform techniques for both infinite-length wire (no mica support effects) and the finite-length wire of the 102 probe. The actual temperature signals are distorted by the larger time constant of the mica supports, especially for the pulse and ramp inputs that are typical of aircraft measurements of thermals and

  5. Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique for identifying nonlinear structural elements from frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Zheng, G. T.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and general Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique is proposed for identifying the parameters or the mathematical model of a nonlinear structural element with steady-state primary harmonic frequency response functions (FRFs). The Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness is defined as the complex ratio between the internal force and the displacement response of unknown element. Obtained with the test data of responses' frequencies and amplitudes, the real and imaginary part of Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness are plotted as discrete points in a three dimensional space over the displacement amplitude and the frequency, which are called the real and the imaginary Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness map, respectively. These points will form a repeatable surface as the Equivalent Dynamic stiffness is only a function of the corresponding data as derived in the paper. The mathematical model of the unknown element can then be obtained by surface-fitting these points with special functions selected by priori knowledge of the nonlinear type or with ordinary polynomials if the type of nonlinearity is not pre-known. An important merit of this technique is its capability of dealing with strong nonlinearities owning complicated frequency response behaviors such as jumps and breaks in resonance curves. In addition, this technique could also greatly simplify the test procedure. Besides there is no need to pre-identify the underlying linear parameters, the method uses the measured data of excitation forces and responses without requiring a strict control of the excitation force during the test. The proposed technique is demonstrated and validated with four classical single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) numerical examples and one experimental example. An application of this technique for identification of nonlinearity from multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems is also illustrated.

  6. Variable Temperature High-Frequency Response of Heterostructure Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Joy

    1992-01-01

    The development of high performance heterostructure transistors is essential for emerging opto-electronic integrated circuits (OEICs) and monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). Applications for OEICs and MMICs include the rapidly growing telecommunications and personal communications markets. The key to successful OEIC and MMIC chip sets is the development of high performance, cost-effective technologies. In this work, several different transistor structures are investigated to determine the potential for high speed performance and the physical mechanisms controlling the ultimate device operation. A cryogenic vacuum microwave measurement system has been developed to study the high speed operation of modulation doped field-effect transistors (MODFETs), doped channel metal insulator field-effect transistors (MISFETs), and metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs). This study has concluded that the high field velocity and not the low field mobility is what controls high frequency operation of GaAs based field-effect transistors. Both Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As/GaAs and InP/In_{rm y}Ga _{rm 1-y}As heterostructure bipolar transistors (HBTs) have also been studied at reduced lattice temperatures to understand the role of diffusive transport in the Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As/GaAs HBT and nonequilibrium transport in the InP/In _{rm y}Ga_ {rm 1-y}As HBT. It is shown that drift/diffusion formulation must be modified to accurately estimate the base delay time in the conventional Al _{rm x}Ga_ {rm 1-x}As/GaAs HBT. The reduced lattice temperature operation of the InP/In_ {rm y}Ga_{rm 1-y}As HBT demonstrates extreme nonequilibrium transport in the neutral base and collector space charge region with current gain cut-off frequency exceeding 300 GHz, which is the fastest reported transistor to date. Finally, the MODFET has been investigated as a three-terminal negative differential resistance (NDR) transistor. The existence of real space transfer is confirmed by

  7. High frequency switched-mode stimulation can evoke postsynaptic responses in cerebellar principal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Van Dongen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the efficacy of high frequency switched-mode neural stimulation. Instead of using a constant stimulation amplitude, the stimulus is switched on and off repeatedly with a high frequency (up to 100kHz duty cycled signal. By means of tissue modeling that includes the dynamic properties of both the tissue material as well as the axon membrane, it is first shown that switched-mode stimulation depolarizes the cell membrane in a similar way as classical constant amplitude stimulation.These findings are subsequently verified using in vitro experiments in which the response of a Purkinje cell is measured due to a stimulation signal in the molecular layer of the cerebellum of a mouse. For this purpose a stimulator circuit is developed that is able to produce a monophasic high frequency switched-mode stimulation signal. The results confirm the modeling by showing that switched-mode stimulation is able to induce similar responses in the Purkinje cell as classical stimulation using a constant current source. This conclusion opens up possibilities for novel stimulation designs that can improve the performance of the stimulator circuitry. Care has to be taken to avoid losses in the system due to the higher operating frequency.

  8. Predicting and measuring fluid responsiveness with echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Miller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echocardiography is ideally suited to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. It can be used to assess fluid responsiveness by looking at the left ventricle, aortic outflow, inferior vena cava and right ventricle. Static measurements and dynamic variables based on heart–lung interactions all combine to predict and measure fluid responsiveness and assess response to intravenous fluid esuscitation. Thorough knowledge of these variables, the physiology behind them and the pitfalls in their use allows the echocardiographer to confidently assess these patients and in combination with clinical judgement manage them appropriately.

  9. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O' Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2010-12-20

    An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

  10. Auditory brainstem responses predict auditory nerve fiber thresholds and frequency selectivity in hearing impaired chinchillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kenneth S; Kale, Sushrut; Scheidt, Ryan E; Heinz, Michael G

    2011-10-01

    Noninvasive auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) are commonly used to assess cochlear pathology in both clinical and research environments. In the current study, we evaluated the relationship between ABR characteristics and more direct measures of cochlear function. We recorded ABRs and auditory nerve (AN) single-unit responses in seven chinchillas with noise-induced hearing loss. ABRs were recorded for 1-8 kHz tone burst stimuli both before and several weeks after 4 h of exposure to a 115 dB SPL, 50 Hz band of noise with a center frequency of 2 kHz. Shifts in ABR characteristics (threshold, wave I amplitude, and wave I latency) following hearing loss were compared to AN-fiber tuning curve properties (threshold and frequency selectivity) in the same animals. As expected, noise exposure generally resulted in an increase in ABR threshold and decrease in wave I amplitude at equal SPL. Wave I amplitude at equal sensation level (SL), however, was similar before and after noise exposure. In addition, noise exposure resulted in decreases in ABR wave I latency at equal SL and, to a lesser extent, at equal SPL. The shifts in ABR characteristics were significantly related to AN-fiber tuning curve properties in the same animal at the same frequency. Larger shifts in ABR thresholds and ABR wave I amplitude at equal SPL were associated with greater AN threshold elevation. Larger reductions in ABR wave I latency at equal SL, on the other hand, were associated with greater loss of AN frequency selectivity. This result is consistent with linear systems theory, which predicts shorter time delays for broader peripheral frequency tuning. Taken together with other studies, our results affirm that ABR thresholds and wave I amplitude provide useful estimates of cochlear sensitivity. Furthermore, comparisons of ABR wave I latency to normative data at the same SL may prove useful for detecting and characterizing loss of cochlear frequency selectivity.

  11. Mean frequency and relative fluorescence intensity measurement of γ‐H2AX foci dose response in PBL exposed to γ‐irradiation: An inter‐ and intra‐laboratory comparison and its relevance for radiation triage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venkateswarlu, Raavi; Tamizh, Selvan G; Bhavani, Manivannan; Kumar, Arun; Alok, Amit; Karthik, Kanagaraj; Kalra, Namita; Vijayalakshmi, J; Paul, Solomon F. D; Chaudhury, N. K; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of γ‐H2AX protein changes in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation is a simple, sensitive, and rapid assay for radiation triage and early marker of dose estimation...

  12. Modal response of 4-rod type radio frequency quadrupole linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Avik; Mahapatra, Abhijit [Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute (CMERI), M.G. Avenue, Durgapur 713209 (India); Mondal, Manas; Chakrabarti, Alok [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Sector-1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2009-10-15

    This paper deals with the analysis and experimental study of natural frequencies of vibration of a 4-rod type radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. The eigenvalue analysis of the structure has been done both analytically (multispan beam concept) as well as using blocked Lanczos eigenvalue finite element solver with an ability to extract the rigid body modes. This has been done in the mechanical design phase to find the level of agreement between the output of simplified analytical analysis results and the output of a commercial finite element method (FEM) solver, since a full scale RFQ structure is too complex to handle analytically. Experimental validation of the analysis results has been done on the physical 1.7 m RFQ at the installation site. The experimental data obtained were later analyzed and found to be in close agreement with the predicted frequencies in the lower frequency ranges. It gets more and more deviated in the higher frequency ranges. Also some frequencies were observed during experimentation, which were not found in the finite element analysis results. The source of those frequencies are to be further investigated as it may play a predominant role in the design high quality factor beam line cavities for higher operational efficiency.

  13. Measurement of carbonaceous aerosol with different sampling configurations and frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; He, K.-B.

    2015-07-01

    A common approach for measuring the mass of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in airborne particulate matter involves collection on a quartz fiber filter and subsequent thermal-optical analysis. Although having been widely used in aerosol studies and in PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) chemical speciation monitoring networks in particular, this measurement approach is prone to several types of artifacts, such as the positive sampling artifact caused by the adsorption of gaseous organic compounds onto the quartz filter, the negative sampling artifact due to the evaporation of OC from the collected particles and the analytical artifact in the thermal-optical determination of OC and EC (which is strongly associated with the transformation of OC into char OC and typically results in an underestimation of EC). The presence of these artifacts introduces substantial uncertainties to observational data on OC and EC and consequently limits our ability to evaluate OC and EC estimations in air quality models. In this study, the influence of sampling frequency on the measurement of OC and EC was investigated based on PM2.5 samples collected in Beijing, China. Our results suggest that the negative sampling artifact of a bare quartz filter could be remarkably enhanced due to the uptake of water vapor by the filter medium. We also demonstrate that increasing sampling duration does not necessarily reduce the impact of positive sampling artifact, although it will enhance the analytical artifact. Due to the effect of the analytical artifact, EC concentrations of 48 h averaged samples were about 15 % lower than results from 24 h averaged ones. In addition, it was found that with the increase of sampling duration, EC results exhibited a stronger dependence on the charring correction method and, meanwhile, optical attenuation (ATN) of EC (retrieved from the carbon analyzer) was more significantly biased by the shadowing effect. Results from this study will be useful for the

  14. Measuring coral size-frequency distribution using stereo video technology, a comparison with in situ measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joseph A; Polunin, Nicholas V C; Field, Stuart N; Wilson, Shaun K

    2015-05-01

    Coral colony size-frequency distribution data offer valuable information about the ecological status of coral reefs. Such data are usually collected by divers in situ, but stereo video is being increasingly used for monitoring benthic marine communities and may be used to collect size information for coral colonies. This study compared the size-frequency distributions of coral colonies obtained by divers measuring colonies 'in situ' with digital video imagery collected using stereo video and later processed using computer software. The size-frequency distributions of the two methods were similar for corymbose colonies, although distributions were different for massive, branching and all colonies combined. The differences are mainly driven by greater abundance of colonies >50 cm and fewer colonies 5 cm and was able to record measurements on 87% of the colonies detected. However, stereo video only detected 57% of marked colonies coral recruits. Estimates of colony size made with the stereo video were smaller than the in situ technique for all growth forms, particularly for massive morphologies. Despite differences in size distributions, community assessments, which incorporated genera, growth forms and size, were similar between the two techniques. Stereo video is suitable for monitoring coral community demographics and provided data similar to in situ measure for corymbose corals, but the ability to accurately measure massive and branching coral morphologies appeared to decline with increasing colony size.

  15. Developmental changes in ERP responses to spatial frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlijn van den Boomen

    Full Text Available Social interaction starts with perception of other persons. One of the first steps in perception is processing of basic information such as spatial frequencies (SF, which represent details and global information. However, although behavioural perception of SF is well investigated, the developmental trajectory of the temporal characteristics of SF processing is not yet well understood. The speed of processing of this basic visual information is crucial, as it determines the speed and possibly accuracy of subsequent visual and social processes. The current study investigated developmental changes in the temporal characteristics of selective processing of high SF (HSF; details versus low SF (LSF; global. To this end, brain activity was measured using EEG in 108 children aged 3-15 years, while HSF or LSF grating stimuli were presented. Interest was in the temporal characteristics of brain activity related to LSF and HSF processing, specifically at early (N80 or later (P1 or N2 peaks in brain activity. Analyses revealed that from 7-8 years onwards HSF but not LSF stimuli evoked an N80 peak. In younger children, aged 3-8 years, the visual manipulation mainly affected the visual N2 peak. Selective processing of HSF versus LSF thus occurs at a rather late time-point (N2 peak in young children. Although behavioural research previously showed that 3-6 year-olds can perceive detailed information, the current results point out that selective processing of HSF versus LSF is still delayed in these children. The delayed processing in younger children could impede the use of LSF and HSF for emotional face processing. Thus, the current study is a starting point for understanding changes in basic visual processing which underlie social development.

  16. Numerical simulation and analysis for low-frequency rock physics measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunhui; Tang, Genyang; Wang, Shangxu; He, Yanxiao

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, several experimental methods have been introduced to measure the elastic parameters of rocks in the relatively low-frequency range, such as differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) and stress-strain measurement. It is necessary to verify the validity and feasibility of the applied measurement method and to quantify the sources and levels of measurement error. Relying solely on the laboratory measurements, however, we cannot evaluate the complete wavefield variation in the apparatus. Numerical simulations of elastic wave propagation, on the other hand, are used to model the wavefield distribution and physical processes in the measurement systems, and to verify the measurement theory and analyze the measurement results. In this paper we provide a numerical simulation method to investigate the acoustic waveform response of the DARS system and the quasi-static responses of the stress-strain system, both of which use axisymmetric apparatus. We applied this method to parameterize the properties of the rock samples, the sample locations and the sensor (hydrophone and strain gauges) locations and simulate the measurement results, i.e. resonance frequencies and axial and radial strains on the sample surface, from the modeled wavefield following the physical experiments. Rock physical parameters were estimated by inversion or direct processing of these data, and showed a perfect match with the true values, thus verifying the validity of the experimental measurements. Error analysis was also conducted for the DARS system with 18 numerical samples, and the sources and levels of error are discussed. In particular, we propose an inversion method for estimating both density and compressibility of these samples. The modeled results also showed fairly good agreement with the real experiment results, justifying the effectiveness and feasibility of our modeling method.

  17. Research on the iterative method for model updating based on the frequency response function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ming Li; Jia-Zhen Hong

    2012-01-01

    Model reduction technique is usually employed in model updating process,In this paper,a new model updating method named as cross-model cross-frequency response function (CMCF) method is proposed and a new iterative method associating the model updating method with the model reduction technique is investigated.The new model updating method utilizes the frequency response function to avoid the modal analysis process and it does not need to pair or scale the measured and the analytical frequency response function,which could greatly increase the number of the equations and the updating parameters.Based on the traditional iterative method,a correction term related to the errors resulting from the replacement of the reduction matrix of the experimental model with that of the finite element model is added in the new iterative method.Comparisons between the traditional iterative method and the proposed iterative method are shown by model updating examples of solar panels,and both of these two iterative methods combine the CMCF method and the succession-level approximate reduction technique.Results show the effectiveness of the CMCF method and the proposed iterative method.

  18. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency during anterior-posterior stretching. Method Three materially linear and three materially nonlinear models were created and stretched up to 10 mm in 1 mm increments. Phonation onset pressure (Pon) and fundamental frequency (F0) at Pon were recorded for each length. Measurements were repeated as the models were relaxed in 1 mm increments back to their resting lengths, and tensile tests were conducted to determine the stress-strain responses of linear versus nonlinear models. Results Nonlinear models demonstrated a more substantial frequency response than did linear models and a more predictable pattern of F0 increase with respect to increasing length (although range was inconsistent across models). Pon generally increased with increasing vocal fold length for nonlinear models, whereas for linear models, Pon decreased with increasing length. Conclusions Nonlinear synthetic models appear to more accurately represent the human vocal folds than linear models, especially with respect to F0 response. PMID:22271874

  19. Modeling the response of small myelinated axons in a compound nerve to kilohertz frequency signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelot, N. A.; Behrend, C. E.; Grill, W. M.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. There is growing interest in electrical neuromodulation of peripheral nerves, particularly autonomic nerves, to treat various diseases. Electrical signals in the kilohertz frequency (KHF) range can produce different responses, including conduction block. For example, EnteroMedics’ vBloc® therapy for obesity delivers 5 kHz stimulation to block the abdominal vagus nerves, but the mechanisms of action are unclear. Approach. We developed a two-part computational model, coupling a 3D finite element model of a cuff electrode around the human abdominal vagus nerve with biophysically-realistic electrical circuit equivalent (cable) model axons (1, 2, and 5.7 µm in diameter). We developed an automated algorithm to classify conduction responses as subthreshold (transmission), KHF-evoked activity (excitation), or block. We quantified neural responses across kilohertz frequencies (5-20 kHz), amplitudes (1-8 mA), and electrode designs. Main results. We found heterogeneous conduction responses across the modeled nerve trunk, both for a given parameter set and across parameter sets, although most suprathreshold responses were excitation, rather than block. The firing patterns were irregular near transmission and block boundaries, but otherwise regular, and mean firing rates varied with electrode-fibre distance. Further, we identified excitation responses at amplitudes above block threshold, termed ‘re-excitation’, arising from action potentials initiated at virtual cathodes. Excitation and block thresholds decreased with smaller electrode-fibre distances, larger fibre diameters, and lower kilohertz frequencies. A point source model predicted a larger fraction of blocked fibres and greater change of threshold with distance as compared to the realistic cuff and nerve model. Significance. Our findings of widespread asynchronous KHF-evoked activity suggest that conduction block in the abdominal vagus nerves is unlikely with current clinical parameters. Our

  20. Dielectric measurements on PWB materials at microwave frequencies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Tanwar; K K Gupta; P J Singh; Y K Vijay

    2006-04-01

    In quest of finding new substrate for printed wiring board (PWB) having low dielectric constant, we have made PSF/PMMA blends and evaluated the dielectric parameters at 8.92 GHz frequency and at 35°C temperature. Incorporating PMMA in PSF matrix results in reduced dielectric constant than that of pure PSF. The dielectric parameters of pure PMMA and PSF films of different thicknesses have also been obtained at microwave frequencies. We have used dielectric data at microwave frequencies as a tool to evaluate optical constants, absorption index `’ and refractive index `’. The blends of PSF/PMMA may be used as base materials for PWBs.

  1. Effect of milking frequency on DHI performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J W; Ely, L O; Graves, W M; Gilson, W D

    2002-12-01

    Increasing production by increasing milking frequency (MF) is a management option available to dairy producers. This study examined effects of MF and interactions with region and herd size on measures of herd performance. Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) Holstein herd summary records (n = 10,754, 10,550, and 10,438) for the years 1998, 1999, and 2000 were classified by MF: two times a day (2X) milking vs three times a day (3X); herd size: small ( or = 250 cows); and region: North and South. Percentage of herds milking 3X by year were 7.0, 6.7, and 7.1. Rolling herd average milk production was 16, 16, and 15% higher for herds milking 3X than herds milking 2X for the respective years. Herds milking 3X in the North region outproduced herds milking 3X in the South region. Milk fat and protein percentages were lower for herds milking 3X during all 3 yr. Differences in energy-corrected milk production between herds milking 3X and herds milking 2X were 14.5, 13.4, and 13.4% during the respective 3 yr as a result of lower component percentages for herds milking 3X. Herds milking 3X had more days open and higher actual calving intervals than herds milking 2X. Services per pregnancy for herds breeding primarily by artificial insemination were higher for herds milking 3X than for herds milking 2X. Somatic cell scores and weighted somatic cell counts were lower for herds milking 3X than herds milking 2X. Herds milking 3X had a higher percentage of somatic cell scores in the low range (0 to 3) and a lower percentage in the high range (7 to 9). Mean percentages of cows entering and leaving the herd were higher for herds milking 3X during all 3 yr.

  2. Day-Ahead Scheduling Considering Demand Response as a Frequency Control Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Qing Bao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced metering technologies makes demand response (DR able to provide fast response services, e.g., primary frequency control. It is recognized that DR can contribute to the primary frequency control like thermal generators. This paper proposes a day-ahead scheduling method that considers DR as a frequency control resource, so that the DR resources can be dispatched properly with other resources. In the proposed method, the objective of frequency control is realized by defining a frequency limit equation under a supposed contingency. The frequency response model is used to model the dynamics of system frequency. The nonlinear frequency limit equation is transformed to a linear arithmetic equation by piecewise linearization, so that the problem can be solved by mixed integer linear programming (MILP. Finally, the proposed method is verified on numerical examples.

  3. Effect of input compression and input frequency response on music perception in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Emily R; Jones, Linor L; Fraser, Matthew; Lockley, Morag; Hill-Feltham, Penelope; McKay, Colette M

    2015-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether modifications to input compression and input frequency response characteristics can improve music-listening satisfaction in cochlear implant users. Experiment 1 compared three pre-processed versions of music and speech stimuli in a laboratory setting: original, compressed, and flattened frequency response. Music excerpts comprised three music genres (classical, country, and jazz), and a running speech excerpt was compared. Experiment 2 implemented a flattened input frequency response in the speech processor program. In a take-home trial, participants compared unaltered and flattened frequency responses. Ten and twelve adult Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant users participated in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Experiment 1 revealed a significant preference for music stimuli with a flattened frequency response compared to both original and compressed stimuli, whereas there was a significant preference for the original (rising) frequency response for speech stimuli. Experiment 2 revealed no significant mean preference for the flattened frequency response, with 9 of 11 subjects preferring the rising frequency response. Input compression did not alter music enjoyment. Comparison of the two experiments indicated that individual frequency response preferences may depend on the genre or familiarity, and particularly whether the music contained lyrics.

  4. Effect of the Detector Width and Gas Pressure on the Frequency Response of a Micromachined Thermal Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Courteaud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the design and the environmental conditions of a micromachined thermal accelerometer, based on convection effect, are discussed and studied in order to understand the behavior of the frequency response evolution of the sensor. It has been theoretically and experimentally studied with different detector widths, pressure and gas nature. Although this type of sensor has already been intensively examined, little information concerning the frequency response modeling is currently available and very few experimental results about the frequency response are reported in the literature. In some particular conditions, our measurements show a cut-off frequency at −3 dB greater than 200 Hz. By using simple cylindrical and planar models of the thermal accelerometer and an equivalent electrical circuit, a good agreement with the experimental results has been demonstrated.

  5. Condition assessment of transformer insulation using dielectric frequency response analysis by artificial bee colony algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigdeli Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transformers are one of the most important components of the power system. It is important to maintain and assess the condition. Transformer lifetime depends on the life of its insulation and insulation life is also strongly influenced by moisture in the insulation. Due to importance of this issue, in this paper a new method is introduced for determining the moisture content of the transformer insulation system using dielectric response analysis in the frequency domain based on artificial bee colony algorithm. First, the master curve of dielectric response is modeled. Then, using proposed method the master curve and the measured dielectric response curves are compared. By analyzing the results of the comparison, the moisture content of paper insulation, electrical conductivity of the insulating oil and dielectric model dimensions are determined. Finally, the proposed method is applied to several practical samples to demonstrate its capabilities compared with the well-known conventional method.

  6. Distance Measurement in Air with a Femtosecond Frequency Comb Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is about interferometric distance measurement using ultrashort pulses, with linear measurement techniques in a dispersive medium. Several fields of expertise are combined here: ultrashort pulse propagation in dispersive media, distance measurement interefometry and linear measurement tec

  7. Distance Measurement in Air with a Femtosecond Frequency Comb Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is about interferometric distance measurement using ultrashort pulses, with linear measurement techniques in a dispersive medium. Several fields of expertise are combined here: ultrashort pulse propagation in dispersive media, distance measurement interefometry and linear measurement tec

  8. Radio frequency current-voltage probe for impedance and power measurements in multi-frequency unmatched loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T.; Delattre, P. A.; Booth, J. P.; Johnson, E. V.; Dine, S.

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band, inline current-voltage probe, with a characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, is presented for the measurement of voltage and current waveforms, impedance, and power in rf systems. The probe, which uses capacitive and inductive sensors to determine the voltage and current, respectively, can be used for the measurement of single or multi-frequency signals into both matched and unmatched loads, over a frequency range of about 1-100 MHz. The probe calibration and impedance/power measurement technique are described in detail, and the calibrated probe results are compared with those obtained from a vector network analyzer and other commercial power meters. Use of the probe is demonstrated with the measurement of power into an unmatched capacitively coupled plasma excited by multi-frequency tailored voltage waveforms.

  9. Radio frequency current-voltage probe for impedance and power measurements in multi-frequency unmatched loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T; Delattre, P A; Booth, J P; Johnson, E V; Dine, S

    2013-01-01

    A broad-band, inline current-voltage probe, with a characteristic impedance of 50 Ω, is presented for the measurement of voltage and current waveforms, impedance, and power in rf systems. The probe, which uses capacitive and inductive sensors to determine the voltage and current, respectively, can be used for the measurement of single or multi-frequency signals into both matched and unmatched loads, over a frequency range of about 1-100 MHz. The probe calibration and impedance/power measurement technique are described in detail, and the calibrated probe results are compared with those obtained from a vector network analyzer and other commercial power meters. Use of the probe is demonstrated with the measurement of power into an unmatched capacitively coupled plasma excited by multi-frequency tailored voltage waveforms.

  10. Extremely high-frequency micro-Doppler measurements of humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Silvious, Jerry L.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Green, Jeremy A.; Wikner, David A.

    2014-05-01

    The development of sensors that are capable of penetrating smoke, dust, fog, clouds, and rain is critical for maintaining situational awareness in degraded visual environments and for providing support to the Warfighter. Atmospheric penetration properties, the ability to form high-resolution imagery with modest apertures, and available source power make the extremely high-frequency (EHF) portion of the spectrum promising for the development of radio frequency (RF) sensors capable of penetrating visual obscurants. Comprehensive phenomenology studies including polarization and backscatter properties of relevant targets are lacking at these frequencies. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing a fully-polarimetric frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) instrumentation radar to explore polarization and backscatter properties of in-situ rain, scattering from natural and man-made surfaces, and the radar cross section and micro-Doppler signatures of humans at EHF frequencies, specifically, around the 220 GHz atmospheric window. This work presents an overview of the design and construction of the radar system, hardware performance, data acquisition software, and initial results including an analysis of human micro-Doppler signatures.

  11. Variable reflectivity signal mirrors and signal response measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Glenn de; Shaddock, Daniel A; McClelland, David E [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2002-04-07

    Future gravitational wave detectors will include some form of signal mirror in order to alter the signal response of the device. We introduce interferometer configurations which utilize a variable reflectivity signal mirror allowing a tunable peak frequency and variable signal bandwidth. A detector configured with a Fabry-Perot cavity as the signal mirror is compared theoretically with one using a Michelson interferometer for a signal mirror. A system for the measurement of the interferometer signal responses is introduced. This technique is applied to a power-recycled Michelson interferometer with resonant sideband extraction. We present broadband measurements of the benchtop prototype's signal response for a range of signal cavity detunings. This technique is also applicable to most other gravitational wave detector configurations.

  12. Building Fluent Performance: Measuring Response Rate and Multiplying Response Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Precision teaching emerged from O.R. Lindsley's pristine application of Skinner's natural science of behavior, with a focus on response rate measurement and free operant procedures. When applied with human learners in instructional settings, these first principles led to a series of developments framed in this paper as four kinds of ceilings that…

  13. Molt frequency of the isopod Porcellio scaber, as a measure of zinc-contaminated food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobne, D.; Strus, J. [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Biology

    1996-02-01

    The effect of zinc-contaminated leaf litter (250--10,000 {micro}g/g dry wt.) diets on molting in Porcellio scaber, a terrestrial isopod was measured under controlled conditions. The duration of the premolt stage, the period between two successive ecdyses and the rate of molting, was followed during the exposure. Increased zinc concentration in the food caused prolongation of the molt cycle and decreased molt frequency. The duration of the premolt stage was not changed. Molt cycle was not affected drastically due to food deprivation. The application of molt cycle response to contaminated food in toxicity tests is discussed.

  14. The Coefficient of the Voltage Induced Frequency Shift Measurement on a Quartz Tuning Fork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Hou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the coefficient of the voltage induced frequency shift (VIFS of a 32.768 KHz quartz tuning fork. Three vibration modes were studied: one prong oscillating, two prongs oscillating in the same direction, and two prongs oscillating in opposite directions. They all showed a parabolic dependence of the eigen-frequency shift on the bias voltage applied across the fork, due to the voltage-induced internal stress, which varies as the fork oscillates. The average coefficient of the VIFS effect is as low as several hundred nano-Hz per millivolt, implying that fast-response voltage-controlled oscillators and phase-locked loops with nano-Hz resolution can be built.

  15. Developmental changes in ERP responses to spatial frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boomen, Carlijn; Jonkman, Lisa M; Jaspers-Vlamings, Petra H J M; Cousijn, Janna; Kemner, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Social interaction starts with perception of other persons. One of the first steps in perception is processing of basic information such as spatial frequencies (SF), which represent details and global information. However, although behavioural perception of SF is well investigated, the developmental

  16. ZBF-DMTD SYNTHETICAL METHOD FOR SHORT-TERM FREQUENCY STABILITY MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包志华; 曹培培

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a zero beat frequency double mixer time difference (ZBF-DMTD) synthetical method for measuring short-term.frequency stability Allen variance σy2(τ) of frequency sourse. The new method has a high measurement preclsion and is easy to realize and spread in engineering. The paper dlscribes the structure and design of the ZBFDMTD automatic measurement system,and gives the contrast measurement results.

  17. Improved Controller Design of Grid Friendly™ Appliances for Primary Frequency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Jianming; Sun, Yannan; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2015-09-01

    The Grid Friendly$^\\textrm{TM}$ Appliance~(GFA) controller, developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, can autonomously switch off the appliances by detecting the under-frequency events. In this paper, the impacts of curtailing frequency threshold on the performance of frequency responsive GFAs are carefully analyzed first. The current method of selecting curtailing frequency thresholds for GFAs is found to be insufficient to guarantee the desired performance especially when the frequency deviation is shallow. In addition, the power reduction of online GFAs could be so excessive that it can even impact the system response negatively. As a remedy to the deficiency of the current controller design, a different way of selecting curtailing frequency thresholds is proposed to ensure the effectiveness of GFAs in frequency protection. Moreover, it is also proposed to introduce a supervisor at each distribution feeder to monitor the curtailing frequency thresholds of online GFAs and take corrective actions if necessary.

  18. Design, Prototyping and Measurement of a Cascaded 6-GHz Frequency Selective Surface Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bender Perotoni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The design, prototyping, and free-space measurement of a 6-GHz Frequency Selective Surface filter is presented. The prototyping resolution of a large (A4 sheet size Frequency Selective Surface with small loops as elements is checked, as well as the correlation with measurements performed with a 3-D full-wave solver. The test also involved the effect of cascading two different Frequency Selective Surfaces with a viewpoint towards a narrower frequency range, which provided good results.

  19. Effect of stride frequency on thermoregulatory responses during endurance running in distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Ishitobi, Masaki; Ogura, Yukio; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Koga, Shunsaku; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Kondo, Narihiko

    2016-10-01

    Changing stride frequency may influence oxygen uptake and heart rate during running as a function of running economy and central command. This study investigated the influence of stride frequency manipulation on thermoregulatory responses during endurance running. Seven healthy endurance runners ran on a treadmill at a velocity of 15km/h for 60min in a controlled environmental chamber (ambient temperature 27°C and relative humidity 50%), and stride frequency was manipulated. Stride frequency was intermittently manipulated by increasing and decreasing frequency by 10% from the pre-determined preferred frequency. These periods of increase or decrease were separated by free frequency running in the order of free stride frequency, stride frequency manipulation (increase or decrease), free stride frequency, and stride frequency manipulation (increase or decrease) for 15min each. The increased and decreased stride frequencies were 110% and 91% of the free running frequency, respectively (196±6, 162±5, and 178±5steps/min, respectively, Pheart rate, or the rate of perceived exhaustion during running. Whole-body sweat loss increased significantly when stride frequency was manipulated (1.48±0.11 and 1.57±0.11kg for control and manipulated stride frequencies, respectively, Prunning economy or central command), our results suggest that manipulation of stride frequency does not have a large effect on sweat loss or other physiological variables, but does increase mean skin temperature during endurance running. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Artificial Ionization and UHF Radar Response Associated with HF Frequencies near Electron Gyro-Harmonics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, B. J.; Fallen, C. T.; Secan, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results from O-mode ionospheric heating experiments at the HAARP facility in Alaska to demonstrate that the magnitude of artificial ionization production is critically dependent on the choice of HF frequency near gyro-harmonics. For O-mode heating in the lower F-region ionosphere, typically about 200 km altitude, artificial ionization enhancements are observed in the lower ionosphere (about 150 - 220 km) and also in the topside ionosphere above about 500 km. Lower ionosphere density enhancements are inferred from HF-enhanced ion and plasma-line signals observed with UHF radar. Upper ionospheric density enhancements have been observed with TEC (total electron content) experiments by monitoring satellite radio beacons where signal paths traverse the HF-modified ionosphere. Both density enhancements and corresponding upward plasma fluxes have also been observed in the upper ionosphere via in-situ satellite observations. The data presented focus mainly on observations near the third and fourth gyro-harmonics. The specific values of the height-dependent gyro-harmonics have been computed from a magnetic model of the field line through the HF heated volume. Experiments with several closely spaced HF frequencies around the gyro-harmonic frequency region show that the magnitude of the lower-ionosphere artificial ionization production maximizes for HF frequencies about 1.0 - 1.5 MHz above the gyro-harmonic frequency. The response is progressively larger as the HF frequency is increased in the frequency region near the gyro-harmonics. For HF frequencies that are initially greater than the gyro-harmonic value the UHF radar scattering cross-section is relatively small, and non-existent or very weak signals are observed; as the signal returns drop in altitude due to density enhancements the HF interaction region passes through lower altitudes where the HF frequency is less than the gyro-harmonic value, for these conditions the radar scattering cross-section is

  1. Response of dielectric constant of dry snow and snow drift to temperature in low measuring frequency range in Bayinbuluk,Xinjiang Region%新疆巴音布鲁克区域干雪及风吹雪介电常数对温度和低频频率的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨金明; 宋芳; 刘洋; 王大环; 牛春霞; 刘志辉

    2016-01-01

    Snow is precious renewable water resources in arid and semi-arid regions. Consequently,many insti-tutions and researchers have focused on researching the characteristics of snow in Northwest China,but less at-tention has been put to researching dielectric constant of snow. The dielectric constant of snow is the foundation to establish inversion model of snow characteristics and to assess snow water resources,as well as to get the aux-iliary information for preventing and mitigating snow disasters. I-V method was adopted to measure the dielectric constant’s real and imaginary components of dry snow at surface,middle and bottom,as well as of snow drift, in Bayinbuluk under measuring frequency range of 1 Hz~1 MHz and at-30~0℃,in order to establish the rela-tionships between dielectric constant of dry snow,snow drift at different snow depths and temperatures and mea-suring frequencies,respectively. The result showed that dielectric constant of dry snow and snow drift is related to temperature and measuring frequency ranging from 1 Hz to 1 MHz;meanwhile,the response of dielectric con-stant’s imaginary parts to temperature and measuring frequency is a little more sensitive than that of the real parts. However,dielectric constant’s response to temperature is more obvious than that to measuring frequency. At last,the linear relationships between temperature and the real parts of dielectric constant of dry snow at sur-face,middle and bottom,as well as snow drift,are obtained,with R2 greater than 0.85.%积雪是干旱半干旱区珍贵的可再生水资源,因此许多研究机构和人员将西北地区积雪特性的研究视为重点,然而对积雪介电常数的研究仍很少.积雪介电常数是建立积雪特性反演模型和雪水资源评估的基础,也是雪灾防灾减灾工作的辅助信息.为了研究不同雪层干雪和风吹雪介电常数与温度和频率之间的关系,使用I-V方法测量了巴音布鲁克区域干雪表、

  2. Cylindrical PVF2 film based fiber optic phase modulator - Phase shift nonlinearity and frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshanam, V. S.; Claus, Richard O.

    1993-03-01

    A new cylindrical coil configuration for polyvinylidene flouride (PVF2) film based fiber optic phase modulator is studied for the frequency response and nonlinearity of phase shift at the resonance frequency. This configuration, hitherto unapproached for PVF2 film modulators, offers resonance at well defined, controllable and higher frequencies than possible for the flat-strip configuration. Two versions of this configuration are presented that differ strongly in both the resonance frequency and the phase shift nonlinearity coefficient.

  3. Doppler Frequency Shift in Ocean Wave Measurements: Frequency Downshift of a Fixed Spectral Wave Number Component by Advection of Wave Orbital Velocity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hwang, Paul

    2006-01-01

    ... expected intrinsic frequency in the frequency spectrum measured by a stationary probe. The advection of the wave number component by the orbital current of background waves produces a net downshift in the encounter frequency...

  4. CRITICAL ILLUMINATION AND CRITICAL FREQUENCY FOR RESPONSE TO FLICKERED LIGHT, IN DRAGONFLY LARVAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, W. J.; Wolf, Ernst; Zerrahn-Wolf, Gertrud

    1937-01-01

    Curves relating flicker frequency (F) to mean critical illumination (Im) for threshold response to flickered light, with equal durations of light and no light intervals, and relating illumination (I) to mean critical flicker frequency (Fm) for the same response, have been obtained from homogeneous data based upon the reactions of dragonfly larvae (Anax junius). These curves exhibit the properties already described in the case of the fish Lepomis. The curve for Fm lies above the curve of Im by an amount which, as a function of I, can be predicted from a knowledge either of the variation of Im or of Fm. The law of the observable connection between F and I is properly expressed as a band, not as a simple curve. The variation of Im (and of Fm) is not due to "experimental error," but is an expression of the variable character of the organism's capacity to exhibit the reaction which is the basis of the measurements. As in other series of measurements, P.E.I is a rectilinear function of Im; P.E.F passes through a maximum as F (or I) increases. The form of P.E.F as a function of I can be predicted from the measurements of P.E.I. It is pointed out that the equations which have been proposed for the interpretation of curves of critical flicker frequency as a function of intensity, based upon the balance of light adaptation and dark adaptation, have in fact the character of "population curves;" and that their contained constants do not have the properties requisite for the consistent application of the view that the shape of the F - I curve is governed by the steady state condition of adaptation. These curves can, however, be understood as resulting from the achievement of a certain level of difference between the average effect of a light flash and its average after effect during the dark interval. PMID:19872997

  5. Low frequency and low temperature behavior of ZnO-based varistor by ac impedance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Abdullah, K.; Bui, A.; Loubiere, A.

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on an original work on the study of the behavior of ZnO-based varistor by ac impedance measurements. The measurements of complex impedance response to small ac signals applied to samples have been achieved in the frequency range 10-3-7×106 Hz and a temperature range -196-145 °C. In the temperature range below -120±10 °C, a complete semicircular relaxation phenomenon has been observed, which is in good agreement with the Debye model. In the temperature range above -120±10 °C, the appearance of the depression angle θ may arise from the heterogeneity of the barriers of the ceramic varistor. A Cole-Cole distribution function of the relaxation time constants was used to characterize the response of the ceramic device as a function of temperature. No observable influence in the response was introduced by either the space charge or the electrode. Using the leakage resistance measurements from the complex plane, two values of the activation energies were observed; 0.36±0.02 eV and 0.01±0.001 eV. Similarly, the boundary layer equivalent capacitance measurements detect two other energy levels: 0.06±0.005 eV and about 0 eV.

  6. Intracellular responses to frequency modulated tones in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruediger eGeis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency modulations occur in many natural sounds, including vocalizations. The neuronal response to frequency modulated (FM stimuli has been studied extensively in different brain areas, with an emphasis on the auditory cortex and the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Here, we measured the responses to FM sweeps in whole-cell recordings from neurons in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus. Both up- and downward logarithmic FM sweeps were presented at two different speeds to both the ipsi- and the contralateral ear. Based on the number of action potentials that were fired, between 10-24% of cells were selective for rate or direction of the FM sweeps. A somewhat lower percentage of cells, 6-21%, showed selectivity based on EPSP size. To study the mechanisms underlying the generation of FM selectivity, we compared FM responses with responses to simple tones in the same cells. We found that if pairs of neurons responded in a similar way to simple tones, they generally also responded in a similar way to FM sweeps. Further evidence that FM selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex was obtained by reconstructing FM sweeps from the response to simple tones using three different models. In about half of the direction selective neurons the selectivity was generated by spectrally asymmetric synaptic inhibition. In addition, evidence for direction selectivity based on the timing of excitatory responses was also obtained in some cells. No clear evidence for the local generation of rate selectivity was obtained. We conclude that FM direction selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus by multiple mechanisms.

  7. Radio Frequency (RF) Measurements for Human Detection, Tracking, and Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    of tick bites and the potential for Lyme disease . Insect repellent will be available at the test site and we will ask volunteers to inspect...2003, 150 (4). 6. Chen, Victor C.; Ling, Hao. Time Frequency for Radar Imaging and Signal Analysis; Artech House, 2002. 7. Natecz, Marek ; Rytel... disease that is the direct result of participating in this project (under the provisions of AR 40-38 and AR 70-25). Title of Research Project: Radio

  8. Specification and Measurement of Mid-Frequency Wavefront Errors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUAN Bin; XIE Jing-jiang

    2006-01-01

    Mid-frequency wavefront errors can be of the most importance for some optical components, but they're not explicitly covered by corresponding international standards such as ISO 10110. The testing methods for the errors also have a lot of aspects to be improved. This paper gives an overview of the specifications especially of PSD. NIF,developed by America, and XMM, developed by Europe, have both discovered some new testing methods.

  9. A new scale for measuring reward responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Van Den Berg

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several psychological theories assume that there are two basic brain mechanisms that guide behavior: an avoidance or inhibition system, which is responsive to signals of punishment, and an approach or activation system, which is sensitive to signals of reward. Several self-report scales have been developed to assess the sensitivity to punishment and reward, and these instruments have been shown to be useful in research on personality, psychopathology, and underlying biological substrates. However, it is also true that in particular scales for measuring reward responsiveness suffer from various inadequacies. Therefore, a new Reward Responsiveness (RR scale was developed and subjected to an extensive psychometric evaluation. The results show that this scale measures a single factor, reward responsiveness that is clearly independent of punishment sensitivity. Further, the data indicated that the internal consistency, convergent validity, discriminant validity, test-retest reliability, and predictive properties of the new scale were all adequate. It can be concluded that the RR scale is a psychometrically sound instrument that may be useful for researchers with interest in the personality construct of reward responsiveness.

  10. Comparisons of Audio and Audiovisual Measures of Stuttering Frequency and Severity in Preschool-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Isabelle; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Jones, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether measures of stuttering frequency and measures of overall stuttering severity in preschoolers differ when made from audio-only recordings compared with audiovisual recordings. Method: Four blinded speech-language pathologists who had extensive experience with preschoolers who stutter measured stuttering frequency and…

  11. Comparisons of Audio and Audiovisual Measures of Stuttering Frequency and Severity in Preschool-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Isabelle; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Jones, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether measures of stuttering frequency and measures of overall stuttering severity in preschoolers differ when made from audio-only recordings compared with audiovisual recordings. Method: Four blinded speech-language pathologists who had extensive experience with preschoolers who stutter measured stuttering frequency and…

  12. Survey of spectral response measurements for photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, J.S.; Lind, M.A.

    1981-11-01

    A survey of the photovoltaic community was conducted to ascertain the present state-of-the-art for PV spectral response measurements. Specific topics explored included measurement system designs, good and bad features of the systems, and problems encountered in the evaluation of specific cell structures and materials. The survey showed that most spectral response data are used in diagnostic analysis for the optimization of developmental solar cells. Measurement systems commonly utilize a chopped narrowband source in conjunction with a constant bias illumination which simulates the ambient end use environment. Researchers emphasized the importance of bias illumination for all types of cells in order to minimize the effects of nonlinearities in cell response. Not surprisingly single crystal silicon cells present the fewest measurement problems to the researcher and have been studied more thoroughly than any other type of solar cell. But, the accurate characterization of silicon cells is still difficult and laboratory intercomparison studies have yielded data scatter ranging from +-5% to +-15%. The measurement experience with other types of cells is less extensive. The development of reliable data bases for some solar cells is complicated by problems of cell nonuniformity, environmental instability, nonlinearity, etc. Cascade cells present new problems associated with their structue (multiple cells in series) which are just beginning to be understood. In addition, the importance of many measurement parameters (spectral content of bias light, bias light intensity, bias voltage, chopping frequency, etc.) are not fully understood for most types of solar cells.

  13. Correction of frequency response of infrared photodetector signal path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalska, Katarzyna

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the investigations targeted at broadening the bandwidth of the high speed photodector signal path. Photodetector output signal is formed in the signal path composed of the photodiode with appropriate cooling circuitry, short segment of transmission line and a high-speed amplifier. Bandwidth widening is achieved by including extra circuits in the signal tract (lossless and possibly also lossy one), which - together with inevitable mismatch at both ends of the transmission line - enable correction of the frequency characteristic. The trade-offs between gain, ripples of the AC characteristic and bandwidth are studied and presented in the paper.

  14. Design of High-Precision Frequency Measure System Based on CPLD Time Delay Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Qian; Ding Wei; Wang Hao, E-mail: fengqian@eqhb.gov.cn [Institute of Seismology, China Earthquake Administration, 40 Hongshan Road, Wuchang District, Wuhan (China)

    2011-02-01

    Introduced a method for high-precision frequency measurement, which do do not need the complicated measuring control circumstance. CPLD is used for improving the precision of measurement by the method of quantization time-delay. High precision frequency adjustable module based on the method has been used on the photoelectricity data acquisition system. Frequency accuracy is -8.306x10{sup -10}, which meet the requirement of instrument.

  15. Effects of quinine on the mechanical frequency response of the cupula in the fish lateral line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, S M; Karlsson, K K; Khanna, S M; Flock, A

    1994-03-01

    Quinine induces changes in the motion of the cupula in the lateral line canal of the African knife-fish in response to sinusoidal water movements. Two different phases in the action of quinine on the cupular frequency response can be discerned. In the first phase the best frequency, i.e., the frequency at which the cupular vibratory displacement is maximal in response to constant-amplitude sinusoidal canal fluid displacement, shifts toward higher frequencies. During this phase, lasting about 70-100 min, the best frequency increases by a factor between 1.3 and 1.5. In the second phase, during roughly the following 90 min, the best frequency decreases gradually to a value 0.3-0.5 times that observed before the application of quinine.

  16. The dielectric calibration of capacitance probes for soil hydrology using an oscillation frequency response model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Robinson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitance probes are a fast, safe and relatively inexpensive means of measuring the relative permittivity of soils, which can then be used to estimate soil water content. Initial experiments with capacitance probes used empirical calibrations between the frequency response of the instrument and soil water content. This has the disadvantage that the calibrations are instrument-dependent. A twofold calibration strategy is described in this paper; the instrument frequency is turned into relative permittivity (dielectric constant which can then be calibrated against soil water content. This approach offers the advantages of making the second calibration, from soil permittivity to soil water content. instrument-independent and allows comparison with other dielectric methods, such as time domain reflectometry. A physically based model, used to calibrate capacitance probes in terms of relative permittivity (εr is presented. The model, which was developed from circuit analysis, predicts, successfully, the frequency response of the instrument in liquids with different relative permittivities, using only measurements in air and water. lt was used successfully to calibrate 10 prototype surface capacitance insertion probes (SCIPS and a depth capacitance probe. The findings demonstrate that the geometric properties of the instrument electrodes were an important parameter in the model, the value of which could be fixed through measurement. The relationship between apparent soil permittivity and volumetric water content has been the subject of much research in the last 30 years. Two lines of investigation have developed, time domain reflectometry (TDR and capacitance. Both methods claim to measure relative permittivity and should therefore be comparable. This paper demonstrates that the IH capacitance probe overestimates relative permittivity as the ionic conductivity of the medium increases. Electrically conducting ionic solutions were used to test the

  17. Time series analysis of the response of measurement instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakaki, Dimitra; Polatoglou, Hariton

    2012-01-01

    In this work the significance of treating a set of measurements as a time series is being explored. Time Series Analysis (TSA) techniques, part of the Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) approach, can provide much insight regarding the stochastic correlations that are induced on the outcome of an experiment by the measurement system and can provide criteria for the limited use of the classical variance in metrology. Specifically, techniques such as the Lag Plots, Autocorrelation Function, Power Spectral Density and Allan Variance are used to analyze series of sequential measurements, collected at equal time intervals from an electromechanical transducer. These techniques are used in conjunction with power law models of stochastic noise in order to characterize time or frequency regimes for which the usually assumed white noise model is adequate for the description of the measurement system response. However, through the detection of colored noise, usually referred to as flicker noise, which is expected to appear ...

  18. Efficient 3D frequency response modeling with spectral accuracy by the rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-07-01

    Frequency responses of seismic wave propagation can be obtained either by directly solving the frequency domain wave equations or by transforming the time domain wavefields using the Fourier transform. The former approach requires solving systems of linear equations, which becomes progressively difficult to tackle for larger scale models and for higher frequency components. On the contrary, the latter approach can be efficiently implemented using explicit time integration methods in conjunction with running summations as the computation progresses. Commonly used explicit time integration methods correspond to the truncated Taylor series approximations that can cause significant errors for large time steps. The rapid expansion method (REM) uses the Chebyshev expansion and offers an optimal solution to the second-order-in-time wave equations. When applying the Fourier transform to the time domain wavefield solution computed by the REM, we can derive a frequency response modeling formula that has the same form as the original time domain REM equation but with different summation coefficients. In particular, the summation coefficients for the frequency response modeling formula corresponds to the Fourier transform of those for the time domain modeling equation. As a result, we can directly compute frequency responses from the Chebyshev expansion polynomials rather than the time domain wavefield snapshots as do other time domain frequency response modeling methods. When combined with the pseudospectral method in space, this new frequency response modeling method can produce spectrally accurate results with high efficiency. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. A double expansion method for the frequency response of finite-length beams with periodic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Z. G.; Ni, Y. Q.

    2017-03-01

    A double expansion method for the frequency response of finite-length beams with periodic distribution parameters is proposed. The vibration response of the beam with spatial periodic parameters under harmonic excitations is studied. The frequency response of the periodic beam is the function of parametric period and then can be expressed by the series with the product of periodic and non-periodic functions. The procedure of the double expansion method includes the following two main steps: first, the frequency response function and periodic parameters are expanded by using identical periodic functions based on the extension of the Floquet-Bloch theorem, and the period-parametric differential equation for the frequency response is converted into a series of linear differential equations with constant coefficients; second, the solutions to the linear differential equations are expanded by using modal functions which satisfy the boundary conditions, and the linear differential equations are converted into algebraic equations according to the Galerkin method. The expansion coefficients are obtained by solving the algebraic equations and then the frequency response function is finally determined. The proposed double expansion method can uncouple the effects of the periodic expansion and modal expansion so that the expansion terms are determined respectively. The modal number considered in the second expansion can be reduced remarkably in comparison with the direct expansion method. The proposed double expansion method can be extended and applied to the other structures with periodic distribution parameters for dynamics analysis. Numerical results on the frequency response of the finite-length periodic beam with various parametric wave numbers and wave amplitude ratios are given to illustrate the effective application of the proposed method and the new frequency response characteristics, including the parameter-excited modal resonance, doubling-peak frequency response

  20. Measurement of grid impedance by a medium frequency converter; Netzimpedanzmessung mithilfe eines Mittelfrequenzumrichters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Jian [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewandlung und -speicherung; Krap, Norbert; Keiper, Heiko [DB Energie GmbH (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    Electric power supply grids today are subject to voltage and current harmonics. Frequency converters contribute to this effect. The frequency curves of the grid impedances are important parameters for assessing the feedback effects of frequency converters. Network impedance in HV grids can be measured by various methods. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of a discontinuous object based on a dual-frequency grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao Nao-Sheng; Cai Xin-Hua; Yao Chun-Mei

    2009-01-01

    The dual-frequency grating measurement theory is proposed in order to carry out the measurement of a discontinuous object. Firstly, the reason why frequency spectra are produced by low frequency gratings and high frequency gratings in the field of frequency is analysed, and the relationship between the wrapped-phase and the unwrappingphase is discussed. Secondly, a method to combine the advantages of the two kinds of gratings is proposed: one stripe is produced in the mutation part of the object measured by a suitable low frequency grating designed by MATLAB, then the phase produced by the low frequency grating need not be unfolded. The integer series of stripes is produced by a high frequency grating designed by MATLAB based on the frequency ratio of the two kinds of gratings and the high frequency wrapped-phase, and the high frequency unwrapping-phase is then obtained. In order to verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis, a steep discontinuous object of 600×600 pixels and 10.00 mm in height is simulated and a discontinuous object of ladder shape which is 32.00 mm in height is used in experiment. Both the simulation and the experiment can restore the discontinuous object height accurately by using the dual-frequency grating measurement theory.

  2. Investigating the subharmonic response of individual phospholipid encapsulated microbubbles at high frequencies: a comparative study of five agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfield, Brandon L; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F Stuart; Goertz, David E

    2012-05-01

    There are a range of contrast ultrasound applications above 10 MHz, a frequency regime in which nonlinear microbubble behavior is poorly understood. Lipid-encapsulated microbubbles have considerable potential for use at higher frequencies because they have been shown to exhibit pronounced nonlinear activity at frequencies up to 40 MHz. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of agent formulation on the subharmonic response of lipid-encapsulated microbubbles at high frequencies with a view to providing information relevant to improving contrast agent design and imaging performance. An optical-acoustical setup was used to measure the subharmonic emissions from small (d subharmonic behavior, both in terms of amplitude and active sizes. MicroMarker™ exhibited the strongest, broadest and most consistent subharmonic response, 22% greater in power than that of Definity™ and as much as 50% greater than the in-house formulations. No clear relation between in-house agents' shell microstructure and nonlinear response was found, other than the variability in the nonlinear response itself. An analysis of the response of MicroMarker™ bubbles suggests that these bubbles exhibit "expansion-dominated" oscillations, in contrast to "compression-only" oscillations observed for similar bubbles at lower frequencies (f < 11 MHz).

  3. Wideband high frequency (HF) skywave channel parameters from narrowband measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Cynthia L.; Uffelman, Donald R.; Walton, Thomas L.

    The HF wideband channel allow the use of spread-spectrum techniques to provide covert communications with low probability of intercept (LPI) and antijam protection. The objective of this work is to determine the extent to which oblique narrowband channel measurements can be used to infer effects in the wideband skywave channel. If oblique narrowband channel measurements can be used as a basis for developing wideband channel models, a large number of existing narrowband measurements can be made available for this task.

  4. Comparative analysis of internal friction and natural frequency measured by free decay and forced vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Z; Ding, X D; Xiong, X M; Zhang, J X

    2007-10-01

    Relations between various values of the internal friction (tgdelta, Q(-1), Q(-1*), and Lambda/pi) measured by free decay and forced vibration are analyzed systemically based on a fundamental mechanical model in this paper. Additionally, relations between various natural frequencies, such as vibration frequency of free decay omega(FD), displacement-resonant frequency of forced vibration omega(d), and velocity-resonant frequency of forced vibration omega(0) are calculated. Moreover, measurement of natural frequencies of a copper specimen of 99.9% purity has been made to demonstrate the relation between the measured natural frequencies of the system by forced vibration and free decay. These results are of importance for not only more accurate measurement of the elastic modulus of materials but also the data conversion between different internal friction measurements.

  5. Low-conductance HCN1 ion channels augment the frequency response of rod and cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Andrew J; Wu, Samuel M

    2009-05-06

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels are expressed in several tissues throughout the body, including the heart, the CNS, and the retina. HCN channels are found in many neurons in the retina, but their most established role is in generating the hyperpolarization-activated current, I(h), in photoreceptors. This current makes the light response of rod and cone photoreceptors more transient, an effect similar to that of a high-pass filter. A unique property of HCN channels is their small single-channel current, which is below the thermal noise threshold of measuring electronics. We use nonstationary fluctuation analysis (NSFA) in the intact retina to estimate the conductance of single HCN channels, revealing a conductance of approximately 650 fS in both rod and cone photoreceptors. We also analyze the properties of HCN channels in salamander rods and cones, from the biophysical to the functional level, showing that HCN1 is the predominant isoform in both cells, and demonstrate how HCN1 channels speed up the light response of both rods and cones under distinct adaptational conditions. We show that in rods and cones, HCN channels increase the natural frequency response of single cells by modifying the photocurrent input, which is limited in its frequency response by the speed of a molecular signaling cascade. In doing so, HCN channels form the first of several systems in the retina that augment the speed of the visual response, allowing an animal to perceive visual stimuli that change more quickly than the underlying photocurrent.

  6. Device for filamentous fungi growth monitoring using the multimodal frequency response of cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, N.; Lukacs, G.; Ball, S. L.; Hegner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi cause opportunistic infections in hospital patients. A fast assay to detect viable spores is of great interest. We present a device that is capable of monitoring fungi growth in real time via the dynamic operation of cantilevers in an array. The ability to detect minute frequency shifts for higher order flexural resonance modes is demonstrated using hydrogel functionalised cantilevers. The use of higher order resonance modes sees the sensor dependent mass responsivity enhanced by a factor of 13 in comparison to measurements utilizing the fundamental resonance mode only. As a proof of principle measurement, Aspergillus niger growth is monitored using the first two flexural resonance modes. The detection of single spore growth within 10 h is reported for the first time. The ability to detect and monitor the growth of single spores, within a small time frame, is advantageous in both clinical and industrial settings.

  7. Impulse and Frequency Response of a Moving Coil Galvanometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a moving coil galvanometer is studied and the electromotive force generated by the swinging coil provides the impulse response information in a form suitable for digitizing and inputing to a microcomputer. Background information and analysis of typical data are included. (JN)

  8. Measurements of reactive gaseous rocket injector response factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Bell, W. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1977-01-01

    The results presented represent the first successful attempt at the measurement of the driving capabilities of coaxial gaseous propellant rocket injectors. The required data have been obtained by employing the modified impedance tube technique with compressed air as the oxidizer and acetylene gas as the fuel. The data describe the frequency dependence of the injector admittances, from which the frequency dependence of the injection response factors can be calculated. The measured injector admittances have been compared with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann (1967) analytical model assuming different values for the characteristic combustion time. The values of combustion time which result in a best fit between the measured and predicted data are indicated for different equivalence ratios. It is shown that for the coaxial injector system investigated in this study the characteristic combustion times vary between .7 and 1.2 msec for equivalence ratios in the range of .57 to 1.31. The experimental data clearly show that the tested injector system could indeed drive combustion instabilities over a frequency range that is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  9. Indoor measurements of low-frequency noise for annoyance assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    was found to have a high risk of significantly underestimating the noise present in a room, unless complainants can precisely appoint the measurement positions. It was found that a very good estimate of the L10 target level can be obtained by measuring only in four three-dimensional corners....

  10. Note: High precision measurements using high frequency gigahertz signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Aohan; Fu, Siyuan; Sakurai, Atsunori; Liu, Liang; Edman, Fredrik; Pullerits, Tõnu; Öwall, Viktor; Karki, Khadga Jung

    2014-12-01

    Generalized lock-in amplifiers use digital cavities with Q-factors as high as 5 × 108 to measure signals with very high precision. In this Note, we show that generalized lock-in amplifiers can be used to analyze microwave (giga-hertz) signals with a precision of few tens of hertz. We propose that the physical changes in the medium of propagation can be measured precisely by the ultra-high precision measurement of the signal. We provide evidence to our proposition by verifying the Newton's law of cooling by measuring the effect of change in temperature on the phase and amplitude of the signals propagating through two calibrated cables. The technique could be used to precisely measure different physical properties of the propagation medium, for example, the change in length, resistance, etc. Real time implementation of the technique can open up new methodologies of in situ virtual metrology in material design.

  11. High sensitivity resonance frequency measurements of individualmicro-cantilevers using fiber optical interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duden, Thomas; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2009-03-04

    We describe a setup for the resonance frequency measurement of individual microcantilevers. The setup displays both high spatial selectivity and sensitivity to specimen vibrations by utilizing a tapered uncoated fiber tip. The high sensitivity to specimen vibrations is achieved by the combination of optical Fabry-Perot interferometry and narrow band RF detection. Wave fronts reflected on the specimen and on the fiber tip end face interfere, thus no reference plane on the specimen is needed, as demonstrated with the example of freestanding silicon nitride micro-cantilevers. The resulting system is integrated in a DB-235 dual beam FIB system, thereby allowing the measurement of micro-cantilever responses during observation in SEM mode. The FIB was used to modify the optical fiber tip. At this point of our RF system development, the microcantilevers used to characterize the detector were not modified in situ.

  12. Absolute Frequency Measurement of Rubidium 5S-7S Two-Photon Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Morzynski, Piotr; Ablewski, Piotr; Gartman, Rafal; Gawlik, Wojciech; Maslowski, Piotr; Nagorny, Bartlomiej; Ozimek, Filip; Radzewicz, Czeslaw; Witkowski, Marcin; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2013-01-01

    We report the absolute frequency measurements of rubidium 5S-7S two-photon transitions with a cw laser digitally locked to an atomic transition and referenced to an optical frequency comb. The narrow, two-photon transition, 5S-7S (760 nm) insensitive to first order in a magnetic field, is a promising candidate for frequency reference. The performed tests yield the transition frequency with accuracy better than reported previously.

  13. Measuring the correlation of two optical frequencies using four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthur, Aravind P; Watts, Regan T; Huynh, Tam N; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2014-11-10

    We use the physics of four-wave mixing to study the decorrelation of two optical frequencies as they propagate through different fiber delays. The phase noise relationship between the four-wave mixing components is used to quantify and measure the correlation between the two optical frequencies using the correlation coefficient. We show the difference in the evolution of decorrelation between frequency-dependent and frequency-independent components of phase noise.

  14. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, G; Jammes, C; Geslot, B; Di Salvo, J; Destouches, C

    2015-11-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the β(eff) parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON.

  15. Effective frequency sensitivity of laser speckle contrast measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, O. B.; Hirst, E. R.; Andrews, M. K.

    2013-02-01

    How does speckle contrast K, measured at camera exposures T around 10 ms, give us information about temporal autocorrelation of the speckle pattern with time constants τ > τ accurately measures τ, but that K measurements at T < τ are required in order to determine the actual shape of the autocorrelation function. Determining the shape of the autocorrelation function is important if we wish to distinguish between different types of flow or movement in tissue, for example distinguishing Brownian motion or the randomly-oriented flows in capillary networks from more ordered flow in resolvable vessels.

  16. Noninvasive Measurement of Conductivity Anisotropy at Larmor Frequency Using MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Joonsung Lee; Yizhuang Song; Narae Choi; Sungmin Cho; Jin Keun Seo; Dong-Hyun Kim

    2013-01-01

    Anisotropic electrical properties can be found in biological tissues such as muscles and nerves. Conductivity tensor is a simplified model to express the effective electrical anisotropic information and depends on the imaging resolution. The determination of the conductivity tensor should be based on Ohm's law. In other words, the measurement of partial information of current density and the electric fields should be made. Since the direct measurements of the electric fiel...

  17. Using the three-frequency bioimpedance measurement for inhomogeneous biological objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Timoshenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The possibility of using three-frequency bioimpedance to determine the structure of a biological object with two inhomogeneities are investigated. Formulation of the problem. The veracity of the determination the internal structure of inhomogeneous biological objects using three-frequency bioimpedance measuring method are studied insufficiently. Methods of research and analysis of the results. Describes the method of determining the possibility of using the three-frequency bioimpedance measuring method for determination the internal structure of inhomogeneous biological objects. Conclusion. Studies indicate the usefulness of three-frequency bioimpedance measuring method just for a rough determination of the parameters of the biological object.

  18. A nondestructive diagnostic method based on swept-frequency ultrasound transmission-reflection measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramanti, Mauro

    1992-08-01

    A nondestructive diagnostic technique is proposed to measure depth and thickness of unwanted inclusions inside laminate-type materials (gaps, delaminations, and cracks, for example). The method is based on the frequency-domain analysis of transmission and reflection coefficient measured on the material under test when it is irradiated by a CW ultrasound beam whose frequency varies over a suitable frequency range. By measuring the frequency distance between two adjacent minima in the attenuation and reflection coefficients the thickness and depth of the inclusion can be obtained. A practical implementation of the technique is suggested, and the first experimental results obtained by a laboratory setup are reported.

  19. Acoustics of fish shelters: frequency response and gain properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Many teleosts emit sounds from cavities beneath stones and other types of submerged objects, yet the acoustical properties of fish shelters are virtually unexplored. This study examines the gain properties of shelters commonly used by Mediterranean gobies as hiding places and/or nest sites in the field (flat stones, shells belonging to five bivalve species), or within aquarium tanks (tunnel-shaped plastic covers, concrete blocks, concrete cylinder pipe, halves of terracotta flower pots). All shelters were acoustically stimulated using a small underwater buzzer, placed inside or around the shelter to mimic a fish calling from the nest site, and different types of driving stimuli (white noise, pure tones, and artificial pulse trains). Results showed the presence of significant amplitude gain (3-18 dB) at frequencies in the range 100-150 Hz in all types of natural shelters but one (Mytilus), terracotta flower pots, and concrete blocks. Gain was higher for stones and artificial shelters than for shells. Gain peak amplitude increased with the weight of stones and shells. Conclusions were verified by performing analogous acoustical tests on flat stones in the stream. Results draw attention to the use of suitable shelters for proper recording of sounds produced by fishes kept within laboratory aquaria.

  20. Development of a Time Domain Radio Frequency Plasma Impedance Probe For Measurement of Absolute Electron Density and Electron Neutral Collision Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    We describe the development of a Time Domain Plasma Impedance Probe for the measurement of plasma properties in the ionosphere. It is being designed and developed to fly on cubesat platforms. The new instrument will be capable of making measurements of absolute electron density and electron neutral collision frequency at temporal and spatial resolutions not previously attained. A single measurement can be made in a time as short as 50 microseconds, which yields a spatial resolution of 0.35 meters for a satellite orbital velocity of 7 km/s. By averaging over 100 samples we expect an average spatial resolution of 35 meters. The method essentially consists of applying a small amplitude time limited voltage signal into a probe and measuring the resulting current response. The electron resonant frequencies of interest in the ionosphere are between are typically between 100 kHz and 20 MHz, which sets the required bandwidth. The new time domain method will present a significant improvement over the frequency domain method currently in use. The RF impedance probe has a distinct advantage over other methods used to measure plasma properties, in that it's measurements are not strongly affected by spacecraft charging effects that contaminate measurements made in the plasma environment. We will demonstrate the effectiveness of the instrument using data from sounding rocket missions, give details of the new instrument methodology, and suggest some possible areas of application of the method to measuring space plasmas. The difficulties associated with performing the measurements in a cubesat platform, and subsequently interpreting the measurements, will also be presented.

  1. A frequency measurement algorithm for non-stationary signals by using wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seong-Heon; Oh, Dong Keun

    2016-11-01

    Scalogram is widely used to measure instantaneous frequencies of non-stationary signals. However, the basic property of the scalogram is observed only for stationary sinusoidal functions. A property of the scalogram for non-stationary signal is analytically derived in this paper. Based on the property, a new frequency measurement algorithm is proposed. In addition, a filter that can separate two similar frequency signals is developed based on the wavelet transform.

  2. The effect of feeding frequency on insulin and ghrelin responses in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Chambers, Edward S; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2008-01-01

    Recent work shows that increased meal frequency reduces ghrelin responses in sheep. Human research suggests there is an interaction between insulin and ghrelin. The effect of meal frequency on this interaction is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effect of feeding frequency on insulin...... and ghrelin responses in human subjects. Five healthy male volunteers were recruited from the general population: age 24 (SEM 2)years, body mass 75.7 (SEM 3.2) kg and BMI 23.8 (SEM 0.8) kg/m(2). Volunteers underwent three 8-h feeding regimens: fasting (FAST); low-frequency(two) meal ingestion (LOFREQ(MEAL......)); high-frequency (twelve) meal ingestion (HIFREQ(MEAL)). Meals were equi-energetic within trials,consisting of 64% carbohydrate, 23% fat and 13% protein. Total energy intake was equal between feeding trials. Total area under the curve for serum insulin and plasma ghrelin responses did not differ between...

  3. Experimental study on vibration frequency response of micro-bend optic-fiber sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuxiang Qin; Honggang Li; Wande Fan; Qiuqin Sheng

    2009-01-01

    We make an experimental study on vibration frequency response of micro-bend optic-fiber sensor, and single-mode fibers and multi-mode fibers are used as the sensitive optic-fibers. Contrast between the two sensitive fibers is presented. Result shows that the micro-bend optic-fiber sensor has good frequency response characteristics and strong ability to restore the waveform. With the frequency varying in the range of 500 - 4762 Hz, the vibration sensors using multi-mode optic-fiber as the sensitive fiber is more sensitive than that using single-mode optic-fiber. And the former has better frequency response characteristics and stronger capacity of waveform revivification. But with the frequency in the range of 287 - 500 Hz, the latter is better.

  4. Effect of noise on Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We study the effects of noise in Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses. We quantify the measurement accuracy in the presence of additive, muliplicative, and quantization noise, and discuss filtering and pre-processing of the data.

  5. Measuring ultrashort pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebino, R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program is the development of techniques for the measurement of ultrafast events important in gas-phase combustion chemistry. Specifically, goals of this program include the development of fundamental concepts and spectroscopic techniques that will augment the information currently available with ultrafast laser techniques. Of equal importance is the development of technology for ultrafast spectroscopy. For example, methods for the production and measurement of ultrashort pulses at wavelengths important for these studies is an important goal. Because the specific vibrational motion excited in a molecule depends sensitively on the intensity, I(t), and the phase, {psi}(t), of the ultrashort pulse used to excite the motion, it is critical to measure both of these quantities for an individual pulse. Unfortunately, this has remained an unsolved problem for many years. Fortunately, this year, the authors present a technique that achieves this goal.

  6. A Monopole Antenna at Optical Frequencies: Single-Molecule Near-Field Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taminiau, Tim H.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2007-01-01

    We present a monopole antenna for optical frequencies (~600 THz) and discuss near-field measurements with single fluorescent molecules as a technique to characterize such antennas. The similarities and differences between near-field antenna measurements at optical and radio frequencies are discussed

  7. Low Frequency Noise Measurement and Analysis of Capacitive Micro-Accelerometers: Temperature Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Yasin, Faisal; Nagel, David J.; Ong, D. S.; Korman, Can E.; Chuah, H. T.

    2008-06-01

    A noise measurements of micro-accelerometers were performed using a special measurement system. A common spectral behavior of noise is found, with 1/ f noise dominating at low frequencies and white thermal noise being the limiting factor at higher frequencies. A temperature dependent and an acceleration dependant of the noise are found in the accelerometers, in agreement and contract of the theories, respectively.

  8. Dielectric properties measurement system at cryogenic temperatures and microwave frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molla, J.; Ibarra, A.; Margineda, J.; Zamarro, J. M.; Hernandez, A.

    1994-07-01

    A system based on the resonant cavity method has been developed to measure the permittivity and loss tangent at 12-18 GHz over the temperature range 80 K to 300 K. Changes of permittivity as low as 0.01 % in the range 1 to 30, and 3 x 10{sup 6} for loss tangent values below 10{sup 2}, can be obtained without requiring temperature stability. The thermal expansion coefficient and resistivity factor of copper have been measured between 80 K and 300 K. Permittivity of sapphire and loss tangent of alumina of 99.9 % purity in the same temperature range are presented. (Author) 23 refs.

  9. Characterizing Far-infrared Laser Emissions and the Measurement of Their Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael; Zink, Lyndon R

    2015-12-18

    The generation and subsequent measurement of far-infrared radiation has found numerous applications in high-resolution spectroscopy, radio astronomy, and Terahertz imaging. For about 45 years, the generation of coherent, far-infrared radiation has been accomplished using the optically pumped molecular laser. Once far-infrared laser radiation is detected, the frequencies of these laser emissions are measured using a three-laser heterodyne technique. With this technique, the unknown frequency from the optically pumped molecular laser is mixed with the difference frequency between two stabilized, infrared reference frequencies. These reference frequencies are generated by independent carbon dioxide lasers, each stabilized using the fluorescence signal from an external, low pressure reference cell. The resulting beat between the known and unknown laser frequencies is monitored by a metal-insulator-metal point contact diode detector whose output is observed on a spectrum analyzer. The beat frequency between these laser emissions is subsequently measured and combined with the known reference frequencies to extrapolate the unknown far-infrared laser frequency. The resulting one-sigma fractional uncertainty for laser frequencies measured with this technique is ± 5 parts in 10(7). Accurately determining the frequency of far-infrared laser emissions is critical as they are often used as a reference for other measurements, as in the high-resolution spectroscopic investigations of free radicals using laser magnetic resonance. As part of this investigation, difluoromethane, CH2F2, was used as the far-infrared laser medium. In all, eight far-infrared laser frequencies were measured for the first time with frequencies ranging from 0.359 to 1.273 THz. Three of these laser emissions were discovered during this investigation and are reported with their optimal operating pressure, polarization with respect to the CO2 pump laser, and strength.

  10. Measuring the Frequency Occurrence of Handwriting and Handprinting Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark E; Vastrick, Thomas W; Boulanger, Michèle; Schuetzner, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    The premise of this study was to take a valid population sampling of handwriting and handprinting and assess how many times each of the predetermined characteristic is found in the samples. Approximately 1500 handwriting specimens were collected from across the United States and pared to obtain a representative sample of the U.S. adult population according to selected demographics based on age, sex, ethnicity, handedness, education level, and location of lower-grade school education. This study has been able to support a quantitative assessment of extrinsic and intrinsic effects in handwriting and handprinting for the six subgroups. Additional results include analyses of the interdependence of characteristics. This study found that 98.55% of handprinted characteristics and 97.39% of cursive characteristics had an independence correlation of under 0.2. The conclusions support use of the product rule in general, but with noted caveats. Finally, this study provides frequency occurrence proportions for 776 handwriting and handprinting characteristics. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Heterogeneity measures in hydrological frequency analysis: review and new developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Ana I.; Chebana, Fateh; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Some regional procedures to estimate hydrological quantiles at ungauged sites, such as the index-flood method, require the delineation of homogeneous regions as a basic step for their application. The homogeneity of these delineated regions is usually tested providing a yes/no decision. However, complementary measures that are able to quantify the degree of heterogeneity of a region are needed to compare regions, evaluate the impact of particular sites, and rank the performance of different delineating methods. Well-known existing heterogeneity measures are not well-defined for ranking regions, as they entail drawbacks such as assuming a given probability distribution, providing negative values and being affected by the region size. Therefore, a framework for defining and assessing desirable properties of a heterogeneity measure in the regional hydrological context is needed. In the present study, such a framework is proposed through a four-step procedure based on Monte Carlo simulations. Several heterogeneity measures, some of which commonly known and others which are derived from recent approaches or adapted from other fields, are presented and developed to be assessed. The assumption-free Gini index applied on the at-site L-variation coefficient (L-CV) over a region led to the best results. The measure of the percentage of sites for which the regional L-CV is outside the confidence interval of the at-site L-CV is also found to be relevant, as it leads to more stable results regardless of the regional L-CV value. An illustrative application is also presented for didactical purposes, through which the subjectivity of commonly used criteria to assess the performance of different delineation methods is underlined.

  12. Uncertainty analysis of strain modal parameters by Bayesian method using frequency response function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Li; Yi Weijian; Zhihua Yi

    2007-01-01

    Structural strain modes are able to detect changes in local structural performance, but errors are inevitably intermixed in the measured data. In this paper, strain modal parameters are considered as random variables, and their uncertainty is analyzed by a Bayesian method based on the structural frequency response function (FRF). The estimates of strain modal parameters with maximal posterior probability are determined. Several independent measurements of the FRF of a four-story reinforced concrete frame structural model were performed in the laboratory. The ability to identify the stiffness change in a concrete column using the strain mode was verified. It is shown that the uncertainty of the natural frequency is very small. Compared with the displacement mode shape, the variations of strain mode shapes at each point are quite different. The damping ratios are more affected by the types of test systems. Except for the case where a high order strain mode does not identify local damage, the first order strain mode can provide an exact indication of the damage location.

  13. Function-weighted frequency response function sensitivity method for analytical model updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. M.

    2017-09-01

    Since the frequency response function (FRF) sensitivity method was first proposed [26], it has since become a most powerful and practical method for analytical model updating. Nevertheless, the original formulation of the FRF sensitivity method does suffer the limitation that the initial analytical model to be updated should be reasonably close to the final updated model to be sought, due the assumed mathematical first order approximation implicit to most sensitivity based methods. Convergence to correct model is not guaranteed when large modelling errors exist and blind application often leads to optimal solutions which are truly sought. This paper seeks to examine all the important numerical characteristics of the original FRF sensitivity method including frequency data selection, numerical balance and convergence performance. To further improve the applicability of the method to cases of large modelling errors, a new novel function-weighted sensitivity method is developed. The new method has shown much superior performance on convergence even in the presence of large modelling errors. Extensive numerical case studies based on a mass-spring system and a GARTEUR structure have been conducted and very encouraging results have been achieved. Effect of measurement noise has been examined and the method works reasonably well in the presence of measurement uncertainties. The new method removes the restriction of modelling error magnitude being of second order in Euclidean norm as compared with that of system matrices, thereby making it a truly general method applicable to most practical model updating problems.

  14. Study on DFIG wind turbines control strategy for improving frequency response characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongmei; Wu, Di; Liu, Yanhua; Zhou, Zhiyu

    2012-01-01

    The active and reactive power decoupling control for the double-fed induction generator wind turbines(DFIG) does not play a positive role to the frequency response ability of power grid because it performs as the hidden inertia for the power grid. If we want to improve the transient frequency stability of the wind turbine when it is integrated with the system, we must ameliorate its frequency response characteristics. The inability of frequency control due to DFIG decoupling control could be overcome through releasing (or absorbing) a part of the kinetic energy stored in the rotor, so as to increase (or decrease) active power injected to the power system when the deviation of power system frequency appears. This paper discusses the mathematical model of the variable speed DFIG, including the aerodynamic model, pitch control system model, shaft model, generator model and inverter control model, and other key components, focusing on the mathematical model of the converters in rotor side and grid side. Based on the existing model of wind generator, the paper attaches the frequency control model on the platform of the simulation software DIgSILENT/PowerFactory. The simulation results show that the proposed control strategy can response quickly to transient frequency deviation and prove that wind farms can participate in the system frequency regulation to a certain extent. Finally, the result verifies the accuracy and plausibility of the inverter control model which attaches the frequency control module.

  15. Intracellular responses to frequency modulated tones in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R.A.P. Geis (H.-Rüdiger A.P.); J.G.G. Borst (Gerard)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFrequency modulations occur in many natural sounds, including vocalizations. The neuronal response to frequency modulated (FM) stimuli has been studied extensively in different brain areas, with an emphasis on the auditory cortex and the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Here,

  16. Optimal frequency range for medical radar measurements of human heartbeats using body-contact radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Aardal, Øyvind; Paichard, Yoann; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the optimal frequency range for heartbeat measurements using body-contact radar is experimentally evaluated. A Body-contact radar senses electromagnetic waves that have penetrated the human body, but the range of frequencies that can be used are limited by the electric properties of the human tissue. The optimal frequency range is an important property needed for the design of body-contact radar systems for heartbeat measurements. In this study heartbeats are measured using three different antennas at discrete frequencies from 0.1 - 10 GHz, and the strength of the received heartbeat signal is calculated. To characterize the antennas, when in contact with the body, two port S-parameters(†) are measured for the antennas using a pork rib as a phantom for the human body. The results shows that frequencies up to 2.5 GHz can be used for heartbeat measurements with body-contact radar.

  17. Low and High Frequency Models of Response Statistics of a Cylindrical Orthogrid Vehicle Panel to Acoustic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Teague, David; Gardner, Bryce; Cotoni, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    This presentation further develops the orthogrid vehicle panel work. Employed Hybrid Module capabilities to assess both low/mid frequency and high frequency models in the VA One simulation environment. The response estimates from three modeling approaches are compared to ground test measurements. Detailed Finite Element Model of the Test Article -Expect to capture both the global panel modes and the local pocket mode response, but at a considerable analysis expense (time & resources). A Composite Layered Construction equivalent global stiffness approximation using SEA -Expect to capture response of the global panel modes only. An SEA approximation using the Periodic Subsystem Formulation. A finite element model of a single periodic cell is used to derive the vibroacoustic properties of the entire periodic structure (modal density, radiation efficiency, etc. Expect to capture response at various locations on the panel (on the skin and on the ribs) with less analysis expense

  18. High frequency wide-band transformer uses coax to achieve high turn ratio and flat response

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Parry, T.

    1966-01-01

    Center-tap push-pull transformer with toroidal core helically wound with a single coaxial cable creates a high frequency wideband transformer. This transformer has a high-turn ratio, a high coupling coefficient, and a flat broadband response.

  19. Frequency response of the Loschmidt echo decay in an open driven nonlinear oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Hui; Yan, Zhan-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    The decay of the Loschmidt echo and its relation to the frequency response of the underlying classical dynamics are investigated in an open Duffing system by means of the Wigner function. The initial Wigner function of the system is Gaussian and centered at a phase point (x 0, p 0). For different (x 0, p 0), significant peaks are observed in the frequency response curves of the Loschmidt echo decay during the evolution of the Wigner function. Furthermore, there is good correspondence between the frequency response curves of the Loschmidt echo decay and the underlying classical dynamics. This can be attributed to the increase of the fringes of the Wigner function by the external driving force, which can be revealed by the frequency response of the underlying classical dynamics.

  20. Unfolded Frequency Response and Model of a Multi-Tap Direct Sampling Mixer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yun; GE Ning; DONG Zaiwang

    2008-01-01

    A transform method was used to model a discrete time multi-tap direct sampling mixer. The method transforms the mixed filtering and down.sampling stages to separate cascade filtering and sampling stages to determine the unfolded frequency response which shows the anti-aliasing ability of the mixer. The transformation can also be applied to other mixed signal and multi-rate receiver systems to analyze their unfolded frequency responses. The transformed system architecture was used to calculate the unfolded frequency response of the multi-tap direct sampling mixer and compared with the mixer model without noise in the ad-vanced design system 2005A environment to further evaluate the frequency response. The simulations show that the -3 dB bandwidth is 3.0 MHz and the voltage gain is attenuated by 1.5 dB within a 1-MHz baseband bandwidth.

  1. Machinery Fault Diagnosis Using Two-Channel Analysis Method Based on Fictitious System Frequency Response Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most existing techniques for machinery health monitoring that utilize measured vibration signals usually require measurement points to be as close as possible to the expected fault components of interest. This is particularly important for implementing condition-based maintenance since the incipient fault signal power may be too small to be detected if a sensor is located further away from the fault source. However, a measurement sensor is often not attached to the ideal point due to geometric or environmental restrictions. In such a case, many of the conventional diagnostic techniques may not be successfully applicable. In this paper, a two-channel analysis method is proposed to overcome such difficulty. It uses two vibration signals simultaneously measured at arbitrary points in a machine. The proposed method is described theoretically by introducing a fictitious system frequency response function. It is then verified experimentally for bearing fault detection. The results show that the suggested method may be a good alternative when ideal points for measurement sensors are not readily available.

  2. Neuromagnetic auditory steady state response to chords: effect of frequency ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Asuka; Yumoto, Masato; Kuriki, Shinya; Nakagawa, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual degree of consonance or dissonance of a chord is known to be varied as a function of frequency ratio between tones composing the chord. It has been indicated that generation of a sense of dissonance is associated with the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) phase-locked to difference frequencies which are salient in the chords with complex frequency ratios. This study further investigated how the neuromagnetic ASSR would be modulated as a function of the frequency ratio when the acoustic properties of the difference frequency, to which the ASSR was synchronized, was identical in terms of its number, energy and frequency. Neuronal frequency characteristics intrinsic to the ASSR were compensated by utilizing responses to a SAM (Sinusoidally Amplitude Modulated) chirp tone sweeping through the corresponding frequency range. The results showed that ASSR was significantly smaller for the chords with simple frequency ratios than for those with complex frequency ratios. It indicates that the basic neuronal correlates underlying the sensation of consonance/dissonance might be associated with the attenuation rate applied to encode the input information through the afferent auditory pathway. Attentional gating of the thalamo-cortical function might also be one of the factors.

  3. MEASURING FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE TYPES OF RESPONSIBILITY CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LOREDANA CIURLĂU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The financial performance of a responsibility center is measured on the basis of specific indicators of the nature center. To obtain a relevant and consistent images relating to the performance of an entity is required to use a system of indicators. Performance indicators of the structure it needs to capture at the same time, at least the following aspects: the objectives of the entity, its strategy, efficacy and effectiveness of activities carried out, the entity's ability to adapt to the requirements of the market in which they operate. Financial indicators of performance are the most objective, because most businesses give important resources for the activities of audit and control.

  4. Analytical and experimental comparisons between the frequency-modulated–frequency-shift measurement and the pulsed-wave–time-shift measurement Doppler systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens Erik; Pedersen, P. C.

    1996-01-01

    In previous publications, a new echo-ranging Doppler system based on transmission of repetitive coherent frequency modulated (FM) sinusoids in two different implementations was presented. One of these implementations, the Frequency Modulated - frequency shift measurement (FM-fsm) Doppler system...... is in this paper compared with its PW counterpart, the Pulsed Wave - time shift measurement (PW-tsm) Doppler system. When using transmitted PW and FM signals with a Gaussian envelope, the parallelism between the two systems can be stated explicitly, and comparison be made between the main performance indices...... for the two Doppler systems. The performance of the FM and PW Doppler systems is evaluated by means of numerical simulation and measurements of actual flow profiles. The results indicate that the two Doppler systems have very similar levels of performance....

  5. Dielectric measurements of nanoliter liquids with a photonic crystal resonator at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanham, S. M.; Watts, C.; Otter, W. J.; Lucyszyn, S.; Klein, N.

    2015-07-01

    We present a highly sensitive technique for determining the complex permittivity of nanoliter liquid samples in the terahertz band based on a photonic crystal resonator and microcapillary. Liquids are characterized by using a capillary tube to introduce a ˜4 nl liquid sample into the electromagnetic field of a resonant mode confined by an L3 resonant cavity in a high-resistivity silicon photonic crystal slab. Monitoring the perturbation of the resonant frequency and unloaded Q-factor of the resonant mode at 100 GHz and ˜5800, respectively, allows a sample's permittivity to be calculated. An analytical model describing the system response based on perturbation theory and quasi-static analysis of the electric field within the capillary is also presented and found to agree well with FEM simulations and experimental measurements of ethanol-water mixtures of various concentrations for low to moderate loss tangents of the liquid samples. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by measuring the complex permittivity of several bioliquids, including suspensions of red and white blood cells. These results represent a step towards a lab-on-a-chip device for the analysis of extremely small quantities of biological, toxic, explosive, and other liquid types at terahertz frequencies.

  6. Experimental measurement of utricle system dynamic response to inertial stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, M D; Grant, J W

    2014-08-01

    The membranous utricle sac of the red-eared turtle was mounted in a piezoelectric actuated platform mounted on the stage of a light microscope. The piezoelectric actuator oscillated the base of the neuroepithelium along a linear axis. Displacements were in the plane of the utricle and consisted of a linear sinusoidal-sweep signal starting at 0 and increasing to 500 Hz over 5 s. This inertial stimulus caused measurable shear displacement of the otoconial layer's dorsal surface, resulting in shear deformation of the gelatinous and column filament layers. Displacements of the otoconial layer and a reference point on the neuroepithelium were filmed at 2,000 frames/s with a high-speed video camera during oscillations. Image registration was performed on the video to track displacements with a resolution better than 15 nm. The displacement waveforms were then matched to a linear second-order model of the dynamic system. The model match identified two system mechanical parameters-the natural circular frequency ω n and the damping ratio ζ-that characterized the utricle dynamic response. The median values found for the medial-lateral axis on 20 utricles with 95 % confidence intervals in parenthesis were as follows: ω n = 374 (353, 396) Hz and ζ = 0.50 (0.47, 0.53). The anterior-posterior axis values were not significantly different: ω n = 409 (390, 430) Hz and ζ = 0.53 (0.48, 0.57). The results have two relevant and significant dynamic system findings: (1) a higher than expected natural frequency and (2) significant under damping. Previous to this study, utricular systems were treated as overdamped and with natural frequencies much lower that measured here. Both of these system performance findings result in excellent utricle time response to acceleration stimuli and a broad frequency bandwidth up to 100 Hz. This study is the first to establish the upper end of this mechanical system frequency response of the utricle in any animal.

  7. Rapid and accurate measurement of the frequency-frequency correlation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Derek G; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2013-07-25

    Using an implementation of heterodyne-detected vibrational echo spectroscopy, we show that equilibrium spectral diffusion caused by solvation dynamics can be measured in a fraction of the time required using traditional two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. Spectrally resolved, heterodyne-detected rephasing and nonrephasing signals, recorded at a single delay between the first two pulses in a photon echo sequence, can be used to measure the full waiting time dependent spectral dynamics that are typically extracted from a series of 2D-IR spectra. Hence, data acquisition is accelerated by more than 1 order of magnitude, while permitting extremely fine sampling of the spectral dynamics during the waiting time between the second and third pulses. Using cymantrene (cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl, CpMn(CO)3) in alcohol solutions, we compare this novel approach--denoted rapidly acquired spectral diffusion (RASD)--with a traditional method using full 2D-IR spectra, finding excellent agreement. Though this approach is largely limited to isolated vibrational bands, we also show how to remove interference from cross-peaks that can produce characteristic modulations of the spectral dynamics through vibrational quantum beats.

  8. Effects of mistuning and matrix structure on the topology of frequency response curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Dare

    1989-01-01

    The stability of a frequency response curve under mild perturbations of the system's matrix is investigated. Using recent developments in the theory of singularities of differentiable maps, it is shown that the stability of a response curve depends on the structure of the system's matrix. In particular, the frequency response curves of a cylic system are shown to be unstable. Consequently, slight parameter variations engendered by mistuning will induce a significant difference in the topology of the forced response curves, if the mistuning transformation crosses the bifurcation set.

  9. Concentration measurement of yeast suspensions using high frequency ultrasound backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, Luis; Vera, Pedro; Cañadas, Francisco Jesús; Shukla, Shiva Kant; Montero, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes the use of an ultrasound based technique to measure the concentration of yeasts in liquid suspension. This measurement was achieved by the detection and quantification of ultrasonic echoes backscattered by the cells. More specifically, the technique was applied to the detection and quantification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A theoretical approach was proposed to get the average density and sound speed of the yeasts, which were found to be 1116 kg/m(3) and 1679 m/s, respectively. These parameters were needed to model the waves backscattered by each single cell. A pulse-echo arrangement working around 50 MHz, being able to detect echoes from single yeasts was used to characterize experimentally yeast solutions from 10(2) to 10(7)cells/ml. The Non-negative Matrix Factorization denoising technique was applied for data analysis. This technique required a previous learning of the spectral patterns of the echoes reflected from yeasts in solution and the base noise from the liquid medium. Comparison between pulse correlation (without denoising) and theoretical and experimental pattern learning was made to select the best signal processing. A linear relation between ultrasound output and concentration was obtained with correlation coefficient R(2)=0.996 for the experimental learning. Concentrations from 10(4) to 10(7)cells/ml were detected above the base noise. These results show the viability of using the ultrasound backscattering technique to detect yeasts and measure their concentration in liquid cultures, improving the sensitivity obtained using spectrophotometric methods by one order of magnitude.

  10. Approximation of the Duffing oscillator frequency response function using the FPK equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, E J; Worden, K, E-mail: k.worden@sheffield.ac.u [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin St Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    Although a great deal of work has been carried out on structural dynamic systems under random excitation, there has been a comparatively small amount of this work concentrating on the calculation of the quantities commonly measured in structural dynamic tests. Perhaps the most fundamental of these quantities is the Frequency Response Function (FRF). A number of years ago, Yar and Hammond took an interesting approach to estimating the FRF of a Duffing oscillator system which was based on an approximate solution of the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorow equation. Despite reproducing the general features of the statistical linearization estimate, the approximation failed to show the presence of the poles at odd multiples of the primary resonance which are known to occur experimentally. The current paper simply extends the work of Yar and Hammond to a higher order of approximation and is thus able to show the existence of a third 'harmonic' in the FRF.

  11. A multichannel frequency response analyser for impedance spectroscopy on power sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL J. L. BRETT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost multi-channel frequency response analyser (FRA has been developed based on a DAQ (data acquisition/LabVIEW interface. The system has been tested for electric and electrochemical impedance measurements. This novel association of hardware and software demonstrated performance comparable to a commercial potentiostat / FRA for passive electric circuits. The software has multichannel capabilities with minimal phase shift for 5 channels when operated below 3 kHz. When applied in active (galvanostatic mode in conjunction with a commercial electronic load (by discharging a lead acid battery at 1.5 A the performance was fit for purpose, providing electrochemical information to characterize the performance of the power source.

  12. Improved Measurement of the Hydrogen 1S - 2S Transition Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Parthey, Christian G; Alnis, Janis; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Beyer, Axel; Holzwarth, Ronald; Maistrou, Aliaksei; Pohl, Randolf; Predehl, Katharina; Udem, Thomas; Wilken, Tobias; Kolachevsky, Nikolai; Abgrall, Michel; Rovera, Daniele; Salomon, Christophe; Laurent, Philippe; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the 1S - 2S transition frequency in atomic hydrogen via two photon spectroscopy on a 5.8 K atomic beam. We obtain $f_{1S-2S} = 2 466 061 413 187 035 (10)$ Hz for the hyperfine centroid. This is a fractional frequency uncertainty of $4.2\\times 10^{-15}$ improving the previous measure- ment by our own group [M. Fischer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 230802 (2004)] by a factor of 3.3. The probe laser frequency was phase coherently linked to the mobile cesium fountain clock FOM via a frequency comb.

  13. Absolute frequency measurement of the 1S0 - 3P0 transition of 171Yb

    CERN Document Server

    Pizzocaro, Marco; Rauf, Benjamin; Bregolin, Filippo; Milani, Gianmaria; Clivati, Cecilia; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We report the absolute frequency measurement of the unperturbed transition 1S0 - 3P0 at 578 nm in 171Yb realized in an optical lattice frequency standard. The absolute frequency is measured 518 295 836 590 863.55(28) Hz relative to a cryogenic caesium fountain with a fractional uncertainty of 5.4x10-16 . This value is in agreement with the ytterbium frequency recommended as a secondary representation of the second in the International System of Units.

  14. Measuring student learning with item response theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jin Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate short-term learning from hints and feedback in a Web-based physics tutoring system. Both the skill of students and the difficulty and discrimination of items were determined by applying item response theory (IRT to the first answers of students who are working on for-credit homework items in an introductory Newtonian physics course. We show that after tutoring a shifted logistic item response function with lower discrimination fits the students’ second responses to an item previously answered incorrectly. Student skill decreased by 1.0 standard deviation when students used no tutoring between their (incorrect first and second attempts, which we attribute to “item-wrong bias.” On average, using hints or feedback increased students’ skill by 0.8 standard deviation. A skill increase of 1.9 standard deviation was observed when hints were requested after viewing, but prior to attempting to answer, a particular item. The skill changes measured in this way will enable the use of IRT to assess students based on their second attempt in a tutoring environment.

  15. Micro-Doppler measurement of insect wing-beat frequencies with W-band coherent radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Hu, Cheng; Fu, Xiaowei; Long, Teng; Zeng, Tao

    2017-05-03

    The wingbeat frequency of insect migrant is regarded potentially valuable for species identification and has long drawn widespread attention in radar entomology. Principally, the radar echo signal can be used to extract wingbeat information, because both the signal amplitude and phase could be modulated by wing-beating. With respect to existing entomological radars, signal amplitude modulation has been used for wingbeat frequency measurement of large insects for many years, but the wingbeat frequency measurement of small insects remains a challenge. In our research, W-band and S-band coherent radars are used to measure the insect wingbeat frequency. The results show that the wingbeat-induced amplitude modulation of W-band radar is more intense than that of the S-band radar and the W-band radar could measure the wingbeat frequency of smaller insects. In addition, it is validated for the first time that the signal phase could also be used to measure the insect wingbeat frequency based on micro-Doppler effect. However, whether the wingbeat frequency measurement is based on the amplitude or phase modulation, it is found that the W-band coherent radar has better performance on both the measurement precision and the measurable minimum size of the insect.

  16. Frequency-dependent dielectric response model for polyimide-poly(vinilydenefluoride) multilayered dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lillo, Luigi; Bergamini, Andrea; Albino Carnelli, Dario; Ermanni, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    A physical model for the frequency-dependent dielectric response of multilayered structures is reported. Two frequency regimes defined by the relative permittivities and volume resistivities of the layers have been analytically identified and experimentally investigated on a structure consisting of polyimide and poly(vinilydenefluoride) layers. The relative permittivity follows an effective medium model at high frequency while showing a dependence on the volume resistivity at low frequency. In this regime, relative permittivities exceeding those expected from effective medium model are recorded. These findings provide insights into inhomogeneous dielectrics behavior for the development of high energy density dielectric films.

  17. Frequency-scanning interferometry for dynamic absolute distance measurement using Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Long; Liu, Zhigang; Zhang, Weibo; Zhou, Yangli

    2014-12-15

    We propose a frequency-scanning interferometry using the Kalman filtering technique for dynamic absolute distance measurement. Frequency-scanning interferometry only uses a single tunable laser driven by a triangle waveform signal for forward and backward optical frequency scanning. The absolute distance and moving speed of a target can be estimated by the present input measurement of frequency-scanning interferometry and the previously calculated state based on the Kalman filter algorithm. This method not only compensates for movement errors in conventional frequency-scanning interferometry, but also achieves high-precision and low-complexity dynamic measurements. Experimental results of dynamic measurements under static state, vibration and one-dimensional movement are presented.

  18. NEW WIND-INDUCED RESPONSES ANALYSIS METHOD OF SPATIAL STRUCTURES IN FREQUENCY DOMAIN WITH MODE COMPENSATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何艳丽; 董石麟

    2002-01-01

    Large span spatial lattice structures have many natural frequencies in a narrow frequency range, the conventional frequency domain method is difficult to contain all significant contribution modes. Through numerical examples, it is found that some high order modes are likely to be overlooked because of their higher positions of modal order, in spite of their significance to wind response. According to the contributions of modes to strain energy of system, the paper presented an efficient method to compensate the errors owing to missing out some significant high order modes. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through a numerical analysis of the wind responses of a spherical dome.

  19. Rapid estimation of frequency response functions by close-range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of a rapid method which estimates the frequency response function from stereoscopic dynamic data is computed. It is shown that reversal of the order of the operations of coordinate transformation and Fourier transformation, which provides a significant increase in computational speed, introduces error. A portion of the error, proportional to the perturbation components normal to the camera focal planes, cannot be eliminated. The remaining error may be eliminated by proper scaling of frequency data prior to coordinate transformation. Methods are developed for least squares estimation of the full 3x3 frequency response matrix for a three dimensional structure.

  20. Implementation of Time and Frequency Response Analysis for Web-Based Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teyana Sapula

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The University of Dar Es Salaam has developed the web-based laboratory for Time and Frequency Response Analysis. The purpose of this web-based laboratory is the utilization of real data from real experiments, in terms of instrumentation and experimental circuits, rather than simulations. The use of webbased laboratory came after realizing the difficulties imposed by the traditional laboratories. Web-based laboratories allow students and educators to interact with real laboratory equipment located anywhere in the world at anytime. This paper presents the implementation of web-based laboratory of single stage common emitter, resistor capacitor coupled amplifier using National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrument Suite platform. Two components are deployed: time response analysis and frequency response analysis. The experiment allows students to carryout time and frequency analysis of the amplifier. The modular can be used to any microelectronic circuits to carry out any time response and frequency response analysis. Both the time response and frequency response analysis results of the amplifier are validated.

  1. Estimation Method of Ionospheric TEC Distribution using Single Frequency Measurements of GPS Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win Zaw Hein

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The satellite-to-ground communications are influenced by ionospheric plasma which varies depending on solar and geomagnetic activities as well as regions and local times. With the expansion of use of the space, continuous monitoring of the ionospheric plasma has become an important issue. In Global Positioning System (GPS, the ionospheric delay, which is proportional to ionospheric total electron content (TEC along the propagation path, is the largest error in signal propagation. The TEC has been observed from dual frequency GPS signals because only the ionospheric delay has frequency dependences. Costs of multi-frequency receivers are, however, much higher than those of single frequency ones. In the present study, an estimation method of TEC distribution map from single frequency GPS measurements was developed. The developed method was evaluated by comparing its results with those from dual frequency measurements. The method makes it possible to expand ionospheric TEC observation networks easily.

  2. Experimental demonstration of sub-Fourier structures in time--frequency measurement of light pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Praxmeyer, L; Radzewicz, C; Wodkiewicz, K; Praxmeyer, Ludmila; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Radzewicz, Czeslaw; Wodkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental data of the frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements of light pulses revealing interference features corresponding to sub-Planck structures in phase space. For superpositions of pulses a small, sub-Fourier shift in the carrier frequency leads to a state orthogonal to the initial one, although in the representation of standard time--frequency distributions these states seem to have a non-vanishing overlap.

  3. Using the three-frequency bioimpedance measurement for inhomogeneous biological objects

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The possibility of using three-frequency bioimpedance to determine the structure of a biological object with two inhomogeneities are investigated. Formulation of the problem. The veracity of the determination the internal structure of inhomogeneous biological objects using three-frequency bioimpedance measuring method are studied insufficiently. Methods of research and analysis of the results. Describes the method of determining the possibility of using the three-frequency bioim...

  4. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  5. Measuring treatment response in psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Meyers, Barnett S; Flint, Alastair J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no established psychometric instrument dedicated to the measurement of severity in psychotic depression (PD). The aim of this study was to investigate whether a new composite rating scale, the Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), covering both the psychotic...... and the depressive domains of PD, could detect differences in effect between two psychopharmacological treatment regimens. METHODS: We reanalyzed the data from the Study of Pharmacotherapy of Psychotic Depression (STOP-PD), which compared the effect of Olanzapine+Sertraline (n=129) versus Olanzapine+Placebo (n=130......). The response to the two regimens was compared using both a mixed effects model and effect size statistics on the total scores of three rating scales: the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17), its 6-item melancholia subscale (HAM-D6), and the 11-item PDAS consisting of the HAM-D6 plus five items...

  6. Input estimation from measured structural response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Dustin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cross, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Silva, Ramon A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bement, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  7. Item response theory for measurement validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Frances M; Kao, Solon T

    2014-06-01

    Item response theory (IRT) is an important method of assessing the validity of measurement scales that is underutilized in the field of psychiatry. IRT describes the relationship between a latent trait (e.g., the construct that the scale proposes to assess), the properties of the items in the scale, and respondents' answers to the individual items. This paper introduces the basic premise, assumptions, and methods of IRT. To help explain these concepts we generate a hypothetical scale using three items from a modified, binary (yes/no) response version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale that was administered to 19,399 respondents. We first conducted a factor analysis to confirm the unidimensionality of the three items and then proceeded with Mplus software to construct the 2-Parameter Logic (2-PL) IRT model of the data, a method which allows for estimates of both item discrimination and item difficulty. The utility of this information both for clinical purposes and for scale construction purposes is discussed.

  8. Precise force measurement method by a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangzong Xiao; Xingwu Long; Bin Zhang; Geng Li

    2011-01-01

    A novel precise force measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is proposed. The principle of force measurement with this method is analyzed, and the analytic relation expression between the input force and the change in the output beat frequency is derived. Experiments using a 632.8-nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser are then performed; they demonstrate that the force measurement is proportional to a high degree over almost five decades of input signal range. The maximum scale factor is observed as 5.02×109 Hz/N, with beat frequency instability equivalent resolution of 10-5 N. By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor, a force measurement resolution of 10-6i N could be expected.%A novel precise force measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is proposed.The principle of force measurement with this method is analyzed,and the analytic relation expression between the input force and the change in the output beat frequency is derived.Experiments using a 632.8-nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser are then performed;they demonstrate that the force measurement is proportional to a high degree over almost five decades of input signal range.The maximum scale factor is observed as 5.02× 109 Hz/N,with beat frequency instability equivalent resolution of 10-5 N.By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor,a force measurement resolution of 10 -6 N could be expected.Precise measurement of force and force-related nagnitudes,such as acceleration,pressure,and mass,is an often demanded task in modern engineering and science[1-3].In recent decades,some research efforts have been intensified to utilize optical measnrement procedures for obtaining precise force measurement.

  9. Accurate MTF measurement in digital radiography using noise response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Rudin, Stephen [Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Biomedical Research Building, Room 445, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a new technique to determine the system presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) in digital radiography using only the detector noise response. Methods: A cascaded-linear systems analysis was used to develop an exact relationship between the two-dimensional noise power spectrum (NPS) and the presampled MTF for a generalized detector system. This relationship was then utilized to determine the two-dimensional presampled MTF. For simplicity, aliasing of the correlated noise component of the NPS was assumed to be negligible. Accuracy of this method was investigated using simulated images from a simple detector model in which the ''true'' MTF was known exactly. Measurements were also performed on three detector technologies (an x-ray image intensifier, an indirect flat panel detector, and a solid state x-ray image intensifier), and the results were compared using the standard edge-response method. Flat-field and edge images were acquired and analyzed according to guidelines set forth by the International Electrotechnical Commission, using the RQA 5 spectrum. Results: The presampled MTF determined using the noise-response method for the simulated detector system was in close agreement with the true MTF with an averaged percent difference of 0.3% and a maximum difference of 1.1% observed at the Nyquist frequency (f{sub N}). The edge-response method of the simulated detector system also showed very good agreement at lower spatial frequencies (less than 0.5 f{sub N}) with an averaged percent difference of 1.6% but showed significant discrepancies at higher spatial frequencies (greater than 0.5 f{sub N}) with an averaged percent difference of 17%. Discrepancies were in part a result of noise in the edge image and phasing errors. For all three detector systems, the MTFs obtained using the two methods were found to be in good agreement at spatial frequencies less than 0.5 f{sub N} with an averaged percent difference of 3

  10. Total urgency and frequency score as a measure of urgency and frequency in overactive bladder and storage lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Christopher R; Drake, Marcus J; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip; Cardozo, Linda; Drogendijk, Ted; Klaver, Monique; Van Charldorp, Karin; Hakimi, Zalmai; Compion, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    The term lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) encompasses a range of urinary symptoms, including storage symptoms (e.g. overactive bladder [OAB]) as well as voiding and post-micturition symptoms. Although treatment of male LUTS tends to focus on voiding symptoms, patients typically find storage symptoms the most bothersome. The core storage symptom is urgency, which drives the other main storage symptoms of increased daytime frequency, nocturia and incontinence. Although several validated questionnaires have been widely used to study urgency, few measure the two important storage parameters, urgency and frequency, in a single assessment. The total urgency and frequency score (TUFS) is a new validated tool that captures both variables and is derived from the Patient Perception of Intensity of Urgency Scale, which has been validated in patients with OAB and LUTS. The TUFS was first validated in OAB in the phase IIa BLOSSOM study, which was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of mirabegron, a β3 -adrenoceptor agonist, in 260 patients. The responsiveness of the TUFS to treatment has been confirmed in a further three large-scale randomized controlled trials of solifenacin in patients with OAB or LUTS. Changes in TUFS from baseline to end of treatment were consistent with changes in micturition diary variables in all four studies. Furthermore, the TUFS was significantly correlated with several health-related quality-of-life variables in the phase III NEPTUNE study. Thus, the TUFS appears to be useful for assessing improvements in major storage symptoms (urgency and frequency) in clinical trials.

  11. A fast continuation scheme for accurate tracing of nonlinear oscillator frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Dunne, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A new algorithm is proposed to combine the split-frequency harmonic balance method (SF-HBM) with arc-length continuation (ALC) for accurate tracing of the frequency response of oscillators with non-expansible nonlinearities. ALC is incorporated into the SF-HBM in a two-stage procedure: Stage I involves finding a reasonably accurate response frequency and solution using a relatively large number of low-frequency harmonics. This step is achieved using the SF-HBM in conjunction with ALC. Stage II uses the SF-HBM to obtain a very accurate solution at the frequency obtained in Stage I. To guarantee rapid path tracing, the frequency axis is appropriately subdivided. This gives high chance of success in finding a globally optimum set of harmonic coefficients. When approaching a turning point however, arc-lengths are adaptively reduced to obtain a very accurate solution. The combined procedure is tested on three hardening stiffness examples: a Duffing model; an oscillator with non-expansible stiffness and single harmonic forcing; and an oscillator with non-expansible stiffness and multiple-harmonic forcing. The results show that for non-expansible nonlinearities and multiple-harmonic forcing, the proposed algorithm is capable of tracing-out frequency response functions with high accuracy and efficiency.

  12. Frequency sweep rate dependence on the dielectrophoretic response of polystyrene beads and red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, T. N. G.; Leonard, K. M.; Minerick, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Alternating current (AC) dielectrophoresis (DEP) experiments for biological particles in microdevices are typically done at a fixed frequency. Reconstructing the DEP response curve from static frequency experiments is laborious, but essential to ascertain differences in dielectric properties of biological particles. Our lab explored the concept of sweeping the frequency as a function of time to rapidly determine the DEP response curve from fewer experiments. For the purpose of determining an ideal sweep rate, homogeneous 6.08 μm polystyrene (PS) beads were used as a model system. Translatability of the sweep rate approach to ∼7 μm red blood cells (RBC) was then verified. An Au/Ti quadrapole electrode microfluidic device was used to separately subject particles and cells to 10Vpp AC electric fields at frequencies ranging from 0.010 to 2.0 MHz over sweep rates from 0.00080 to 0.17 MHz/s. PS beads exhibited negative DEP assembly over the frequencies explored due to Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarizations. Results demonstrate that frequency sweep rates must be slower than particle polarization timescales to achieve reliable incremental polarizations; sweep rates near 0.00080 MHz/s yielded DEP behaviors very consistent with static frequency DEP responses for both PS beads and RBCs. PMID:24396548

  13. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, S.A.; Van Eldik, S.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phas

  14. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  15. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  16. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  17. Relation between derived-band auditory brainstem response latencies and behavioral frequency selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Derived-band click-evoked auditory brainstem responses ABRs were obtained for normal-hearing NH and sensorineurally hearing-impaired HI listeners. The latencies extracted from these responses, as a function of derived-band center frequency and click level, served as objective estimates of cochlear...... selectivity in human listeners and offer a window to better understand how hearing impairment affects the spatiotemporal cochlear response pattern....

  18. Voice fundamental frequency modulates vocal response to pitch perturbations during English speech

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hanjun; Auger, James; Charles R Larson

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated task-dependent vocal responses to pitch perturbations during speech production. The present study investigated the effect of voice fundamental frequency (F0) on the modulation of vocal responses during English speech. Randomized pitch shifts of ±100 or 200 cents during speaking were presented to English speakers. Results indicated larger vocal responses and shorter latencies at a high voice F0 than at a low voice F0, but no significance differences were obse...

  19. General-form 3-3-3 interpolation kernel and its simplified frequency-response derivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tian-Bo

    2016-11-01

    An interpolation kernel is required in a wide variety of signal processing applications such as image interpolation and timing adjustment in digital communications. This article presents a general-form interpolation kernel called 3-3-3 interpolation kernel and derives its frequency response in a closed-form by using a simple derivation method. This closed-form formula is preliminary to designing various 3-3-3 interpolation kernels subject to a set of design constraints. The 3-3-3 interpolation kernel is formed through utilising the third-degree piecewise polynomials, and it is an even-symmetric function. Thus, it will suffice to consider only its right-hand side when deriving its frequency response. Since the right-hand side of the interpolation kernel contains three piecewise polynomials of the third degree, i.e. the degrees of the three piecewise polynomials are (3,3,3), we call it the 3-3-3 interpolation kernel. Once the general-form frequency-response formula is derived, we can systematically formulate the design of various 3-3-3 interpolation kernels subject to a set of design constraints, which are targeted for different interpolation applications. Therefore, the closed-form frequency-response expression is preliminary to the optimal design of various 3-3-3 interpolation kernels. We will use an example to show the optimal design of a 3-3-3 interpolation kernel based on the closed-form frequency-response expression.

  20. Criteria for comparison of synchronization algorithms spaced measures time and frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Koval, Yuriy; Kostyrya, Alexander; Pryimak, Viacheslav; Al-Tvezhri, Basim

    2012-01-01

    The role and gives a classification of synchronization algorithms spatially separated measures time and frequency. For comparison algorithms introduced criteria that consider the example of one of the algorithms.

  1. Note: Directly measuring the direct digital synthesizer frequency chirp-rate for an atom interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Min-Kang, E-mail: zkhu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Qiao-Zhen; Cui, Jia-Feng; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun, E-mail: zkhu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zmk@hust.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luo Yu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-09-15

    During gravity measurements with Raman type atom interferometry, the frequency of the laser used to drive Raman transition is scanned by chirping the frequency of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and the local gravity is determined by precisely measuring the chip rate α of DDS. We present an effective method that can directly evaluate the frequency chirp rate stability of our DDS. By mixing a pair of synchronous linear sweeping signals, the chirp rate fluctuation is precisely measured with a frequency counter. The measurement result shows that the relative α instability can reach 5.7 × 10{sup −11} in 1 s, which is neglectable in a 10{sup −9} g level atom interferometry gravimeter.

  2. A Cs-Based Optical Frequency Measurement Using Cross-Linked Optical and Microwave Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Tamm, Chr; Lipphardt, B; Gerginov, V; Nemitz, N; Kazda, M; Weyers, S; Peik, E

    2013-01-01

    We describe a measurement of the frequency of the 2S1/2(F = 0) - 2D3/2(F' = 2) transition of 171Yb+ at the wavelength 436 nm (frequency 688 THz), using a single Yb+ ion confined in a Paul trap and two caesium fountains as references. In one of the fountains, the frequency of the microwave oscillator that interrogates the caesium atoms is stabilized by the laser that excites the Yb+ reference transition with a linewidth in the hertz range. The stability is transferred to the microwave oscillator with the use of a fiber laser based optical frequency comb generator that also provides the frequency conversion for the absolute frequency measurement. The frequency comb generator is configured as a transfer oscillator so that fluctuations of the pulse repetition rate and of the carrier offset frequency do not degrade the stability of the frequency conversion. The phase noise level of the generated ultrastable microwave signal is comparable to that of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator. For fountain operation with optic...

  3. Measurement of Localized Nonlinear Microwave Response of Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheng-Chiang; Palmer, Benjamin; Maiorov, B.

    2005-03-01

    We measure the local harmonic generation from superconducting thin films at microwave frequencies to investigate the intrinsic nonlinear Meissner effect near T/c in zero magnetic field. Both second and third harmonic generation are measured to identify time-reversal symmetry breaking (TRSB) and time-reversal symmetric (TRS) nonlinearities. The microscope can measure the local nonlinear response of a bicrystal grain boundary [Sheng-Chiang Lee and Steven M. Anlage, Physica C 408-410, 324 (2004); cond-mat/0408170]. We also performed a systematic doping-dependent study of the nonlinear response and find that the TRS characteristic nonlinearity current density scale follows the doping dependence of the de-pairing critical current density [cond-mat/0405595]. We extract a spontaneous TRSB characteristic current density scale that onsets at T/c, grows with decreasing temperature, and systematically decreases in magnitude (at fixed T/T/c) with under-doping. The origin of this current scale could be Josephson circulating currents or the spontaneous magnetization associated with a TRSB order parameter.

  4. Frequency response and design consideration of GaN SAM avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Yang, Guofeng; Zhou, Dong; Lu, Hai; Wang, Guosheng

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a method is developed for estimating the frequency response characteristics of GaN avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with separated absorption and multiplication regions (SAM). The method calculates the total diode current with varying frequency by solving transport equations analytically and uses a commercial device simulator as a supplement for determining the exact electrical field profile within the device. Due to the high carrier saturation velocity of GaN, a high-gain-bandwidth product over THz is found achievable for GaN SAM-APDs. The potential performances of GaN SAM-APDs with different structural designs are further compared through numerical studies. It is found that a close-to-reach-through design is attractive for simultaneously achieving both relatively low operation voltage and high working frequency. In addition, transit-time limit and RC-delay limit for the frequency response of GaN SAM-APDs are also discussed.

  5. Effect of ischemia and cooling on the response to high frequency stimulation in rat tail nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning; Feldbæk Nielsen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Bodil

    2000-01-01

    In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP-amp...... ischemia to the rat tail, an additional fall of the PP-amp was seen after 15-20 min of HFS at both low (20 Hz) and high (143 Hz) stimulation frequencies. In conclusion, ischemia and cooling result in an impaired ability to transmit high frequency impulses.......In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP...

  6. Core influence on the frequency response analysis (FRA of power transformers through the finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Alvarez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of core parameters in Frequency Response Analysis is analyzed through the equivalent circuit impedance matrix of the transformer winding; the parameters of the circuit have been computed using the Finite Element Method. In order to appreciate the behavior of the iron core in comparison to the air core, the frequency dependence of resonances is calculated to show how the air core only influences the results at low frequencies. The core is modeled using a complex permeability, and the parameters of conductivity and permeability are varied to show their influence in the resonances, which turned out to be negligible. In order to explain this behavior, the eigenvalues of the inverse impedance matrix are calculated showing that they are similar for different values of conductivity and permeability. Finally, the magnetic flux inside and outside the core and its influence in the frequency response is studied.

  7. Frequency-resolved noise figure measurements of phase (in)sensitive fiber optical parametric amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A; Lorences-Riesgo, A; Andrekson, P A; Karlsson, M

    2014-11-17

    We measure the frequency-resolved noise figure of fiber optical parametric amplifiers both in phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive modes in the frequency range from 0.03 to 3 GHz. We also measure the variation in noise figure due to the degradation in pump optical signal to noise ratio and also as a function of the input signal powers. Noise figure degradation due to stimulated Brillouin scattering is observed.

  8. Low-frequency Periodic Error Identification and Compensation for Star Tracker Attitude Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiongqi; XIONG Kai; ZHOU Haiyin

    2012-01-01

    The low-frequency periodic error of star tracker is one of the most critical problems for high-accuracy satellite attitude determination.In this paper an approach is proposed to identify and compensate the low-frequency periodic error for star tracker in attitude measurement.The analytical expression between the estimated gyro drift and the low-frequency periodic error of star tracker is derived firstly.And then the low-frequency periodic error,which can be expressed by Fourier series,is identified by the frequency spectrum of the estimated gyro drift according to the solution of the first step.Furthermore,the compensated model of the low-frequency periodic error is established based on the identified parameters to improve the attitude determination accuracy.Finally,promising simulated experimental results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method.The periodic error for attitude determination is eliminated basically and the estimation precision is improved greatly.

  9. Accurate Estimation of Low Fundamental Frequencies from Real-Valued Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the difficult problem of estimating low fundamental frequencies from real-valued measurements is addressed. The methods commonly employed do not take the phenomena encountered in this scenario into account and thus fail to deliver accurate estimates. The reason for this is that the......In this paper, the difficult problem of estimating low fundamental frequencies from real-valued measurements is addressed. The methods commonly employed do not take the phenomena encountered in this scenario into account and thus fail to deliver accurate estimates. The reason...... for this is that they employ asymptotic approximations that are violated when the harmonics are not well-separated in frequency, something that happens when the observed signal is real-valued and the fundamental frequency is low. To mitigate this, we analyze the problem and present some exact fundamental frequency estimators...

  10. Frequency response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex /VOR/ in the monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, U. W.; Henn, V.; Young, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has been investigated in the alert monkey during sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis in a frequency range of 0.001-0.5 Hz. Phase and gain of nystagmus slow phase velocity was determined. In the frequency range above 0.1 Hz, nystagmus slow phase velocity was in phase with (compensated for) head velocity. At lower frequencies, an increasing phase lead was present which could reach more than 90 deg. Gain fell off correspondingly at low frequencies. Calculated time constants were 10-40 s in different monkeys. Animals which had been exposed to numerous previous rotary stimuli in the laboratory showed much shorter time constants than did 'native' monkeys.

  11. Neural Network Model Of The PXIE RFQ Cooling System and Resonant Frequency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, Auralee [Fermilab; Biedron, Sandra [Colorado State U., Fort Collins; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Chase, Brian [Fermilab; Edelen, Jonathan [Fermilab; Milton, Stephen [Colorado State U., Fort Collins; Steimel, Jim [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    As part of the PIP-II Injector Experiment (PXIE) accel-erator, a four-vane radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerates a 30-keV, 1-mA to 10-mA H' ion beam to 2.1 MeV. It is designed to operate at a frequency of 162.5 MHz with arbitrary duty factor, including continuous wave (CW) mode. The resonant frequency is controlled solely by a water-cooling system. We present an initial neural network model of the RFQ frequency response to changes in the cooling system and RF power conditions during pulsed operation. A neural network model will be used in a model predictive control scheme to regulate the resonant frequency of the RFQ.

  12. Extending the frequency range of free-field reciprocity calibration of measurement microphones to frequencies up to 150 kHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Torras Rosell, Antoni; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Measurement microphones are typically calibrated in a free field at frequencies up to 50 kHz. This is a sufficiently high frequency for the most sound measurement applications related with noise assessment. However, other applications such as the measurement of noise emitted by ultrasound cleanin...

  13. High Frequency Tan Delta Measurement Method for 132kV Transmission Underground Cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Avinash

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tangent Delta is a measurement technique to investigate cables insulation strength. Current techniques utilize Very Low Frequency (VLF at 0.1 Hz and power frequency at 50 Hz. However, high voltages are required, thus requiring larger space and cost. Proposed method of tangent delta testing utilizes High frequency Low voltage diagnoses. The phase between the current and the voltage is utilized to determine the tangent delta (tan δ. The aim of this study is to develop a low voltage high frequency tangent delta measurement method and test if it can discriminate manufactured 132 kV good conditioned cable sample from defect induced cables with void, scotched and contamination in its insulation. Impurities are clearly discriminated using this method. Comparison of Tangent Delta of cables manufactured simultaneously in good condition and defect induced is performed using High Frequency Tangent Delta method and in 50 Hz conventional method to validate the effectiveness of the measurement technique. The High Frequency AC setup utilizes a small testing environment which can sample small lengths with minimum 1 m length of cable. The small lengths will result in the reduction of total capacitance of the cable but using High Frequency induces high electric stress on XLPE layer thus resulting in measureable dielectric current.

  14. Design PID controllers for desired time-domain or frequency-domain response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yugeng; Yang, Genke; Xu, Xiaoming

    2002-10-01

    Practical requirements on the design of control systems, especially process control systems, are usually specified in terms of time-domain response, such as overshoot and rise time, or frequency-domain response, such as resonance peak and stability margin. Although numerous methods have been developed for the design of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, little work has been done in relation to the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses. In this paper, we study the following problem: Given a nominal stable process with time delay, we design a suboptimal PID controller to achieve the required time-domain response or frequency-domain response for the nominal system or the uncertain system. An H(infinity) PID controller is developed based on optimal control theory and the parameters are derived analytically. Its properties are investigated and compared with that of two developed suboptimal controllers: an H2 PID controller and a Maclaurin PID controller. It is shown that all three controllers can provide the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses.

  15. The brain responses to different frequencies of binaural beat sounds on QEEG at cortical level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirakittayakorn, Nantawachara; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2015-01-01

    Beat phenomenon is occurred when two slightly different frequency waves interfere each other. The beat can also occur in the brain by providing two slightly different frequency waves separately each ear. This is called binaural beat. The brain responses to binaural beat are in discussion process whether the brain side and the brain area. Therefore, this study aims to figure out the brain responses to binaural beat by providing different binaural beat frequencies on 250 carrier tone continuously for 30 minutes to participants and using quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) to interpret the data. The result shows that different responses appear in different beat frequency. Left hemisphere dominance occur in 3 Hz beat within 15 minutes and 15 Hz beat within 5 minutes. Right hemisphere dominance occurs in 10 Hz beat within 25 minute. 6 Hz beat enhances all area of the brain within 10 minutes. 8 Hz and 25 Hz beats have no clearly responses while 40 Hz beat enhances the responses in frontal lobe. These brain responses can be used for brain modulation application to induce the brain activity in further studies.

  16. An electrodeless system for measurement of liquid sample dielectric properties in radio frequency band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, V; Giovannetti, G; Vanello, N; Costantino, M; Landini, L; Benassi, A

    2006-01-01

    An electrodeless measurement system based on a resonant circuit is proposed for the measurement of dielectric properties of liquid samples at RF (radio frequency). Generally, properties as dielectric constant, loss factor and conductivity are measured by parallel plate capacitor cells: this method has several limitations in the case of particular liquid samples and in the range of radiofrequencies. Our method is based on the measurements of resonance frequency and quality factor of a LC resonant circuit in different measuring conditions, without and with the liquid sample placed inside a test tube around which the home made coil is wrapped. The measurement is performed using a network analyzer and a dual loop probe, inductively coupled with the resonant circuit. One of the advantages of this method is the contactless between the liquid sample and the measurement electrodes. In this paper the measurement system is described and test measurements of conventional liquids dielectric properties are reported.

  17. PD-Detection vs. Loss Measurements at High Voltages with variable frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Edin, Hans

    1999-01-01

    Partial discharge-activity (PD) in internal voids in epoxy plastic was measured at AC voltages from below inception to 3 times inception with variable frequencies in the range 0.1 to 100Hz.The results from phase/height analyses were compared to dielec-tric loss measurements and related to the app......Partial discharge-activity (PD) in internal voids in epoxy plastic was measured at AC voltages from below inception to 3 times inception with variable frequencies in the range 0.1 to 100Hz.The results from phase/height analyses were compared to dielec-tric loss measurements and related...

  18. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Supersonic Turbine Bladed Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2012-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. Assessing the blade structural integrity is a complex task requiring an initial characterization of whether resonance is possible and then performing a forced response analysis if that condition is met. The standard technique for forced response analysis in rocket engine turbines is to decompose a computational fluid dynamics (CFD).generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies using cyclically symmetric structural dynamic models. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non ]harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. This complex content can only be captured by a CFD flow field encompassing at least an entire revolution. A substantial development effort to create a series of software programs to enable application of the 360 degree forcing function in a frequency response analysis on cyclic symmetric models has been completed (to be described in a future paper), but the question still remains whether the frequency response analysis itself is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, of bladed-disks undergoing this complex flow environment have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements and the disk modeled with plates (using the finite element code MSC/NASTRAN). The focus of this model is to be representative of response of realistic bladed disks, and so the dimensions are roughly equivalent to the new J2X rocket engine 1st stage fuel pump turbine. The simplicity of the model allows

  19. Effect of dipole-quadrupole Robinson mode coupling upon the beam response to radio-frequency phase noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Bosch

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In an electron storage ring, coupling between dipole and quadrupole Robinson oscillations modifies the spectrum of longitudinal beam oscillations driven by radio-frequency (rf generator phase noise. In addition to the main peak at the resonant frequency of the coupled dipole Robinson mode, another peak occurs at the resonant frequency of the coupled quadrupole mode. To describe these peaks analytically for a quadratic synchrotron potential, we include the dipole and quadrupole modes when calculating the beam response to generator noise. We thereby obtain the transfer function from generator-noise phase modulation to beam phase modulation with and without phase feedback. For Robinson-stable bunches confined in a synchrotron potential with a single minimum, the calculated transfer function agrees with measurements at the Aladdin 800-MeV electron storage ring. The transfer function is useful in evaluating phase feedback that suppresses Robinson oscillations in order to obtain quiet operation of an infrared beam line.

  20. Absolute frequency measurements and hyperfine structures of the molecular iodine transitions at 578 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Inaba, Hajime; Okubo, Sho; Tanabe, Takehiko; Yasuda, Masami; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2016-01-01

    We report absolute frequency measurements of 81 hyperfine components of the rovibrational transitions of molecular iodine at 578 nm using the second harmonic generation of an 1156-nm external-cavity diode laser and a fiber-based optical frequency comb. The relative uncertainties of the measured absolute frequencies are typically $1.4\\times10^{-11}$. Accurate hyperfine constants of four rovibrational transitions are obtained by fitting the measured hyperfine splittings to a four-term effective Hamiltonian including the electric quadrupole, spin-rotation, tensor spin-spin, and scalar spin-spin interactions. The observed transitions can be good frequency references at 578 nm, and are especially useful for research using atomic ytterbium since the transitions are close to the $^{1}S_{0}-^{3}P_{0}$ clock transition of ytterbium.

  1. A new method using orthogonal two-frequency grating in online 3D measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kuang; Cao, Yiping; Wu, Yingchun; Lu, Mingteng

    2016-09-01

    In online 3D measurement, a new method using orthogonal two-frequency grating based on Phase Measuring Profilometry(PMP) is proposed. The modulation of the entire measured object is used to match pixels and this proposed method successfully resolves the contradiction of the demand for different frequency fringes between the extraction of the modulation information and the phase unwrapping. The high-frequency fringe is used to catch the better modulation patterns for pixel matching, and the low-frequency fringe is used to calculate the phase distribution and avoid phase unwrapping error. In addition, to extract the better modulation patterns for pixel matching, the flat filtering window replaces the circular filtering window to avoid the spectrum aliasing phenomenon. The simulations and experiments show its feasibility.

  2. Effects of Noise and Absorption on High Frequency Measurements of Acoustic-Backscatter from Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Furusawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative echosounders operating at multiple frequencies (e.g., 18, 38, 70, 120, 200, 333, and 710 kHz are often used to observe fish and zooplankton and identify their species. At frequencies above 100 kHz, the absorption attenuation increases rapidly and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Also, incomplete compensation for the attenuation may result in measurement error. This paper addresses the effects of the attenuation and noise on high frequency measurements of acoustic backscatter from fish. It is shown that measurements of a fish with target strength of −40 dB at 200 m depth are limited by SNR to frequencies up to about 100 kHz. Above 100 kHz, absorption coefficients must be matched to local environmental conditions.

  3. Effects of noise on the frequency response of the monostable Duffing oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Edmon

    2017-03-01

    The influence of noise on the frequency response of the monostable, hardening Duffing oscillator is studied. These changes are studied via the averaged dynamics (using Euler-Maruyama simulations) as well as experiments. It is found that for intermediate noise amplitudes, the qualitative shape of the frequency response curve is changed. For large noise amplitudes, the upper and lower branches of the hysteresis curve collapse into one curve. These results could be of practical significance, if an oscillator is desired to be placed on the upper or lower branch of the hysteresis curve.

  4. Boundary implications for frequency response of interval FIR and IIR filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, N. K.; Kim, K. D.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that vertex implication results in parameter space apply to interval trigonometric polynomials. Subsequently, it is shown that the frequency responses of both interval FIR and IIR filters are bounded by the frequency responses of certain extreme filters. The results apply directly in the evaluation of properties of designed filters, especially because it is more realistic to bound the filter coefficients from above and below instead of determining those with infinite precision because of finite arithmetic effects. Illustrative examples are provided to show how the extreme filters might be easily derived in any specific interval FIR or IIR filter design problem.

  5. A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Hongwei; YAO; Lei; ZHAO; Hong; ZHANG; Jichuan; XUE; Zhaohong

    2006-01-01

    A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials is presented.The dynamic mechanical parameters of materials are first measured by using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Apparatus(DMTA) at low frequencies,usually less than 100 Hz; then based on the Principles of Time-Temperature Super position (TTS),these parameters are extended to the frequency range that acousticians are concerned about,usually from hundreds to thousands of hertz; finally the extended dynamic mechanical parameters are transformed into acoustic parameters with the help of acoustic measurement and inverse analysis.To test the feasibility and accuracy,we measure a kind of rubber sample in DMTA and acquire the basic acoustic parameters of the sample by using this method.While applying the basic parameters to calculating characteristics of the sample in acoustic pipe,a reasonable agreement of sound absorption coefficients is obtained between the calculations and measurements in the acoustic pipe.

  6. Low-frequency measurements of the CMB (cosmic microwave background) spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, G.; Levin, S.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Sironi, G. (Milan Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica); Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy))

    1989-10-01

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in California. On average, these measurements suggest a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amnudsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements from a polar observing site. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  7. An in situ measurement of the radio-frequency attenuation in ice at Summit Station, Greenland

    CERN Document Server

    Avva, J; Miki, C; Saltzberg, D; Vieregg, A G

    2014-01-01

    We report an in situ measurement of the electric field attenuation length at radio frequencies for the bulk ice at Summit Station, Greenland, made by broadcasting radio-frequency signals vertically through the ice and measuring the relative power in the return ground bounce signal. We find the depth-averaged field attenuation length to be 947 +92/-85 meters at 75 MHz. While this measurement has clear radioglaciological applications, the radio clarity of the ice also has implications for the detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) astrophysical particles via their radio emission in dielectric media such as ice. The measured attenuation length at Summit Station is comparable to previously measured radio-frequency attenuation lengths at candidate particle detector sites around the world, and strengthens the case for Summit Station as the most promising northern site for UHE neutrino detection.

  8. High frequency electro-optic measurement of strained silicon racetrack resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Borghi, M; Merget, F; Witzens, J; Bernard, M; Ghulinyan, M; Pucker, G; Pavesi, L

    2015-01-01

    The observation of the electro-optic effect in strained silicon waveguides has been considered as a direct manifestation of an induced $\\chi^{(2)}$ non-linearity in the material. In this work, we perform high frequency measurements on strained silicon racetrack resonators. Strain is controlled by a mechanical deformation of the waveguide. It is shown that any optical modulation vanishes independently of the applied strain when the applied voltage varies much faster than the carrier effective lifetime, and that the DC modulation is also largely independent of the applied strain. This demonstrates that plasma carrier dispersion is responsible for the observed electro-optic effect. After normalizing out free carrier effects, our results set an upper limit of $8\\,pm/V$ to the induced high-speed $\\chi^{(2)}_{eff,zzz}$ tensor element at an applied stress of $-0.5\\,GPa$. This upper limit is about one order of magnitude lower than the previously reported values for static electro-optic measurements.

  9. High-frequency electro-optic measurement of strained silicon racetrack resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M; Mancinelli, M; Merget, F; Witzens, J; Bernard, M; Ghulinyan, M; Pucker, G; Pavesi, L

    2015-11-15

    The observation of the electro-optic effect in strained silicon waveguides has been considered a direct manifestation of an induced χ(2) nonlinearity in the material. In this work, we perform high-frequency measurements on strained silicon racetrack resonators. Strain is controlled by a mechanical deformation of the waveguide. It is shown that any optical modulation vanishes, independent of the applied strain, when the applied voltage varies much faster than the carrier effective lifetime and that the DC modulation is also largely independent of the applied strain. This demonstrates that plasma carrier dispersion is responsible for the observed electro-optic effect. After normalizing out free-carrier effects, our results set an upper limit of (8±3) pm/V to the induced high-speed effective χeff,zzz(2) tensor element at an applied stress of -0.5 GPa. This upper limit is about 1 order of magnitude lower than previously reported values for static electro-optic measurements.

  10. Nonlinear amygdala response to face trustworthiness: contributions of high and low spatial frequency information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Christopher P; Baron, Sean G; Todorov, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    Previous neuroimaging research has shown amygdala sensitivity to the perceived trustworthiness of neutral faces, with greater responses to untrustworthy compared with trustworthy faces. This observation is consistent with the common view that the amygdala encodes fear and is preferentially responsive to negative stimuli. However, some studies have shown greater amygdala activation to positive compared with neutral stimuli. The first goal of this study was to more fully characterize the amygdala response to face trustworthiness by modeling its activation with both linear and nonlinear predictors. Using fMRI, we report a nonmonotonic response profile, such that the amygdala responds strongest to highly trustworthy and highly untrustworthy faces. This finding complicates future attempts to make inferences about mental states based on activation in the amygdala. The second goal of the study was to test for modulatory effects of image spatial frequency filtering on the amygdala response. We predicted greater amygdala sensitivity to face trustworthiness for low spatial frequency images compared with high spatial frequency images. Instead, we found that both frequency ranges provided sufficient information for the amygdala to differentiate faces on trustworthiness. This finding is consistent with behavioral results and suggests that trustworthiness information may reach the amygdala through pathways carrying both coarse and fine resolution visual signals.

  11. Frequency spectra from current vs. magnetic flux density measurements for mobile phones and other electrical appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Wilén, Jonna

    2007-10-01

    The frequency spectra of electromagnetic fields have to be determined to evaluate human exposure in accordance to ICNIRP guidelines. In the literature, comparisons with magnetic field guidelines have been performed by using the frequency distribution of the current drawn from the battery. In the present study we compared the frequency spectrum in the range 217 Hz to 2.4 kHz of the magnetic flux density measured near the surface of a mobile phone with the frequency spectrum of the supply current. By using the multiple frequency rule, recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, we estimated the magnetic field exposure in the two cases. Similar measurements and estimations were done for an electric drill, a hair dryer, and a fluorescent desk lamp. All the devices have a basic frequency of 50 Hz, and the frequency spectra were evaluated up to 550 Hz. We also mapped the magnetic field in 3D around three mobile phones. The frequency distributions obtained from the two measurement methods are not equal. The frequency content of the current leads to an overestimation of the magnetic field exposure by a factor up to 2.2 for the mobile phone. For the drill, the hair dryer, and the fluorescent lamp, the supply current signal underestimated the exposure by a factor up to 2.3. In conclusion, an accurate exposure evaluation requires the magnetic flux density spectrum of the device to be measured directly. There was no indication that the devices studied would exceed the reference levels at the working distances normally used.

  12. In vivo measurement of the rabbit brain impedance frequency response and the elementary imaging of electrical impedance tomography%在体兔脑组织电阻抗频率特性测量及电阻抗断层成像

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小明; 董秀珍; 秦明新; 王跃民

    2005-01-01

    perform the in vivo measurement of the rabbit brain impedance frequency response before and after ischemia. And it was to verify the feasibility of EIT in brain functional imaging by ischemia brain functional imaging using EIT.DESIGN: It was a single-sample experiment.SETTING: It was conducted at the Department of Medical Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: This study was conducted at the Department of Medical Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA from August to September 2001 and 10 healthy rabbits were selected.METHODS: Cerebral ischemia animal model was made using carotid artery ligation. Then the in vivo measurement of the rabbit brain impedance frequency response before and after ischemia was performed.Dynamic unilateral brain blood supply was recorded using EIT imaging.curves were plot before and after ischemia in the frequency range from 0.1 Hz EIT imagingRESULTS: Nine rabbits entered the statistical analysis and one was omitimpedance increased significantly. The ratio of increasing impedance can be up to 75% at frequencies lower than 10 Hz. And in the range from 1 kHz namic imaging showed that the changes in unilateral brain blood supply is accordant with the corresponding regions having a changing impedance.CONCLUSION: The changes in brain tissue impedance before and after ischemia can be imaged and it could be used as a variable for EIT imaging.

  13. Spatial Frequency Dependence of the Human Visual Cortex Response on Temporal Frequency Modulation Studied by fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mirzajani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The brain response to temporal frequencies (TF has been already reported. However, there is no study on different TF with respect to various spatial frequencies (SF. Materials and Methods: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was done by a 1.5 T General Electric system for 14 volunteers (9 males and 5 females, aged 19–26 years during square-wave reversal checkerboard visual stimulation with different temporal frequencies of 4, 6, 8 and 10 Hz in 2 states of low SF of 0.4 and high SF of 8 cycles/degree (cpd. All subjects had normal visual acuity of 20/20 based on Snellen’s fraction in each eye with good binocular vision and normal visual field based on confrontation test. The mean luminance of the entire checkerboard was 161.4 cd/m2 and the black and white check contrast was 96%. The activation map was created using the data obtained from the block designed fMRI study. Pixels with a Z score above a threshold of 2.3, at a statistical significance level of 0.05, were considered activated. The average percentage blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal change for all activated pixels within the occipital lobe, multiplied by the total number of activated pixels within the occipital lobe, was used as an index for the magnitude of the fMRI signal at each state of TF&SF. Results: The magnitude of the fMRI signal in response to different TF’s was maximum at 6 Hz for a high SF value of 8 cpd; it was however, maximum at a TF of 8 Hz for a low SF of 0.4 cpd. Conclusion: The results of this study agree with those of animal invasive neurophysiologic studies showing SF and TF selectivity of neurons in visual cortex. These results can be useful for vision therapy and selecting visual tasks in fMRI studies.

  14. Analysis of frequency response of high power MUTC photodiodes based on photocurrent-dependent equivalent circuit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Xiong, Bing; Sun, Changzheng; Miao, Di; Luo, Yi

    2015-08-24

    A back-illuminated mesa-structure InGaAs/InP modified uni-traveling-carrier photodiode (MUTC-PD) is fabricated and its frequency response is investigated. A bandwidth of 40 GHz and a saturation photocurrent up to 33 mA are demonstrated. A photocurrent-dependent equivalent circuit model is proposed to analyze the frequency response of the high power MUTC-PDs. The influences of the space-charge screening, self-induced electric field and over-shoot effects are discussed in detail based on the model. Fitted curves obtained from the simple equivalent circuit model are found to be in good agreement with the data measured under different bias voltages and photocurrents.

  15. Mechanomyographic amplitude and mean power frequency responses during isometric ramp vs. step muscle actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Eric D; Beck, Travis W; Herda, Trent J; Hartman, Michael J; Stout, Jeffrey R; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel T

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the mechanomyographic amplitude (MMG(RMS)) and mean power frequency (MMG(MPF)) vs. torque relationships during isometric ramp and step muscle actions for the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles. Nineteen subjects (mean+/-S.D. age=24+/-4 years) performed 2 isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) before and after 2 or 3 isometric ramp muscle actions from (5-95% MVC) to 9 submaximal step muscle actions (15, 25, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75, 85, and 95% MVC). MMG signals were recorded from the VL and RF muscles, and MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF) values were computed for each corresponding percentage of the MVC. Absolute and normalized MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF) vs. torque relationships were analyzed and interpreted on a subject-by-subject and composite pattern basis using polynomial regression and repeated measures ANOVAs. For MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF), only 16-53% and 11-26% of the individual responses were consistent with the composite polynomial models, respectively. In addition, the normalized composite MMG(RMS) values were greater for the RF than the VL from 35 to 85% MVC. Only 47% of the MMG(RMS) and 5% of the MMG(MPF) individual patterns of responses were the same for the ramp and step muscle actions, and differences were also observed for the composite MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF) patterns between the ramp and step muscle actions. Overall, these findings indicated that the torque-related patterns of responses for MMG(RMS) and MMG(MPF) were different among subjects (i.e., inter-individual variability) and were muscle- (VL vs. RF) and mode-specific (ramp vs. step).

  16. Reference-free, high-resolution measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dohyeon; Jeon, Chan-Gi; Shin, Junho; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Park, Sang Eon; Song, Youjian; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Timing jitter is one of the most important properties of femtosecond mode-locked lasers and optical frequency combs. Accurate measurement of timing jitter power spectral density (PSD) is a critical prerequisite for optimizing overall noise performance and further advancing comb applications both in the time and frequency domains. Commonly used jitter measurement methods require a reference mode-locked laser with timing jitter similar to or lower than that of the laser-under-test, which is a demanding requirement for many laser laboratories, and/or have limited measurement resolution. Here we show a high-resolution and reference-source-free measurement method of timing jitter spectra of optical frequency combs using an optical fibre delay line and optical carrier interference. The demonstrated method works well for both mode-locked oscillators and supercontinua, with 2 × 10−9 fs2/Hz (equivalent to −174 dBc/Hz at 10-GHz carrier frequency) measurement noise floor. The demonstrated method can serve as a simple and powerful characterization tool for timing jitter PSDs of various comb sources including mode-locked oscillators, supercontinua and recently emerging Kerr-frequency combs; the jitter measurement results enabled by our method will provide new insights for understanding and optimizing timing noise in such comb sources. PMID:28102352

  17. Sound-tube measurements of the relaxation frequency of moist nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D.; Shields, F. D.; Bass, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    At audible frequencies, the vibrational relaxation of nitrogen contributes significantly to the absorption of sound in still air. The accurate measurement of the humidity dependence of the relaxation frequency of nitrogen, as yet, has eluded careful measurement due to the difficulty in measuring small absorption at low frequencies. Recently, equipment has been constructed for measuring sound absorption in air as a function of humidity over the frequency range from 4 to 100 kHz. In the experiment described here, the temperature and humidity range of this equipment has been extended so that it can be used to study the relaxation absorption in nitrogen at temperatures from 311 K to 418 K. The results indicate that, over this temperature range, the frequency of maximum absorption in moist nitrogen, f, can be given by f/P = 260 x h, Hz/atm, where h is the percent mole fraction of water, and P is the pressure in atm. To the accuracy of the measurements reported here, f is independent of temperature over the range of temperatures at which the measurements were made.

  18. The influence of wrist posture on the time and frequency EMG signal measures of forearm muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Liu, Danuta; Bartuzi, Paweł

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates how altering wrist posture influences the relationship between the time and frequency measures of the electromyography (EMG) signal of extensor digitorum communis (EDC) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU). Thirteen participants exerted handgrip force related to maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in four tests: 20%MVC and 50%MVC in neutral wrist posture and 20%MVC in full wrist flexion and extension. EMG measurements from EDC and FCU were used to calculate normalized values of amplitude (nRMS) and mean and median frequency of the power spectrum (nMPF, nMF). During muscle shortening (wrist flexion for FCU and wrist extension for EDC) nRMS was approximately twofold higher than in neutral posture for FCU and fourfold for EDC. All measures obtained at 20%MVC in neutral posture were significantly different from 20%MVC in wrist flexion for FCU and 20%MVC in wrist extension for EDC (pMVC and 20%MVC at neutral posture (nRMS) were significant for both muscles, although in nMPF and nMF for EDC only. Muscle shortening changed the pattern of statistical significance when the time and frequency domain measures were compared, whereas muscle lengthening did not. It can be concluded that muscle shortening caused by altering wrist posture influences the relationship between the time and frequency measures in both muscles. This suggests that in studies using EMG in different wrist postures, changes in the relationship between the time and the frequency measures should be considered.

  19. Two Novel Measurements for the Drive-Mode Resonant Frequency of a Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancheng Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG, one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method.

  20. Two novel measurements for the drive-mode resonant frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ancheng; Hu, Xiaoping; Luo, Bing; Jiang, Mingming; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG), one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method.

  1. Building the analytical response in frequency domain of AC biased bolometers. Application to Planck/HFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvé, Alexandre; Montier, Ludovic

    2016-12-01

    Context: Bolometers are high sensitivity detector commonly used in Infrared astronomy. The HFI instrument of the Planck satellite makes extensive use of them, but after the satellite launch two electronic related problems revealed critical. First an unexpected excess response of detectors at low optical excitation frequency for ν linearized versions of the bolometer electro thermal equilibrium. A custom description of signals in frequency is used to solve the problem with linear algebra. The model performances is validated using time domain simulations. Results: The provided expression is suitable for calibration and data processing. It can also be used to provide constraints for fitting optical transfer function using real data from steady state electronic response and optical response. The accurate description of electronic response can also be used to improve the ADC nonlinearity correction for quickly varying optical signals.

  2. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose-response calibration curve, background frequency in the population and dose estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastkhah, E; Zakeri, F; Ghoranneviss, M; Rajabpour, M R; Farshidpour, M R; Mianji, F; Bayat, M

    2016-03-01

    An in vitro study of the dose responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted with the aim of creating calibrated dose-response curves for biodosimetry measuring up to 4 Gy (0.25-4 Gy) of gamma radiation. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay was employed to obtain the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell in blood samples from 16 healthy donors (eight males and eight females) in two age ranges of 20-34 and 35-50 years. The data were used to construct the calibration curves for men and women in two age groups, separately. An increase in micronuclei yield with the dose in a linear-quadratic way was observed in all groups. To verify the applicability of the constructed calibration curve, MN yields were measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes of two real overexposed subjects and three irradiated samples with unknown dose, and the results were compared with dose values obtained from measuring dicentric chromosomes. The comparison of the results obtained by the two techniques indicated a good agreement between dose estimates. The average baseline frequency of MN for the 130 healthy non-exposed donors (77 men and 55 women, 20-60 years old divided into four age groups) ranged from 6 to 21 micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells. Baseline MN frequencies were higher for women and for the older age group. The results presented in this study point out that the CBMN assay is a reliable, easier and valuable alternative method for biological dosimetry.

  3. A piezoresistive micro-accelerometer with high frequency response and low transverse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhao, Yulong; Tian, Bian; Liu, Yan; Wang, Zixi; Li, Cun; Zhao, You

    2017-01-01

    With the purpose of measuring vibration signals in high-speed machinery, this paper developed a piezoresistive micro-accelerometer with multi-beam structure by combining four tiny sensing beams with four suspension beams. The eight-beam (EB) structure was designed to improve the trade-off between the sensitivity and the natural frequency of piezoresistive accelerometer. Besides, the piezoresistor configuration in the sensing beams reduces the cross interference from the undesirable direction significantly. The natural frequency of the structure and the stress on the sensing beams are theoretically calculated, and then verified through finite element method (FEM). The proposed sensor is fabricated on the n-type single crystal silicon wafer and packaged for experiment. The results demonstrate that the developed device possesses a suitable characteristic in sensitivity, natural frequency and transverse effect, which allows its usage in the measuring high frequency vibration signals.

  4. A digital instantaneous frequency measurement technique utilising high speed analogue to digital converters and field programmable gate arrays

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, PLR

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In modern information and sensor systems, the timely estimation of the carrier frequency of received signals is of critical importance. This paper presents a digital instantaneous frequency measurement (DIFM) technique, which can measure the carrier...

  5. Measurement of output power density from mobile phone as a function of input sound frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of power density emitted by a mobile phone were carried out as a function of the sound frequency transmitted by a sound generator, ranging from 250 to 14000 Hz. Output power density was monitored by means of the selective radiation meter Narda SRM 3000 in spectrum analysis mode, and the octave frequency analysis of each tone used for the experimental design was acquired by the sound level meter Larson Davis LxT Wind. Vodafone providers were used for mobile phone calls with respect to various local base station in Southern-Italy. A relationship between the mobile phone microwaves power density and the sound frequencies transmitted by the sound generator was observed. In particular, microwaves power density level decreases significantly at sound frequency values larger than 4500 Hz. This result can be explained assuming that discontinuous transmission mode of global system for mobile communications is powered not only in silence-mode, but also at frequencies larger than 4500 Hz.

  6. Thickness Measurement of a Film on a Substrate by Low-Frequency Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-Xuan; WANG Xiao-Min; MAO Jie

    2004-01-01

    @@ We describe a new simple technique for the low-frequency ultrasonic thickness measurement of an air-backed soft thin layer attached on a hard substrate of finite thickness through the frequency-shifts of the substrate resonances by the substrate-side insonification. A plane compressive wave impinging normally on the substrate surface from a liquid is studied. Low frequency here means an interrogating acoustical wave frequency of less than half of coating to the substrate. Equations for the frequency-shifts are derived and solved by the Newton iterative method and the Taylor expansion method, respectively, indicating satisfactory agreement within the range of interest of thickness ratio of the thin layer to the substrate for a polymer-aluminium structure. An experimental setup is constructed to verify the validity of the technique.

  7. Associations between nine family dinner frequency measures and child weight, dietary and psychosocial outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Friend, Sarah E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Background Family meal frequency has been consistently and significantly associated with positive youth dietary and psychosocial outcomes but less consistently associated with weight outcomes. Family meal frequency measurement has varied widely and it is unclear how this variation may impact relationships with youth weight, dietary, and psychosocial outcomes. Objective This study assesses how five parent/caregiver-reported and four child-reported family dinner frequency measures correlate with each other and are associated with health-related outcomes. Design/Participants This secondary, cross-sectional analysis uses baseline, parent/caregiver (n=160) and 8–12 year old child (n=160) data from the Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus trial (collected 2011–2012). Data were obtained from objective measurements, dietary recall interviews, and psychosocial surveys. Outcome measures Outcomes included child body mass index z-scores (BMIz), fruit, vegetable and sugar-sweetened beverage intake, dietary quality (Healthy Eating Index-2010 [HEI-2010]), family connectedness, and meal conversations. Statistical analyses performed Pearson correlations and general linear models were used to assess associations between family dinner frequency measures and outcomes. Results All family dinner frequency measures had comparable means and were correlated within and across parent/caregiver- and child-reporters (r=0.17–0.94, pfamily dinner frequency measures were significantly associated with BMIz scores and 100% were significantly associated with fruit/vegetable intake and HEI-2010. In adjusted models, most significant associations with dietary and psychosocial outcomes remained but associations with child BMIz remained significant only for parent/caregiver- (β±SE= −0.07±0.03; pfamily dinner frequency measures asking about ‘sitting and eating’ dinner. Conclusions In spite of phrasing variations in family dinner frequency measures (e.g., which

  8. New method for lens thickness measurement by the frequency-shifted confocal feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yidong; Zhu, Kaiyi; Zhang, Shulian

    2016-12-01

    We describe a new method for lens thickness and air gap measurement based on the frequency-shifted confocal feedback. The light intensity fluctuation is eliminated by the heterodyne modulation and the detection sensitivity is improved prominently by the frequency-shifted feedback effect. The measurement results for different materials and kinds of lenses are presented in the paper, including K9 plain glasses, fused silica plain glass, and K9 biconvex lens. The uncertainty of the axial positioning is better than 0.0005 mm and the accuracy reaches micron range. It is promising to be applied in the multi-layer interface positioning and measurement area.

  9. Time-frequency analysis of railway bridge response in forced vibration

    OpenAIRE

    Cantero, Daniel; Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-01-01

    This paper suggests the use of the Continuous Wavelet Transform in combination with the Modified Littlewood-Paley basis to analyse bridge responses exited by traversing trains. The analysis provides an energy distribution map in the time-frequency domain that offers a better resolution compared to previous published studies. This is demonstrated with recorded responses of the Skidträsk Bridge, a 36 m long composite bridge located in Sweden. It is shown to be particularly useful to understand ...

  10. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop instrument for measurement of ultrasonic velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Kushnick, Peter W.

    1991-10-01

    A new instrument based on a constant-frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop (CFPPLL) concept has been developed to accurately measure the ultrasonic wave velocity in liquids and changes in ultrasonic wave velocity in solids and liquids. An analysis of the system shows that it is immune to many of the frequency-dependent effects that plague other techniques. Measurements of the sound velocity in ultrapure water are used to confirm the analysis. The results are in excellent agreement with values from the literature, and establish that the CFPPLL provides a reliable, accurate way to measure velocities, as well as for monitoring small changes in velocity without the sensitivity to frequency-dependent phase shifts common to other measurement systems. The estimated sensitivity to phase changes is better than a few parts in 10 to the 7th.

  11. Effectiveness of a prolonged incarceration and rehabilitation measure for high-frequency offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tollenaar, N.; van der Laan, A. M.; van der Heijden, P. G M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incapacitation effect and the impact on post-release recidivism of a measure combining prolonged incarceration and rehabilitation, the ISD measure for high frequency offenders (HFOs) was compared to the standard practice of short-term imprisonment. Methods: We applied a q

  12. High-accuracy long-distance measurements in air with a frequency comb laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, M.; Zeitouny, M.G.; Bhattacharya, N.; Van den Berg, S.A.; Urbach, H.P.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a femtosecond frequency comb laser can be applied as a tool for longdistance measurement in air. Our method is based on the measurement of cross correlation between individual pulses in a Michelson interferometer. From the position of the correlation functions, dis

  13. An evaluation of objective measures for intelligibility prediction of time-frequency weighted noisy speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, C.H.; Henriks, R.C.; Heusdens, R.; Jensen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Existing objective speech-intelligibility measures are suitable for several types of degradation, however, it turns out that they are less appropriate in cases where noisy speech is processed by a time-frequency weighting. To this end, an extensive evaluation is presented of objective measure for in

  14. High-accuracy long-distance measurements in air with a frequency comb laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, M.; Zeitouny, M.G.; Bhattacharya, N.; Van den Berg, S.A.; Urbach, H.P.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a femtosecond frequency comb laser can be applied as a tool for longdistance measurement in air. Our method is based on the measurement of cross correlation between individual pulses in a Michelson interferometer. From the position of the correlation functions, dis

  15. Reproductive phase locking of mosquito populations in response to rainfall frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Shaman

    Full Text Available The frequency of moderate to heavy rainfall events is projected to change in response to global warming. Here we show that these hydrologic changes may have a profound effect on mosquito population dynamics and rates of mosquito-borne disease transmission. We develop a simple model, which treats the mosquito reproductive cycle as a phase oscillator that responds to rainfall frequency forcing. This model reproduces observed mosquito population dynamics and indicates that mosquito-borne disease transmission can be sensitive to rainfall frequency. These findings indicate that changes to the hydrologic cycle, in particular the frequency of moderate to heavy rainfall events, could have a profound effect on the transmission rates of some mosquito-borne diseases.

  16. Associations among Nine Family Dinner Frequency Measures and Child Weight, Dietary, and Psychosocial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, Melissa L; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Friend, Sarah E; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2016-06-01

    Family meal frequency has been consistently and significantly associated with positive youth dietary and psychosocial outcomes, but less consistently associated with weight outcomes. Family meal frequency measurement has varied widely and it is unclear how this variation might impact relationships with youth weight, dietary, and psychosocial outcomes. This study assesses how five parent/caregiver-reported and four child-reported family dinner frequency measures correlate with each other and are associated with health-related outcomes. This secondary, cross-sectional analysis uses baseline, parent/caregiver (n=160) and 8- to 12-year-old child (n=160) data from the Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus trial (collected 2011 to 2012). Data were obtained from objective measurements, dietary recall interviews, and psychosocial surveys. Outcomes included child body mass index z scores (BMIz); fruit, vegetable, and sugar-sweetened beverage intake; dietary quality (Healthy Eating Index-2010); family connectedness; and meal conversations. Pearson correlations and general linear models were used to assess associations between family dinner frequency measures and outcomes. All family dinner frequency measures had comparable means and were correlated within and across parent/caregiver and child reporters (r=0.17 to 0.94; Pfamily dinner frequency measures were significantly associated with BMIz and 100% were significantly associated with fruit and vegetable intake and Healthy Eating Index-2010. In adjusted models, most significant associations with dietary and psychosocial outcomes remained, but associations with child BMIz remained significant only for parent/caregiver- (β±standard error=-.07±.03; Pfamily dinner frequency measures asking about "sitting and eating" dinner. Despite phrasing variations in family dinner frequency measures (eg, which family members were present and how meals were occurring), few differences were found in associations

  17. Frequency response of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Dakin, C.J.; Vardy, A.N.; Happee, R.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; Blouin, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular pathways form short-latency disynaptic connections with neck motoneurons, whereas they form longer-latency disynaptic and polysynaptic connections with lower limb motoneurons. We quantified frequency responses of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles to explain

  18. A fast, reliable algorithm for computing frequency responses of state space models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wette, Matt

    1991-01-01

    Computation of frequency responses for large order systems described by time invariant state space systems often provides a bottleneck in control system analysis. It is shown that banding the A-matrix in the state space model can effectively reduce the computation time for such systems while maintaining reliability in the results produced.

  19. Role of Wind Power in Primary Frequency Response of an Interconnection: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y. C.; Gevorgian, V.; Ela, E.; Singhvi, V.; Pourbeik, P.

    2013-09-01

    The electrical frequency of an interconnection must be maintained very close to its nominal level at all times. Large frequency deviations can lead to unintended consequences such as load shedding, instability, and machine damage, among others. Turbine governors of conventional generating units provide primary frequency response (PFR) to ensure that frequency deviations are not significant duringlarge transient events. Increasing penetrations of variable renewable generation, such as wind and solar power, and planned retirements of conventional thermal plants - and thus a reduction in the amount of suppliers with PFR capabilities - causes concerns about a decline of PFR and system inertia in North America. The capability of inverter-coupled wind generation technologies to contribute toPFR and inertia, if appropriately equipped with the necessary control features, can help alleviate concerns. However, these responses differ from those supplied by conventional generation and inertia, and it is not entirely understood how variable renewable generation will affect the system response at different penetration levels. This paper evaluates the impact of wind generation providing PFRand synthetic inertial response on a large interconnection.

  20. Mid Frequency Shock Response Determination by Using Energy Flow Method and Time Domain Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hyun Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock induced vibration can be more crucial in the mid frequency range where the dynamic couplings with structural parts and components play important roles. To estimate the behavior of structures in this frequency range where conventional analytical schemes, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA and finite element analysis (FEA methods may become inaccurate, many alternative methodologies have been tried up to date. This study presents an effective and practical method to accurately predict transient responses in the mid frequency range without having to resort to the large computational efforts. Specifically, the present study employs the more realistic frequency response functions (FRFs from the energy flow method (EFM which is a hybrid method combining the pseudo SEA equation (or SEA-Like equation and modal information obtained by the finite element analysis (FEA. Furthermore, to obtain the time responses synthesized with modal characteristics, a time domain correction is practiced with the input force signal and the reference FRF on a position of the response subsystem. A numerical simulation is performed for a simple five plate model to show its suitability and effectiveness over the standard analytical schemes.

  1. Effects of Frequency and Acceleration Amplitude on Osteoblast Mechanical Vibration Responses: A Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone cells are deformed according to mechanical stimulation they receive and their mechanical characteristics. However, how osteoblasts are affected by mechanical vibration frequency and acceleration amplitude remains unclear. By developing 3D osteoblast finite element (FE models, this study investigated the effect of cell shapes on vibration characteristics and effect of acceleration (vibration intensity on vibrational responses of cultured osteoblasts. Firstly, the developed FE models predicted natural frequencies of osteoblasts within 6.85–48.69 Hz. Then, three different levels of acceleration of base excitation were selected (0.5, 1, and 2 g to simulate vibrational responses, and acceleration of base excitation was found to have no influence on natural frequencies of osteoblasts. However, vibration response values of displacement, stress, and strain increased with the increase of acceleration. Finally, stress and stress distributions of osteoblast models under 0.5 g acceleration in Z-direction were investigated further. It was revealed that resonance frequencies can be a monotonic function of cell height or bottom area when cell volumes and material properties were assumed as constants. These findings will be useful in understanding how forces are transferred and influence osteoblast mechanical responses during vibrations and in providing guidance for cell culture and external vibration loading in experimental and clinical osteogenesis studies.

  2. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, the dynamic response of a rotor supported by an active lubricated tilting-pad bearing is investigated in the frequency domain. The theoretical part of the investigation is based on a mathematical model obtained by means of rigid body dynamics. The oil film forces are inserte...

  3. A low density, high stiffness flat loudspeaker with improved sound frequency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel flat loudspeaker with improved sound frequency response. Flat loudspeakers provide advantages of compact dimensions and high durability. Known flat loudspeaker technology is based on high modal density. However, the resonances in the panel are complex and difficult to

  4. Sizing of an Energy Storage System for Grid Inertial Response and Primary Frequency Reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Vaclav; Chaudhary, Sanjay Kumar; Stroe, Daniel Loan

    2016-01-01

    event in the power system with a high penetration of wind power. An energy storage system (ESS) might be a viable solution for providing inertial response and primary frequency regulation. A methodology has been presented here for the sizing of the ESS in terms of required power and energy. It describes...

  5. Frequency response of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Dakin, C.J.; Vardy, A.N.; Happee, R.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular pathways form short-latency disynaptic connections with neck motoneurons, whereas they form longer-latency disynaptic and polysynaptic connections with lower limb motoneurons. We quantified frequency responses of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles to explain between

  6. Frequency response for electromotility of isolated outer hair cells of the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, HP; vanDijk, P; Segenhout, HM

    1996-01-01

    Frequency and impulse responses were determined for isolated guinea pig outer hair cells by electrically stimulating the cells between two wire electrodes with white noise. Cells were attached to the bottom of a small culture dish at one end while the other end was freely moving. Results have the ch

  7. Building the analytical response in frequency domain of AC biased bolometers Application to Planck/HFI

    CERN Document Server

    Sauvé, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Context: Bolometers are high sensitivity detector commonly used in Infrared astronomy. The HFI instrument of the Planck satellite makes extensive use of them, but after the satellite launch two electronic related problems revealed critical. First an unexpected excess response of detectors at low optical excitation frequency for {\

  8. Oscillatory brain responses in spoken word production reflect lexical frequency and sentential constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piai, V.; Roelofs, A.P.A.; Maris, E.G.G.

    2014-01-01

    Two fundamental factors affecting the speed of spoken word production are lexical frequency and sentential constraint, but little is known about their timing and electrophysiological basis. In the present study, we investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) and oscillatory brain responses induced

  9. Tidal Frequencies in the Time Series Measurements of Atmospheric Muon Flux from Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Takai, H; Minelli, M; Sundermier, J; Winters, G; Russ, M K; Dodaro, J; Varshney, A; McIlwaine, C J; Tomaszewski, T; Tomaszewski, J; Warasila, W; McDermott, J; Khan, U; Chaves, K; Kassim, O; Ripka, J

    2016-01-01

    Tidal frequencies are detected in time series muon flux measurements performed over a period of eight years. Meson production and subsequent decay produce the muons that are observed at ground level. We interpret the periodic behavior as a consequence of high altitude density variations at the point of meson production. These variations are driven by solar thermal cycles. The detected frequencies are in good agreement with published tidal frequencies and suggest that muons can be a complementary probe to the study of atmospheric tides at altitudes between 20 to 60 km.

  10. Frequency Measurement of the Electric Quadrupole Transition in a Single Laser-Cooled 40Ca+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qu; HUANG Yao; CAO Jian; OU Bao-Quan; GUO Bin; GUAN Hua; HUANG Xue-Ren; GAO Ke-Lin

    2011-01-01

    The optical frequency of the 4s2S1/2-3d2D5/2 transition in a single trapped and laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion is measured with an optical frequency comb system referenced to a hydrogen maser. A 729-nm laser can be locked to the clock transition about ten hours and the Allan deviation is better than 2 × 10-14/1000s.

  11. Time-frequency characteristics of blasting vibration signals measured in milliseconds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Mingsheng; Zhang Jianhua; Yi Changping

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the time-frequency characteristics of blasting vibration signals,measured in milliseconds,we carried out site blasting vibration tests at an open pit of the Jinduicheng Mine.Based on recorded field data and applying a combination of RSPWVD and wavelet,.we analyzed the time-frequency characteristics of recorded field data.summarized the time-frequency characteristics of blasting vibration signals in different frequency bands and present detailed information of blasting vibration signals in milliseconds of high time-frequency resolutions.Because RSPWVD can be seen as of definite physical significance to signal energy distribution in time and frequency domains,we studied the energy distribution of blasting vibration signals for various milliseconds intervals from a perspective of energy distribution.The results indicate that the effect of milliseconds intervals on time-frequency characteristics of blasting vibration signals is significant:the length of delay time directly affects the energy distribution of blasting vibration signals as well as the duration of energy in frequency bands.

  12. Sampling frequency, response times and embedded signal filtration in fast, high efficiency liquid chromatography: A tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, M Farooq; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kadjo, Akinde F; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-02-11

    With increasingly efficient columns, eluite peaks are increasingly narrower. To take full advantage of this, choice of the detector response time and the data acquisition rate a.k.a. detector sampling frequency, have become increasingly important. In this work, we revisit the concept of data sampling from the theorem variously attributed to Whittaker, Nyquist, Kotelnikov, and Shannon. Focusing on time scales relevant to the current practice of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and optical absorbance detection (the most commonly used method), even for very narrow simulated peaks Fourier transformation shows that theoretical minimum sampling frequency is still relatively low (fast chromatography on a state-of-the-art column (38,000 plates), we evaluate the responses produced by different present generation instruments, each with their unique black box digital filters. We show that the common wisdom of sampling 20 points per peak can be inadequate for high efficiency columns and that the sampling frequency and response choices do affect the peak shape. If the sampling frequency is too low or response time is too large, the observed peak shapes will not remain as narrow as they really are - this is especially true for high efficiency and high speed separations. It is shown that both sampling frequency and digital filtering affect the retention time, noise amplitude, peak shape and width in a complex fashion. We show how a square-wave driven light emitting diode source can reveal the nature of the embedded filter. We discuss time uncertainties related to the choice of sampling frequency. Finally, we suggest steps to obtain optimum results from a given system.

  13. Swept frequency eddy current (SFEC) measurements of Inconel 718 as a function of microstructure and residual stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Ramya

    The goal of this thesis was to determine the dependency of swept frequency eddy current (SFEC) measurements on the microstructure of the Ni-based alloy, Inconel 718 as a function of heat treatment and shot peening. This involved extensive characterization of the sample using SEM and TEM coupled with measurements and analysis of the eddy current response of the various sample conditions using SFEC data. Specific objectives included determining the eddy current response at varying depths within the sample, and this was accomplished by taking SFEC measurements in frequencies ranging from 100 kHz to 50 MHz. Conductivity profile fitting of the resulting SFEC signals was obtained by considering influencing factors (such as surface damage). The problems associated with surface roughness and near surface damage produced by shot peening were overcome by using an inversion model. Differences in signal were seen as a result of precipitation produced by heat treatment and by residual stresses induced due to the shot peening. Hardness of the material, which is related both to precipitation and shot peening, was seen to correlate with the measured SFEC signal. Surface stress measurement was carried out using XRD giving stress in the near surface regions, but not included in the calculations due to shallow depth information provided by the technique compared to SFEC. By comparing theoretical SFEC signal computed using the microstructural values (precipitate fraction) and experimental SFEC data, dependency of the SFEC signals on microstructure and residual stress was obtained.

  14. Analysis of measured data of human body based on error correcting frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Aiyan; Peipei, Gao; Shang, Xiaomei

    2014-04-01

    Anthropometry is to measure all parts of human body surface, and the measured data is the basis of analysis and study of the human body, establishment and modification of garment size and formulation and implementation of online clothing store. In this paper, several groups of the measured data are gained, and analysis of data error is gotten by analyzing the error frequency and using analysis of variance method in mathematical statistics method. Determination of the measured data accuracy and the difficulty of measured parts of human body, further studies of the causes of data errors, and summarization of the key points to minimize errors possibly are also mentioned in the paper. This paper analyses the measured data based on error frequency, and in a way , it provides certain reference elements to promote the garment industry development.

  15. Determining the dispersion characteristics of rivers from the frequency response of the system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertz, Peter; Palancar, MaríA. C.; Aragón, José M.; Gil, Roberto

    2006-09-01

    A new method of determining the parameters of an aggregated dead zone model (ADZ) to predict longitudinal dispersion in rivers is presented. The method is based on the frequency response analysis (FRA) of observed field tests, which consist of tracer injections (input) and measurement of tracer in downstream sampling points (output) located downstream from the injection point. The ADZ is a combination of plug and completely mixed flow compartments. The ADZ parameters (number of compartments, mean residence time, and delay time) are evaluated by means of Bode plots that give the system order (number of compartments), gain, time constant (mean residence time of each compartment) and delay time. The FRA-ADZ method was checked with tracer data runs in two Spanish rivers, the Tagus and the Ebro rivers. The experimental tracer concentration versus time distributions were compared with the ADZ predicted curves, which were calculated using parameters obtained from the FRA method, and with curves predicted by several classical models. The residence time of several reaches within the two studied rivers was predicted by the FRA-ADZ method with a relative error lower than 10%. The method is generally applicable to ideal and nonideal inputs and is particularly well suited to arbitrary-shaped initial source concentration distributions.

  16. Current measurement in high-performance frequency converters; Strommessung in Hochleistungsumrichtern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marien, Jan; Hetzler, Ullrich [Isabellenhuette Heusler GmbH und Co. KG, Dillenburg (Germany); Hornung, Hans-Georg; Zwinger, Stefan [Sensor-Technik Wiedemann GmbH, Kaufbeuren (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The load cycles (raising, lowering, accelerating, braking) of cranes, lift trucks and other off-road vehicles are ideally suited for the efficient deployment of hybrid or full electrical drive technology. Current measurement is a key technology for advancing electrification. Sensor Technik Wiedemann places by her frequency converters on a shunt-based current measurement module from Isabellenhuette Heusler which permits highly accurate measurements. (orig.)

  17. Resonant tube for measurement of sound absorption in gases at low frequency/pressure ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Griffin, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a resonant tube for measuring sound absorption in gases, with specific emphasis on the vibrational relaxation peak of N2, over a range of frequency/pressure ratios from 0.1 to 2500 Hz/atm. The experimental background losses measured in argon agree with the theoretical wall losses except at few isolated frequencies. Rigid cavity terminations, external excitation, and a differential technique of background evaluation were used to minimize spurious contributions to the background losses. Room temperature measurements of sound absorption in binary mixtures of N2-CO2 in which both components are excitable resulted in the maximum frequency/pressure ratio in Hz/atm of 0.063 + 123m for the N2 vibrational relaxation peak, where m is mole percent of added CO2; the maximum ratio for the CO2 peak was 34,500 268m where m is mole percent of added N2.

  18. Photonic-assisted microwave frequency measurement system based on a silicon ORR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianfei; Shao, Haifeng; Li, Xia; Li, Yan; Dai, Tingge; Wang, Gencheng; Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    A photonic-assisted instantaneous microwave frequency measurement (IFM) system is demonstrated with add-drop optical ring resonators (ORRs) on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. By launching a double-sideband suppressed carrier modulated optical signal into the ring, a monotonous amplitude comparison function (ACF) irrespective of the amplitudes of both optical and RF signals is established to translate the RF frequency to the power ratio between the through and drop ports of the ring. Two experiments have been set up with two rings which have different Q values. Two 25 μm radius ORRs with Q values of 3974 and 25833 are used to offer different measurement ranges and accuracies. In the experiments the ORR with low Q value has a large measurement range of 0.5-35 GHz, and the other one with high Q value exhibits a high accuracy of 0.1 GHz in the frequency range of 0.1-5 GHz.

  19. Effect of sampling frequency on the measurement of phase-locked action potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go eAshida

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Phase-locked spikes in various types of neurons encode temporal information. To quantify the degree of phase-locking, the metric called vector strength (VS has been most widely used. Since VS is derived from spike timing information, error in measurement of spike occurrence should result in errors in VS calculation. In electrophysiological experiments, the timing of an action potential is detected with finite temporal precision, which is determined by the sampling frequency. In order to evaluate the effects of the sampling frequency on the measurement of VS, we derive theoretical upper and lower bounds of VS from spikes collected with finite sampling rates. We next estimate errors in VS assuming random sampling effects, and show that our theoretical calculation agrees with data from electrophysiological recordings in vivo. Our results provide a practical guide for choosing the appropriate sampling frequency in measuring VS.

  20. Constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop instrument for measurement of ultrasonic velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yost, William T; Cantrell, John H; Kushnick, Peter W

    1991-10-01

    A new instrument based on a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop (CFPPLL) concept has been developed to accurately measure the ultrasonicwavevelocity in liquids and changes in ultrasonicwavevelocity in solids and liquids. An analysis of the system shows that it is immune to many of the frequency-dependent effects that plague other techniques including the constant phase shifts of reflectors placed in the path of the ultrasonicwave.Measurements of the sound velocity in ultrapure water are used to confirm the analysis. The results are in excellent agreement with values from the literature, and establish that the CFPPLL provides a reliable, accurate way to measurevelocities, as well as for monitoring small changes in velocity without the sensitivity to frequency-dependent phase shifts common to other measurement systems. The estimated sensitivity to phase changes is better than a few parts in 10{sup 7}.

  1. Measuring the bunch frequency multiplication at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, AE; Bravin, E; Corsini, R; Dobert, S; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Soby, L; Skowronski, P K; Tecker, F; Egger, D; Ferrari, A; Welsch, C P

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) is being built and commissioned by an international collaboration to test the feasibility of the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) drive beam generation scheme. Central to this scheme is the use of RF deflectors to inject bunches into a delay loop and a combiner ring, in order to transform the initial bunch frequency of 1.5 GHz from the linac to a final bunch frequency of 12 GHz. To do so, the machine's transverse optics must be tuned to ensure beam isochronicity and each ring's length can finally be adjusted with wiggler magnets to a sub millimeter path length accuracy. Diagnostics based on optical streak camera and RF power measurements, in particular frequency bands, have been designed to measure the longitudinal behaviour of the beam during the combination. This paper presents the diagnostics and recent commissioning measurements.

  2. Footbridge system identification using wireless inertial measurement units for force and response measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownjohn, James Mark William; Bocian, Mateusz; Hester, David; Quattrone, Antonino; Hudson, William; Moore, Daniel; Goh, Sushma; Lim, Meng Sun

    2016-12-01

    With the main focus on safety, design of structures for vibration serviceability is often overlooked or mismanaged, resulting in some high profile structures failing publicly to perform adequately under human dynamic loading due to walking, running or jumping. A standard tool to inform better design, prove fitness for purpose before entering service and design retrofits is modal testing, a procedure that typically involves acceleration measurements using an array of wired sensors and force generation using a mechanical shaker. A critical but often overlooked aspect is using input (force) to output (response) relationships to enable estimation of modal mass, which is a key parameter directly controlling vibration levels in service. This paper describes the use of wireless inertial measurement units (IMUs), designed for biomechanics motion capture applications, for the modal testing of a 109 m footbridge. IMUs were first used for an output-only vibration survey to identify mode frequencies, shapes and damping ratios, then for simultaneous measurement of body accelerations of a human subject jumping to excite specific vibrations modes and build up bridge deck accelerations at the jumping location. Using the mode shapes and the vertical acceleration data from a suitable body landmark scaled by body mass, thus providing jumping force data, it was possible to create frequency response functions and estimate modal masses. The modal mass estimates for this bridge were checked against estimates obtained using an instrumented hammer and known mass distributions, showing consistency among the experimental estimates. Finally, the method was used in an applied research application on a short span footbridge where the benefits of logistical and operational simplicity afforded by the highly portable and easy to use IMUs proved extremely useful for an efficient evaluation of vibration serviceability, including estimation of modal masses.

  3. Voice fundamental frequency modulates vocal response to pitch perturbations during English speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanjun; Auger, James; Larson, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated task-dependent vocal responses to pitch perturbations during speech production. The present study investigated the effect of voice fundamental frequency (F(0)) on the modulation of vocal responses during English speech. Randomized pitch shifts of +/-100 or 200 cents during speaking were presented to English speakers. Results indicated larger vocal responses and shorter latencies at a high voice F(0) than at a low voice F(0), but no significance differences were observed for stimulus magnitude or direction. These findings suggest that the pitch-shift reflex during speech can be modulated as a function of voice F(0).

  4. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

  5. Measurement of laser quantum frequency fluctuations using a Pound-Drever stabilization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Mussche, Paul L.; Siegman, Anthony E.

    1994-06-01

    We describe a method for measuring the frequency fluctuation spectrum of a laser oscillator, especially the weak noise contributions in the wings of the spectrum, and apply this method to confirm the existence of large excess quantum frequency fluctuations in a laser oscillator using an unstable optical resonator. Our measurement apparatus uses the Pound-Drever technique, which employs an RF phase modulator and a Fabry-Perot cavity to produce a sensitive high-speed frequency discrimination signal. We show that this signal can also be used to measure the quantum noise contributions to the frequency spectrum of a laser oscillator. Experimental measurements on a miniature diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser using a stable optical cavity closely match the predictions of the usual Schawlow-Townes theory, while the frequency fluctuations in a nearly identical laser employing an unstable optical resonator are approximately 1300 times larger. These much larger fluctuations arise in part from the larger output coupling and cavity bandwidth of the unstable cavity, but they also appear to confirm a predicted excess spontaneous emission factor (Petermann excess noise factor) of approximately = 180 times arising from the nonorthogonal transverse mode properties of the unstable cavity.

  6. Behavioral responses by grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) to high frequency sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Gordon D; Donovan, Carl; Götz, Thomas; Janik, Vincent M

    2014-02-15

    The use of high frequency sonar is now commonplace in the marine environment. Most marine mammals rely on sound to navigate, and for detecting prey, and there is the potential that the acoustic signals of sonar could cause behavioral responses. To investigate this, we carried out behavioral response tests with grey seals to two sonar systems (200 and 375 kHz systems). Results showed that both systems had significant effects on the seals behavior; when the 200 kHz sonar was active, seals spent significantly more time hauled out and, although seals remained swimming during operation of the 375 kHz sonar, they were distributed further from the sonar. The results show that although peak sonar frequencies may be above marine mammal hearing ranges, high levels of sound can be produced within their hearing ranges that elicit behavioral responses; this has clear implications for the widespread use of sonar in the marine environment.

  7. The low-frequency dielectric response of charged oblate spheroidal particles immersed in an electrolyte

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Sen, Pabitra N

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-frequency polarization response of a surface-charged oblate spheroidal particle immersed in an electrolyte solution. Because the charged spheroid attracts counter-ions which form the electric double layer around the particle, using usual boundary conditions at the interface between the particle and electrolyte can be quite complicated and challenging. Hence, we generalize Fixman's boundary conditions, originally derived for spherical particles, to the case of the charged oblate spheroid. Given two different counter-ion distributions in the thin electric double layer limit, we obtain analytic expressions for the polarization coefficients to the first non-trivial order in frequency. We find that the polarization response normal to the symmetry axis depends on the total amount of charge carried by the oblate spheroid while that parallel to the symmetry axis is suppressed when there is less charge on the edge of the spheroid. We further study the overall dielectric response for a dilute suspensio...

  8. Conventional Frequency Ultrasonic Biomarkers of Cancer Treatment Response In Vivo12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Tadayyon, Hadi; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William; Papanicolau, Naum; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conventional frequency quantitative ultrasound in conjunction with textural analysis techniques was investigated to monitor noninvasively the effects of cancer therapies in an in vivo preclinical model. METHODS: Conventional low-frequency (∼7 MHz) and high-frequency (∼20 MHz) ultrasound was used with spectral analysis, coupled with textural analysis on spectral parametric maps, obtained from xenograft tumor-bearing animals (n = 20) treated with chemotherapy to extract noninvasive biomarkers of treatment response. RESULTS: Results indicated statistically significant differences in quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers in both low- and high-frequency ranges between untreated and treated tumors 12 to 24 hours after treatment. Results of regression analysis indicated a high level of correlation between quantitative ultrasound-based biomarkers and tumor cell death estimates from histologic analysis. Applying textural characterization to the spectral parametric maps resulted in an even stronger correlation (r2 = 0.97). CONCLUSION: The results obtained in this research demonstrate that quantitative ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency can monitor tissue changes in vivo in response to cancer treatment administration. Using higher order textural information extracted from quantitative ultrasound spectral parametric maps provides more information at a high sensitivity related to tumor cell death. PMID:23761215

  9. Optimisation of the Low-Frequency Response of a Multi-stage Bioelectric Amplifier for Electrocardiogram (ECG Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the optimisation of the low-frequency response of a multi-stage bioelectric amplifier intended for use in the measurement of the human electrocardiogram (ECG using high-impedance un-gelled electrodes. The frequency response was optimised to meet international performance requirements for electrocardiographic recorders, in particular the International Electrotechnical Commission 60601 standards [1,2]. The pole and zero locations of a multi-stage amplifier configuration were optimised to meet both time and frequency domain specifications. The optimum assignment for a three stage amplifier, having two differential stages and a differential-to-single-ended conversion stage was established by evaluating the performance of a number of circuit configurations. The optimum configuration was found to be two differential stages with a gain of 20dB each and a differential-to single-ended output stage with unity gain. The -3dB pole is placed at 0.028Hz and a zero at 0.0028Hz in the first and second stages to give an overall -3dB bandwidth of 0.043Hz. In addition, the pole of the input ac coupling network was placed at 0.0028Hz in order to meet the undershoot and recovery slope requirements in the narrow pulse response.

  10. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph C.; Su, Erica; Badger, Christopher; Coughlan, Carolyn A.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Ciliated epithelial cells populate up to 80% of the surface area of the human airway and are responsible for mucociliary transport, which is the key protective mechanism that provides the first line of defense in the respiratory tract. Cilia beat in a rhythmic pattern and may be easily affected by allergens, pollutants, and pathogens, altering ciliary beat frequency (CBF) subsequently. Diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and primary ciliary dyskinesia may also decrease CBF. CBF is therefore a critical component of respiratory health. The current clinical method of measuring CBF is phase-contrast microscopy, which involves a tissue biopsy obtained via brushing of the nasal cavity. While this method is minimally invasive, the tissue sample must be oriented to display its profile view, making the visualization of a single layer of cilia challenging. In addition, the conventional method requires subjective analysis of CBF, e.g., manually counting by visual inspection. On the contrary, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to study the retina in ophthalmology as well as vasculature in cardiology, and offers higher resolution than conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Based on this technology, our lab specifically developed an ultra-high resolution OCT system to image the microstructure of the ciliated epithelial cells. Doppler analysis was also performed to determine CBF. Lastly, we also developed a program that utilizes fast Fourier transform to determine CBF under phase-contrast microscopy, providing a more objective method compared to the current method.

  11. In vivo determination of the frequency response of the tooth root canal impedance versus distance from the apical foramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambo, Marcos V H; Gamba, Humberto R; Ratzke, Alexandre S; Schneider, Fabio K; Maia, Joaquim M; Ramos, Carlos A S

    2007-01-01

    Working length (WL) determination is a key factor to the endodontic therapy or root canal treatment success. Almost all therapy procedures depend on this measure and the wrong WL determination may produce severe consequences, like post-therapeutic pain and the need of a new root canal treatment. Electronic foramen locators (EFL) have been replacing the traditional radiographic imaging as they are faster, easier to use and have a higher success rate when measuring WL. EFLs are based on the root canal impedance assessment between two electrodes: one fixed on the endodontic file that is inserted into the root canal, and the other positioned at oral mucosa membrane. There are only few reported studies that qualify or quantify the root canal impedance characteristics. The present work aims to determine the module of tooth root canal frequency response. The preliminary results show the frequency response module variation as a function of endodontic file position inside the root canal and reinforce the methods based on relative impedance over frequency analysis used in modern EFLs.

  12. Thermal conductivity measurements of non-metals via combined time- and frequency-domain thermoreflectance without a metal film transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Cheaito, R.; Braun, J. L.; Giri, A.; Hopkins, P. E.

    2016-09-01

    The thermoreflectance-based techniques time- and frequency-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR and FDTR, respectively) have emerged as robust platforms to measure the thermophysical properties of a wide array of systems on varying length scales. Routine in the implementation of these techniques is the application of a thin metal film on the surface of the sample of interest to serve as an opto-thermal transducer ensuring the measured modulated reflectivity is dominated by the change in thermoreflectance of the sample. Here, we outline a method to directly measure the thermal conductivities of bulk materials without using a metal transducer layer using a standard TDTR/FDTR experiment. A major key in this approach is the use of a thermal model with z-dependent heat source when the optical penetration depth is comparable to the beam sizes and measuring the FDTR response at a long delay time to minimize non-thermoreflectivity contributions to the modulated reflectance signals (such as free carrier excitations). Using this approach, we demonstrate the ability to measure the thermal conductivity on three semiconductors, intrinsic Si (100), GaAs (100), and InSb (100), the results of which are validated with FDTR measurements on the same wafers with aluminum transducers. We outline the major sources of uncertainty in this approach, including frequency dependent heating and precise knowledge of the pump and probe spot sizes. As a result, we discuss appropriate pump-frequency ranges in which to implement this TDTR/FDTR approach and present a procedure to measure the effective spot sizes by fitting the FDTR data of an 80 nm Al/SiO2 sample at a time delay in which the spot size sensitivity dominates an FDTR measurement over the substrate thermal properties. Our method provides a more convenient way to directly measure the thermal conductivities of semiconductors.

  13. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500-2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  14. First Measurements of High Frequency Cross-Spectra from a Pair of Large Michelson Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron S.; Gustafson, Richard; Hogan, Craig; Kamai, Brittany; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Raymond; Waldman, Samuel; Weiss, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are reported of high frequency cross-spectra of signals from the Fermilab Holometer, a pair of co-located 39 m, high power Michelson interferometers. The instrument obtains differential position sensitivity to cross-correlated signals far exceeding any previous measurement in a broad frequency band extending to the 3.8 MHz inverse light crossing time of the apparatus. A model of universal exotic spatial shear correlations that matches the Planck scale holographic information bound of space-time position states is excluded to 4.6{\\sigma} significance.

  15. Measurement of the lowest millimetre-wave transition frequency of the CH radical

    CERN Document Server

    Truppe, S; Hinds, E A; Tarbutt, M R

    2013-01-01

    The CH radical offers a sensitive way to test the hypothesis that fundamental constants measured on earth may differ from those observed in other parts of the universe. The starting point for such a comparison is to have accurate laboratory frequencies. Here we measure the frequency of the lowest millimetre-wave transition of CH, near 535 GHz, with an accuracy of 0.6 kHz. This improves the uncertainty by roughly two orders of magnitude over previous determinations and opens the way for sensitive new tests of varying constants.

  16. DEFORMATION MEASUREMENT USING DUAL-FREQUENCY PROJECTION GRATING PHASE-SHIFT PROFILOMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanming Chen; Yuming He; Eryi Hu; Hongmao Zhu

    2008-01-01

    2π phase ambiguity problem is very important in phase measurement when a deformed object has a large out of plane displacement. The dual-frequency projection grating phaseshifting profilometry (PSP) can be used to solve such an issue. In the measurement, two properchosen frequency gratings are utilized to synthesize an equivalent wavelength grating which ensures the computed phase in a principal phase range. Thus, the error caused by the phase unwrapping process with the conventional phase reconstruct algorithm can be eliminated. Finally, experimental result of a specimen with large plastic deformation is given to prove that the proposed method is effective to handle the phase discontinuity.

  17. Broadband frequency and angular response of a sinusoidal bull’s eye antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaskoetxea, U.; Navarro-Cía, M.; Beruete, M.

    2016-07-01

    A thorough experimental study of the frequency and beaming angle response of a metallic leaky-wave bull’s eye antenna working at 77 GHz with a sinusoidally corrugated profile is presented. The beam scanning property of these antennas as frequency is varied is experimentally demonstrated and corroborated through theoretical and numerical results. From the experimental results the dispersion diagram of the n  =  -1 and n  =  -2 space harmonics is extracted, and the operation at different frequency regimes is identified and discussed. In order to show the contribution of each half of the antenna, numerical examples of the near-field behavior are also displayed. Overall, experimental results are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with theoretical and numerical calculations. Finally, an analysis of the beamwidth as a function of frequency is performed, showing that it can achieve values below 1.5° in a fractional bandwidth of 4% around the operation frequency, which is an interesting frequency-stable broadside radiation.

  18. Metabolic pathways reconstruction by frequency and amplitude response to forced glycolytic oscillations in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, William B

    2005-10-05

    The hypothesis that frequency and amplitude response can be used in a complicated metabolic pathway kinetics model for optimal parameter estimation, as speculated by its successful prior usage for a mechanical oscillator and a heterogeneous chemical system, is tested here. Given the complexity of the glycolysis model of yeast chosen, this question is limited to three kinetics parameters of the 87 in the in vitro model developed in the literature. The direct application of the approach, used with the uninformed selection of operating conditions for the oscillation of external glucose concentration, led to miring the data assimilation process in local minima. Application of linear systems theory, however, identified two natural resonant frequencies that, when excited by external forced oscillations of the same frequency, result in the expression of many harmonics in the Fourier spectra, that is, information-rich experiments. A single such information-rich experiment at one of the resonant frequencies was sufficient to break away from the local minima to find the optimum kinetics parameter estimates. The resonant frequencies themselves represent oscillation modes in glycolysis akin to those previously observed. Furthermore, operation of the bioreactor with large amplitude oscillations of glucose feed (25%) leads to enhanced ethanol average yield by 1.6% at the resonant frequency.

  19. Dichotic multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses in evaluating the hearing thresholds of occupational noise-exposed workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Fen Hsu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An objective, fast, and reasonably accurate assessment test that allows for easy interpretation of the responses of the hearing thresholds at all frequencies of a conventional audiogram is needed to resolve the medicolegal aspects of an occupational hearing injury. This study evaluated the use of dichotic multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses (Mf-ASSR to predict the hearing thresholds in workers exposed to high levels of noise. The study sample included 34 workers with noise-induced hearing impairment. Thresholds of pure-tone audiometry (PTA and Mf-ASSRs at four frequencies were assessed. The differences and correlations between the thresholds of Mf-ASSRs and PTA were determined. The results showed that, on average, Mf-ASSR curves corresponded well with the thresholds of the PTA contours averaged across subjects. The Mf-ASSRs were 20±8 dB, 16±9 dB, 12±9 dB, and 11±12 dB above the thresholds of the PTA for 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, 2,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz, respectively. The thresholds of the PTA and the Mf-ASSRs were significantly correlated (r=0.77–0.89. We found that the measurement of Mf-ASSRs is easy and potentially time saving, provides a response at all dichotic multiple frequencies of the conventional audiogram, reduces variability in the interpretation of the responses, and correlates well with the behavioral hearing thresholds in subjects with occupational noise-induced hearing impairment. Mf-ASSR can be a valuable aid in the adjustment of compensation cases.

  20. Precision frequency measurement of 1S0-3P1 intercombination lines of Sr isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Gao, Feng; Ye-Bing, Wang; Xiao, Tian; Jie, Ren; Ben-Quan, Lu; Qin-Fang, Xu; Yu-Lin, Xie; Hong, Chang

    2015-01-01

    We report on frequency measurement of the intercombination (5s2)1S0-(5s5p)3P1 transition of the four natural isotopes of strontium, including 88Sr (82.58%), 87Sr (7.0%), 86Sr (9.86%), and 84Sr (0.56%). A narrow-linewidth laser that is locked to an ultra-low expansion (ULE) optical cavity with a finesse of 12000 is evaluated at a linewidth of 200 Hz with a fractional frequency drift of 2.8×10-13 at an integration time of 1 s. The fluorescence collector and detector are specially designed, based on a thermal atomic beam. Using a double-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) combined with a fiber and laser power stabilization configuration to detune the laser frequency enables high signal-to-noise ratios and precision saturated spectra to be obtained for the six transition lines, which allows us to determine the transition frequency precisely. The optical frequency is measured using an optical frequency synthesizer referenced to an H maser. Both the statistical values and the final values, including the corrections and uncertainties, are derived for a comparison with the values given in other works. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61127901) and the Key Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-W02).

  1. Correspondence between phasor transforms and frequency response function in RLC circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, Hassan Mohamed Abdelalim

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of RLC circuits is usually made by considering phasor transforms of sinusoidal signals (characterized by constant amplitude, period and phase) that allow the calculation of the AC steady state of RLC circuits by solving simple algebraic equations. In this paper I try to show that phasor representation of RLC circuits is analogue to consider the frequency response function (commonly designated by FRF) of the total impedance of the circuit. In this way I derive accurate expressions for the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and their corresponding values of impedances of the parallel and series RLC circuits respectively, notwithstanding the presence of damping effects.

  2. Compressive inverse scattering: I. High-frequency SIMO/MISO and MIMO measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fannjiang, Albert C.

    2010-03-01

    Inverse scattering from discrete targets with the single-input-multiple-output (SIMO), multiple-input-single-output (MISO) or multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) measurements is analyzed by compressed sensing theory with and without the Born approximation. High-frequency analysis of (probabilistic) recoverability by the L1-based minimization/regularization principles is presented. In the absence of noise, it is shown that the L1-based solution can recover exactly the target of sparsity up to the dimension of the data either with the MIMO measurement for the Born scattering or with the SIMO/MISO measurement for the exact scattering. The stability with respect to noisy data is proved for weak or widely separated scatterers. Reciprocity between the SIMO and MISO measurements is analyzed. Finally a coherence bound (and the resulting recoverability) is proved for diffraction tomography with high-frequency, few-view and limited-angle SIMO/MISO measurements.

  3. Avoiding measurement dogma: a response to Rossiter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigdon, E.E.; Preacher, K.J.; Lee, N.; Howell, R.D.; Franke, G.R.; Borsboom, D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to respond to John Rossiter's call for a "Marketing measurement revolution" in the current issue of EJM, as well as providing broader comment on Rossiter's C-OAR-SE framework, and measurement practice in marketing in general. Design/methodology/approach - The paper is purel

  4. Control response measurements of the Skyship-500 airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jex, H. R.; Hogue, J. R.; Gelhausen, P.

    1985-01-01

    An examination is conducted of the Skyship 500's dynamic response to control inputs from elevators, rudders, and throttles at zero, 25, and 40 kts indicated airspeed. Input frequency sweeps were made with pitch and turn controls at 25 and 40 kts, ranging in frequency from about 0.03 to 1.5 Hz. FFT data analysis was then applied to compute describing functions for each run. Frequency responses are noted to be very smooth, and comparisons between repeat runs indicate excellent agreement. Summary plots of the faired describing functions from each run form the core of the data presented. These data constitute a comprehensive and reliable data base on which to predicate future dynamic simulation mathematical models of small airship dynamic response.

  5. On-line adaptive line frequency noise cancellation from a nuclear power measuring channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Javed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available On-line software for adaptively canceling 50 Hz line frequency noise has been designed and tested at Pakistan Research Reactor 1. Line frequency noise causes much problem in weak signals acquisition. Sometimes this noise is so dominant that original signal is totally corrupted. Although notch filter can be used for eliminating this noise, but if signal of interest is in close vicinity of 50 Hz, then original signal is also attenuated and hence overall performance is degraded. Adaptive noise removal is a technique which could be employed for removing line frequency without degrading the desired signal. In this paper line frequency noise has been eliminated on-line from a nuclear power measuring channel. The adaptive LMS algorithm has been used to cancel 50 Hz noise. The algorithm has been implemented in labVIEW with NI 6024 data acquisition card. The quality of the acquired signal has been improved much as can be seen in experimental results.

  6. Length and refractive index measurement by Fourier transform interferometry and frequency comb spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balling, Petr; Mašika, Pavel; Křen, Petr; Doležal, Miroslav

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we describe the progress we have made in our simultaneous length measurement and the femtosecond comb interferometric spectroscopy in a conventional arrangement with a moving mirror. Scanning and detection over an interval longer than the distance between two consecutive pulses of the frequency comb allow for a spectral resolution of the individual frequency modes of the comb. Precise knowledge of comb mode frequency leads to a precise estimation of the spectral characteristics of inspected phenomena. Using the pulse train of the frequency comb allows for measurement with highly unbalanced lengths of interferometer arms, i.e. an absolute long distance measurement. Further, we present a non-contact (double sided) method of measurement of the length/thickness of plane-parallel objects (gauge blocks, glass samples) by combining the fs comb (white light) with single frequency laser interferometry. The position of a fringe packet is evaluated by estimating the stationary phase position for any wavelength in the spectral band used. The repeatability of this position estimation is a few nanometres regardless of whether dispersion of the arms is compensated (transform limited fringe packet ˜10 fringes FWHM) or highly different (fringe packet stretched to >200 fringes FWHM). The measurement of steel gauge block by this method was compared with the standard method, and deviation (+13 ± 12) nm for gauge blocks (2 to 100) mm was found. The measurement of low reflecting ceramic gauges or clear glass samples was also tested. In the case of glass, it becomes possible to measure simultaneously both the thickness and the refractive index (and dispersion) of flat samples.

  7. Tube method of sound-absorption measurement extended to frequencies far above cutoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, F. D.; Bass, H. E.; Bolen, L. N.

    1977-01-01

    Equipment had been constructed for measuring sound absorption in the frequency range from 4 to 100 kHz in a large tube 25.4 cm in diameter and 4.8-m long. The technique employs a large moveable solid-dielectric capacitance transducer that completely fills the tube cross section and generates pulses of plane waves. An identical transducer terminates the other end of the tube and serves as a microphone to detect and reflect the sound pulses. Measurements in argon, nitrogen, and air indicate that the attenuation of the sound pulses differs by less than 1% from values calculated for the zero-order mode for frequencies up to 44 times the cutoff frequency for the first 'nonplane' mode. Above that frequency, the measured values are less than those predicted by theory by an amount that is approximately proportional to the wavelength to the -3.1 power. In a smaller tube of similar construction, the high-frequency deviation from theory is absent.

  8. Frequency Domain Analysis for Assessing Fluid Responsiveness by Using Instantaneous Pulse Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chen Lin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the ICU, fluid therapy is conventional strategy for the patient in shock. However, only half of ICU patients have well-responses to fluid therapy, and fluid loading in non-responsive patient delays definitive therapy. Prediction of fluid responsiveness (FR has become intense topic in clinic. Most of conventional FR prediction method based on time domain analysis, and it is limited ability to indicate FR. This study proposed a method which predicts FR based on frequency domain analysis, named instantaneous pulse rate variability (iPRV. iPRV provides a new indication in very high frequency (VHF range (0.4-0.8Hz of spectrum for peripheral responses. Twenty six healthy subjects participated this study and photoplethysmography signal was recorded in supine baseline, during head-up tilt (HUT, and passive leg raising (PLR, which induces variation of venous return and helps for quantitative assessment of FR individually. The result showed the spectral power of VHF decreased during HUT (573.96±756.36 ms2 in baseline; 348.00±434.92 ms2 in HUT and increased during PLR (573.96±756.36 ms2 in baseline; 718.92±973.70 ms2 in PLR, which present the compensated regulation of venous return and FR. This study provides an effective indicator for assessing FR in frequency domain and has potential to be a reliable system in ICU.

  9. The optical frequency method of distance measurement with sub-nanometer resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cip, Ondrej; Petru, Frantisek; Lazar, Josef

    2005-02-01

    We present design and experimental setup for direct transformation of the relative change of distances in measuring arm of the Michelson interferometer to relative changes of the resonant optical-frequency of Fabry-Perot (F.-P.) resonator. The method consists of a mechanical coupled moving system of the corner cube mirror of the interferometer measuring arm with one of the mirrors of F.-P. resonator. A piezoelectric transducer (PZT) with elongation 10 microns approximately drives that moving system. An external tunable laser source at 633 nm wavelength provides identification of one of the resonant optical frequency of F.-P. resonator by the frequency locking mechanism with synchronous detection technique in the servo loop feedback. Because the definition of the meter unit is based on iodine stabilized He-Ne laser, then the optical frequency of the locked tunable laser is frequency compared with He-Ne-I2 laser by the heterodyne optical mixing. A fast high-resolution counter counts the resultant radio-frequency signal as a product of the optical mixing. Measured frequency values and values of interference phase acquired by the interferometer are simultaneously sampled step by step for each elongation position of PZT element. We used that experimental setup for the testing process where a verification of scale-linearity of Michelson interferometer with total resolution 0,3 nm is investigated. The experimental data achieved by F.-P. resonator during such a way shows the absolute uncertainty better than 0,08 nm for the relative distance change 1.5 microns. We verified the scale-linearity of Michelson interferometer to +/-1,0 nm limit.

  10. Absolute frequency measurement with uncertainty below $1\\times 10^{-15}$ using International Atomic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Hachisu, Hidekazu; Ido, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The absolute frequency of the $^{87}{\\rm Sr}$ clock transition measured in 2015 was reevaluated using an improved frequency link to the SI second. The scale interval of International Atomic Time (TAI) that we used as the reference was calibrated for an evaluation interval of five days instead of the conventional interval of one month which is regularly employed in Circular T. The calibration on a five-day basis removed the uncertainty in assimilating the TAI scale of the five-day mean to that of the one-month mean. The reevaluation resulted in the total uncertainty of $10^{-16}$ level for the first time without local cesium fountains. Since there are presumably no correlations among systematic shifts of cesium fountains worldwide, the measurement is not limited by the systematic uncertainty of a specific primary frequency standard.

  11. Absolute frequency measurement with uncertainty below 1× 10^{-15} using International Atomic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisu, Hidekazu; Petit, Gérard; Ido, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    The absolute frequency of the ^{87}Sr clock transition measured in 2015 (Jpn J Appl Phys 54:112401, 2015) was reevaluated using an improved frequency link to the SI second. The scale interval of International Atomic Time (TAI) that we used as the reference was calibrated for an evaluation interval of 5 days instead of the conventional interval of 1 month which is regularly employed in Circular T. The calibration on a 5-day basis removed the uncertainty in assimilating the TAI scale of the 5-day mean to that of the 1-month mean. The reevaluation resulted in the total uncertainty of 10^{-16} level for the first time without local cesium fountains. Since there are presumably no correlations among systematic shifts of cesium fountains worldwide, the measurement is not limited by the systematic uncertainty of a specific primary frequency standard.

  12. Comparison of Simulated and Measured Fluid-Surface Oscillation Frequencies in a Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapuzzano, Matthew; Pierre, Kiesha; Tufekcioglu, Emre; Guldiken, Rasim; Tejada-Martinez, Andres; Crane, Nathan

    2016-11-01

    Many important processes from agriculture to manufacturing depend on the wetting of fluids on rough or textured surfaces. This has traditionally been studied from a macro-perspective. The effects of these surface features can be dramatically altered by vibrations that overcome energy barriers to contact line motion caused by surface roughness. In order to study these effects in confined geometries and at different length scales, a validated model is required. This presentation will compare the measured and simulated frequencies of capillary vibrations in a cylindrical glass tube. Fluid surface vibrations are excited externally through deformation of the interface. The resulting surface oscillations are observed with a high speed video camera and the dominant oscillation frequencies are calculated. The measured oscillation frequencies are compared to predictions from transient CFD simulations across a range of interface diameters from 400 um to 1.5 mm. These results may be used to inform studies of wetting under vibration. NSF CMMI-1361919.

  13. Dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reconstructed from continuous impedance measurement of single frequency during charging/discharging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel implementation of dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (DEIS) is proposed. The method first measures the impedance continuously at a single frequency during one charging/discharging cycle, then repeats the measurement at a number of other selected frequencies. The impedance spectrum at a specific SOC is obtained by interpolating and collecting the impedance at all of the selected frequencies. The charge transfer resistance, Rct, from the DEIS is smaller than that from the steady EIS in a wide state-of-charge (SOC) range from 0.4 to 1.0, the Rct during charging is generally smaller than that during discharging for the battery chemistry used in this study.

  14. Frequency-Speed Control Model Identification of Ultrasonic Motor Using Step Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Jingzhuo; Zhang Caixia

    2015-01-01

    Control model of ultrasonic motor is the foundation for high control performance .The frequency of driv-ing voltage is commonly used as control variable in the speed control system of ultrasonic motor .Speed control model with the input frequency can significantly improve speed control performance .Step response of rotating speed is tested .Then ,the transfer function model is identified through characteristic point method .Considering time-varying characteristics of the model parameters ,the variables are fitted with frequency and speed as the inde-pendent variables ,and the variable model of ultrasonic motor system is obtained ,with consideration of the nonlin-earity of ultrasonic motor system .The proposed model can be used in the design and analysis of the speed control system in ultrasonic motor .

  15. Modal identification using the frequency-scale domain decomposition technique of ambient vibration responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thien-Phu; Argoul, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a new modal identification method of ambient vibration responses. The application of the singular value decomposition to continuous wavelet transform of power spectral density matrix gives singular values and singular vectors in frequency-scale domain. Analytical development shows a direct relation between local maxima in frequency-scale representation of singular values and modal parameters. This relation is then carried on for the identification of modal parameters via a complete practical procedure. The main novelties of this work involve the new formulation in frequency-scale domain and the capacity for the identification of modal parameters without the step of ridges extraction in comparison with previous wavelet-based modal identification methods.

  16. Effect of tip mass on frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilever in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    The effect of tip mass on the frequency response and sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever in the liquid environment is investigated. For this purpose, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and considering tip mass and hydrodynamic functions in a liquid environment, an expression for the resonance frequencies of AFM cantilever in liquid is derived. Then, based on this expression, the effect of the surface contact stiffness on the flexural mode of a rectangular AFM cantilever in fluid is investigated and compared with the case where the AFM cantilever operates in the air. The results show that in contrast with an air environment, the tip mass has no significant impact on the resonance frequency and sensitivity of the AFM cantilever in the liquid. Hence, analysis of AFM behaviour in liquid environment by neglecting the tip mass is logical.

  17. Prediction of power system frequency response after generator outages using neural nets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M.B.; Popovic, D.P. (Electrotechnicki Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Sobajic, D.J.; Pao, Y.-H. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1993-09-01

    A new methodology is presented for estimating the frequency behaviour of power systems necessary for an indication of under-frequency load shedding in steady-state security assessment. It is well known that large structural disturbances such as generator tripping or load outages can initiate cascading outages, system separation into islands, and even the complete breakup. The approach provides a fairly accurate method of estimating the system average frequency response without making simplifications or neglecting non-linearities and small time constants in the equations of generating units, voltage regulators and turbines. The efficiency of the new procedure is demonstrated using the New England power system model for a series of characteristic perturbations. The validity of the proposed approach is verified by comparison with the simulation of short-term dynamics including effects of control and automatic devices. (author)

  18. Orbit Response Measurements at the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, J

    2004-01-01

    The optics of the SPS ring and the TT40 transfer line have been analyzed using the closed orbit (respectively trajectory) response to controlled corrector magnet deflections. A large amount of information on the machine model, beam position monitor quality and orbit corrector calibrations can be extracted from te response data. The data was analyzed with the LOCO fit program that was adapted to the SPS machine model. A large amount of data was collected on the SPS ring, and the modelling was tested under a number of different conditions. The SPS ring data showed that a significant number of horizontal SPS orbit correctors do not provide the nominal kick strength and are damaged at the level of the magnet coil. This note describes the experience that has been gained at the SPS, the information that could be extracted from orbit data and some of the limitations of the analysis procedure in the context of the SPS.

  19. Low-error and broadband microwave frequency measurement in a silicon chip

    CERN Document Server

    Pagani, Mattia; Zhang, Yanbing; Casas-Bedoya, Alvaro; Aalto, Timo; Harjanne, Mikko; Kapulainen, Markku; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Marpaung, David

    2015-01-01

    Instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM) of microwave signals is a fundamental functionality for applications ranging from electronic warfare to biomedical technology. Photonic techniques, and nonlinear optical interactions in particular, have the potential to broaden the frequency measurement range beyond the limits of electronic IFM systems. The key lies in efficiently harnessing optical mixing in an integrated nonlinear platform, with low losses. In this work, we exploit the low loss of a 35 cm long, thick silicon waveguide, to efficiently harness Kerr nonlinearity, and demonstrate the first on-chip four-wave mixing (FWM) based IFM system. We achieve a large 40 GHz measurement bandwidth and record-low measurement error. Finally, we discuss the future prospect of integrating the whole IFM system on a silicon chip to enable the first reconfigurable, broadband IFM receiver with low-latency.

  20. Response prediction for modified mechanical systems based on in-situ frequency response functions: Theoretical and numerical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengwei; Zhu, Ping

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a general method using in-situ frequency response functions (FRFs) is proposed for predicting operational responses of modified mechanical systems. In the method responses of modified mechanical systems can be calculated by using the delta dynamic stiffness matrix, the subsystem FRF matrix and responses of the original system, even though operational forces are unknown. The proposed method is derived theoretically in a general form as well as for six specific scenarios. The six scenarios correspond respectively to: (a) modifications made on the mass; (b) changes made on the stiffness values of the link between a degree-of-freedom (DOF) and the ground; (c) the fully rigid link between a DOF and the ground; (d) changes made on the stiffness values of the link between two DOFs; (e) the null link between two DOFs and (f) the fully rigid link between two DOFs. It is found that for scenarios (a), (b) and (d) the delta dynamic stiffness matrix is required when predicting responses of the modified mechanical system. But for scenarios (c), (e) and (f), no delta dynamic stiffness matrix is required and the new system responses can be calculated solely using the subsystem FRF matrix and responses of the original system. The proposed method is illustrated by a numerical example and validated using data generated by finite element simulations. The work in this paper will be beneficial to solving vibration and noise engineering problems.