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Sample records for frequency resolved fluorescence

  1. Plastique: A synchrotron radiation beamline for time resolved fluorescence in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Zema, N.; Antonangeli, F.; Savoia, A.; Parasassi, T.; Rosato, N.

    1991-06-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beamline in the world that performs time resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and dynamics of molecules. We describe the beamline and some initial data.

  2. Lifetime Resolved Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Berland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been widely used investigate molecular dynamics and interactions in biological systems. FCS typically resolves the component species of a sample either through differences in diffusion coefficient or molecular brightness. Diffusion based assays currently have a major limitation which requires that the diffusion coefficients of component species in a sample must be substantially different in order to be resolved. This criterion is not met in many important cases, such as when molecules of similar molecular weight bind to each other. This limitation can be overcome, and resolution of FCS measurements enhanced, by combining FCS measurements with measurements of fluorescence lifetimes. By using of global analysis on simultaneously acquired FCS and lifetime data we show that we can dramatically enhance resolution in FCS measurements, and accurately resolve the concentration and diffusion coefficients of multiple sample components even when their diffusion coefficients are identical provided there is a difference in the lifetime of the component species. We show examples of this technique using both simulations and experiments. It is expected that this method will be of significance for binding assays studying molecular interactions.

  3. Angle-Resolved Spectroscopy of Parametric Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Feng-kuo

    2013-01-01

    The parametric fluorescence from a nonlinear crystal forms a conical radiation pattern. We measure the angular and spectral distributions of parametric fluorescence in a beta-barium borate crystal pumped by a 405-nm diode laser employing angle-resolved imaging spectroscopy. The experimental angle-resolved spectra and the generation efficiency of parametric down conversion are compared with a plane-wave theoretical analysis. The parametric fluorescence is used as a broadband light source for the calibration of the instrument spectral response function in the wavelength range from 450 to 1000 nm.

  4. Depth-resolved fluorescence of biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-06-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence ofrabbit oral tissue, normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within l20μm depth were investigated utilizing a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of oral and ectocervical tissue, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed. The fluorescence signal from epithelial tissue between the keratinizing layer and stroma can be well resolved. Furthermore, NADH and FADfluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  5. Spectra-resolved technique of a sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhouyi; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Yali

    2004-07-01

    The lanthanide trivalence ion and its chelates are used for marking substance in time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA), marking the protein, hormone, antibody, nucleic acid probe or biologica alive cell, to measure the concentration of the analysis substance inside the reaction system with time-resolved fluorometry after the reaction system occurred, and attain the quantitative analysis's purpose. TRFIA has been become a kind of new and more sensitive measure method after radioisotope marking, enzymatic marking, chemiluminescence, electrochemiluminescence, it primarily is decided by the special physics and chemistry characteristic of lanthanide trivalence ion and its chelates. In this paper, the result of spectroscopic evaluation of europium trivalence ion and its chelate, and the principle of spectra-resolved technology and a sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay instrument made by ourselves are reported. In the set, a high frequency Xenon pulsed-light was adopted as exciting light, and two special filters was utilized according to spectra-resolved technique. Thus the influence of scattering light and short-lifetime fluorescence was removed. And the sensitivity is 10-12mol/L (when Eu3+ was used for marking substance), examination repeat is CV = 95% (p < 0.01).

  6. Time resolved fluorescence of naproxen in organogel medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguete, M. Isabel; Izquierdo, M. Angeles; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V.

    2008-07-01

    The interaction between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen and the self assembled fibrillar network created by a low molecular weight organogelator has been probed by means of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  7. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the fluorescence quenching of a donor — acceptor pair by halothane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Draxler, S.; Lippitsch, M. E.

    1992-04-01

    Donor (anthracene) sensitized acceptor (perylene) fluorescence is quenched more efficiently by halothane than is intrinsic perylene fluorescence. The underlying process of dynamic fluorescence quenching is investigated by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  8. Polar plot representation of time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorst, John Paul; Wen Teng, Kai; Clegg, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring changes in a molecule's fluorescence emission is a common technique to study complex biological systems such as cells and tissues. Although the steady-state fluorescence intensity is frequently used, measuring the average amount of time that a molecule spends in the excited state (the fluorescence lifetime) reveals more detailed information about its local environment. The lifetime is measured in the time domain by detecting directly the decay of fluorescence following excitation by short pulse of light. The lifetime can also be measured in the frequency domain by recording the phase and amplitude of oscillation in the emitted fluorescence of the sample in response to repetitively modulated excitation light. In either the time or frequency domain, the analysis of data to extract lifetimes can be computationally intensive. For example, a variety of iterative fitting algorithms already exist to determine lifetimes from samples that contain multiple fluorescing species. However, recently a method of analysis referred to as the polar plot (or phasor plot) is a graphical tool that projects the time-dependent features of the sample's fluorescence in either the time or frequency domain into the Cartesian plane to characterize the sample's lifetime. The coordinate transformations of the polar plot require only the raw data, and hence, there are no uncertainties from extensive corrections or time-consuming fitting in this analysis. In this chapter, the history and mathematical background of the polar plot will be presented along with examples that highlight how it can be used in both cuvette-based and imaging applications.

  9. Time resolved fluorescence of cow and goat milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandao, Mariana P.; de Carvalho dos Anjos, Virgílio; Bell., Maria José V.

    2017-01-01

    Milk powder is an international dairy commodity. Goat and cow milk powders are significant sources of nutrients and the investigation of the authenticity and classification of milk powder is particularly important. The use of time-resolved fluorescence techniques to distinguish chemical composition and structure modifications could assist develop a portable and non-destructive methodology to perform milk powder classification and determine composition. This study goal is to differentiate milk powder samples from cows and goats using fluorescence lifetimes. The samples were excited at 315 nm and the fluorescence intensity decay registered at 468 nm. We observed fluorescence lifetimes of 1.5 ± 0.3, 6.4 ± 0.4 and 18.7 ± 2.5 ns for goat milk powder; and 1.7 ± 0.3, 6.9 ± 0.2 and 29.9 ± 1.6 ns for cow's milk powder. We discriminate goat and cow powder milk by analysis of variance using Fisher's method. In addition, we employed quadratic discriminant analysis to differentiate the milk samples with accuracy of 100%. Our results suggest that time-resolved fluorescence can provide a new method to the analysis of powder milk and its composition.

  10. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  11. Spectrally resolved visualization of fluorescent dyes permeating into skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Ulf; Bergmann, Thorsten; Beer, Sebastian; Burg, Jan Michael; Schmidts, Thomas; Runkel, Frank; Fiebich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    We present a spectrally resolved confocal imaging approach to qualitatively asses the overall uptake and the penetration depth of fluorescent dyes into biological tissue. We use a confocal microscope with a spectral resolution of 5 nm to measure porcine skin tissue after performing a Franz-Diffusion experiment with a submicron emulsion enriched with the fluorescent dye Nile Red. The evaluation uses linear unmixing of the dye and the tissue autofluorescence spectra. The results are combined with a manual segmentation of the skin's epidermis and dermis layers to assess the penetration behavior additionally to the overall uptake. The diffusion experiments, performed for 3h and 24h, show a 3-fold increased dye uptake in the epidermis and dermis for the 24h samples. As the method is based on spectral information it does not face the problem of superimposed dye and tissue spectra and therefore is more precise compared to intensity based evaluation methods.

  12. Angle-resolved polarimetry measurements of antenna-mediated fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Mohtashami, Abbas; Koenderink, A Femius

    2015-01-01

    Optical phase-array antennas can be used to control not only the angular distribution but also the polarization of fluorescence from quantum emitters. The emission pattern of the resulting system is determined by the properties of the antenna, the properties of the emitters and the strength of the antenna-emitter coupling. Here we show that Fourier polarimetry can be used to characterize these three contributions. To this end, we measured the angle and Stokes-parameter resolved emission of bullseye plasmon antennas as well as spiral antennas excited by an ensemble of emitters. We estimate the antenna-emitter coupling on basis of the degree of polarization, and determine the effect of anisotropy in the intrinsic emitter orientation on polarization of the resulting emission pattern. Our results not only provide new insights in the behavior of bullseye and spiral antennas, but also demonstrate the potential of Fourier polarimetry when characterizing antenna mediated fluorescence.

  13. Perspectives in Super-resolved Fluorescence Microscopy: What comes next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2016-04-01

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 has been awarded to three scientists involved in the development of STED and PALM super-resolution fluorescence microscopy (SRM) methods. They have proven that it is possible to overcome the hundred year old theoretical limit for the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light), which for decades has precluded a direct glimpse of the molecular machinery of life. None of the present-day super-resolution techniques have invalidated the Abbe limit for light optical detection; however, they have found clever ways around it. In this report, we discuss some of the challenges still to be resolved before arising SRM approaches will be fit to bring about the revolution in Biology and Medicine envisaged. Some of the challenges discussed are the applicability to image live and/or large samples, the further enhancement of resolution, future developments of labels, and multi-spectral approaches.

  14. Perspectives in Super-resolved Fluorescence Microscopy: What comes next?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eCremer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 has been awarded to three scientists involved in the development of STED and PALM super-resolution fluorescence microscopy (SRM methods. They have proven that it is possible to overcome the hundred year old theoretical limit for the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light, which for decades has precluded a direct glimpse of the molecular machinery of life. None of the present-day super-resolution techniques have invalidated the Abbe limit for light optical detection; however, they have found clever ways around it. In this report, we discuss some of the challenges still to be resolved before arising SRM approaches will be fit to bring about the revolution in Biology and Medicine envisaged. Some of the challenges discussed are the applicability to image live and/or large samples, the further enhancement of resolution, future developments of labels, and multi-spectral approaches.

  15. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained

  16. Time-resolved remote Raman and fluorescence spectrometers for planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Acosta, Tayro E.; Lucey, Paul G.

    2012-06-01

    At the University of Hawaii, we have developed compact time-resolved (TR) Raman, and fluorescence spectrometers suitable for planetary exploration under NASA's Mars Instrument Development Program. The compact Raman and fluorescence spectrometers consist of custom miniature spectrographs based on volume holographic gratings, and custom miniature intensified CCD cameras. These spectrographs have been interfaced with a regular 50 mm camera lens as well as with a three and a half inch diameter telescope for remotely interrogating minerals, water, water-ice and dry ice. Using a small frequency-doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser (35 mJ/pulse, 20 Hz) and 50 mm camera lens, TRRaman and LINF spectra of minerals, and bio-minerals can be measured within 30 s under super-critical CO2, and with 3.5-inch telescope these samples can be interrogated to 50 m radial distance during day time and nighttime. The fluorescence spectrograph is capable of measuring TR- laser-induced fluorescence excited with 355 nm laser in the spectral range 400-800 nm spectral range. The TR-fluorescence spectra allow measurement of LINF from rare-earths and transition-metal ions in time domain, and also assist in differentiating between abiogenic minerals from organic and biogenic materials based on the fluorescence lifetime. Biological materials are also identified from their characteristic short-lived (<10 ns) laser-induced fluorescence lifetime. These instruments will play important role in planetary exploration especially in NASA's future Mars Sample Return Mission, and lander and rover missions.

  17. Mode-resolved Photon Counting via Cascaded Quantum Frequency Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Resources for the manipulation and measurements of high-dimensional photonic signals are crucial for implementing qu$d$it-based applications. Here we propose potentially high-performance, chip-compatible devices for such purposes by exploiting quantum-frequency conversion in nonlinear optical media. Specifically, by using sum-frequency generation in a $\\chi^{(2)}$ waveguide we show how mode-resolved photon counting can be accomplished for telecom-band photonic signals subtending multiple temporal modes. Our method is generally applicable to any nonlinear medium with arbitrary dispersion property.

  18. Halide (Cl(super -)) Quenching of Quinine Sulfate Fluorescence: A Time-Resolved Fluorescence Experiment for Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutow, Jonathan H.

    2005-01-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence experiment investigating the halide quenching of fluorescence from quinine sulfate in water is described. The objectives of the experiment include reinforcing student understanding of the kinetics of competing pathways, making connections with microscopic theories of kinetics through comparison of experimental and…

  19. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of oil spill detected by ocean lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-long; Chen, Yong-hua; Li, Jie; Jiang, Jingbo; Ni, Zuotao; Liu, Zhi-shen

    2016-10-01

    Based on time-resolved fluorescence of oils, an oceanographic fluorescence Lidar was designed to identify oil pollutions. A third harmonic (at 355nm) of Nd:YAG laser is used as the excitation source, and the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of oil fluorescence at wavelength from 380 nm to 580 nm are measured by an intensified CCD (ICCD). In the experiments, time-resolved fluorescence spectra of 20 oil samples, including crude oils, fuel oils, lubricating oil, diesel oils and gasoline, are analyzed to discuss fluorescence spectral characteristics of samples for oil classification. The spectral characteristics of oil fluorescence obtained by ICCD with delay time of 2 ns, 4 ns, and 6 ns were studied by using the principal component analysis (PCA) method. Moreover, an efficient method is used to improve the recognition rate of the oil spill types, through enlarging spectral differences of oil fluorescence at different delay times. Experimental analysis shows that the optimization method can discriminate between crude oil and fuel oil, and a more accurate classification of oils is obtained by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. As the result, comparing to traditional fluorescence spectroscopy, a higher recognition rate of oil spill types is achieved by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy which is also a feasibility technology for Ocean Lidar.

  20. Cellular uptake of modified oligonucleotides enhanced by porphyrins studied by time-resolved microspectrofluorimetry and fluorescence imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praus, P.; Kočišová, E.; Mojzeš, P.; Štěpánek, J.; Turpin, P.-Y.; Sureau, F.

    2011-05-01

    Fluorescence microimaging and homodyne phase-resolved confocal microspectrofluorimetry were used to monitor the transport of antisense oligonucleotide into 3T3 living cells and its subsequent intracellular distribution. Phosphorothioate analog of 15-mer oligothymidylate labeled by ATTO 425 was complexed with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (H 2TMPyP4) as an uptake-mediating agent. High frequency (up to 180 MHz) analog modulation of both exciting diode laser and the detector image intensifier gain was used to record time-resolved fluorescence spectra. Fluorescence lifetime data within a broad spectral range have revealed preservation of oligonucleotide/porphyrin complex integrity and binding properties of both components inside the cell.

  1. Fluorescence polarization competition assay: the range of resolvable inhibitor potency is limited by the affinity of the fluorescent ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinyi

    2003-02-01

    For the development of fluorescence polarization (FP) competition assays, there is a widespread belief that tight-binding fluorescent ligands should be avoided to identify inhibitors of low or intermediate potency in the screening of small-molecule compound libraries. It is demonstrated herein that this statement is a misconception; in fact, the higher the affinity of the fluorescent ligand, the wider the range of inhibitor potency that can be resolved. An approximate estimate for the low end of inhibitor K(i) values that can be resolved is the K(d) value of the fluorescent ligand. Because FP competition assays are typically conducted under nonstoichiometric titration conditions, it is suggested that a fluorescent ligand of highest affinity that also has an adequate quantum yield to satisfy such conditions be selected.

  2. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorometry of fluorescent pollutants and heavy metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Ute; Rurack, Knut

    1997-05-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive optical methods which is well suited for on-line in situ analysis. Here, three examples for the steady- state and time-resolved fluorescence analysis of environmentally important analytes, the fluorescent monoaromatic hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, and xylene as well as non fluorescent heavy metal ions forming a fluorescent complex with a cation coordinating fluorescence probe, are presented and the potential of both methods is discussed. For BTX, various mixtures of the spectrally similar compounds B, T, and X showing different fluorescence lifetimes were studied with both methods. As an example for fluorometric metal ion analysis, the fluorescence probe BP(OH)2 (2,2'-bipyridyl- 3,3'-diol) was employed for the determination of d10 metal ions in water and the newly developed fluorescence probe APTA for the detection of Cu(II). Cation complexation of BP(OH2 yields spectrally very similar complexes which differ in their fluorescence lifetimes. Complexation of APTA to Cu(II) leads to small spectral changes and a strong increase in fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime. For the analytes studied, a comparison of the detection limits, standard deviations, and linear dynamic range of both methods clearly demonstrates the analytical potential of time-resolved fluorometry.

  3. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  4. Revealing Carrier-Envelope Phase through Frequency Mixing and Interference in Frequency Resolved Optical Gating

    CERN Document Server

    Snedden, Edward W; Jamison, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that full temporal characterisation of few-cycle electromagnetic pulses, including retrieval of the carrier envelope phase (CEP), can be directly obtained from Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) techniques in which the interference between non-linear frequency mixing processes is resolved. We derive a framework for this scheme, defined Real Domain-FROG (ReD-FROG), as applied to the cases of interference between sum and difference frequency components and between fundamental and sum/difference frequency components. A successful numerical demonstration of ReD-FROG as applied to the case of a self-referenced measurement is provided. A proof-of-principle experiment is performed in which the CEP of a single-cycle THz pulse is accurately obtained and demonstrates the possibility for THz detection beyond the bandwidth limitations of electro-optic sampling.

  5. Time- and spectrally resolved characteristics of flavin fluorescence in U87MG cancer cells in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horilova, Julia; Cunderlikova, Beata; Marcek Chorvatova, Alzbeta

    2015-05-01

    Early detection of cancer is crucial for the successful diagnostics of its presence and its subsequent treatment. To improve cancer detection, we tested the progressive multimodal optical imaging of U87MG cells in culture. A combination of steady-state spectroscopic methods with the time-resolved approach provides a new insight into the native metabolism when focused on endogenous tissue fluorescence. In this contribution, we evaluated the metabolic state of living U87MG cancer cells in culture by means of endogenous flavin fluorescence. Confocal microscopy and time-resolved fluorescence imaging were employed to gather spectrally and time-resolved images of the flavin fluorescence. We observed that flavin fluorescence in U87MG cells was predominantly localized outside the cell nucleus in mitochondria, while exhibiting a spectral maximum under 500 nm and fluorescence lifetimes under 1.4 ns, suggesting the presence of bound flavins. In some cells, flavin fluorescence was also detected inside the cell nuclei in the nucleoli, exhibiting longer fluorescence lifetimes and a red-shifted spectral maximum, pointing to the presence of free flavin. Extra-nuclear flavin fluorescence was diminished by 2-deoxyglucose, but failed to increase with 2,4-dinitrophenol, the uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, indicating that the cells use glycolysis, rather than oxidative phosphorylation for functioning. These gathered data are the first step toward monitoring the metabolic state of U87MG cancer cells.

  6. Time-resolved fluorescence observation of di-tyrosine formation in horseradish peroxidase upon ultrasound treatment leading to enzyme inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikrika, Konstantina; Lemos, M. Adília; Chu, Boon-Seang; Bremner, David H.; Hungerford, Graham

    2017-02-01

    The application of ultrasound to a solution can induce cavitional phenomena and generate high localised temperatures and pressures. These are dependent of the frequency used and have enabled ultrasound application in areas such as synthetic, green and food chemistry. High frequency (100 kHz to 1 MHz) in particular is promising in food chemistry as a means to inactivate enzymes, replacing the need to use periods of high temperature. A plant enzyme, horseradish peroxidase, was studied using time-resolved fluorescence techniques as a means to assess the effect of high frequency (378 kHz and 583 kHz) ultrasound treatment at equivalent acoustic powers. This uncovered the fluorescence emission from a newly formed species, attributed to the formation of di-tyrosine within the horseradish peroxidase structure caused by auto-oxidation, and linked to enzyme inactivation.

  7. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of quinine sulfate dication bound to sodium dodecylsulfate micelles: Fluorescent complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D., E-mail: ddpant@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    Interaction of quinine sulfate dication (QSD) with anionic, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been studied at different premicellar, micellar and postmicellar concentrations in aqueous phase using steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy techniques. At premicellar concentrations of SDS, the decrease in absorbance, appearance of an extra fluorescence band at lower wavelengths and tri-exponential decay behavior of fluorescence, are attributed to complex formation between QSD molecules and surfactant monomers. At postmicellar concentrations the red shift in fluorescence spectrum, increase in quantum yield and increase in fluorescence lifetimes are attributed to incorporation of solute molecules to micelles. At lower concentrations of SDS, a large shift in fluorescence is observed on excitation at the red edge of absorption spectrum and this is explained in terms of distribution of ion pairs of different energies in the ground state and the observed fluorescence lifetime behavior corroborates with this model. The temporal fluorescence anisotropy decay of QSD in SDS micelles allowed determination of restriction on the motion of the fluorophore. All the different techniques used in this study reveal that the photophysics of QSD is very sensitive to the microenvironments of SDS micelles and QSD molecules reside at the water-micelle interface. -- Highlights: • Probe molecule is very sensitive to microenvironment of micelles. • Highly fluorescent ion-pair formation has been observed. • Modulated photophysics of probe molecule in micellar solutions has been observed. • Probe molecules strongly bind with micelles and reside at probe–micelle interface.

  8. Quantitative wavelength-resolved fluorescence detection for microchip capillary electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a new wavelengthresolved CCD-based fluorescence detector for microchip separations. In recent years, miniaturization has been one of the major trends in the development of new analytical separation systems. As the manipulated sample amounts an

  9. Computational modeling of time-resolved fluorescence transport in turbid media for non-invasive clinical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Karthik

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging methods, including fluorescence lifetime sensing, are being developed for a variety of non-invasive clinical diagnostic procedures, including applications to early cancer diagnosis. Here, both the theoretical developments and experimental validations of a versatile, numerical Monte Carlo code that models photon migration in turbid media to include simulations of time-resolved fluorescence transport are presented. The developed numerical model was used to study, for the first time, the dependence of time-resolved fluorescence signals emanating from turbid media on the optical transport coefficients, fluorophore properties and source-detector configurations in single-layered turbid media as well as more complex multi-layered turbid media. The numerical codes presented here can be adapted to model a wide range of experimental techniques measuring the optical responses of biological tissues to laser irradiation and are demonstrated here for two specific applications (a) to model time-resolved fluorescence dynamics in human colon tissues and (b) to extract the frequency-dependent optical responses of a model adult human head to an incident laser-source whose intensity was harmonically modulated i.e. simulating frequency-domain measurements. Specifically, measurements of time-resolved fluorescence decays from a previous clinical study aimed toward detecting differences in tissue pathologies in patients undergoing gastro-intestinal endoscopy were simulated using the Monte Carlo model and results demonstrated that variations in tissue optical transport coefficients (absorption and scattering) alone could not account for the fluorescence decay differences detected between tissue pathologies in vivo. However, variations in fluorescence decay time as large as those detected clinically between normal and pre-malignant tissues (of 2 ns) could be accounted for by simulated variations in tissue morphology or biochemistry while intrinsic

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1996-07-01

    A family of sensors is presented with fluorescence decay-time measurements used as the sensing technique. The concept is to take a single fluorophore with a suitably long fluorescence decay time as the basic building block for numerous different sensors. Analyte recognition can be performed by different functional groups that are necessary for selective interaction with the analyte. To achieve this, the principle of excited-state electron transfer is applied with pyrene as the fluorophore. Therefore the same instrumentation based on a small, ambient air-nitrogen laser and solid-state electronics can be used to measure different analytes, for example, oxygen, pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, ammonium, lead, cadmium, zinc, and phosphate.

  11. Super-resolved multimodal multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Jeffrey J; Domingue, Scott R; Motz, Alyssa M Allende; DeLuca, Keith F; DeLuca, Jennifer G; Kuciauskas, Darius; Levi, Dean H; Squier, Jeff A; Bartels, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all super-resolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of probe molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing super-resolved imaging of contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states such as harmonic generation (HG). Here we report a super-resolution technique based on SPatIal Frequency modulated Imaging (SPIFI) that permits super-resolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism, and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal super-resolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2$\\eta$ below the diffraction limit, where $\\eta$ is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI has the potential to not only pro...

  12. Intracellular Monitoring of AS1411 Aptamer by Time-Resolved Microspectrofluorimetry and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočišová, Eva; Praus, Petr; Bok, Jiří; Bonneau, Stéphanie; Sureau, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Time-resolved microspectrofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy imaging-two complementary fluorescence techniques-provide important information about the intracellular distribution, level of uptake and binding/interactions inside living cell of the labeled molecule of interest. They were employed to monitor the "fate" of AS1411 aptamer labeled by ATTO 425 in human living cells. Confocal microspectrofluorimeter adapted for time-resolved intracellular fluorescence measurements by using a phase-modulation principle with homodyne data acquisition was employed to obtain emission spectra and to determine fluorescence lifetimes in U-87 MG tumor brain cells and Hs68 non-tumor foreskin cells. Acquired spectra from both the intracellular space and the reference solutions were treated to observe the aptamer localization and its interaction with biological structures inside the living cell. The emission spectra and the maximum emission wavelengths coming from the cells are practically identical, however significant lifetime lengthening was observed for tumor cell line in comparison to non-tumor one.

  13. Use of Time-Resolved Fluorescence to Monitor Bioactive Compounds in Plant Based Foodstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adília Lemos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity has recently received much interest in the food industry because of their potential health benefits. Most of these compounds are plant based, such as polyphenolics and carotenoids, and there is a need to monitor them from the field through processing and into the body. Ideally, a monitoring technique should be non-invasive with the potential for remote capabilities. The application of the phenomenon of fluorescence has proved to be well suited, as many plant associated compounds exhibit fluorescence. The photophysical behaviour of fluorescent molecules is also highly dependent on their microenvironment, making them suitable probes to monitor changes in pH, viscosity and polarity, for example. Time-resolved fluorescence techniques have recently come to the fore, as they offer the ability to obtain more information, coupled with the fact that the fluorescence lifetime is an absolute measure, while steady state just provides relative and average information. In this work, we will present illustrative time-resolved measurements, rather than a comprehensive review, to show the potential of time-resolved fluorescence applied to the study of bioactive substances. The aim is to help assess if any changes occur in their form, going from extraction via storage and cooking to the interaction with serum albumin, a principal blood transport protein.

  14. CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral fluorescence imaging for DNA molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Nan; Cheung, Kawai; Wong, Hiu Tong; Ho, Derek

    2014-10-31

    Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art.

  15. CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Guo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art.

  16. Photophysical behavior and fluorescence quenching by halides of quinidine dication: Steady state and time resolved study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Neeraj Kumar; Tewari, Neeraj; Arora, Priyanka; Rautela, Ranjana; Pant, Sanjay [Photophysics Laboratory, Department of Physics, DSB Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263002, Uttarakhand (India); Joshi, Hem Chandra, E-mail: hem_sup@yahoo.co.uk [Institute for Plasma Research, Laser Diagnostics Division, Bhat, Near Indira Bridge, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat (India)

    2015-02-15

    The fluorescence quenching of quinidine in acidified aqueous solution by various halides (Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −} and I{sup −}) was studied using steady state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. The quenching process was characterized by Stern–Volmer (S–V) plots. Possibility of conformers (one is not quenched by halide and the other is quenched) is invoked to explain the observed results. - Highlights: • Fluorescence quenching of quinidine in acidified aqueous solution by halides. • Various quenching parameters have been estimated. • Possibility of conformers is invoked to explain the observed results.

  17. Feasibility analysis of an epidermal glucose sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study is to test the feasibility of using an embedded time-resolved fluorescence sensor for monitoring glucose concentration. Skin is modeled as a multilayer medium with each layer having its own optical properties and fluorophore absorption coefficients, lifetimes, and quantum yields obtained from the literature. It is assumed that the two main fluorophores contributing to the fluorescence at these excitation and emission wavelengths are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)H and collagen. The intensity distributions of excitation and fluorescent light in skin are determined by solving the transient radiative transfer equation by using the modified method of characteristics. The fluorophore lifetimes are then recovered from the simulated fluorescence decays and compared with the actual lifetimes used in the simulations. Furthermore, the effect of adding Poissonian noise to the simulated decays on recovering the lifetimes was studied. For all cases, it was found that the fluorescence lifetime of NADH could not be recovered because of its negligible contribution to the overall fluorescence signal. The other lifetimes could be recovered to within 1.3% of input values. Finally, the glucose concentrations within the skin were recovered to within 13.5% of their actual values, indicating a possibility of measuring glucose concentrations by using a time-resolved fluorescence sensor.

  18. Time-Resolved Fluorescence in Lipid Bilayers: Selected Applications and Advantages over Steady State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Mariana; Šachl, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Coutinho, Ana; Prieto, Manuel; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence methods are versatile tools for obtaining dynamic and topological information about biomembranes because the molecular interactions taking place in lipid membranes frequently occur on the same timescale as fluorescence emission. The fluorescence intensity decay, in particular, is a powerful reporter of the molecular environment of a fluorophore. The fluorescence lifetime can be sensitive to the local polarity, hydration, viscosity, and/or presence of fluorescence quenchers/energy acceptors within several nanometers of the vicinity of a fluorophore. Illustrative examples of how time-resolved fluorescence measurements can provide more valuable and detailed information about a system than the time-integrated (steady-state) approach will be presented in this review: 1), determination of membrane polarity and mobility using time-dependent spectral shifts; 2), identification of submicroscopic domains by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy; 3), elucidation of membrane leakage mechanisms from dye self-quenching assays; and 4), evaluation of nanodomain sizes by time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25517142

  19. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay for C-Reactive Protein Using Colloidal Semiconducting Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Hänninen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Besides the typical short-lived fluorescence with decay times in the nanosecond range, colloidal II/VI semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in buffer also possess a long-lived fluorescence component with decay times in the microsecond range. Here, the signal intensity of the long-lived luminescence at microsecond range is shown to increase 1,000-fold for CdTe nanoparticles in PBS buffer. This long-lived fluorescence can be conveniently employed for time-gated fluorescence detection, which allows for improved signal-to-noise ratio and thus the use of low concentrations of nanoparticles. The detection principle is demonstrated with a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP using CdSe-ZnS nanoparticles and green light excitation.

  20. Development of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopic technique for the analysis of biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Our developments of the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF detection system for biomolecules are presented. This system is based on the tunable (320 nm to 475 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses used to excite various biomolecules. The detection part is the Streak System for Fluorescence Lifetime Spectroscopy (Hamamatsu, Japan. The system consists of a C4334-01 streakscope, as a detector, DG 535 digital pulse/delay generator, C5094-S Spectrograph and HPD-TA System, as a temporal analyzer. The TR-LIF spectrometer is designed primarily to study the temperature and pressure effects on fluorescence behavior of biomolecules upon excitation with a single nanosecond pulse. The design of this system has capability to combine laser-induced breakdown (LIB with fluorescence, as well to study optodynamic behavior of fluorescence biomolecules.

  1. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  2. Locating and classifying fluorescent tags behind turbid layers using time-resolved inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Barsi, Christopher; Raviv, Dan; Chen, Ou; Bawendi, Moungi G; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-04-13

    The use of fluorescent probes and the recovery of their lifetimes allow for significant advances in many imaging systems, in particular, medical imaging systems. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate reconstructing the locations and lifetimes of fluorescent markers hidden behind a turbid layer. This opens the door to various applications for non-invasive diagnosis, analysis, flowmetry and inspection. The method is based on a time-resolved measurement that captures information about both fluorescence lifetime and spatial position of the probes. To reconstruct the scene, the method relies on a sparse optimization framework to invert time-resolved measurements. This wide-angle technique does not rely on coherence, and does not require the probes to be directly in line of sight of the camera, making it potentially suitable for long-range imaging.

  3. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  4. Fluorescence imaging and time-resolved spectroscopy of steroid using confocal synchrotron radiation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; van der Oord, C. J. R.; Levine, Yehudi K.; Munro, Ian H.; Jones, Gareth R.; Shaw, D. A.; Rommerts, Fokko F.

    1994-08-01

    The Confocal Synchrotron Radiation Microscope at Daresbury was used in a study of the transport and distribution of the steroid Coumestrol in single Leydig cells. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation in combination with UV compatible microscope optics affords the extension of confocal microscopy from the visible to the UV region down to about 200 nm. Consequently fluorescent molecules with absorption bands in the UV can be imaged. In addition the pulsed nature of the light source allows us to perform time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on microscopic volumes. Coumestrol is a naturally fluorescing plant steroid exhibiting estrogenic activity. In physiological environments it has an absorption peak in the UV at 340 nm and it emits around 440 nm. First results indicate that the Coumestrol transport through the cell membrane is diffusion limited. The weak fluorescence observed in the nuclei of the Leydig cells may be due to fluorescence quenching arising from the interaction of the Coumesterol with nuclear components. However, micro-volume time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on cell nuclei have revealed the same decay behavior for Coumesterol in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the cells.

  5. Time-resolved fluorescence analysis of the mobile flavin cofactor in -hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Petra A W Van Den Berg; Koert Grever; Arie Van Hoek; Willem J H Van Berkel; Antonie J W G Visser

    2007-03-01

    Conformational heterogeneity of the FAD cofactor in -hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) was investigated with time-resolved polarized flavin fluorescence. For binary enzyme/substrate (analogue) complexes of wild-type PHBH and Tyr222 mutants, crystallographic studies have revealed two distinct flavin conformations; the `in’ conformation with the isoalloxazine ring located in the active site, and the `out’ conformation with the isoalloxazine ring disposed towards the protein surface. Fluorescence-lifetime analysis of these complexes revealed similar lifetime distributions for the `in’ and `out’ conformations. The reason for this is twofold. First, the active site of PHBH contains various potential fluorescence-quenching sites close to the flavin. Fluorescence analysis of uncomplexed PHBH Y222V and Y222A showed that Tyr222 is responsible for picosecond fluorescence quenching free enzyme. In addition, other potential quenching sites, including a tryptophan and two tyrosines involved in substrate binding, are located nearby. Since the shortest distance between these quenching sites and the isoalloxazine ring differs only little on average, these aromatic residues are likely to contribute to fluorescence quenching. Second, the effect of flavin conformation on the fluorescence lifetime distribution is blurred by binding of the aromatic substrates: saturation with aromatic substrates induces highly efficient fluorescence quenching. The flavin conformation is therefore only reflected in the small relative contributions of the longer lifetimes.

  6. Assembling Tunable Time-Resolved Fluorescence Layer onto Nano-Gold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The assembling of a coating of time-resolved fluorescent chelator BSPDA (abbreviated for 4,7-bis(sulfhydrylphenyl)-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) onto a nano-gold layer was demonstrated. First, BSPDA was synthesized by simple procedures, and then an approach was developed to immobilize BSPDA onto the nano-gold layer deposited on a silane modified glass substrate, whereby europium ion (Ⅲ, Eu3+) was captured and released owing to the interactive process of complexation and dissociation between BSPDA functionalized coating and Eu3+ solution. The fluorescence spectra and related lifetimes were determined. Also, the BSPDA functionalized coating's specific complexation with Eu3+ on the BSPDA assembly layer and the nonspecific adsorption of Eu3+ on the nano-gold layer were compared. These results allowed a selective complexation of Eu3+ by assembling a BSPDA chelating layer on the nano-gold layer;thus, a tunable time-resolved fluorescent layer was covalently attached. The results of the nanoparticle assembling and probing (or labeling) processes to specific bio-systems were very interesting and had significant implications to time-resolved-fluorescence-based detection on biosensor surfaces such as DNA chip and to arrayed light display devices.

  7. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  8. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  9. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankelevich, Diego R; Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Elson, Daniel S; Marcu, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements of low quantum efficiency sub-nanosecond fluorophores.

  10. Advances in ultrafast time resolved fluorescence physics for cancer detection in optical biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Alfano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the use of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to extract fundamental kinetic information on molecular species in tissues. The temporal profiles reveal the lifetime and amplitudes associated with key active molecules distinguishing the local spectral environment of tissues. The femtosecond laser pulses at 310 nm excite the tissue. The emission profile at 340 nm from tryptophan is non-exponential due to the micro-environment. The slow and fast amplitudes and lifetimes of emission profiles reveal that cancer and normal states can be distinguished. Time resolved optical methods offer a new cancer diagnostic modality for the medical community.

  11. Real time optical Biopsy: Time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy instrumentation and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittle, David S.; Vasefi, Fartash; Patil, Chirag G.; Mamelak, Adam; Black, Keith L.; Butte, Pramod V.

    2016-12-01

    The Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-FS) has the potential to differentiate tumor and normal tissue in real time during surgical excision. In this manuscript, we describe the design of a novel TR-FS device, along with preliminary data on detection accuracy for fluorophores in a mixture. The instrument is capable of near real-time fluorescence lifetime acquisition in multiple spectral bands and analysis. It is also able to recover fluorescence lifetime with sub-20ps accuracy as validated with individual organic fluorescence dyes and dye mixtures yielding lifetime values for standard fluorescence dyes that closely match with published data. We also show that TR-FS is able to quantify the relative concentration of fluorescence dyes in a mixture by the unmixing of lifetime decays. We show that the TR-FS prototype is able to identify in near-real time the concentrations of dyes in a complex mixture based on previously trained data. As a result, we demonstrate that in complex mixtures of fluorophores, the relative concentration information is encoded in the fluorescence lifetime across multiple spectral bands. We show for the first time the temporal and spectral measurements of a mixture of fluorochromes and the ability to differentiate relative concentrations of each fluorochrome mixture in real time.

  12. Characterization of powellite-based solid solutions by site-selective time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Moritz; Heck, Stephanie; Bosbach, Dirk; Ganschow, Steffen; Walther, Clemens; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the solid solution system Ca-2(MoO4)(2)-NaGd(MoO4)(2) on the molecular scale, by means of site-selective time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Eu3+ is used as a trace fluorescent probe, homogeneously substituting for Gd3+ in the solid solution crystal structure. Site-selective TRLFS of a series of polycrystalline samples covering the whole composition range of the solid solution series from 10% substitution of Ca2+ to the NaGd end-member re...

  13. Advances in frequency-domain fluorometry, gigahertz instrumentation, time-dependent photomigration, and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szmacinski, Henryk; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Johnson, Michael L.

    1992-02-01

    During the past seven years, there have been remarkable advances in the frequency-domain method for measurement of time-resolved emission or light scattering. In this presentation we describe the recent extension of the frequency range to 10 GHz using a specially designed microchannel plate PMT. Experimental data will be shown for measurement of picosecond rotational diffusion and for sub-picosecond resolution of time delays. The resolution of ps to ns timescale processes is not obtained at the expense of sensitivity or is it shown by measurements on the intrinsic tryptophan emission from hemoglobin. We also describe a time- resolved reflectance imaging experiment on a scattering medium containing an absorbing object. Time-resolved imaging of the back-scattered light is realized by means of a RF-phase- sensitive camera, synchronized to the laser pulses. By processing the stored images, a final image can be created, the contrast of which is based only on time differences of the back- scattered photons. This image reveals the presence and position of the absorber within the scattering medium. And finally, we describe a new methodology, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), in which the contrast depends on the fluorescence lifetime at each point in a two-dimensional image, and not the local concentration and/or intensity of the fluorophore. We used FLIM to create lifetime images of NADH when free in solution and when bound to malate dehydrogenase. FLIM has numerous potential applications in cell biology and imaging.

  14. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development.

  15. Diffuse optical fluorescence tomography using time-resolved data acquired in transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Frederic; Fortier, Simon; Friedlander, Michael P.

    2007-02-01

    We present an algorithm using data acquired with a time-resolved system with the goal of reconstructing sources of fluorescence emanating from the deep interior of highly scattering biological tissues. A novelty in our tomography algorithm is the integration of a light transport model adapted to rodent geometries. For small volumes, our analysis suggest that neglecting the index of refraction mismatch between diffusive and non-diffusive regions, as well as the curved nature of the boundary, can have a profound impact on fluorescent images and spectroscopic applications relying on diffusion curve fitting. Moreover, we introduce a new least-squares solver with bound constraints adapted for optical problems where a physical non-negative constraint can be imposed. Finally, we find that maximizing the time-related information content of the data in the reconstruction process significantly enhances the quality of fluorescence images. Preliminary noise propagation and detector placement optimization analysis are also presented.

  16. Efficient signal processing for time-resolved fluorescence detection of nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Hacquebard, L.; Childress, L.

    2016-03-01

    Room-temperature fluorescence detection of the nitrogen-vacancy center electronic spin typically has low signal to noise, requiring long experiments to reveal an averaged signal. Here, we present a simple approach to analysis of time-resolved fluorescence data that permits an improvement in measurement precision through signal processing alone. Applying our technique to experimental data reveals an improvement in signal to noise equivalent to a 14% increase in photon collection efficiency. We further explore the dependence of the signal to noise ratio on excitation power, and analyze our results using a rate equation model. Our results provide a rubric for optimizing fluorescence spin detection, which has direct implications for improving precision of nitrogen-vacancy-based sensors.

  17. Drug/protein interactions studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Vayá, Ignacio; Bonancía, Paula; Jiménez, M. C.; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2014-09-01

    We report here on a recent time-resolved fluorescence study [1] of the interaction between flurbiprofen (FBP), a chiral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and human serum albumin (HSA), the main transport protein in the human body. We compare the results obtained for the drug-protein complex with those of various covalently linked flurbiprofentryptophan dyads having well-defined geometries. In all cases stereoselective dynamic fluorescence quenching is observed, varying greatly from one system to another. In addition, the fluorescence anisotropy decays also display a clear stereoselectivity. For the drug-protein complexes, this can be interpreted in terms of the protein microenvironment playing a significant role in the conformational relaxation of FBP, which is more restricted in the case of the (R)- enantiomer.

  18. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA) fluorophore in silica and PVA thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Shah, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    in silica thin films and PVA films were studied by means of steady-state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. We have found that the azadioxatriangulenium entrapped in silica thin film has a wider fluorescence lifetime distribution (Lorentzian distribution), lower fluorescence efficiencies, shorter....... In contrast to the PVA matrices, the porous silica films allow restricted rotations of Azadioxatriangulenium molecules, which result in faster and complex fluorescence anisotropy decays suggesting energy migration among dye molecules....

  19. Thermal dynamics of thermoelectric phenomena from frequency resolved methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Cañadas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of thermoelectric (TE phenomena is important for the detailed knowledge of the operation of TE materials and devices. By analyzing the impedance response of both a single TE element and a TE device under suspended conditions, we provide new insights into the thermal dynamics of these systems. The analysis is performed employing parameters such as the thermal penetration depth, the characteristic thermal diffusion frequency and the thermal diffusion time. It is shown that in both systems the dynamics of the thermoelectric response is governed by how the Peltier heat production/absorption at the junctions evolves. In a single thermoelement, at high frequencies the thermal waves diffuse semi-infinitely from the junctions towards the half-length. When the frequency is reduced, the thermal waves can penetrate further and eventually reach the half-length where they start to cancel each other and further penetration is blocked. In the case of a TE module, semi-infinite thermal diffusion along the thickness of the ceramic layers occurs at the highest frequencies. As the frequency is decreased, heat storage in the ceramics becomes dominant and starts to compete with the diffusion of the thermal waves towards the half-length of the thermoelements. Finally, the cancellation of the waves occurs at the lowest frequencies. It is demonstrated that the analysis is able to identify and separate the different physical processes and to provide a detailed understanding of the dynamics of different thermoelectric effects.

  20. Thermal dynamics of thermoelectric phenomena from frequency resolved methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañadas, J.; Min, G.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the dynamics of thermoelectric (TE) phenomena is important for the detailed knowledge of the operation of TE materials and devices. By analyzing the impedance response of both a single TE element and a TE device under suspended conditions, we provide new insights into the thermal dynamics of these systems. The analysis is performed employing parameters such as the thermal penetration depth, the characteristic thermal diffusion frequency and the thermal diffusion time. It is shown that in both systems the dynamics of the thermoelectric response is governed by how the Peltier heat production/absorption at the junctions evolves. In a single thermoelement, at high frequencies the thermal waves diffuse semi-infinitely from the junctions towards the half-length. When the frequency is reduced, the thermal waves can penetrate further and eventually reach the half-length where they start to cancel each other and further penetration is blocked. In the case of a TE module, semi-infinite thermal diffusion along the thickness of the ceramic layers occurs at the highest frequencies. As the frequency is decreased, heat storage in the ceramics becomes dominant and starts to compete with the diffusion of the thermal waves towards the half-length of the thermoelements. Finally, the cancellation of the waves occurs at the lowest frequencies. It is demonstrated that the analysis is able to identify and separate the different physical processes and to provide a detailed understanding of the dynamics of different thermoelectric effects.

  1. Resolving environmental microheterogeneity and dielectric relaxation in fluorescence kinetics of protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; McLaughlin, Damien; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav

    2016-09-01

    The fluorescence intensity decay of protein is easily measurable and reports on the intrinsic fluorophore-local environment interactions on the sub-nm spatial and sub-ns temporal scales, which are consistent with protein activity in numerous biomedical and industrial processes. This makes time-resolved fluorescence a perfect tool for understanding, monitoring and controlling these processes at the molecular level, but the complexity of the decay, which has been traditionally fitted to multi-exponential functions, has hampered the development of this technique over the last few decades. Using the example of tryptophan in HSA we present the alternative to the conventional approach to modelling intrinsic florescence intensity decay in protein where the key factors determining fluorescence decay, i.e. the excited-state depopulation and the dielectric relaxation (Toptygin and Brand 2000 Chem. Phys. Lett. 322 496-502), are represented by the individual relaxation functions. This allows quantification of both effects separately by determining their parameters from the global analysis of a series of fluorescence intensity decays measured at different detection wavelengths. Moreover, certain pairs of the recovered parameters of tryptophan were found to be correlated, indicating the influence of the dielectric relaxation on the transient rate of the electronic transitions. In this context the potential for the dual excited state depopulation /dielectric relaxation fluorescence lifetime sensing is discussed.

  2. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankelevich, Diego R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, 3101 Kemper Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura, E-mail: lmarcu@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Elson, Daniel S. [Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  3. Effect of noise on Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We study the effects of noise in Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses. We quantify the measurement accuracy in the presence of additive, muliplicative, and quantization noise, and discuss filtering and pre-processing of the data.

  4. Development of a High-Speed Digitizer to Time Resolve Nanosecond Fluorescence Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Moreno-García

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of a high-speed digitizer system to measure time-domain voltage pulses in nanoseconds range is presented in this work. The digitizer design includes a high performance digital signal processor, a high-bandwidth analog-to-digital converter of flash-type, a set of delay lines, and a computer to achieve the time-domain measurements. A program running on the processor applies a time-equivalent sampling technique to acquire the input pulse. The processor communicates with the computer via a serial port RS-232 to receive commands and to transmit data. A control program written in LabVIEW 7.1 starts an acquisition routine in the processor. The program reads data from processor point by point in each occurrence of the signal, and plots each point to recover the time-resolved input pulse after n occurrences. The developed prototype is applied to measure fluorescence pulses from a homemade spectrometer. For this application, the LabVIEW program was improved to control the spectrometer, and to register and plot time-resolved fluorescence pulses produced by a substance. The developed digitizer has 750 MHz of analog input bandwidth, and it is able to resolve 2 ns rise-time pulses with 150 ps of resolution and a temporal error of 2.6 percent.

  5. Compressive hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging and spatial multiplexing have offered information content and collection-efficiency boosts in microscopy, but efficient implementations for macroscopic applications are still lacking. An imaging platform based on time-resolved structured light and hyperspectral single-pixel detection has been developed to perform quantitative macroscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging (MFLI) over a large field of view (FOV) and multiple spectral bands simultaneously. The system makes use of three digital micromirror device (DMD)-based spatial light modulators (SLMs) to generate spatial optical bases and reconstruct N by N images over 16 spectral channels with a time-resolved capability (∼40 ps temporal resolution) using fewer than N2 optical measurements. We demonstrate the potential of this new imaging platform by quantitatively imaging near-infrared (NIR) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) both in vitro and in vivo. The technique is well suited for quantitative hyperspectral lifetime imaging with a high sensitivity and paves the way for many important biomedical applications.

  6. Enhanced speed in fluorescence imaging using beat frequency multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Wang, Yisen; Hamad, Syed; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence imaging using radiofrequency-tagged emission (FIRE) is an emerging technique that enables higher imaging speed (namely, temporal resolution) in fluorescence microscopy compared to conventional fluorescence imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy and wide-field microscopy. It works based on the principle that it uses multiple intensity-modulated fields in an interferometric setup as excitation fields and applies frequency-division multiplexing to fluorescence signals. Unfortunately, despite its high potential, FIRE has limited imaging speed due to two practical limitations: signal bandwidth and signal detection efficiency. The signal bandwidth is limited by that of an acousto-optic deflector (AOD) employed in the setup, which is typically 100-200 MHz for the spectral range of fluorescence excitation (400-600 nm). The signal detection efficiency is limited by poor spatial mode-matching between two interfering fields to produce a modulated excitation field. Here we present a method to overcome these limitations and thus to achieve higher imaging speed than the prior version of FIRE. Our method achieves an increase in signal bandwidth by a factor of two and nearly optimal mode matching, which enables the imaging speed limited by the lifetime of the target fluorophore rather than the imaging system itself. The higher bandwidth and better signal detection efficiency work synergistically because higher bandwidth requires higher signal levels to avoid the contribution of shot noise and amplifier noise to the fluorescence signal. Due to its unprecedentedly high-speed performance, our method has a wide variety of applications in cancer detection, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine.

  7. A CTRW-based model of time-resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging in a turbid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomordik, Victor; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Hassan, Moinuddin; Pajevic, Sinisa; Weiss, George H

    2010-12-01

    We develop an analytic model of time-resolved fluorescent imaging of photons migrating through a semi-infinite turbid medium bounded by an infinite plane in the presence of a single stationary point fluorophore embedded in the medium. In contrast to earlier models of fluorescent imaging in which photon motion is assumed to be some form of continuous diffusion process, the present analysis is based on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) on a simple cubic lattice, the object being to estimate the position and lifetime of the fluorophore. Such information can provide information related to local variations in pH and temperature with potential medical significance. Aspects of the theory were tested using time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence from small inclusions inside tissue-like phantoms. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions provided that the fluorophore was not located too close to the planar boundary, a common problem in many diffusive systems.

  8. Combined influences of chromatic aberration and scattering in depth-resolved two-photon fluorescence endospectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yicong; Li, Xingde

    2010-10-27

    The influence of chromatic aberration of an objective lens in two-photon fluorescence (TPF) endospectroscopy of scattering media has been systematically investigated through both experiments and numerical simulations. Experiments were carried out on a uniform 3D scattering gelatin phantom embedded with TiO(2) granules (to mimic tissue scattering) and fluorescein-tagged polystyrene beads. It was found that fluorescence spectral intensity and lineshape varied as a function of depth when measured with a gradient-index (GRIN) lens which has severe chromatic aberration. The spectral distortion caused by the chromatic aberration became diminishing as the imaging depth increased. Ray tracing analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to study the interplay of chromatic aberration and scattering in the depth-resolved TPF spectra. The simulation results suggest that the collected fluorescence signals from deeper layers included more out-of-focus photons that experienced a few or multiple scatterings, which diminish the influence of chromatic aberration on the measured TPF spectra. The simulated collection efficiencies of TPF at different wavelengths and depths can be used to properly recover the true depth-resolved TPF spectra of a relatively uniform scattering medium.

  9. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of nucleotide flipping by restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Robert K; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Chen, Kai; Kubala, Marta; Siksnys, Virginijus; Jones, Anita C

    2009-11-01

    Restriction enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C, specific for interrupted 5-bp target sequences, flip the central base pair of these sequences into their protein pockets to facilitate sequence recognition and adjust the DNA cleavage pattern. We have used time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-aminopurine-labelled DNA in complex with each of these enzymes in solution to explore the nucleotide flipping mechanism and to obtain a detailed picture of the molecular environment of the extrahelical bases. We also report the first study of the 7-bp cutter, PfoI, whose recognition sequence (T/CCNGGA) overlaps with that of the Ecl18kI-type enzymes, and for which the crystal structure is unknown. The time-resolved fluorescence experiments reveal that PfoI also uses base flipping as part of its DNA recognition mechanism and that the extrahelical bases are captured by PfoI in binding pockets whose structures are quite different to those of the structurally characterized enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C. The fluorescence decay parameters of all the enzyme-DNA complexes are interpreted to provide insight into the mechanisms used by these four restriction enzymes to flip and recognize bases and the relationship between nucleotide flipping and DNA cleavage.

  10. Use of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate diagnostic value of collagen degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Joanna; Cyrankiewicz, Michał; Wybranowski, Tomasz; Ziomkowska, Blanka; Ośmiałowski, Borys; Obońska, Ewa; Augustyńska, Beata; Kruszewski, Stefan; Kubica, Jacek

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of collagen degradation products (CDPs) may reflect the process of left ventricular remodeling (LVR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential diagnostic usefulness of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) in assessment of CDPs. The preliminary experiment was designed to establish if CDPs’ characteristics might be visible by mean fluorescence lifetime (FLT) in determined conditions. The in vitro model of CDPs was prepared by conducting the hydrolysis of type III collagen. The FLT of samples was measured by the time-resolved spectrometer Life Spec II with the subnanosecond pulsed 360-nm EPLED diode. The FLTs were obtained by deconvolution analysis of the data using a multiexponential model of fluorescence decay. In order to determine the limit of traceability of CDPs, a comparison of different collagen/plasma ratio in samples was performed. The results of our study showed that the increase of added plasma to hydrolyzed collagen extended the mean FLT. Thus, the diagnosis of LVR based on measurements using TRFS is possible. However, it is important to point out the experiment was preliminary and further investigation in this field of research is crucial.

  11. Frequency resolved transverse mode instability in rod fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette Marie; Laurila, Marko; Maack, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    Frequency dynamics of transverse mode instabilities (TMIs) are investigated by testing three 285/100 rod fibers in a single-pass amplifier setup reaching up to ~200W of extracted output power without beam instabilities. The pump power is increased well above the TMI threshold to uncover output...

  12. Thermal dynamics of thermoelectric phenomena from frequency resolved methods

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of thermoelectric (TE) phenomena is important for the detailed knowledge of the operation of TE materials and devices. By analyzing the impedance response of both a single TE element and a TE device under suspended conditions, we provide new insights into the thermal dynamics of these systems. The analysis is performed employing parameters such as the thermal penetration depth, the characteristic thermal diffusion frequency and the thermal diffusion time. It is show...

  13. Advanced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy Techniques for the Investigation of Peptide Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Neil R.

    The ubiquitous cross beta sheet peptide motif is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative diseases while at the same time offers remarkable potential for constructing isomorphic high-performance bionanomaterials. Despite an emerging understanding of the complex folding landscape of cross beta structures in determining disease etiology and final structure, we lack knowledge of the critical initial stages of nucleation and growth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding of these key stages in the cross-beta nucleation and growth pathways using cutting-edge microscopy techniques. In addition, I present a new combined time-resolved fluorescence analysis technique with the potential to advance our current understanding of subtle molecular level interactions that play a pivotal role in peptide self-assembly. Using the central nucleating core of Alzheimer's Amyloid-beta protein, Abeta(16 22), as a model system, utilizing electron, time-resolved, and non-linear microscopy, I capture the initial and transient nucleation stages of peptide assembly into the cross beta motif. In addition, I have characterized the nucleation pathway, from monomer to paracrystalline nanotubes in terms of morphology and fluorescence lifetime, corroborating the predicted desolvation process that occurs prior to cross-beta nucleation. Concurrently, I have identified unique heterogeneous cross beta domains contained within individual nanotube structures, which have potential bionanomaterials applications. Finally, I describe a combined fluorescence theory and analysis technique that dramatically increases the sensitivity of current time-resolved techniques. Together these studies demonstrate the potential for advanced microscopy techniques in the identification and characterization of the cross-beta folding pathway, which will further our understanding of both amyloidogenesis and bionanomaterials.

  14. Study on time-resolved fluorescence dynamics of cyanine dye sensitizing AgBr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra of three different dyes adsorbed on the tabular and cubic AgBr microcrystals are obtained by the picosecond time-resolved streak camera technique. The dependence of the ultrafast electron transferring from dye-aggre-gates to the conduction band of AgBr and the efficiency of spectral sensitization on different kinds of dyes with different concentrations is analyzed. Further more,the microcosmic mechanism of the sensitization process is discussed. It is found that the fluorescence decay curves are fitted very well by the double exponential func-tion,consisting of a slow component and a fast one with large amplitude. We con-sider this fast one mainly attributable to the electron transfer from dye J-aggre-gates to the conduction band of AgBr.

  15. Simultaneous quantitation of diphtheria and tetanus antibodies by double antigen, time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggerbeck, H; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Heron, I

    1996-04-19

    A dual, double antigen, time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for the simultaneous detection and quantitation of diphtheria (D) and tetanus (T) antibodies in sera has been developed. In the double antigen format one arm of the antibody binds to antigen coated microtitre wells and the other arm binds to labelled antigen to provide a fluorescent signal. This assay was found to be functionally specific for IgG antibodies and showed a good correlation with established toxin neutralization assays. Furthermore, the double antigen set-up was species independent, permitting the direct use of existing international references of animal origin to measure protective antibody levels in humans in international units (IU/ml). The detection limit corresponded to 0.0003 IU/ml with Eu(3+)-labelled toxoids and to 0.0035 IU/ml using Sm(3+)-labelled toxoids. The assay was fast with a high capacity making it a suitable method for serological surveillance studies.

  16. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-28

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  17. Fluorescence Dynamics in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of a Live Cell: Time-Resolved Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Nandi, Somen; Ghosh, Catherine; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-09-19

    Fluorescence dynamics in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a live non-cancer lung cell (WI38) and a lung cancer cell (A549) are studied by using time-resolved confocal microscopy. To selectively study the organelle, ER, we have used an ER-Tracker dye. From the emission maximum (λmaxem) of the ER-Tracker dye, polarity (i.e. dielectric constant, ϵ) in the ER region of the cells (≈500 nm in WI38 and ≈510 nm in A549) is estimated to be similar to that of chloroform (λmaxem =506 nm, ϵ≈5). The red shift by 10 nm in λmaxem in the cancer cell (A549) suggests a slightly higher polarity compared to the non-cancer cell (WI38). The fluorescence intensity of the ER-Tracker dye exhibits prolonged intermittent oscillations on a timescale of 2-6 seconds for the cancer cell (A549). For the non-cancer cell (WI38), such fluorescence oscillations are much less prominent. The marked fluorescence intensity oscillations in the cancer cell are attributed to enhanced calcium oscillations. The average solvent relaxation time () of the ER region in the lung cancer cell (A549, 250±50 ps) is about four times faster than that in the non-cancer cell (WI38, 1000±50 ps).

  18. Configurational fluctuations and flavin-substrate interactions in the flavoenzyme ThyX studied by time- and spectrally resolved fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebl U.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond-resolved fluorescence of bacterial thymidilate synthase using a Kerr-gate based setup identifies a close-by tyrosine involved in flavin fluorescence quenching, shows that the substrate dUMP acts as a strong quencher itself and highlights functional configurational flexibility

  19. A Novel Europium Chelate Coated Nanosphere for Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Shen

    Full Text Available A novel europium ligand 2,2',2'',2'''-(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-diyl bis (methylene bis (azanetriyl tetra acetic acid (BC-EDTA was synthesized and characterized. It shows an emission spectrum peak at 610 nm when it is excited at 360 nm, with a large Stock shift (250 nm. It is covalently coated on the surface of a bare silica nanosphere containi free amino groups, using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-Hydroxysuccinimide. We also observed an interesting phenomenon that when BC-EDTA is labeled with a silica nanosphere, the chelate shows different excitation spectrum peaks of about 295 nm. We speculate that the carboxyl has a significant influence on its excitation spectrum. The BC-EDTA/Eu3+coated nanosphere could be used as a fluorescent probe for time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay. We labeled the antibody with the fluorescent nanosphere to develop a nanosphere based hepatitis B surface antigen as a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay reagent, which is very easy to operate and eliminates potential contamination of Eu3+ contained in the environment. The analytical and functional sensitivities are 0.0037 μg/L and 0.08 μg/L (S/N≥2.0 respectively. The detection range is 0.08-166.67 μg/L, which is much wider than that of ELISA (0.2-5 μg/L. It is comparable to the commercial dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoro-immunoassay system (DELFIA reagents (0.2-145 μg/L. We propose that it can fulfill clinical applications.

  20. Rapid and economical data acquisition in ultrafast frequency-resolved spectroscopy using choppers and a microcontroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Monahan, Daniele M; Fleming, Graham

    2016-08-08

    Spectrometers and cameras are used in ultrafast spectroscopy to achieve high resolution in both time and frequency domains. Frequency-resolved signals from the camera pixels cannot be processed by common lock-in amplifiers, which have only a limited number of input channels. Here we demonstrate a rapid and economical method that achieves the function of a lock-in amplifier using mechanical choppers and a programmable microcontroller. We demonstrate the method's effectiveness by performing a frequency-resolved pump-probe measurement on the dye Nile Blue in solution.

  1. Steady-State and Time-Resolved Studies into the Origin of the Intrinsic Fluorescence of G-Quadruplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, Madeline E; Rumble, Christopher A; Kwok, Chun Kit; Breffke, Jens; Maroncelli, Mark; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-06-16

    Stretches of guanines in DNA and RNA can fold into guanine quadruplex structures (GQSs). These structures protect telomeres in DNA and regulate gene expression in RNA. GQSs have an intrinsic fluorescence that is sensitive to different parameters, including loop sequence and length. However, the dependence of GQS fluorescence on solution and sequence parameters and the origin of this fluorescence are poorly understood. Herein we examine effects of dangling nucleotides and cosolute conditions on GQS fluorescence using both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The quantum yield of dGGGTGGGTGGGTGGG, termed "dG3T", is found to be modest at ∼2 × 10(-3). Nevertheless, dG3T and its variants are significantly brighter than the common nucleic acid fluorophore 2-aminopurine (2AP) largely due to their sizable extinction coefficients. Dangling 5'-end nucleotides generally reduce emission and blue-shift the resultant spectrum, whereas dangling 3'-end nucleotides slightly enhance fluorescence, particularly on the red side of the emission band. Time-resolved fluorescence decays are broadly distributed in time and require three exponential components for accurate fits. Time-resolved emission spectra suggest the presence of two emitting populations centered at ∼330 and ∼390 nm, with the redder component being a well-defined long-lived (∼1 ns) entity. Insights into GQS fluorescence obtained here should be useful in designing brighter intrinsic RNA and DNA quadruplexes for use in label-free biotechnological applications.

  2. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy of UO2(CO3)3(4-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, E C; Cho, H-R; Baik, M H; Kim, H; Cha, W

    2015-11-21

    The objective of the present study is to examine the luminescence characteristics of UO2(CO3)3(4-) in detail using time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The peak wavelengths and lifetime of UO2(CO3)3(4-) were determined at room temperature using the two excitation laser wavelengths of 266 and 448 nm. The peak wavelengths in the luminescence spectrum exhibited hypsochromic shifts compared with those of UO2(2+). The lifetime determined from several samples containing various uranium concentrations was 8.9 ± 0.8 ns. Explanations for the hindrance to the observation of the luminescence spectrum of UO2(CO3)3(4-) in previous investigations are discussed. The representative experimental parameters, which might interrupt the measurement of weak luminescence, are the insertion delay time of the detection device, the overlapped luminescence of the background materials and the primary inner filter effect in the sample solution.

  3. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for clinical diagnosis of actinic cheilitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Alessandro; Nogueira, Marcelo Saito; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Takahama, Ademar; Azevedo, Rebeca de Souza; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant disorder of the lips. Its first cause is believed to be UV sun radiation. The lesion is highly heterogeneous, making the choice of area to be biopsied difficult. This study exploits the capabilities of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for the identification of the most representative area to be biopsied. A preliminary study was performed on fourteen patients. A classification algorithm was used on data acquired on nine different biopsies. The algorithm discriminated between absent, mild, and moderate dysplasia with a sensitivity of 92.9%, 90.0%, and 80.0%, respectively. The false positive rate for healthy tissue (specificity) was 88.8%. PMID:27867726

  4. Time-resolved fluorescence quenching studies of sodium lauryl ether sulfate micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Leidi C.; Silva, Volnir O.; Quina, Frank H., E-mail: quina@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Moreira Junior, Paulo F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Departamento de Engenharia Quimica; Tcacenco, Celize M. [Fundacao Instituto de Ensino para Osasco (FIEO/UNIFIEO), SP (Brazil). Centro Universitario FIEO. Centro de Estudos Quimicos

    2013-02-15

    Aggregation numbers (N{sub Ag}) of micelles of the commercial anionic detergent sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), with an average of two ethylene oxide subunits, were determined at 30 and 40 deg C by the time-resolved fluorescence quenching method with pyrene as the fluorescent probe and the N-hexadecylpyridinium ion as the quencher. The added-salt dependent growth of SLES micelles ({gamma} = 0.11-0.15, where {gamma} is the slope of a plot of log aggregation number vs. log [Y{sub aq}] and [Y{sub aq}] is the sodium counterion concentration free in the intermicellar aqueous phase) is found to be significantly lower than that of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles ({gamma} ca. 0.25), a difference attributed to the larger headgroup size of SLES. The I{sub 1}/I{sub 3} vibronic intensity ratio and the rate constant for intramicellar quenching of pyrene show that the pyrene solubilization microenvironment and the intramicellar microviscosity are insensitive to micelle size or the presence of added salt. (author)

  5. Time-resolved fluorescence quenching studies of sodium lauryl ether sulfate micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Leidi C.; Silva, Volnir O.; Quina, Frank H., E-mail: quina@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Moreira Junior, Paulo F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Departamento de Engenharia Quimica; Tcacenco, Celize M. [Fundacao Instituto de Ensino para Osasco (FIEO/UNIFIEO), SP (Brazil). Centro Universitario FIEO. Centro de Estudos Quimicos

    2013-02-15

    Aggregation numbers (N{sub Ag}) of micelles of the commercial anionic detergent sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), with an average of two ethylene oxide subunits, were determined at 30 and 40 deg C by the time-resolved fluorescence quenching method with pyrene as the fluorescent probe and the N-hexadecylpyridinium ion as the quencher. The added-salt dependent growth of SLES micelles ({gamma} = 0.11-0.15, where {gamma} is the slope of a plot of log aggregation number vs. log [Y{sub aq}] and [Y{sub aq}] is the sodium counterion concentration free in the intermicellar aqueous phase) is found to be significantly lower than that of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles ({gamma} ca. 0.25), a difference attributed to the larger headgroup size of SLES. The I{sub 1}/I{sub 3} vibronic intensity ratio and the rate constant for intramicellar quenching of pyrene show that the pyrene solubilization microenvironment and the intramicellar microviscosity are insensitive to micelle size or the presence of added salt. (author)

  6. Light adaptation of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthetic organisms change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes and the interactions among these complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed light adaptation of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, whose pigment composition is similar to that of cyanobacteria because its phycobilisomes (PBS) lack phycoerythrin. C. merolae were grown under different light qualities, and their responses were measured by steady-state absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Cells were cultivated under four monochromatic light-emitting diodes (blue, green, yellow, and red), and changes in pigment composition and energy transfer were observed. Cells grown under blue and green light increased their relative phycocyanin levels compared with cells cultured under white light. Energy-transfer processes to photosystem I (PSI) were sensitive to yellow and red light. The contribution of direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI increased only under yellow light, while red light induced a reduction in energy transfer from photosystem II to PSI and an increase in energy transfer from light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex I to PSI. Differences in pigment composition, growth, and energy transfer under different light qualities are discussed.

  7. Solvent sorting in (mixed solvent + electrolyte) systems: Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harun Al Rasidgazi; Hemant K Kashyap; Ranjit Biswas

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscriptwe explore electrolyte-induced modification of preferential solvation of a dipolar solute dissolved in a binary mixture of polar solvents. Composition dependence of solvation characteristics at a fixed electrolyte concentration has been followed. Binary mixtures of two different polarities have been employed to understand the competition between solute-ion and solute-solvent interactions. Time-resolved fluorescence Stokes shift and anisotropy have been measured for coumarin 153 (C153) in moderately polar (ethyl acetate + 1-propanol) and strongly polar (acetonitrile + propylene carbonate) binary mixtures at various mixture compositions, and in the corresponding 1.0M solutions of LiClO4. Both the mixtures show red shifts in C153 absorption and fluorescence emission upon increase of mole fraction of the less polar solvent component in presence of the electrolyte. In addition, measured average solvation times become slower and rotation times faster for the above change in the mixture composition. A semi-molecular theory based on solution density fluctuations has been developed and found to successfully capture the essential features of the measured Stokes shift dynamics of these complex multi-component mixtures. Dynamic anisotropy results have been analyzed by using both Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) and Dote-Kivelson-Schwartz (DKS) theories. The importance of local solvent structure around the dissolved solute has been stressed.

  8. Frequency-resolved noise figure measurements of phase (in)sensitive fiber optical parametric amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A; Lorences-Riesgo, A; Andrekson, P A; Karlsson, M

    2014-11-17

    We measure the frequency-resolved noise figure of fiber optical parametric amplifiers both in phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive modes in the frequency range from 0.03 to 3 GHz. We also measure the variation in noise figure due to the degradation in pump optical signal to noise ratio and also as a function of the input signal powers. Noise figure degradation due to stimulated Brillouin scattering is observed.

  9. An approach to estimate spatial distribution of analyte within cells using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Irfanullah, Mir; Basu, Santanu Kumar; Madhu, Sheri; De, Suman; Jadhav, Sameer; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-03-01

    While fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool amongst chemists and biologists for the detection of various analyte within cellular environments, non-uniform spatial distribution of sensors within cells often restricts extraction of reliable information on relative abundance of analytes in different subcellular regions. As an alternative to existing sensing methodologies such as ratiometric or FRET imaging, where relative proportion of analyte with respect to the sensor can be obtained within cells, we propose a methodology using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy, via which both the relative abundance of sensor as well as their relative proportion with respect to the analyte can be simultaneously extracted for local subcellular regions. This method is exemplified using a BODIPY sensor, capable of detecting mercury ions within cellular environments, characterized by spectral blue-shift and concurrent enhancement of emission intensity. Spectral emission envelopes collected from sub-microscopic regions allowed us to compare the shift in transition energies as well as integrated emission intensities within various intracellular regions. Construction of a 2D scatter plot using spectral shifts and emission intensities, which depend on the relative amount of analyte with respect to sensor and the approximate local amounts of the probe, respectively, enabled qualitative extraction of relative abundance of analyte in various local regions within a single cell as well as amongst different cells. Although the comparisons remain semi-quantitative, this approach involving analysis of multiple spectral parameters opens up an alternative way to extract spatial distribution of analyte in heterogeneous systems. The proposed method would be especially relevant for fluorescent probes that undergo relatively nominal shift in transition energies compared to their emission bandwidths, which often restricts their usage for quantitative ratiometric imaging in

  10. Super-resolved fluorescence microscopy: Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 for Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möckl, Leonhard; Lamb, Don C; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2014-12-15

    A big honor for small objects: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was jointly awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy". This Highlight describes how the field of super-resolution microscopy developed from the first detection of a single molecule in 1989 to the sophisticated techniques of today.

  11. Time-Resolved Fluorescent Immunochromatography of Aflatoxin B1 in Soybean Sauce: A Rapid and Sensitive Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Du; Zhang, Zhaowei; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and quantitative sensing of aflatoxin B1 with high sensitivity and specificity has drawn increased attention of studies investigating soybean sauce. A sensitive and rapid quantitative immunochromatographic sensing method was developed for the detection of aflatoxin B1 based on time-resolved fluorescence. It combines the advantages of time-resolved fluorescent sensing and immunochromatography. The dynamic range of a competitive and portable immunoassay was 0.3–10.0 µg·kg−1, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 µg·kg−1 and recoveries of 87.2%–114.3%, within 10 min. The results showed good correlation (R2 > 0.99) between time-resolved fluorescent immunochromatographic strip test and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Soybean sauce samples analyzed using time-resolved fluorescent immunochromatographic strip test revealed that 64.2% of samples contained aflatoxin B1 at levels ranging from 0.31 to 12.5 µg·kg−1. The strip test is a rapid, sensitive, quantitative, and cost-effective on-site screening technique in food safety analysis. PMID:27428975

  12. Detection of rhodopsin dimerization in situ by PIE-FCCS, a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin self-associates in the plasma membrane. At low concentrations, the interactions are consistent with a monomer-dimer equilibrium (Comar et al., J Am Chem Soc 136(23):8342-8349, 2014). At high concentrations in native tissue, higher-order clusters have been observed (Fotiadis et al., Nature 421:127-128, 2003). The physiological role of rhodopsin dimerization is still being investigated, but it is clear that a quantitative assessment is essential to determining the function of rhodopsin clusters in vision. To quantify rhodopsin interactions, I will outline the theory and methodology of a specialized time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for measuring membrane protein-protein interactions called pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS). The strength of this technique is its ability to quantify rhodopsin interactions in situ (i.e., a live cell plasma membrane). There are two reasons for restricting the scope to live cell membranes. First, the compositional heterogeneity of the plasma membrane creates a complex milieu with thousands of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate species. This makes it difficult to infer quaternary interactions from detergent solubilized samples or construct a model phospholipid bilayer that recapitulates all of the interactions present in native membranes. Second, organizational structure and dynamics is a key feature of the plasma membrane, and fixation techniques like formaldehyde cross-linking and vitrification will modulate the interactions. PIE-FCCS is based on two-color fluorescence imaging with time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) (Becker et al., Rev Sci Instrum 70:1835-1841, 1999). By time-tagging every detected photon, the data can be analyzed as a fluorescence intensity distribution, fluorescence lifetime histogram, or fluorescence (cross-)correlation spectra (FCS/FCCS) (Becker, Advanced time-correlated single-photon counting techniques, Springer, Berlin, 2005). These

  13. Ns-scale time-resolved laser induced fluorescence imaging for detection of fecal contamination on apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2004-11-01

    Our laboratory has been utilizing fluorescence techniques as a potential means for detection of quality and wholesomeness of food products. A system with a short pulse light source such as a laser coupled with a gated detector can be used to harvest fluorescence in ambient light conditions from biological samples with relatively low fluorescence yields. We present a versatile multispectral laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system capable of ns-scale time resolved fluorescence. The system is equipped with a tunable pulse laser system that emits in the visible range from 410 nm to 690 nm. Ns-scale, time-dependent multispectral fluorescence emissions of apples contaminated with a range of diluted cow feces were acquired. Four spectral bands, F670, F680, F685 and F730, centered near the emission peak wavelengths of the major constituents responsible for the red fluorescence emissions from apples artificially contaminated with cow feces were examined to determine a suitable single red fluorescence band and optimal ns-gate window for detection of fecal contamination on apples. The results based on the ns decay curves showed that 670 nm with 10 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM) at a gate-delay of 4 ns from the laser excitation peak provided the greatest differences in time-dependent fluorescence responses between feces contaminated spots and apples surfaces.

  14. Characterization of type I, II, III, IV, and V collagens by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Cohen, David; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2000-04-01

    The relative proportions of genetically distinct collagen types in connective tissues vary with tissue type and change during disease progression, development, wound healing, aging. This study aims to 1) characterize the spectro- temporal fluorescence emission of fiber different types of collagen and 2) assess the ability of time-resolved laser- induced fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between collagen types. Fluorescence emission of commercially available purified samples was induced with nitrogen laser excitation pulses and detected with a MCP-PMT connected to a digital storage oscilloscope. The recorded time-resolved emission spectra displayed distinct fluorescence emission characteristics for each collagen type. The time domain information complemented the spectral domain intensity data for improved discrimination between different collagen types. Our results reveal that analysis of the fluorescence emission can be used to characterize different species of collagen. Also, the results suggest that time-resolved spectroscopy can be used for monitoring of connective tissue matrix composition changes due to various pathological and non-pathological conditions.

  15. A chloride ion nanosensor for time-resolved fluorimetry and fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Talavera, Eva M

    2012-03-21

    In this work, the first CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence lifetime based chloride ion nanosensor is reported. The acridinium dication lucigenin was self-assembled on the surface of negatively charged mercaptopropionic acid capped QDs to achieve QD-lucigenin conjugates. Upon attachment, a drastic decrease of the photoluminescence lifetime of both QD nanoparticles and lucigenin is observed by virtue of a charge transfer mechanism. Since lucigenin is a chloride-sensitive indicator dye, the photoluminescence decay of QD-lucigenin conjugates changes by adding chloride ion. The photoluminescence lifetime of the QDs in the conjugate increases after reacting with Cl(-), but also shows a concomitant decrease in the lucigenin lifetime immobilized on the surface. The photoluminescence lifetime of QD-lucigenin nanosensors shows a linear response in the Cl(-) concentration range between 0.5 and 50 mM. Moreover, the ratio τ(ave)(QD)/τ(ave)(luc) can be used as an analytical signal since the lifetime ratio presents a linear response in the same Cl(-) concentration range. The system also shows good selectivity towards most of the main anions and molecules that can be found in biological fluids. These nanosensors have been satisfactorily applied for Cl(-) determination in simulated intracellular media with high sensitivity and high selectivity. Finally, we demonstrate the potential application of the proposed nanosensor in confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). These results show the promising application of the QD-lucigenin nanosensors in FLIM, particularly for intracellular sensing, with the invaluable advantages of the time-resolved fluorescence techniques.

  16. Building a Pulse Detector using the Frequency Resolved Optical Gating Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallin, J

    2004-02-05

    We show how to construct a diagnostic optical layout known as Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) for an ir mode-locked laser by using the nonlinear effect known as second harmonic generation (SHG). In this paper, we explain the principle of operation and the theory upon which this diagnostic is based. Moreover, we described the procedure used to measure the duration and frequency components of a pulse. This process consists of calibrating the scales of a two-dimensional image, time delay vs. frequency, known as FROG spectrogram or FROG trace. This calibration of the time delay scale yields the correspondence between a pixel and time delay. Similarly, the calibration of the frequency scale yields the correspondence between a pixel, and frequency.

  17. Backreflection diagnostics for ultra-intense laser plasma experiments based on frequency resolved optical gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, F.; Hornung, J.; Schmidt, C.; Eckhardt, M.; Roth, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Bagnoud, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the development and implementation of a time resolved backscatter diagnostics for high power laser plasma experiments at the petawatt-class laser facility PHELIX. Pulses that are backscattered or reflected from overcritical plasmas are characterized spectrally and temporally resolved using a specially designed second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating system. The diagnostics meets the requirements made by typical experiments, i.e., a spectral bandwidth of more than 30 nm with sub-nanometer resolution and a temporal window of 10 ps with 50 fs temporal resolution. The diagnostics is permanently installed at the PHELIX target area and can be used to study effects such as laser-hole boring or relativistic self-phase-modulation which are important features of laser-driven particle acceleration experiments.

  18. Investigation of Prolactin Receptor Activation and Blockade Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle eTallet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The prolactin receptor (PRLR is emerging as a therapeutic target in oncology. Knowledge-based drug design led to the development of a pure PRLR antagonist (Del1-9-G129R-hPRL that was recently shown to prevent PRL-induced mouse prostate tumorogenesis. In humans, the first gain-of-function mutation of the PRLR (PRLRI146L was recently identified in breast tumor patients. At the molecular level, the actual mechanism of action of these two novel players in the PRL system remains elusive. In this study, we addressed whether constitutive PRLR activation (PRLRI146L or PRLR blockade (antagonist involved alteration of receptor oligomerization and/or of inter-chain distances compared to unstimulated and PRL-stimulated PRLR. Using a combination of various biochemical and spectroscopic approaches (co-IP, blue-native electrophoresis, BRET1, we demonstrated that preformed PRLR homodimers are altered neither by PRL- or I146L-induced receptor triggering, nor by antagonist-mediated blockade. These findings were confirmed using a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET technology that allows monitoring distance changes between cell-surface tagged receptors. This technology revealed that PRLR blockade or activation did not involve detectable distance changes between extracellular domains of receptor chains within the dimer. This study merges with our previous structural investigations suggesting that the mechanism of PRLR activation solely involves intermolecular contact adaptations leading to subtle intramolecular rearrangements.

  19. Rapid homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) immunoassay for anthrax detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noam; Mechaly, Adva; Mazor, Ohad; Fisher, Morly; Zahavy, Eran

    2014-05-01

    Infection with Bacillus anthracsis spores induces an acute anthrax disease that can cause casualties and death in untreated cases. Thus rapid diagnosis of anthrax at early stage of the disease is essential to allow an effective treatment. Here we present the development of rapid and sensitive homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) immunoassays based on the energy transfer process of europium cryptate (EuK) donor to AlexaFluor647 acceptor. The energy transfer process is limited to d bacteremia in infected hosts, using two monoclonal anti-PA antibodies that specifically recognize two different epitopes on the PA molecule. The assay was sensitive enabling detection of 2 ng/ml PA in the serum of B. anthracsis-infected rabbits in only 15 min assay. Additionally, HTRF assay was developed for the detection of bacterial spores using polyclonal anti-spore antibodies that recognize many epitopes on the bacterial surface. The assay enabled the detection of 2 × 10(6) spores/ml in 30 min assay and was specific, showing no cross reactivity with closely related non-virulent bacillus cereus strain. This study describes the use of the HTRF assay for the detection of both singled-epitope (proteins) and multi-epitope (particles) as rapid, simple and sensitive method that can be used at the time that fast results are needed to allow an effective medical care.

  20. Low-frequency Fresnel mirrors for fluorescence detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Anzures, J.; Cordero-Davila, A.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J.; Martinez-Bravo, O.; Robledo-Sanchez, C.; Khrenov, B. A.; Garipov, G. K.

    2004-07-01

    In this work we present several designs of a Fresnel mirror with small number of rings (low frequency) to be used in fluorescence detectors aimed for study of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Being segmented the Fresnel mirror has an advantage of simple development from a compact package to a "plane" large area mirror-concentrator. This advantage is important for detectors in space and detectors at remote mountain sites. In this work, we investigated four possible ways of generating a focusing surface. In the first (main) design, the mirror consists of sections belonging to several parabolic surfaces. In this case the best focusing of a source on optical axis is achieved--the Fresnel mirror operates as parabolic mirror. This design is the best for a space "telescope", observing a source from large distances. Close to this design are mirror options with sections of a common parabolic surface and with sections of several spherical surfaces. The simplest for construction is the mirror with sections of a common spherical surface. In this design, focusing of a source on optical axis is much poorer than in previous options, but the mirror may be used in the experiments needed a wide field of view (FOV) with rough angular resolution. An advantage of this design is simplicity of the mirror construction which is shown in the mirror prototype construction and its testing. Results of the focal spot measurements are presented. This simple design of the Fresnel mirror is planned for use in the Pico de Orizaba mountain hybrid array where the wide field of view is important.

  1. Time-resolved microspectrofluorometry and fluorescence lifetime imaging of photosensitizers using picosecond pulsed diode lasers in laser scanning microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Matthias; Meier, Thomas; Steiner, Rudolf; Dolp, Frank; Erdmann, Rainer; Ortmann, Uwe; Rück, Angelika

    2003-01-01

    This work describes the time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of two different photosensitizers in single cells, in detail mTHPC and 5-ALA induced PPIX, which are currently clinically used in photodynamic therapy. The fluorescence lifetime of the drugs was determined in the cells from time-gated spectra as well as single photon counting, using a picosecond pulsed diode laser for fluorescence excitation. The diode laser, which emits pulses at 398 nm with 70 ps full width at half maximum duration, was coupled to a confocal laser scanning microscope. For time-resolved spectroscopy a setup consisting of a Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Time-gated spectra within the cells were acquired by placing the laser beam in "spot scan" mode. In addition, a time-correlated single photon counting module was used to determine the fluorescence lifetime from single spots and to record lifetime images. The fluorescence lifetime of mTHPC decreased from 7.5 to 5.5 ns during incubation from 1 to 6 h. This decrease was probably attributed to enhanced formation of aggregates during incubation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging showed that longer lifetimes were correlated with accumulation in the cytoplasm in the neighborhood of the cell nucleus, whereas shorter lifetimes were found in the outer cytoplasm. For cells that were incubated with 5-ALA, a fluorescence lifetime of 7.4 ns was found for PPIX; a shorter lifetime at 3.6 ns was probably attributed to photoproducts and aggregates of PPIX. In contrast from fluorescence intensity images alone, different fluorescence species could not be distinguished. However, in the lifetime image a structured fluorescence distribution in the cytoplasm was correlated with the longer lifetime and probably coincides with mitochondria. In conclusion, picosecond diode lasers coupled to a laser scanning microscope equipped with appropriate detection units allows time-resolved spectroscopy and lifetime imaging

  2. Persistent luminescence nanoprobe for biosensing and lifetime imaging of cell apoptosis via time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Lei, Jianping; Liu, Jintong; Ma, Fengjiao; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence technique can reduce the short-lived background luminescence and auto-fluorescence interference from cells and tissues by exerting the delay time between pulsed excitation light and signal acquisition. Here, we prepared persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) to design a universal time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) platform for biosensing, lifetime imaging of cell apoptosis and in situ lifetime quantification of intracellular caspase-3. Three kinds of PLNPs-based nanoprobes are assembled by covalently binding dye-labeled peptides or DNA to carboxyl-functionalized PLNPs for the efficient detection of caspase-3, microRNA and protein. The peptides-functionalized nanoprobe is also employed for fluorescence lifetime imaging to monitor cell apoptosis, which shows a dependence of cellular fluorescence lifetime on caspase-3 activity and thus leads to an in situ quantification method. This work provides a proof-of-concept for PLNPs-based TR-FRET analysis and demonstrates its potential in exploring dynamical information of life process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamics and flexibility of human aromatase probed by FTIR and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Di Nardo

    Full Text Available Human aromatase (CYP19A1 is a steroidogenic cytochrome P450 converting androgens into estrogens. No ligand-free crystal structure of the enzyme is available to date. The crystal structure in complex with the substrate androstenedione and the steroidal inhibitor exemestane shows a very compact conformation of the enzyme, leaving unanswered questions on the conformational changes that must occur to allow access of the ligand to the active site. As H/D exchange kinetics followed by FTIR spectroscopy can provide information on the conformational changes in proteins where solvent accessibility is affected, here the amide I region was used to measure the exchange rates of the different elements of the secondary structure for aromatase in the ligand-free form and in the presence of the substrate androstenedione and the inhibitor anastrozole. Biphasic exponential functions were found to fit the H/D exchange data collected as a function of time. Two exchange rates were assigned to two populations of protons present in different flexible regions of the protein. The addition of the substrate androstenedione and the inhibitor anastrozole lowers the H/D exchange rates of the α-helices of the enzyme when compared to the ligand-free form. Furthermore, the presence of the inhibitor anastrozole lowers exchange rate constant (k1 for β-sheets from 0.22±0.06 min(-1 for the inhibitor-bound enzyme to 0.12±0.02 min(-1 for the free protein. Dynamics effects localised in helix F were studied by time resolved fluorescence. The data demonstrate that the fluorescence lifetime component associated to Trp224 emission undergoes a shift toward longer lifetimes (from ≈5.0 to ≈5.5 ns when the substrate or the inhibitor are present, suggesting slower dynamics in the presence of ligands. Together the results are consistent with different degrees of flexibility of the access channel and therefore different conformations adopted by the enzyme in the free, substrate- and

  4. Dynamics and flexibility of human aromatase probed by FTIR and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, Giovanna; Breitner, Maximilian; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Castrignanò, Silvia; Mei, Giampiero; Di Venere, Almerinda; Nicolai, Eleonora; Allegra, Paola; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Human aromatase (CYP19A1) is a steroidogenic cytochrome P450 converting androgens into estrogens. No ligand-free crystal structure of the enzyme is available to date. The crystal structure in complex with the substrate androstenedione and the steroidal inhibitor exemestane shows a very compact conformation of the enzyme, leaving unanswered questions on the conformational changes that must occur to allow access of the ligand to the active site. As H/D exchange kinetics followed by FTIR spectroscopy can provide information on the conformational changes in proteins where solvent accessibility is affected, here the amide I region was used to measure the exchange rates of the different elements of the secondary structure for aromatase in the ligand-free form and in the presence of the substrate androstenedione and the inhibitor anastrozole. Biphasic exponential functions were found to fit the H/D exchange data collected as a function of time. Two exchange rates were assigned to two populations of protons present in different flexible regions of the protein. The addition of the substrate androstenedione and the inhibitor anastrozole lowers the H/D exchange rates of the α-helices of the enzyme when compared to the ligand-free form. Furthermore, the presence of the inhibitor anastrozole lowers exchange rate constant (k1) for β-sheets from 0.22±0.06 min(-1) for the inhibitor-bound enzyme to 0.12±0.02 min(-1) for the free protein. Dynamics effects localised in helix F were studied by time resolved fluorescence. The data demonstrate that the fluorescence lifetime component associated to Trp224 emission undergoes a shift toward longer lifetimes (from ≈5.0 to ≈5.5 ns) when the substrate or the inhibitor are present, suggesting slower dynamics in the presence of ligands. Together the results are consistent with different degrees of flexibility of the access channel and therefore different conformations adopted by the enzyme in the free, substrate- and inhibitor

  5. Hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence molecular tomography based on structured light and single-pixel detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Zhao, Lingling; Intes, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    We present a time-resolved fluorescence diffuse optical tomography platform that is based on wide-field structured illumination, single-pixel detection, and hyperspectral acquisition. Two spatial light modulators (digital micro-mirror devices) are employed to generate independently wide-field illumination and detection patterns, coupled with a 16-channel spectrophotometer detection module to capture hyperspectral time-resolved tomographic data sets. The main system characteristics are reported, and we demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring dense 4D tomographic data sets (space, time, spectra) for time domain 3D quantitative multiplexed fluorophore concentration mapping in turbid media.

  6. Short-pulsed diode lasers as an excitation source for time-resolved fluorescence applications and confocal laser scanning microscopy in PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Matthias; Meier, Thomas H.; El-Tayeb, Tarek A. A.; Kemkemer, Ralf; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Rueck, Angelika C.

    2001-11-01

    This article describes a setup for subcellular time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime measurements using a confocal laser scanning microscope in combination with a short pulsed diode laser for fluorescence excitation and specimen illumination. The diode laser emits pulses at 398 nm wavelength with 70 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) duration. The diode laser can be run at a pulse repetition rate of 40 MHz down to single shot mode. For time resolved spectroscopy a spectrometer setup consisting of an Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Subcellular fluorescence lifetime measurements were achieved using a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) module instead of the spectrometer setup. The capability of the short pulsed diode laser for fluorescence imaging, fluorescence lifetime measurements and time-resolved spectroscopy in combination with laser scanning microscopy is demonstrated by fluorescence analysis of several photosensitizers on a single cell level.

  7. 340 nm pulsed UV LED system for europium-based time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng/L in immunoas......We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng....../L in immunoassay. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable to state-of-the-art Xenon flash lamp based unit with equal excitation energy and without overdriving the LED. We performed a comparative study of the flash lamp and the LED based system and discussed temporal, spatial, and spectral features of the LED...

  8. Influence enhancement effect of bi-frequency ultrasonic irradiation by TA fluorescence method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xinnan; ZHU Changping; FENG Ruo; WANG Yuming; He Shichuan

    2004-01-01

    Based on a previous research of cavitation effect under bi-frequency ultrasound irradiation, this paper studies bi-frequency irradiations with similar experimental settings. The additional irradiation sources with frequencies of 1.04MHz, 0.8MHz and 1.7MHz are individually combined with the main ultrasonic irradiation source with frequency of 28kHz to form bi-frequency ultrasonic irradiation. The intensity of 28kHz irradiation was fixed at 12.5W/cm2, while the intensity of the ultrasound at the other three frequencies is varied from1 W/cm2 to 18 W/cm2. It turns out that under the influence of the bi-frequency irradiation, the fluorescence intensity is obviously greater than the sum of those at individual frequencies. So the frequency of the additional sonication strikingly influences the fluorescence enhancement effect. For example, the fluorescence enhancement effect of 1.04MHz is stronger than that of 1.7MHz, and the enhancement effect of 0.8MHz is further stronger than that of 1.04MHz. Under the sonic intensity of 7.9W/cm2, the fluorescence intensity of 1.04MHz is approximately twice that of 1.7MHz while the fluorescence intensity of 0.8MHz is approximately 1.5 times that of 1.04MHz.

  9. Combination of a spinning disc confocal unit with frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Goedhart, J.; Kremers, G.J.; Manders, E.M.M.; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is an established technique to determine fluorescence lifetimes. Disadvantage of wide-field imaging is that measurements are compromised by out-of-focus blur. Conventional scanning confocal typically means long

  10. Time resolved dosimetry of human brain exposed to low frequency pulsed magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Lucano, Elena; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2016-06-01

    An accurate dosimetry is a key issue to understanding brain stimulation and related interaction mechanisms with neuronal tissues at the basis of the increasing amount of literature revealing the effects on human brain induced by low-level, low frequency pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs). Most literature on brain dosimetry estimates the maximum E field value reached inside the tissue without considering its time pattern or tissue dispersivity. Nevertheless a time-resolved dosimetry, accounting for dispersive tissues behavior, becomes necessary considering that the threshold for an effect onset may vary depending on the pulse waveform and that tissues may filter the applied stimulatory fields altering the predicted stimulatory waveform’s size and shape. In this paper a time-resolved dosimetry has been applied on a realistic brain model exposed to the signal presented in Capone et al (2009 J. Neural Transm. 116 257-65), accounting for the broadband dispersivity of brain tissues up to several kHz, to accurately reconstruct electric field and current density waveforms inside different brain tissues. The results obtained by exposing the Duke’s brain model to this PMF signal show that the E peak in the brain is considerably underestimated if a simple monochromatic dosimetry is carried out at the pulse repetition frequency of 75 Hz.

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of cis-stilbene in hexane and acetonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, M.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Garbin, E.; Ernsting, N. P.; Kovalenko, S. A.

    2010-04-01

    Transient fluorescence spectra from cis-stilbene in solution are recorded with 0.24 ps instrument response by a Kerr-Shutter upon excitation at 283 and 267 nm. The fluorescence decay shows no dependence on the excitation wavelength and proceeds monoexponentially with 0.21 ps in acetonitrile and 0.75 ps in hexane. No spectral shift or distortion of the fluorescence band is observed during the decay. Fluorescence contribution from 4a,4b-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP), produced in a competing reaction channel, was not detectable. From comparison with trans-fluorescence, the emission oscillator strength of cis-stilbene is determined to be 0.19 in hexane and 0.21 in acetonitrile.

  12. A homogeneous europium cryptate-based assay for the diagnosis of mutations by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Crapez, E; Bazin, H; Andre, E; Noletti, J; Grenier, J; Mathis, G

    2001-07-15

    Oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is considered to be a very useful methodology for the detection and characterization of mutations, particularly for clinical purposes. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a fluorescent donor and a suitable fluorophore as acceptor has been applied in the past to several scientific fields. This technique is well adapted to nucleic acid analysis such as DNA sequencing, DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. We describe here a homogeneous format based on the use of a rare earth cryptate label as donor: tris-bipyridine-Eu(3+). The long-lived fluorescence of this label makes it possible to reach a high sensitivity by using a time-resolved detection mode. A non-radiative energy transfer technology, known as time-resolved amplification of cryptate emission (TRACE((R))) characterized by a temporal and spectral selectivity has been developed. The TRACE((R)) detection of characterized single nucleotide polymorphism using the OLA for allelic discrimination is proposed. We demonstrate the potentialities of this OLA-TRACE((R)) methodology through the analysis of K-ras oncogene point mutations.

  13. Spectral resolved Measurement of the Nitrogen Fluorescence Emissions in Air induced by Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Waldenmaier, Tilo; Klages, Hans

    2007-01-01

    For the calorimetric determination of the primary energy of extensive air showers, measured by fluorescence telescopes, a precise knowledge of the conversion factor (fluorescence yield) between the deposited energy in the atmosphere and the number of emitted fluorescence photons is essential. The fluorescence yield depends on the pressure and the temperature of the air as well as on the water vapor concentration. Within the scope of this work the fluorescence yield for the eight strongest nitrogen emission bands between 300 nm and 400 nm has been measured using electrons from a Sr-90 source with energies between 250 keV and 2000 keV. Measurements have been performed in dry air, pure nitrogen, and a nitrogen-oxygen mixture at pressures ranging from 2 hPa to 990 hPa. Furthermore the influence of water vapor has been studied. A new approach for the parametrization of the fluorescence yield was used to analyze the data, leading to a consistent description of the fluorescence yield with a minimal set of parameters...

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence study of electron transfer in a model peptide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Fiona; Hungerford, Graham; Moore, Barry D.; Birch, David J. S.

    1994-08-01

    At present there is a great deal of interest in the study of the transference of energy in biological systems. For example, electron transfer is of major importance in many synthetic and biological processes and in nature is mediated by proteins. Information regarding this process is therefore useful in leading to a greater understanding of phenomena such as photosynthesis and respiration. Previous work on protein systems has shown the electron transfer process to be complex to analyze because of the presence of competing pathways. This has led to the use of model systems to simplify the kinetics. We have synthesized novel model systems using peptides containing both a fluorescent methoxy- naphthalene donor and a dicyanoethylene group as a potential electron acceptor and observed fluorescence quenching for both dipeptide and oligopeptide systems. Biexponential fluorescence decay behavior was observed for all donor acceptor systems, with an increase in the amount of the shorter fluorescence decay component on increasing temperature.

  15. 340 nm pulsed UV LED system for europium-based time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Petersen, Paul Michael; Pedersen, Christian

    2016-09-19

    We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng/L in immunoassay. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable to state-of-the-art Xenon flash lamp based unit with equal excitation energy and without overdriving the LED. We performed a comparative study of the flash lamp and the LED based system and discussed temporal, spatial, and spectral features of the LED excitation for time-resolved fluorimetry. Optimization of the suggested key parameters of the LED promises significant increase of the signal-to-noise ratio and hence of the sensitivity of immunoassay systems.

  16. Dynamical co-existence of excitons and free carriers in perovskite probed by density-resolved fluorescent spectroscopic method

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiangyuan; Lv, Yanping; Wang, Shufeng; Wang, Kai; Shi, Yantao; Xiao, Lixin; Chen, Zhijian; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Using transient fluorescent spectra at time-zero, we develop a density-resolved fluorescent spectroscopic method for investigating photoproducts in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite and related photophysics. The density dependent dynamical co-existence of excitons and free carriers over a wide density range is experimentally observed for the first time. The exciton binding energy (EB) and the effective mass of electron-hole pair can be estimated based on such co-existence. No ionic polarization is found contributing to photophysical behavior. It also solves the conflict between the large experimentally measured EB and the small predicted values. The spectroscopic method also helps to detect the true free carrier density under continuous illumination without the interference of ionic conductivity. Our methods and results profoundly enrich the study and understanding of the photophysics in perovskite materials for photovoltaic applications.

  17. Solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 embedded in AOT + phenol organogels studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsura; Takata, Kei; Watanabe, Keiichi; Shigematsu, Hirotake

    2012-03-01

    We investigate solvation dynamics of organogel utilizing ps-ns fluorescence spectroscopy. The organogel studied in this Letter comprises bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) and p-chlorophenol in the m-xylene solvent, that produce an organogel architecture with self-assembly. Within the organogel, an emitting probe, coumarin 153 (C153), is embedded. We then obtain dynamic response functions of solvation derived from the time-resolved fluorescence spectra of C153. We propose that total energy of the C153-organogel system relaxes with a relaxation time of 3.9 ns, whereas the entire rearrangement of the organogel structure around C153 is achieved with that of 6.1 ns, respectively.

  18. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum...... by 39% compared to that of the Xenon flash lamp based unit, due to the LEDs narrower emission spectrum and longer pulse width. Key parameters of the LED system are discussed to further optimize the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-background, and hence the sensitivity of the instrument......, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based...

  19. Strongly nonexponential time-resolved fluorescence of quantum-dot ensembles in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; van Driel, A. Floris

    2007-01-01

    We observe experimentally that ensembles of quantum dots in three-dimensional 3D photonic crystals reveal strongly nonexponential time-resolved emission. These complex emission decay curves are analyzed with a continuous distribution of decay rates. The log-normal distribution describes the decays...... parameter. This interpretation qualitatively agrees with the calculations of the 3D projected local density of states. We therefore conclude that fluorescence decay of ensembles of quantum dots is highly nonexponential to an extent that is controlled by photonic crystals....

  20. 340 nm pulsed UV LED system for europium-based time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report on the design, development and investigation of an optical system based on UV light emitting diode (LED) excitation at 340 nm for time-resolved fluorescence detection of immunoassays. The system was tested to measure cardiac marker Troponin I with a concentration of 200 ng....../L in immunoassay. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable to state-of-the-art Xenon flash lamp based unit with equal excitation energy and without overdriving the LED. We performed a comparative study of the flash lamp and the LED based system and discussed temporal, spatial, and spectral features of the LED...

  1. Simultaneous determination of nabumetone and its principal metabolite in medicines and human urine by time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo Pulgarín, José Antonio; Alañón Molina, Aurelia; Martínez Ferreras, Fernando

    2012-11-07

    A simple fluorescent methodology for the simultaneous determination of nabumetone and its main metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), in pharmaceutical preparations and human urine is proposed. Due to the strong overlapping between the fluorescence spectra of both analytes, the use of fluorescence decay curves to resolve their mixture is proposed, since these curves are more selective. Values of dependent instrumental variables affecting the signal-to-noise ratio were fixed using a simplex optimization procedure. A factorial design with three levels per factor coupled to a central composite design was selected to obtain a calibration matrix of thirteen standards plus one blank sample that was processed using a partial least-squares (PLS) analysis. In order to assess the goodness of the proposed method, a prediction set of ten synthetic samples was analyzed, obtaining recovery percentages between 97 and 105%. Limits of detection, calculated by means of a new criterion, were 0.96 μg L(-1) and 0.88 μg L(-1) for nabumetone and 6-MNA, respectively. The method was also tested in the pharmaceutical preparation Relif, which contains nabumetone, obtaining recovery percentages close to 100%. Finally, the simultaneous determination of both analytes in human urine samples was successfully carried out by the PLS-analysis of a matrix of fifteen standards plus four analyte blanks and the use of the standard addition technique. Although urine shows native fluorescence, no extraction method or prior separation of the analytes was needed.

  2. Translational and rotational motions of albumin sensed by a non-covalent associated porphyrin under physiological and acidic conditions: a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time resolved anisotropy study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade, S.M.; Costa, S.M.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between a free-base, anionic water-soluble porphyrin, TSPP, and the drug carrier protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) at two different pH-values. Both rotational correlatio

  3. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithm for frequency resolved optical gating: super-resolution and supreme robustness

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorenko, Pavel; Avnat, Zohar; Cohen, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) is probably the most popular technique for complete characterization of ultrashort laser pulses. In FROG, a reconstruction algorithm retrieves the pulse from a measured spectrogram, yet current FROG reconstruction algorithms require and exhibit several restricting features that weaken FROG performances. For example, the delay step must correspond to the spectral bandwidth measured with large enough SNR a condition that limits the temporal resolution of the reconstructed pulse, obscures measurements of weak broadband pulses, and makes measurement of broadband mid-IR pulses hard and slow because the spectrograms become huge. We develop a new approach for FROG reconstruction, based on ptychography (a scanning coherent diffraction imaging technique), that removes many of the algorithmic restrictions. The ptychographic reconstruction algorithm is significantly faster and more robust to noise than current FROG algorithms, which are based on generalized projections (GP). We d...

  4. Site-specific structural dynamics of α-Synuclein revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Shruti; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-12-01

    Aggregation of α-Synuclein (α-Syn) into amyloid fibrils is known to be associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Several missense mutations of the α-Syn gene have been associated with rare, early onset familial forms of PD. Despite several studies done so far, the local/residue-level structure and dynamics of α-Syn in its soluble and aggregated fibril form and how these are affected by the familial PD associated mutations are still not clearly understood. Here, we review studies performed by our group as well as other research groups, where time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to understand the site-specific structure and dynamics of α-Syn under physiological conditions as well as under conditions that alter the aggregation properties of the protein such as low pH, high temperature, presence of membrane mimics and familial PD associated mutations. These studies have provided important insights into the critical structural properties of α-Syn that may govern its aggregation. The review also highlights time-resolved fluorescence as a promising tool to study the critical conformational transitions associated with early oligomerization of α-Syn, which are otherwise not accessible using other commonly used techniques such as thioflavin T (ThT) binding assay.

  5. Direct Detection of Time-Resolved Rabi Oscillationsin a Single Quantum Dot via Resonance Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    Schaibley, A. Burgers, G. McCracken , D. Steel, A. Bracker, D. Gammon, and I. Sham 5d. PROJECT NUMBER QEST 5e. TASK NUMBER MI 5f. WORK UNIT...fluorescence J. R. Schaibley, A. P. Burgers, G. A. McCracken , and D. G. Steel* The H. M. Randall Laboratory of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

  6. Preparation and time-resolved fluorescence study of RGB organic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Lu, Shi-Yang; Wang, Lei; Ding, Ran; Wang, Hai-Yu; Feng, Jing; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo; Fang, Honghua

    In this work, large-size tetracene- and pentacene-doped 1,4-Bis(4-methylstyryl)-benzene (BSB-Me) crystals were prepared with physical vapor transfer technique. The photoluminescence emission can be adjusted from blue to green and even to red by changing the doping. Their fluorescence features are

  7. Preparation and time-resolved fluorescence study of RGB organic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Lu, Shi-Yang; Wang, Lei; Ding, Ran; Wang, Hai-Yu; Feng, Jing; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo; Fang, Honghua

    2013-01-01

    In this work, large-size tetracene- and pentacene-doped 1,4-Bis(4-methylstyryl)-benzene (BSB-Me) crystals were prepared with physical vapor transfer technique. The photoluminescence emission can be adjusted from blue to green and even to red by changing the doping. Their fluorescence features are in

  8. Full genotyping of a highly polymorphic human gene trait by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Totè

    Full Text Available The ability of detecting the subtle variations occurring, among different individuals, within specific DNA sequences encompassed in highly polymorphic genes discloses new applications in genomics and diagnostics. DQB1 is a gene of the HLA-II DQ locus of the Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA system. The polymorphisms of the trait of the DQB1 gene including codons 52-57 modulate the susceptibility to a number of severe pathologies. Moreover, the donor-receiver tissue compatibility in bone marrow transplantations is routinely assessed through crossed genotyping of DQB and DQA. For the above reasons, the development of rapid, reliable and cost-effective typing technologies of DQB1 in general, and more specifically of the codons 52-57, is a relevant although challenging task. Quantitative assessment of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET efficiency between chromophores labelling the opposite ends of gene-specific oligonucleotide probes has proven to be a powerful tool to type DNA polymorphisms with single-nucleotide resolution. The FRET efficiency can be most conveniently quantified by applying a time-resolved fluorescence analysis methodology, i.e. time-correlated single-photon counting, which allows working on very diluted template specimens and in the presence of fluorescent contaminants. Here we present a full in-vitro characterization of the fluorescence responses of two probes when hybridized to oligonucleotide mixtures mimicking all the possible genotypes of the codons 52-57 trait of DQB1 (8 homozygous and 28 heterozygous. We show that each genotype can be effectively tagged by the combination of the fluorescence decay constants extrapolated from the data obtained with such probes.

  9. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-09-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication.

  10. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication. PMID:27609521

  11. A dissociative fluorescence enhancement technique for one-step time-resolved immunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Kaj R.; Mukkala, Veli-Matti; Hakala, Harri H.O.; Maekinen, Pauliina H.; Suonpaeae, Mikko U.; Hemmilae, Ilkka A. [PerkinElmer Inc, Wallac Oy, P.O. Box 10, Turku (Finland)

    2011-02-15

    The limitation of current dissociative fluorescence enhancement techniques is that the lanthanide chelate structures used as molecular probes are not stable enough in one-step assays with high concentrations of complexones or metal ions in the reaction mixture since these substances interfere with lanthanide chelate conjugated to the detector molecule. Lanthanide chelates of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are extremely stable, and we used EuDTPA derivatives conjugated to antibodies as tracers in one-step immunoassays containing high concentrations of complexones or metal ions. Enhancement solutions based on different {beta}-diketones were developed and tested for their fluorescence-enhancing capability in immunoassays with EuDTPA-labelled antibodies. Characteristics tested were fluorescence intensity, analytical sensitivity, kinetics of complex formation and signal stability. Formation of fluorescent complexes is fast (5 min) in the presented enhancement solution with EuDTPA probes withstanding strong complexones (ethylenediaminetetra acetate (EDTA) up to 100 mM) or metal ions (up to 200 {mu}M) in the reaction mixture, the signal is intensive, stable for 4 h and the analytical sensitivity with Eu is 40 fmol/L, Tb 130 fmol/L, Sm 2.1 pmol/L and Dy 8.5 pmol/L. With the improved fluorescence enhancement technique, EDTA and citrate plasma samples as well as samples containing relatively high concentrations of metal ions can be analysed using a one-step immunoassay format also at elevated temperatures. It facilitates four-plexing, is based on one chelate structure for detector molecule labelling and is suitable for immunoassays due to the wide dynamic range and the analytical sensitivity. (orig.)

  12. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  13. Interactions of a lytic peptide with supported lipid bilayers investigated by time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapson, Andrew C.; Gee, Michelle L.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2016-12-01

    We report investigations, using time-resolved and polarised evanescent wave-induced fluorescence methods, into the location, orientation and mobility of a fluorescently labelled form of the antimicrobial peptide, melittin, when it interacts with vesicles and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). This melittin analogue, termed MK14-A430, was found to penetrate the lipid headgroup structure in pure, ordered-phase DPPC membranes but was located near the headgroup-water region when cholesterol was included. MK14-A430 formed lytic pores in SLBs, and an increase in pore formation with incubation time was observed through an increase in polarity and mobility of the probe. When associated with the Cholesterol-containing SLB, the probe displayed polarity and mobility that indicated a population distributed near the lipid headgroup-water interface with MK14-A430 arranged predominantly in a surface-aligned state. This study indicates that the lytic activity of MK14-A430 occurred through a pore-forming mechanism. The lipid headgroup environment experienced by the fluorescent label, where MK14-A430 displayed pore information, indicated that pore formation was best described by the toroidal pore model.

  14. Development of a dual-modal tissue diagnostic system combining time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrasonic backscatter microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Park, Jesung; Stephens, Douglas N.; Jo, Javier A.; Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Saroufeem, Ramez M. G.; Shung, K. Kirk; Marcu, Laura

    2009-06-01

    We report a tissue diagnostic system which combines two complementary techniques of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) and ultrasonic backscatter microscopy (UBM). TR-LIFS evaluates the biochemical composition of tissue, while UBM provides tissue microanatomy and enables localization of the region of diagnostic interest. The TR-LIFS component consists of an optical fiber-based time-domain apparatus including a spectrometer, gated multichannel plate photomultiplier, and fast digitizer. It records the fluorescence with high sensitivity (nM concentration range) and time resolution as low as 300 ps. The UBM system consists of a transducer, pulser, receiving circuit, and positioning stage. The transducer used here is 45 MHz, unfocused, with axial and lateral resolutions 38 and 200 μm. Validation of the hybrid system and ultrasonic and spectroscopic data coregistration were conducted both in vitro (tissue phantom) and ex vivo (atherosclerotic tissue specimens of human aorta). Standard histopathological analysis of tissue samples was used to validate the UBM-TRLIFS data. Current results have demonstrated that spatially correlated UBM and TR-LIFS data provide complementary characterization of both morphology (necrotic core and calcium deposits) and biochemistry (collagen, elastin, and lipid features) of the atherosclerotic plaques at the same location. Thus, a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy with ultrasound imaging would allow for better identification of features associated with tissue pathologies. Current design and performance of the hybrid system suggests potential applications in clinical diagnosis of atherosclerotic plaque.

  15. Time resolved fluorescence anisotropy of basic dyes bound to poly(methacrylic acid in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Hueder Paulo M. de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of atactic poly(methacrylic acid, PMAA, with molecular weights in the range of (1.6 to 3.4 x 10(5 g mol-1, and labeled with the fluorescent dyes 9-aminoacridine or Nile blue were studied by photophysical measurements as a function of solvent viscosity and polarity. The conformational behavior of the PMAA chain segments around the fluorescent probe was reported by the change in the rotational diffusion of the dyes. Ethylene glycol swells the polymer chain compared with the more contracted conformation of PMAA in 50% water/ethylene glycol. The change in the rotational relaxation time of the dye bound to PMAA with the decrease of water content in the solvent mixture indicates a progressive expansion of polymer chain to a more open coil form in solution.

  16. A Theoretical Distinction Between Time-Resolved Resonance Raman andResonance Fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jing; DU Si-De; FAN Kang-Nian; Lee Soo-Ying

    2000-01-01

    Based on the time-dependent theory, an analysis of the distinction between resonance Raman (RR) and resonance fluorescence (RF) with pulse excitation was presented. The real population of the intermediate state gives two optical components-the independent time evolution of intermediate ket and bra states generates RR while RF originates from the phase coherent between ket and bra states. In cw limit, the transition probability of spontaneous emission with pulse excitation can be reduced to the classical theory.

  17. Chamber bioaerosol study: human emissions of size-resolved fluorescent biological aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangar, S; Adams, R I; Pasut, W; Huffman, J A; Arens, E A; Taylor, J W; Bruns, T D; Nazaroff, W W

    2016-04-01

    Humans are a prominent source of airborne biological particles in occupied indoor spaces, but few studies have quantified human bioaerosol emissions. The chamber investigation reported here employs a fluorescence-based technique to evaluate bioaerosols with high temporal and particle size resolution. In a 75-m(3) chamber, occupant emission rates of coarse (2.5-10 μm) fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs) under seated, simulated office-work conditions averaged 0.9 ± 0.3 million particles per person-h. Walking was associated with a 5-6× increase in the emission rate. During both walking and sitting, 60-70% or more of emissions originated from the floor. The increase in emissions during walking (vs. while sitting) was mainly attributable to release of particles from the floor; the associated increased vigor of upper body movements also contributed. Clothing, or its frictional interaction with human skin, was demonstrated to be a source of coarse particles, and especially of the highly fluorescent fraction. Emission rates of FBAPs previously reported for lecture classes were well bounded by the experimental results obtained in this chamber study. In both settings, the size distribution of occupant FBAP emissions had a dominant mode in the 3-5 μm diameter range.

  18. Spatially resolved data on sediment transport: 1) field application examining fluorescent soil particle movement from tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, John; Hardy, Robert; Pates, Jacqueline; James, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Understanding where sediment originates from and where it travels to, in what quantities and at which rate is at the heart of many questions surrounding sediment transport. Progress towards unravelling these questions and deepening our understanding has come from a wide range of approaches, including laboratory and field experiments conducted at a variety of scales. In seeking to understand the connectivity of sources and sinks of sediment scientists have spent considerable energy in developing tracing technologies. These have included numerous studies that have relied on the chemical properties of the soil and sediment to establish source-sink connectivity, and the use of 137Ceasium, from radioactive fall-out, to map sediment redistribution. More recently there has been an upsurge in interest in the use of artificially applied soil tracers, including rare earth element oxides and magnetic minerals. However all these tracing methods have a significant drawback: they rely on the collection of samples to assess their concentration. This means that their spatial distribution cannot easily be established in situ and that the environment that is being studied is damaged by the sampling process; nor can data be collected in real time which allows a dynamic understanding of erosion and transport processes to be developed. Here we report on the field application of a fluorescent sand sized tracer at the hillslope scale during a tillage erosion experiment. Here we trialled both intensity based and particle counting methodologies for tracer enumeration. After simulating seven years of tillage on a hillslope we were able to precisely determine the distribution of the fluorescent tracer and also its incorporation and distribution within the soil profile. Single grains of tracer could be found over 35 m from the insertion point. In a second abstract we report on an application that combines novel fluorescent videography techniques with custom image processing to trace the

  19. Single-atom-resolved fluorescence imaging of an atomic Mott insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob; Weitenberg, Christof; Andres, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    in situ images of a quantum fluid in which each underlying quantum particle is detected. Here we report fluorescence imaging of strongly interacting bosonic Mott insulators in an optical lattice with single-atom and single-site resolution. From our images, we fully reconstruct the atom distribution......The reliable detection of single quantum particles has revolutionized the field of quantum optics and quantum information processing. For several years, researchers have aspired to extend such detection possibilities to larger-scale, strongly correlated quantum systems 1 , 2 in order to record...

  20. A space- and time-resolved single photon counting detector for fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-02-01

    We have recently developed a wide-field photon-counting detector having high-temporal and high-spatial resolutions and capable of high-throughput (the H33D detector). Its design is based on a 25 mm diameter multi-alkali photocathode producing one photo electron per detected photon, which are then multiplied up to 10 7 times by a 3-microchannel plate stack. The resulting electron cloud is proximity focused on a cross delay line anode, which allows determining the incident photon position with high accuracy. The imaging and fluorescence lifetime measurement performances of the H33D detector installed on a standard epifluorescence microscope will be presented. We compare them to those of standard single-molecule detectors such as single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) or electron-multiplying camera using model samples (fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells). Finally, we discuss the design and applications of future generation of H33D detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions.

  1. Resolving the depth of fluorescent light by structured illumination and shearing interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Johannes; Elmaklizi, Ahmed; Voit, Florian; Hohmann, Ansgar; Schau, Philipp; Brodhag, Nicole; Krauter, Philipp; Frenner, Karsten; Kienle, Alwin; Osten, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    A method for the depth-sensitive detection of fluorescent light is presented. It relies on a structured illumination restricting the excitation volume and on an interferometric detection of the wave front curvature. The illumination with two intersecting beams of a white-light laser separated in a Sagnac interferometer coupled to the microscope provides a coarse confinement in lateral and axial direction. The depth reconstruction is carried out by evaluating shearing interferograms produced with a Michelson interferometer. This setup can also be used with spatially and temporally incoherent light as emitted by fluorophores. A simulation workflow of the method was developed using a combination of a solution of Maxwell's equations with the Monte Carlo method. These simulations showed the principal feasibility of the method. The method is validated by measurements at reference samples with characterized material properties, locations and sizes of fluorescent regions. It is demonstrated that sufficient signal quality can be obtained for materials with scattering properties comparable to dental enamel while maintaining moderate illumination powers in the milliwatt range. The depth reconstruction is demonstrated for a range of distances and penetration depths of several hundred micrometers.

  2. Monoclonal antibody-based time-resolved fluorescence immunoassays for daidzein, genistein and equol in blood and urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talbot, Duncan C.S.; Ogborne, Richard M.; Dadd, Tony

    2007-01-01

    isoflavones in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease in postmenopaususal women. Methods: We estalished murine monoclonal TR-FIA methods for daidzein, genistein and equol. The assays could be perfomed manually or adapted to an automated analyzer for the high throughput and increased accuracy. Analysis....... Conclusions: The validated monoclonal TR-FIA methods are applicable for use in large-scale human phytoestrogen intervention studies and can be used to monitor cokpliance, demonstrate bioavailability and assess equol producer status.......Background: Time-resolved fluorescence immunoessays (TR-FIAs) for phytoestrogens in biological samples are an alternative to mass spectrometric methods. These immunoessays were used to test urne and plasma samples from individuals in a dietary trial aimed at determining the efficacy of dietary...

  3. Using time-resolved fluorescence to measure serum venom-specific IgE and IgG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E van Eeden

    Full Text Available We adapted DELFIA™ (dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoroimmunoassay, a time resolved fluorescence method, to quantitate whole venom specific and allergenic peptide-specific IgE (sIgE, sIgG(1 and sIgG(4 in serum from people clinically allergic to Australian native ant venoms, of which the predominant cause of allergy is jack jumper ant venom (JJAV. Intra-assay CV was 6.3% and inter-assay CV was 13.7% for JJAV sIgE. DELFIA and Phadia CAP JJAV sIgE results correlated well and had similar sensitivity and specificity for the detection of JJAV sIgE against intradermal skin testing as the gold standard. DELFIA was easily adapted for detecting sIgE to a panel of other native ant venoms.

  4. Architecture of polyglutamine-containing fibrils from time-resolved fluorescence decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlein, Christoph; Miettinen, Markus S; Borwankar, Tejas; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Kumke, Michael U; Ignatova, Zoya

    2014-09-26

    The disease risk and age of onset of Huntington disease (HD) and nine other repeat disorders strongly depend on the expansion of CAG repeats encoding consecutive polyglutamines (polyQ) in the corresponding disease protein. PolyQ length-dependent misfolding and aggregation are the hallmarks of CAG pathologies. Despite intense effort, the overall structure of these aggregates remains poorly understood. Here, we used sensitive time-dependent fluorescent decay measurements to assess the architecture of mature fibrils of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 implicated in HD pathology. Varying the position of the fluorescent labels in the Htt monomer with expanded 51Q (Htt51Q) and using structural models of putative fibril structures, we generated distance distributions between donors and acceptors covering all possible distances between the monomers or monomer dimensions within the polyQ amyloid fibril. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we systematically scanned all possible monomer conformations that fit the experimentally measured decay times. Monomers with four-stranded 51Q stretches organized into five-layered β-sheets with alternating N termini of the monomers perpendicular to the fibril axis gave the best fit to our data. Alternatively, the core structure of the polyQ fibrils might also be a zipper layer with antiparallel four-stranded stretches as this structure showed the next best fit. All other remaining arrangements are clearly excluded by the data. Furthermore, the assessed dimensions of the polyQ stretch of each monomer provide structural evidence for the observed polyQ length threshold in HD pathology. Our approach can be used to validate the effect of pharmacological substances that inhibit or alter amyloid growth and structure.

  5. Multi-channel lock-in amplifier assisted femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence non-collinear optical parametric amplification spectroscopy with efficient rejection of superfluorescence background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Pengcheng; Wang, Zhuan; Dang, Wei; Weng, Yuxiang, E-mail: yxweng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Superfluorescence appears as an intense background in femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence noncollinear optical parametric amplification spectroscopy, which severely interferes the reliable acquisition of the time-resolved fluorescence spectra especially for an optically dilute sample. Superfluorescence originates from the optical amplification of the vacuum quantum noise, which would be inevitably concomitant with the amplified fluorescence photons during the optical parametric amplification process. Here, we report the development of a femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence non-collinear optical parametric amplification spectrometer assisted with a 32-channel lock-in amplifier for efficient rejection of the superfluorescence background. With this spectrometer, the superfluorescence background signal can be significantly reduced to 1/300–1/100 when the seeding fluorescence is modulated. An integrated 32-bundle optical fiber is used as a linear array light receiver connected to 32 photodiodes in one-to-one mode, and the photodiodes are further coupled to a home-built 32-channel synchronous digital lock-in amplifier. As an implementation, time-resolved fluorescence spectra for rhodamine 6G dye in ethanol solution at an optically dilute concentration of 10{sup −5}M excited at 510 nm with an excitation intensity of 70 nJ/pulse have been successfully recorded, and the detection limit at a pump intensity of 60 μJ/pulse was determined as about 13 photons/pulse. Concentration dependent redshift starting at 30 ps after the excitation in time-resolved fluorescence spectra of this dye has also been observed, which can be attributed to the formation of the excimer at a higher concentration, while the blueshift in the earlier time within 10 ps is attributed to the solvation process.

  6. Resolving the influence of nitrogen abundances on sediment organic matter in macrophyte-dominated lakes, using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Yao; Shengrui Wang; Lixin Jiao; Caihong Yan; Xiangcan Jin

    2015-01-01

    A controlled experiment was designed to resolve the influence of nitrogen abundance on sediment organic matters in macrophyte-dominated lakes using fluorescence analysis.Macrophyte biomass showed coincident growth trends with time,but different variation rates with nitrogen treatment.All plant growth indexes with nitrogen addition (N,NH4Cl 100,200,400 mg/kg,respectively) were lower than those of the control group.Four humiclike components,two autochthonous tryptophan-like components,and one autochthonous tyrosine-like component were identified using the parallel factor analysis model.The results suggested that the relative component changes of fluorescence in the colonized sediments were in direct relation to the change of root biomass with time.In the experiment,the root formation parameters of the plants studied were significantly affected by adding N in sediments,which may be related to the reason that the root growth was affected by N addition.Adding a low concentration of N to sediments can play a part in supplying nutrients to the plants.However,the intensive uptake of NH~ may result in an increase in the intracellular concentration of ammonia,which is highly toxic to the plant cells.Hence,our experiment results manifested that organic matter cycling in the macrophyte-dominated sediment was influenced by nitrogen enrichment through influencing vegetation and relevant microbial activity.

  7. Interaction of europium and nickel with calcite studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, A. [Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Déchets RAdioactifs, 1-7 rue J. Monnet, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Pipon, Y., E-mail: pipon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA/DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lomenech, C. [Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Jordan, N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Barkleit, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); and others

    2014-08-01

    This study aims at elucidating the mechanisms regulating the interaction of Eu and Ni with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}). Calcite powders or single crystals (some mm sized) were put into contact with Eu or Ni solutions at concentrations ranging from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for Eu and 10{sup −3} mol L{sup −1} for Ni. The sorption durations ranged from 1 week to 1 month. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) well adapted to discriminate incorporation processes such as: (i) adsorption or co precipitation at the mineral surfaces or, (ii) incorporation into the mineral structure (through diffusion for instance), has been carried out. Moreover, using the fluorescence properties of europium, the results have been compared to those obtained by Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) on calcite powders. For the single crystals, complementary SEM observations of the mineral surfaces at low voltage were also performed. Results showed that Ni accumulates at the calcite surface whereas Eu is also incorporated at a greater depth. Eu seems therefore to be incorporated into two different states in calcite: (i) heterogeneous surface accumulation and (ii) incorporation at depth greater than 160 nm after 1 month of sorption. Ni was found to accumulate at the surface of calcite without incorporation.

  8. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved by 39% compared to that of the Xenon flash lamp based unit, due to the LEDs narrower emission spectrum and longer pulse width. Key parameters of the LED system are discussed to further optimize the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-background, and hence the sensitivity of the instrument.

  9. Monitoring changes of cellular metabolism and microviscosity in vitro based on time-resolved endogenous fluorescence and its anisotropy decay dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-05-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a well-known metabolic coenzyme and endogenous fluorophore. In this study, we develop a system that simultaneously measures time- and wavelength-resolved fluorescence to extract free and protein-bound NADH signals from total cellular fluorescence. We analyze temporal characteristics of NADH fluorescence in a mixture of NADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as in living cell samples. The results show that in both the NADH/LDH mixture and cell samples, a fraction of free NADH and protein-bound components can be identified. The extracted free and bound NADH signals are confirmed by time-resolved measurement of anisotropy decay of NADH fluorescence, based on the fact that free NADH is a small fluorescent molecule with much shorter rotational diffusion time than bound NADH. The ratio of free NADH signal to bound NADH signal is very different between normal and cancer cervical epithelial cells. In addition, the ratio changes significantly when the cell samples are treated with a mitochondrial inhibitor or uncoupler, demonstrating that the method is sensitive to monitor cellular metabolic activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the microviscosity for relatively small molecules such as NADH in cells could be extracted from wavelength- and time-resolved NADH fluorescence of living cell samples.

  10. Assessment of lifetime resolution limits in time-resolved photoacoustic calorimetry vs. transducer frequencies: setting the stage for picosecond resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaberle, Fábio A; Rego Filho, Francisco de Assis M G; Reis, Luís A; Arnaut, Luis G

    2016-02-01

    Time-resolved photoacoustic calorimetry (PAC) gives access to lifetimes and energy fractions of reaction intermediates by deconvolution of the photoacoustic wave of a sample (E-wave) with that of the instrumental response (T-wave). The ability to discriminate between short lifetimes increases with transducer frequencies employed to detect the PAC waves. We investigate the lifetime resolution limits of PAC as a function of the transducer frequencies using the instrumental response obtained with the photoacoustic reference 2-hydroxybenzophenone in toluene or acetonitrile. The instrumental response was obtained for a set of transducers with central frequencies ranging from 0.5 MHz up to 225 MHz. The simulated dependence of the lifetime resolution with the transducer frequencies was anchored on experimental data obtained for the singlet state of naphthalene with a 2.25 MHz transducer. The shortest lifetime resolved with the 2.25 MHz transducer was 19 ns and our modelling of the transducer responses indicates that sub-nanosecond lifetimes of photoacoustic transients can be resolved with transducers of central frequencies above 100 MHz.

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence-based assay for rapid detection of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpakko, Janne; Kopra, Kari; Hänninen, Pekka

    2015-02-01

    Fast and simple detection of pathogens is of utmost importance in health care and the food industry. In this article, a novel technology for the detection of pathogenic bacteria is presented. The technology uses lytic-specific bacteriophages and a nonspecific interaction of cellular components with a luminescent lanthanide chelate. As a proof of principle, Escherichia coli-specific T4 bacteriophage was used to infect the bacteria, and the cell lysis was detected. In the absence of E. coli, luminescent Eu(3+)-chelate complex cannot be formed and low time-resolved luminescence signal is monitored. In the presence of E. coli, increased luminescence signal is observed as the cellular contents are leached to the surrounding medium. The luminescence signal is observed as a function of the number of bacteria in the sample. The homogeneous assay can detect living E. coli in bacterial cultures and simulated urine samples within 25 min with a detection limit of 1000 or 10,000 bacterial cells/ml in buffer or urine, respectively. The detection limit is at the clinically relevant level, which indicates that the method could also be applicable to clinical settings for fast detection of urine bacteria.

  12. Global and Time-Resolved Monitoring of Crop Photosynthesis with Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanter, Luis; Zhang, Yongguang; Jung, Martin; Joiner, Joanna; Voigt, Maximilian; Berry, Joseph A.; Frankenberg, Christian; Huete, Alfredo R.; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Lee, Jung-Eun; Moran, M. Susan; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo; Beer, Christian; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Buchmann, Nina; Gianelle, Damiano; Klumpp, Katja; Cescatti, Alessandro; Baker, John M.; Griffis, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the process by which plants harvest sunlight to produce sugars from carbon dioxide and water. It is the primary source of energy for all life on Earth; hence it is important to understand how this process responds to climate change and human impact. However, model-based estimates of gross primary production (GPP, output from photosynthesis) are highly uncertain, in particular over heavily managed agricultural areas. Recent advances in spectroscopy enable the space-based monitoring of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) from terrestrial plants. Here we demonstrate that spaceborne SIF retrievals provide a direct measure of the GPP of cropland and grassland ecosystems. Such a strong link with crop photosynthesis is not evident for traditional remotely sensed vegetation indices, nor for more complex carbon cycle models. We use SIF observations to provide a global perspective on agricultural productivity. Our SIF-based crop GPP estimates are 50-75% higher than results from state-of-the-art carbon cycle models over, for example, the US Corn Belt and the Indo-Gangetic Plain, implying that current models severely underestimate the role of management. Our results indicate that SIF data can help us improve our global models for more accurate projections of agricultural productivity and climate impact on crop yields. Extension of our approach to other ecosystems, along with increased observational capabilities for SIF in the near future, holds the prospect of reducing uncertainties in the modeling of the current and future carbon cycle.

  13. Temperature-dependent loop formation kinetics in flexible peptides studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harekrushna Sahoo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Looping rates in short polypeptides can be determined by intramolecular fluorescence quenching of a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo by tryptophan. By this methodology, the looping rates in glycine-serine peptides with the structure Trp-(Gly-Sern-Dbo-NH2 of different lengths (n = 0–10 were determined in dependence on temperature in D2O and the activation parameters were derived. In general, the looping rate increases with decreasing peptide length, but the shortest peptide (n=0 shows exceptional behavior because its looping rate is slower than that for the next longer ones (n=1,2. The activation energies increase from 17.5 kJ mol−1 for the longest peptide (n=10 to 20.5 kJ mol−1 for the shortest one (n=0, while the pre-exponential factors (log⁡(A/s−1 range from 10.20 to 11.38. The data are interpreted in terms of an interplay between internal friction (stiffness of the biopolymer backbone and steric hindrance effects and solvent friction (viscosity-limited diffusion. For the longest peptides, the activation energies resemble more and more the value expected for solvent viscous flow. Internal friction is most important for the shortest peptides, causing a negative curvature and a smaller than ideal slope (ca. –1.1 of the double-logarithmic plots of the looping rates versus the number of peptide chain segments (N. Interestingly, the corresponding plot for the pre-exponential factors (logA versus logN shows the ideal slope (–1.5. While the looping rates can be used to assess the flexibility of peptides in a global way, it is suggested that the activation energies provide a measure of the “thermodynamic” flexibility of a peptide, while the pre-exponential factors reflect the “dynamic” flexibility.

  14. Dynamics of male meiotic recombination frequency during plant development using Fluorescent Tagged Lines in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny

    2017-02-13

    Meiotic homologous recombination plays a central role in creating genetic variability, making it an essential biological process relevant to evolution and crop breeding. In this study, we used pollen-specific fluorescent tagged lines (FTLs) to measure male meiotic recombination frequency during the development of Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, a subset of pollen grains consistently shows loss of fluorescence expression in tested lines. Using nine independent FTL intervals, the spatio-temporal dynamics of male recombination frequency was assessed during plant development, considering both shoot type and plant age as independent parameters. In most genomic intervals assayed, male meiotic recombination frequency is highly consistent during plant development, showing no significant change between different shoot types and during plant aging. However, in some genomic regions, such as I1a and I5a, a small but significant effect of either developmental position or plant age were observed, indicating that the meiotic CO frequency in those intervals varies during plant development. Furthermore, from an overall view of all nine genomic intervals assayed, both primary and tertiary shoots show a similar dynamics of increasing recombination frequency during development, while secondary and lateral shoots remain highly stable. Our results provide new insights in the dynamics of male meiotic recombination frequency during plant development.

  15. A method for the frequency control in time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Kaneko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an extension of the time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging based on the optical pump-probe technique with periodic light source at a fixed repetition frequency. Usually such imaging measurement may generate and detect acoustic waves with their frequencies only at or near the integer multiples of the repetition frequency. Here we propose a method which utilizes the amplitude modulation of the excitation pulse train to modify the generation frequency free from the mentioned limitation, and allows for the first time the discrimination of the resulted upper- and lower-side-band frequency components in the detection. The validity of the method is demonstrated in a simple measurement on an isotropic glass plate covered by a metal thin film to extract the dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves.

  16. A novel cell-based duplex high-throughput screening assay combining fluorescent Ca(2+) measurement with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, László; Cselenyák, Attila; Varga, Ágnes; Visegrády, András

    2016-08-15

    Cell-based assays for G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation applied in high-throughput screening (HTS) monitor various readouts for second messengers or intracellular effectors. Recently, our understanding of diverging signaling pathways downstream of receptor activation and the capability of small molecules to selectively modulate signaling routes has increased substantially, underlining the importance of selecting appropriate readouts in cellular functional screens. To minimize the rate of false negatives in large-scale screening campaigns, it is crucial to maximize the chance of a ligand being detected, and generally applicable methods for detecting multiple analytes from a single well might serve this purpose. The few assays developed so far based on multiplexed GPCR readouts are limited to only certain applications and usually rely on genetic manipulations hindering screening in native or native-like cellular systems. Here we describe a more generally applicable and HTS-compatible homogeneous assay based on the combination of fluorometric detection of [Ca(2+)] with subsequent homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) cAMP readout in the same well. Besides describing development and validation of the assay, using a cell line recombinantly expressing the human PTH1 receptor screening of a small library is also presented, demonstrating the robustness and HTS compatibility of the novel paradigm.

  17. Structural differences in the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, K. L.; Corringer, P. J.; Edelstein, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo marmorata carries two nonequivalent agonist binding sites at the αδ and αγ subunit interfaces. These sites have been characterized by time-resolved fluorescence with the partial nicotinic agonist dansyl-C6-choline (Dnscho). When bound to t...

  18. Structural differences in the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, K. L.; Corringer, P. J.; Edelstein, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo marmorata carries two nonequivalent agonist binding sites at the αδ and αγ subunit interfaces. These sites have been characterized by time-resolved fluorescence with the partial nicotinic agonist dansyl-C6-choline (Dnscho). When bound...

  19. Revealing Shape Selectivity and Catalytic Activity Trends Within the Pores of H-ZSM-5 Crystals by Time- and Space-Resolved Optical and Fluorescence Microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavitski, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/310912008; Kox, M.H.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30484179X; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2007-01-01

    A combination of in-situ optical and fluorescence microspectroscopy has been employed to investigate the oligomerization of styrene derivatives occurring in the micropores of coffin-shaped H-ZSM-5 zeolite crystals in a space- and time-resolved manner. The carbocationic intermediates in this reaction

  20. Measurement of total angular momentum values of high-lying even-parity atomic states of samarium by spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Pulhani; M L Shah; G P Gupta; B M Suri

    2010-12-01

    Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to uniquely assign total angular momentum () values to high-lying even-parity energy levels of atomic samarium. Unique value assignment was done for seven energy levels in the energy region 34,800–36,200 cm-1 , recently observed and reported in the literature.

  1. Flexibility of Enzymes Suspended in Organic Solvents Probed by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy. Evidence That Enzyme Activity and Enantioselectivity Are Directly Related to Enzyme Flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broos, Jaap; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Verboom, Willem; Hoek, Arie van; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1995-01-01

    A time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy study on the molecular flexibility of active-site labeled anthraniloyl-α-chymotrypsin, dansylsubtilisin Carlsberg, and native subtilisin Carlsberg, suspended in organic solvents, is described. The internal rotational mobility of the fluorophore in the

  2. Metastable Magnesium fluorescence spectroscopy using a frequency-stabilized 517 nm laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ming; Jensen, Brian B; Therkildsen, Kasper T

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser operating at 517 nm for our Magnesium laser-cooling and atomic clock project. A two-stage Yb-doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) system generates more than 1.5 W of 1034 nm light when seeded with a 15 mW diode laser. Using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide, we...... obtained more than 40 mW of 517 nm output power by single pass frequency doubling. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of metastable magnesium atoms could be used to stabilize the 517 nm laser to an absolute frequency within 1 MHz....

  3. Fluorescence-suppressed time-resolved Raman spectroscopy of pharmaceuticals using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojalin, Tatu; Kurki, Lauri; Laaksonen, Timo; Viitala, Tapani; Kostamovaara, Juha; Gordon, Keith C; Galvis, Leonardo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Strachan, Clare J; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we utilize a short-wavelength, 532-nm picosecond pulsed laser coupled with a time-gated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detector to acquire Raman spectra of several drugs of interest. With this approach, we are able to reveal previously unseen Raman features and suppress the fluorescence background of these drugs. Compared to traditional Raman setups, the present time-resolved technique has two major improvements. First, it is possible to overcome the strong fluorescence background that usually interferes with the much weaker Raman spectra. Second, using the high photon energy excitation light source, we are able to generate a stronger Raman signal compared to traditional instruments. In addition, observations in the time domain can be performed, thus enabling new capabilities in the field of Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. With this system, we demonstrate for the first time the possibility of recording fluorescence-suppressed Raman spectra of solid, amorphous and crystalline, and non-photoluminescent and photoluminescent drugs such as caffeine, ranitidine hydrochloride, and indomethacin (amorphous and crystalline forms). The raw data acquired by utilizing only the picosecond pulsed laser and a CMOS SPAD detector could be used for identifying the compounds directly without any data processing. Moreover, to validate the accuracy of this time-resolved technique, we present density functional theory (DFT) calculations for a widely used gastric acid inhibitor, ranitidine hydrochloride. The obtained time-resolved Raman peaks were identified based on the calculations and existing literature. Raman spectra using non-time-resolved setups with continuous-wave 785- and 532-nm excitation lasers were used as reference data. Overall, this demonstration of time-resolved Raman and fluorescence measurements with a CMOS SPAD detector shows promise in diverse areas, including fundamental chemical research, the

  4. Temporal characterization of FEL micropulses as function of cavity length detuning using frequency-resolved optical gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richman, B.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Results of frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements on the Stanford mid-IR FEL system show the effect of FEL cavity length detuning on the micropulse temporal structure. The FROG technique enables the acquisition of complete and uniquely invertible amplitude and phase temporal dependence of optical pulses. Unambiguous phase and amplitude profiles are recovered from the data. The optical pulses are nearly transform limited, and the pulse length increases with cavity length detuning.

  5. Adaptation of light-harvesting systems of Arthrospira platensis to light conditions, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Seiji; Yokono, Makio; Hamada, Fumiya; Teshigahara, Ayaka; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-08-01

    Cyanobacteria change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed excitation relaxation dynamics in the cyanobacterium, Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis, grown under lights exhibiting different spectral profiles, by means of steady-state absorption and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. It was found that F760, which is the PSI red-chlorophyll characteristic of A. platensis, contributes to slower energy-transfer phase in the PSI of A. platensis. Excitation energy transfers in phycobilisome and those from PSII to PSI were modified depending on the light quality. Existence of quencher was suggested in PSI of the blue-light grown cells. Phycobilisomes in the green-light grown cells and the far-red-light grown cells transferred excitation energy from phycobilisome to chlorophyll without loss of energy. In these cells, excitation energy was shared between two photosystems. Fast energy transfer was established in phycobilisome under the yellow-light condition where only the phycobilisome can absorb the cultivation light. Differences in light-harvesting and energy-transfer processes under different cultivation-light conditions are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial.

  6. Excited state dynamics of 9,9'-bianthryl in room temperature ionic liquids as revealed by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dinesh Chandra Khara; Aniruddha Paul; Kotni Santhosh; Anunay Samanta

    2009-05-01

    Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements have been carried out on 9,9'-bianthryl in three imidazolium ionic liquids to probe the excited state dynamics. In the early time-scale, the fluorescence spectra of bianthryl have been found to consist of emission from both locally excited (LE) and charge transfer (CT) states. The LE → CT relaxation time, as estimated from the decay of the fluorescence intensity of the LE emission, is found to vary between 230 and 390 ps, while the average solvent relaxation time, as estimated from the analysis of time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift, is found to vary between 620 ps and 1840 ps, depending on the viscosity of the ionic liquids. The results confirm that while in conventional less viscous solvents the CT formation kinetics of bianthryl occurs simultaneously with the solvation dynamics, in ionic liquids the two processes mostly occur in different time scales.

  7. Time-resolved study of the UV fluorescence of chlorine under synchrotron radiation excitation of Cl/sub 2//rare-gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Calve, J. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Castex, M.C. (Paris-13 Univ., 93 - Villetaneuse (France)); Haaks, D. (Gesamthochschule Wuppertal (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie); Jordan, B.; Zimmerer, G. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). 2. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik)

    1981-05-11

    UV fluorescence of pure Cl/sub 2/ and Cl/sub 2//rare-gas mixtures has been investigated under selective, pulsed VUV excitation. In pure Cl/sub 2/, a strong fluorescence between 1350 and 2000 A is found with typical radiative lifetimes of 3 ns. Addition of Kr(Ar) to Cl/sub 2/ strongly quenches this fluorescence and let show up Kr(Ar)Cl* emissions as well as the Cl/sub 2/ ''laser'' emission at 2580 A. The radiative lifetime of the Cl/sub 2/ laser state is found to be 16 ns. Absorptions and emissions observed in this work are discussed in view of the results of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and of recent theoretical results on the excited-potential curves of Cl/sub 2/.

  8. Low-frequency phased-array 2D fluorescence localization in breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Chen, Yu; Chance, Britton; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    A method for rapid, non-invasive 2D fluorescence localization of breast cancer using low frequency phased array near-infrared technique is presented in this article. In our study, we have developed a dual-channel fluorescence detection system to locate breast cancer. This system consists two pair of in-phase and out-of-phase light emitting diodes (LEDs) as the light sources and Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) as the detector. Two null planes generated by cancellation of diffusion photon density waves (DPDW) will indicate the 2D position of breast cancer with exogenous contrast agents. The fluorescent contrast agent used in this study is Indocyanine Green (ICG) and the minimum amount of ICG detected by our system is 0.5 μM. With the 2 cm separation of sources and detector, the maximum depth our system can detect is 10 mm. The whole system is in compact size and portable. Phantom experiments show that the system can provide real time detection and localization of small hidden absorbing-fluorescent objects inside the highly scattering medium with high accuracy of +/-3 mm. The potential application is that it is low-cost and can be used for breast cancer localization as operation aid and self-examination.

  9. Quantitative frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy in tissues and tissue-like media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert Edward

    1999-09-01

    In the never-ending quest for improved medical technology at lower cost, modern near-infrared optical spectroscopy offers the possibility of inexpensive technology for quantitative and non-invasive diagnoses. Hemoglobin is the dominant chromophore in the 700-900 nm spectral region and as such it allows for the optical assessment of hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygenation by absorption spectroscopy. However, there are many other important physiologically relevant compounds or physiological states that cannot be effectively sensed via optical methods because of poor optical contrast. In such cases, contrast enhancements are required. Fluorescence spectroscopy is an attractive component of optical tissue spectroscopy. Exogenous fluorophores, as well as some endogenous ones, may furnish the desperately needed sensitivity and specificity that is lacking in near-infrared optical tissue spectroscopy. The main focus of this thesis was to investigate the generation and propagation of fluorescence photons inside tissues and tissue-like media (i.e., scattering dominated media). The standard concepts of fluorescence spectroscopy have been incorporated into a diffusion-based picture that is sometimes referred to as photon migration. The novelty of this work lies in the successful quantitative recovery of fluorescence lifetimes, absolute fluorescence quantum yields, fluorophore concentrations, emission spectra, and both scattering and absorption coefficients at the emission wavelength from a tissue-like medium. All of these parameters are sensitive to the fluorophore local environment and hence are indicators of the tissue's physiological state. One application demonstrating the capabilities of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy in tissue-like media is a study of the binding of ethidium bromide to bovine leukocytes in fresh milk. Ethidium bromide is a fluorescent dye that is commonly used to label DNA, and hence visualize chromosomes in cells. The lifetime of

  10. Time and Frequency Resolved Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Dimercaptostilbene on Silver

    CERN Document Server

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Hess, Wayne P

    2014-01-01

    Non-resonant tip-enhanced Raman images of dimercaptostilbene on silver reveal that different vibrational resonances of the reporter are selectively enhanced at different sites on the metal substrate. Sequentially recorded images track molecular diffusion within the diffraction-limited laser spot which illuminates the substrate. In effect, the recorded time resolved (dt = 10 s) pixelated images (25 nm x 8 cm-1) broadcast molecule-local field interactions which take place on much finer scales.

  11. Super-resolved time-frequency analysis of wideband backscattered data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, John; Ling, H.

    1995-01-01

    A time-frequency super-resolution procedure is presented for processing wideband backscattered data containing both scattering center and natural resonance information. In this procedure, Prony's method is first applied in the frequency domain to locate scattering centers. The data is processed one...

  12. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, S.A.; Van Eldik, S.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phas

  13. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex.

  14. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Robyn A.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Schiffer, Jarad M.; Boyer, Anne E.; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A.; Soroka, Stephen D.; Dauphin, Leslie A.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63 × 10−6 μM (0.551 ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51 × 10−5 μM (1.58 ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex. PMID:24857756

  15. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-08

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  16. Spaced-Resolved Electron Density of Aluminum Plasma Produced by Frequency-Tripled Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Boqian; Han Shensheng; Zhang Jiyan; Zheng Zhijian; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiaming; Li Jun; Wang Yan

    2005-01-01

    By using the space-resolved spectrograph, the K-shell emission from laser-produced plasma was investigated. Electron density profiles along the normal direction of the target surface in aluminum laser-plasmas were obtained by two different diagnostic methods and compared with the profiles from the theoretical simulation of hydrodynamics code MULTI1D. The results corroborate the feasibility to obtain the electron density above the critical surface by the diagnostic method based on the Stark-broadened wings in the intermediately coupled plasmas.

  17. A time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the measurement of testosterone in saliva: Monitoring of testosterone replacement therapy with testosterone buciclate

    OpenAIRE

    Tschöp, Matthias; Behre, Hermann M.; Nieschlag, Eberhard; Dressendorfer, Regina A.; Strasburger, Christian J.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring of testosterone replacement therapy requires a reliable method for testosterone measurement. Determination of salivary testosterone, which reflects the hormone's biologically active plasma fraction, is a superior technique for this purpose. The aim of the present study was to establish a new sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the accurate measurement of testosterone levels in saliva and to validate it by monitoring testosterone replacement therapy in eight hypogon...

  18. Measuring molecular reorientation at liquid surfaces with time-resolved sum-frequency spectroscopy: a theoretical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2009-05-28

    A theoretical framework is presented for the design and analysis of ultrafast time- and polarization-resolved surface vibrational spectroscopy, aimed at elucidating surface molecular reorientational motion in real time. Vibrational excitation with linearly polarized light lifts the azimuthal symmetry of the surface transition-dipole distribution, causing marked, time-dependent changes in the surface sum-frequency generation (SFG) intensity. The subsequent recovery of the SFG signal generally reflects both vibrational relaxation and reorientational motion of surface molecules. We present experimental schemes that allow direct quantification of the time scale of surface molecular reorientational diffusive motion.

  19. Molecular order at polymer interfaces measured by broad-bandwidth vibrationally-resolved sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Philip T.; Briggman, Kimberly A.; Stephenson, John C.; Wallace, William E.; Richter, Lee J.

    2001-03-01

    Broad-bandwidth vibrationally-resolved sum frequency generation (VR-SFG)spectroscopy has been used to measure the molecular orientation distribution at polymer/dielectric interfaces. A novel three layer microcavity structure of polystyrene (i.e.,PS)/spin-on hydrogen silsesquioxane dielectric (i.e.,spin-on glass)/Au has been developed in which manipulation of Fresnel factors through the variation of dielectric thickness allows unique spectroscopic study of either the free or buried polymer interface. Chemically specific VR-SFG spectroscopy of the phenyl groups of PS reveals opposite absolute orientations of these groups for the two interfaces, each directed away from the bulk of the PS film.

  20. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of the effect of 4-hydroxynonenal on endogenous NAD(P)H in living cardiac myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorvatova, Alzbeta; Aneba, Swida; Mateasik, Anton; Chorvat, Dusan; Comte, Blandine

    2013-06-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a major biochemical consequence of the oxidative deterioration of polyunsaturated lipids in cell membranes and causes damage to membrane integrity and loss of protein function. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), one of the most reactive products of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation of membrane phospholipids, has been shown to be capable of affecting both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) reduced [NAD(P)H] as well as NADH production. However, the understanding of its effects in living cardiac cells is still lacking. Our goal was to therefore investigate HNE effects on NAD(P)H noninvasively in living cardiomyocytes. Spectrally resolved lifetime detection of endogenous fluorescence, an innovative noninvasive technique, was employed. Individual fluorescence components were resolved by spectral linear unmixing approach. Gathered results revealed that HNE reduced the amplitude of both resolved NAD(P)H components in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, HNE increased flavoprotein fluorescence and responsiveness of the NAD(P)H component ratio to glutathione reductase (GR) inhibitor. HNE also increased the percentage of oxidized nucleotides and decreased maximal NADH production. Presented data indicate that HNE provoked an important cell oxidation by acting on NAD(P)H regulating systems in cardiomyocytes. Understanding the precise role of oxidative processes and their products in living cells is crucial for finding new noninvasive tools for biomedical diagnostics of pathophysiological states.

  1. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Study of the Interaction Between DNA and a Peptide Truncated from the p53 Protein Core Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengxuan; Liang, Gaiting; Liu, Zhen; Zu, Lily

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy spectroscopy was applied to study the interaction between a peptide truncated from the binding site of tumor suppressor p53 protein and the DNAs covalently labeled with 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) dye. Fluorescence intensity quenching and changes of anisotropy decay lifetime were monitored when FAM labeled DNA formed complex with the peptide. The results demonstrated that the sequence of DNA could not define the binding specificity between the peptide and DNA. But the anisotropy decay of FAM can be used to examine the binding affinity of the peptide to DNA. The fluorescent dynamics of FAM can also be used to represent the rigidity of the complex formed between the peptide and DNA.

  2. Time-resolved study of the UV fluorescence of chlorine under synchrotron radiation excitation of Cl/sub 2//rare-gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    le Calve, J. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Castex, M.C. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 93 - Villetaneuse (France). Lab. des Interactions Moleculaires et des Hautes Pressions); Haaks, D. (Gesamthochschule Wuppertal (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie); Jordan, B.; Zimmerer, G. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). 2. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik)

    1981-05-11

    UV fluroescence of pure Cl/sub 2/ and Cl/sub 2//rare-gas mixtures has been investigated under selective, pulsed VUV excitation. In pure Cl/sub 2/, a strong fluorescence between 135 and 200 nm is found with typical radiative lifetimes of 3 ns. Addition of Kr(Ar) to Cl/sub 2/ strongly quenches this fluorescence and let Kr(Ar)Clsup(*) emissions show up as well as the Cl/sub 2/ laser emission at 258 nm. The radiative lifetime of the Cl/sub 2/ laser state is found to be 16 ns. Absorptions and emissions observed in this work are discussed in view of the results of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and the recent theoretical results on the excited-potential curves of Cl/sub 2/.

  3. Time-, Frequency-, and Wavevector-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction from Single Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Kochise; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broad-band X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and ...

  4. Elucidating low-frequency vibrational dynamics in calcite and water with time-resolved third-harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2015-07-14

    Low-frequency vibrations are foundational for material properties including thermal conductivity and chemical reactivity. To resolve the intrinsic molecular conformational dynamics in condensed phase, we implement time-resolved third-harmonic generation (TRTHG) spectroscopy to unravel collective skeletal motions in calcite, water, and aqueous salt solution in situ. The lifetime of three Raman-active modes in polycrystalline calcite at 155, 282 and 703 cm(-1) is found to be ca. 1.6 ps, 1.3 ps and 250 fs, respectively. The lifetime difference is due to crystallographic defects and anharmonic effects. By incorporating a home-built wire-guided liquid jet, we apply TRTHG to investigate pure water and ZnCl2 aqueous solution, revealing ultrafast dynamics of water intermolecular stretching and librational bands below 500 cm(-1) and a characteristic 280 cm(-1) vibrational mode in the ZnCl4(H2O)2(2-) complex. TRTHG proves to be a compact and versatile technique that directly uses the 800 nm fundamental laser pulse output to capture ultrafast low-frequency vibrational motion snapshots in condensed-phase materials including the omnipresent water, which provides the important time dimension to spectral characterization of molecular structure-function relationships.

  5. Theory of frequency-filtered and time-resolved N-photon correlations

    CERN Document Server

    del Valle, Elena; Laussy, Fabrice P; Tejedor, Carlos; Hartmann, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    A theory of correlations between N photons of given frequencies and detected at given time delays is presented. These correlation functions are usually too cumbersome to be computed explicitly. We show that they are obtained exactly through intensity correlations between two-level sensors in the limit of their vanishing coupling to the system. This allows the computation of correlation functions hitherto unreachable. The uncertainties in time and frequency of the detection, which are necessary variables to describe the system, are intrinsic to the theory. We illustrate the formalism with the Jaynes--Cummings model, showing how correlations of various peaks at zero or finite time delays bring new insights into the dynamics of open quantum systems.

  6. Spatially resolved simulation of a radio frequency driven micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet and its effluent

    CERN Document Server

    Hemke, Torben; Gebhardt, Markus; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency driven plasma jets are frequently employed as efficient plasma sources for surface modification and other processes at atmospheric pressure. The \\textit{radio-frequency driven micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet} ($\\mu$APPJ) is a particular variant of that concept whose geometry allows direct optical access. In this work, the characteristics of a $\\mu$APPJ operated with a helium-oxygen mixture and its interaction with a helium environment are studied by numerical simulation. The density and temperature of the electrons, as well as the concentration of all reactive species are studied both in the jet itself and in its effluent. It is found that the effluent is essentially free of charge carriers but contains a substantial amount of activated oxygen (O, O$_3$ and O$_2(^1\\Delta)$).

  7. An improved regularization method to resolve integer ambiguity in rapid positioning using single frequency GPS receivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Jikun; WANG Zhenjie

    2004-01-01

    A new approach is employed in GPS rapid positioning using several-epoch single frequency phase data. Firstly, the structure characteristic of the normal matrix in GPS rapid positioning is analyzed. Then, in the light of the characteristic, based on TIKHONOV regularization theorem, a new regularizer is designed to mitigate the ill-condition of the normal matrix. The accurate float ambiguity solutions and their MSEM (Mean Squared Error Matrix) are obtained using several-epoch single frequency phase data. Combined with LAMBDA method, the new approach was used to fix the integer ambiguities correctly and quickly using MSEM instead of the cofactor matrix of the ambiguities. Finally, a baseline over 3 km is taken as an example. The fixed integer ambiguities by the new approach using five epoch single frequency phase data are the same as those fixed by Bernese software using long time data. The success rate of fixing the integer ambiguities is 100 percent using 197 group data. Compared with the traditional methods, the new approach provides better accuracy and efficiency in GPS rapid positioning. So, the new approach has an extensive application outlook in deformation monitoring, pseudokinematic relative positioning, and attitude determination, etc.

  8. Towards a Novel Spatially-Resolved Hemolysis Detection Method Using a Fluorescent Indicator and Loaded Ghost Cells: Proof-of-Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sebastian V; Müller, Indra; Kiesendahl, Nicole; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    It is of the utmost importance to reduce flow-induced hemolysis in devices such as heart-valve prostheses and blood pumps. Thus, in vitro measurements of hemolysis are performed in order to optimize their design in this regard. However, with existing measurement methods, hemolysis can only be assessed as an integrated value over the complete test-circuit. Currently, there are no spatially-resolved in vitro hemolysis measurement techniques known to the authors that would allow for a determination of the critical regions within a device. In this study, a novel spatially-resolved measurement principle is proposed. Ghost cells (i.e. erythrocytes with a lower hemoglobin concentration) were loaded with a calcium-dicitrato complex, and a fluorescent calcium indicator was suspended in the extracellular medium. Calcium and indicator are separated until the cell membrane ruptures (i.e. hemolysis occurs). In the moment of hemolysis, the two compounds bind to each other and emit a fluorescent signal that can be recorded and spatially-resolved in a setup very similar to a standard Particle Image Velocimetry measurement. A proof-of-principle experiment was performed by intentionally inducing hemolysis in a flow-model with a surfactant. The surfactant-induced hemolysis demonstrated a clear increase of the fluorescent signal compared to that of a negative reference. Furthermore, the signal was spatially restricted to the area of hemolysis. Although further challenges need to be addressed, a successful proof-of-principle for novel spatially-resolved hemolysis detection is presented. This method can contribute to better design optimization of devices with respect to flow-induced hemolysis.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy studies of intermolecular interactions in bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)dihydroborate bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and its mixtures with various cosolvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Nanda, Raju; Seth, Sudipta; Ghosh, Arindam; Sarkar, Moloy

    2016-09-01

    Keeping in mind the potential usefulness of mixed ionic liquid (IL)-cosolvents systems in several industrial applications, intermolecular interactions between a borate-based IL, bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)dihydroborate bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([BIMIMDBA][TF2N]), and its binary mixtures with several molecular solvents has been investigated through NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of the 1H chemical shifts (δ/ppm) and translational diffusion coefficients (D) of the IL in different solvent mixtures demonstrate interplay of nonspecific (ion-dipole) and specific (hydrogen bonding) interactions in governing the properties of these mixtures. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data provide evidence in favour of different IL-solvent interaction for different IL-cosolvent systems.

  10. Artifact-Free and Detection-Profile-Independent Higher-Order Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Microsecond-Resolved Kinetics. 1. Multidetector and Sub-Binning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollah-Nia, Farshad; Gelfand, Martin P; Van Orden, Alan

    2017-03-23

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful tool in the time-resolved analysis of nonreacting or reacting molecules in solution, based on fluorescence intensity fluctuations. However, conventional (second-order) FCS alone is insufficient to measure all parameters needed to describe a reaction or mixture, including concentrations, fluorescence brightnesses, and forward and reverse rate constants. For this purpose, correlations of higher powers of fluorescence intensity fluctuations can be calculated to yield additional information from the single-photon data stream collected in an FCS experiment. To describe systems of diffusing and reacting molecules, considering cumulants of fluorescence intensity results in simple expressions in which the reaction and diffusion parts factorize. The computation of higher-order correlations in experiments is hindered by shot-noise and common detector artifacts, the effects of which become worse with increasing order. In this article, we introduce a technique to calculate artifact-free higher-order correlation functions with improved time resolution, and without any need for modeling and calibration of detector artifacts. The technique is formulated for general multidetector experiments and verified in both two-detector and single-detector configurations. Good signal-to-noise ratio is achieved down to 1 μs in correlation curves up to order (2, 2). This capability makes possible a variety of new measurements including multicomponent analysis and fast reaction kinetics, as demonstrated in a companion article (10.1021/acs.jpcb.7b00408).

  11. Resolving multipath interference in time-of-flight imaging via modulation frequency diversity and sparse regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Ayush; Kadambi, Achuta; Whyte, Refael; Barsi, Christopher; Feigin, Micha; Dorrington, Adrian; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-03-15

    Time-of-flight (ToF) cameras calculate depth maps by reconstructing phase shifts of amplitude-modulated signals. For broad illumination of transparent objects, reflections from multiple scene points can illuminate a given pixel, giving rise to an erroneous depth map. We report here a sparsity-regularized solution that separates K interfering components using multiple modulation frequency measurements. The method maps ToF imaging to the general framework of spectral estimation theory and has applications in improving depth profiles and exploiting multiple scattering.

  12. Spatially resolved optical-emission spectroscopy of a radio-frequency driven iodine plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, James; Doyle, Scott; Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Iodine is of interest for potential use as a propellant for spacecraft propulsion, and has become attractive as a replacement to xenon due to its similar mass and ionisation potential. Optical emission spectroscopy has been undertaken to characterise the emission from a low-pressure, radio-frequency driven inductively coupled plasma source operating in iodine with respect to axial distance across its transverse magnetic filter. The results are compared with axial profiles of the electron temperature and density for identical source conditions, and the spatial distribution of the emission intensity is observed to be closely correlated with the electron temperature. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@Par project, and received financial state aid managed by the ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'', as part of the ``Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir'' under the reference ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02.

  13. FLIMX: A Software Package to Determine and Analyze the Fluorescence Lifetime in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Data from the Human Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Matthias; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Peters, Sven; Sauer, Lydia; Hammer, Martin; Haueisen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is a new technique for measuring the in vivo autofluorescence intensity decays generated by endogenous fluorophores in the ocular fundus. Here, we present a software package called FLIM eXplorer (FLIMX) for analyzing FLIO data. Specifically, we introduce a new adaptive binning approach as an optimal tradeoff between the spatial resolution and the number of photons required per pixel. We also expand existing decay models (multi-exponential, stretched exponential, spectral global analysis, incomplete decay) to account for the layered structure of the eye and present a method to correct for the influence of the crystalline lens fluorescence on the retina fluorescence. Subsequently, the Holm-Bonferroni method is applied to FLIO measurements to allow for group comparisons between patients and controls on the basis of fluorescence lifetime parameters. The performance of the new approaches was evaluated in five experiments. Specifically, we evaluated static and adaptive binning in a diabetes mellitus patient, we compared the different decay models in a healthy volunteer and performed a group comparison between diabetes patients and controls. An overview of the visualization capabilities and a comparison of static and adaptive binning is shown for a patient with macular hole. FLIMX’s applicability to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is shown in the ganglion cell layer of a porcine retina sample, obtained by a laser scanning microscope using two-photon excitation. PMID:26192624

  14. Selective nonpeptidic fluorescent ligands for oxytocin receptor: design, synthesis, and application to time-resolved FRET binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Iuliia A; Margathe, Jean-François; Rodriguez, Thiéric; Pflimlin, Elsa; Dupuis, Elodie; Hibert, Marcel; Durroux, Thierry; Bonnet, Dominique

    2015-03-12

    The design and the synthesis of the first high-affinity fluorescent ligands for oxytocin receptor (OTR) are described. These compounds enabled the development of a TR-FRET based assay for OTR, readily amenable to high throughput screening. The validation of the assay was achieved by competition experiments with both peptide and nonpeptide OTR ligands as competitors. These probes represent the first selective fluorescent ligands for the oxytocin G protein-coupled receptor.

  15. Confocal depth-resolved fluorescence micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy for the study of cultural heritage materials: a new mobile endstation at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Chu, Shengqi; Sun, Tianxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Zheng, Lirong; An, Pengfei; Zhu, Jian; Wu, Shurong; Du, Yonghua; Zhang, Jing

    2017-09-01

    A confocal fluorescence endstation for depth-resolved micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy is described. A polycapillary half-lens defines the incident beam path and a second polycapillary half-lens at 90° defines the probe sample volume. An automatic alignment program based on an evolutionary algorithm is employed to make the alignment procedure efficient. This depth-resolved system was examined on a general X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamline at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Sacrificial red glaze (AD 1368-1644) china was studied to show the capability of the instrument. As a mobile endstation to be applied on multiple beamlines, the confocal system can improve the function and flexibility of general XAS beamlines, and extend their capabilities to a wider user community.

  16. Analysis of a photon number resolving detector based on fluorescence readout of an ion Coulomb crystal quantum memory inside an optical cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christoph; Sangouard, N.; Drewsen, M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect single photons with a high efficiency is a crucial requirement for various quantum information applications. By combining the storage process of a quantum memory for photons with fluorescence-based quantum state measurement, it is, in principle, possible to achieve high...... on an ion Coulomb crystal inside a moderately high-finesse optical cavity. The cavity enhancement leads to an effective optical depth of 15 for a finesse of 3000 with only about 1500 ions interacting with the light field. We show that these values allow for essentially noiseless detection with an efficiency......-efficiency photon counting in large ensembles of atoms. The large number of atoms can, however, pose significant problems in terms of noise stemming from imperfect initial state preparation and off-resonant fluorescence. We identify and analyse a concrete implementation of a photon number resolving detector based...

  17. Determination of the PSI/PSII ratio in living plant cells at room temperature by spectrally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgass, Kirstin; Zell, Martina; Maurino, Veronica G.; Schleifenbaum, Frank

    2011-02-01

    Leaf cells of living plants exhibit strong fluorescence from chloroplasts, the reaction centers of photosynthesis. Mutations in the photosystems change their structure and can, thus, be monitored by recording the fluorescence spectra of the emitted chlorophyll light. These measurements have, up to now, mostly been carried out at low temperatures (77 K), as these conditions enable the differentiation between the fluorescence of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII). In contrast, at room temperature, energy transfer processes between the various photosynthetic complexes result in very similar fluorescence emissions, which mainly consist of fluorescence photons emitted by PSII hindering a discrimination based on spectral ROIs (regions of interest). However, by statistical analysis of high resolution fluorescence spectra recorded at room temperature, it is possible to draw conclusions about the relative PSI/PSII ratio. Here, the possibility of determining the relative PSI/PSII ratio by fluorescence spectroscopy is demonstrated in living maize plants. Bundle-sheath chloroplasts of mature maize plants have a special morphologic characteristic; they are agranal, or exhibit only rudimentary grana, respectively. These chloroplasts are depleted in PSII activity and it could be shown that PSII is progressively reduced during leaf differentiation. A direct comparison of PSII activity in isolated chloroplasts is nearly impossible, since the activity of PSII in both mesophyll- and bundle-sheath chloroplasts decays with time after isolation and it takes significantly longer to isolate bundle-sheath chloroplasts. Considering this fact the measurement of PSI/PSII ratios with the 77K method, which includes taking fluorescence spectra from a diluted suspension of isolated chloroplasts at 77K, is questionable. These spectra are then used to analyze the distribution of energy between PSI and PSII. After rapid cooling to 77K secondary biochemical influences, which attenuate the

  18. The open, the closed, and the empty: time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and computational analysis of RC-LH1 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Sebastian R; Müller, Lars; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Ullmann, G Matthias; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-01-29

    We studied the time-resolved fluorescence of isolated RC-LH1 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas palustris as a function of the photon fluence and the repetition rate of the excitation laser. Both parameters were varied systematically over 3 orders of magnitude. On the basis of a microstate description we developed a quantitative model for RC-LH1 and obtained very good agreement between experiments and elaborate simulations based on a global master equation approach. The model allows us to predict the relative population of RC-LH1 complexes with the special pair in the neutral state or in the oxidized state P(+) and those complexes that lack a reaction center.

  19. Interaction of quinine sulfate with anionic micelles of sodium dodecylsulfate: A time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy at different pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D.

    2015-09-01

    Photophysical behavior and rotational relaxation dynamics of quinine sulfate (QS) in anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) at different pH have been studied using steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. It has been observed that the cationic form of quinine sulfate (at pH 2) forms a fluorescent ion pair complex with the surfactant molecules at lower concentrations of surfactant. However, for higher concentrations of SDS, the probe molecules bind strongly with the micelles and reside at the water-micelle interface. At pH 7, QS is singly protonated in bulk aqueous solution. At lower concentrations of SDS aggregation between probe and surfactant molecules has been observed. However, for higher concentrations of SDS, an additional fluorescence peak corresponding to dicationic form of QS appears and this has been attributed to double protonation of the QS molecule in micellar solution. At pH 7, in the presence of SDS micelles, the photophysical properties of QS showed substantial changes compared to that in the bulk water solution. At pH 12, an increase in fluorescence intensity and lifetime has been observed and this has been attributed to the increase in radiative rate due to the incorporation of QS at the micelle-water interface. The local pH at micellar surface has been found different from the pH of bulk solution.

  20. Surface speciation of Eu3+ adsorbed on kaolinite by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Keisuke; Saito, Takumi; Aoyagi, Noboru; Kimura, Takaumi; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Nagasaki, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoru

    2012-05-15

    Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) is an effective speciation technique for fluorescent metal ions and can be further extended by the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The adsorption of Eu(3+) on kaolinite as well as gibbsite as a reference mineral was investigated by TRLFS together with batch adsorption measurements. The PAFAFAC modeling provided the fluorescence spectra, decay lifetimes, and relative intensity profiles of three Eu(3+) surface complexes with kaolinite; an outer-sphere (factor A) complex and two inner-sphere (factors B and C) complexes. Their intensity profiles qualitatively explained the measured adsorption of Eu(3+). Based on the TRLFS results in varied H(2)O/D(2)O media, it was shown that the outer-sphere complex exhibited more rapid fluorescence decay than Eu(3+) aquo ion, because of the energy transfer to the surface. Factor B was an inner-sphere complex, which became dominant at relatively high pH, high salt concentration and low Eu(3+) concentration. Its spectrum and lifetime were similar to those of Eu(3+) adsorbed on gibbsite, suggesting its occurrence on the edge face of the gibbsite layer of kaolinite. From the comparison with the spectra and lifetimes of crystalline or aqueous Eu(OH)(3), factor C was considered as a poly-nuclear surface complex of Eu(3+) formed at relatively high Eu(3+) concentration.

  1. Excitation relaxation dynamics and energy transfer in fucoxanthin-chlorophyll a/c-protein complexes, probed by time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Seiji; Teshigahara, Ayaka; Yokono, Makio; Mimuro, Mamoru; Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya

    2014-09-01

    In algae, light-harvesting complexes contain specific chlorophylls (Chls) and keto-carotenoids; Chl a, Chl c, and fucoxanthin (Fx) in diatoms and brown algae; Chl a, Chl c, and peridinin in photosynthetic dinoflagellates; and Chl a, Chl b, and siphonaxanthin in green algae. The Fx-Chl a/c-protein (FCP) complex from the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis contains Chl c1, Chl c2, and the keto-carotenoid, Fx, as antenna pigments, in addition to Chl a. In the present study, we investigated energy transfer in the FCP complex associated with photosystem II (FCPII) of C. gracilis. For these investigations, we analyzed time-resolved fluorescence spectra, fluorescence rise and decay curves, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data. Chl a exhibited different energy forms with fluorescence peaks ranging from 677 nm to 688 nm. Fx transferred excitation energy to lower-energy Chl a with a time constant of 300fs. Chl c transferred excitation energy to Chl a with time constants of 500-600fs (intra-complex transfer), 600-700fs (intra-complex transfer), and 4-6ps (inter-complex transfer). The latter process made a greater contribution to total Chl c-to-Chl a transfer in intact cells of C. gracilis than in the isolated FCPII complexes. The lower-energy Chl a received excitation energy from Fx and transferred the energy to higher-energy Chl a. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  2. Efficient calculation of time- and frequency-resolved four-wave-mixing signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelin, Maxim F; Egorova, Dassia; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2009-09-15

    "Four-wave-mixing" is the generic name for a family of nonlinear electronic and vibrational spectroscopies. These techniques are widely used to explore dissipation, dephasing, solvation, and interstate coupling mechanisms in various material systems. Four-wave-mixing spectroscopy needs a firm theoretical support, because it delivers information on material systems indirectly, through certain transients, which are measured as functions of carrier frequencies, durations, and relative time delays of the laser pulses. The observed transients are uniquely determined by the three-pulse-induced third-order polarization. There exist two conceptually different approaches to the calculation of the nonlinear polarization. In the standard perturbative approach to nonlinear spectroscopy, the third-order polarization is expressed in terms of the nonlinear response functions. As the material systems become more complex, the evaluation of the response functions becomes cumbersome and the calculation of the signals necessitates a number of approximations. Herein, we review alternative methods for the calculation of four-wave-mixing signals, in which the relevant laser pulses are incorporated into the system Hamiltonian and the driven system dynamics is simulated numerically exactly. The emphasis is on the recently developed equation-of-motion phase-matching approach (EOM-PMA), which allows us to calculate the three-pulse-induced third-order polarization in any phase-matching direction by performing three (with the rotating wave approximation) or seven (without the rotating wave approximation) independent propagations of the density matrix. The EOM-PMA is limited to weak laser fields (its domain of validity is equivalent to the approach based on the third-order response functions) but allows for arbitrary pulse durations and automatically accounts for pulse-overlap effects. As an illustration, we apply the EOM-PMA to the calculation of optical three-pulse photon-echo two

  3. Time-resolved detection of aromatic compounds on planetary surfaces by ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshelman, E.; Daly, M. G.; Slater, G.; Cloutis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Raman spectroscopic instruments are highly capable in the search for organics on Mars due to the potential to perform rapid and nondestructive measurements on unprepared samples. Upcoming and future Raman instruments are likely to also incorporate laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) capabilities, which can be added for modest cost and complexity. We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain sub-ns fluorescence lifetime measurements of Mars-relevant organics and minerals if a fast time-gating capability is used with an intensified detector and a short ultraviolet laser pulse. This serves a primary purpose of discriminating mineral from short-lived (less than 10 ns) organic fluorescence, considered a potential biosignature. Additionally, lifetime measurements may assist in determining if more than one fluorescing species is present and provide information concerning the molecular structure as well as the local environment. Fast time-gating is also useful at longer visible or near-IR wavelengths, as this approach increases the sensitivity of the instrument to organic material by removing the majority of the fluorescence background from the Raman signal and reducing the effect of ambient light.

  4. The manipulation of massive ro-vibronic superpositions using time-frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TFRCARS) from quantum control to quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Zadoyan, R; Lidar, D A; Apkarian, V A

    2001-01-01

    Molecular ro-vibronic coherences, joint energy-time distributions of quantum amplitudes, are selectively prepared, manipulated, and imaged in Time-Frequency-Resolved Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (TFRCARS) measurements using femtosecond laser pulses. The studies are implemented in iodine vapor, with its thermally occupied statistical ro-vibrational density serving as initial state. The evolution of the massive ro-vibronic superpositions, consisting of 1000 eigenstates, is followed through two-dimensional images. The first- and second-order coherences are captured using time-integrated frequency-resolved CARS, while the third-order coherence is captured using time-gated frequency-resolved CARS. The Fourier filtering provided by time integrated detection projects out single ro-vibronic transitions, while time-gated detection allows the projection of arbitrary ro-vibronic superpositions from the coherent third-order polarization. Beside the control and imaging of chemistry, the controlled manipulation of...

  5. Strongly nonexponential time-resolved fluorescence of quantum-dot ensembles in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolaev, I.; Lodahl, P.; van Driel, A. Floris; Koenderink, A.F.; Vos, Willem L.

    2007-01-01

    We observe experimentally that ensembles of quantum dots in three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals reveal strongly nonexponential time-resolved emission. These complex emission decay curves are analyzed with a continuous distribution of decay rates. The log-normal distribution describes the decays

  6. Artifact-Free and Detection-Profile-Independent Higher-Order Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Microsecond-Resolved Kinetics. 2. Mixtures and Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollah-Nia, Farshad; Gelfand, Martin P; Van Orden, Alan

    2017-03-23

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a primary tool in the time-resolved analysis of nonreacting or reacting molecules in solution, based on fluorescence intensity fluctuations. However, conventional FCS alone is insufficient for a complete determination of reaction or mixture parameters. In an accompanying article, a technique for the computation of artifact-free higher-order correlations with microsecond time resolution was described. Here, we demonstrate the applications of the technique to analyze the systems of fast and slow reactions. As an example of non- or slow-reacting systems, the technique is applied to resolve two-component mixtures of labeled oligonucleotides. Next, the protonation reaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate in phosphate buffer is analyzed as an example of fast reactions (relaxation time system, the simple factorized form of cumulant-based higher-order correlations is exploited to remove the dependence on the molecular detection function (MDF). Therefore, there is no need to model and characterize the experimental MDF, and the precision and the accuracy of the technique are enhanced. It is verified that the higher-order correlation analysis enables a complete and simultaneous determination of the number and brightness parameters of mixing or reacting molecules, the reaction relaxation time, and forward and reverse reaction rates.

  7. Twisted intramolecular charge transfer states : rotationally resolved fluorescence excitation spectra of 4,4 '-dimethylaminobenzonitrile in a molecular beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolaev, A.E.; Myszkiewicz, G.; Berden, G.; Meerts, W.L.; Pfanstiel, J.F.; Pratt, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    We report the observation at high resolution of seven vibronic bands that appear within similar to200 cm(-1) of the electronic origin in the S-1-S-0 fluorescence excitation spectrum of 4,4(')-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN) in a molecular beam. Surprisingly, each band is found to be split into two

  8. 时间分辨荧光在免疫分析中的应用%The Application of Time-resolved Fluorescence in Immune Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄燕清

    2011-01-01

    As a kind of high sensitivity test means, time-resolved fluorescence(TRFIA) in immune analysis is widely used. With rare earth elements with a long fluorescence life and a strong fluorescence intensity as markers, and combed with time resolution, the technology sensitivity is greatly enhanced.Through the discussion of the application reseach of time-resolved fluorescence analysis in DNA analysis, clinic, food inspection,the great significance to the development of medicine and life sciences is revealed. The development of the method in applied field is promoted and related problems get further research, which make it better to serve human beings.%时间分辨荧光免疫分析作为一种高灵敏度的检测手段被应用到各个领域。该技术以荧光寿命长、荧光强度大的稀土元素作为标记物与时间分辨光谱相结合,极大的提高了检测灵敏度。通过探讨时间分辨荧光分析法在DNA分析、临床、食品检验中的应用研究。展示了其对医学及生命科学的发展具有重要意义。促进该方法应用领域的拓展及相关问题得进一步研究,使其更好地为人类所服务。

  9. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit@bose.res.in [Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata, West Bengal 700098 (India)

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  10. Time-resolved optical fluorescence spectroscopy of heterogeneous turbid media with special emphasis on brain tissue structures including diseased regions: A sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudelle, Fabrice; L'huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging based on near-infrared light provides a promising tool to differentiate diseased lesions from normal tissue. However, the measurement sensitivity of the fluorescence signals acquired at the output surface of the tissue is greatly influenced by the tissue structure, the optical properties, the location and the size of the target. In this paper, we present a numerical model based on the Monte Carlo method that allows to simulate time-resolved reflectance signals acquired on the surface of the scalp of a human head model bearing a fluorescent diseased region (tumor, glioma). The influence of tumor depth, tumor size and tumor shape evolution on the computed signals are analyzed by taking into account the multi-layered tissue structure. The simulations show that the mean-time-of-flight and the difference between two mean-times acquired at two source-detector distances are both relevant to this problem type. Furthermore, the simulations suggest that the use of the difference between mean-flight-times may be interesting to probe scattering changes that occur in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence of cationic dyes covalently bound to poly(methacrylic acid) in rigid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulo Moises de Oliveira, Hueder [Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Gehlen, Marcelo Henrique [Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: marcelog@iqsc.usp.br

    2006-12-15

    Atactic poly(methacrylic acid) labeled with acridine and Nile blue (NB) were studied by photophysical techniques in bulk solid state and in solution-cast films over different surfaces (glass, ITO, and polymethylmethacrylate). In the systems with both dyes, energy transfer from acridine to NB occurs with an efficiency depending on the type of substrate (solid or film). The films are more disordered fluorescent rigid media than the bulk chromophoric or bichromophoric polymers, and this effect is ascribed to inhomogeneous distribution of the dyes in the film. This effect enhances dye bimolecular interactions and increases the energy transfer rates between acridine donor and NB acceptor. Bimodal distributions of donor fluorescence lifetimes are observed.

  12. Level sequence and splitting identification of closely-spaced energy levels by angle-resolved analysis of the fluorescence light

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Z W; Surzhykov, A; Dong, C Z; Fritzsche, S

    2016-01-01

    The angular distribution and linear polarization of the fluorescence light following the resonant photoexcitation is investigated within the framework of the density matrix and second-order perturbation theory. Emphasis has been placed on "signatures" for determining the level sequence and splitting of intermediate (partially) overlapping resonances, if analyzed as a function of the photon energy of the incident light. Detailed computations within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method have been performed especially for the $1s^{2}2s^{2}2p^{6}3s\\;\\, J_{i}=1/2 \\,+\\, \\gamma_{1} \\:\\rightarrow\\: (1s^{2}2s2p^{6}3s)_{1}3p_{3/2}\\;\\, J=1/2, \\, 3/2 \\:\\rightarrow\\: 1s^{2}2s^{2}2p^{6}3s\\;\\, J_{f}=1/2 \\,+\\, \\gamma_{2}$ photoexcitation and subsequent fluorescence emission of atomic sodium. A remarkably strong dependence of the angular distribution and linear polarization of the $\\gamma_{2}$ fluorescence emission is found upon the level sequence and splitting of the intermediate $(1s^{2}2s2p^{6}3s)_{1}3p_{3/2}\\;\\, J=1/2,...

  13. Time-Resolved Frequency Comb Spectroscopy for Studying the Kinetics and Branching Ratio of OD+CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thinh Quoc; Bjork, Bryce J.; Heckl, Oliver H.; Changala, Bryan; Spaun, Ben; Okumura, Mitchio; Ye, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The chemical kinetics of the OH+CO reaction plays important roles in combustion and atmospheric processes. OH+CO has two product channels, H+CO_2 and the stabilized HOCO intermediate, with a branching ratio that is highly pressure dependent. Therefore, establishing an accurate kinetic model for this chemical system requires knowledge of the reaction rates and product yields, and the lifetimes of all molecules along a particular reaction pathway. We report the application of time-resolved frequency comb spectroscopy (TRFCS) in the mid-infrared (3.7 μm) spectral region to address the complex reaction kinetics of OD+CO at room temperature. We use the deuterated forms to avoid atmospheric water interference. This technique allows us to detect the lowest energy conformer trans-DOCO intermediate with high time-resolution and sensitivity while also permitting the direct determination of rotational state distributions of all relevant molecules. We simultaneously observe the time-dependent concentrations of trans-DOCO, OD, and D_2O which are used in conjunction with kinetics modeling to obtain the pressure- and collision partner-dependent branching ratio of OD+CO.

  14. Towards real time spatially resolved data on sediment transport: 1) tracing the motion of the fluorescent soil particles under rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, John; Hardy, Rob; Pates, Jackie; James, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Understanding where sediment originates from and where it travels to, in what quantities and at which rate is at the heart of many questions surrounding sediment transport, including the connectivity problem. Progress towards unravelling these questions and deepening our understanding has come from a wide range of approaches, including laboratory and field experiments conducted at a variety of scales. In seeking to understand the connectivity of sources and sinks of sediment scientists have spent considerable energy in developing tracing technologies. These have included numerous studies that have relied on the chemical properties of the soil and sediment to establish source-sink connectivity, and the use of 137Ceasium, from radioactive fall-out, to map sediment redistribution. More recently there has been an upsurge in interest in the use of artificially applied soil tracers, including rare earth element oxides and magnetic minerals. However all these tracing methods have a significant drawback: they rely on the collection of samples to assess their concentration. This means that their spatial distribution cannot easily be established in situ and that the environment that is being studied is damaged by the sampling process; nor can data be collected in real time which allows a dynamic understanding of erosion and transport processes to be developed. In this paper we present a methodology for use with a commercially available fluorescent tracer. The tracer is produced in a range of sizes and fluorescent signatures and can be applied to the soil surface. Here we report on an application that combines novel fluorescent videography techniques with custom image processing to trace the motion of the fluorescent soil particles under rainfall. Here we demonstrate the tracking of multiple sub-millimetre particles simultaneously, establishing their position 50 times a second with submillimetre precision. From this we are able to visualise and quantify parameters such as

  15. Time-resolved single tryptophan fluorescence in photoactive yellow protein monitors changes in the chromophore structure during the photocycle via energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Harald; Hoersch, Daniel; Meyer, Terry E; Cusanovich, Michael A; Heyn, Maarten P

    2005-12-27

    We show from time-resolved fluorescence intensity and depolarization experiments that the fluorescence of the unique tryptophan W119 of PYP is quenched by energy transfer to the 4-hydroxycinnamoyl chromophore. Whereas the intensity decay has a time constant of 0.18 ns in P, the decay in the absence of the cofactor (apo-PYP) has a single exponential lifetime of 4.8 ns. This difference in lifetime with and without acceptor can be explained quantitatively on the basis of energy transfer and the high-resolution X-ray structure of P, which allows an accurate calculation of the kappa2 factor. Fluorescence depolarization experiments with donor and acceptor indicate that both are immobilized so that kappa2 is constant on the fluorescence time scale. Using background illumination from an LED emitting at 470 nm, we measured the time-resolved fluorescence in a photostationary mixture of P and the intermediates I2 and I2'. The composition of the photostationary mixture depends on pH and changes from mainly I2 at low pH to predominantly I2' at high pH. The I2/I2' equilibrium is pH-dependent with a pKa of approximately 6.3. In I2 the lifetime increases to approximately 0.82 ns. This is not due to a change in distance or to the increase in spectral overlap but is primarily a consequence of a large decrease in kappa2. Kappa2 was calculated from the available X-ray structures and decreases from approximately 2.7 in P to 0.27 in I2. This change in kappa2 is caused by the isomerization of the acceptor, which leads to a reorientation of its transition dipole moment. We have here a rare case of the kappa2 factor dominating the change in energy transfer. The fluorescence decay in the light is pH-dependent. From an SVD analysis of the light/dark difference intensity decay at a number of pH values, we identify three species with associated lifetimes: P (0.18 ns), I2 (0.82 ns), and X (0.04 ns). On the basis of the pH dependence of the amplitudes associated with I2 and X, with a pKa of

  16. Digitally synthesized beat frequency multiplexing for sub-millisecond fluorescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Diebold, Eric D; Gossett, Daniel R; Jalali, Bahram

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is the most widely used method for unveiling the molecular composition of biological specimens. However, the weak optical emission of fluorescent probes and the tradeoff between imaging speed and sensitivity is problematic for acquiring blur-free images of fast phenomena, such as sub-millisecond biochemical dynamics in live cells and tissues, and cells flowing at high speed. We report a solution that achieves real-time pixel readout rates one order of magnitude faster than a modern electron multiplier charge coupled device (EMCCD) - the gold standard in high-speed fluorescence imaging technology. Deemed fluorescence imaging using radiofrequency-multiplexed excitation (FIRE), this approach maps the image into the radiofrequency spectrum using the beating of digitally synthesized optical fields. We demonstrate diffraction-limited confocal fluorescence imaging of stationary cells at a frame rate of 4.4 kHz, as well as fluorescence microscopy in flow at a throughput of approximately 50,000 ce...

  17. Sorption of Eu(III)/Cm(III) on Ca-montmorillonite and Na-illite. Part 1: Batch sorption and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabung, Th.; Pierret, M. C.; Bauer, A.; Geckeis, H.; Bradbury, M. H.; Baeyens, B.

    2005-12-01

    Sorption of Cm(III) and Eu(III) at trace concentrations onto Ca-montmorillonite (SWy-1) and Na-illite (Illite du Puy) has been studied under anaerobic conditions by batch sorption experiments and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Comparison of the results from spectroscopic and batch sorption experiments with Cm and Eu indicates the existence of outer-sphere complexes at pH 5 for both clay minerals. Five H 2O/OH - molecules remain in the first metal ion coordination sphere of the sorbed Eu/Cm. Measured fluorescence lifetimes of sorbed Eu/Cm and peak deconvolution of Cm-spectra are consistent with the formation of surface complexes of the form ≡S-O-Eu/Cm(OH) x(2-x)(H 2O) 5-x. At pH ≥ 12 Cm becomes incorporated into a surface precipitate at the Ca-montmorillonite surface presumably composed of Ca(OH) 2 or calcium silicate hydrate. A dramatic shift of the fluorescence emission band by more than 20 nm and a clear increase in the fluorescence lifetime suggests the almost complete displacement of coordinated H 2O and OH -. The pH dependent Eu sorption data obtained in batch experiments are consistent with spectroscopic data on Eu and Cm within experimental uncertainties thus demonstrating the validity of Eu as a homologue for trivalent actinides. Parameterization of a two-site protolysis nonelectrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange model using the batch sorption data and spectroscopic results is discussed in Part 2 of this work.

  18. Novel application of fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis to resolve the interaction between the G-quadruplex aptamer and thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhao; Gu, Yaqin; Liu, Li; Wang, Cheli; Wang, Jianpeng; Ding, Shumin; Li, Jinping; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2017-08-01

    The dynamic binding status between the thrombin and its G-quadruplex aptamers and the stability of its interaction partners were probed using our previously established fluorescence-coupled capillary electrophoresis method. A 29-nucleic acid thrombin binding aptamer was chosen as a model to study its binding affinity with the thrombin ligand. First, the effects of the cations on the formation of G-quadruplex from unstructured 29-nucleic acid thrombin binding aptamer were examined. Second, the rapid binding kinetics between the thrombin and 6-carboxyfluorescein labeled G-quadruplex aptamer was measured. Third, the stability of G-quadruplex aptamer-thrombin complex was also examined in the presence of the interfering species. Remarkably, it was found that the complementary strand of 29-nucleic acid thrombin binding aptamer could compete with G-quadruplex aptamer and thus disassociated the G-quadruplex structure into an unstructured aptamer. These data suggest that our in-house established fluorescence-coupled capillary electrophoresis assay could be applied to binding studies of the G-quadruplex aptamers, thrombin, and their ligands, while overcoming the complicated and costly approaches currently available. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Enhancing contrast and quantitation by spatial frequency domain fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jessica; Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging with fluorescent contrast agents is highly sensitive for molecular imaging but is limited in depth to a few centimeters below the skin. Planar fluorescence imaging with full-field, uniform illumination and scientific camera image capture provides a portable and robust configuration for real-time, sensitive fluorescence detection with scalable resolution, but is inherently surface weighted and therefore limited in depth to a few millimeters. At the NIR region (700-1000 nm), tissue absorption and autofluorescence are relatively reduced, increasing depth penetration and reducing background signal, respectively. Optical imaging resolution scales with depth, limiting microscopic resolution with multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography to skin and peri-tumoral tissues are not uniform, varying in thickness and color, complicating subsurface fluorescence measurements. Diffuse optical imaging methods have been developed that better quantify optical signals relative to faster full-field planar reflectance imaging, but require long scan times, complex instrumentation, and reconstruction algorithms. Here we report a novel strategy for rapid measurement of subsurface fluorescence using structured light illumination to improve quantitation of deep-seated fluorescence molecular probe accumulation. This technique, in combination with highly specific, tumor-avid fluorescent molecular probes, will easily integrate noninvasive diagnostics for superficial cancers and fluorescence guided surgery.

  20. Complexation of europium(III) with the zwitterionic form of amino acids studied with ultraviolet-visible and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Anne; Rönitz, Olivia; Barkleit, Astrid; Bernhard, Gert; Ackermann, Jörg-Uwe

    2010-08-01

    The complex formation of europium(III) with the zwitterionic form of amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, and threonine) has been studied in aqueous solution. Measurements were performed at I = 0.1 M (NaCl/NaClO(4)), room temperature, and trace metal concentrations in the range of pH 2 to 8 using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). While complexation leads to a significant luminescence enhancement in the emission spectrum of the metal ion, absorption in the UV-Vis spectrum of the amino acid (AA) decreases. As zwitterionic species (AAH), all three ligands form weak complexes with 1:1 stoichiometry and a general formula of EuAAH(3+) with the metal. The complex stability constants were determined to be log K approximately 1 for all complexes, indicating the negligible contribution of the amino acid side chain to the complex formation reaction.

  1. Interaction of Cm(III) and Am(III) with human serum transferrin studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence and EXAFS spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicole; Fröhlich, Daniel R; Panak, Petra J

    2014-05-14

    The complexation of Cm(III) with human serum transferrin was investigated in a pH range from 3.5 to 11.0 using time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). At pH ≥ 7.4 Cm(III) is incorporated at the Fe(III) binding site of transferrin whereas at lower pH a partially bound Cm(III) transferrin species is formed. At physiological temperature (310 K) at pH 7.4, about 70% of the partially bound and 30% of the incorporated Cm(III) transferrin species are present in solution. The Cm(III) results obtained by TRLFS are in very good agreement with Am(III) EXAFS results, confirming the incorporation of Am(III) at the Fe(III) binding site at pH 8.5.

  2. Exactly soluble model of the time-resolved fluorescence return to thermal equilibrium in many-particle systems after excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czachor, Andrzej, E-mail: a.czachor@ncbj.gov.pl

    2016-02-15

    In this paper we consider the assembly of weakly interacting identical particles, where the occupation of single-particle energy-levels at thermal equilibrium is governed by statistics. The analytic form of the inter-energy-level jump matrix is derived and analytic solution of the related eigen-problem is given. It allows one to demonstrate the nature of decline in time of the energy emission (fluorescence, recombination) of such many-level system after excitation in a relatively simple and unifying way – as a multi-exponential de-excitation. For the system of L energy levels the number of the de-excitation lifetimes is L−1. The lifetimes depend on the energy level spectrum as a whole. Two- and three-level systems are considered in detail. The impact of the energy level degeneracy on the lifetimes is discussed.

  3. Study on self-frequency-shift of femtosecond pulse in nonlinear dispersion medium using time-resolved cross-phase modulation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵应桥; 朱鹤元; 刘建华; 孙迭篪; 李富铭

    1997-01-01

    A time-resolved cross-phase modulation method combined with a modified nonlinear Schrodinger equation is used to study the effects of nonlinear response time on the propagation of ultrashort pulses in nonlinear dispersion media. Evolution of cross-phase modulation spectrum with the different time delay between the probe pulse and pump pulse is simulated using split-step Fourier method. It is shown that both normal self-frequency-shift-red-shift and abnormal self-frequency-shift-blue-shift can occur in the frequency domain for the probe pulse, and a satisfactory theoretical interpretation is given.

  4. Evaluation of the time resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA) for the detection of varicella zoster virus (VZV) antibodies following vaccination of healthcare workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, S.L.R.; Maple, P.A.C.; Andrews, N.; Brown, K.E.; Ayres, K.L.; Scott, F.T.; Bassam, M. Al; Gershon, A.A.; Steinberg, S.P.; Breuer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Determination of varicella zoster virus (VZV) immunity in healthcare workers without a history of chickenpox is important for identifying those in need of vOka vaccination. Post immunisation, healthcare workers in the UK who work with high risk patients are tested for seroconversion. To assess the performance of the time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA) for the detection of antibody in vaccinated as well as unvaccinated individuals, a cut-off was first calculated. VZV-IgG specific avidity and titres six weeks after the first dose of vaccine were used to identify subjects with pre-existing immunity among a cohort of 110 healthcare workers. Those with high avidity (≥60%) were considered to have previous immunity to VZV and those with low or equivocal avidity (130 mIU/mL which best discriminated between the two groups and this was confirmed by ROC analysis. Using this value, the sensitivity and specificity of TRFIA cut-off were 90% (95% CI 79–96), and 78% (95% CI 61–90) respectively in this population. A subset of samples tested by the gold standard Fluorescence Antibody to Membrane Antigen (FAMA) test showed 84% (54/64) agreement with TRFIA. PMID:21192976

  5. Fulvic acid complexation of Eu(III) and Cm(III) at elevated temperatures studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Daniel R; Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Gast, Michael; Panak, Petra J

    2014-11-07

    The interaction of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with three different aquatic fulvic acids (FA) was studied as a function of the temperature (T = 20-80 °C) in 0.1 M NaCl solution by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The speciation of both trivalent metal ions was determined by peak deconvolution of the recorded fluorescence spectra. For each studied metal ion-FA system only one complexed species is formed under the given experimental conditions. The stability constants at 20, 40, 60 and 80 °C (log β'(T)) were determined according to the charge neutralization model. The log β' (20 °C) for the different FAs show similar values (log β(20 °C) = 5.60-6.29). The stability constants increase continuously with increasing temperature by approximately 0.3-1.0 orders of magnitude. The reaction enthalpies and entropies are derived from the integrated Van't Hoff equation. The results show that all investigated complexation reactions are endothermic and entropy-driven.

  6. Energy transfer in Anabaena variabilis filaments adapted to nitrogen-depleted and nitrogen-enriched conditions studied by time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Aya; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-02-16

    Nitrogen is among the most important nutritious elements for photosynthetic organisms such as plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. Therefore, nitrogen depletion severely compromises the growth, development, and photosynthesis of these organisms. To preserve their integrity under nitrogen-depleted conditions, filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia, and self-adapt by regulating their light-harvesting and excitation energy-transfer processes. To investigate the changes in the primary processes of photosynthesis, we measured the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence spectra (TRFS) of whole filaments of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis at 77 K. The filaments were grown in standard and nitrogen-free media for 6 months. The TRFS were measured with a picosecond time-correlated single photon counting system. Despite the phycobilisome degradation, the energy-transfer paths within phycobilisome and from phycobilisome to both photosystems were maintained. However, the energy transfer from photosystem II to photosystem I was suppressed and a specific red chlorophyll band appeared under the nitrogen-depleted condition.

  7. Synthesis of a highly fluorescent beta-diketone-europium chelate and its utility in time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay of serum total thyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng-Bo; Han, Shi-Quan; Zhang, Chao; He, You-Feng

    2002-11-15

    A new highly fluorescent beta-diketone-europium chelate was synthesized and employed as a tracer to develop a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TRFIA) for detection of serum total thyroxine (T4). The tetradentate beta-diketone chelator, 1,10-bis(thiophene-2'-yl)-4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7-octafluorodecane-1,3,8,10-tetraone (BTOT), was structurally composed of two units of thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) derivatives but expressed fluorescence that was greatly enhanced, as compared to the original TTA molecules, in the presence of excess amount of Eu3+. The luminescence properties of the europium chelate of BTOT werestudied in aqueous solution. Chlorosulfonylation of BTOT afforded 1, 10-bis(5'-chlorosulfo-thiophene-2'-yl)-4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7-octafluorodecane-1,3,8,10-tetraone (BCTOT), which could be coupled to proteins (i.e., streptavidin or the BSA-T4 conjugate) and used as a tracer for TRFIA. Although the BCTOT-Eu complex could be detected at a very low level (approximately 1.07 x 10(-12) mol/L) in buffered aqueous solution (50 mmoVLTris-HCl; pH, 8.0), the application of the chelate label in direct serum T4 TRFIA experienced a problem of matrix interference, which was probably caused by some unknown chelating components in the samples as a result of the fact that the fluorescence of the BCTOT-Eu chelate was prone to quenching or enhancement by some chelating reagents. To remove this problem, an indirect serum T4 TRFIA was proposed with the use of BCTOT-Eu-labeled streptavidin (SA) as signal generation reagent. The concentrations of T4 in 27 human serums were determined by indirect T4 TRFIA, and the assay results correlated well with those obtained by commercial Coming-CLIA (r = 0.955) and Wallac-DELFIA (r 0.965).

  8. Smith-Magenis syndrome deletion: A case with equivocal cytogenetic findings resolved by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juyal, R.C.; Patel, P.I.; Greenberg, F. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-11

    The availability of markers for the 17p11.2 region has enabled the diagnosis of Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). SMS is typically associated with a discernible deletion of band 17p11.2 upon cytogenetic analysis at a resolution of 400-550 bands. We present a case that illustrates the importance of using FISH to confirm a cytogenetic diagnosis of del(17)(p11.2). Four independent cytogenetic analyses were performed with different conclusions. Results of low resolution analyses of amniocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes were apparently normal, while high resolution analyses of peripheral blood samples in two laboratories indicated mosaicism for del(17)(p11.2). FISH clearly demonstrated a 17p deletion on one chromosome of all peripheral blood cells analyzed and ruled out mosaicism unambiguously. The deletion was undetectable by flow cytometric quantitation of chromosomal DNA content, suggesting that it is less than 2 Mb. We conclude that FISH should be used to detect the SMS deletion when routine chromosome analysis fails to detect it and to verify mosaicism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Real-time, Spatially Resolved Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Activity And Regulation Using the Fluorescent Substrate, ASP+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, M.; Libby, T.; Kivell, B.; Jaligam, V.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Shippenberg, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) mediates clearance of serotonin from the synapse, thereby, regulating extracellular serotonin concentrations. Radioligand uptake techniques are typically used to assess SERT function in tissue and heterologous expression systems. The need for sufficient protein in samples, however, requires use of homogenate preparations, potentially masking effects limited to specific cell populations. 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium (ASP+) is a fluorescent monoamine transporter substrate that has been used for real-time monitoring of dopamine and norepinephrine transporter function in single cells. The present live cell imaging studies examine the utility of ASP+ for quantifying hSERT function in HEK-293 and neuroblastoma cells. We show rapid membrane binding and intracellular ASP+ accumulation in hSERT expressing cells. Accumulation is saturable; dependent on temperature and the presence of sodium and chloride in the media, and attenuated by serotonin. Acute or prolonged exposure of cells to serotonin re-uptake inhibitors produces a concentration-dependent decrease in accumulation. Similar effects are produced by PKC activation whereas p38MAPK activation increases ASP+ accumulation. These data demonstrate the validity of ASP+ as a probe for monitoring SERT function in living cells. Alterations in SERT binding and uptake can be quantified in the same cell and use of a within cell design permits analysis of time-related alterations in SERT function. PMID:20524964

  11. Development of a Multi-modal Tissue Diagnostic System Combining High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging with Lifetime Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yinghua; Marcu, Laura; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    We report the development and validate a multi-modal tissue diagnostic technology, which combines three complementary techniques into one system including ultrasound backscatter microscopy (UBM), photoacoustic imaging (PAI), and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS). UBM enables the reconstruction of the tissue microanatomy. PAI maps the optical absorption heterogeneity of the tissue associated with structure information and has the potential to provide functional imaging of the tissue. Examination of the UBM and PAI images allows for localization of regions of interest for TR-LIFS evaluation of the tissue composition. The hybrid probe consists of a single element ring transducer with concentric fiber optics for multi-modal data acquisition. Validation and characterization of the multi-modal system and ultrasonic, photoacoustic, and spectroscopic data coregistration were conducted in a physical phantom with properties of ultrasound scattering, optical absorption, and fluorescence. The UBM system with the 41 MHz ring transducer can reach the axial and lateral resolution of 30 and 65 μm, respectively. The PAI system with 532 nm excitation light from a Nd:YAG laser shows great contrast for the distribution of optical absorbers. The TR-LIFS system records the fluorescence decay with the time resolution of ~300 ps and a high sensitivity of nM concentration range. Biological phantom constructed with different types of tissues (tendon and fat) was used to demonstrate the complementary information provided by the three modalities. Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes were compared to differentiate chemical composition of tissues at the regions of interest determined by the coregistered high resolution UBM and PAI image. Current results demonstrate that the fusion of these techniques enables sequentially detection of functional, morphological, and compositional features of biological tissue, suggesting potential applications in diagnosis of tumors

  12. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth resolved from geoelectromagnetic pedotransfer function and depth of investigation resolved from geoelectrical measurements: A case study of coastal formation, southern Nigeria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N J George; D N Obiora; A M Ekanem; A E Akpan

    2016-10-01

    The task involved in the interpretation of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) data is how to get unique results in the absence/limited number of borehole information, which is usually limited to information on the spot. Geological and geochemical mapping of electrical properties are usually limited to direct observations on the surface and therefore, conclusions and extrapolations that can be drawn about thesystem electrical characteristics and possible underlying structures may be masked as geology changes with positions. The electrical resistivity study pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been linked with the electromagnetic (EM) resolved PTFs at chosen frequencies of skin/penetration depth corresponding to the VES resolved investigation depth in order to determine the local geological attributes of hydrogeological repository in the coastal formation dominated with fine sand. The illustrative application of effective skin depth depicts that effective skin depth has direct relation with the EM response of the local source over the layered earth and thus, can be linked to the direct current earth response functions as an aidfor estimating the optimum depth and electrical parameters through comparative analysis. Though the VES and EM resolved depths of investigation at appropriate effective and theoretical frequencies have wide gaps, diagnostic relations characterising the subsurface depth of interest have been established. Thedetermining factors of skin effect have been found to include frequency/period, resistivity/conductivity, absorption/attenuation coefficient and energy loss factor. The novel diagnostic relations and their corresponding constants between 1-D resistivity data and EM skin depth are robust PTFs necessary for checking the accuracy associated with the non-unique interpretations that characterise the 1-D resistivitydata, mostly when lithostratigraphic data are not available.

  13. Approximate relationship between frequency-dependent skin depth resolved from geoelectromagnetic pedotransfer function and depth of investigation resolved from geoelectrical measurements: A case study of coastal formation, southern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, N. J.; Obiora, D. N.; Ekanem, A. M.; Akpan, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    The task involved in the interpretation of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) data is how to get unique results in the absence/limited number of borehole information, which is usually limited to information on the spot. Geological and geochemical mapping of electrical properties are usually limited to direct observations on the surface and therefore, conclusions and extrapolations that can be drawn about the system electrical characteristics and possible underlying structures may be masked as geology changes with positions. The electrical resistivity study pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been linked with the electromagnetic (EM) resolved PTFs at chosen frequencies of skin/penetration depth corresponding to the VES resolved investigation depth in order to determine the local geological attributes of hydrogeological repository in the coastal formation dominated with fine sand. The illustrative application of effective skin depth depicts that effective skin depth has direct relation with the EM response of the local source over the layered earth and thus, can be linked to the direct current earth response functions as an aid for estimating the optimum depth and electrical parameters through comparative analysis. Though the VES and EM resolved depths of investigation at appropriate effective and theoretical frequencies have wide gaps, diagnostic relations characterising the subsurface depth of interest have been established. The determining factors of skin effect have been found to include frequency/period, resistivity/conductivity, absorption/attenuation coefficient and energy loss factor. The novel diagnostic relations and their corresponding constants between 1-D resistivity data and EM skin depth are robust PTFs necessary for checking the accuracy associated with the non-unique interpretations that characterise the 1-D resistivity data, mostly when lithostratigraphic data are not available.

  14. Speciation of europium (III) surface species on monocrystalline alumina using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence-scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaleb, K.A.; Viala, F.; Miserque, F.; Salmon, L. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP, Lab Reactivite Surface et Interface, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Reiller, P. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides et Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Moutiers, G. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC, Serv Chim Phys, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work was to perform highly localized spectroscopic surface measurements by combining time-resolved laser spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy. The final purpose of that was to study surface sorption at the molecular level of trivalent ions in the framework of nuclear waste disposal assessment. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy presents the advantages of being selective, sensitive, and noninvasive and scanning near-field optical microscopy is a promising technique for high resolution surface speciation. Investigation of the interaction between trivalent europium and a monocrystalline alumina (11-bar02) surface was made using different conditions of concentration and pH. We found that the distribution of sorbed europium was always homogeneous with a decay time of europium (III) equal to 350 {mu}s {+-} 15 {mu}s. On the other hand, carbonate species with a decay time of 210 {mu}s {+-} 10 {mu}s or other hydroxide species with a decay time of 180 {mu}s {+-} 10 {mu}s were detected on the surface when a higher concentration or a higher pH solution, respectively, were used. Distribution of these species was heterogeneous and their associated fluorescence signal was relatively high, evoking a precipitated form. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was also used on the same samples as a complementary technique. A binding energy of 1135.1 eV was obtained for the sorbed europium and another binding energy of 1134.4 eV was obtained for the hydroxide species, thus confirming the presence of two kinds of species on the surface. (authors)

  15. Modulation-frequency encoded multi-color fluorescent DNA analysis in an optofluidic chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongre, C.; van Weerd, Jasper; Besselink, G.A.J.; Martinez Vazquez, Rebecca; Osellame, Roberto; Cerullo, Giulio; van Weeghel, Rob; van den Vlekkert, Hans H.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Pollnau, Markus

    We introduce a principle of parallel optical processing to an optofluidic lab-on-a-chip. During electrophoretic separation, the ultra-low limit of detection achieved with our set-up allows us to record fluorescence from covalently end-labeled DNA molecules. Different sets of exclusively

  16. Mapping of wave packets in direct fragmentation via pump-probe frequency integrated fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, Volker; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2000-01-01

    We consider femtosecond excitation of a molecule to a dissociative electronic state. The quantum dynamics is recorded via delayed excitation to a higher electronic state and measurement of the total fluorescence from this state detected as a function of delay time. It is shown that the signal can...

  17. Fatty acid-specific fluorescent probes and their use in resolving mixtures of unbound free fatty acids in equilibrium with albumin†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Andrew H.; Kampf, J. Patrick; Kwan, Thomas; Zhu, Baolong; Kleinfeld, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first measurements to profile mixtures of unbound free fatty acids. Measurements utilized fluorescent probes with distinctly different response profiles for different free fatty acids (FFA). These probes were constructed by labeling site-specific mutants of the rat intestinal fatty acid binding protein (rI-FABP) with acrylodan. The probes were produced and screened by high throughput methods and from more than 30,000 such probes we selected 6 that together have sufficient specificity and sensitivity to resolve the profile of unbound FFA (FFAu) in mixtures of different FFAu. We developed analytical methods to determine the FFAu profile from the fluorescence (ratio) response of the different probes and used these methods to determine FFAu profiles for mixtures of arachidonate, linoleate, oleate, palmitate and stearate in equilibrium with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Measurements were performed using mixtures with a range of total FFAu concentrations, including 0.9 nM, which is similar to normal plasma levels. We also measured single FFA binding isotherms for BSA and found that binding was well described by 6-7 sites with the same binding constants (Kd). The Kd values for the FFA (4 to 38 nM) were inversely related to the aqueous solubility of the FFA. We constructed a model with these parameters to predict the FFAu profile in equilibrium with BSA and found excellent agreement between the profiles measured using the FFA probes and those calculated with this model. These results should lead to a better understanding of albumin's role in buffering FFAu and to profiling FFAu in intra and extracellular biological fluids. PMID:17128966

  18. Applications of immunomagnetic capture and time-resolved fluorescence to detect outbreak Escherichia coli O157 and Salmonella in alfalfa sprouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shu-I.; Gordon, Marsha; Fett, William F.; Gehring, Andrew G.; Irwin, Peter L.

    2004-03-01

    Commercially available alfalfa seeds were inoculated with low levels (~ 4 CFU/g) of pathogenic bacteria. The inoculated seeds were then allowed to sprout in sterile tap water at 22°C. After 48 hours, the irrigation water and sprouts were separately transferred to bovine heart infusion (BHI) media. The microbes in the BHI samples were allowed to grow for 4 hours at 37°C and 160 rpm. Specific immunomagnetic beads (IMB) were then applied to capture the E.coli O157 and/or Salmonella in the growth media. Separation and concentration of IMB-captured pathogens were achieved using magnetic separators. The captured E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp were further tagged with europium (Eu) labeled anti-E. coli O157 antibodies and samarium (Sm) labeled anti-Salmonella antibodies, respectively. After washing, the lanthanide labels were extracted out from the complexes by specific chelators to form strongly fluorescent chelates. The specific time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) associated with Eu or Sm was measured to estimate the extent of capture of the E. coli O157 and Salmonella, respectively. The results indicated that the approach could detect E. coli O157 and Salmonella enterica from the seeds inoculated with ~ 4 CFU/g of the pathogens. Non-targeted bacteria, e.g., Aeromonas and Citrobacter exhibited essentially no cross reactivity. Since the pathogen detection from the sprouts was achieved within 6 hours, the developed methodology could be use as a rapid, sensitive and specific screening process for E. coli O157 and Salmonella enterica in this popular salad food.

  19. High sensitive and high temporal and spatial resolved image of reactive species in atmospheric pressure surface discharge reactor by laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Feng, Chun-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Ding, Hongbin

    2017-05-01

    The current paucity of spatial and temporal characterization of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) concentration has been a major hurdle to the advancement and clinical translation of low temperature atmospheric plasmas. In this study, an advanced laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to be an effective antibacterial surface discharge reactor for the diagnosis of RONS, where the highest spatial and temporal resolution of the LIF system has been achieved to ˜100 μm scale and ˜20 ns scale, respectively. Measurements on an oxidative OH radical have been carried out as typical RONS for the benchmark of the whole LIF system, where absolute number density calibration has been performed on the basis of the laser Rayleigh scattering method. Requirements for pixel resolved spatial distribution and outer plasma region detection become challenging tasks due to the low RONS concentration (˜ppb level) and strong interference, especially the discharge induced emission and pulsed laser induced stray light. In order to design the highly sensitive LIF system, a self-developed fluorescence telescope, the optimization of high precision synchronization among a tunable pulsed laser, a surface discharge generator, intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera, and an oscilloscope have been performed. Moreover, an image BOXCAR approach has been developed to remarkably improve the sensitivity of the whole LIF system by optimizing spatial and temporal gating functions via both hardware and software, which has been integrated into our automatic control and data acquisition system on the LabVIEW platform. In addition, a reciprocation averaging measurement has been applied to verify the accuracy of the whole LIF detecting system, indicating the relative standard deviation of ˜3%.

  20. A cell-based time-resolved fluorescence assay for selection of antibody reagents for G protein-coupled receptor immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jui-Lan; Fornwald, Jim; Rivers, Philip; Goldsworthy, Susan; Looney, Noeleen A; Hanvey, Jeff; Plumpton, Chris; Parham, Janet; Romanos, Michael; Kost, Thomas A; Kull, Frederick C

    2004-08-01

    A cell-based time-resolved fluorescence (celTRF) immunoassay is described for pre-screening antibodies to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) peptides that predicts suitability for immunohistochemistry (IHC). Rat GPCRs were expressed in Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells via recombinant baculoviruses designed for mammalian cell expression, i.e., the transduced cells were used as a "screening lawn". The lawn was fixed and permeabilized similarly to IHC tissue. The celTRF, a dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA), employed Eu-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG. It exhibited a broad dynamic range upon which enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA)-positive affinity-purified anti-peptide antibody reagents were examined for specificity and potency. Over 150 anti-peptide reagents to 27 GPCRs were characterized. All celTRF-positive antibodies were found to be suitable for IHC, whereas ELISA alone did not predict IHC utility. Examples are illustrated with five rabbit anti-neuropeptide FF receptor 1 (NPFF1) antibodies, where a strong correlation between celTRF potency and IHC utility was observed in both applications. In contrast, two high anti-peptide ELISA titer but celTRF-negative antibodies failed to recognize the NPFF1 receptor in IHC. The celTRF assay was performed manually and in an automated fashion, in our case, using a Biomek FX station and Sami scheduling software. The celTRF is the first in vitro automated assay that offers confident pre-selection of antibodies for IHC and the versatility to accommodate the rapid screening of large numbers of GPCRs. The celTRF is readily applicable to other protein target classes.

  1. Excitation-resolved wide-field fluorescence imaging of indocyanine green visualizes the microenvironment properties in vivo via solvatochromic shift (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaedu; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRF) is a powerful wide-field optical imaging tool that has a potential to visualize molecular-specific exogenous fluorescence agents, such as FDA approved Indocyanine Green (ICG), in thick tissue. Indeed, ICG is sensitive to biochemical environment such that it can be used to detect micro- or macroscopic environmental changes in tissue by solvatochromic shift that is defined by the dependence of absorption and emission spectra with the solvent polarity. For example, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a very powerful drug carrier that can penetrate biological barriers such as the skin, the membranes, and the blood-brain-barrier. In presence of DMSO, ICG in tissue shows the excitation blue shift. However, NIRF imaging of microenvironment dependent changes of ICG has been challenging for the following reasons. First, the Stoke's shift of ICG is too small to separate the excitation and emission spectra easily. Second, the solvatochromic shift of ICG is too small to be detected by conventional NIRF techniques. Last but not least, the multiple scattering in tissue degrades not only the spatial information but also the spectral contents by the red-shift. We developed a wavelength-swept laser-based NIRF system that can resolve the excitation shift of ICG in tissue such that DMSO can be indirectly visualized. We plan to conduct an in-vivo lymph-node drug-delivery study in a mouse model to show feasibility of the indirect imaging of the drug-carrier with the wavelength-swept-laser based NIRF system.

  2. Green fluorescent protein retroviral vectors: low titer and high recombination frequency suggest a selective disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazono, Y; Yu, J M; Dunbar, C E; Emmons, R V

    1997-07-20

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been used as a reporter molecule for gene expression because it fluoresces green after blue-light excitation. Inclusion of this gene in a vector could allow rapid, nontoxic selection of successfully transduced cells. However, many attempts by our laboratory to isolate stable retroviral producer cell clones secreting biologically active vectors containing either the highly fluorescent S65T-GFP mutant or humanized GFP have failed. Vector plasmids containing various forms of GFP and the neomycin resistance gene were transfected into three different packaging cell lines and fluorescence was observed for several days, but stable clones selected with G418 no longer fluoresced. Using confocal microscopy, the brightest cells were observed to contract and die within a matter of days. RNA slot-blot analysis of retroviral producer supernatants showed no viral production from the GFP plasmid-transfected clones, although all clones derived after transfection with an identical retroviral construct not containing GFP produced virus. Genomic Southern analysis of the GFP-transduced clones showed a much higher probability of rearrangement of the priviral sequences than in the control non-GFP clones. Overall, 18/34 S65T-GFP clones and 17/33 humanized-GFP clones had rearrangements, whereas 2/15 control non-GFP clones had rearrangements. Hence, producer cells expressing high levels of these GFP genes seem to be selected against, with stable clones undergoing major rearrangements or other mutations that both abrogate GFP expression and prevent vector production. These observations indicate that GFP may not be an appropriate reporter gene for gene transfer applications in our vector/packaging system.

  3. Time and Spectrally Resolved Fluorescence of Cl*2 and ArCl* in Cl2 Doped Ar Under State Selective Pulsed Photoexcitation with Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, T.; Jordan, B.; Zimmerer, G.; Haaks, D.; Le Calvé, J.; Castex, M.-C.

    1986-03-01

    Synchrotron Radiation is used to selectively excite chlorine and Cl2 doped argon in the VUV region. Stationary fluorescence and excitation spectra of the 11Σ{/u +}, 21Σ{/u +} and 23Π g Cl{2/*} states and of the ArCl*( B-X) transition are obtained. The excitation threshold of ArCl*( B) in Ar/Cl2 system is found to be 1,285±5 Å and that of ArCl( C) at ˜1,260 Å. The formation of ArCl* and Cl*2(23Π g) is discussed in terms of recent potential curves data. A detailed time resolved study is reported which allows us to determine precisely the radiative lifetime of ArCl*( B) state (5.2 ns) and numerous kinetic parameters of this system, to estimate the C state energy and to discuss the relaxation and mixing process of the ArCl*( B) and ( C) states. A two ladder multilevel kinetic model is described which accounts for the experimental results and shows the difficulty of studying this particular ArCl* system as compared to the closely related XeCl* and KrCl* ones.

  4. 新颖的时频对照法解决EMI问题%Novel Time-frequency Cross Methods to Resolve EMI Issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄敏超

    2016-01-01

    在产品开发的EMI测试和整改过程中,经常会遇到很多问题很难用常见的电磁干扰理论进行解释和解决,由此提出一种新颖的时频对照法来解释并解决这些EMI问题。时频对照法借助近场探头和频谱分析仪,确认产品中隐藏的电磁场分布,准确定位噪声源位置和其传播途径。结合实际案例,通过抑制噪声源本身强度来解决EMI问题。%During resolving the product electromagnetic interference(EMI)issues, it is difficult for the general EMI theory to explain the root cause of some EMI phenomenon. A novel time-frequency cross method was proposed to confirm the root causes and resolve the EMI issues. Based on the three electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)elements, the time-frequency cross method can confirm the exact location of the noise and its transfer path according to the hidden electric-magnetic field distribution. The EMI issue is resolved by suppressed the noise strength itself with the real case.

  5. Spectral characterization of crude oil using fluorescence (synchronous and time-resolved) and NIR (Near Infrared Spectroscopy); Caracterizacao espectral do petroleo utilizando fluorescencia (sincronizada e resolvida no tempo) e NIR (Near Infrared Spectroscopy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falla Sotelo, F.; Araujo Pantoja, P.; Lopez-Gejo, J.; Le Roux, G.A.C.; Nascimento, C.A.O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Simulacao e Controle de Processos; Quina, F.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Centro de Capacitacao e Pesquisa em Meio Ambiente (CEPEMA)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of two spectroscopic techniques employed in the crude oil characterization: NIR spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy (Synchronous fluorescence - SF and Time Resolved Fluorescence - TRF) for the development of correlation models between spectral profiles of crude oil samples and both physical properties (viscosity and API density) and physico-chemical properties (SARA analysis: Saturated, Aromatic, Resins and Asphaltenes). The better results for viscosity and density were obtained using NIR whose prediction capacity was good (1.5 cP and 0.5 deg API, respectively). For SARA analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy revealed its potential in the model calibration showing good results (R2 coefficients greater than 0.85). TRF spectroscopy had better performance than SF spectroscopy. (author)

  6. Plasma-mirror frequency-resolved optical gating for simultaneous retrieval of a chirped vacuum-ultraviolet waveform and time-dependent reflectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryuji Itakura; Takayuki Kumada; Motoyoshi Nakano; Hiroshi Akagi

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the methodology of frequency-resolved optical gating(FROG) is applicable to time-resolved reflection spectroscopy of a plasma mirror in the vacuum-ultraviolet(VUV) region. Our recent study [R. Itakura et al. Opt. Express 23, 10914(2015)] has shown that a VUV waveform can be retrieved from a VUV reflection spectrogram of a plasma mirror formed on a fused silica(FS) surface by irradiation with an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Simultaneously, the increase in the reflectivity with respect to the Fresnel reflection of the unexcited FS surface can be obtained as a time-dependent reflectivity of the plasma mirror. In this study, we update the FROG analysis procedure using the least-square generalized projections algorithm. This procedure can reach convergence much faster than the previous one and has no aliasing problem. It is demonstrated that a significantly chirped VUV pulse as long as 1 ps can be precisely characterized.

  7. Frequency-Domain Optical Mammogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    the tumor. * Combination of the above two points into a composite false-color breast image containing structural information (from the second...Antonangeli, A. Savoia, T. Parasassi, and N. Rosato, " Plastique : a synchrotron radiation beamline for time resolved fluorescence in the frequency domain

  8. Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence-Based Assay to Monitor Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signalling in a High-Throughput Format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAyoub

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs are key components of multiple important cell signalling pathways regulating diverse biological responses. This signalling is characterized by phosphorylation cascades leading to ERK1/2 activation and promoted by various cell surface receptors including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. We report the development of a new cell-based phospho-ERK1/2 assay (designated Phospho-ERK, which is a sandwich proximity-based assay using the homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology. We have validated the assay on endogenously expressed ERK1/2 activated by the epidermal growth factor (EGFR as a prototypical RTK, as well as various GPCRs belonging to different classes and coupling to different heterotrimeric G proteins. The assay was successfully miniaturized in 384-well plates using various cell lines endogenously, transiently or stably expressing the different receptors. The validation was performed for agonists, antagonists and inhibitors in dose-response as well as kinetic analysis, and the signalling and pharmacological properties of the different receptors were reproduced. Furthermore, the determination of a Z’-factor value of 0.7 indicates the potential of the Phospho-ERK assay for high-throughput screening of compounds that may modulate ERK1/2 signalling. Finally, our study is of great interest in the current context of investigating ERK1/2 signalling with respect to the emerging concepts of biased ligands, G protein-dependent/independent ERK1/2 activation, and functional transactivation between GPCRs and RTKs, illustrating the importance of considering the ERK1/2 pathway in cell signalling.

  9. Investigation of the frequency of chromosomal aneuploidy using triple fluorescence in situ hybridization in 12 Chinese infertile men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张群芳; 卢光琇

    2004-01-01

    Background Chromosomal aberrations are the major cause of pre-and post-implantation embryo wastage and some studies suggest that half of all human conceptions have a chromosomal abnormality. A chromosomal aberration in human sperms is also one of the causes of failure of in vitro fertilization. This study was designed to ascertain whether chromosomal aneuploidy in spermatozoa is a risk factor for male infertility.Methods Twelve infertile men were divided into two groups: 10 with oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT, Group A) and two with a normal semen analysis (Group B). Two normal healthy sperm donors acted as controls (Group C). We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and probes for chromosomes X, Y and 18 to determine the frequency of aneuploidy.Results The frequencies of spermatozoa disomy for chromosomes X, Y and 18 were 0.30% and 0.30%, respectively, in Group B. The percentages were not significantly different from those of Group C (0.15% and 0. 16%). The frequencies of nullisomy for chromosomes X, Y and 18 were 0.15%and 0 for Group B, and 0 and 0.15% for Group C (P>0.05). In Group A, the incidences of disomy were 1.13% and 0. 96% and the frequencies of nullisomy were 1.13% and 1.60%. In these three groups, the incidences of diploidy were 0.60%, 1.00%, and 0.30%, respectively. Both the frequencies of disomic and nullisomic spermatozoa for chromosomes X, Y, and 18 and of diploid spermatozoa were significantly higher in Group A than in Groups B and C. The estimated total aneuploidy rates in the sperm from the three groups were 42.44%, 6.05%, and 2.59%,respectively.Conclusion These results indicate that chromosomal aneuploidy in spermatozoa may be a risk factor for infertility.

  10. Charge and frequency resolved isochronous mass spectrometry in storage rings: First direct mass measurement of the short-lived neutron-deficient $^{51}$Co nuclide

    CERN Document Server

    Shuai, P; Tu, X L; Zhang, Y H; Sun, B H; Litvinov, Yu A; Yan, X L; Blaum, K; Wang, M; Zhou, X H; He, J J; Sun, Y; Kaneko, K; Yuan, Y J; Xia, J W; Yang, J C; Audi, G; Chen, X C; Jia, G B; Hu, Z G; Ma, X W; Mao, R S; Mei, B; Sun, Z Y; Wang, S T; Xiao, G Q; Xu, X; Yamaguchi, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Zang, Y D; Zhao, H W; Zhao, T C; Zhang, W; Zhan, W L

    2014-01-01

    Revolution frequency measurements of individual ions in storage rings require sophisticated timing detectors. One of common approaches for such detectors is the detection of secondary electrons released from a thin foil due to penetration of the stored ions. A new method based on the analysis of intensities of secondary electrons was developed which enables determination of the charge of each ion simultaneously with the measurement of its revolution frequency. Although the mass-over-charge ratios of $^{51}$Co$^{27+}$ and $^{34}$Ar$^{18+}$ ions are almost identical, and therefore, the ions can not be resolved in a storage ring, by applying the new method the mass excess of the short-lived $^{51}$Co is determined for the first time to be ME($^{51}$Co)=-27342(48) keV. Shell-model calculations in the $fp$-shell nuclei compared to the new data indicate the need to include isospin-nonconserving forces.

  11. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.P.

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  12. Testing UK blood donors for exposure to human parvovirus 4 using a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay to screen sera and Western blot to confirm reactive samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maple, Peter A C; Beard, Stuart; Parry, Ruth P; Brown, Kevin E

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (ParV4), a newly described member of the family Parvoviridae, like B19V, has been found in pooled plasma preparations. The extent, and significance, of ParV4 exposure in UK blood donors remain to be determined and reliable detection of ParV4 immunoglobulin (Ig)G, using validated methods, is needed. With ParV4 virus-like particles a ParV4 IgG time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA) was developed. There is no gold standard or reference assay for measuring ParV4 IgG and the utility of the TRFIA was first examined using a panel of sera from people who inject drugs (PWIDS)--a high-prevalence population for ParV4 infection. Western blotting was used to confirm the specificity of TRFIA-reactive sera. Two cohorts of UK blood donor sera comprising 452 sera collected in 1999 and 156 sera collected in 2009 were tested for ParV4 IgG. Additional testing for B19V IgG, hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV), and ParV4 DNA was also undertaken. The rate of ParV4 IgG seroprevalence in PWIDS was 20.7% and ParV4 IgG was positively associated with the presence of anti-HCV with 68.4% ParV4 IgG-positive sera testing anti-HCV-positive versus 17.1% ParV4 IgG-negative sera. Overall seropositivity for ParV4 IgG, in 608 UK blood donors was 4.76%. The ParV4 IgG seropositivity for sera collected in 1999 was 5.08%, compared to 3.84% for sera collected in 2009. No ParV4 IgG-positive blood donor sera had detectable ParV4 DNA. ParV4 IgG has been found in UK blood donors and this finding needs further investigation. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  13. Resolving Multi-path Interference in Time-of-Flight Imaging via Modulation Frequency Diversity and Sparse Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Bhandari, Ayush; Whyte, Refael; Barsi, Christopher; Feigin, Micha; Dorrington, Adrian; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Time-of-flight (ToF) cameras calculate depth maps by reconstructing phase shifts of amplitude-modulated signals. For broad illumination or transparent objects, reflections from multiple scene points can illuminate a given pixel, giving rise to an erroneous depth map. We report here a sparsity regularized solution that separates K-interfering components using multiple modulation frequency measurements. The method maps ToF imaging to the general framework of spectral estimation theory and has applications in improving depth profiles and exploiting multiple scattering.

  14. Diurnal and Seasonal Responses of High Frequency Chlorophyll Fluorescence and PRI Measurements to Abiotic Stress in Almonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambach-Ortiz, N. E.; Paw U, K. T.

    2016-12-01

    Plants have evolved to efficiently utilize light to synthesize energy-rich carbon compounds, and at the same time, dissipate absorbed but excessive photon that would otherwise transfer excitation energy to potentially toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nevertheless, even the most rapidly growing plants with the highest rates of photosynthesis only utilize about half of the light their leaves absorb during the hours of peak irradiance in sun-exposed habitats. Usually, that daily peak of irradiance coincides with high temperature and a high vapor pressure deficit, which are conditions related to plant stomata closure. Consequently, specially in water stressed environments, plants need to have mechanisms to dissipate most of absorbed photons. Plants avoid photo-oxidative damage of the photosynthetic apparatus due to the formation of ROS under excess light using different mechanisms in order to either lower the amount of ROS formation or detoxify already formed ROS. Photoinhibition is defined as a reduction in photosynthetic activity due largely to a sustained reduction in the photochemical efficiency of Photosystem II (PSII), which can be assessed by monitoring Chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF). Alternatively, monitoring abiotic stress effects upon photosynthetic activity and photoinhibition may be possible using high frequency spectral reflectance sensors. We aim to find the potential relationships between high frequency PRI and ChlF as indicators of photoinhibition and permanent photodamage at a seasonal scale. Preliminary results show that PRI responses are sensitive to photoinhibition, but provide a poor representation of permanent photodamage observed at a seasonal scale.

  15. Nonphotochemical quenching of excitation energy in photosystem II. A picosecond time-resolved study of the low yield of chlorophyll a fluorescence induced by single-turnover flash in isolated spinach thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, S; Bruce, D

    1998-08-04

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence emission is widely used as a noninvasive measure of a number of parameters related to photosynthetic efficiency in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. The most important component for the estimation of photochemistry is the relative increase in fluorescence yield between dark-adapted samples which have a maximal capacity for photochemistry and a minimal fluorescence yield (F0) and light-saturated samples where photochemistry is saturated and fluorescence yield is maximal (Fm). However, when photosynthesis is saturated with a short (less than 50 micro(s)) flash of light, which induces only one photochemical turnover of photosystem II, the maximal fluorescence yield is significantly lower (Fsat) than when saturation is achieved with a millisecond duration multiturnover flash (Fm). To investigate the origins of the difference in fluorescence yield between these two conditions, our time-resolved fluorescence apparatus was modified to allow collection of picosecond time-resolved decay kinetics over a short time window immediately following a saturating single-turnover flash (Fsat) as well as after a multiturnover saturating pulse (Fm). Our data were analyzed with a global kinetic model based on an exciton radical pair equilibrium model for photosystem II. The difference between Fm and Fsat was modeled well by changing only the rate constant for quenching of excitation energy in the antenna of photosystem II. An antenna-based origin for the quenching was verified experimentally by the observation that addition of the antenna quencher 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone to thylakoids under Fm conditions resulted in decay kinetics and modeled kinetic parameters very similar to those observed under Fsat conditions in the absence of added quinone. Our data strongly support the origin of low fluorescence yield at Fsat to be an antenna-based nonphotochemical quenching of excitation energy in photosystem II which has not usually been considered explicitly in

  16. 多功能灵敏固相时间分辨荧光免疫分析仪设计%Design of a new solid-phase time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋克非; 张佩杰

    2011-01-01

    A new solid-phase time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay analysis system has been designed for solid-phase time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. The device uses nitrogen molecular laser as the excitation light source and employs integrating sphere combined with grating monochromator as the fluorescence collecting subsystem to minimize the influences of stray light on the sample fluorescence. Photomultiplier tube is used to convert the sampled optic signal to electronic signal and high resolution measurements of fluorescence spectrum in the range of 500 ~ 700 nm are implemented. The converted electrical signals are sampled and integrated digitally with a single chip micro-computer, which improves the signal to noise ratio of the received signal. The instrument can complete fluorescence lifetime measurement, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy measurement and substance concentration measurement. Experimental results show that the measurement sensitivity is up to 10 ~12 mol/L, linearity range is 10 ~'2 ~ 10 "9 mol/L, relative stability error is lass than 3% and the measurement resolution is 0. 5 nm.%针对固相时间分辨荧光光谱的测量,设计出一种全新的固相时间分辨荧光免疫分析系统.使用氮分子激光器作为激发光源,采用积分球和单色仪相结合的荧光收集结构,使杂散光对样品荧光的影响降到最低;用光电倍增管进行光电转换,在500~700 nm范围实现了高分辨荧光光谱测量;利用数字方式实现取样积分功能,提高了系统的信噪比.系统可实现荧光寿命、时间分辨荧光光谱、物质浓度的自动测量,仪器的检测灵敏度可达10 - 12 moL/L,线性范围为10-12~10-9 mol/L,稳定性相对误差小于3%,荧光光谱分辨为0.5nm.

  17. Angular measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients by the inversion of V(z, t) data with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    For inspection of mechanical properties and integrity of critical components such as integrated circuits or composite materials by acoustic methodology, it is imperative to evaluate their acoustic reflection coefficients, which are in close correlation with the elastic properties, thickness, density, and attenuation and interface adhesion of these layered structures. An experimental method based on angular spectrum to evaluate the acoustic coefficient as a function of the incident angle, θ, and frequency, ω, is presented with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy. In order to achieve a high spatial resolution for evaluation of thin plates with thicknesses about one or two wavelengths, a point focusing transducer with a nominal center frequency of 25 MHz is adopted. By measuring the V(z, t) data in pulse mode, the reflection coefficient, R(θ, ω), can be reconstructed from its two-dimensional spectrum. It brings simplicity to experimental setup and measurement procedure since only single translation of the transducer in the vertical direction is competent for incident angle and frequency acquisition. It overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional methods requiring the spectroscopy for frequency scanning and/or ultrasonic goniometer for angular scanning. Two substrates of aluminum and Plexiglas and four stainless plates with various thicknesses of 100 μm, 150 μm, 200 μm, and 250 μm were applied. The acoustic reflection coefficients are consistent with the corresponding theoretical calculations. It opened the way of non-destructive methodology to evaluate the elastic and geometrical properties of very thin multi-layers structures simultaneously.

  18. Oligomerization of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) on A431 cells studied by time-resolved fluorescence imaging microscopy: a stereochemical model for tyrosine kinase receptor activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, Th.W.J.; Jovin, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation states of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on single A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells were assessed with two new techniques for determining fluorescence resonance en- ergy transfer: donor photobleaching fluorescence reso- nance energy transfer (pbFRET) microscopy and

  19. Oligomerization of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) on A431 cells studied by time-resolved fluorescence imaging microscopy: a stereochemical model for tyrosine kinase receptor activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th.W.J. Gadella; T.M. Jovin

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation states of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on single A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells were assessed with two new techniques for determining fluorescence resonance en- ergy transfer: donor photobleaching fluorescence reso- nance energy transfer (pbFRET) microscopy and

  20. Phylogenomic analyses resolve an ancient trichotomy at the base of Ischyropsalidoidea (Arachnida, Opiliones) despite high levels of gene tree conflict and unequal minority resolution frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richart, Casey H; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Hedin, Marshal

    2016-02-01

    Phylogenetic resolution of ancient rapid radiations has remained problematic despite major advances in statistical approaches and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we report on a combined phylogenetic approach utilizing transcriptome data in conjunction with Sanger sequence data to investigate a tandem of ancient divergences in the harvestmen superfamily Ischyropsalidoidea (Arachnida, Opiliones, Dyspnoi). We rely on Sanger sequences to resolve nodes within and between closely related genera, and use RNA-seq data from a subset of taxa to resolve a short and ancient internal branch. We use several analytical approaches to explore this succession of ancient diversification events, including concatenated and coalescent-based analyses and maximum likelihood gene trees for each locus. We evaluate the robustness of phylogenetic inferences using a randomized locus sub-sampling approach, and find congruence across these methods despite considerable incongruence across gene trees. Incongruent gene trees are not recovered in frequencies expected from a simple multispecies coalescent model, and we reject incomplete lineage sorting as the sole contributor to gene tree conflict. Using these approaches we attain robust support for higher-level phylogenetic relationships within Ischyropsalidoidea.

  1. Momentum resolved electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution, a new technique, probing the low frequency motion of adsorbed molecules on single crystal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahner, J. [Surface Science Center, Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Mocuta, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Yates, J.T. Jr. [Surface Science Center, Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

    1999-07-01

    A new technique, momentum resolved electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution (ESDIAD), provides a method for taking snapshots of the zero-point position and lateral momentum of particles adsorbed on crystalline surfaces. By employing state-of-the-art electronics and computer technology it is possible to record for each desorbing particle the desorption direction together with the flight time. High momentum and directional resolved images are obtained, with time-of-flight resolution in the picosecond range and data acquisition rates up to 100 kHz. This enables us to deconvolute spatial and momentum contributions to the ESDIAD pattern and to map the low frequency motion of the adsorbed particles. These maps reflect the adsorbate interactions with the substrate and with neighboring species on the substrate. For selected examples it is demonstrated that by measuring the three dimensional momentum vector for each desorbing particle it is possible to probe the lowest energy states of adsorbed species, as well as to measure the momentum distribution when the adsorbed species gains thermal energy. Such information can be used as a basis for thinking about anisotropies in lateral motion of particles on surfaces. One major opportunity involves the study of dissimilar chemisorbed species which, when imaged together in momentum and real space, give new insights into the first stages of interaction between the species, leading ultimately to a chemical reaction. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  2. Distinguishing between ultrafast optical harmonic generation and multi-photon-induced luminescence from ZnO thin films by interferometric frequency-resolved autocorrelation microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Slawa; Mascheck, Manfred; Silies, Martin [Carl-von-Ossietzky-Universitaet, Oldenburg (Germany); Yatsui, Takashi; Kitamura, Kokoro; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Lienau, Christoph [University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of a thin ZnO film are studied using interferometric frequency-resolved autocorrelation (IFRAC) microscopy. By exciting the film with 6-fs, below-bandgap laser pulses at 800nm focused to a spot size of 1 {mu}m two emission bands in the blue and bluegreen spectral region with distinctly different coherence properties can be detected. We show that an analysis of the wavelength-dependence of the interference fringes in the IFRAC signal allows for an unambiguous assignment of these bands as coherent second harmonic emission and incoherent, multiphoton-induced photoluminescence, respectively. More generally our analysis shows that IFRAC allows for a complete characterization of the coherence properties of the nonlinear optical emission from nanostructures in a single-beam experiment. Since this technique combines a very high temporal and spatial resolution we anticipate broad applications in nonlinear nano-optics.

  3. Tri-frequency spectrum method and results for resolving the parameters of Earth's liquid core free nutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI; Xiange(雷湘鄂); XU; Houze(许厚泽)

    2002-01-01

    The parameters of Earth free core nutation (FCN) are two relatively significant geophysical parameters. Sasao et al. (1980) and Wahr and Bergen (1986) provided the theoretical estimation values of FCN parameters. Gwinn, Herring and Shapiro (1987) first obtained the observational values of FCN parameters by very long base Interference (VLBI) at Cambridge University. In the same year, Neuberg and Zürn in former West Germany and Hinderer in France began to retrieve FCN parameters by the observation of gravity tides and introduced the stacking method. The other scholars who researched into the same geophysical problems by applying the data of gravity tides basically followed the stacking method. The results they reached were similar to the observational result of FCN parameters given by Neuberg et al. in 1987. But the observational results of FCN parameters gained from gravity tides were not identical with those from VLBI, mainly because of the large difference of quality of FCN. So there was not an affirmative observational result of FCN parameters since then. In this paper, The authors firstly introduce the tri-frequency spectrum method with clearly geometrical and geophysical meaning for the resolution of FCN parameters, and the observational results of FCN parameters obtained from tide data at three superconducting gravity stations were accordant with those from VLBI, which will be relatively important to arriving at a certain observational result of FCN parameters.

  4. The dependence of the ultrafast relaxation kinetics of the S2 and S1 states in β-carotene homologs and lycopene on conjugation length studied by femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Masazumi; Fujii, Ritsuko; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2009-06-01

    The ultrafast relaxation kinetics of all-trans-β-carotene homologs with varying numbers of conjugated double bonds n(n =7-15) and lycopene (n =11) has been investigated using femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies, both carried out under identical excitation conditions. The nonradiative relaxation rates of the optically allowed S2(1Bu+1) state were precisely determined by the time-resolved fluorescence. The kinetics of the optically forbidden S1(2Ag-1) state were observed by the time-resolved absorption measurements. The dependence of the S1 relaxation rates upon the conjugation length is adequately described by application of the energy gap law. In contrast to this, the nonradiative relaxation rates of S2 have a minimum at n =9 and show a reverse energy gap law dependence for values of n above 11. This anomalous behavior of the S2 relaxation rates can be explained by the presence of an intermediate state (here called the Sx state) located between the S2 and S1 states at large values of n (such as n =11). The presence of such an intermediate state would then result in the following sequential relaxation pathway S2→Sx→S1→S0. A model based on conical intersections between the potential energy curves of these excited singlet states can readily explain the measured relationships between the decay rates and the energy gaps.

  5. In Situ Qualitative Measurement of FDOM in Water Samples by Time-Resolved Fluorescence System%时间分辨荧光法现场原位检测水体中的FDOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴芳; 陈佳宁; 孙海峰; 张振轩; 张勇

    2014-01-01

    利用激光诱导纳秒时间分辨荧光(Laser-induced nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence,LITRF)系统,建立了现场原位检测水体中的荧光溶解态有机物(Fluorescence Dissolved Organic Matter,FDOM)的方法,并将其用于近岸水域(九龙江)水样中FDOM的现场原位检测.通过与传统实验室荧光法检测结果比较,表明使用该系统可实现FDOM中类腐殖质和类蛋白质的同时现场原位检测.

  6. High frequency, cell type-specific visualization of fluorescent-tagged genomic sites in interphase and mitotic cells of living Arabidopsis plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Winden Johannes

    2010-01-01

    on the promoter used to drive expression of the RP-FP fusion protein gene, the fluorescent tagged sites can be visualized at high frequency in different cell types. The ability to observe fluorescent dots on both interphase and mitotic chromosomes allows tagged sites to be tracked throughout the cell cycle. These improvements enhance the versatility of the fluorescent tagging technique for future studies of chromosome arrangement and dynamics in living plants.

  7. Detection of radiation-induced brain necrosis in live rats using label-free time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Brad A.; Ma, Htet S. W.; Sridharan, Shamira; Hansen, Katherine; Klich, Melanie; Perks, Julian; Kent, Michael; Kim, Kyoungmi; Fragoso, Ruben; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    Differentiating radiation-induced necrosis from recurrent tumor in the brain remains a significant challenge to the neurosurgeon. Clinical imaging modalities are not able to reliably discriminate the two tissue types, making biopsy location selection and surgical management difficult. Label-free fluorescence lifetime techniques have previously been shown to be able to delineate human brain tumor from healthy tissues. Thus, fluorescence lifetime techniques represent a potential means to discriminate the two tissues in real-time during surgery. This study aims to characterize the endogenous fluorescence lifetime signatures from radiation induced brain necrosis in a tumor-free rat model. Fischer rats received a single fraction of 60 Gy of radiation to the right hemisphere using a linear accelerator. Animals underwent a terminal live surgery after gross necrosis had developed, as verified with MRI. During surgery, healthy and necrotic brain tissue was measured with a fiber optic needle connected to a multispectral fluorescence lifetime system. Measurements of the necrotic tissue showed a 48% decrease in intensity and 20% increase in lifetimes relative to healthy tissue. Using a support vector machine classifier and leave-one-out validation technique, the necrotic tissue was correctly classified with 94% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Spectral contribution analysis also confirmed that the primary source of fluorescence contrast lies within the redox and bound-unbound population shifts of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. A clinical trial is presently underway to measure these tissue types in humans. These results show for the first time that radiation-induced necrotic tissue in the brain contains significantly different metabolic signatures that are detectable with label-free fluorescence lifetime techniques.

  8. Multimode Surface Functional Group Determination: Combining Steady-State and Time-Resolved Fluorescence with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Absorption Measurements for Absolute Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tobias; Dietrich, Paul M; Unger, Wolfgang E S; Rurack, Knut

    2016-01-19

    The quantitative determination of surface functional groups is approached in a straightforward laboratory-based method with high reliability. The application of a multimode BODIPY-type fluorescence, photometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) label allows estimation of the labeling ratio, i.e., the ratio of functional groups carrying a label after reaction, from the elemental ratios of nitrogen and fluorine. The amount of label on the surface is quantified with UV/vis spectrophotometry based on the molar absorption coefficient as molecular property. The investigated surfaces with varying density are prepared by codeposition of 3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and cyanoethyltriethoxysilane (CETES) from vapor. These surfaces show high functional group densities that result in significant fluorescence quenching of surface-bound labels. Since alternative quantification of the label on the surface is available through XPS and photometry, a novel method to quantitatively account for fluorescence quenching based on fluorescence lifetime (τ) measurements is shown. Due to the complex distribution of τ on high-density surfaces, the stretched exponential (or Kohlrausch) function is required to determine representative mean lifetimes. The approach is extended to a commercial Rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC) label, clearly revealing the problems that arise from such charged labels used in conjunction with silane surfaces.

  9. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yi

    2014-11-24

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include

  10. A study of the time-resolved fluorescence spectrum and red edge effect of ANF in a room-temperature ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhonghan; Margulis, Claudio J

    2006-06-15

    In a recent article, we have analyzed using molecular dynamics simulations the steady-state red edge effect (REE) observed by Samanta and co-workers when the fluorescent probe 2-amino-7-nitrofluorene (ANF) is photoexcited at different wavelengths in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([BMIM+]) hexafluorophosphate ([PF6-]). In this letter, we predict the time- and wavelength-dependent emission spectra of ANF in the same ionic solvent. From the analysis of our simulated data, we are able to derive an approximate time scale for reorganization of the solvent around the solute probe. The effect that slow varying local liquid environments have on the overall time-dependent signal is also discussed.

  11. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy of Bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane/Tolane-Based Molecular Rods Included in Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolloni, Marco; Kaleta, Jiří; Mašát, Milan; Dron, Paul I; Shen, Yongqiang; Zhao, Ke; Rogers, Charles T; Shoemaker, Richard K; Michl, Josef

    2015-04-23

    We examine the fluorescence anisotropy of rod-shaped guests held inside the channels of tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) host nanocrystals, characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and solid state NMR spectroscopy. We address two issues: (i) are light polarization measurements on an aqueous colloidal solution of TPP nanocrystals meaningful, or is depolarization by scattering excessive? (ii) Can measurements of the rotational mobility of the included guests be performed at low enough loading levels to suppress depolarization by intercrystallite energy transfer? We find that meaningful measurements are possible and demonstrate that the long axis of molecular rods included in TPP channels performs negligible vibrational motion.

  12. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS); Ortsaufgeloeste Analyse von Uranspezies mittels einem Gekoppelten System aus Konfokaler Laser-Scanning Mikroskopie (CLSM) und Laser Induzierter Fluoreszenzspektroskopie (LIFS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, S. [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany); Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Ressourcenoekologie

    2014-01-15

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10{sup -6} M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  13. Time-Resolved Magneto-Optical Imaging of Y1Ba2Cu3O7-delta Thin Films in High-Frequency AC Current Regime (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ΘF=αB laser pulseAC time φ Figure 1. Schematic diagram of the time-resolved MO imaging setup. time-resolved imaging, we use a Q- switched Nd:YLF diode...controlled power source in order to obtain time-resolved MO images of the current flow in the sample. We use a 6 µm thick epitaxial grown ferrite ...the AC current. Ultimately the time resolution achievable with this method will be limited to sub-nanoseconds by the magnetization switching time of the

  14. Constitutive oligomerization of human D2 dopamine receptors expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf9) and in HEK293 cells. Analysis using co-immunoprecipitation and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazi, Lucien; López-Giménez, Juan F; Rüdiger, Martin P; Strange, Philip G

    2003-10-01

    Human D2Long (D2L) and D2Short (D2S) dopamine receptor isoforms were modified at their N-terminus by the addition of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or a FLAG epitope tag. The receptors were then expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf9) cells using the baculovirus system, and their oligomerization was investigated by means of co-immunoprecipitation and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). [3H]Spiperone labelled D2 receptors in membranes prepared from Sf9 cells expressing epitope-tagged D2L or D2S receptors, with a pKd value of approximately 10. Co-immunoprecipitation using antibodies specific for the tags showed constitutive homo-oligomerization of D2L and D2S receptors in Sf9 cells. When the FLAG-tagged D2S and HIV-tagged D2L receptors were co-expressed, co-immunoprecipitation showed that the two isoforms can also form hetero-oligomers in Sf9 cells. Time-resolved FRET with europium and XL665-labelled antibodies was applied to whole Sf9 cells and to membranes from Sf9 cells expressing epitope-tagged D2 receptors. In both cases, constitutive homo-oligomers were revealed for D2L and D2S isoforms. Time-resolved FRET also revealed constitutive homo-oligomers in HEK293 cells expressing FLAG-tagged D2S receptors. The D2 receptor ligands dopamine, R-(-)propylnorapomorphine, and raclopride did not affect oligomerization of D2L and D2S in Sf9 and HEK293 cells. Human D2 dopamine receptors can therefore form constitutive oligomers in Sf9 cells and in HEK293 cells that can be detected by different approaches, and D2 oligomerization in these cells is not regulated by ligands.

  15. Time-resolved non-contact fluorescence diffuse optical tomography measurements with ultra-fast time-correlated single photon counting avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves; Robichaud, Vincent; Lapointe, Éric

    2007-07-01

    The design and fabrication of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and associated quenching circuits have made significant progresses in recent years. APDs with temporal resolutions comparable to microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMTs) are now available. MCP-PMTs were until these progresses the best TCSPC detectors with timing resolutions down to 30ps. APDs can now achieve these resolutions at a fraction of the cost. Work is under way to make the manufacturing of TCSPC APDs compatible with standard electronics fabrication practices. This should allow to further reduce their cost and render them easier to integrate in complex multi-channel TCSPC electronics, as needed in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) systems. Even if their sensitive area is much smaller than that of the ubiquitous PMT used in TCSPC, we show that with appropriate selection of optical components, TCSPC APDs can be used in time-domain DOT. To support this, we present experimental data and calculations clearly demonstrating that comparable measurements can be obtained with APDs and PMTs. We are, to our knowledge, the first group using APDs in TD DOT, in particular in non-contact TD fluorescence DOT.

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence of 2-aminopurine in DNA duplexes in the presence of the EcoP15I Type III restriction-modification enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Long; Wu, Xiaohua; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Jones, Anita C; Dryden, David T F

    2014-06-20

    EcoP15I is a Type III DNA restriction and modification enzyme of Escherichia coli. We show that it contains two modification (Mod) subunits for sequence-specific methylation of DNA and one copy of a restriction endonuclease (Res) subunit for cleavage of DNA containing unmethylated target sequences. Previously the Mod2 dimer in the presence of cofactors was shown to use nucleotide flipping to gain access to the adenine base targeted for methylation (Reddy and Rao, J. Mol. Biol. 298 (2000) 597-610.). Surprisingly the Mod2 enzyme also appeared to flip a second adenine in the target sequence, one which was not subject to methylation. We show using fluorescence lifetime measurements of the adenine analogue, 2-aminopurine, that only the methylatable adenine undergoes flipping by the complete Res1Mod2 enzyme and that this occurs even in the absence of cofactors. We suggest that this is due to activation of the Mod2 core by the Res subunit.

  17. Comparison of microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles in the presence of inorganic and organic salts: a time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, G B

    2005-11-08

    Microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles was examined in the presence of additives such as sodium chloride and p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) by monitoring the fluorescence anisotropy decays of two hydrophobic probes, 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP) and coumarin 6 (C6). It has been well-established that SDS micelles undergo a sphere-to-rod transition and that their mean hydrodynamic radius increases from 19 to 100 A upon the addition of 0.0-0.7 M NaCl at 298 K. A similar size and shape transition is induced by PTHC at concentrations that are 20 times lower compared to that of NaCl. This study was undertaken to find out how the microviscosity of the micelles is influenced under these circumstances. It was noticed that the microviscosity of the SDS/NaCl system increased by approximately 45%, whereas there was a less than 10% variation in the microviscosity of the SDS/PTHC system. The large increase in the microviscosity of the former system with salt concentration has been rationalized on the basis of the high concentration of sodium ions in the headgroup region of the micelles and their ability to strongly coordinate with the water present in this region, which decreases the mobility of the probe molecules.

  18. Technical Testing of Deep-UV Solid-State Sources for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements in the Frequency Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    circuits. Depending on the level of fluorescence signal, either standard color -glass optical filters or more expensive custom-designed interference...acids (derivatives of tyrosine and tryptophan), coenzymes NADH and riboflavin as well as dipicolinic acid (DPA) were used for the analysis of the...Roth GmbH, Karlsruhe, Germany), N- acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATA), ovalbumin, collagen and elastin (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO), riboflavin (Reanal

  19. Resolving colocalization of bacteria and metal(loid)s on plant root surfaces by combining fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with multiple-energy micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (ME μXRF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeker, Linnea K; Root, Robert A; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M

    2016-12-01

    Metal(loid)-contamination of the environment due to anthropogenic activities is a global problem. Understanding the fate of contaminants requires elucidation of biotic and abiotic factors that influence metal(loid) speciation from molecular to field scales. Improved methods are needed to assess micro-scale processes, such as those occurring at biogeochemical interfaces between plant tissues, microbial cells, and metal(loid)s. Here we present an advanced method that combines fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with synchrotron-based multiple-energy micro-focused X-ray fluorescence microprobe imaging (ME μXRF) to examine colocalization of bacteria and metal(loid)s on root surfaces of plants used to phytostabilize metalliferous mine tailings. Bacteria were visualized on a small root section using SytoBC nucleic acid stain and FISH probes targeting the domain Bacteria and a specific group (Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, or Actinobacteria). The same root region was then analyzed for elemental distribution and metal(loid) speciation of As and Fe using ME μXRF. The FISH and ME μXRF images were aligned using ImageJ software to correlate microbiological and geochemical results. Results from quantitative analysis of colocalization show a significantly higher fraction of As colocalized with Fe-oxide plaques on the root surfaces (fraction of overlap 0.49±0.19) than to bacteria (0.072±0.052) (pbacteria that colocalized with metal(loid)s, Actinobacteria, known for their metal tolerance, had a higher correlation with both As and Fe than Alphaproteobacteria or Gammaproteobacteria. This method demonstrates how coupling these micro-techniques can expand our understanding of micro-scale interactions between roots, metal(loid)s and microbes, information that should lead to improved mechanistic models of metal(loid) speciation and fate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Engineering out motion: a surface disulfide bond alters the mobility of tryptophan 22 in cytochrome b5 as probed by time-resolved fluorescence and 1H NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, E M; Grinstead, J S; Campbell, A P; Daggett, V; Atkins, W M

    1999-04-20

    In the accompanying paper [Storch et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 5054-5064] equilibrium denaturation studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate localized dynamics on the surface of cytochrome b5 (cyt b5) that result in the formation of a cleft. In those studies, an S18C:R47C disulfide mutant was engineered to inhibit cleft mobility. Temperature- and urea-induced denaturation studies revealed significant differences in Trp 22 fluorescence between the wild-type and mutant proteins. On the basis of the results, it was proposed that wild type populates a conformational ensemble that is unavailable to the disulfide mutant and is mediated by cleft mobility. As a result, the solvent accessibility of Trp 22 is decreased in S18C:R47C, suggesting that the local environment of this residue is less mobile due to the constraining effects of the disulfide on cleft dynamics. To further probe the structural effects on the local environment of Trp 22 caused by inhibition of cleft formation, we report here the results of steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, differential phase/modulation fluorescence anisotropy, and 1H NMR studies. In Trp fluorescence experiments, the Stern-Volmer quenching constant increases in wild type versus the oxidized disulfide mutant with increasing temperature. At 50 degrees C, KSV is nearly 1.5-fold greater in wild type compared to the oxidized disulfide mutant. In the reduced disulfide mutant, KSV was the same as wild type. The bimolecular collisional quenching constant, kq, for acrylamide quenching of Trp 22 increases 2.7-fold for wild type and only 1.8-fold for S18C:R47C, upon increasing the temperature from 25 to 50 degrees C. The time-resolved anisotropy decay at 25 degrees C was fit to a double-exponential decay for both the wild type and S18C:R47C. Both proteins exhibited a minor contribution from a low-amplitude fast decay, consistent with local motion of Trp 22. This component was more prevalent in

  1. 原油样品激光诱导荧光的时间分辨光谱特性研究%Characterization of Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence from Crude Oil Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德庆; 栾晓宁; 韩晓爽; 郭金家; 安居白; 郑荣儿

    2015-01-01

    为探索激光诱导时间分辨荧光光谱技术应用于海洋悬浮溢油原位探测的可行性,对来自胜利油田六个不同井区不同密度的原油样品的时间分辨荧光光谱进行了探测分析。结果发现,各原油样品荧光发射的持续时间基本相同,从ICCD中数字延时发生器(DDG )的输入延时52 ns开始,到输入延时82 ns左右结束,各原油样品的荧光峰强度随时间变化曲线的半高宽约10 ns;不同原油样品的最强荧光峰位及其衰减寿命不尽相同,并且与样品密度有一定相关性,密度相近的原油具有相近的最强荧光峰位和相似的荧光寿命。对比六种原油样品的时间分辨荧光光谱发现,在荧光增强时,原油荧光光谱峰位不变,当荧光从最大强度开始衰减时,六种原油样品的荧光光谱峰位均出现了不同程度(17~30 nm )的红移现象,这一定程度上反映出原油中各荧光组分的荧光衰减速率存在差异,或者存在荧光组分之间的能量传递。所观测到的原油密度相关的时间分辨光谱信息和荧光峰红移现象可望成为水下悬浮溢油识别的有效特征之一。%To evaluate the feasibility of laser induced time‐resolved fluorescence technique for in‐situ detection of underwater sus‐pended oil spill ,extensive investigations have been carried out with different densities of crude oil samples from six different wells of Shengli Oilfield in this work .It was found that the fluorescence emission durations of these crude oil samples were al‐most the same ,the Gate Pulse Delay of DDG (Digital Delay Generator ) in the ICCD started at 52ns and ended at 82ns with a width (FWHM ) of 10 ns .It appears that the peak location and lifetime of fluorescence for different crude oil samples varied with their densities ,and those with similar densities shared a similar lifespan with the closer peak locations of fluorescence .It is also observed that

  2. Fluorescence, Decay Time, and Structural Change of Laser Dye Cresyl Violet in Solution due to Microwave Irradiation at GSM 900/1800 Mobile Phone Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Bayrakceken

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave irradiation at GSM 900/1800 MHz mobile phone frequencies affects the electronic structure of cresyl violet in solution. These changes are important because laser-dye cresyl violet strongly bonds to DNA- and RNA-rich cell compounds in nerve tissues. The irradiation effects on the electronic structure of cresyl violet and its fluorescence data were all obtained experimentally at room temperature. For most laser dyes, this is not a trivial task because laser dye molecules possess a relatively complex structure. They usually consist of an extended system of conjugated double or aromatic π-bonds with attached auxochromic (electron donating groups shifting the absorption band further towards longer wavelength. Because of the intrinsically high degree of conjugation, the vibrational modes of the molecular units couple strongly with each other. We found that the fluorescence quantum yield was increased from to due to intramolecular energy hopping of cresyl violet in solution which is exposed to microwave irradiation at mobile phone frequencies, and the photonic product cannot be used as a laser dye anymore.

  3. Complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with a hydrophilic 2,6-bis(1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-pyridine studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Christian M; Müllich, Udo; Geist, Andreas; Panak, Petra J

    2012-12-28

    The complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with 2,6-bis(5,6-di(sulfophenyl)-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (aq-BTP) is studied in water at pH 3.0 applying time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. With increasing ligand concentration [M(H(2)O)(9-3n)(aq-BTP)(n)] (M = Cm(III)/Eu(III), n = 1, 2, 3) complex species are spectroscopically identified. The conditional stability constants of the M(III) 1 : 3 complex species with aq-BTP are log β(03) = 12.2 for Cm(III) and log β(03) = 10.2 for Eu(III). The complexation reaction is enthalpy- and entropy-driven for both metal ions, while the enthalpy change ΔH(03) is 9.7 kJ mol(-1) more negative for Cm(III); changes in ΔS(03) are marginal. The difference in ΔG(03) of -12.7 kJ mol(-1) between the formation of the [M(aq-BTP)(3)] complexes agrees with aq-BTP's selectivity in liquid-liquid extraction studies.

  4. FPGA-based multi-channel fluorescence lifetime analysis of Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-09-22

    We report a fast non-iterative lifetime data analysis method for the Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping confocal FLIM (Fm-FLIM) system [Opt. Express 22, 10221 (2014)]. The new method, named R-method, allows fast multi-channel lifetime image analysis in the system's FPGA data processing board. Experimental tests proved that the performance of the R-method is equivalent to that of single-exponential iterative fitting, and its sensitivity is well suited for time-lapse FLIM-FRET imaging of live cells, for example cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level imaging with GFP-Epac-mCherry sensors. With the R-method and its FPGA implementation, multi-channel lifetime images can now be generated in real time on the multi-channel frequency-sweeping FLIM system, and live readout of FRET sensors can be performed during time-lapse imaging.

  5. Fluorescence nanoscopy. Methods and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Requejo-Isidro, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence nanoscopy refers to the experimental techniques and analytical methods used for fluorescence imaging at a resolution higher than conventional, diffraction-limited, microscopy. This review explains the concepts behind fluorescence nanoscopy and focuses on the latest and promising developments in acquisition techniques, labelling strategies to obtain highly detailed super-resolved images and in the quantitative methods to extract meaningful information from them.

  6. In vivo fluorescence lifetime tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Ralph E.; Patwardhan, Sachin V.; Akers, Walter; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2009-03-01

    Local molecular and physiological processes can be imaged in vivo through perturbations in the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) of optical imaging agents. In addition to providing functional information, FLT methods can quantify specific molecular events and multiplex diagnostic and prognostic information. We have developed a fluorescence lifetime diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system for in vivo preclinical imaging. Data is captured using a time-resolved intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) system to measure fluorescence excitation and emission in the time domain. Data is then converted to the frequency domain, and we simultaneously reconstruct images of yield and lifetime using an extension to the normalized Born approach. By using differential phase measurements, we demonstrate DOT imaging of short lifetimes (from 350 ps) with high precision (+/-5 ps). Furthermore, this system retains the efficiency, speed, and flexibility of transmission geometry DOT. We demonstrate feasibility of FLT-DOT through a progressive series of experiments. Lifetime range and repeatability are first measured in phantoms. Imaging of subcutaneous implants then verifies the FLT-DOT approach in vivo in the presence of inhomogeneous optical properties. Use in a common research scenario is ultimately demonstrated by imaging accumulation of a targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent-labeled peptide probe (cypate-RGD) in a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor.

  7. Probing the Interaction of Human Serum Albumin with Norfloxacin in the Presence of High-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields: Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshidkhan Chamani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes an investigation by fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and UV-visible spectroscopy of the interaction between norfloxacin (NRF and human serum albumin (HSA in the presence of electromagnetic fields (EMFs. The results obtained from this study indicated that NRF had a strong ability to quench HSA at λex = 280 nm. In addition, a slight blue shift occurred, which suggested that the microenvironment of the protein became more hydrophobic after addition of NRF. The interaction between the NRF and HSA, whether in the absence or presence of an EMF, was considered to be a static quenching mechanism. Moreover, synchronous fluorescence demonstrated that the microenvironment around Trp became modified. Data of HSA-NRF in the presence of EMFs between 1 Hz–1 MHz confirmed the results of quenching and blue shifts. Corresponding Stern-Volmer plots were also drawn and the resultant Ksv and kq values were compared. Moreover, the binding parameters, including the number of binding sites, the binding constant and the distance, r, between donor and acceptor, were calculated based on Förster’s non-radiative energy transfer theory. According to far and near UV-CD, the formation of the complex caused changes of the secondary and tertiary structures of HSA. The obtained results are significant for patients who are subjected to high-frequency radiation as this was found to reduce the affinity of NRF to HSA.

  8. Intense frequency upconversion fluorescence of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped lithium-strontium-lead-bismuth glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongtao Sun; Shiqing Xu; Baoyu Chen; Shixun Dai; Shilong Zhao; Lili Hu; Zhonghong Jiang

    2005-01-01

    @@ Infrared-to-visible upconversion fluorescence of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped lithium-strontium-lead-bismuth (LSPB) glasses for developing potential upconversion lasers has been studied under 975-nm excitation.Based on the results of energy transfer efficiency and upconversion spectra, the optimal Yb3+-Er3+ concentration ratio is found to be 5∶1. Intense green and red emissions centered at 525, 546, and 657 nm,corresponding to the transitions 2H11/2→4I15/2, 4S3/2→4I15/2, and 4F9/2 → 4I15/2, respectively, were observed. The quadratic dependence of the 525-, 546-, and 657-nm emissions on excitation power indicates that a two-photon absorption process occurs under 975-nm excitation. The high-populated 4I11/2 level is supposed to serve as the intermediate state responsible for the upconversion processes. The intense upconversion luminescence of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped LSPB glasses may be a potentially useful material for developing upconversion optical devices.

  9. Time-Resolved Autofluorescence Imaging of Human Donor Retina Tissue from Donors with Significant Extramacular Drusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Gaillard, Elizabeth R.; Dillon, James; Mullins, Robert F.; Russell, Stephen; Hoffmann, Birgit; Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Biskup, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Time and spectrally resolved measurements of autofluorescence have the potential to monitor metabolism at the cellular level. Fluorophores that emit with the same fluorescence intensity can be discriminated from each other by decay time of fluorescence intensity after pulsed excitation. We performed time-resolved autofluorescence measurements on fundus samples from a donor with significant extramacular drusen. Methods. Tissue sections from two human donors were prepared and imaged with a laser scanning microscope. The sample was excited with a titanium-sapphire laser, which was tuned to 860 nm, and frequency doubled by a BBO crystal to 430 nm. The repetition rate was 76 MHz and the pulse width was 170 femtoseconds (fs). The time-resolved autofluorescence was recorded simultaneously in 16 spectral channels (445–605 nm) and bi-exponentially fitted. Results. RPE can be discriminated clearly from Bruch's membrane, drusen, and choroidal connective tissue by fluorescence lifetime. In RPE, bright fluorescence of lipofuscin could be detected with a maximum at 510 nm and extending beyond 600 nm. The lifetime was 385 ps. Different types of drusen were found. Most of them did not contain lipofuscin and exhibited a weak fluorescence, with a maximum at 470 nm. The lifetime was 1785 picoseconds (ps). Also, brightly emitting lesions, presumably representing basal laminar deposits, with fluorescence lifetimes longer than those recorded in RPE could be detected. Conclusions. The demonstrated differentiation of fluorescent structures by their fluorescence decay time is important for interpretation of in vivo measurements by the new fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) ophthalmoscopy on healthy subjects as well as on patients. PMID:22511622

  10. Time Resolved Magneto-Optical Imaging in High Frequency AC Currents of YBa2Cu3O7-delta Thin Films (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    resolved imaging, we use a Q- switched Nd:YLF diode-pumped solid-state laser which provides 100-nsec short pulses at 527-nm wavelength. The pulse...We use a 6-µm thick epitaxial grown ferrite -garnet film (FGF) (Y,Bi,Pr,Lu)3.0(Fe,Ga)5.0O12.0 with an in-plane magnetization as the MO indicator...sub-nanoseconds by the magnetization switching time of the FGF as in ref. [11]. The power source provides up to 15 Amps of bipolar current in a

  11. Resolving regional frequency analysis of precipitation at large and complex scales using a bottom-up approach: The Latin America and the Caribbean Drought Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, J.; Hallack-Alegría, M.; Cadena, M.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrologic frequency analysis is a statistical technique for the assessment of natural hazards, particularly the so-called water hazards caused exclusively by extreme hydrologic events. In particular, L-moments based regional frequency analysis (RFA-LM) has being adopted as the standard method for hydrologic frequency analysis in many parts of the world and for many other applications relating to hydrological extremes. However, despite the widespread use of RFA-LM, its application at large network and high and complex spatial scale conditions (LNHCSSC) has been poorly studied. The lack of studies about RFA-LM under such conditions and its use preferentially at subnational scales and areas with low number of rain gauge stations, or based on grid data, may be explained by the fact that the most difficult, less robust, and most subjective stage of RFA-LM is the delineation of homogeneous regions. This work proposes an integral procedure for the application of RFA-LM under LNHCSSC. The proposed method is applied to the study of drought event frequency in three case studies from Latin America, and incorporates innovating aspects compared to the state-of-the-art RFA-LM. These aspects are specifically (a) the decoupling of the cause of homogeneity from the regionalization stage; (b) the proposal of regionalization efficiency metrics; (c) the development of a regionalization algorithm; and (d) the development of a frequency estimation and mapping method for ungauged sites.

  12. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  13. Time-resolved magneto-optical imaging of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} thin films in high-frequency AC current regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucarelli, A [Department of Applied Science, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Luepke, G [Department of Applied Science, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Haugan, T J [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7919 (United States); Levin, G A [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7919 (United States); Barnes, P N [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7919 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    We present a time-resolved magneto-optical (MO) imaging study of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) in a high-frequency alternating current (AC) regime. The evolution of the magnetic flux density distribution in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) thin film samples is studied as a function of the phase of the applied AC current. A quantitative analysis of the data shows that the maxima of the AC current density is shifted from the edges further inside the sample, which may be caused by the higher self-induced field in that region. This technique can be used to study magnetic flux evolution in HTS films and coated conductors in the high-frequency current regime.

  14. Locally resolved investigation of wedged Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} films prepared by physical vapor deposition using hard X-ray photoelectron and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, Wolfram, E-mail: wolfram.calvet@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Ümsür, Bünyamin; Höpfner, Britta; Lauermann, Iver; Prietzel, Karsten; Kaufmann, Christan A.; Unold, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Lux-Steiner, Martha C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Physics, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated a specially grown Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) absorber, which was deposited by co-evaporation of Cu, In, Ga, and Se using a modified three stage process. Prior to the growth, the molybdenum-coated glass substrate was covered by a bent shroud made from tantalum (Ta), leading to a wedged absorber structure with a width of about 2 mm where the film thickness varies from 0 to 2 μm. In this region of interest the thickness dependency of morphology, concentration ratios and electronic properties was studied with secondary electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), probing the CIGSe sample along the thickness gradient. The evidence of the thickness gradient itself was proven with SEM measurements in cross section geometry. By using XRF it was found that with decreasing film thickness the Cu concentration decreases significantly. This finding was also verified by HAXPES measurements. Furthermore, an enrichment of Ga towards the Mo back contact was found using the same technique. Besides these results the formation of a molybdenum selenide (MoSe) phase was observed on the fully covered part of the Mo coated substrate indicating a high mobility of Se on Mo under the given temperature conditions of the modified three stage deposition process. - Highlights: • Growth of a CIGSe wedge • Application of HAXPES and XRF as local probing techniques • Good agreement with former studies • Wedged CIGSe structures can be used for further, locally resolved experiments.

  15. Research on time resolved fluorescence immunoassay in quantitative detection of the anti-HBs of children's serum%时间分辨技术定量检测儿童乙肝病毒抗-HBs水平的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程邦宁; 李林; 金载璇; 郝家砚; 孙亮; 许莉莉; 张功

    2011-01-01

    Objective To detect the anti-HBs of children's serum quantitatively, so as to analyze their immunity to hepatitis B virus (HBV). Methods Time resolved fluorescence immunoassay was used to measure the anti-HBs of 3480 serum samples from the children of non-infective HBV. Results There were 817 cases in 0~ mIU/ml about con-tent of the anti-HBs (23.5%), 1142 cases in 10-100 mlU/ml (32.8%), 1 521 cases > 100 mlU/ml (43.7%). There was no statistical difference between deferent sex of the anti-HBs (Z = 0.34,P = 0.735). There was statistical dif-ference between different age groups (Z = 3 634.00, P100 mIU/ml 1 521人(43.7%),不同性别间抗-HBs含量差异无统计学意义(Z=0.34,P=0.735);不同年龄组之间抗-HBs含量差异有统计学意义(Z=3 634.00,P<0.001),且年龄组与抗-HBs含量呈现负相关(rs=-0.217,P<0.001).结论 安徽省部分儿童对HBV的免疫力不容乐观,且随着年龄的增长,抗-HBs水平呈下降趋势,因此定期定量检测抗-HBs含量和加强乙肝疫苗预防接种非常必要.

  16. Ultrafast fluorescence of photosynthetic crystals and light-harvesting complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van B.F.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes using time resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy often requires attaching fluorescent labels to the proteins under investigation. With photosynthetic proteins this is not necessary, because these

  17. Ultrafast fluorescence of photosynthetic crystals and light-harvesting complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van B.F.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes using time resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy often requires attaching fluorescent labels to the proteins under investigation. With photosynthetic proteins this is not necessary, because these prote

  18. Ultrafast fluorescence of photosynthetic crystals and light-harvesting complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van B.F.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes using time resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy often requires attaching fluorescent labels to the proteins under investigation. With photosynthetic proteins this is not necessary, because these prote

  19. Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy%基于激光诱导时间分辨荧光的原油识别方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩晓爽; 刘德庆; 栾晓宁; 郭金家; 刘永信; 郑荣儿

    2016-01-01

    在柴油、汽油、重质燃料油等成品油和原油等溢油油源的区分方面 ,荧光光谱结合模式识别手段得到了广泛的应用.传统的三维荧光光谱分析方法虽然能够获得溢油样品丰富的成分信息 ,但难以适应现场应用的要求 ,目前还停留在实验室检测的阶段.发展适用于现场应用的原油识别方法 ,对于海洋溢油污染的快速响应与处理意义重大.面向激光雷达的需要 ,发展了一种基于激光诱导时间分辨荧光手段、结合支持向量机(SVM )模型的原油识别方法 ,从时间和波长两个不同维度出发 ,通过对时间窗口和波长范围的选取进行优化 ,获得了理想的油种识别准确率.实验结果表明通过选取ICCD探测延时为54~74 ns可以将分类正确率从全谱线数据的83. 3% 提高到88. 1% .通过选取波长范围为387. 00~608. 87 nm的谱线数据 ,可将疑似油种的分类正确率从全谱线数据的84% 提高到100% .激光荧光雷达在实际工作中 ,受波浪、运载平台晃动等因素的影响 ,探测延时会出现一定的波动.本文介绍的分类识别方法通过时间和波长两个维度的筛选 ,更加适用于现场探测数据的识别 ,并进一步凸显了原油时间分辨荧光光谱特征 ,为疑似油种分类识别过程中数据量的压缩提供了重要依据.%The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimi-nation of different spilled oil ,such as diesel ,gasoline ,and crude oil .However ,traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method ,which is not adapted to requirement of field detection ,is limited to laboratory investigatio ns .The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill .In this paper ,a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM ) model was introduced to dis

  20. Resolved SZE Cluster Count

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Yu Tang; Zu-Hui Fan

    2003-01-01

    We study the counts of resolved SZE (Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect) clus-ters expected from an interferometric survey in different cosmological models underdifferent conditions. The self-similar universal gas model and Press-Schechter massfunction are used. We take the observing frequency to be 90 GHz, and consider twodish diameters, 1.2 m and 2.5 m. We calculate the number density of the galaxyclusters dN/(dΩdz) at a high flux limit Slimv = 100mJy and at a relative lowSlimv = 10 mJy. The total numbers of SZE clusters N in two low-Ω0 models arecompared. The results show that the influence of the resolved effect depends notonly on D, but also on Slimv: at a given D, the effect is more significant for a highthan for a low Slim Also, the resolved effect for a flat universe is more impressivethan that for an open universe. For D = 1.2m and Slimv= 10mJy, the resolvedeffect is very weak. Considering the designed interferometers which will be used tosurvey SZE clusters, we find that the resolved effect is insignificant when estimatingthe expected yield of the SZE cluster surveys.

  1. Frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging system (pco.flim) based on a in-pixel dual tap control CMOS image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Robert; Holst, Gerhard A.

    2015-03-01

    The luminescence lifetime as a beneficial analytical parameter is known for many years and is well described by a large variety of publications. Many instruments including 2D measuring systems with cameras have been developed and applied in the past years. However, since the current instrumentation to perform either time- or frequency-domain lifetime measurements is rather complex, new developments in CMOS image sensor technology have achieved to create new image sensors, which can efficiently be integrated into easier-to-handle luminescence lifetime measuring systems. The principle of these modulatable CMOS image sensors, while initially being designed for distance measurements, shows a clear analogy to frequency-domain FLIM measurements, which was proven by researchers [1, 2]. Based on this principle a new CMOS image sensor has been developed, integrated into a camera system and has been investigated within a research project. The image sensor has a resolution of 1024 × 1024 pixels with a 5.6 μm pitch and can be modulated up to 50 MHz. First measurements show an effective dynamic range of larger than 1:1024 (corresponding to 10 bit dynamic). The maximum frame rate is in the range of 90 frames/s in dual-tap mode, resulting in an effective lifetime image frame rate for realistic measurements of approximately 22 frames/s. The camera system pco.flim, featuring that image sensor, generates all required modulation signals from 5 kHz to 50 MHz (sinusoidal and rectangular). It performs advanced pixel correction to generate linear and high-quality images, while the basic lifetime image processing is done in the computer. The modulation frequency can be freely adjusted within the specified range. The characteristics of the camera systems are presented, and first results are discussed using different representations of the data like for example the phasor approach [3], which has been established to provide a more global view to pixelwise fluorescence lifetime data and

  2. Biogeochemical processing of nutrients in groundwater-fed stream during baseflow conditions - the value of fluorescence spectroscopy and automated high-frequency nutrient monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Heathwaite, Louise

    2014-05-01

    Recent research in groundwater-dominated streams indicates that organic matter plays an important role in nutrient transformations at the surface-groundwater interface known as the hyporheic zone. Mixing of water and nutrient fluxes in the hyporheic zone controls in-stream nutrients availability, dynamics and export to downstream reaches. In particular, benthic sediments can form adsorptive sinks for organic matter and reactive nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) that sustain a variety of hyporheic processes e.g. denitrification, microbial uptake. Thus, hyporheic metabolism can have an important effect on both quantity (concentration) and quality (labile vs. refractory character) of organic matter. Here high-frequency nutrient monitoring combined with spectroscopic analysis was used to provide insights into biogeochemical processing of a small, agricultural stream in the NE England subject to diffuse nutrient pollution. Biogeochemical data were collected hourly for a week at baseflow conditions when in-stream-hyporheic nutrient dynamics have the greatest impact on stream health. In-stream nutrients (total phosphorus, reactive phosphorus, nitrate nitrogen) and water quality parameters (turbidity, specific conductivity, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, redox potential) were measured in situ hourly by an automated bank-side laboratory. Concurrent hourly autosamples were retrieved daily and analysed for nutrients and fine sediments including spectroscopic analyses of dissolved organic matter - excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance spectroscopy. Our results show that organic matter can potentially be utilised as a natural, environmental tracer of the biogeochemical processes occurring at the surface-groundwater interface in streams. High-frequency spectroscopic characterisation of in-stream organic matter can provide useful quantitative and qualitative information on fluxes of reactive nutrients in

  3. Frequencies of complex chromosome exchange aberrations induced by 238Pu alpha-particles and detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization using single chromosome-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C S; Marsden, S J; Stevens, D L; Simpson, P; Savage, J R

    1995-04-01

    We undertook an analysis of chromosome-type exchange aberrations induced by alpha-particles using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome-specific probes for human chromosomes 1 or 4, together with a pan-centromeric probe. Contact-inhibited primary human fibroblasts (in G1) were irradiated with 0.41-1.00 Gy 238Pu alpha-particles and aberrations were analysed at the next mitosis following a single chromosome paint. Exchange and aberration painting patterns were classified according to Savage and Simpson (1994a). Of exchange aberrations, 38-47% were found to be complex derived, i.e. resulting from three or more breaks in two or more chromosomes, and the variation with dose was minimal. The class of complex aberrations most frequently observed were insertions, derived from a minimum of three breaks in two chromosomes. There was also an elevated frequency of rings. The high level of complex aberrations observed after alpha-particle irradiation indicates that, when chromosome domains are traversed by high linear energy transfer alpha-particle tracks, there is an enhanced probability of production of multiple localized double-strand breaks leading to more complicated interactions.

  4. Study on the interaction between albendazole and eosin Y by fluorescence, resonance Rayleigh scattering and frequency doubling scattering spectra and their analytical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fengling; Huang, Wei; Yang, Jidong; Li, Qin

    In pH 3.25-3.35 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, albendazole (ABZ) could react with eosin Y (EY) to form a 1:1 ion-association complex, which not only results in the quenching of fluorescence, but also resulted in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and frequency doubling scattering (FDS). Furthermore, a new RRS spectrum will appear, and the maximum RRS wavelength was located at about 356 nm. The detection limit for ABZ were 21.51 ng mL-1 for the fluorophotometry, 6.93 ng mL-1 for the RRS method and 12.89 ng mL-1 for the FDS method. Among them, the RRS method had the highest sensitivity. The experimental conditions were optimized and effects of coexisting substances were evaluated. Meanwhile, the influences of coexisting substances were tested. The methods have been successfully applied to the determination of ABZ in capsules and human urine samples. The composition and structure of the ion-association complex and the reaction mechanism were discussed.

  5. Time-Resolved Measurement of the C_2 ^1AΠ u State Population Following Photodissociation of the S_1 State of Acetylene Using Frequency-Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenhui; Jiang, Jun; Field, Robert W.

    2017-06-01

    The excited-state population of the C_2 ^1AΠ_u state produced in photolysis of S_1 acetylene was investigated. The pulsed UV laser (216.5 nm) excites acetylene into J=8 e-symmetry level of the S_1 3^4 level, and subsequently dissociates the S_1 acetylene into C_2 fragments. A frequency-modulated near-infrared probe laser beam is used to detect the C_2 population in the ^1AΠ_u state. The sensitivity and the fast response of the experimental setup has been verified by I_2 excited state measurements. The setup will be used to record the C_2 A-X transitions, which are fitted with a Voigt function. The derived lineshape and line intensities will be analyzed, and we will use the information to calculate the A state populations of C_2 and map the populations with time-resolution following the photolysis.

  6. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimetre spectrally resolved CT system on high- and low-frequency imaging tasks: a simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yveborg, Moa; Danielsson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans

    2012-04-21

    We are developing a photon-counting silicon strip detector with 0.4 × 0.5 mm² detector elements for clinical CT applications. Except for the limited detection efficiency of approximately 0.8 for a spectrum of 80 kVp, the largest discrepancies from ideal spectral behaviour have been shown to be Compton interactions in the detector and electronic noise. Using the framework of cascaded system analysis, we reconstruct the 3D MTF and NPS of a silicon strip detector including the influence of scatter and charge sharing inside the detector. We compare the reconstructed noise and signal characteristics with a reconstructed 3D MTF and NPS of an ideal energy-integrating detector system with unity detection efficiency, no scatter or charge sharing inside the detector, unity presampling MTF and 1 × 1 mm² detector elements. The comparison is done by calculating the dose-normalized detectability index for some clinically relevant imaging tasks and spectra. This work demonstrates that although the detection efficiency of the silicon detector rapidly drops for the acceleration voltages encountered in clinical computed tomography practice, and despite the high fraction of Compton interactions due to the low atomic number, silicon detectors can perform on a par with ideal energy-integrating detectors for routine imaging tasks containing low-frequency components. For imaging tasks containing high-frequency components, the proposed silicon detector system can perform approximately 1.1-1.3 times better than a fully ideal energy-integrating system.

  7. Combined time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy study on the complexation of trivalent actinides with chloride at T = 25-200 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Fröhlich, Daniel R; Rothe, Jörg; Dardenne, Kathy; Panak, Petra J

    2014-01-21

    The complexation of trivalent actinides (An(III)) with chloride is studied in the temperature range from 25 to 200 °C by spectroscopic methods. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) is applied to determine the thermodynamic data of Cm(III)-Cl(-) complexes, while extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) is used to determine the structural data of the respective Am(III) complexes. The experiments are performed in a custom-built high-temperature cell which is modified for the respective spectroscopic technique. The TRLFS results show that at 25 °C the speciation is dominated mainly by the Cm(3+) aquo ion. Only a minor fraction of the CmCl(2+) complex is present in solution. As the temperature increases, the fraction of this species decreases further. Simultaneously, the fraction of the CmCl2(+) complex increases strongly with the temperature. Also, the CmCl3 complex is formed to a minor extent at T > 160 °C. The conditional stability constant log β'2 is determined as a function of the temperature and extrapolated to zero ionic strength with the specific ion interaction theory approach. The log β°2(T) values increase by more than 3 orders of magnitude in the studied temperature range. The temperature dependency of log β°2 is fitted by the extended van't Hoff equation to determine ΔrH°m, ΔrS°m, and ΔrC°p,m. The EXAFS results support these findings. The results confirm the absence of americium(III) chloride complexes at T = 25 and 90 °C ([Am(III)] = 10(-3) m, [Cl(-)] = 3.0 m), and the spectra are described by 9-10 oxygen atoms at a distance of 2.44-2.48 Å. At T = 200 °C two chloride ligands are present in the inner coordination sphere of Am(III) at a distance of 2.78 Å.

  8. Fluorescence dynamics of green fluorescent protein in AOT reversed micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uskova, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Hink, M.A.; Hoek, van A.; Schots, A.; Klyachko, N.L.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2000-01-01

    We have used the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to investigate the properties of surfactant-entrapped water pools in organic solvents (reversed micelles) with steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods. The surfactant used was sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) and the

  9. Better Resolved Low Frequency Dispersions by the Apt Use of Kramers-Kronig Relations, Differential Operators, and All-In-1 Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Turnhout, J

    2016-01-01

    The dielectric spectra of colloidal systems often contain a typical low frequency dispersion, which usually remains unnoticed, because of the presence of strong conduction losses. The KK relations offer a means for converting ε' into ε″ data. This allows us to calculate conduction free ε″ spectra in which the l.f. dispersion will show up undisturbed. This interconversion can be done on line with a moving frame of logarithmically spaced ε' data. The coefficients of the conversion frames were obtained by kernel matching and by using symbolic differential operators. Logarithmic derivatives and differences of ε' and ε″ provide another option for conduction free data analysis. These difference-based functions actually derived from approximations to the distribution function, have the additional advantage of improving the resolution power of dielectric studies. A high resolution is important because of the rich relaxation structure of colloidal suspensions. The development of all-in-1 modeling facilitates the conduction free and high resolution data analysis. This mathematical tool allows the apart-together fitting of multiple data and multiple model functions. It proved also useful to go around the KK conversion altogether. This was achieved by the combined approximating ε' and ε″ data with a complex rational fractional power function. The all-in-1 minimization turned out to be also highly useful for the dielectric modeling of a suspension with the complex dipolar coefficient. It guarantees a secure correction for the electrode polarization, so that the modeling with the help of the differences ε' and ε″ can zoom in on the genuine colloidal relaxations.

  10. Better resolved low frequency dispersions by the apt use of Kramers-Kronig relations, differential operators and all-in-1 modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan van Turnhout

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric spectra of colloidal systems often contain a typical low frequency dispersion, which usually remains unnoticed, because of the presence of strong conduction losses. The KK relations offer a means for converting  into  data. This allows us to calculate conduction free  spectra in which the l.f. dispersion will show up undisturbed. This interconversion can be done on line with a moving frame of logarithmically spaced  data. The coefficients of the conversion frames were obtained by kernel matching and by using symbolic differential operators. Logarithmic derivatives and differences of  and  provide another option for conduction free data analysis. These difference-based functions actually derived from approximations to the distribution function, have the additional advantage of improving the resolution power of dielectric studies. A high resolution is important because of the rich relaxation structure of colloidal suspensions. The development of all-in-1 modelling facilitates the conduction free and high resolution data analysis. This mathematical tool allows the apart-together fitting of multiple data and multiple model functions. It proved also useful to go around the KK conversion altogether. This was achieved by the combined approximating  and  data with a complex rational fractional power function. The all-in-1 minimization turned out to be also highly useful for the dielectric modelling of a suspension with the complex dipolar coefficient. It guarantees a secure correction for the electrode polarization, so that the modelling with the help of the differences  and  can zoom in on the genuine colloidal relaxations.

  11. Better resolved low frequency dispersions by the apt use of Kramers-Kronig relations, differential operators and all-in-1 modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnhout, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The dielectric spectra of colloidal systems often contain a typical low frequency dispersion, which usually remains unnoticed, because of the presence of strong conduction losses. The KK relations offer a means for converting ɛ' into ɛ'' data. This allows us to calculate conduction free ɛ'' spectra in which the l.f. dispersion will show up undisturbed. This interconversion can be done on line with a moving frame of logarithmically spaced ɛ' data. The coefficients of the conversion frames were obtained by kernel matching and by using symbolic differential operators. Logarithmic derivatives and differences of ɛ' and ɛ'' provide another option for conduction free data analysis. These difference-based functions actually derived from approximations to the distribution function, have the additional advantage of improving the resolution power of dielectric studies. A high resolution is important because of the rich relaxation structure of colloidal suspensions. The development of all-in-1 modelling facilitates the conduction free and high resolution data analysis. This mathematical tool allows the apart-together fitting of multiple data and multiple model functions. It proved also useful to go around the KK conversion altogether. This was achieved by the combined approximating ɛ' and ɛ'' data with a complex rational fractional power function. The all-in-1 minimization turned out to be also highly useful for the dielectric modelling of a suspension with the complex dipolar coefficient. It guarantees a secure correction for the electrode polarization, so that the modelling with the help of the differences ɛ' and ɛ'' can zoom in on the genuine colloidal relaxations.

  12. 基于稀土铕离子配合物的时间分辨荧光pH 探针的合成及应用%The Synthesis and Application of Time-Resolved Fluorescence pH Probe Based on Rare Earth Europium Ion Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄大伟; 邴永鑫; 洪伟; 崔恺; 虢清伟

    2016-01-01

    A rare earth ternary europium ion complex with fluorescent lifetime of 0.544 0 ms was synthesized by using 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline and 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone as synergic agents andβ-diketone ligands. The complex was used as fluorescent probe for pH determination of environmental water samples by time-resolved fluorescence analysis.The fluorescent probe showed the maximum and stable time-resolved fluorescence intensity when the pH ranged from 7.00 to 8.95,while the time-resolved fluorescence intensity changed obviously in acidic (pH 8.95 )conditions.The time-resolved fluorescence quenching of the fluorescent probe showed linear response toward pH in the range of 2.50-7.00 or 9.91 -14.00.The prepared fluorescent probe was insensitive to dissolved oxygen and ionic strength.The prepared fluorescent probe was used to determine pH of real water samples,giving results in consistent with those obtained by glass electrode and RSDs (n=8)in the range of 4.3%-8.1%.%以4,7-二苯基-1,10-菲啉(母体)和2-噻吩甲酰三氟丙酮为协同剂和β-二酮配体,合成了一种稀土三元铕离子配合物,其荧光寿命为0.5440 ms,并以其为荧光探针对水环境的 pH 进行时间分辨荧光测定。荧光探针的时间分辨荧光强度在 pH 7.00~8.95时达到最大值并保持较好的稳定性;在 pH 小于7.00和 pH 大于8.95时,荧光探针的时间分辨荧光强度随着 pH 变化而变化;在 pH 2.50~7.00和 pH 9.91~14.00时,荧光探针的时间分辨荧光猝灭率与 pH 呈线性关系。溶解氧浓度和离子强度变化对 pH 测定结果无影响。采用荧光探针测定实际水样的 pH,结果与玻璃电极的测定结果相符,测定值的相对标准偏差(n=8)在4.3%~8.1%之间。

  13. Cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating of white-light continuum (500-900 nm) generated in bulk media by 1053 nm laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, T.; Hussain, M.; Figueira, G.

    2016-06-01

    We have efficiently characterized the white-light continuum (WLC) generation covering 500-900 nm in a bulk sapphire plate using 280 fs pulse duration, 1053 nm center-wavelength seed laser pulses. We have acquired the well-optimized smoother region of the WLC spectrum successfully by using an FGS-900 color glass filter (Edmund Optics, Inc.). We have suppressed the spectral components below 500 nm and over 900 nm including an intense 1053 nm residual seed laser peak of the WLC spectrum. The experimental artifacts have been avoided by suppressing the intense 1053 nm seed laser. We employed the sum frequency generation cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating (SFG-XFROG) technique for characterization. The XFROG measurement was carried out by introducing the crystal dithering method up to 10° in 2° intervals to obtain the phase matching effectively over the filtered and smoother region of the WLC spectrum. This well-optimized WLC region covering 500-900 nm has significant importance for use as a seed pulse in an optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) system.

  14. Steady-state and time-resolved Thioflavin-T fluorescence can report on morphological differences in amyloid fibrils formed by Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, David J. [Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Chemical Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Wranne, Moa S.; Gilbert Gatty, Mélina [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Division of Physical Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Westerlund, Fredrik [Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Chemical Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Esbjörner, Elin K., E-mail: eline@chalmers.se [Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Chemical Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-03-06

    Thioflavin-T (ThT) is one of the most commonly used dyes for amyloid detection, but the origin of its fluorescence enhancement is not fully understood. Herein we have characterised the ThT fluorescence response upon binding to the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) variants of the Alzheimer's-related peptide amyloid-β, in order to explore how the photophysical properties of this dye relates to structural and morphological properties of two amyloid fibril types formed by peptides with a high degree of sequence homology. We show that the steady-state ThT fluorescence is 1.7 times more intense with Aβ(1-40) compared to Aβ(1-42) fibrils in concentration matched samples prepared under quiescent conditions. By measuring the excited state lifetime of bound ThT, we also demonstrate a distinct difference between the two fibril isoforms, with Aβ(1-42) fibrils producing a longer ThT fluorescence lifetime compared to Aβ(1-40). The substantial steady-state intensity difference is therefore not explained by differences in fluorescence quantum yield. Further, we find that the ThT fluorescence intensity, but not the fluorescence lifetime, is dependent on the fibril preparation method (quiescent versus agitated conditions). We therefore propose that the fluorescence lifetime is inherent to each isoform and sensitively reports on fibril microstructure in the protofilament whereas the total fluorescence intensity relates to the amount of exposed β-sheet in the mature Aβ fibrils and hence to differences in their morphology. Our results highlight the complexity of ThT fluorescence, and demonstrate its extended use in amyloid fibril characterisation. - Highlights: • ThT emission is more intense with Aβ(1-40) fibrils than with Aβ(1-42) fibrils. • Aβ(1-42) fibrils induce longer ThT fluorescence lifetimes and higher quantum yield. • ThT emission intensity in Aβ fibril samples reports on fibril morphology. • The ThT fluorescence lifetime is a characteristic feature of each A

  15. Determination of Dimethachlon in Tobacco by Time-resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay%时间分辨荧光免疫分析方法检测烟草中菌核净残留

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘媛; 刘蓉蓉; 刘贤金; 方敦煌; 宋春满; Huovinen Tuomas; Vehni(a)inen Markus; L(o)vgren Timo

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA) with a cleanup-free pretreat-ment for dimethachlon in tobacco was developed The competitive indirect TRFIA for dimethachlon was established by using goat anti-rabbit IgG conjugated with a Eu-N1 delate as a tracer. The detection limit ( I10) and I50 for this assay was 1. 98 μg/L and 32. 00 μg/L, respectively. And the linear range for detection is between 3. 97 -128. 76 μg/L. Meanwhile, the effect of tobacco matrix to TRFIA was also studied. It was demonstrated that the linear range of inhibition curve with 1 % tobacco matrix was parallel to the standard curve; so the extract of tobacco would be diluted 200 times before assay, the index of matrix interference (Im) was calculated as 17. 1. Three levels of dimethachon (1,7 and 24 mg/L) were spiked into tobacco, the overall recoveries and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 73%-128% and 4. 3 -13. 2, and the practical detection limit for the method was 1 mg/L. This assay is a suitable tool for screening dimethachlon residue in tobacco samples%建立了简便、灵敏地检测烟草中菌核净残留的时间分辨荧光免疫分析方法(TRFIA),及配套的无净化的快速前处理技术.采用镧系元素螯合物Eu-N1标记亲和纯化后的羊抗兔IgG示踪抗体.采用间接竞争TRFIA法建立了菌核净标准抑制曲线,方法的检出限为2.0 μg/L;抑制终浓度I30为32.00 μg/L;检测线性范围为4~128 μg/L.考察了丙酮提取后33%,10%和1%的烟草基质对菌核净-TRFIA分析方法的影响,表明在1%烟叶基质条件下,建立的菌核净的抑制曲线的线性范围与标准抑制曲线趋于平行,确定烟草样品的前处理稀释倍数为100倍,计算得到基质影响因子(Im)为17.1.对烟叶样品中添加1,7和24 mg/L的菌核净标样,连续3d的添加回收实验表明,方法的回收率为73%~128%,相对标准标准偏差(RSD)在4.3%~13.2%之间;烟草中菌核净

  16. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  17. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  18. 罗丹明6G在醇溶液中的荧光频移特性分析%Analysis of Fluorescence Frequency Shift of Rhodamine 6G in Alcohol Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付静; 高洁; 杨雪芹; 马小虎

    2016-01-01

    Rhodamine 6G in methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol solution are all issue a strong fluorescence. When the concentration of alcohol is 33.3%,there is no frequency shift,when alcohol concentration is 99.7%and fluorescence summit occurs redshift or blueshift.The analysis shows that the frequency shift is composed of Rhodamine 6G and alcohols interactions (such as hydrogen bonding,electrostatic attraction)lead to excited state energy increased and thus fluorescence peak occurs blueshift,and alcohols in the hydroxyl OH solitary on the electron transition leads to lower fluorescence energy,and thus fluorescence peak occurs redshift,and in high concentration alcohol solution,the more the hydroxyl OH,the redshift more obvious.%罗丹明6G在甲醇、乙醇、乙二醇溶液中均发出较强的荧光。当醇溶液浓度为33.3%时,基本不存在频移现象。当醇溶液浓度为99.7%时,荧光峰发生蓝移或红移,分析认为该频移是由罗丹明6G和醇类物质分子相互作用(如氢键、静电吸引)导致激发态能量升高、荧光峰蓝移,与醇类物质分子中羟基OH的孤对电子跃迁导致荧光能量降低、荧光峰红移,这两种因素相互竞争的结果,且在高浓度醇溶液中,羟基OH数量越多,红移越明显。

  19. Evaluation of microphysics and precipitation-type frequencies in long-term three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulations using passive and active microwave sensors from the TRMM satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T.; Zeng, X.; Tao, W.; Lang, S.; Zhang, M.; Masunaga, H.

    2007-12-01

    With significant improvements in computational power over the last decades, cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations can now be conducted on larger scales for longer time periods to better understand cloud- precipitation systems. However, even after the decadal development of CRMs, there are many uncertainties in cloud microphysics processes and cloud-precipitation structures due to the lack of routine observations. Therefore, we need to establish a practical CRM evaluation framework using frequent observations from satellites. This evaluation framework consists of i) multi-satellite simulators and ii) the construction of statistical composites that can be used to effectively evaluate cloud-precipitation systems. First, simulated cloud- precipitation structures and microphysics processes are converted to satellite-consistent radar reflectivity and microwave brightness temperature using microwave and radar simulators in the Satellite Data Simulator Unit (SDSU). Second, the CRM-computed and satellite-observed radar reflectivities and microwave brightness temperatures are used to construct two statistical composites. One combines TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) PR (precipitation radar) 13.8-GHz radar echo-top heights and TRMM VIRS (visible/infrared scanner) 10.8-micron brightness temperatures. This composite categorizes precipitating clouds into shallow warm, cumulus congestus, deep stratiform, and deep convective clouds. The other composite combines multi- frequency TMI (TRMM microwave imager) brightness temperatures. The combination of low- and high-frequency channels reveals the performance of the model cloud microphysics in terms of liquid and ice precipitation amounts. In this study, long-term CRM simulations are performed using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model for three cases: ARM TWP-ICE (Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment), SCSMEX (South China Sea Monsoon Experiment), and KWAJEX (Kwajalein Experiment). Results from the proposed

  20. 频率分辨光学开关法测量飞秒脉冲的研究%Measurement of Femtosecond Laser Pulses Using Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文汝红

    2012-01-01

    The theory and the algorithm of the frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) method for retrieving amplitude and phase of ultrashort laser pulse are presented. Several types of FROG are numerically simulated. Then the amplitude and the phase of the pulse are retrieved for the free-noise and 20% random noise SHG-FROG traces. A measurement is presented with SHG-FROG. The characterization of Ti:sapphire pulse is measured with the apparatus. The pulse duration is in reasonable agreement with the measurement using interference autocorrelation.%在详细分析频率分辨光学开关法(FROG)的基础上,对几种类型的FROG迹线进行了模拟,并运用Matlab软件编制程序还原出脉冲信息.用二次谐波型频率分辨光学开关法(SHG-FROG)测量了KLM钛宝石激光器的输出脉冲,并运用算法进行了处理,得到脉冲的振幅和相位信息,与干涉自相关法的测量结果一致.

  1. 异丙醇-水配合液的荧光偏振和时间分辨特性%Fluorescence Polarization and Time Resolved Characteristics of Isopropanol-water Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩彩芹; 段培同; 吴斌; 刘莹; 骆晓森; 倪晓武

    2011-01-01

    The polarization fluorescence spectra of isopropanol-water mixture excited by ultraviolet light was studied experimentally. The decay process of fluorescence intensity was detected at different center emission peaks. The curve was fitted by an exponential function and the processing data was obtained by deconvolution. Both the polarization degree and fluorescence lifetime were calculated, and mathematical characterization was performed for the fluorescence counts decay curves. The fluorescence emission and polarization characteristics were discussed. It is found that the isopropanol-water mixture excited by ultraviolet light obtains partially polarized fluorescence with certain molecular orientation. The polarization degree and anisotropy degree are 0.542 and 0.441, respectively. Induced by exciting light with wavelengths of 220 nm and 232 nm, the fluorescence lifetime of isopropanol-water mixture at peaks of 277, 284, 293,309 nm is about 17 ns. While the average fluorescence lifetime at peaks of 328 nm, 345 nm and 362 nm is around 21, 22, 16 ns, respectively. It is related with the molecular cluster structure relative stability of isopropanol-water mixture by the action of hydrogen bond. The research will contribute to the study of the molecular characteristic of isopropanol-water cluster.%研究了紫外光照射下异丙醇-水配合液的偏振荧光光谱,以及不同荧光峰处光子强度随时间的衰变过程,计算了偏振度并讨论了其偏振特性,测试了不同峰位对应的荧光寿命并分析了其荧光发射特性.结果表明,异丙醇-水配合液在紫外光激励下发射的荧光为具有确定分子取向的部分偏振光,偏振度和各向异性度分别为0.542和0.441.在波长为220 nm和232 nm的激发光照射下,荧光峰位于277,284,293,309 nm,对应寿命均约为17 ns.而328,345,362 nm荧光峰对应的平均寿命分别约为21,22,16 ns,这与氢键作用下异丙醇和水形成团簇结构的相对稳定性有关.

  2. Study of the interaction of trivalent actinide and lanthanide ions with human serum transferrin by means of time-resolved laser-fluorescence spectroscopy; Untersuchung der Wechselwirkung trivalenter Actinid- und Lanthanidionen mit humanem Serumtransferrin mittels zeitaufgeloester Laserfluoreszenzspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Nicole

    2015-04-27

    In the present work the complexation of Cm(III), Eu(III) and Am(III) with human serum transferrin is studied. The aim of this work was the identification and the spectroscopic and thermodynamic characterization of An(III) and Ln(III) transferrin complex species. Different speciation methods, such as time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), luminescence spectroscopy and EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy were applied. Using TRLFS two unambiguously different Cm(III) transferrin species were identified for the first time. In the pH range from 3.5 to 9.7 the Cm(III) transferrin species I is formed revealing complexation of the metal ion at a nonspecific site of the protein surface. In case of the Cm(III) transferrin species II Cm(III) is bound at the Fe(III) binding site of the protein resulting in a 4-fold coordination via amino acid groups of the protein (His, Asp, 2 x Tyr) and coordination of two water molecules and three additional ligands, e.g. OH{sup -} or CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. Due to the kinetic and thermodynamic differences of the binding sites of the N- and C-lobe, the experimental conditions ensure exclusive coordination of Cm(III) at the C-terminal binding site. In addition to the complexation studies of Cm(III) with transferrin, the interaction with the recombinant N-lobe of human serum transferrin (hTf/2N) as a model component for the transferrin N-lobe was investigated. At pH≥7.4 a Cm(III) hTf/2N species with Cm(III) bound at the Fe(III) binding site is formed which is comparable to the Cm(III) transferrin species II. An increase of the temperature from room temperature (T=296 K) to physiological temperature (T=310 K) favors the complexation of Cm(III) with both transferrin and hTf/2N. The complexation of Cm(III) with transferrin was investigated at three different carbonate concentrations (c(carbonate){sub tot}=0 mM, 0,23 mM und 25 mM (physiological carbonate concentration)). An increase of the total carbonate

  3. Charge-driven feedback loop in the resonance fluorescence of a single quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, B.; Kurzmann, A.; Schulze, J.-H.; Strittmatter, A.; Geller, M.; Lorke, A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a feedback loop that manifests itself in a strong hysteresis and bistability of the exciton resonance fluorescence signal. Field ionization of photogenerated quantum dot excitons leads to the formation of a charged interface layer that drags the emission line along over a frequency range of more than 30 GHz . These measurements are well described by a rate equation model. With a time-resolved resonance fluorescence measurement we determined the buildup times for the hole gas in the orders of milliseconds. This internal charge-driven feedback loop could be used to reduce the spectral wandering in the emission spectra of single self-assembled quantum dots.

  4. Fluorescence spectra of atomic ensembles in a magneto-optical trap as an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Wook-Rae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as an optical lattice. Fluorescence spectra of atoms trapped in a MOT with a passively phase-stabilized beam configuration have been measured by means of the photon-counting heterodyne spectroscopy. We observe a narrow Rayleigh peak and well-resolved Raman sidebands in the fluorescence spectra which clearly show that the MOT itself behaves as a three-dimensional optical lattice. Optical-lattice-like properties of the phase-stabilized MOT such as vibrational frequencies and lineshapes of Rayleigh peak and Raman sidebands are investigated systematically for various trap conditions.

  5. Fluorescence-lifetime identification of biological agents using deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitta, P.; Kurilcik, N.; Jursenas, S.; Zukauskas, A.; Bakienė, E.; Zhang, J.; Katona, T.; Bilenko, Y.; Lunev, A.; Hu, X.; Deng, J.; Gaska, R.

    2005-10-01

    Recently developed deep-UV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are already used in prototype fluorescence sensors for detection of hazardous biological agents. However, increasing of the sensor ability of discrimination against common interferents requires further development of measurement technique. In particular, LED-based fluorescence lifetime measurements are to be considered as a technique supplementary to fluorescence spectral and excitation measurements. Here we report on application of UVTOP® series deep-UV LEDs developed by Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. for real-time measurements of fluorescence lifetime in the frequency domain. LEDs with the wavelengths of 280 nm (targeted to protein excitation) and 340 nm (for excitation of coenzymes NADH and flavins) were used. The output of the LEDs was harmonically modulated at frequencies up to 100 MHz and fluorescence lifetime on the nanosecond and subnanosecond scale was estimated by measuring the phase angle of the fluorescence signal in respect of the LED output. Dual-wavelength LED-based phase-resolved measurement technique was tested for discrimination of B. globigii against a variety of interferents such as diesel fuel, paper, cotton, dust, etc. We conclude that fluorescence phase measurements have potential to improve the discrimination ability of the "detect-to-warn" optical bioparticle sensors.

  6. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.; Zachara, J.M.; Liu, C.; Gassman, P.L.; Felmy, A.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Clark, S.B. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In this work we applied time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIF) at both room temperature (RT) and near liquid-helium temperature (6 K) to characterize a series of natural and synthetic minerals of uranium carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxides including rutherfordine, zellerite, liebigite, phosphuranylite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, uranyl phosphate, sodium-uranyl-phosphate, becquerelite, schoepite, meta-schoepite, dehydrated schoepite and compreignacite, and have compared the spectral characteristics among these minerals as well as our previously published data on uranyl silicates. For the carbonate minerals, the fluorescence spectra of rutherfordine showed significant difference from those of zellerite and liebigite. The fluorescence spectra of the phosphate minerals closely resemble each other despite the differences in their composition and structure. For all uranium oxyhydroxides, the fluorescence spectra are largely red-shifted as compared to those of the uranium carbonates and phosphates and their vibronic bands are broad and less resolved at RT. The enhanced spectra resolution at 6 K allows more accurate determination of the fluorescence band origin and offers a complemental method to measure the O=U=O symmetrical stretch frequency, {nu}{sub 1}, from the spacings of the vibronic bands of the fluorescence spectra. The average {nu}{sub 1} values appear to be inversely correlated with the average pK{sub a} values of the anions. (orig.)

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  8. Evidence for covalent binding of epicocconone with proteins from synchronous fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetimes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debashis Panda; Anindya Datta

    2007-03-01

    Synchronous fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic studies that reveal the interaction of epicocconone with human serum albumin is significantly different from its interaction with surfactant assemblies. This observation, along with steady-state fluorescence data, indicates groundstate interaction between the fluorophore epicocconone and the protein. Similarity in fluorescence properties with the adduct of the fluorophore with -butylamine indicates that bonding occurs at the Nterminus of the protein.

  9. Mean frequency and relative fluorescence intensity measurement of γ-H2AX foci dose response in PBL exposed to γ-irradiation: An inter- and intra-laboratory comparison and its relevance for radiation triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, Raavi; Tamizh, Selvan G; Bhavani, Manivannan; Kumar, Arun; Alok, Amit; Karthik, Kanagaraj; Kalra, Namita; Vijayalakshmi, J; Paul, Solomon F D; Chaudhury, N K; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of γ-H2AX protein changes in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation is a simple, sensitive, and rapid assay for radiation triage and early marker of dose estimation. The qualitative and quantitative measurements of the protein changes were examined using flow cytometry and microscopy. Whole blood and isolated lymphocytes were exposed in vitro between 0.1 and 5 Gy doses of (60) Co γ-radiation at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min. Radiation induced γ-H2AX foci frequency (n = 3) and relative fluorescence intensity (n = 7) in PBL was measured at 0.5 and 2 hrs postexposure. The observed dose response for γ-H2AX foci frequency at both time points, for whole blood and isolated lymphocytes did not show any significant (P > 0.05) differences. However, when compared with γ-H2AX foci frequency scored manually (microscopy), the semiautomated analysis (captured images) showed a better correlation (r(2) = 0.918) than that obtained with automated (Metafer) scoring (r(2) = 0.690). It is noteworthy to mention that, the γ-H2AX foci frequency quantified using microscopy showed a dose dependent increase up to 2 Gy and the relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) measured with flow cytometry revealed an increase up to 5 Gy in the PBL exposed in vitro. Moreover, a better correlation was observed between the γ-H2AX foci frequency obtained by manual scoring and RFI (r(2) = 0.910). Kinetic studies showed that the γ-H2AX foci remain more or less unchanged up to 4 hrs and reduces gradually over 48 hrs of postexposure at 37°C. Further, inter and intra-laboratory comparisons showed consistency in the scoring of γ-H2AX foci frequency by manual and semiautomated scoring. The overall results suggest that measurement of γ-H2AX (microscopy and flow cytometry) should be employed within 4 to 6 hrs for a reliable dosimetry either by sharing the work load between the laboratories or investing more manpower; however, triage can be possible even up

  10. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  11. High speed multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fereidouni, F.; Reitsma, K.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    We report a spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on time gated single photon detection with a fixed gate width of 200 ps and 7 spectral channels. Time gated systems can operate at high count rates but usually have large gate widths and sample only part of the fluorescence d

  12. Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy: advanced studies of fluorescence dynamics, lifetime imaging, clinical sensing, two-photon excitation, and light quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Malak, Henryk M.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szmacinski, Henryk; Kusba, Jozef; Akkaya, Engin; Terpetschnig, Ewald A.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1994-08-01

    The Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy (CFS) is a multi-user facility providing state of the art time-resolved fluorescence instrumentation and software for scientists, whose research can be enhanced by such experimental data. The CFS is a national center, supported by the National Center for Research Resources Division of the National Institutes of Health, and in part by the National Science Foundation. Both time-domain (TD) and frequency- domain (FD) measurements (10 MHz to 10 Ghz) are available, with a wide range of excitation and emission wavelengths (UV to NIR). The data can be used to recover distances and site-to-site diffusion in protein, interactions between macromolecules, accessibility of fluorophores to quenchers, and the dynamic properties of proteins, membranes and nucleic acids. Current software provides for analysis of multi-exponential intensity and anisotropy decays, lifetime distribution, distance distributions for independent observation of fluorescence donors and acceptors, transient effects in collisional quenching, phase-modulation spectra and time-resolved emission spectra. Most programs provide for global analysis of multiple data sets obtained under similar experimental conditions. Data can be analyzed on-site by connection with the CFS computers through the internet. During six years of operation we have established scientific collaborations with over 30 academic and industrial groups in the United States. These collaborations have resulted in 63 scientific papers.

  13. Ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhi

    2007-01-01

    We review the technique and research of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy and its applications in the field of the ultrafast dynamics of mesoscopic systems and nanomaterials. Combining femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), we can obtain the spectra with ultrahigh temporal and spatial resolutions simultaneously. Some problems in doing so are discussed. Then we show the important applications of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy with a few typical examples.……

  14. Ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ We review the technique and research of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy and its applications in the field of the ultrafast dynamics of mesoscopic systems and nanomaterials. Combining femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), we can obtain the spectra with ultrahigh temporal and spatial resolutions simultaneously. Some problems in doing so are discussed. Then we show the important applications of the ultrahigh spatiotemporal resolved spectroscopy with a few typical examples.

  15. Evanescent wave induced fluorescence. A tool for quantitative interfacial analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, C D

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved angle-resolved evanescent wave induced fluorescence spectroscopy (EWIFS) has been used, for the first time, to determine interfacial concentration distributions of molecular species. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that in dynamic systems the non-radiative fluorescence decay coefficients of molecular species are effected only in a minor way by the presence of a dielectric interface. Consequently, measurements of interfacial fluorescence decay times are used to probe variations in molecular fluorescence quantum efficiencies, caused by the presence of an interface. The understanding of these variations is combined with angle-resolved evanescent wave theory. Examination of derived theoretical models using simulated data demonstrates that angle-resolved EWIFS is capable of measuring interfacial interactions on a nanometer scale. An evanescent wave induced fluorescence spectrometer is designed and fabricated to allow the measurement of the time-integrated and time-resolved interfacial emission. ...

  16. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Clark, Sue B.

    2008-11-03

    In this work we have applied liquid-helium temperature (LHeT) time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIF) to characterize a series of natural and synthetic minerals of uranium carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxides including rutherfordine, zellerite, liebigite, phosphuranylite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, uranyl phosphate, sodium-uranyl-phosphate, bequerelite, clarkeite, curite, schoepite and compregnacite, and compared their spectral characteristics among these minerals as well as our previously published data on uranyl silicates. For the carbonate minerals, the fluorescence spectra depend on the stoichiometry of the mineral. For the phosphate minerals the fluorescence spectra closely resemble each other despite the differences in their composition and structure. For all uranium oxyhydroxides, the fluorescence spectra are largely red-shifted as compared with those of the uranium carbonates and phosphates and their vibronic bands are broadened and less resolved. The much enhanced spectra resolution at LHeT allows more accurate calculation of the O=U=O symmetrical stretch frequency, ν1, corresponding to the average spacing of the vibronic peaks of the fluorescence spectra and the spectral origin as reflected by the position of the first vibronic band. It was found that both the average ν1 and λ1 values correlate well with the average basicity of the inorganic anion.

  17. Subtelomeric rearrangements in Indian children with idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay: Frequency estimation & clinical correlation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shruthi; Koshy, Teena; Vekatachalam, Perumal; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Yesodharan, Dhanya; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Kumar, Jeevan; Ravichandran, Latha; Joseph, Santhosh; Chandrasekaran, Anupama; Paul, Solomon F. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Subtelomeres are prone to deleterious rearrangements owing to their proximity to unique sequences on the one end and telomeric repetitive sequences, which increase their tendency to recombine, on the other end. These subtelomeric rearrangements resulting in segmental aneusomy are reported to contribute to the aetiology of idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD). We undertook this study to estimate the frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements in children with ID/DD. Methods: One hundred and twenty seven children with idiopathic ID/DD were tested for subtelomeric rearrangements using karyotyping and FISH. Blood samples were cultured, harvested, fixed and GTG-banded using the standard protocols. Results: Rearrangements involving the subtelomeres were observed in 7.8 per cent of the tested samples. Detection of rearrangements visible at the resolution of the karyotype constituted 2.3 per cent, while those rearrangements detected only with FISH constituted 5.5 per cent. Five deletions and five unbalanced translocations were detected. Analysis of parental samples wherever possible was informative regarding the inheritance of the rearrangement. Interpretation & conclusions: The frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements observed in this study was within the reported range of 0-35 per cent. All abnormal genotypes were clinically correlated. Further analysis with array technologies presents a future prospect. Our results suggest the need to test individuals with ID/DD for subtelomeric rearrangements using sensitive methods such as FISH. PMID:27934799

  18. Subtelomeric rearrangements in Indian children with idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay: Frequency estimation & clinical correlation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Subtelomeres are prone to deleterious rearrangements owing to their proximity to unique sequences on the one end and telomeric repetitive sequences, which increase their tendency to recombine, on the other end. These subtelomeric rearrangements resulting in segmental aneusomy are reported to contribute to the aetiology of idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD. We undertook this study to estimate the frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements in children with ID/DD. Methods: One hundred and twenty seven children with idiopathic ID/DD were tested for subtelomeric rearrangements using karyotyping and FISH. Blood samples were cultured, harvested, fixed and GTG-banded using the standard protocols. Results: Rearrangements involving the subtelomeres were observed in 7.8 per cent of the tested samples. Detection of rearrangements visible at the resolution of the karyotype constituted 2.3 per cent, while those rearrangements detected only with FISH constituted 5.5 per cent. Five deletions and five unbalanced translocations were detected. Analysis of parental samples wherever possible was informative regarding the inheritance of the rearrangement. Interpretation & conclusions: The frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements observed in this study was within the reported range of 0-35 per cent. All abnormal genotypes were clinically correlated. Further analysis with array technologies presents a future prospect. Our results suggest the need to test individuals with ID/DD for subtelomeric rearrangements using sensitive methods such as FISH.

  19. Time-resolved rotational spectroscopy of para-difluorobenzene·Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, A.; Riehn, C.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Jarzeba, W.; Brutschy, B.

    2002-07-01

    We report on time-resolved rotational spectroscopy experiments of the cluster para-difluorobenzene·Ar ( pDFB·Ar) by picosecond laser pulses in a supersonic expansion. Rotational coherences of pDFB·Ar are generated by resonant electronic excitation and probed by time-resolved fluorescence depletion spectroscopy and time-resolved photoionization ((1+1') PPI) spectroscopy. The former allows the determination of both ground and excited state rotational constants, whereas the latter technique enables the separate study of the excited state with the benefit of mass-selective detection. Since pDFB·Ar represents a near symmetric oblate rotor, persistent J-type transients with tJ≈ n/2( A+ B) could be measured. From their analysis, (A″+B″)=2234.9±2 MHz and (A'+B')=2237.9±2 MHz were obtained. A structural investigation, based on data of the pDFB monomer, is presented resulting in a pDFB·Ar center-of-mass distance of both moieties of R z=3.543±0.017 Å with a change of ΔR z=-0.057±0.009 Å upon electronic excitation. These results are compared to data of former frequency-resolved experiments and ab initio computations.

  20. Fluorescence properties of meso-tetrafurylporphyrins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iti Gupta; M Ravikanth

    2005-03-01

    Fluorescence properties of meso-tetrafurylporphyrins with N4, N3S and N2S2 porphyrin cores are studied by both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques and compared with the corresponding meso-tetraarylporphyrins. The study shows that the replacement of six-membered aryl groups with five-membered furyl groups at meso-positions alter the fluorescence properties considerably, as reflected in the large red shifts and broadening of fluorescence bands with reduction in quantum yields and singlet excited-state lifetimes. However, zinc(II) derivatives of meso-tetrafurylporphyrin and mesotetraarylporphyrin did not show significant differences in their emission properties.

  1. Time-resolved imaging of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, L. K.; Dinish, U. S.; Ong, S. K.; Chao, Z. X.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2004-07-01

    Imaging of latent fingerprints using time-resolved (TR) method offers a broader platform to eliminate the unwanted background emission. In this paper, a novel TR imaging technique is demonstrated and implemented, which facilitates the detection of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Simulated experiments were carried out with two overlapping fingerprints treated with two fluorescent powders having different lifetimes in nanosecond range. The dependence of the fluorescence emission intensity in nanosecond resolution of TR imaging is also revealed.

  2. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer.

  3. Time-resolved chlorophyll fluorescence in forest decline research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneckenburger, H.; Schmidt, W. [Fachhochschule Aalen (Germany). Fachbereich Optoelektronik

    1997-12-01

    Aiming at clues of forest decline we studied prompt and delayed luminescence of spruce needles from the picosecond to the second time range using various self fabricated kinetic equipments including self written software. Both kinetics in the picosecond and in the seconds time range could be fitted by three exponentially decaying components yielding three amplitudes and three reaction constants each. Basically, all components showed a typical annual time course, independent of the degree of damage or air pollution. In addition, it turned out that on one hand the `slow` component of picosecond decay kinetics (decay time {tau}=2.0-3.5 ns) reflects some damage of the photosynthetic apparatus. Similarly, in long term delayed luminescence in the seconds time range the `fast` component (decay time {tau}=0.13 s) obviously carries some information on the spruces` vitality. Interestingly, all other components are scarcely affected. In the present report we present results obtained from gas exclusion experiments performed within so-called Open Top Chambers (OTC`s) at Edelmannshof, Welzheimer Wald. In general, all spruces showed the highest photosynthetic efficiencies but also the most pronounced stress symptoms during the summer period - probably due to high irradiance, drought and increased ozone concentrations. (orig.)

  4. Resolving-Power Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Starting with a general discussion, a program is sketched for a quantization based on dilations. This resolving-power quantization is simplest for scalar field theories. The hope is to find a way to relax the requirement of locality so that the necessity to fine tune mass parameters is eliminated while universality is still preserved.

  5. Operation: Inherent Resolve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer-Larsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet giver læseren indsigt i den internationale koalitions engagement mod IS igennem Operaton Inherent Resolve; herunder koalitionens strategi i forhold til IS strategi, ligesom det belyser kampagnens legalitet og folkeretlige grundlag, ligesom det giver et bud på overvejelser om kampagnens l...

  6. Resolving Disputes in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kenneth R.; Schrant, Nancy E.

    Because of the increasing incidence of disputes in schools, educators need more knowledge about methods of dispute resolution. The adversary system of resolving disputes, on which the U.S. judicial system is founded, assumes that truth is best found through a struggle between two opposing parties. In the adversary system, due process plays a…

  7. Fluorescence lifetimes: fundamentals and interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noomnarm, Ulai; Clegg, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements have been an established mainstay of photosynthesis experiments for many decades. Because in the photosynthesis literature the basics of excited states and their fates are not usually described, we have presented here an easily understandable text for biology students in the style of a chapter in a text book. In this review we give an educational overview of fundamental physical principles of fluorescence, with emphasis on the temporal response of emission. Escape from the excited state of a molecule is a dynamic event, and the fluorescence emission is in direct kinetic competition with several other pathways of de-excitation. It is essentially through a kinetic competition between all the pathways of de-excitation that we gain information about the fluorescent sample on the molecular scale. A simple probability allegory is presented that illustrates the basic ideas that are important for understanding and interpreting most fluorescence experiments. We also briefly point out challenges that confront the experimenter when interpreting time-resolved fluorescence responses.

  8. Fluorescent microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  9. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Alexander; Riemann, Iris; Stark, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro multiphoton imaging was used to perform high resolution optical sectioning of human hair by nonlinear excitation of endogenous as well as exogenous fluorophores. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) based on time-resolved single photon counting and near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse excitation was employed to analyze the various fluorescent hair components. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of intratissue pigments has the potential (i) to identify endogenous keratin and melanin, (ii) to obtain information on intrahair dye accumulation, (iii) to study bleaching effects, and (iv) to monitor the intratissue diffusion of pharmaceutical and cosmetical components along hair shafts.

  10. Time-resolved spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for depth analysis of diffusely scattering layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Dvořák, Patrick; Buijs, Joost B; Gooijer, Cees; Ariese, Freek

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to use time-resolved (TR) Raman spectroscopy, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), and a combination of these approaches to obtain high quality Raman spectra from materials hidden underneath an opaque layer. Both TR Raman and SORS are advanced techniques that allow for an increased relative selectivity of photons from deeper layers within a sample. Time-resolved detection reduces fluorescence background, and the selectivity for the second layer is improved. By combining this with spatially offset excitation we additionally increased selectivity for deeper layers. Test samples were opaque white polymer blocks of several mm thicknesses. Excitation was carried out with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser at 460 nm, 3 ps pulse width and 76 MHz repetition rate. Detection was either with a continuous-wave CCD camera or in time-resolved mode using an intensified CCD camera with a 250 ps gate width. The Raman photons were collected in backscatter mode, with or without lateral offset. By measuring the delay of the Raman signal from the second layer (polyethylene terephthalate/PET/Arnite), the net photon migration speeds through Teflon, polythene, Delrin and Nylon were determined. Raman spectra could be obtained from a second layer of PET through Teflon layers up to 7 mm of thickness. The ability to obtain chemical information through layers of diffusely scattering materials has powerful potential for biomedical applications.

  11. Lagragian 3D tracking of fluorescent microscopic objects under flow

    CERN Document Server

    Darnige, T; Bohec, P; Lindner, A; Clément, E

    2016-01-01

    We detail the elaboration of a tracking device mounted on an epifluorescent inverted microscope and suited to obtain time resolved 3D Lagrangian tracks of fluorescent micro-objects. The system is based on a real-time image processing driving a mechanical X-Y stage displacement and a Z refocusing piezo mover such as to keep the designed object at a fixed position in a moving frame. Track coordinates with respect to the microfluidic device, as well as images of the object in the laboratory reference frame are thus obtained at a frequency of several tenths of Hertz. This device is particularly adapted to follow the trajectory of motile micro-organisms in microfluidic devices with or without flow.

  12. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M.; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  13. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-03

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  14. Monitoring of labeled antisense oligonucleotides within living cells by using a multifrequency phase/modulation approach for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocisova, E.; Sureau, F.; Praus, P.; Rosenberg, I.; Stepanek, J.; Turpin, P.-Y.

    2003-06-01

    A multifrequency phase/modulation method has been developed for our UV confocal laser microspectrofluorimeter (modulation frequency 1-200 MHz) for fluorescence lifetime measurements. This technique enables excited state lifetimes of mixed fluorescent components to be resolved and the fluorescence spectral contribution of each species to be determined without using any model spectra. This approach is very efficient for analyzing intracellular multicomponent fluorescence signals. Our effort is focused on the elucidation of the intracellular behavior of synthetic modified oligonucleotides - potential drugs for antisense and/or antigene strategies of curing viral and malignant diseases. A novel type single stranded dT 15 oligomer analogue containing isopolar, non-isosteric, phosphonate-based internucleotide linkages (3'-O-P-CH 2-O-5'), labeled with tetramethylrhodamine dye at the 3'-end, has been utilized. This method, along with fluorescence micro-imaging, was used to monitor uptake, distribution and stability of our modified oligonucleotide inside living cells. Binding to Escort™ vector leads to an homogeneous intracellular distribution of fluorescent labeled oligonucleotide, including nucleus staining, while point distribution only is achieved for its free form.

  15. Intense fluorescence of Au 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chongqi; Harbich, Wolfgang; Sementa, Luca; Ghiringhelli, Luca; Aprá, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Brune, Harald

    2017-08-21

    Ligand-protected Au clusters are non-bleaching fluorescence markers in bio- and medical applications. We show that their fluorescence is an intrinsic property of the Au cluster itself. We find a very intense and sharp fluorescence peak located at λ =739.2 nm (1.68 eV) for Au20 clusters in a Ne matrix held at 6 K. The fluorescence reflects the HOMO-LUMO diabatic bandgap of the cluster. The cluster shows a very rich absorption fine structure reminiscent of well defined molecule-like quantum levels. These levels are resolved since Au20 has only one stable isomer (tetrahedral), therefore our sample is mono-disperse in cluster size and conformation. Density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations clarify the nature of optical absorptionand predict both main absorption peaks and intrinsic fluorescence in good agreement with experiment.

  16. [Fluorescent carbon dots and the application in biomedicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Gao, Hui-Le; Shen, Shun; Wang, Wei-Liang; Qian, Jun

    2014-09-01

    As a new type of carbon nanomaterials, fluorescent carbon dots (fluorescent CDs) have many advantages when compared with the traditional fluorescent probes. They are photoluminescence stable and resistance to photo bleaching. Moreover, they are excellent in biocompatibility, low-toxic and easy to modify. All these above make them a promising optical image material as a probe in optical image. This article reviews structure, the common carbon sources, the preparation methods, and the light-emitting principles of the carbon dots. We also introduce the research progress of fluorescent carbon dots in biomedicine, and the problems need to be resolved in the study of fluorescent CDs.

  17. Resolvability in Circulant Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad SALMAN; Imran JAVAID; Muhammad Anwar CHAUDHRY

    2012-01-01

    A set W of the vertices of a connected graph G is called a resolving set for G if for every two distinct vertices u,v ∈ V(G) there is a vertex w ∈ W such that d(u,w) ≠ d(v,w).A resolving set of minimum cardinality is called a metric basis for G and the number of vertices in a metric basis is called the metric dimension of G,denoted by dim(G).For a vertex u of G and a subset S of V(G),the distance between u and S is the number mins∈s d(u,s).A k-partition H ={S1,S2,...,Sk} of V(G) is called a resolving partition if for every two distinct vertices u,v ∈ V(G) there is a set Si in Π such that d(u,Si) ≠ d(v,Si).The minimum k for which there is a resolving k-partition of V(G) is called the partition dimension of G,denoted by pd(G).The circulant graph is a graph with vertex set Zn,an additive group ofintegers modulo n,and two vertices labeled i and j adjacent if and only if i - j (mod n) ∈ C,where C C Zn has the property that C =-C and 0(∈) C.The circulant graph is denoted by Xn,△ where A =|C|.In this paper,we study the metric dimension of a family of circulant graphs Xn,3 with connection set C ={1,-n/2,n - 1} and prove that dim(Xn,3) is independent of choice of n by showing that 3 for all n =0 (mod 4),dim(X,n,3) ={ 4 for all n =2 (mod 4).We also study the partition dimension of a family of circulant graphs Xn,4 with connection set C ={±1,±2} and prove that pd(Xn,4) is independent of choice of n and show that pd(X5,4) =5 and 3 forall odd n≥9,pd(Xn,4) ={ 4 for all even n ≥ 6 and n =7.

  18. Timing and Operating Mode Design for Time-Gated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Liu; Xinwei Wang; Yan Zhou; Yuliang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state fluorence imaging and time-resolved fluorescence imaging are two important areas in fluorescence imaging research. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is an absolute measurement method which is independent of excitation laser intensity, fluorophore concentration, and photobleaching compared to fluorescence intensity imaging techniques. Time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can provide high resolution and high imaging frame during mature FLIM methods. An abstract ti...

  19. Dual Brushless Resolver Rate Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A resolver rate sensor is disclosed in which dual brushless resolvers are mechanically coupled to the same output shaft. Diverse inputs are provided to each resolver by providing the first resolver with a DC input and the second resolver with an AC sinusoidal input. A trigonometric identity in which the sum of the squares of the sin and cosine components equal one is used to advantage in providing a sensor of increased accuracy. The first resolver may have a fixed or variable DC input to permit dynamic adjustment of resolver sensitivity thus permitting a wide range of coverage. In one embodiment of the invention the outputs of the first resolver are directly inputted into two separate multipliers and the outputs of the second resolver are inputted into the two separate multipliers, after being demodulated in a pair of demodulator circuits. The multiplied signals are then added in an adder circuit to provide a directional sensitive output. In another embodiment the outputs from the first resolver is modulated in separate modulator circuits and the output from the modulator circuits are used to excite the second resolver. The outputs from the second resolver are demodulated in separate demodulator circuit and added in an adder circuit to provide a direction sensitive rate output.

  20. Brief resolved unexplained event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arane, Karen; Claudius, Ilene; Goldman, Ran D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Question For many years, the term apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) was associated with sudden infant death syndrome, and parents who described an acute event in their infants were sent to the hospital for admission. I understand that for infants new terminology is recommended. What is the current approach to a near-death experience of an infant? Answer A recent clinical practice guideline revised the name and definition of an ALTE to a brief resolved unexplained event (BRUE). The diagnosis of BRUE in infants younger than 1 year of age is made when infants experience 1 of the following BRUE symptoms: a brief episode (ie, less than 1 minute and usually less than 20 to 30 seconds) that is entirely resolved (infant is at baseline), which remains unexplained after the history and physical examination are completed, and includes an event characterized by cyanosis or pallor; absent, decreased, or irregular breathing; hypertonia or hypotonia; or altered responsiveness. Low-risk infants should not be admitted to the hospital and overtesting is discouraged. PMID:28115439

  1. 农产品中黄曲霉毒素的时间分辨荧光免疫层析快速检测技术研究%Study on Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunochromatography for Afaltoxin Determination in Agricultural Product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆威; 李培武; 张奇; 丁小霞

    2014-01-01

    时间分辨荧光免疫层析检测技术灵敏度高、线性范围宽,重复性和稳定性好,是一种适合中国国情的实用快速检测技术,具有广阔的应用前景。%[Objective]Aflatoxin contaminates agricultural product severely, threatens health and life of people and livestocks. It is one of the major focus issues and attracts both governmental and social concerns. Thus, it is required to establish a rapid and sensitive determination method for aflatoxin. High specific and sensitive monoclonal antibody against aflatoxin has been developed. In this study, using the as-prepared monoclonal antibody against aflatoxin, the aim is to establish time-resolved fluorescence immunochromatography for afaltoxin determination in agricultural product, in order to provide technical support for agricultural product quality supervision and risk assessment. [Method] Herein, monoclonal antibody against aflatoxin was coupled with emulsion europium for labeling. With the home-made time-resolved fluorescence immunochromatographic strip, aflatoxin could be determined quantitatively, by using the signal value ratio of test line to control line and natural logarithm of concentration in standard aflatoxin solution. Regarding to various agricultural product samples (as peanut, rice and vegetable oil), an integration technology was developed that combined grinding and homogenization in one step. The methodological evaluation was conducted, in which aflatoxin in real agricultural products such as peanut, rice and vegetable oil. Moreover, these results via time-resolved fluorescence immunochromatography were compared with those via HPLC method. [Result] Results showed a detecting limit of 0.3μg·kg-1, a liner range of 0.8-25, 0.8-15, 0.8-30 μg·kg-1, for peanut, rice, plant oil, respectively. The standard curves were recorded as y=0.238x+0.654 (R2=0.992), y=0.321x+0.811 (R2=0.990), and y=0.146x+0.173 (R2=0.993), for peanut, rice, and plant oil, respectively

  2. Interaction of aromatic compounds with Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase: fluorescence anisotropy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryasheva, N.S.; Nemtseva, E.V.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, van A.

    2003-01-01

    The time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence techniques were employed to elucidate possible interactions of four aromatic compounds (anthracene, POPOP, MSB and 1,4-naphthalendiol) with bacterial luciferase. Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence anisotropy decays of these compounds were studied in

  3. One- and two-photon excited fluorescence lifetimes and anisotropy decays of green fluorescent proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We have used one- (OPE) and two-photon (TPE) excitation with time-correlated single-photon counting techniques to determine time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decays of the wild-type Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and two red-shifted mutants, S65T-GFP and RSGFP. WT-GFP and S65T-GFP exhibited a predominant approximately 3 ns monoexponential fluorescence decay, whereas for RSGFP the main lifetimes were approximately 1.1 ns (main component) and approximately 3.3 ns. The anisotr...

  4. Probing Local Environments by Time-Resolved Stimulated Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved stimulated emission spectroscopy was employed to probe the local environment of DASPMI (4-(4-(dimethylaminostyryl-N-methyl-pyridinium iodide in binary solvents of different viscosity and in a sol-gel matrix. DASPMI is one of the molecules of choice to probe local environments, and the dependence of its fluorescence emission decay on viscosity has been previously used for this purpose in biological samples, solid matrices as well as in solution. The results presented in this paper show that time-resolved stimulated emission of DASPMI is a suitable means to probe the viscosity of local environments. Having the advantage of a higher time resolution, stimulated emission can provide information that is complementary to that obtained from fluorescence decay measurements, making it feasible to probe systems with lower viscosity.

  5. Nanoprobes for super-resolution fluorescence imaging at the nanoscale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU ShangGuo; LIANG Le; DENG SuHui; CHEN JianFang; HUANG Qing; CHENG Ya; FAN ChunHai

    2014-01-01

    Compared with other imaging techniques,fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool to study cell biology due to its high compatibility with living cells.Owing to the resolution limit set by the diffraction of light,fluorescence microscopy could not resolve the nanostructures in the range of〈200 nm.Recently,many techniques have been emerged to overcome the diffraction barrier,providing nanometer spatial resolution.In the course of development,the progress in fluorescent probes has helped to promote the development of the high-resolution fluorescence nanoscopy.Here,we describe the contributions of the fluorescent probes to far-field super resolution imaging,focusing on concepts of the existing super-resolution nanoscopy based on the photophysics of fluorescent nanoprobes,like photoswitching,bleaching and blinking.Fluorescent probe technology is crucial in the design and implementation of super-resolution imaging methods.

  6. Measuring ultrashort pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebino, R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program is the development of techniques for the measurement of ultrafast events important in gas-phase combustion chemistry. Specifically, goals of this program include the development of fundamental concepts and spectroscopic techniques that will augment the information currently available with ultrafast laser techniques. Of equal importance is the development of technology for ultrafast spectroscopy. For example, methods for the production and measurement of ultrashort pulses at wavelengths important for these studies is an important goal. Because the specific vibrational motion excited in a molecule depends sensitively on the intensity, I(t), and the phase, {psi}(t), of the ultrashort pulse used to excite the motion, it is critical to measure both of these quantities for an individual pulse. Unfortunately, this has remained an unsolved problem for many years. Fortunately, this year, the authors present a technique that achieves this goal.

  7. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin George Abraham

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM.

  8. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-05

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  9. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  10. The fluorescence and dynamics properties in phenoxy-phthalocyanines liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cheng-Bao; Yan, Xiao-Yan; Tan, Ming-Yue; Li, Jin; Sun, Wen-Jun; Yang, Shou-Bin

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the one/two-photon fluorescence and excited state dynamics properties of two synthesized phenoxy-phthalocyanines (Pc1 and Pc2) using mild reaction coordination method. The results show that the fast decay component in the time-resolved fluorescence technique dynamics comes from the intramolecular vibrational relaxation, the slower ones from the internal conversion. Furthermore, in comparison with one-photon fluorescence spectra, the red shift of two-photon fluorescence spectra can be explained by the reabsorption effect of molecules. The samples are expected to be a potential candidate for optical applications and photodynamic therapy.

  11. 3D super-resolved in vitro multiphoton microscopy by saturation of excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Anh Dung; Bouwens, Arno; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Egrise, Dominique; Van Simayes, Gaetan; Emplit, Philippe; Goldman, Serge; Gorza, Simon-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a significant resolution enhancement beyond the conventional limit in multiphoton microscopy (MPM) using saturated excitation of fluorescence. Our technique achieves super-resolved imaging by temporally modulating the excitation laser-intensity and demodulating the higher harmonics from the saturated fluorescence signal. The improvement of the lateral and axial resolutions is measured on a sample of fluorescent microspheres. While the third harmonic already provides an enhanced resolution, we show that a further improvement can be obtained with an appropriate linear combination of the demodulated harmonics. Finally, we present in vitro imaging of fluorescent microspheres incorporated in HeLa cells to show that this technique performs well in biological samples.

  12. Resonance fluorescence and electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong

    2009-11-18

    The work presented in this dissertation contains the first observation of spin-resolved resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot and its application of direct measurement of electron spin dynamics. The Mollow triplet and the Mollow quintuplet, which are the hallmarks of resonance fluorescence, are presented as the non-spin-resolved and spin-resolved resonance fluorescence spectrum, respectively. The negligible laser background contribution, the near pure radiative broadened spectrum and the anti-bunching photon statistics imply the sideband photons are background-free and near transform-limited single photons. This demonstration is a promising step towards the heralded single photon generation and electron spin readout. Instead of resolving spectrum, an alternative spin-readout scheme by counting resonance fluorescence photons under moderate laser power is demonstrated. The measurements of n-shot time-resolved resonance fluorescence readout are carried out to reveal electron spin dynamics of the measurement induced back action and the spin relaxation. Hyperfine interaction and heavy-light hole mixing are identified as the relevant mechanisms for the back action and phonon-assistant spin-orbit interaction dominates the spin relaxation. After a detailed discussion on charge-spin configurations in coupled quantum dots system, the single-shot readout on electron spin are proposed. (orig.)

  13. Fluorescence of fullerene derivatives at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.K.; Shiu, L.L.; Chien, K.M.; Luh, T.Y.; Lin, T.I. (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1995-01-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of fullerene (C[sub 60]) and its derivatives C[sub 60]C[sub 4]H[sub 6], C[sub 60]C[sub 5]H[sub 6], C[sub 60]CHCO[sub 2]Et, and C[sub 60]NCO[sub 2]Et at room temperature were investigated. Breaking the structural symmetry of C[sub 60] results in enhancing the fluorescence quantum yield 2-3-fold in some derivatives. Thus, the room temperature fluorescence of fullerene compounds could be detected more rapidly. New absorption bands and altered fluorescence spectra were observed in the derivatives. The Stokes' shifts of the derivatives are small, about 4-5 nm, compared to 68 nm for the parent compound. The time-resolved fluorescence decay study indicates that all four fullerene derivatives have a single fluorescence lifetime of ca. 1.2-1.4 as, which is about the same as that for C[sub 60] (ca. 1.3 ns). Aliphatic solvents have little influence on the absorption or fluorescence spectral profile except on the extinction coefficient whereas aromatic and polar solvents strongly interact with the fullerene derivatives, causing a peak broadening effect. 31 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Novel Terbium Chelate Doped Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Qiaoyu; Meng Jianxin; Wang Haiming; Liu Yingliang; Man Shiqing

    2006-01-01

    Novel terbium chelate doped silica fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared and characterized.The preparation was carried out in water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion containing monomer precursor (pAB-DTPAA-APTEOS), Triton X-100, n-hexanol, and cyclohexane by controlling copolymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate and 3-aminopropyl-triethyloxysilane.The nanoparticles are spherical and uniform in size, about 30 nm in diameter, strongly fluorescent, and highly stable.The amino groups directly introduced to the surface of the nanoparticles using APTEOS during preparation made the surface modification and bioconjugation of the nanoparticles easier.The nanoparticles are expected as an efficient time-resolved luminescence biological label.

  15. Fluorescent Nanowire Ring Illumination for Wide-Field Far-Field Subdiffraction Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowei; Kuang, Cuifang; Hao, Xiang; Pang, Chenlei; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Ying; Yu, Chao; Xu, Yingke; Nan, Di; Shen, Weidong; Fang, Yue; He, Lenian; Liu, Xu; Yang, Qing

    2017-02-01

    Here we demonstrate an active method which pioneers in utilizing a combination of a spatial frequency shift and a Stokes frequency shift to enable wide-field far-field subdiffraction imaging. A fluorescent nanowire ring acts as a localized source and is combined with a film waveguide to produce omnidirectional illuminating evanescent waves. Benefitting from the high wave vector of illumination, the high spatial frequencies of an object can be shifted to the passband of a conventional imaging system, contributing subwavelength spatial information to the far-field image. A structure featuring 70-nm-wide slots spaced 70 nm apart has been resolved at a wavelength of 520 nm with a 0.85 numerical aperture standard objective based on this method. The versatility of this approach has been demonstrated by imaging integrated chips, Blu-ray DVDs, biological cells, and various subwavelength 2D patterns, with a viewing area of up to 1 0 0 0 μ m2 , which is one order of magnitude larger than the previous far-field and full-field nanoscopy methods. This new resolving technique is label-free, is conveniently integrated with conventional microscopes, and can potentially become an important tool in cellular biology, the on-chip industry, as well as other fields requiring wide-field nanoscale visualization.

  16. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope.

  17. Recognizing frequency characteristics of gas sensor array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel method based on independent component analyzing (ICA) in frequency domain to distinguish the frequency characteristics of multi-sensor system is presented. The conditions of this type of ICA are considered and each step of resolving the problem is discussed. For a two gas sensor array, the frequency characteristics including amplitude-frequency and phase-frequency are recognized by this method, and cross-sensitivity between them is also eliminated. From the principle of similarity, the recognition m...

  18. Angle resolved photoemission in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroff, Y.

    1983-02-01

    Bases of angular resolved photoemission: determination of the electronic band structure of solids (bulk), measurements of life-time and mean free path, determination of surfaces states (valence and core) and their relationship with surface reconstruction are described.

  19. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  20. RESOLVE and ECO: Survey Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Norman, Dara J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and galaxy interactions within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web, reaching down to dwarf galaxies of baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun and spanning multiple large-scale filaments, walls, and voids. RESOLVE is surrounded by the ~10x larger Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog, with matched custom photometry and environment metrics enabling analysis of cosmic variance with greater statistical power. For the ~1500 galaxies in its two equatorial footprints, RESOLVE goes beyond ECO in providing (i) deep 21cm data with adaptive sensitivity ensuring HI mass detections or upper limits designed to complement other radio and optical surveys in providing diverse, contiguous, and uniform local/global environment data as well as unusually high completeness extending into the gas-dominated dwarf galaxy regime. RESOLVE also offers superb reprocessed photometry including full, deep NUV coverage and synergy with other equatorial surveys as well as unique northern and southern facilities such as Arecibo, the GBT, and ALMA. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614.

  1. Resolving the formation of modern Chladni figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, P. H.; Tung, J. C.; Liang, H. C.; Chiang, P. Y.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2015-09-01

    The resonant spectrum of a thin plate driven with a mechanical oscillator is precisely measured to distinguish modern Chladni figures (CFs) observed at the resonant frequencies from classical CFs observed at the non-resonant frequencies. Experimental results reveal that modern CFs generally display an important characteristic of avoided crossings of nodal lines, whereas the nodal lines of classical CFs form a regular grid. The formation of modern CFs and the resonant frequency spectrum are resolved with a theoretical model that characterizes the interaction between the plate and the driving source into the inhomogeneous Kirchhoff-Love equation. The derived formula for determining resonant frequencies is shown to be exactly identical to the meromorphic function given in singular billiards that deals with the coupling strength on the transition between integrable and chaotic features. The good agreement between experimental results and theoretical predictions verifies the significant role of the strong-coupling effect in the formation of modern CFs. More importantly, it is confirmed that the apparatus for generating modern CFs can be developed to serve as an expedient system for exploring the nodal domains of chaotic wave functions as well as the physics of the strong coupling with a point scatterer.

  2. Depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer based on structured light illumination and Fourier transform interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heejin; Wadduwage, Dushan; Matsudaira, Paul T; So, Peter T C

    2014-10-01

    A depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer can provide depth resolved imaging both in the spatial and the spectral domain. Images acquired through a standard imaging Fourier transform spectrometer do not have the depth-resolution. By post processing the spectral cubes (x, y, λ) obtained through a Sagnac interferometer under uniform illumination and structured illumination, spectrally resolved images with depth resolution can be recovered using structured light illumination algorithms such as the HiLo method. The proposed scheme is validated with in vitro specimens including fluorescent solution and fluorescent beads with known spectra. The system is further demonstrated in quantifying spectra from 3D resolved features in biological specimens. The system has demonstrated depth resolution of 1.8 μm and spectral resolution of 7 nm respectively.

  3. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  4. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  5. Effect of quencher and temperature on fluorescence intensity of laser dyes: DETC and C504T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Basavaraja; Inamdar, S. R.; Kumar, H. M. Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching of 7- Diethylamino-3-thenoylcoumarin (DETC) and 2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1,1,7,7-tetramethyl11-oxo-1H,5H,11H- [1]benzopyrano[6,7,8-ij]quinolizine-10-carboxylic acid, ethyl ester (C504T) by aniline(AN), dimethylaniline (DMA) and diethylaniline (DEA) was investigated in toluene by steady state and transient methods. The quenching parameters like frequency of encounter (kd), probability of quenching per encounter (p), quenching rate parameters (kq) and activation energy of quenching (Ea) were determined experimentally. The kq values determined by steady state and time-resolved methods for the both dyes were found to be same, indicating the dynamic nature of interaction. Magnitudes of p and Ea suggested that the quenching reaction is predominantly controlled by material diffusion. The quenching mechanism is rationalized in terms of electron transfer (ET) from donors (aromatic amines) to the acceptors (coumarin derivatives) confirmed by correlating kq with free energy changes (ΔG°). Further, an effect of temperature on fluorescence intensity was carried out in toluene and methanol solvents. Fluorescence intensity of both the dyes decreases with increase in temperature. Temperature quenching in case of C504T is due to intersystem crossing S1 → T2, whereas for DETC, quenching is due to intersystem crossing S1 → T2 and ICT → TICT transition.

  6. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the molecul

  7. Two-dimensional fluorescence correlation spectroscopy IV: Resolution of fluorescence of tryptophan residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Hiroaki; Nakashima, Kenichi; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Noda, Isao

    2006-11-01

    Generalized two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence correlation spectroscopy has been used to resolve the fluorescence spectra of two tryptophan (Trp) residues in alcohol dehydrogenase and lysozyme. In each protein, one Trp residue is buried in a hydrophobic domain of the protein matrix and the other Trp residue is located at a hydrophilic domain close to the protein-water interface. Fluorescence quenching by iodide ion, a hydrophilic quencher, was employed as a perturbation to induce the intensity change in the spectra. The Trp residue which is located at the hydrophilic domain is effectively quenched by the quencher, while the Trp residue located at the hydrophobic domain is protected from the quenching. Therefore, the fluorescence of these two Trp residues have a different sensitivity to the quenching, showing a different response to the concentration of the quencher. Fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues in alcohol dehydrogenase, which are heavily overlapped in conventional one-dimensional spectra, have been successfully resolved by the 2D correlation technique. From the asynchronous correlation map, it was revealed that the quenching of Trp located at the hydrophobic part was brought about after that of Trp located at the hydrophilic part. In contrast, the fluorescence spectra of the two Trp residues could not be resolved after the alcohol dehydrogenase was denatured with guanidine hydrochloride. These results are consistent with the well-known structure of alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was elucidated that the present 2D analysis is not interfered by Raman bands of the solvent, which sometimes bring difficulty into the conventional fluorescence analysis. Fluorescence spectra of the Trp residues in lysozyme could not be resolved by the 2D correlation technique. The differences between the two proteins are attributed to the fact that the Trp residue in the hydrophobic site of lysozyme is not sufficiently protected from the quenching.

  8. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  9. Fluorescence spectral studies of Gum Arabic: Multi-emission of Gum Arabic in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenadhayalan, Namasivayam, E-mail: ndhena@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mythily, Rajan, E-mail: rajanmythily@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India); Kumaran, Rajendran, E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Gum Arabic (GA), a food hydrocolloid is a natural composite obtained from the stems and branches of Acacia Senegal and Acacia Seyal trees. GA structure is made up of highly branched arabinogalactan polysaccharides. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence spectral studies of acid hydrolyzed GA solutions were carried out at various pH conditions. The fluorescence in GA is predominantly attributed to the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine amino acids. The presence of multi-emissive peaks at different pH condition is attributed to the exposure of the fluorescing amino acids to the aqueous phase, which contains several sugar units, hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of GA exhibits a multi-exponential decay with different fluorescence lifetime of varying amplitude which confirms that tyrosine is confined to a heterogeneous microenvironment. The existence of multi-emissive peaks with large variation in the fluorescence intensities were established by 3D emission contour spectral studies. The probable location of the fluorophore in a heterogeneous environment was further ascertained by constructing a time-resolved emission spectrum (TRES) and time-resolved area normalized emission spectrum (TRANES) plots. Fluorescence spectral technique is used as an analytical tool in understanding the photophysical properties of a water soluble complex food hydrocolloid containing an intrinsic fluorophore located in a multiple environment is illustrated. - Highlights: • The Manuscript deals with the steady state absorption, emission, fluorescence lifetime and time-resolved emission spectrum studies of Gum Arabic in aqueous medium at various pH conditions. • The fluorescence emanates from the tyrosine amino acid present in GA. • Change in pH results in marked variation in the fluorescence spectral properties of tyrosine. • Fluorescence spectral techniques are employed as a tool in establishing the

  10. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States)

    2015-12-09

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP11(2015)072 smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  11. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  12. Resolving Boosted Jets with XCone

    CERN Document Server

    Thaler, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies---dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs---that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  13. Fluorescence self-quenching of tetraphenylporphyrin in liquid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Mihir [Integrated Science Education and Research Centre, Siksha-Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Nath, Sukhendu [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Hajra, Alakananda [Department of Chemistry, Siksha-Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Sinha, Subrata, E-mail: subratasinha67@rediffmail.com [Integrated Science Education and Research Centre, Siksha-Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2013-09-15

    Self-quenching of the fluorescence emission of tetraphenylporphyrin at high concentrations in toluene at the ambient temperature (300 K) is discussed in detail based on steady state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The fluorescence self-quenching is mainly attributed to re-absorption effect and the Förster type resonance energy transfer process (homotransfer). The re-absorption effect is found to deform the fluorescence emission spectra significantly in energy positions as well as relative intensities of different peaks at high concentrations. Nearly ideal fluorescence emission spectra are observed at a concentration ∼10{sup −7} mol/L. Moreover, there is an apparent enhancement of the fluorescence lifetime value of tetraphenylporphyrin in toluene at high concentrations, especially on the blue side of the fluorescence emission spectra. To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first detail report on the fluorescence self-quenching of porphyrins in liquid medium. This finding carries great importance in view of the widespread research on porphyrins in the fields of solar light harvesting, artificial photosynthesis, photodynamic therapy, etc. -- Highlights: • The effect of concentration on the fluorescence emission spectra of tetraphenylporphyrin (TPhP) in toluene at 300 K is investigated by using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. • Both re-absorption effect and the Förster type resonance energy transfer are found to be responsible for the observed fluorescence self-quenching at high concentrations. • These investigations are extremely important in view of the extensive applications of porphyrins in the fabrication of molecular electronic devices, especially for solar and artificial photosynthetic devices, where highly concentrated porphyrins are often used for efficient light harvesting.

  14. Phase-Resolved Spectra of PSR B0525+21 and PSR B2020+28

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. L. Chen; H. G. Wang; N. Wang

    2011-03-01

    Using the published data of multi-frequency time-aligned pulse profiles from Kuzmin et al. (1998), we calculate the phase-resolved spectra of PSRs B0525+21 and B2020+28. The results reveal that conaldouble pulsars have common `M’-shaped phase-resolved spectra.

  15. Time-resolved flowfield measurements in a turbine stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, J. L.

    1985-06-01

    Time-resolved flowfield measurements for a 0.5-meter diameter, high work transonic turbine have been completed in the MIT Turbine Blowdown Facility (TBF). Measurements were taken: to determine the blade-to-blade total temperature profile for comparison with predictions from the Euler turbine equation; to determine the effect of using time-averaged pressures to calculate turbine performance; and to provide a complete set of time-resolved turbine stage data. A preliminary objective (given a 6 kHz blade passing frequency) was to determine the frequency response characteristics of the instrumentation used to make the flowfield measurements. A shock tube was built for this purpose. Measurements were taken with high-frequency response instrumentation including a dual-hot-wire aspirating probe, a four-way angle probe, and two cobra head total pressure probes incorporating silicon diaphragm pressure transducers. The aspirating probe is found to have a natural frequency of 15.5 kHz in the test gas with a damping ratio of 0.36; the angle probe a characteristic frequency of 45 kHz with a settling time of 18 usec. Both results are satisfactory for application in the TBF. The measured total temperature profile shows a peak-to-peak variation of 65 C (20%) and a characteristic frequency twice that of the blade passing frequency.

  16. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  17. Healthcare Teams Neurodynamically Reorganize When Resolving Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Stevens

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on the microscale neural dynamics of social interactions has yet to be translated into improvements in the assembly, training and evaluation of teams. This is partially due to the scale of neural involvements in team activities, spanning the millisecond oscillations in individual brains to the minutes/hours performance behaviors of the team. We have used intermediate neurodynamic representations to show that healthcare teams enter persistent (50–100 s neurodynamic states when they encounter and resolve uncertainty while managing simulated patients. Each of the second symbols was developed situating the electroencephalogram (EEG power of each team member in the contexts of those of other team members and the task. These representations were acquired from EEG headsets with 19 recording electrodes for each of the 1–40 Hz frequencies. Estimates of the information in each symbol stream were calculated from a 60 s moving window of Shannon entropy that was updated each second, providing a quantitative neurodynamic history of the team’s performance. Neurodynamic organizations fluctuated with the task demands with increased organization (i.e., lower entropy occurring when the team needed to resolve uncertainty. These results show that intermediate neurodynamic representations can provide a quantitative bridge between the micro and macro scales of teamwork.

  18. Reductive fluorescence quenching of DMP with aniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asha Jhonsi, M. [B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Vandalur, Chennai 600048, Tamil Nadu (India); Kathiravan, A., E-mail: akathir23@hotmail.com [National Centre for Ultrafast Processes, University of Madras, Taramani Campus, Chennai 600113, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-01-15

    The photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between 8-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,5-di[(E)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]-1,2,3,5,6, 7-hexahydrodicyclopenta[b,e]pyridine (DMP) and aniline is studied in acetonitrile medium by using steady state and time resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. Bimolecular quenching rate constants (k{sub q}) were calculated from the obtained linear Stern–Volmer plots from both steady state and time resolved measurements. The rate constant (k{sub q}) for PET between DMP and aniline is 1.4×10{sup 10} M{sup −1} s{sup −1}, which is in diffusion control limit. The free energy change (ΔG{sup 0}) has been evaluated by using Rehm–Weller equation for the evidence of electron transfer from aniline to DMP. Direct evidence for the electron transfer reaction in the present system has been obtained by characterizing the aniline cation radical using nanosecond time resolved absorption measurements in the visible region. Further, this quenching mechanism is attributed to be reductive in nature i.e. electron transfer occurs from ground state aniline to excited DMP. This is the first example of reductive fluorescence quenching of DMP with aniline in acetonitrile ever known. -- Highlights: • Photoinduced electron transfer between DMP and aniline using time resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy has been investigated. • Reductive quenching behavior was observed. • Direct evidence for the ET reaction in the present system has been obtained by characterizing the aniline cation radical.

  19. Cervical cancer detection by time-resolved spectra of blood components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaivani, Rudran; Masilamani, Vadivel; AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Ramamurthy, P.; Palled, Siddanna R.; Ganesh, K. M.

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence spectral techniques are very sensitive, and hence they are gaining importance in cancer detection. The biomarkers indicative of cancer could be identified and quantified by spectral or time domain fluorescence spectroscopy. The results of an investigation of time-resolved spectra of cellular components of blood obtained from cervical cancer patients and normal controls are given. The cancer indicative biomarker in this paper is porphyrin; it has a fluorescence decay time of 60% more in samples of cancer patients than those of normal controls. Based on such measurements, a randomized set comprising samples from cancer patients and controls (N=27 in total) could be classified with sensitivity (92%) and specificity (86%).

  20. Space-Time Resolved Capillary Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Berhanu, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We report experiments on the full space and time resolved statistics of capillary wave turbulence at the air-water interface. The three-dimensional shape of the free interface is measured as a function of time by using the optical method of Diffusing Light Photography associated with a fast camera. Linear and nonlinear dispersion relations are extracted from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of wave amplitude. When wave turbulence regime is reached, we observe power-law spectra both in frequency and in wave number, whose exponents are found in agreement with the predictions of capillary wave turbulence theory. Finally, the temporal dynamics of the spatial energy spectrum highlights the occurrence of stochastic bursts transferring wave energy through the spatial scales.

  1. Time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Schwämmle, Veit; Sylvester, Marc

    2012-01-01

    proteins involved in the Ang-(1-7) signaling, we performed a mass spectrometry-based time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteome study of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) treated with Ang-(1-7). We identified 1288 unique phosphosites on 699 different proteins with 99% certainty of correct peptide...

  2. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  3. Resolving Ethical Issues at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninga, Jacques S.

    2013-01-01

    Although ethical dilemmas are a constant in teachers' lives, the profession has offered little in the way of training to help teachers address such issues. This paper presents a framework, based on developmental theory, for resolving professional ethical dilemmas. The Four-Component Model of Moral Maturity, when used in conjunction with a…

  4. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair); Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  5. Fluorescence enhancement of photoswitchable metal ion sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Georgina; Heng, Sabrina; Abell, Andrew D.

    2016-12-01

    Spiropyran-based fluorescence sensors are an ideal target for intracellular metal ion sensing, due to their biocompatibility, red emission frequency and photo-controlled reversible analyte binding for continuous signal monitoring. However, increasing the brightness of spiropyran-based sensors would extend their sensing capability for live-cell imaging. In this work we look to enhance the fluorescence of spiropyran-based sensors, by incorporating an additional fluorophore into the sensor design. We report a 5-membered monoazacrown bearing spiropyran with metal ion specificity, modified to incorporate the pyrene fluorophore. The effect of N-indole pyrene modification on the behavior of the spiropyran molecule is explored, with absorbance and fluorescence emission characterization. This first generation sensor provides an insight into fluorescence-enhancement of spiropyran molecules.

  6. FLEX: fluorescence explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Marc-Ph.; Court, Andrew; Smorenburg, Kees; Visser, Huib; Crocco, Luiggi; Heilimo, Jyro; Honig, Andre

    1999-12-01

    FLEX is a scientifically driven space mission to provide demonstration/validation of the instrumentation and technique for measuring the natural fluorescence of vegetation in the Fraunhofer lines. The payload consists of high spectral resolution (0.1 - 0.3 nm) CCD imaging grating spectrometer with two channels: one in the red (648 - 664 nm) and one in the blue (391 - 438 nm) for working with several Fraunhofer lines. The across track FOV is 8.4 degrees; ground spatial resolution is better than 0.5 X 0.5 km2. To increase the S/N ratio a steering mirror will be used, if necessary, to 'freeze' the image and also to provide plus or minus 4 degrees across track depointing. Calibration is made by viewing the sun via a diffuser plate switched into the telescope field of view. A separate CCD camera will allow cloud detection and scene identification. A TIR radiometer will provide simultaneous surface temperature measurements. The spacecraft, overall mass estimated at 200 kg, is derived from the ASI-MITA bus which provides all the necessary subsystems and stabilized platform. By use of on-board storage, ground requirements for satellite control and data link are minimized; the possibility of local stations for real time reception/distribution is also envisaged. Provisional orbit characteristics are: LEO sun synchronous, 500 - 900 km altitude. Priority will be given to highest revisit frequency on a sufficient number of selected test sites.

  7. Cytogenetic effects in children and mothers exposed to air pollution assessed by the frequency of micronuclei and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a family pilot study in the Czech Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Vinzents, Peter; Petersen, Joergen Holm

    2006-01-01

    A family pilot study was conducted in the Czech Republic to test the hypothesis that exposure to air pollution with particulate matter (PM) in children results in detectable effects indicated by a number of biomarkers of exposure and early effects. The frequency of micronuclei (MN) in peripheral...... of air pollution, especially during winter, and compared with a population from the rural area of Prachatice in Southern Bohemia. Significant higher frequencies of MN were found in the younger children living in the Teplice area as compared with those living in the Prachatice area (7.0+/-2.3 per thousand...... with elevated carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs) concentration of the PM(2.5) measured in the ambient Teplice air, but other factors like genotoxic compounds from the diet or protective effect of micronutrients, which was not addressed in this pilot study, may also differ between the two...

  8. U(IV) fluorescence spectroscopy. A new speciation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Susanne; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Steudtner, Robin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2017-06-01

    We combined absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy to study the speciation of U(IV) in solution in concentrations down to 10{sup -6} M uranium. With our time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence setup we could determine the fluorescence decay time of U(IV) in perchloric as well as in chloric acid with 2.6 ± 0.3 ns at room temperature and 148.4 ± 6.5 ns at liquid nitrogen temperature. For the U(IV) sulfate system, we observed a bathochromic shift and a peak shape modification in the fluorescence spectra with increasing sulfate concentration in solution. Thus, the potential of U(IV) fluorescence for speciation analysis could be proven.

  9. Quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence induced by silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, A. M.; Mezacasa, A. V.; Graciano, D. E.; Falco, W. F.; M'Peko, J.-C.; Guimarães, F. E. G.; Lawson, T.; Colbeck, I.; Oliveira, S. L.; Caires, A. R. L.

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between chlorophyll (Chl) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was evaluated by analyzing the optical behavior of Chl molecules surrounded by different concentrations of AgNPs (10, 60, and 100 nm of diameter). UV-Vis absorption, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements were performed for Chl in the presence and absence of these nanoparticles. AgNPs strongly suppressed the Chl fluorescence intensity at 678 nm. The Stern-Volmer constant (KSV) showed that fluorescence suppression is driven by the dynamic quenching process. In particular, KSV was nanoparticle size-dependent with an exponential decrease as a function of the nanoparticle diameter. Finally, changes in the Chl fluorescence lifetime in the presence of nanoparticles demonstrated that the fluorescence quenching may be induced by the excited electron transfer from the Chl molecules to the metal nanoparticles.

  10. Resonance Fluorescence from an Artificial Atom in Squeezed Vacuum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toyli, D. M; Eddins, A. W; Boutin, S; Puri, S; Hover, D; Bolkhovsky, V; Oliver, W. D; Blais, A; Siddiqi, I

    2016-01-01

    .... We strongly couple microwave-frequency squeezed light to a superconducting artificial atom and detect the resulting fluorescence with high resolution enabled by a broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifier...

  11. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of organic-plasmonic hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Fiutowski, Jacek

    We study the optical properties of organic thin films and crystalline organic nanofibers as well as their interaction with plasmonic materials by means of laser-scanning fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TR-PLS). The aim of our......-carrier dynamics in such systems. In this contribution we will show how the interaction of organic nanofibers placed on top of regular arrays of nanostructures leads to a significantly enhanced second-harmonic response and, at the same time, an increased decay rate of the photoluminescence lifetime....

  12. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity assay with time-resolved fluorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建中; 章竹君; 金伯泉; 田方

    1996-01-01

    A new time-resolved fluorimetric method for the measurement of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity has been developed by labelling the target cell K562 with a new synthesized fluorescence marker KLUK. The method has advantages of higher sensitivity, time-saving, good reproducibility and has no radioactivity problems. A satisfactory result is obtained by comparing it with 51Cr release method. It demonstrates that the new marker provides an alternative to currently used radioactive markers for the assessment of in vitro cellular cytotoxicity.

  13. Dynamic fluorescence quenching of quinine sulfate dication by chloride ion in ionic and neutral micellar environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sunita; Varma Y, Tej Varma; Pant, Debi D.

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescence quenching of Quinine sulfate dication (QSD) by chloride-ion (Cl-) in micellar environments of anionic, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and neutral, triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous phase has been investigated by time-resolved and steady- state fluorescence measurements. The quenching follows linear Stern-Volmer relation in micellar solutions and is dynamic in nature.

  14. All Fiber-optic Fluorescent Spectral Measurement and Analysis on Alga Chla/c Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The fluorescent principle used for measuring alga characteristic parameters and the optimum structure design of the instrument are discussed. The fluorescent spectrum of Chla/c and the time-resolved different spectrum ΔA(λ,t) are given. The research provides an effective method for considering the density and the classification of algae, which will be helpful to monitor sea pollution.

  15. Ultrafast polarized fluorescence measurements on monomeric and self-associated melittin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, A.; Larsen, O.F.A.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Grondelle, van R.; Kraayenhof, R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    The anisotropic and magic-angle fluorescence decay of the single tryptophan (Trp) residue of melittin, a bee venom peptide, was investigated by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy using a streak camera setup. The peptide was dissolved either in distilled water or in Hepes/NaOH buffer containing lo

  16. Spectrally And Temporally Resolved Low-Light Level Video Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, John E.; Furukawa, Ruth; Fechheimer, Marcus

    1989-12-01

    The IDG law-light video microscope system was designed to aid studies of localization of subcellular luminescence sources and stimulus/response coupling in single living cells using luminescent probes. Much of the motivation for design of this instrument system came from the pioneering efforts of Dr. Reynolds (Reynolds, Q. Rev. Biophys. 5, 295-347; Reynolds and Taylor, Bioscience 30, 586-592) who showed the value of intensified video camera systems for detection and localizion of fluorescence and bioluminescence signals from biological tissues. Our instrument system has essentially two roles, 1) localization and quantitation of very weak bioluminescence signals and 2) quantitation of intracellular environmental characteristics such as pH and calcium ion concentrations using fluorescent and bioluminescent probes. The instrument system exhibits over one million fold operating range allowing visualization and enhancement of quantum limited images with quantum limited response, spectral analysis of fluorescence signals, and transmitted light imaging. The computer control of the system implements rapid switching between light regimes, spatially resolved spectral scanning, and digital data processing for spectral shape analysis and for detailed analysis of the statistical distribution of single cell measurements. The system design and software algorithms used by the system are summarized. These design criteria are illustrated with examples taken from studies of bioluminescence, applications of bioluminescence to study developmental processes and gene expression in single living cells, and applications of fluorescent probes to study stimulus/response coupling in living cells.

  17. A 3-D fluorescence imaging system incorporating structured illumination technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antos, L.; Emord, P.; Luquette, B.; McGee, B.; Nguyen, D.; Phipps, A.; Phillips, D.; Helguera, M.

    2010-02-01

    A currently available 2-D high-resolution, optical molecular imaging system was modified by the addition of a structured illumination source, OptigridTM, to investigate the feasibility of providing depth resolution along the optical axis. The modification involved the insertion of the OptigridTM and a lens in the path between the light source and the image plane, as well as control and signal processing software. Projection of the OptigridTM onto the imaging surface at an angle, was resolved applying the Scheimpflug principle. The illumination system implements modulation of the light source and provides a framework for capturing depth resolved mages. The system is capable of in-focus projection of the OptigridTM at different spatial frequencies, and supports the use of different lenses. A calibration process was developed for the system to achieve consistent phase shifts of the OptigridTM. Post-processing extracted depth information using depth modulation analysis using a phantom block with fluorescent sheets at different depths. An important aspect of this effort was that it was carried out by a multidisciplinary team of engineering and science students as part of a capstone senior design program. The disciplines represented are mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and imaging science. The project was sponsored by a financial grant from New York State with equipment support from two industrial concerns. The students were provided with a basic imaging concept and charged with developing, implementing, testing and validating a feasible proof-of-concept prototype system that was returned to the originator of the concept for further evaluation and characterization.

  18. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Uptake for Brain Tumor Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tréhin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delineation of tumor margins is vital to the successful surgical resection of brain tumors. We have previously developed a multimodal nanoparticle CLIO-Cy5.5, which is detectable by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence, to assist in intraoperatively visualizing tumor boundaries. Here we examined the accuracy of tumor margin determination of orthotopic tumors implanted in hosts with differing immune responses to the tumor. Using a nonuser-based signal intensity method applied to fluorescent micrographs of 9L gliosarcoma green fluorescent protein (GFP tumors, mean overestimations of 2 and 24 µm were obtained using Cy5.5 fluorescence, compared to the true tumor margin determined by GFP fluorescence, in nude mice and rats, respectively. To resolve which cells internalized the nanoparticle and to quantitate degree of uptake, tumors were disaggregated and cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticle uptake was seen in both CD11b+ cells (representing activated microglia and macrophages and tumor cells in both animal models by both methods. CD11b+ cells were predominantly found at the tumor margin in both hosts, but were more pronounced at the margin in the rat model. Additional metastatic (CT26 colon and primary (Gli36 glioma brain tumor models likewise demonstrated that the nanoparticle was internalized both by tumor cells and by host cells. Together, these observations suggest that fluorescent nanoparticles provide an accurate method of tumor margin estimation based on a combination of tumor cell and host cell uptake for primary and metastatic tumors in animal model systems and offer potential for clinical translation.

  19. Approaches to resolving trade disputes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D W; Thiermann, A B

    2003-08-01

    The authors discuss the various approaches to resolving trade disputes available to Member Countries of the OIE (World organisation for animal health). The paper first describes the rights and obligations of Member Countries in setting health measures for the importation of animals and animal products, according to the provisions of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the SPS Agreement). The authors indicate how OIE standards may be used to set import measures and introduce issues such as equivalence and the use of provisional measures, which are both areas of potential conflict. The authors then describe the options available for resolving disputes--bilateral discussions, mediation through the OIE, the use of the WTO SPS Committee and the formal WTO dispute settlement process, discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

  20. Fluorescence kinetics of Trp-Trp dipeptide and its derivatives in water via ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Menghui; Yi, Hua; Chang, Mengfang; Cao, Xiaodan; Li, Lei; Zhou, Zhongneng; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Sanjun; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of Tryptophan-Tryptophan (Trp-Trp/Trp2) dipeptide and its derivatives in water have been investigated using a picosecond resolved time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) apparatus together with a femtosecond resolved upconversion spectrophotofluorometer. The fluorescence decay profiles at multiple wavelengths were fitted by a global analysis technique. Nanosecond fluorescence kinetics of Trp2, N-tert-butyl carbonyl oxygen-N'-aldehyde group-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan (NBTrp2), l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (Trp2Me), and N-acetyl-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (NATrp2Me) exhibit multi-exponential decays with the average lifetimes of 1.99, 3.04, 0.72 and 1.22ns, respectively. Due to the intramolecular interaction between two Trp residues, the "water relaxation" lifetime was observed around 4ps, and it is noticed that Trp2 and its derivatives also exhibit a new decay with a lifetime of ∼100ps, while single-Trp fluorescence decay in dipeptides/proteins shows 20-30ps. The intramolecular interaction lifetime constants of Trp2, NBTrp2, Trp2Me and NATrp2Me were then calculated to be 3.64, 0.93, 11.52 and 2.40ns, respectively. Candidate mechanisms (including heterogeneity, solvent relaxation, quasi static self-quenching or ET/PT quenching) have been discussed.

  1. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  2. Resolved observations of transition disks

    CERN Document Server

    Casassus, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Resolved observations are bringing new constraints on the origin of radial gaps in protoplanetary disks. The kinematics, sampled in detail in one case-study, are indicative of non-Keplerian flows, corresponding to warped structures and accretion which may both play a role in the development of cavities. Disk asymmetries seen in the radio continuum are being interpreted in the context of dust segregation via aerodynamic trapping. We summarise recent observational progress, and also describe prospects for improvements in the near term.

  3. Nanoscopic Visualization of Soft Matter Using Fluorescent Diarylethene Photoswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskyi, Oleksii; Sysoiev, Dmytro; Oppermann, Alex; Huhn, Thomas; Wöll, Dominik

    2016-10-04

    The in situ imaging of soft matter is of paramount importance for a detailed understanding of functionality on the nanoscopic scale. Although super-resolution fluorescence microscopy methods with their unprecedented imaging capabilities have revolutionized research in the life sciences, this potential has been far less exploited in materials science. One of the main obstacles for a more universal application of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy methods is the limitation of readily available suitable dyes to overcome the diffraction limit. Here, we report a novel diarylethene-based photoswitch with a highly fluorescent closed and a nonfluorescent open form. Its photophysical properties, switching behavior, and high photostability make the dye an ideal candidate for photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM). It is capable of resolving apolar structures with an accuracy far beyond the diffraction limit of optical light in cylindrical micelles formed by amphiphilic block copolymers.

  4. Background suppression in fluorescence nanoscopy with stimulated emission double depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Prunsche, Benedikt; Zhou, Lu; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence nanoscopy is a powerful super-resolution imaging technique based on the confinement of fluorescence emission to the central subregion of an observation volume through de-excitation of fluorophores in the periphery via stimulated emission. Here, we introduce stimulated emission double depletion (STEDD) as a method to selectively remove artificial background intensity. In this approach, a first, conventional STED pulse is followed by a second, delayed Gaussian STED pulse that specifically depletes the central region, thus leaving only background. Thanks to time-resolved detection we can remove this background intensity voxel by voxel by taking the weighted difference of photons collected before and after the second STED pulse. STEDD thus yields background-suppressed super-resolved images as well as STED-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data. Furthermore, the proposed method is also beneficial when considering lower-power, less redshifted depletion pulses.

  5. Weak Total Resolvability In Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casel Katrin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A vertex v ∈ V (G is said to distinguish two vertices x, y ∈ V (G of a graph G if the distance from v to x is di erent from the distance from v to y. A set W ⊆ V (G is a total resolving set for a graph G if for every pair of vertices x, y ∈ V (G, there exists some vertex w ∈ W − {x, y} which distinguishes x and y, while W is a weak total resolving set if for every x ∈ V (G−W and y ∈ W, there exists some w ∈ W −{y} which distinguishes x and y. A weak total resolving set of minimum cardinality is called a weak total metric basis of G and its cardinality the weak total metric dimension of G. Our main contributions are the following ones: (a Graphs with small and large weak total metric bases are characterised. (b We explore the (tight relation to independent 2-domination. (c We introduce a new graph parameter, called weak total adjacency dimension and present results that are analogous to those presented for weak total dimension. (d For trees, we derive a characterisation of the weak total (adjacency metric dimension. Also, exact figures for our parameters are presented for (generalised fans and wheels. (e We show that for Cartesian product graphs, the weak total (adjacency metric dimension is usually pretty small. (f The weak total (adjacency dimension is studied for lexicographic products of graphs.

  6. Steady state and time-resolved autofluorescence studies of human colonic tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Buhong Li; Zhenxi Zhang; Shusen Xie

    2006-01-01

    Steady state and time-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopies are employed to study the autofluorescence characteristics of human colonic tissues in vitro. The excitation wavelength varies from 260 to 540 nm, and the corresponding fluorescence emission spectra are acquired from 280 to 800 nm. Significant difference in fluorescence intensity of excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) is observed between normal and tumor colonic tissues. Compared with normal colonic tissue, low nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and high amino acids and protoporphyrin Ⅸ (PpⅨ) fluorescences characterize high-grade malignant tissue. Moreover, the autofluorescence lifetimes of normal and carcinomatous colonic tissues at 635 nm under 397-nm excitation are about 4.32±0.12 and 18.45±0.05 ns, respectively. The high accumulation of endogenous PpⅨ in colonic cancers is demonstrated in both steady state and time-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopies.

  7. Fourier-Resolved Spectroscopy of AGN using XMM-Newton data: I. The 3-10 keV band results

    CERN Document Server

    Papadakis, I E; Kazanas, D

    2007-01-01

    We present the results from the Fourier Resolved Spectroscopy of archival XMM-Newton data of five AGN, namely, Mrk 766, NGC 3516, NGC 3783, NGC 4051 and Ark 564. This work supplements the earlier study of MCG-6-30-15 as well as those of several Galactic Black Hole Candidate sources. Our results exhibit much larger diversity than those of Galactic sources, a fact we attribute to the diversity of their masses. When we take into account this effect and combine our results with those from Cyg X-1, it seems reasonable to conclude that, at high frequencies, the slope of the Fourier-resolved spectra in accreting black hole systems decreases with increasing frequency as proportional to f^{-0.25}, irrespective of whether the system is in its High or Low state. This result implies that the flux variations in AGN are accompanied by complex spectral slope variations as well. We also find that the Fe Ka line in Mrk 766, NGC 3783 and NGC 4051 is variable on time scales ~day - 1 hour. The iron fluorescence line is absent in...

  8. Time Resolved Broadband Terahertz Relaxation Dynamics of Electron in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David G.;

    We investigated the transient response of the solvated electron in water ejected by photodetachment from potassium ferrocyanide using time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TSTS). Ultrabroadband THz transients are generated and detected by a two-color femtosecond-induced air plasma and air biased...... coherent detection, respectively. We find that the measured frequency dependent conductivity can be well described by a Drude-Smith model, supplemented by a Lorentz model oscillating near 5 THz....

  9. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  10. Use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for latent fingerprints detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Chao, Zhi Xia; Seah, Leong K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke M.

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in frequency domain enables the mapping of the spatial distribution of fluorescence lifetimes of a specimen. FLIM can provide unique information about fluorophores and hence is widely used in biology and for medical diagnostics. In this paper, a theoretical analysis for the fluorescence lifetime determination of latent fingerprint samples is described, which is followed by the feasibility study of using FLIM in frequency domain for latent fingerprints detection. Experiments are carried out with fingerprint on green paper substrate and postcard substrate treated with certain fluorescent powder. The total phase lag and demodulation factor are calculated to determine the lifetimes pixel by pixel. The resulting fluorescence lifetime image of fingerprint revealed an improvement in the contrast, and was able to detect the latent fingerprint clearly.

  11. Novel aspects of fluorescence lifetime for molecules positioned close to metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussenegg, F. R.; Leitner, A.; Lippitsch, M. E.; Reinisch, H.; Riegler, M.

    1987-10-01

    On metal surfaces with submicroscopic corrugations, surface-enhanced optical processes can be observed. Results obtained by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for dye molecules in the proximity (0-50 nm) of silver islands films are reported. It is demonstrated how the rather complex dependence of the integral fluorescence intensity on the distance dye-islands, can be resolved in the contributions of different mechanisms by analysing the fluorescence decay curves at various distances. It turns out, that the enhancement of absorption influences only the peak fluorescence intensity without changing the decay time, while the enhancement of emission and dissipative losses reduces the decay time. Thus time-resolved spectroscopy opens the possibility to test theoretical concepts on surface enhancement and provides basic data for tailoring molecule-metal structures with well-defined surface-enhancement properties.

  12. Fluorescence antibunching microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Osip

    2011-01-01

    Breaking the diffraction limit in microscopy by utilizing quantum properties of light has been the goal of intense research in the recent years. We propose a quantum superresolution technique based on non-classical emission statistics of fluorescent markers, routinely used as contrast labels for bio-imaging. The technique can be readily implemented using standard fluorescence microscopy equipment.

  13. Fluorescence of atopic allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1967-01-01

    Purified atopic allergens have been found to emit flue fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light of 365 mμ wavelength. The maximum of fluorescence is in the region 445–490 mμ and the intensity is of the same order of magnitude for different atopic allergens. Synthetic model compounds, inc

  14. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Light-emitting diode, LED, lighting, fluorescent, waste reduction, energy conservation, net zero , mercury 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...Center (ATC) to assess the benefits of converting fluorescent tube lighting to light-emitting diode (LED) technology. The report documents the waste ...1-15 SECTION 2. SUBTESTS 2.1 HAZARDOUS WASTE REDUCTION

  15. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  16. Filtered fluorescer x-ray detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruns, H.C.; Emig, J.A.; Thoe, R.S.; Springer, P.T.; Hernandez, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, an instrument capable of measuring x-rays between 8 and 90 keV was conceived to help understand conditions pertaining to pulsed power research. This resulted in the development of a versatile device that would incrementally detect x-rays emitted at predetermined energy bands over this range. To accomplish this, an array of well characterized filter-fluorescer combinations were produced which would allow fluoresced x-rays to be observed by time resolved electro-optical devices. As many as sixteen channels could be utilized with each channel having a corresponding background channel. Upon completion of the device, a three week series of experiments was then successfully carried out.

  17. Frequency synthesiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, Salvatore; Sebastiano, Fabio; Leenaerts, Dominicus Martinus Wilhelmus; Breems, Lucien Johannes; Nauta, Bram

    2016-01-01

    A low power frequency synthesiser circuit (30) for a radio transceiver, the synthesiser circuit comprising: a digital controlled oscillator configured to generate an output signal having a frequency controlled by an input digital control word (DCW); a feedback loop connected between an output and an

  18. Fluorescence emission of pyrene in surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Lucas; Novo, Mercedes; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2015-01-01

    The systematic description of the complex photophysical behaviour of pyrene in surfactant solutions in combination with a quantitative model for the surfactant concentrations reproduces with high accuracy the steady-state and the time resolved fluorescence intensity of pyrene in surfactant solutions near the cmc, both in the monomer and in the excimer emission bands. We present concise model equations that can be used for the analysis of the pyrene fluorescence intensity in order to estimate fundamental parameters of the pyrene-surfactant system, such as the binding equilibrium constant K of pyrene to a given surfactant micelle, the rate constant of excimer formation in micelles, and the equilibrium constant of pyrene-surfactant quenching. The values of the binding equilibrium constant K(TX100)=3300·10³ M⁻¹ and K(SDS)=190·10³ M⁻¹ for Triton X-100 (TX100) and SDS micelles, respectively, show that the partition of pyrene between bulk water and micelles cannot be ignored, even at relatively high surfactant concentrations above the cmc. We apply the model to the determination of the cmc from the pyrene fluorescence intensity, especially from the intensity ratio at two vibronic bands in the monomer emission or from the ratio of excimer to monomer emission intensity. We relate the finite width of the transition region below and above the cmc with the observed changes in the pyrene fluorescence in this region.

  19. Digital Frequency Domain Fluorometry and the Study of Hoechst 33258 Dye-Dna Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddersen, Brett Andrew

    Fluorescence is a powerful tool for the study of chemical and biological processes. The typical decay times of fluorescence are ideal to study events in the pico to nanosecond range. On these time scales, the motions of many biological processes can be studied. The use of frequency domain fluorometry to measure the lifetime of the excited state has been used for many years. However, the development of an acquisition system based on modern digital techniques, presented in this thesis, has opened the door to different types of experiments that previously were either too time consuming or could not be done. The use of digital techniques and the development of a method to modulate an image intensifier have made it possible to incorporate linear and matrix detectors in frequency domain fluorometry. The extension of time -resolved fluorescence measurements to linear arrays has made it possible to follow the time evolution of the emission spectra while the use of matrix detectors has permitted the measurement of the lifetime at every "pixel" of an image. The dye Hoechst 33258 has been used for many years in the study of DNA and DNA binding. However, the fluorescent properties of Hoechst 33258 are not well understood. The dye is highly quenched in aqueous solutions and becomes brightly fluorescent when bound to Acdot T rich sequences of DNA or placed in non-aqueous solutions. The fluorescence of Hoechst 33258 seems to arise from two different solvation states of the molecule. When Hoechst 33258 binds to calf thymus DNA or poly(d(A cdotT)), the molecule becomes highly fluorescent, yet the two states can still be distinguished. The two states are attributed to different binding modes of the dye. The loose binding allows access of water molecules which results in different emission properties. On the other hand, when Hoechst binds onto d(CGCGAATTCGCG) only one lifetime is observed. The single lifetime has been attributed to strong binding of the Hoechst molecule onto the AATT

  20. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  1. Screening of cardiomyocyte fluorescence during cell contraction by multi-dimensional TCSPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorvat, D., Jr.; Abdulla, S.; Elzwiei, F.; Mateasik, A.; Chorvatova, A.

    2008-02-01

    Autofluorescence is one of the most versatile non-invasive tools for mapping the metabolic state of living tissues, such as the heart. We present a new approach to the investigation of changes in endogenous fluorescence during cardiomyocyte contraction - by spectrally-resolved, time correlated, single photon counting (TCSPC). Cell contraction is stimulated by external platinum electrodes, incorporated in a home-made bath and triggered by a pulse generator at a frequency of 0.5 Hz (to stabilize sarcoplasmic reticulum loading), or 5 Hz (the rat heart rate). Cell illumination by the laser is synchronized with cell contraction, using TTL logic pulses operated by a stimulator and delayed to study mitochondrial metabolism at maximum contraction (10-110 ms) and/or at steady state (1000-1100 ms at 0.5 Hz). To test the setup, we recorded calcium transients in cells loaded with the Fluo-3 fluorescent probe (excited by 475 nm pulsed picosecond diode laser). We then evaluated recordings of flavin AF (excited by 438 nm pulsed laser) at room and physiological temperatures. Application of the presented approach will shed new insight into metabolic changes in living, contracting myocytes and, therefore, regulation of excitation-contraction coupling and/or ionic homeostasis and, thus, heart excitability.

  2. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  3. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  4. Recognizing frequency characteristics of gas sensor array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel method based on independent component analyzing (ICA) in frequency domain to distinguish the frequency characteristics of multi-sensor system is presented. The conditions of this type of ICA are considered and each step of resolving the problem is discussed. For a two gas sensor array, the frequency characteristics including amplitude-frequency and phase-frequency are recognized by this method, and cross-sensitivity between them is also eliminated. From the principle of similarity, the recognition mean square error is no more than 0.085.

  5. Highly Resolved Paleoclimatic Aerosol Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Ernesto

    In ice cores a plethora of proxies for paleoclimatic conditions is archived. Air trapped in the ice during firnification allows for direct measurements of the concentrations and isotope ratios of paleoatmospheric gases while, the isotopic composition of the ice matrix itself is related...... to paleotemperatures. Impurities in the matrix are comprised of particulate and soluble aerosols, each carrying information on its source’s activitiy and|or proximity. Opposed to gases and water isotopes, the seasonality of many aerosols is not smoothed out in the firn column so that large concentration gradients...... with frequently changing signs are preserved. Therefore, these aerosol records can be used for dating by annual layer counting. However, with increasing depth the annual layer thicknesses decreases due to pressure and ice flow and accurate dating is possible only as long as the rapid variations can be resolved...

  6. Highly Resolved Paleoclimatic Aerosol Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Ernesto

    experimentally. Over the last decades Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) has become a well-established technique for aerosol quantification. In CFA, a piece of core is melted continuously and the melt water is analysed for an array of chemical impurities. When designing a CFA system, a trilemma between high sample...... with frequently changing signs are preserved. Therefore, these aerosol records can be used for dating by annual layer counting. However, with increasing depth the annual layer thicknesses decreases due to pressure and ice flow and accurate dating is possible only as long as the rapid variations can be resolved...... impossible to circumvent by employing a third detection technique - laser scattering. Reliable information on size changes, even relative ones, cannot be obtained using optical methods. It is therefore proposed to focus further efforts on electrical measurements, making use of the advancements made over...

  7. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  8. Fluorescence properties of dyes adsorbed to silver islands, investigated by picosecond techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, A.; Lippitsch, M. E.; Draxler, S.; Riegler, M.; Aussenegg, F. R.

    1985-02-01

    The fluorescence properties of dye molecules (rhodamine 6G and erythrosin) adsorbed on pure glass surfaces and on silver islands films are investigated by cw and picosecond time-resolved methods. On pure glass surfaces we observe concentration quenching below a critical intermolecular distance (reduction of the fluorescence power per molecule as well as shortened and non-exponential fluorescence decay). On silver islands films the shortening in fluorescence lifetime is more drastic and is nearly independent of the intermolecular distance. This behavior suggests an electrodynamic interaction between dye monomers and plasmons in the metal particles, modified by a damping influence of dye dimers.

  9. Electron beam dispersion measurements in nitrogen using two-dimensional imaging of N2(+) fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, L. H.; Twiss, R. G.; Cattolica, R. J.

    Experimental results are presented related to the radial spread of fluorescence excited by 10 and 20 KeV electron beams passing through nonflowing rarefied nitrogen at 293 K. An imaging technique for obtaining species distributions from measured beam-excited fluorescence is described, based on a signal inversion scheme mathematically equivalent to the inversion of the Abel integral equation. From fluorescence image data, measurements of beam radius, integrated signal intensity, and spatially resolved distributions of N2(+) first-negative-band fluorescence-emitting species have been made. Data are compared with earlier measurements and with an heuristic beam spread model.

  10. Fluorescence anisotropy of acridinedione dyes in glycerol: Prolate model of ellipsoid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Indirapriyadharshini; P Ramamurthy

    2007-03-01

    Time-dependent reorientations of resorcinol-based acridinidione (ADR) dyes in glycerol were studied using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies. The difference between fluorescence anisotropy decays recorded at 460 nm when exciting at 250 nm and those obtained when exciting at 394 nm are reported. When exciting at 394 nm, the fluorescence anisotropy decay is bi-exponential, while on exciting at 250 nm a mono-exponential fluorescence anisotropy decay is observed. We interpret this in terms of different directions of the absorption dipole at 394 and 250 nm with the emission dipole respectively, which is experimentally validated and further analysed as a prolate model of ellipsoid.

  11. Functional Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Campioli, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents an extensive study on fluorescent organic nanoparticles and fluorescent organic binary and ternary nanoassemblies. In particular the attention is focused on the preparation and characterization of organic nanoparticles and new nanocomposites obtained from different types of small organic molecules, their stabilization and the use of these materials for biological and optoelectronics applications. The work deals at the beginning with the description of some methods used...

  12. Red fluorescent biofilm: the thick, the old, and the cariogenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M.C. Volgenant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some dental plaque fluoresces red. The factors involved in this fluorescence are yet unknown. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess systematically the effect of age, thickness, and cariogenicity on the extent of red fluorescence produced by in vitro microcosm biofilms. Design: The effects of biofilm age and thickness on red fluorescence were tested in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF by growing biofilms of variable thicknesses that received a constant supply of defined mucin medium (DMM and eight pulses of sucrose/day. The influence of cariogenicity on red fluorescence was tested by growing biofilm on dentin disks receiving DMM, supplemented with three or eight pulses of sucrose/day. The biofilms were analyzed at different time points after inoculation, up to 24 days. Emission spectra were measured using a fluorescence spectrophotometer (λexc405 nm and the biofilms were photographed with a fluorescence camera. The composition of the biofilms was assessed using 454-pyrosequecing of the 16S rDNA gene. Results: From day 7 onward, the biofilms emitted increasing intensities of red fluorescence as evidenced by the combined red fluorescence peaks. The red fluorescence intensity correlated with biofilm thickness but not in a linear way. Biofilm fluorescence also correlated with the imposed cariogenicity, evidenced by the induced dentin mineral loss. Increasing the biofilm age or increasing the sucrose pulsing frequency led to a shift in the microbial composition. These shifts in composition were accompanied by an increase in red fluorescence. Conclusions: The current study shows that a thicker, older, or more cariogenic biofilm results in a higher intensity of red fluorescence.

  13. Red fluorescent biofilm: the thick, the old, and the cariogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M.C.; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Buijs, Mark J.; Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob (Bob) M.; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Some dental plaque fluoresces red. The factors involved in this fluorescence are yet unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to assess systematically the effect of age, thickness, and cariogenicity on the extent of red fluorescence produced by in vitro microcosm biofilms. Design The effects of biofilm age and thickness on red fluorescence were tested in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF) by growing biofilms of variable thicknesses that received a constant supply of defined mucin medium (DMM) and eight pulses of sucrose/day. The influence of cariogenicity on red fluorescence was tested by growing biofilm on dentin disks receiving DMM, supplemented with three or eight pulses of sucrose/day. The biofilms were analyzed at different time points after inoculation, up to 24 days. Emission spectra were measured using a fluorescence spectrophotometer (λexc405 nm) and the biofilms were photographed with a fluorescence camera. The composition of the biofilms was assessed using 454-pyrosequecing of the 16S rDNA gene. Results From day 7 onward, the biofilms emitted increasing intensities of red fluorescence as evidenced by the combined red fluorescence peaks. The red fluorescence intensity correlated with biofilm thickness but not in a linear way. Biofilm fluorescence also correlated with the imposed cariogenicity, evidenced by the induced dentin mineral loss. Increasing the biofilm age or increasing the sucrose pulsing frequency led to a shift in the microbial composition. These shifts in composition were accompanied by an increase in red fluorescence. Conclusions The current study shows that a thicker, older, or more cariogenic biofilm results in a higher intensity of red fluorescence. PMID:27060056

  14. Ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy and spectrally resolved super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Kenny, Samuel J; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Xu, Ke

    2015-10-01

    By developing a wide-field scheme for spectral measurement and implementing photoswitching, we synchronously obtained the fluorescence spectra and positions of ∼10(6) single molecules in labeled cells in minutes, which consequently enabled spectrally resolved, 'true-color' super-resolution microscopy. The method, called spectrally resolved stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (SR-STORM), achieved cross-talk-free three-dimensional (3D) imaging for four dyes 10 nm apart in emission spectrum. Excellent resolution was obtained for every channel, and 3D localizations of all molecules were automatically aligned within one imaging path.

  15. Plasmonic Molecular Nanohybrids—Spectral Dependence of Fluorescence Quenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olejnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate strong spectral dependence of the efficiency of fluorescence quenching in molecular systems composed of organic dyes and gold nanoparticles. In order to probe the coupling with metallic nanoparticles we use dyes with varied spectral overlap between the plasmon resonance and their absorption. Hybrid molecular structures were obtained via conjugation of metallic nanoparticles with the dyes using biotin-streptavidin linkage. For dyes featuring absorption above the plasmon excitation in gold nanoparticles, laser excitation induces minute changes in the fluorescence intensity and its lifetime for both conjugated and non-conjugated mixtures, which are the reference. In contrast, when the absorption of the dye overlaps with the plasmon resonance, the effect is quite dramatic, reaching 85% and 95% fluorescence quenching for non-conjugated and conjugated mixtures, respectively. The degree of fluorescence quenching strongly depends upon the concentration of metallic nanoparticles. Importantly, the origin of the fluorescence quenching is different in the case of the conjugated mixture, as evidenced by time-resolved fluorescence. For conjugated mixtures of dyes resonant with plasmon, excitation features two-exponential decay. This is in contrast to the single exponential decay measured for the off-resonant configuration. The results provide valuable insight into spectral dependence of the fluorescence quenching in molecular assemblies involving organic dyes and metallic nanoparticles.

  16. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Antonie J W G; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  17. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lindhoud

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488, which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  18. Common fluorescent proteins for single-molecule localization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klementieva, Natalia V.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Mishina, Natalie M.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution techniques for breaking the diffraction barrier are spread out over multiple studies nowadays. Single-molecule localization microscopy such as PALM, STORM, GSDIM, etc allow to get super-resolved images of cell ultrastructure by precise localization of individual fluorescent molecules via their temporal isolation. However, these methods are supposed the use of fluorescent dyes and proteins with special characteristics (photoactivation/photoconversion). At the same time, there is a need for retaining high photostability of fluorophores during long-term acquisition. Here, we first showed the potential of common red fluorescent protein for single-molecule localization microscopy based on spontaneous intrinsic blinking. Also, we assessed the effect of different imaging media on photobleaching of these fluorescent proteins. Monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins were examined for stochastic switching from a dark state to a bright fluorescent state. We studied fusions with cytoskeletal proteins in NIH/3T3 and HeLa cells. Imaging was performed on the Nikon N-STORM system equipped with EMCCD camera. To define the optimal imaging conditions we tested several types of cell culture media and buffers. As a result, high-resolution images of cytoskeleton structure were obtained. Essentially, low-intensity light was sufficient to initiate the switching of tested red fluorescent protein reducing phototoxicity and provide long-term live-cell imaging.

  19. Phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance detection using heterodyning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seungha; McMichael, Robert D.

    We have developed a new phase-resolved ferromagnetic (FMR) detection method using a heterodyne method. Phase resolution is important to determine the characteristics of spin transfer torques in magnetization dynamics under microwave excitation. Specifically, field-like torques and damping-like torques result in magnetization precession with different phases. In this method, we drive spin precession in a Permalloy thin film using microwaves. The resulting precession is detected using 1550 nm laser light, that is modulated at a frequency slightly shifted with respect to the driving frequency. In the reflected light, beating of the spin precession and the light modulation produces an oscillating Kerr rotation signal with a phase equal to the precession phase plus a phase due to the path length difference between the excitation microwave and the optical signal. This detection method eliminates the need for field modulation and allows detection at higher frequencies where the 1/f noise floor is reduced

  20. Excited state dynamics of Kr N clusters probed with time- and energy-resolved photoluminescence methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnbach, R.; Castex, M. C.; Keto, J. W.; Joppien, M.; Wörmer, J.; Zimmerer, G.; Möller, T.

    1993-02-01

    Excitation and decay processes in Kr N clusters ( N=2-10 4) were investigated via time- and energy-resolved fluorescence methods with synchrotron radiation excitation. In small clusters ( N<50) in addition to the well-known emission bands of condensed Kr another broad continuous emission is observed. It is assigned to a radiative decay of Kr excimers desorbing from the cluster surface. There are indications that the cluster size where the desorption rate becomes slow is related to a change in sign of the electron affinity of the cluster. Changes of spectral distribution of the fluorescence light with cluster size are interpreted as variations of the vibrational energy flow.

  1. Deflecting cavity dynamics for time-resolved machine studies of SXFEL user facility

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Minghao; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Radio frequency deflectors are widely used for time-resolved electron beam energy, emittance and radiation profile measurements in modern free electron laser facilities. In this paper, we present the beam dynamics aspects of the deflecting cavity of SXFEL user facility, which is located at the exit of the undulator. With a targeted time resolution around 10 fs, it is expected to be an important tool for time-resolved commissioning and machine studies for SXFEL user facility.

  2. A microenvironment-sensitive fluorescent pyrimidine ribonucleoside analogue: synthesis, enzymatic incorporation, and fluorescence detection of a DNA abasic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanpure, Arun A; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2011-11-04

    Base-modified fluorescent ribonucleoside-analogue probes are valuable tools in monitoring RNA structure and function because they closely resemble the structure of natural nucleobases. Especially, 2-aminopurine, a highly environment-sensitive adenosine analogue, is the most extensively utilized fluorescent nucleoside analogue. However, only a few isosteric pyrimidine ribonucleoside analogues that are suitable for probing the structure and recognition properties of RNA molecules are available. Herein, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of a small series of base-modified pyrimidine ribonucleoside analogues derived from tagging indole, N-methylindole, and benzofuran onto the 5-position of uracil. One of the analogues, based on a 5-(benzofuran-2-yl)pyrimidine core, shows emission in the visible region with a reasonable quantum yield and, importantly, displays excellent solvatochromism. The corresponding triphosphate substrate is effectively incorporated into oligoribonucleotides by T7 RNA polymerase to produce fluorescent oligoribonucleotide constructs. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic studies with fluorescent oligoribonucleotide constructs demonstrate that the fluorescent ribonucleoside photophysically responds to subtle changes in its environment brought about by the interaction of the chromophore with neighboring bases. In particular, the emissive ribonucleoside, if incorporated into an oligoribonucleotide, positively reports the presence of a DNA abasic site with an appreciable enhancement in fluorescence intensity. The straightforward synthesis, amicability to enzymatic incorporation, and sensitivity to changes in the microenvironment highlight the potential of the benzofuran-conjugated pyrimidine ribonucleoside as an efficient fluorescent probe to investigate nucleic acid structure, dynamics, and recognition events.

  3. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  4. Improving Earthquake Stress Drop Measurements - What can we Really Resolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, R. E.; Bannister, S. C.; Fry, B.; Ruhl, C. J.; Kozlowska, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake stress drop is fundamental to understanding the physics of the rupture process. Although it is superficially simple to calculate an estimate of stress drop from the corner frequency of the radiated spectrum, it is much harder to be certain that measurements are reliable and accurate. The same is true of other measurements of stress drop and radiated energy. The large number of studies of earthquake stress drop, the high variability in results (~0.1-100 MPa), the large uncertainties, and the ongoing scaling controversy are evidence for this. We investigate the resolution and uncertainties of stress drops calculated using an empirical Green's function (EGF) approach. Earthquakes in 3 sequences at Parkfield, California are recorded by multiple borehole stations and have abundant smaller earthquakes to use as EGFs (Abercrombie, 2014). The earthquakes in the largest magnitude cluster (M~2.1) exhibit clear temporal variation of stress drop. Independent studies obtained a similar pattern implying that it is resolvable for these well-recorded, simple sources. The borehole data reveal a similar temporal pattern for another sequence, not resolvable in an earlier study using surface recordings. The earthquakes in the third sequence have complex sources; corner frequency measurements for this sequence are highly variable and poorly resolved. We use the earthquakes in the first cluster to quantify the uncertainties likely to arise in less optimal settings. The limited signal bandwidth and the quality of the EGF assumption are major sources of error. Averaging across multiple stations improves the resolution, as does using multiple good EGFs (Abercrombie, 2015). We adapt the approach to apply to larger data sets. We focus on New Zealand, with the aim of resolving stress drop variability in a variety of tectonic settings. We investigate stacking over stations and multiple EGFs, and compare earthquakes (M~3-6) from both the overlying and the subducting plates.

  5. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of DNA dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalettar, B.A.

    1987-04-01

    Random solvent induced motions of DNA are manifest as nanosecond torsional oscillations of the helix backbone, nanosecond through millisecond bending deformations and overall rotational and translational diffusion of the polymer. Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to study this spectrum of DNA motions while ethidium monoazide was covalently bounded. The steady state fluorescence depolarization data indicate that the covalent monoazide/DNA complex exhibits internal motions characterized by an average angular amplitude of 26 degrees confirming reports of fast torsional oscillations in noncovalent ethidium bromide/DNA systems. Data obtained by use of a new polarized photobleaching recovery technique (FPR) reflect both the rotational dynamics of the polymer and the reversible photochemistry of the dye. To isolate the reorientational motion of the DNA, the FPR experiments were ran in two modes that differ only in the polarization of the bleaching light. A quotient function constructed from the data obtained in these two modes monitors only the rotational component of the FPR recovery. In specific applications those bending deformations of long DNA molecules that have characteristic relaxation times on the order of 100 microseconds have been resolved. A fluorescence correlation technique that relates fluctuations in particle number to center-of-mass motion was used to measure translational diffusion on coefficients of the plasmid PBR322 and a short oligomeric DNA. A theory that describes angular correlation in systems exhibiting cyclic, biologically directed reorientation and random Brownian rotation is developed.

  7. Resonance Fluorescence from an Artificial Atom in Squeezed Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Toyli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental realization of resonance fluorescence in squeezed vacuum. We strongly couple microwave-frequency squeezed light to a superconducting artificial atom and detect the resulting fluorescence with high resolution enabled by a broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifier. We investigate the fluorescence spectra in the weak and strong driving regimes, observing up to 3.1 dB of reduction of the fluorescence linewidth below the ordinary vacuum level and a dramatic dependence of the Mollow triplet spectrum on the relative phase of the driving and squeezed vacuum fields. Our results are in excellent agreement with predictions for spectra produced by a two-level atom in squeezed vacuum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2539 (1987], demonstrating that resonance fluorescence offers a resource-efficient means to characterize squeezing in cryogenic environments.

  8. Evaluation of Light Frequency Shift in a Cesium Beam Frequency Standard with Sharp Angle Incident Detecting Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-Hai; WANG Feng-Zhi; WANG Yi-Qiu; YANG Dong-Hai

    2004-01-01

    @@ Light frequency shift measured in a smalloptically pumped caesium beam frequency standard is reported and analysed. Two light sources, the diffused laser light scattered from the caesium beam tube parts and the fluorescence light from the beam atoms excited by the laser light, for the light frequency shift are discussed.

  9. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  10. A novel frequency control scheme for comb-referenced sensitive difference-frequency-generation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakuni, Kana; Okubo, Sho; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-17

    We present a novel scheme of frequency scan and wavelength modulation of a difference-frequency-generation source for comb-referenced sensitive spectroscopy. While the pump and signal frequencies are phase-locked to an optical frequency comb (OFC), the offset frequency between the signal wave and the nearest comb tooth is modulated to apply a wavelength-modulation technique, and the idler wave frequency is repeatedly swept for signal accumulation by changing the repetition frequency of the OFC. The spectrometer is applied to absolute frequency measurement of weak hyperfine-resolved rovibration transitions of the ν(1) band of CH(3)I, and the uncertainty in frequency determination is reduced by one order of magnitude in compared with that of the previous work published in Optics Express 20, 9178-9186 (2012).

  11. Fluorescence dynamics of interactions between polyamide PyPyPyβDp and DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Huijuan; WANG; Jin; WU; Yishi; YUAN; Gu; AI; Xicheng; WANG; Li

    2006-01-01

    The photophysical properties of the polyamide PyPyPyβDp (PPP) were investigated by means of steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that the excited-state properties of PPP are very sensitive to solvents. In TKMC buffer PPP exhibited weak fluorescence with a decay time constant of 16 ps, while with the decrease of the solvent polarity PPP showed the blue-shifted peak position, increased intensity and lengthened life-time for its fluorescence behavior. In the presence of calf thymus DNA, it was observed that the fluorescence intensity was enhanced and the fluorescence lifetime increased from 16 to 32 ps for PPP, which verified that PPP bound into the minor groove of DNA duplex.

  12. Application of fluorescence spectroscopy and chemometrics in the evaluation of processed cheese during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J; Povlsen, V T; Sørensen, J

    2003-04-01

    Front face fluorescence spectroscopy is applied for an evaluation of the stability of processed cheese during storage. Fluorescence landscapes with excitation from 240 to 360 nm and emission in the range of 275 to 475 nm were obtained from cheese samples stored in darkness and light in up to 259 d, at 5, 20 and 37 degrees C, respectively. Parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis of the fluorescence landscapes exhibits four fluorophores present in the cheese, all related to the storage conditions. The chemometric analysis resolves the fluorescence signal into excitation and emission profiles of the pure fluorescent compounds, which are suggested to be tryptophan, vitamin A and a compound derived from oxidation. Thus, it is concluded that fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics has a potential as a fast method for monitoring the stability of processed cheese.

  13. Fluorescence optimisation and lifetime studies of fingerprints treated with magnetic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, L K; Dinish, U S; Phang, W F; Chao, Z X; Murukeshan, V M

    2005-09-10

    Fluorescence study plays a significant role in fingerprint detection when conventional chemical enhancement methods fail. The basic properties of fluorescence emission such as colour, intensity and lifetime could be well exploited in the detection of latent fingerprints under steady state and in dynamic methods. This paper describes a systematic study of fluorescence emission intensity from fingerprint samples treated with different magnetic powders. Understanding of suitable excitation wavelength required for getting maximum fluorescence emission intensity could be beneficial when selecting the appropriate fluorescent powders for the fingerprint detection. Lifetime study of fingerprints treated with various magnetic powders was also carried out. The importance of lifetime study is well explained through the time-resolved (TR) imaging of fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Results from the TR imaging study revealed an improvement in the fingerprint image contrast. This is significant when the print is deposited on fluorescing background and its emission wavelength is close to that of treated fingerprint.

  14. Spectral and Temporal Laser Fluorescence Analysis Such as for Natural Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekalyuk, Alexander (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An Advanced Laser Fluorometer (ALF) can combine spectrally and temporally resolved measurements of laser-stimulated emission (LSE) for characterization of dissolved and particulate matter, including fluorescence constituents, in liquids. Spectral deconvolution (SDC) analysis of LSE spectral measurements can accurately retrieve information about individual fluorescent bands, such as can be attributed to chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), phycobiliprotein (PBP) pigments, or chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), among others. Improved physiological assessments of photosynthesizing organisms can use SDC analysis and temporal LSE measurements to assess variable fluorescence corrected for SDC-retrieved background fluorescence. Fluorescence assessments of Chl-a concentration based on LSE spectral measurements can be improved using photo-physiological information from temporal measurements. Quantitative assessments of PBP pigments, CDOM, and other fluorescent constituents, as well as basic structural characterizations of photosynthesizing populations, can be performed using SDC analysis of LSE spectral measurements.

  15. Temperature effect on 4-aminophtalimide fluorescence in n-alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobek, Krzysztof, E-mail: dobas@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Karolczak, Jerzy, E-mail: jgkarol@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Center For Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2015-09-15

    The compound 4-aminophthalimide (4-AP) is a well-known dye used as an environment polarity sensitive probe e.g. in solvation studies. This paper presents the effect of temperature on 4-aminophthalimides steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in five n-alcohols. It is shown that the hydrogen bonding ability of n-alcohols affects the shifts of steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra of 4-aminophthalimide at room temperature, and the shifts of fluorescence also at temperatures from the range 180 to 323 K. Temperature is shown to affect the change in hydrogen bond energy that follows 4-AP excitation, in a way dependent on the n-alcohol alkyl chain length. On the other hand, time-resolved results indicate that the temperature dependence of 4-AP deactivation follows mainly from the energy-gap dependent non-radiative deactivation rate. Fluorescence transition dipole moments at room temperature have been found to be slightly dependent on the solvent, but nothing proves that these changes are connected to different hydrogen bonding character of each n-alcohol. Therefore, while the steady-state results provide clear evidence of hydrogen bonding between 4-AP and n-alcohols, the time-resolved results do not show any evident sign of hydrogen bonding, besides the influence of the position of fluorescence emission on the radiative and non-radiative rates. - Highlights: • We show temperature effect on 4-aminophthalimide (4-AP) absorption and emission. • Hydrogen bonds formation between n-alcohols and 4-AP affect steady-state results. • Temperature change influences hydrogen bonds energy. • 4-AP non-radiative deactivation is energy-gap controlled.

  16. Time-resolved luminescence from quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Pagonis, V.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved optical stimulation of luminescence has become established as a key method for measurement of optically stimulated luminescence from quartz, feldspar and α-Al2O3:C, all materials of interest in dosimetry. The aim of time-resolved optical stimulation is to separ

  17. Spatially resolved voltage, current and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerteisen, D.; Kurz, T.; Schwager, M.; Hebling, C. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Merida, W. [Clean Energy Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lupotto, P. [Materials Mates Italia, Milano (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    In this work a 50-channel characterisation system for PEMFCs is presented. The system is capable of traditional electrochemical measurements (e.g. staircase voltammetry, chronoamperometry and cyclic voltammetry), and concurrent EIS measurements. Unlike previous implementations, this system relies on dedicated potentiostats for current and voltage control, and independent frequency response analysers (FRAs) at each channel. Segmented fuel cell hardware is used to illustrate the system's flexibility and capabilities. The results here include steady-state data for cell characterisation under galvanostatic and potentiostatic control as well as spatially resolved impedance spectra. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition.

  19. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, A; Dhez, O; Schwartz, W; Torricelli, G; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  20. Eddy current imaging with an atomic radio-frequency magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Blanchard, John W; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    We use a radio-frequency $^{85}$Rb alkali-vapor cell magnetometer based on a paraffin-coated cell with long spin-coherence time and a small, low-inductance driving coil to create highly resolved conductivity maps of different objects. We resolve sub-mm features in conductive objects, we characterize the frequency response of our technique, and by operating at frequencies up to 250 kHz we are able to discriminate between differently conductive materials based on the induced response. The method is suited to cover a wide range of driving frequencies and can potentially be used for detecting non-metallic objects with low DC conductivity.

  1. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siria, A; Schwartz, W; Chevrier, J [Institut Neel, CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dhez, O; Comin, F [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Torricelli, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  2. Fluorescence Experiments with Quinine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, James E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments which illustrate the analytical capabilities of fluorescence, and outlines two straightforward analyses involving real analyses. These experiments are suitable for an undergraduate instrumental analysis course and require approximately six to seven hours of laboratory time. (MLH)

  3. FLEX: fluorescence explorer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoll, M.Ph.; Court, A.J.; Smorenburg, C.; Visser, H.; Crocco, L.; Heilimo, J.; Honig, A.

    1999-01-01

    FLEX is a scientifically driven space mission to provide demonstration/validation of the instrumentation and technique for measuring the natural fluorescence of vegetation in the Fraunhofer lines. The payload consists of high spectral resolution (0.1-0.3 nm) CCD imaging grating spectrometer with two

  4. Donor-acceptor-pair emission characterization in N-B doped fluorescent SiC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Kamiyama, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated donor-acceptor-pair emission in N-B doped fluorescent 6H-SiC, by means of photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, and angle-resolved photoluminescence. The photoluminescence results were interpreted by using a band diagram with Fermi-Dirac statistics. It is shown...... intensity in a large emission angle range was achieved from angle-resolved photoluminescence. The results indicate N-B doped fluorescent SiC as a good wavelength converter in white LEDs applications....

  5. Spatially resolved two-color diffusion measurements in human skin applied to transdermal liposome penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-05-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy imaging, the acquired diffusion information was processed to construct spatially resolved diffusion maps at different depths of the stratum corneum (SC). Experiments using amphiphilic and hydrophilic fluorescently labeled molecules show that their diffusion in SC is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes--containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer and a hydrophilic fluorophore encapsulated in the liposome lumen--was measured using cross-correlation RICS. This type of experiment allows discrimination between separate (uncorrelated) and joint (correlated) diffusion of the two different fluorescent probes, giving information about liposome integrity. Independent of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier.

  6. Steady state anisotropy two-photon microscopy resolves multiple, spectrally similar fluorophores, enabling in vivo multilabel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubach, J Matthew; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-08-01

    The use of spectrally distinguishable fluorescent dyes enables imaging of multiple targets. However, in two-photon microscopy, the number of fluorescent labels with distinct emission spectra that can be effectively excited and resolved is constrained by the confined tuning range of the excitation laser and the broad and overlapping nature of fluorophore two-photon absorption spectra. This limitation effectively reduces the number of available imaging channels. Here, we demonstrate that two-photon steady state anisotropy imaging (2PSSA) offers the capability to resolve otherwise unresolvable fluorescent tracers both in live cells and in mouse tumor models. This approach expands the number of biological targets that can be imaged simultaneously, increasing the total amount of information that can be obtained through imaging.

  7. Quasi-real-time fluorescence imaging with lifetime dependent contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pei-Chi; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2011-08-01

    Conventional fluorescence lifetime imaging requires complicated algorithms to extract lifetimes of fluorophores and acquisition of multiple data points at progressively longer delay times to characterize tissues. To address diminishing signal-to-noise ratios at these progressively longer time delays, we report a time-resolved fluorescence imaging method, normalized fluorescence yield imaging that does not require the extraction of lifetimes. The concept is to extract the ``contrast'' instead of the lifetime value of the fluorophores by using simple mathematical algorithms. This process converts differences in decay times directly to different intensities. The technique was verified experimentally using a gated iCCD camera and an ultraviolet light-emitting diode light source. It was shown that this method can distinguish between chemical dyes (Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B) and biomedical samples, such as powders of elastin and collagen. Good contrast was obtained between fluorophores that varied by less than 6% in lifetime. Additionally, it was shown that long gate times up to 16 ns achieve good contrast depending upon the samples to be studied. These results support the feasibility of time-resolved fluorescence imaging without lifetime extraction, which has a potential clinical role in noninvasive real-time imaging.

  8. Simultaneous Determination of Magnolol and Honokiol by Synchronous Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min ZHANG; Li Ming DU

    2006-01-01

    A simple sensitive and quick assay for simultaneously determining magnolol (MOL)and honokiol (HOL) has been described based on their natural fluorescence. This method is based on the fact that synchronous fluorometry could resolve the overlapping of fluorescence spectra, which was aroused by their similar molecular structures. In this work, the synchronous spectrum, maintaining a constant difference of Δλ =10 nm between the emission and excitation wavelengths, has been selected for the determination of HOL and MOL. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of MOL and HOL in solution over the range 0.075-0.7 μg/mL and 0.05-0.9 μg/mL with the detection limit of 0.029 μg/mL and 0.019 μg/mL, respectively. The method was applied to the simultaneous determination of MOL and HOL in pharmaceutical dosage with satisfactory results.

  9. Saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaocong; Sun, Shiyi; Kuang, Cuifang; Ge, Baoliang; Wang, Wensheng; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (vFED) has been proposed recently to enhance the lateral resolution of confocal microscopy with a detector array, implemented by scanning a doughnut-shaped pattern. Theoretically, the resolution can be enhanced by around 1.3-fold compared with that in confocal microscopy. For further improvement of the resolving ability of vFED, a novel method is presented utilizing fluorescence saturation for super-resolution imaging, which we called saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (svFED). With a point detector array, matched solid and hollow point spread functions (PSF) can be obtained by photon reassignment, and the difference results between them can be used to boost the transverse resolution. Results show that the diffraction barrier can be surpassed by at least 34% compared with that in vFED and the resolution is around 2-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy.

  10. Time-dependent pressure distribution in microstructured shocked materials using fluorescent dye probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James M.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    We have used fluorescent probes for time-resolved microscopy of shocked particulate media. By embedding rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye in silica nano- and micro-particles, we have created superemissive ultrafast pressure probes. We used silica-embedded dye particles to obtain stroboscopic fluorescence images of shocked sand-like media. Shock effects on microstructured media and micropressure distributions can be determined from shock-induced emission intensity loss, with high time and space resolution.

  11. Solvent and solute ingress into hydrogels resolved by a combination of imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, D.; Burbach, J.; Grünzweig, C.; Hartmann, S.; Lehmann, E.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E.

    2016-05-01

    Using simultaneous neutron, fluorescence, and optical brightfield transmission imaging, the diffusion of solvent, fluorescent dyes, and macromolecules into a crosslinked polyacrylamide hydrogel was investigated. This novel combination of different imaging techniques enables us to distinguish the movements of the solvent and fluorescent molecules. Additionally, the swelling or deswelling of the hydrogels can be monitored. From the sequence of images, dye and solvent concentrations were extracted spatially and temporally resolved. Diffusion equations and different boundary conditions, represented by different models, were used to quantitatively analyze the temporal evolution of these concentration profiles and to determine the diffusion coefficients of solvent and solutes. Solute size and network properties were varied and their effect was investigated. Increasing the crosslinking ratio or partially drying the hydrogel was found to hinder solute diffusion due to the reduced pore size. By contrast, solvent diffusion seemed to be slightly faster if the hydrogel was only partially swollen and hence solvent uptake enhanced.

  12. Dynamic fluorescence spectroscopy on single tryptophan mutants of EIImtl in detergent micelles : Effects of substrate binding and phosphorylation on the fluorescence and anisotropy decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaving Dijkstra, Dolf; Broos, J.; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; van Hoek, A.; Robillard, George

    1997-01-01

    The effects of substrate and substrate analogue binding and phosphorylation on the conformational dynamics of the mannitol permease of Escherichia coli were investigated, using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on mutants containing five single tryptophans situated in the membrane-embedded C d

  13. Examining Electron-Boson Coupling Using Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentef, Michael; Kemper, Alexander F.; Moritz, Brian; Freericks, James K.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.

    2013-12-26

    Nonequilibrium pump-probe time-domain spectroscopies can become an important tool to disentangle degrees of freedom whose coupling leads to broad structures in the frequency domain. Here, using the time-resolved solution of a model photoexcited electron-phonon system, we show that the relaxational dynamics are directly governed by the equilibrium self-energy so that the phonon frequency sets a window for “slow” versus “fast” recovery. The overall temporal structure of this relaxation spectroscopy allows for a reliable and quantitative extraction of the electron-phonon coupling strength without requiring an effective temperature model or making strong assumptions about the underlying bare electronic band dispersion.

  14. Flow cytometric fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA binding fluorochromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissman, Harry A.; Cui, H. H. (H. Helen); Steinkamp, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Most flow cytometry (FCM) applications monitor fluorescence intensity to quantitate the various cellular parameters; however, the fluorescence emission also contains information relative to the fluorescence lifetime. Recent developments in FCM (Pinsky et al., 1993; Steinkamp & Crissman, 1993; Steinkamp et al., 1993), provide for the measurement of fluorescence lifetime which is also commonly referred to as fluorescence decay, or the time interval in which a fluorochrome remains in the excited state. Many unbound fluorochromes have characteristic lifetime values that are determined by their molecular structure; however, when the probe becomes bound, the lifetime value is influenced by a number of factors that affect the probe interaction with a target molecule. Monitoring the changes in the lifetime of the probe yields information relating to the molecular conformation, the functional state or activity of the molecular target. In addition, the lifetime values can be used as signatures to resolve the emissions of multiple fluorochrome labels with overlapping emission spectra that cannot be resolved by conventional FCM methodology. Such strategies can increase the number of fluorochrome combinations used in a flow cytometer with a single excitation source. Our studies demonstrate various applications of lifetime measurements for the analysis of the binding of different fluorochromes to DNA in single cells. Data presented in this session will show the utility of lifetime measurements for monitoring changes in chromatin structure associated with cell cycle progression, cellular differentiation, or DNA damage, such as induced during apoptosis. Several studies show that dyes with specificity for nucleic acids display different lifetime values when bound to DNA or to dsRNA. The Phase Sensitive Flow Cytometer is a multiparameter instrument, capable of performing lifetime measurements in conjunction with all the conventional FCM measurements. Future modifications of this

  15. Fluorescence quenching of coumarin 153 by hydroxyl-functionalized room temperature ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Yu, Anchi; Lu, Rong

    2016-08-01

    Steady-state absorption and fluorescence as well as time-resolved fluorescence of coumarin 151 (C151) and coumarin 153 (C153) were measured in hydroxyl-functionalized ionic liquids ([HOEmim][BF4] and [HOEmim][N(CN)2]) and in nonhydroxyl-functionalized ionic liquids ([Emim][BF4] and [Emim][N(CN)2]). Both the steady-state fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence observations reveal that hydroxyl-functionalized ionic liquid quenches the fluorescence of C153 while the nonhydroxyl-functionalized ionic liquid does not. We also measured the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of C151 and C153 in both [HOEmim][BF4] and [Emim][BF4]. It is found that the ratio of the rotational relaxation lifetime of C153 in [HOEmim][BF4] with respect to that in [Emim][BF4] is about 15% larger than that of C151 in [HOEmim][BF4] with respect to that in [Emim][BF4], indicating extra interaction between C153 and [HOEmim][BF4] exists except the effect of the viscosity of ionic liquid.

  16. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  17. Synthesis and Fluorescence Spectra of Triazolylcoumarin Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xian-fu; LI Hong-qi

    2009-01-01

    Much attention is devoted to fluorescent dyes especially those with potential in versatile applications. Reactions under "click" conditions between nonfluorescent 3 - azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes produced 3 -(1, 2, 3- triazol- 1 - yl)cournarins, a novel type of fluorescent dyes with intense fluorescence. The structures of the new coumarins were characterized by 1H NMR, MS, and IR spectra. Fluorescence spectra measurement demonstrated excellent fluorescence performance of the triazolylcoumarins and this click reaction is a promising candidate for bioconjugation and bioimaging applications since both azide and alkynes are quite inert to biological systems.

  18. A multi-analytical investigation of semi-conductor pigments with time-resolved spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, A.; Cesaratto, A.; D'Andrea, C.; Valentini, Gianluca; Comelli, D.

    2013-05-01

    We present the non-invasive study of historical and modern Zn- and Cd-based pigments with time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence multispectral imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Zinc oxide and Zinc sulphide are semiconductors which have been used as white pigments in paintings, and the luminescence of these pigments from trapped states is strongly dependent on the presence of impurities and crystal defects. Cadmium sulphoselenide pigments vary in hue from yellow to deep red based on their composition, and are another class of semiconductor pigments which emit both in the visible and the near infrared. The Fluorescence lifetime of historical and modern pigments has been measured using both an Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) coupled with a Nd:YAG nslaser, and a streak camera coupled with a ps-laser for spectrally-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements. For Znbased pigments we have also employed Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) for the measurement of luminescence. A case study of FLIM applied to the analysis of the painting by Vincent Van Gogh on paper - "Les Bretonnes et le pardon de Pont-Aven" (1888) is presented. Through the integration of complementary, portable and non-invasive spectroscopic techniques, new insights into the optical properties of Zn- and Cd-based pigments have been gained which will inform future analysis of late 19th] and early 20th C. paintings.

  19. Time- and Site-Resolved Dynamics in a Topological Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ningyuan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From studies of exotic quantum many-body phenomena to applications in spintronics and quantum information processing, topological materials are poised to revolutionize the condensed-matter frontier and the landscape of modern materials science. Accordingly, there is a broad effort to realize topologically nontrivial electronic and photonic materials for fundamental science as well as practical applications. In this work, we demonstrate the first simultaneous site- and time-resolved measurements of a time-reversal-invariant topological band structure, which we realize in a radio-frequency photonic circuit. We control band-structure topology via local permutation of a traveling-wave capacitor-inductor network, increasing robustness by going beyond the tight-binding limit. We observe a gapped density of states consistent with a modified Hofstadter spectrum at a flux per plaquette of ϕ=π/2. In situ probes of the band gaps reveal spatially localized bulk states and delocalized edge states. Time-resolved measurements reveal dynamical separation of localized edge excitations into spin-polarized currents. The radio-frequency circuit paradigm is naturally compatible with nonlocal coupling schemes, allowing us to implement a Möbius strip topology inaccessible in conventional systems. This room-temperature experiment illuminates the origins of topology in band structure, and when combined with circuit quantum electrodynamics techniques, it provides a direct path to topologically ordered quantum matter.

  20. Time- and Site-Resolved Dynamics in a Topological Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningyuan, Jia; Owens, Clai; Sommer, Ariel; Schuster, David; Simon, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    From studies of exotic quantum many-body phenomena to applications in spintronics and quantum information processing, topological materials are poised to revolutionize the condensed-matter frontier and the landscape of modern materials science. Accordingly, there is a broad effort to realize topologically nontrivial electronic and photonic materials for fundamental science as well as practical applications. In this work, we demonstrate the first simultaneous site- and time-resolved measurements of a time-reversal-invariant topological band structure, which we realize in a radio-frequency photonic circuit. We control band-structure topology via local permutation of a traveling-wave capacitor-inductor network, increasing robustness by going beyond the tight-binding limit. We observe a gapped density of states consistent with a modified Hofstadter spectrum at a flux per plaquette of ϕ =π /2 . In situ probes of the band gaps reveal spatially localized bulk states and delocalized edge states. Time-resolved measurements reveal dynamical separation of localized edge excitations into spin-polarized currents. The radio-frequency circuit paradigm is naturally compatible with nonlocal coupling schemes, allowing us to implement a Möbius strip topology inaccessible in conventional systems. This room-temperature experiment illuminates the origins of topology in band structure, and when combined with circuit quantum electrodynamics techniques, it provides a direct path to topologically ordered quantum matter.