WorldWideScience

Sample records for frequency photonic applications

  1. Frequency Conversion of Single Photons: Physics, Devices, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Anton Zeilinger , Alexan- der V. Sergienko, and Yanhua Shih. New high-intensity source of polarization- entangled photon pairs. Physical Review Letters...interface. Nature, 437(7055):116–120, 2005. [36] S. Ramelow, A. Fedrizzi, A. Poppe, N. K. Langford, and A. Zeilinger . Polarization-entanglement-conserving

  2. Deterministically swapping frequency-bin entanglement from photon-photon to atom-photon hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Bao-Quan; Liu, Chang; Sun, Yuan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2018-02-01

    Inspired by the recent developments of the research on the atom-photon quantum interface and energy-time entanglement between single-photon pulses, we are motivated to study the deterministic protocol for the frequency-bin entanglement of the atom-photon hybrid system, which is analogous to the frequency-bin entanglement between single-photon pulses. We show that such entanglement arises naturally in considering the interaction between a frequency-bin entangled single-photon pulse pair and a single atom coupled to an optical cavity, via straightforward atom-photon phase gate operations. Its anticipated properties and preliminary examples of its potential application in quantum networking are also demonstrated. Moreover, we construct a specific quantum entanglement witness tool to detect such extended frequency-bin entanglement from a reasonably general set of separable states, and prove its capability theoretically. We focus on the energy-time considerations throughout the analysis.

  3. Experiments on quantum frequency conversion of photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramelow, S.

    2011-01-01

    Coherently converting photons between different states offers intriguing new possibilities and applications in quantum optical experiments. In this thesis three experiments on this theme are presented. The first experiment demonstrates the quantum frequency conversion of polarization entangled photons. Coherent frequency conversion of single photons offers an elegant solution for the often difficult trade-off of choosing the optimal photon wavelength, e.g. regarding optimal transmission and storage of photons in quantum memory based quantum networks. In our experiments, we verify the successful entanglement conversion by violating a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality and fully characterised our close to unity fidelity entanglement transfer using quantum state- and process tomography. Our implementation is robust and flexible, making it a practical building block for future quantum technologies.The second part of the thesis introduces a deterministic scheme for photonic quantum information processing. While single photons offer many advantages for quantum information technologies, key unresolved challenges are scalable on-demand single photon sources; deterministic two-photon interactions; and near 100%-efficient detection. All these can be solved with a single versatile process - a novel four-wave mixing process that we introduce here as a special case of the more general scheme of coherent photon conversion (CPC). It can provide valuable photonic quantum processing tools, from scalably creating single- and multi-photon states to implementing deterministic entangling gates and high-efficiency detection. Notably, this would enable scalable photonic quantum computing. Using photonic crystal fibres, we experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear process suited for coherent photon conversion. We observe correlated photon-pair production at the predicted wavelengths and experimentally characterise the enhancement of the interaction strength by varying the pump

  4. PFMCal : Photonic force microscopy calibration extended for its application in high-frequency microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butykai, A.; Domínguez-García, P.; Mor, F. M.; Gaál, R.; Forró, L.; Jeney, S.

    2017-11-01

    automatic calibration process which requires only to write the input data in the main script. Additionally, we include a calibration method based on thermal noise statistics, which can be used with viscoelastic fluids if the trap stiffness is previously estimated. Reasons for the new version: This version extends the functionality of PFMCal for the particular case of spherical probes and unknown fluid viscosities. The extended code is automatic, works in different operating systems and it is compatible with GNU Octave. Summary of revisions: The original MatLab program in the previous version, which is executed by PFMCal.m, is not changed. Here, we have added two additional main archives named PFMCal_auto.m and PFMCal_histo.m, which implement automatic calculations of the calibration process and calibration through Boltzmann statistics, respectively. The process of calibration using this code for spherical beads is described in the README.pdf file provided in the new code submission. Here, we obtain different calibration factors, β (given in μm/V), according to [2], related to two statistical quantities: the mean-squared displacement (MSD), βMSD, and the velocity autocorrelation function (VAF), βVAF. Using that methodology, the trap stiffness, k, and the zero-shear viscosity of the fluid, η, can be calculated if the value of the particle's radius, a, is previously known. For comparison, we include in the extended code the method of calibration using the corner frequency of the power-spectral density (PSD) [5], providing a calibration factor βPSD. Besides, with the prior estimation of the trap stiffness, along with the known value of the particle's radius, we can use thermal noise statistics to obtain calibration factors, β, according to the quadratic form of the optical potential, βE, and related to the Gaussian distribution of the bead's positions, βσ2. This method has been demonstrated to be applicable to the calibration of optical tweezers when using non

  5. Photon correlation in single-photon frequency upconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaorong; Huang, Kun; Pan, Haifeng; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2012-01-30

    We experimentally investigated the intensity cross-correlation between the upconverted photons and the unconverted photons in the single-photon frequency upconversion process with multi-longitudinal mode pump and signal sources. In theoretical analysis, with this multi-longitudinal mode of both signal and pump sources system, the properties of the signal photons could also be maintained as in the single-mode frequency upconversion system. Experimentally, based on the conversion efficiency of 80.5%, the joint probability of simultaneously detecting at upconverted and unconverted photons showed an anti-correlation as a function of conversion efficiency which indicated the upconverted photons were one-to-one from the signal photons. While due to the coherent state of the signal photons, the intensity cross-correlation function g(2)(0) was shown to be equal to unity at any conversion efficiency, agreeing with the theoretical prediction. This study will benefit the high-speed wavelength-tunable quantum state translation or photonic quantum interface together with the mature frequency tuning or longitudinal mode selection techniques.

  6. Atomic frequency reference at 1033 nm for ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber lasers and applications exploiting a rubidium (Rb) 5S_1/2 to 4D_5/2 one-colour two-photon transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ritayan; Condylis, Paul C.; Johnathan, Yik Jinen; Hessmo, Björn

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate a two-photon transition of rubidium (Rb) atoms from the ground state (5$S_{1/2}$) to the excited state (4$D_{5/2}$), using a home-built ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber amplifier at 1033 nm. This is the first demonstration of an atomic frequency reference at 1033 nm as well as of a one-colour two-photon transition for the above energy levels. A simple optical setup is presented for the two-photon transition fluorescence spectroscopy, which is useful for frequency stabilization for a broad class of lasers. This spectroscopy has potential applications in the fiber laser industry as a frequency reference, particularly for the Yb-doped fiber lasers. This two-photon transition also has applications in atomic physics as a background- free high- resolution atom detection and for quantum communication, which is outlined in this article.

  7. REVIEW OF IMPROVEMENTS IN RADIO FREQUENCY PHOTONICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0156 REVIEW OF IMPROVEMENTS IN RADIO FREQUENCY PHOTONICS Preetpaul S. Devgan RF/EO Subsystems Branch Aerospace Components...Center (DTIC) (http://www.dtic.mil). AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0156 HAS BEEN REVIEWED AND IS APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASSIGNED DISTRIBUTION...public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions

  8. Review of Radio Frequency Photonics Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-06

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0157 REVIEW OF RADIO FREQUENCY PHOTONICS BASICS Preetpaul S. Devgan RF/EO Subsystems Branch Aerospace Components & Subsystems...Center (DTIC) (http://www.dtic.mil). AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0157 HAS BEEN REVIEWED AND IS APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASSIGNED...including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing

  9. Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chremmos, Ioannis; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications explores advances in the fabrication process that enable nanometer waveguide separations. The technology surrounding the design and fabrication of optical microresonators has matured to a point where there is a need for commercialization. Consequently, there is a need for device research involving more advanced architectures and more esoteric operating princples. This volume discusses these issues, while also: Showing a reader how to design and fabricate microresonators Discussing microresonators in photonic crystals, microsphere circuits, and sensors, and provides application oriented examples Covering the latest in microresonator research with contributions from the leading researchers Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications would appeal to researchers and academics working in the optical sciences.

  10. Design and properties of high-power highly-coherent single-frequency VECSEL emitting in the near- to mid-IR for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnache, A.; Laurain, A.; Myara, M.; Sellahi, M.; Cerutti, L.; Perez, J. P.; Michon, A.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Cermak, P.; Romanini, D.

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate high power (multiwatt) low noise single frequency operation of tunable compact verical-external- cavity surface-emitting-lasers exhibiting a low divergence high beam quality, of great interest for photonics applications. The quantum-well based lasers are operating in CW at RT at 1μm and 2.3μm exploiting GaAs and Sb technologies. For heat management purpose the VECSEL membranes were bonded on a SiC substrate. Both high power diode pumping (using GaAs commercial diode) at large incidence angle and electrical pumping are developed. The design and physical properties of the coherent wave are presented. We took advantage of thermal lens-based stability to develop a short (0.5-5mm) external cavity without any intracavity filter. We measured a low divergence circular TEM00 beam (M2 = 1.2) close to diffraction limit, with a linear light polarization (> 30 dB). The side mode suppression ratio is > 45 dB. The free running laser linewidth is 37 kHz limited by pump induced thermal fluctuations. Thanks to this high-Q external cavity approach, the frequency noise is low and the dynamics is in the relaxation-oscillation-free regime, exhibiting low intensity noise (laser power and coherence will be discussed. These design/properties can be extended to other wavelengths.

  11. Temporal interference with frequency-controllable long photons from independent cold atomic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Peng; Gu, Zhenjie; Wen, Rong; Zhang, Weiping; Chen, J. F.

    2018-01-01

    The interference of single photons from independent sources is an essential tool in quantum information processing. However, the interfering of photons with long temporal states in a time-resolved manner has rarely been studied. This is because without transmitting spectral filters or coupling to a cavity mode single photons generated in traditional nonlinear crystals suffer from a short temporal profile below 1 ns. With spectral correlation maintained in the biphotons generated from spontaneous four-wave mixing process in cold atom clouds, here we demonstrate the temporal interference of two frequency-tunable long photons from two independent cold atomic sources. We observe and analyze the interference of frequency-mismatched photons, where the phenomenon of the quantum beat at megahertz separation is displayed. Our paper provides more details for the quantum beat of two independent narrow-band single photons, which may find potential application in frequency-encoded photonic qubits in quantum information processing.

  12. Polymers for electronic & photonic application

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, C P

    2013-01-01

    The most recent advances in the use of polymeric materials by the electronic industry can be found in Polymers for Electronic and Photonic Applications. This bookprovides in-depth coverage of photoresis for micro-lithography, microelectronic encapsulants and packaging, insulators, dielectrics for multichip packaging,electronic and photonic applications of polymeric materials, among many other topics. Intended for engineers and scientists who design, process, and manufacturemicroelectronic components, this book will also prove useful for hybrid and systems packaging managers who want to be info

  13. Coherence revivals in two-photon frequency combs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Company, Victor; Lancis, Jesus; Lajunen, Hanna; Friberg, Ari T.

    2011-01-01

    We describe and theoretically analyze the self-imaging Talbot effect of entangled photon pairs in the time domain. Rich phenomena are observed in coherence propagation along dispersive media of mode-locked two-photon states with frequency entanglement exhibiting a comblike correlation function. Our results can be used to remotely transfer frequency standards through optical fiber networks with two-photon light, avoiding the requirement of dispersion compensation.

  14. SIGNAL PROCESSING UTILIZING RADIO FREQUENCY PHOTONICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-07

    has many advantages over these electronic counterparts. The ability to cover larger bandwidths, immunity to electromagnetic interference, low weight...is unlimited. 4.1 RF Photonics Sampling with Electronic ADCs Figure 7 shows a photonic sampling scheme. The amplitude of the pulses from a laser are...modified by the RF signal to be sampled. The pulses are time demultiplexed and passed to multiple ADCs. The hybrid configuration combines parallel

  15. Waveguide superconducting single-photon autocorrelators for quantum photonic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahin, D.; Gaggero, A.; Frucci, G.; Jahanmirinejad, S.; Sprengers, J.P.; Mattioli, F.; Leoni, R.; Beetz, J.; Lermer, M.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Fiore, A.; Hasan, Z.U.; Hemmer, P.R.; Lee, H.; Santori, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel component for integrated quantum photonic applications, a waveguide single-photon autocorrelator. It is based on two superconducting nanowire detectors patterned onto the same GaAs ridge waveguide. Combining the electrical output of the two detectors in a correlation card enables

  16. Frequency Agile Microwave Photonic Notch Filter in a Photonic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Interference mitigation is crucial in modern radiofrequency (RF) communications systems with dynamically changing operating frequencies, such as cognitive...frequency measurement (IFM) system was also explored. 4. Results and discussions: a. High extinction tunable notch filter in a chalcogenide chip [Optica...Figure 2(b, lower). The measured interferer suppression in this case was 47 dB, limited by the noise floor of the measurements . This paper is in the

  17. Photonics Applications and Web Engineering: WILGA 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2017-08-01

    XLth Wilga Summer 2017 Symposium on Photonics Applications and Web Engineering was held on 28 May-4 June 2017. The Symposium gathered over 350 participants, mainly young researchers active in optics, optoelectronics, photonics, modern optics, mechatronics, applied physics, electronics technologies and applications. There were presented around 300 oral and poster papers in a few main topical tracks, which are traditional for Wilga, including: bio-photonics, optical sensory networks, photonics-electronics-mechatronics co-design and integration, large functional system design and maintenance, Internet of Things, measurement systems for astronomy, high energy physics experiments, and other. The paper is a traditional introduction to the 2017 WILGA Summer Symposium Proceedings, and digests some of the Symposium chosen key presentations. This year Symposium was divided to the following topical sessions/conferences: Optics, Optoelectronics and Photonics, Computational and Artificial Intelligence, Biomedical Applications, Astronomical and High Energy Physics Experiments Applications, Material Research and Engineering, and Advanced Photonics and Electronics Applications in Research and Industry.

  18. Photonic crystals: features and applications (physics research and technology)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The present book is focused on the study of unprecedented control and manipulation of light by photonic crystals (PCs) and their applications. These are micro- or usually nano-structures composed of periodic indexes of refraction of dielectrics with high refractive index contrast. They exhibit optical frequency band gaps in analogy to electronic bands for a periodic potential of a semiconductor crystal lattice. The gemstone opal and butterflys feathers colours are already referred to as natural examples of photonic crystals. The characteristics of such supper-lattices were first reported by Yablonovitch in 1987. The exploitation of photonic crystals is a promising tool in communication, sensors, optical computing, and nanophotonics. Discussed are the various features of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals, photonic quasi crystals, heterostuctures and PC fibres under a variety of conditions using several materials, and metamaterials. It also focuses on the applications of PCs in opt...

  19. On chip frequency discriminator for microwave photonics signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marpaung, D.A.I.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave photonics (MWP) techniques for the generation, distribution and pro- cessing of radio frequency (RF) signals have enjoyed a surge of interest in the last few years. The workhorse behind these MWP functionalities is a high performance MWP link. Such a link needs to fulfill several criteria

  20. Two-photon direct frequency comb spectroscopy of alkali atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Christopher; Pradhananga, Trinity; Nguyen, Khoa; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Kimball, Derek

    2012-11-01

    We have studied transition frequencies and excited state hyperfine structure in rubidium using 2-photon transitions excited directly with the frequency-doubled output of a erbium fiber optical frequency comb. The frequency comb output is directed in two counterpropagating directions through a vapor cell containing the rubidium vapor. A pair of optical filters is used to select teeth of the comb in order to identify the transition wavelengths. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) measures fluorescence from a decay channel wavelength selected with another optical filter. Using different combinations of filters enables a wide range of transitions to be investigated. By scanning the repetition rate, a Doppler-free spectrum can be obtained enabling kHz-resolution spectral measurements. An interesting dependence of the 2-photon spectrum on the energy of the intermediate state of the 2-photon transition is discussed. Our investigations are laying the groundwork for a long-term research program to use direct frequency comb spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms.

  1. Propagation and survival of frequency-bin entangled photons in metallic nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olislager Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the design of two plasmonic nanostructures and the propagation of frequency-bin entangled photons through them. The experimental findings clearly show the robustness of frequency-bin entanglement, which survives after interactions with both a hybrid plasmo-photonic structure, and a nano-pillar array. These results confirm that quantum states can be encoded into the collective motion of a many-body electronic system without demolishing their quantum nature, and pave the way towards applications of plasmonic structures in quantum information.

  2. Silicon photonics III systems and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, David

    2016-01-01

    This book is volume III of a series of books on silicon photonics. It reports on the development of fully integrated systems where many different photonics component are integrated together to build complex circuits. This is the demonstration of the fully potentiality of silicon photonics. It contains a number of chapters written by engineers and scientists of the main companies, research centers and universities active in the field. It can be of use for all those persons interested to know the potentialities and the recent applications of silicon photonics both in microelectronics, telecommunication and consumer electronics market.

  3. Progress in photon science basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book features chapters based on lectures presented by world-leading researchers of photon science from Russia and Japan at the first “STEPS Symposium on Photon Science” held in Tokyo in March 2015. It describes recent progress in the field of photon science, covering a wide range of interest to experts in the field, including laser-plasma interaction, filamentation and its applications, laser assisted electron scattering, exotic properties of light, ultrafast imaging, molecules and clusters in intense laser fields, photochemistry and spectroscopy of novel materials, laser-assisted material synthesis, and photon technology.

  4. Photonic-crystal diplexers for terahertz-wave applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yata, Masahiro; Fujita, Masayuki; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2016-04-04

    A compact diplexer is designed using a silicon photonic-crystal directional coupler of length comparable to the incident wavelength. The diplexer theoretically and experimentally exhibits a cross state bandwidth as broad as 2% of the operation frequency, with over 40-dB isolation between the cross and bar ports. We also demonstrate 1.5-Gbit/s frequency-division communication in the 0.32- and 0.33-THz bands using a single-wavelength-sized diplexer, and discuss the transmission bandwidth. Our study demonstrates the potential for application of photonic crystals as terahertz-wave integration platforms.

  5. Pulsed single-photon spectrometer by frequency-to-time mapping using chirped fiber Bragg gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alex O C; Saulnier, Paul M; Karpiński, Michał; Smith, Brian J

    2017-05-29

    A fiber-integrated spectrometer for single-photon pulses outside the telecommunications wavelength range based upon frequency-to-time mapping, implemented by chromatic group delay dispersion (GDD), and precise temporally-resolved single-photon counting, is presented. A chirped fiber Bragg grating provides low-loss GDD, mapping the frequency distribution of an input pulse onto the temporal envelope of the output pulse. Time-resolved detection with fast single-photon-counting modules enables monitoring of a wavelength range from 825 nm to 835 nm with nearly uniform efficiency at 55 pm resolution (24 GHz at 830 nm). To demonstrate the versatility of this technique, spectral interference of heralded single photons and the joint spectral intensity distribution of a photon-pair source are measured. This approach to single-photon-level spectral measurements provides a route to realize applications of time-frequency quantum optics at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, where multiple spectral channels must be simultaneously monitored.

  6. Photonic crystals physics, fabrication and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtaka, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    "Photonic Crystals" details recent progress in the study of photonic crystals, ranging from fundamental aspects to up-to-date applications, in one unified treatment It covers most of the worldwide frontier fields in photonic crystals, including up-to-date fabrication techniques, recent and future technological applications, and our basic understanding of the various optical properties of photonic crystals Brand-new theoretical and experimental data are also presented The book is intended for graduate course students and specialists actively working in this field, but it will also be useful for newcomers, especially the extensive chapter dealing with fundamental aspects of photonic crystals, which paves the way to a full appreciation of the other topics addressed

  7. Photonic quasicrystals for application in WDM systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero-Vivas, J.; Chigrin, D. N.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2005-01-01

    Photonic quasicrystals can possess an isotropic (complete) photonic bandgap even in the case of low refractive indices of the constitutive materials, which makes them atrractive optical materials with important technological applications. In this work, several aspects related to the design...... of waveguides and cavities using the two-dimensional (2D) octagonal quasiperiodic lattice are investigated numerically. As an example, the integration of waveguides and a resonating cavity to design an add/drop filer for wavelength division multiplexing applications is brieflydescribed....

  8. Applications of Graphene to Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Engineering 52 (2013). [32] W. S. Koh , C. H. Gan, W. K. Phua, Y. A. Akimov, and P. Bai, “The potential of graphene as an ITO replacement in organic solar...1996). [70] S. Kivist, T. Hakulinen, M. Guina, and O. G. Okhotnikov, “Tunable raman soliton source using mode- locked tm-ho fiber laser,” IEEE Photonics

  9. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  10. Photonic Crystal Fibers for Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. R. Pinto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystal fibers are a kind of fiber optics that present a diversity of new and improved features beyond what conventional optical fibers can offer. Due to their unique geometric structure, photonic crystal fibers present special properties and capabilities that lead to an outstanding potential for sensing applications. A review of photonic crystal fiber sensors is presented. Two different groups of sensors are detailed separately: physical and biochemical sensors, based on the sensor measured parameter. Several sensors have been reported until the date, and more are expected to be developed due to the remarkable characteristics such fibers can offer.

  11. Time and frequency applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, H

    1993-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities of atomic clocks and quartz crystal oscillators in terms of available precision of time and frequency signals. The generation, comparison, and dissemination of time and frequency is then discussed. The principal focus is to survey uses of time and frequency in navigation, communication, and science. The examples given include the Global Positioning System, a satellite-based global navigation system, and general and dedicated communication networks, as well as experiments in general relativity and radioastronomy. The number of atomic clocks and crystal oscillators that are in actual use worldwide is estimated.

  12. High-fidelity frequency down-conversion of visible entangled photon pairs with superconducting single-photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Rikizo; Kato, Hiroshi; Kusaka, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide; Koashi, Masato

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-fidelity visible-to-telecommunicationwavelength conversion of a photon by using a solid-state-based difference frequency generation. In the experiment, one half of a pico-second visible entangled photon pair at 780 nm is converted to a 1522-nm photon. Using superconducting single-photon detectors with low dark count rates and small timing jitters, we observed a fidelity of 0.93±0.04 after the wavelength conversion

  13. Polarized-photon frequency filter in double-ferromagnetic barrier silicene junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chantngarm, Peerasak; Yamada, Kou [Domain of Mechanical Science and Technology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Gunma (Japan); Soodchomshom, Bumned, E-mail: Bumned@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2017-05-01

    We present an analytical study of effects from circularly polarized light illumination on controlling spin-valley currents in a dual ferromagnetic-gated silicene. Two different perpendicular electric fields are applied into the ferromagnetic (FM) gates and the photo-irradiated normal (NM) area between the gates. One parallel (P) and two anti-parallel (AP) configurations of exchange fields applied along with chemical potential to the gates are used in this investigation. Interestingly, the studied junction might give rise to polarized-photon frequency filter. Spin-valley filtering can be achieved at the off-resonant frequency region with appropriate direction of electric fields and the configuration of exchange fields (AP-1 or AP-2). Under the photo irradiation, this study found that tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) is controllable to achieve giant magnetoresistance (GMR) by adjusting electric fields or chemical potentials. Our study suggests the potential of photo-sensing devices in spin-valleytronics realm. - Highlights: • Photon-frequency control of spin-valley currents in silicene is investigated. • Complete photon frequency filtering effect is predicted. • Giant magnetoresistance induced by polarized photon is also found. • The junction is applicable for photo-sensing devices in spin-valleytronics realm.

  14. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  15. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  16. High-frequency homogenization of zero frequency stop band photonic and phononic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Antonakakis, Tryfon; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    We present an accurate methodology for representing the physics of waves, for periodic structures, through effective properties for a replacement bulk medium: This is valid even for media with zero frequency stop-bands and where high frequency phenomena dominate. Since the work of Lord Rayleigh in 1892, low frequency (or quasi-static) behaviour has been neatly encapsulated in effective anisotropic media. However such classical homogenization theories break down in the high-frequency or stop band regime. Higher frequency phenomena are of significant importance in photonics (transverse magnetic waves propagating in infinite conducting parallel fibers), phononics (anti-plane shear waves propagating in isotropic elastic materials with inclusions), and platonics (flexural waves propagating in thin-elastic plates with holes). Fortunately, the recently proposed high-frequency homogenization (HFH) theory is only constrained by the knowledge of standing waves in order to asymptotically reconstruct dispersion curves an...

  17. Frequency tunability of solid-core photonic crystal fibers filled with nanoparticle-doped liquid crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Scolari, Lara; Gauza, Sebastian; Xianyu, Haiqing; Zhai, Lei; Eskildsen, Lars; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Wu, Shin-Tson; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    We infiltrate liquid crystals doped with BaTiO3 nanoparticles in a photonic crystal fiber and compare the measured transmission spectrum with the one achieved without dopant. New interesting features, such as frequency modulation response of the device and a transmission spectrum with tunable attenuation on the short wavelength side of the widest bandgap, suggest a potential application of this device as a tunable all-in-fiber gain equalization filter with an adjustable slope. The tunability ...

  18. Ultra High-Speed Radio Frequency Switch Based on Photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jia; Fok, Mable P

    2015-11-26

    Microwave switches, or Radio Frequency (RF) switches have been intensively used in microwave systems for signal routing. Compared with the fast development of microwave and wireless systems, RF switches have been underdeveloped particularly in terms of switching speed and operating bandwidth. In this paper, we propose a photonics based RF switch that is capable of switching at tens of picoseconds speed, which is hundreds of times faster than any existing RF switch technologies. The high-speed switching property is achieved with the use of a rapidly tunable microwave photonic filter with tens of gigahertz frequency tuning speed, where the tuning mechanism is based on the ultra-fast electro-optics Pockels effect. The RF switch has a wide operation bandwidth of 12 GHz and can go up to 40 GHz, depending on the bandwidth of the modulator used in the scheme. The proposed RF switch can either work as an ON/OFF switch or a two-channel switch, tens of picoseconds switching speed is experimentally observed for both type of switches.

  19. Microwave Photonics: current challenges towards widespread application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Li, Guifang; Lim, Christina; Yao, Jianping

    2013-09-23

    Microwave Photonics, a symbiotic field of research that brings together the worlds of optics and radio frequency is currently facing several challenges in its transition from a niche to a truly widespread technology essential to support the ever-increasing values for speed, bandwidth, processing capability and dynamic range that will be required in next generation hybrid access networks. We outline these challenges, which are the subject of the contributions to this focus issue.

  20. Frequency dependence of coherently amplified two-photon emission from hydrogen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hideaki; Miyamoto, Yuki; Hiraki, Takahiro; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2017-12-01

    We investigate how the efficiency of coherently amplified two-photon emission depends on the frequency of one of the two emitted photons, namely the signal photon. This is done over the wavelength range of 5.048-10.21 μ m by using the vibrational transition of parahydrogen. The efficiency increases with the frequency of the signal photon. Considering experimental errors, our results are consistent with the theoretical prediction for the present experimental conditions. This study is an experimental demonstration of the frequency dependence of coherently amplified two-photon emission, and also presents its potential as a light source.

  1. Engineering quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals for frequency conversion of lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baoqin; Hong, Lihong; Hu, Chenyang; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Rongjuan; Li, Zhiyuan

    2018-03-01

    Nonlinear frequency conversion offers an effective way to extend the laser wavelength range. Quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals (NPCs) are artificial materials composed of domain-inversion structures whose sign of nonlinear coefficients are modulated with desire to implement quasi-phase matching (QPM) required for nonlinear frequency conversion. These structures can offer various reciprocal lattice vectors (RLVs) to compensate the phase-mismatching during the quadratic nonlinear optical processes, including second-harmonic generation (SHG), sum-frequency generation and the cascaded third-harmonic generation (THG). The modulation pattern of the nonlinear coefficients is flexible, which can be one-dimensional or two-dimensional (2D), be periodic, quasi-periodic, aperiodic, chirped, or super-periodic. As a result, these NPCs offer very flexible QPM scheme to satisfy various nonlinear optics and laser frequency conversion problems via design of the modulation patterns and RLV spectra. In particular, we introduce the electric poling technique for fabricating QPM structures, a simple effective nonlinear coefficient model for efficiently and precisely evaluating the performance of QPM structures, the concept of super-QPM and super-periodically poled lithium niobate for finely tuning nonlinear optical interactions, the design of 2D ellipse QPM NPC structures enabling continuous tunability of SHG in a broad bandwidth by simply changing the transport direction of pump light, and chirped QPM structures that exhibit broadband RLVs and allow for simultaneous radiation of broadband SHG, THG, HHG and thus coherent white laser from a single crystal. All these technical, theoretical, and physical studies on QPM NPCs can help to gain a deeper insight on the mechanisms, approaches, and routes for flexibly controlling the interaction of lasers with various QPM NPCs for high-efficiency frequency conversion and creation of novel lasers.

  2. Anomalous transparency in photonic crystals and its application to point-by-point grating inscription in photonic crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdasaryan, Tigran; Geernaert, Thomas; Chah, Karima; Caucheteur, Christophe; Schuster, Kay; Kobelke, Jens; Thienpont, Hugo; Berghmans, Francis

    2018-04-03

    It is common belief that photonic crystals behave similarly to isotropic and transparent media only when their feature sizes are much smaller than the wavelength of light. Here, we counter that belief and we report on photonic crystals that are transparent for anomalously high normalized frequencies up to 0.9, where the crystal's feature sizes are comparable with the free space wavelength. Using traditional photonic band theory, we demonstrate that the isofrequency curves can be circular in the region above the first stop band for triangular lattice photonic crystals. In addition, by simulating how efficiently a tightly focused Gaussian beam propagates through the photonic crystal slab, we judge on the photonic crystal's transparency rather than on isotropy only. Using this approach, we identified a wide range of photonic crystal parameters that provide anomalous transparency. Our findings indicate the possibility to scale up the features of photonic crystals and to extend their operational wavelength range for applications including optical cloaking and graded index guiding. We applied our result in the domain of femtosecond laser micromachining, by demonstrating what we believe to be the first point-by-point grating inscribed in a multi-ring photonic crystal fiber.

  3. Designing of Metallic Photonic Structures and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-Sung Kim

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis our main interest has been to investigate metallic photonic crystal and its applications. We explained how to solve a periodic photonic structure with transfer matrix method and when and how to use modal expansion method. Two different coating methods were introduced, modifying a photonic structure's intrinsic optical properties and rigorous calculation results are presented. Two applications of metallic photonic structures are introduced. For thermal emitter, we showed how to design and find optimal structure. For conversion efficiency increasing filter, we calculated its efficiency and the way to design it. We presented the relation between emitting light spectrum and absorption and showed the material and structural dependency of the absorption spectrum. By choosing a proper base material and structural parameters, we can design a selective emitter at a certain region we are interested in. We have developed a theoretical model to analyze a blackbody filament enclosed by a metallic mesh which can increase the efficiency of converting a blackbody radiation to visible light. With this model we found that a square lattice metallic mesh enclosing a filament might increase the efficiency of incandescent lighting sources. Filling fraction and thickness dependency were examined and presented. Combining these two parameters is essential to achieve the maximum output result

  4. Advanced photon counting applications, methods, instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Kapusta, Peter; Erdmann, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC), a powerful tool allowing luminescence lifetime measurements to be made with high temporal resolution, even on single molecules. Combining spectrum and lifetime provides a "fingerprint" for identifying such molecules in the presence of a background. Used together with confocal detection, this permits single-molecule spectroscopy and microscopy in addition to ensemble measurements, opening up an enormous range of hot life science applications such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and measurement of Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) for the investigation of protein folding and interaction. Several technology-related chapters present both the basics and current state-of-the-art, in particular of TCSPC electronics, photon detectors and lasers. The remaining chapters cover a broad range of applications and methodologies for experiments and data analysis, including the life sciences, defect centers in diamonds, super-resolution micr...

  5. Heterojunction Structures for Photon Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-21

    IR: Fourier-transform infrared FTO: Fluorine doped tin oxide G-R: generation-recombination HEIWIP: heterojunction interfacial workfunction internal...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The work presented here report findings in (1) infrared detectors based on p-GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunctions , (2) J and H...aggregate sensitized heterojunctions for solar cell and photon detection applications, (3) heterojunctions sensitized with quantum dots as low cost

  6. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-12

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4 ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics.

  7. Magnetic activity at infrared frequencies in structured metallic photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, S.; Pendry, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    We derive the effective permeability and permittivity of a nanostructured metallic photonic crystal by analysing the complex reflection and transmission coefficients for slabs of various thicknesses. These quantities were calculated using the transfer matrix method. Our results indicate that these structures could be used to realize a negative effective permeability, at least up to infrared frequencies. The origin of the negative permeability is a resonance due to the internal inductance and capacitance of the structure. We also present an analytic model for the effective permeability of the crystal. The model reveals the importance of the inertial inductance due to the finite mass of the electrons in the metal. We find that this contribution to the inductance has implications for the design of metallic magnetic structures in the optical region of the spectrum. We show that the magnetic activity in the structure is accompanied by the concentration of the incident field energy into very small volumes within the structure. This property will allow us to considerably enhance non-linear effects with minute quantities of material. (author)

  8. Photonic band gap materials: Technology, applications and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johri, M.; Ahmed, Y.A.; Bezboruah, T.

    2006-05-01

    Last century has been the age of Artificial Materials. One material that stands out in this regard is the semiconductor. The revolution in electronic industry in the 20th century was made possible by the ability of semiconductors to microscopically manipulate the flow of electrons. Further advancement in the field made scientists suggest that the new millennium will be the age of photonics in which artificial materials will be synthesized to microscopically manipulate the flow of light. One of these will be Photonic Band Gap material (PBG). PBG are periodic dielectric structures that forbid propagation of electromagnetic waves in a certain frequency range. They are able to engineer most fundamental properties of electromagnetic waves such as the laws of refraction, diffraction, and emission of light from atoms. Such PBG material not only opens up variety of possible applications (in lasers, antennas, millimeter wave devices, efficient solar cells photo-catalytic processes, integrated optical communication etc.) but also give rise to new physics (cavity electrodynamics, localization, disorder, photon-number-state squeezing). Unlike electronic micro-cavity, optical waveguides in a PBG microchip can simultaneously conduct hundreds of wavelength channels of information in a three dimensional circuit path. In this article we have discussed some aspects of PBG materials and their unusual properties, which provided a foundation for novel practical applications ranging from clinical medicine to information technology. (author)

  9. Photonics applications in high-capacity data link terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zan; Foshee, James J.

    2001-12-01

    Radio systems and, in particular, RF data link systems are evolving toward progressively more bandwidth and higher data rates. For many military RF data link applications the data transfer requirements exceed one Gigabit per second. Airborne collectors need to transfer sensor information and other large data files to ground locations and other airborne terminals, including the rel time transfer of files. It is a challenge to the system designer to provide a system design, which meets the RF link budget requirements for a one Gigabit per second data link; and there is a corresponding challenge in the development of the terminal architecture and hardware. The utilization of photonic circuitry and devices as a part of the terminal design offers the designer some alternatives to the conventional RF hardware design within the radio. Areas of consideration for the implementation of photonic technology include Gigabit per second baseband data interfaces with fiber along with the associated clocking rates and extending these Gigabit data rates into the radio for optical processing technology; optical interconnections within the individual circuit boards in the radio; and optical backplanes to allow the transfer of not only the Gigabit per second data rates and high speed clocks but other RF signals within the radio. True time delay using photonics in phased array antennas has been demonstrated and is an alternative to the conventional phase shifter designs used in phased array antennas, and remoting of phased array antennas from the terminal electronics in the Ku and Ka frequency bands using fiber optics as the carrier to minimize the RF losses, negate the use of the conventional waveguides, and allow the terminal equipment to be located with other electronic equipment in the aircraft suitable for controlled environment, ready access, and maintenance. The various photonics design alternatives will be discussed including specific photonic design approaches. Packaging

  10. Frequency-bin entanglement of ultra-narrow band non-degenerate photon pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieländer, Daniel; Lenhard, Andreas; Jime`nez Farìas, Osvaldo; Máttar, Alejandro; Cavalcanti, Daniel; Mazzera, Margherita; Acín, Antonio; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate frequency-bin entanglement between ultra-narrowband photons generated by cavity enhanced spontaneous parametric down conversion. Our source generates photon pairs in widely non-degenerate discrete frequency modes, with one photon resonant with a quantum memory material based on praseodymium doped crystals and the other photon at telecom wavelengths. Correlations between the frequency modes are analyzed using phase modulators and narrowband filters before detection. We show high-visibility two photon interference between the frequency modes, allowing us to infer a coherent superposition of the modes. We develop a model describing the state that we create and use it to estimate optimal measurements to achieve a violation of the Clauser-Horne (CH) Bell inequality under realistic assumptions. With these settings we perform a Bell test and show a significant violation of the CH inequality, thus proving the entanglement of the photons. Finally we demonstrate the compatibility with a quantum memory material by using a spectral hole in the praseodymium (Pr) doped crystal as spectral filter for measuring high-visibility two-photon interference. This demonstrates the feasibility of combining frequency-bin entangled photon pairs with Pr-based solid state quantum memories.

  11. Frequency splitter based on the directional emission from surface modes in dielectric photonic crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasolamprou, Anna C; Zhang, Lei; Kafesaki, Maria; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the numerical design and the experimental validation of frequency dependent directional emission from a dielectric photonic crystal structure. The wave propagates through a photonic crystal line-defect waveguide, while a surface layer at the termination of the photonic crystal enables the excitation of surface modes and a subsequent grating layer transforms the surface energy into outgoing propagating waves of the form of a directional beam. The angle of the beam is controlled by the frequency and the structure operates as a frequency splitter in the intermediate and far field region.

  12. Frequency Control of Single Quantum Emitters in Integrated Photonic Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidgall, Emma R; Chakravarthi, Srivatsa; Gould, Michael; Christen, Ian R; Hestroffer, Karine; Hatami, Fariba; Fu, Kai-Mei C

    2018-02-14

    Generating entangled graph states of qubits requires high entanglement rates with efficient detection of multiple indistinguishable photons from separate qubits. Integrating defect-based qubits into photonic devices results in an enhanced photon collection efficiency, however, typically at the cost of a reduced defect emission energy homogeneity. Here, we demonstrate that the reduction in defect homogeneity in an integrated device can be partially offset by electric field tuning. Using photonic device-coupled implanted nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in a GaP-on-diamond platform, we demonstrate large field-dependent tuning ranges and partial stabilization of defect emission energies. These results address some of the challenges of chip-scale entanglement generation.

  13. Frequency Control of Single Quantum Emitters in Integrated Photonic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidgall, Emma R.; Chakravarthi, Srivatsa; Gould, Michael; Christen, Ian R.; Hestroffer, Karine; Hatami, Fariba; Fu, Kai-Mei C.

    2018-02-01

    Generating entangled graph states of qubits requires high entanglement rates, with efficient detection of multiple indistinguishable photons from separate qubits. Integrating defect-based qubits into photonic devices results in an enhanced photon collection efficiency, however, typically at the cost of a reduced defect emission energy homogeneity. Here, we demonstrate that the reduction in defect homogeneity in an integrated device can be partially offset by electric field tuning. Using photonic device-coupled implanted nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in a GaP-on-diamond platform, we demonstrate large field-dependent tuning ranges and partial stabilization of defect emission energies. These results address some of the challenges of chip-scale entanglement generation.

  14. Frequency conversion through spontaneous degenerate four wave mixing in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2014-01-01

    Frequency conversion through spontaneous degenerate four wave mixing (FWM) is investigated in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers. Different FWM processes are observed, phasematching between fiber modes of orthogonal polarization, intermodal phasematching across bandgaps, and intramodal...

  15. Influence of Two Photon Absorption on Soliton Self-Frequency Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Henrik; Rottwitt, Karsten; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2011-01-01

    The creation of mid-infrared supercontinua necessitates the use of soft-glass fibers. However, some materials, like chalcogenide, have a substantial two photon absorption. We introduce a model for soliton self-frequency shift that successfully includes this effect.......The creation of mid-infrared supercontinua necessitates the use of soft-glass fibers. However, some materials, like chalcogenide, have a substantial two photon absorption. We introduce a model for soliton self-frequency shift that successfully includes this effect....

  16. Time Reversal of Arbitrary Photonic Temporal Modes via Nonlinear Optical Frequency Conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Raymer, Michael G; Reddy, Dileep V; van Enk, Steven J; McKinstrie, Colin J

    2017-01-01

    Single-photon wave packets can carry quantum information between nodes of a quantum network. An important general operation in photon-based quantum information systems is blind reversal of a photon's temporal wave-packet envelope, that is, the ability to reverse an envelope without knowing the temporal state of the photon. We present an all-optical means for doing so, using nonlinear-optical frequency conversion driven by a short pump pulse. This scheme allows for quantum operations such as a...

  17. Photonics applications and web engineering: WILGA Summer 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2016-09-01

    Wilga Summer 2016 Symposium on Photonics Applications and Web Engineering was held on 29 May - 06 June. The Symposium gathered over 350 participants, mainly young researchers active in optics, optoelectronics, photonics, electronics technologies and applications. There were presented around 300 presentations in a few main topical tracks including: bio-photonics, optical sensory networks, photonics-electronics-mechatronics co-design and integration, large functional system design and maintenance, Internet of Thins, and other. The paper is an introduction the 2016 WILGA Summer Symposium Proceedings, and digests some of the Symposium chosen key presentations.

  18. Photonics applications and web engineering: WILGA Summer 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2015-09-01

    Wilga Summer 2015 Symposium on Photonics Applications and Web Engineering was held on 23-31 May. The Symposium gathered over 350 participants, mainly young researchers active in optics, optoelectronics, photonics, electronics technologies and applications. There were presented around 300 presentations in a few main topical tracks including: bio-photonics, optical sensory networks, photonics-electronics-mechatronics co-design and integration, large functional system design and maintenance, Internet of Thins, and other. The paper is an introduction the 2015 WILGA Summer Symposium Proceedings, and digests some of the Symposium chosen key presentations.

  19. Analysis of cutoff frequency in a one-dimensional superconductor-metamaterial photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Arafa H; Aghajamali, Alireza; Elsayed, Hussein A.; Mobarak, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Our results show that the appearance of the cutoff frequency, below which the incident electromagnetic waves cannot propagate in the structure. We demonstrate that the cutoff frequency shows an upward trend as the thickness of the superconductor layer as well as the thickness of the metamaterial increase. • The cutoff frequency can be tuned by the operating temperature. Our structures are good candidates for many optical devices such as optical filters, switches, temperature controlled optical shutter, and among photoelectronic applications in gigahertz. - Abstract: In this paper, using the two-fluid model and the characteristic matrix method, we investigate the transmission characteristics of the one-dimensional photonic crystal. Our structure composed of the layers of low-temperature superconductor material (NbN) and double-negative metamaterial. We target studying the effect of many parameters such as the thickness of the superconductor material, the thickness of the metamaterial layer, and the operating temperature. We show that the cut-off frequency can be tuned efficiently by the operating temperature as well as the thicknesses of the constituent materials.

  20. System Engineering of Photonic Systems for Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Pryor, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    The application of photonics in space systems requires tight integration with the spacecraft systems to ensure accurate operation. This requires some detailed and specific system engineering to properly incorporate the photonics into the spacecraft architecture and to guide the spacecraft architecture in supporting the photonics devices. Recent research in product focused, elegant system engineering has led to a system approach which provides a robust approach to this integration. Focusing on the mission application and the integration of the spacecraft system physics incorporation of the photonics can be efficiently and effectively accomplished. This requires a clear understanding of the driving physics properties of the photonics device to ensure proper integration with no unintended consequences. The driving physics considerations in terms of optical performance will be identified for their use in system integration. Keywords: System Engineering, Optical Transfer Function, Optical Physics, Photonics, Image Jitter, Launch Vehicle, System Integration, Organizational Interaction

  1. Information Optics and Photonics Algorithms, Systems, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram

    2010-01-01

    This book addresses applications, recent advances, and emerging areas in fields with applications in information optics and photonics systems. The objective of this book is to illustrate and discuss novel approaches, analytical techniques, models, and technologies that enhance sensing, measurement, processing, interpretation, and visualization of information using free space optics and photonics. The material in this book concentrates on integration of diverse fields for cross-disciplinary applications including bio-photonics, digitally enhanced sensing and imaging systems, multi-dimensional optical imaging and image processing, bio-inspired imaging, 3D visualization, 3D displays, imaging on the nano-scale, quantum optics, super resolution imaging, photonics for biological applications, and holographic information systems. As a result, this book is a useful resource for researchers, engineers, and graduate students who work in the diverse fields comprising information optics and photonics.

  2. Dual-function photonic integrated circuit for frequency octo-tupling or single-side-band modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mehedi; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramón; Hall, Trevor J

    2015-06-01

    A dual-function photonic integrated circuit for microwave photonic applications is proposed. The circuit consists of four linear electro-optic phase modulators connected optically in parallel within a generalized Mach-Zehnder interferometer architecture. The photonic circuit is arranged to have two separate output ports. A first port provides frequency up-conversion of a microwave signal from the electrical to the optical domain; equivalently single-side-band modulation. A second port provides tunable millimeter wave carriers by frequency octo-tupling of an appropriate amplitude RF carrier. The circuit exploits the intrinsic relative phases between the ports of multi-mode interference couplers to provide substantially all the static optical phases needed. The operation of the proposed dual-function photonic integrated circuit is verified by computer simulations. The performance of the frequency octo-tupling and up-conversion functions is analyzed in terms of the electrical signal to harmonic distortion ratio and the optical single side band to unwanted harmonics ratio, respectively.

  3. Mach-Zehnder interferometric photonic crystal fiber for low acoustic frequency detections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawar, Dnyandeo; Rao, Ch. N.; Kale, S. N., E-mail: sangeetakale2004@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), Girinagar, Pune 411 025, Maharashtra (India); Choubey, Ravi Kant [Department of Applied Physics, Amity Institute of Applied Sciences, Amity University, Noida 201 313 (India)

    2016-01-25

    Low frequency under-water acoustic signal detections are challenging, especially for marine applications. A Mach-Zehnder interferometric hydrophone is demonstrated using polarization-maintaining photonic-crystal-fiber (PM-PCF), spliced between two single-mode-fibers, operated at 1550 nm source. These data are compared with standard hydrophone, single-mode and multimode fiber. The PM-PCF sensor shows the highest response with a power shift (2.32 dBm) and a wavelength shift (392.8 pm) at 200 Hz. High birefringence values and the effect of the imparted acoustic pressure on this fiber, introducing the difference between the fast and slow axis changes, owing to the phase change in the propagation waves, demonstrate the strain-optic properties of the sensor.

  4. Fluorescence decay time imaging using an imaging photon detector with a radio frequency photon correlation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher G.; Mitchell, A. C.; Murray, J. G.

    1990-05-01

    An imaging photon detector has been modified to incorporate fast timing electronics coupled to a custom built photon correlator interfaced to a RISC computer. Using excitation with intensity- muodulated light, fluorescence images can be readily obtained where contrast is determined by the decay time of emission, rather than by intensity. This technology is readily extended to multifrequency phase/demodulation fluorescence imaging or to differential polarised phase fluorometry. The potential use of the correlator for confocal imaging with a laser scanner is also briefly discussed.

  5. A modified hexagonal photonic crystal fiber for terahertz applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Saiful; Sultana, Jakeya; Faisal, Mohammad; Islam, Mohammad Rakibul; Dinovitser, Alex; Ng, Brian W.-H.; Abbott, Derek

    2018-05-01

    We present a Zeonex based highly birefringent and dispersion flattened porous core photonic crystal fiber (PC-PCF) for polarization preserving applications in the terahertz region. In order to facilitate birefringence, an array of elliptical shaped air holes surrounded by porous cladding is introduced. The porous cladding comprises circular air-holes in a modified hexagonal arrangement. The transmission characteristics of the proposed PCF are investigated using a full-vector finite element method with perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary conditions. Simulation results show a high birefringence of 0.086 and an ultra-flattened dispersion variation of ± 0.03 ps/THz/cm at optimal design parameters. Besides, a number of other important wave-guiding properties including frequency dependence of the effective material loss (EML), confinement loss, and effective area are also investigated to assess the fiber's effectiveness as a terahertz waveguide.

  6. Inline microring reflector for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young Mo

    The microring is a compact resonator that is used as a versatile building block in photonic circuits ranging from filters, modulators, logic gates, sensors, switches, multiplexers, and laser cavities. The Bragg grating is a periodic structure that allows the selection of a narrow bandwidth of spectrum for stable lasing operation. In this dissertation, we study analysis and simulations of a compact microring based reflector assembled by forming a Bragg grating into a loop. With the appropriate design, the microring resonance can precisely align with the reflection peak of the grating while all other peaks are suppressed by reflection nulls of the grating. The field buildup at the resonance effectively amplifies small reflection of the grating, thereby producing significant overall reflection from the ring, and it is possible to achieve a stable narrow linewidth compact laser by forming a single mode laser cavity. The device operation principle is studied from two distinct perspectives; the first looks at coupling of two contra-directional traveling waves within the ring whereas the second aspect investigates relative excitation of the two competing microring resonant modes. In the former method, we relate the steady state amplitudes of the two traveling waves to the reflection spectrum of the grating and solve for the reflection and transmission response for each wavelength of interest. In the latter approach, we expand the field in terms of the resonant modes of the ring cavity and derive transfer functions for reflection and transmission from the nearby mode frequencies. The angular periodicity of the reflective microring geometry allows us to effectively simulate the resonant modes from a computational domain of a single period grating when the continuity boundary condition is applied. We successfully predict the reflection and transmission response of a Si3N 4/SiO2 microring reflector using this method---otherwise too large to carry out full-wave simulation

  7. Frequency-tuned microwave photon counter based on a superconductive quantum interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnyrkov, V. I.; Yangcao, Wu; Soroka, A. A.; Turutanov, O. G.; Lyakhno, V. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Various types of single-photon counters operating in infrared, ultraviolet, and optical wavelength ranges are successfully used to study electromagnetic fields, analyze radiation sources, and solve problems in quantum informatics. However, their operating principles become ineffective at millimeter band, S-band, and ultra-high frequency bands of wavelengths due to the decrease in quantum energy by 4-5 orders of magnitude. Josephson circuits with discrete Hamiltonians and qubits are a good foundation for the construction of single-photon counters at these frequencies. This paper presents a frequency-tuned microwave photon counter based on a single-junction superconducting quantum interferometer and flux qutrit. The control pulse converts the interferometer into a two-level system for resonance absorption of photons. Decay of the photon-induced excited state changes the magnetic flux in the interferometer, which is measured by a SQUID magnetometer. Schemes for recording the magnetic flux using a DC SQUID or ideal parametric detector, based on a qutrit with high-frequency excitation, are discussed. It is shown that the counter consisting of an interferometer with a Josephson junction and a parametric detector demonstrates high performance and is capable of detecting single photons in a microwave band.

  8. Long-Distance Single Photon Transmission from a Trapped Ion via Quantum Frequency Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thomas; Miyanishi, Koichiro; Ikuta, Rikizo; Takahashi, Hiroki; Vartabi Kashanian, Samir; Tsujimoto, Yoshiaki; Hayasaka, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Keller, Matthias

    2018-05-01

    Trapped atomic ions are ideal single photon emitters with long-lived internal states which can be entangled with emitted photons. Coupling the ion to an optical cavity enables the efficient emission of single photons into a single spatial mode and grants control over their temporal shape. These features are key for quantum information processing and quantum communication. However, the photons emitted by these systems are unsuitable for long-distance transmission due to their wavelengths. Here we report the transmission of single photons from a single 40Ca+ ion coupled to an optical cavity over a 10 km optical fiber via frequency conversion from 866 nm to the telecom C band at 1530 nm. We observe nonclassical photon statistics of the direct cavity emission, the converted photons, and the 10 km transmitted photons, as well as the preservation of the photons' temporal shape throughout. This telecommunication-ready system can be a key component for long-distance quantum communication as well as future cloud quantum computation.

  9. Efficient frequency downconversion at the single photon level from the red spectral range to the telecommunications C-band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaske, Sebastian; Lenhard, Andreas; Becher, Christoph

    2011-06-20

    We report on single photon frequency downconversion from the red part of the spectrum (738 nm) to the telecommunications C-band. By mixing attenuated laser pulses with an average photon number per pulse telecommunications wavelengths.

  10. Present and future applications of analogue microwave photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2009-01-01

    Photonics may be even more suited for analog than for digital signal applications. Today, microwave photonics techniques are currently used in radio-over-fibre signal transmission and other commercial applications, but recent advances are widening the scope of application to new areas. The speakers...... will introduce present and emerging opportunities for analog photonics, among which microwave filters, arbitrary optical waveform control, THz radiation and UWB pulse generation. A panel discussion will contrast different views from company, academy and funding bodies, to identify the most promising ones...

  11. Self-collimation in photonic crystals. Applications and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noori, Mina; Soroosh, Mohammad; Baghban, Hamed

    2018-01-01

    A comprehensive review considering recent advances in self-collimation and its applications in optical integration is covered in the current article. Self-collimation is compared to the conventional technique of photonic bandgap engineering to control the light propagation in photonic crystal-based structures. It is fully discussed how the self-collimation phenomenon can be tailored to be independent of the incident angle and polarization. This adds substantial flexibility to the structure to overcome light coupling challenges and simultaneously aids in the omission of bulk and challenging elements, including polarizers and lenses from optical integrated circuits. Additionally, designed structures have the potential to be rescaled to operate in any desired frequency range thanks to the scalability rule in the field of electromagnetics. Moreover, it is shown that one can boost the coupling efficiency by applying an anti-reflection property to the structure, which provides not only efficient index matching but also the matching between external waves with uniform amplitude and Bloch waves with periodic amplitude. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Fabrication of Terahertz Wave Resonators with Alumina Diamond Photonic Crystals for Frequency Amplification in Water Solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, N; Niki, T; Kirihara, S

    2011-01-01

    Terahertz wave resonators composed of alumina photonic crystals with diamond lattice structures were designed and fabricated by using micro stereolithography. These three dimensional periodic structures can reflect perfectly electromagnetic waves through Bragg diffraction. A micro glass cell including water solutions was put between the photonic crystals as a novel resonance sensor with terahertz frequency range. The localized and amplified waves in the resonators were measured by a spectroscopy, and visualized by theoretical simulations.

  13. Radio frequency regenerative oscillations in monolithic high-Q/V heterostructured photonic crystal cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jinghui; Gu, Tingyi; Zheng, Jiangjun; Wei Wong, Chee; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2014-01-01

    We report temporal and spectral domain observation of regenerative oscillation in monolithic silicon heterostructured photonic crystals cavities with high quality factor to mode volume ratios (Q/V). The results are interpreted by nonlinear coupled mode theory (CMT) tracking the dynamics of photon, free carrier population, and temperature variations. We experimentally demonstrate effective tuning of the radio frequency tones by laser-cavity detuning and laser power levels, confirmed by the CMT simulations with sensitive input parameters

  14. Photon wave function formalism for analysis of Mach–Zehnder interferometer and sum-frequency generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritboon, Atirach, E-mail: atirach.3.14@gmail.com [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai 90112 (Thailand); Daengngam, Chalongrat, E-mail: chalongrat.d@psu.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai 90112 (Thailand); Pengpan, Teparksorn, E-mail: teparksorn.p@psu.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai 90112 (Thailand)

    2016-08-15

    Biakynicki-Birula introduced a photon wave function similar to the matter wave function that satisfies the Schrödinger equation. Its second quantization form can be applied to investigate nonlinear optics at nearly full quantum level. In this paper, we applied the photon wave function formalism to analyze both linear optical processes in the well-known Mach–Zehnder interferometer and nonlinear optical processes for sum-frequency generation in dispersive and lossless medium. Results by photon wave function formalism agree with the well-established Maxwell treatments and existing experimental verifications.

  15. Photon wave function formalism for analysis of Mach–Zehnder interferometer and sum-frequency generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritboon, Atirach; Daengngam, Chalongrat; Pengpan, Teparksorn

    2016-01-01

    Biakynicki-Birula introduced a photon wave function similar to the matter wave function that satisfies the Schrödinger equation. Its second quantization form can be applied to investigate nonlinear optics at nearly full quantum level. In this paper, we applied the photon wave function formalism to analyze both linear optical processes in the well-known Mach–Zehnder interferometer and nonlinear optical processes for sum-frequency generation in dispersive and lossless medium. Results by photon wave function formalism agree with the well-established Maxwell treatments and existing experimental verifications.

  16. Visualization of frequency-modulated electric field based on photonic frequency tracking in asynchronous electro-optic measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisatake, Shintaro; Yamaguchi, Koki; Uchida, Hirohisa; Tojyo, Makoto; Oikawa, Yoichi; Miyaji, Kunio; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2018-04-01

    We propose a new asynchronous measurement system to visualize the amplitude and phase distribution of a frequency-modulated electromagnetic wave. The system consists of three parts: a nonpolarimetric electro-optic frequency down-conversion part, a phase-noise-canceling part, and a frequency-tracking part. The photonic local oscillator signal generated by electro-optic phase modulation is controlled to track the frequency of the radio frequency (RF) signal to significantly enhance the measurable RF bandwidth. We demonstrate amplitude and phase measurement of a quasi-millimeter-wave frequency-modulated continuous-wave signal (24 GHz ± 80 MHz with a 2.5 ms period) as a proof-of-concept experiment.

  17. Space evaluation of optical modulators for microwave photonic on-board applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Kernec, A.; Sotom, M.; Bénazet, B.; Barbero, J.; Peñate, L.; Maignan, M.; Esquivias, I.; Lopez, F.; Karafolas, N.

    2017-11-01

    Since several years, perspectives and assets offered by photonic technologies compared with their traditional RF counterparts (mass and volume reduction, transparency to RF frequency, RF isolation), make them particularly attractive for space applications [1] and, in particular, telecommunication satellites [2]. However, the development of photonic payload concepts have concurrently risen and made the problem of the ability of optoelectronic components to withstand space environment more and more pressing. Indeed, photonic components used in such photonic payloads architectures come from terrestrial networks applications in order to benefit from research and development in this field. This paper presents some results obtained in the frame of an ESA-funded project, carried out by Thales Alenia Space France, as prime contractor, and Alter Technology Group Spain (ATG) and Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), as subcontractors, one objective of which was to assess commercial high frequency optical intensity modulators for space use through a functional and environmental test campaign. Their potential applications in microwave photonic sub-systems of telecom satellite payloads are identified and related requirements are presented. Optical modulator technologies are reviewed and compared through, but not limited to, a specific figure of merit, taking into account two key features of these components : optical insertion loss and RF half-wave voltage. Some conclusions on these different technologies are given, on the basis of the test results, and their suitability for the targeted applications and environment is highlighted.

  18. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangyu, E-mail: cqufangyuli@hotmail.com [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wen, Hao [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Zhenyun [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wei, Lianfu; Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Miao [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Interaction of very low-frequency primordial (relic) gravitational waves (GWs) to cosmic microwave background (CMB) can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic (EM) response to high-frequency GWs (HFGWs) would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes. We study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes, and it is shown that such two effects are from the same physical origin: the tensor perturbation of the GWs and not the density perturbation. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs and related numerical calculation, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  19. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Y. Fangyu Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of very low-frequency primordial (relic gravitational waves (GWs to cosmic microwave background (CMB can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic (EM response to high-frequency GWs (HFGWs would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes. We study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes, and it is shown that such two effects are from the same physical origin: the tensor perturbation of the GWs and not the density perturbation. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs and related numerical calculation, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  20. Heralded wave packet manipulation and storage of a frequency-converted pair photon at telecom wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroh, Tim; Ahlrichs, Andreas; Sprenger, Benjamin; Benson, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Future quantum networks require a hybrid platform of dissimilar quantum systems. Within the platform, joint quantum states have to be mediated either by single photons, photon pairs or entangled photon pairs. The photon wavelength has to lie within the telecommunication band to enable long-distance fibre transmission. In addition, the temporal shape of the photons needs to be tailored to efficiently match the involved quantum systems. Altogether, this requires the efficient coherent wavelength-conversion of arbitrarily shaped single-photon wave packets. Here, we demonstrate the heralded temporal filtering of single photons as well as the synchronisation of state manipulation and detection as key elements in a typical experiment, besides of delaying a photon in a long fibre. All three are realised by utilising commercial telecommunication fibre-optical components which will permit the transition of quantum networks from the lab to real-world applications. The combination of these renders a temporally filtering single-photon storage in a fast switchable fibre loop possible.

  1. Radio frequency phototube and optical clock: High resolution, high rate and highly stable single photon timing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaryan, Amur

    2011-10-01

    A new timing technique for single photons based on the radio frequency phototube and optical clock or femtosecond optical frequency comb generator is proposed. The technique has a 20 ps resolution for single photons, is capable of operating with MHz frequencies and achieving 10 fs instability level.

  2. High-performance silicon photonics technology for telecommunications applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Koji; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Nishi, Hidetaka; Kou, Rai; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Takeda, Kotaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2014-04-01

    By way of a brief review of Si photonics technology, we show that significant improvements in device performance are necessary for practical telecommunications applications. In order to improve device performance in Si photonics, we have developed a Si-Ge-silica monolithic integration platform, on which compact Si-Ge-based modulators/detectors and silica-based high-performance wavelength filters are monolithically integrated. The platform features low-temperature silica film deposition, which cannot damage Si-Ge-based active devices. Using this platform, we have developed various integrated photonic devices for broadband telecommunications applications.

  3. High-performance silicon photonics technology for telecommunications applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Koji; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Nishi, Hidetaka; Kou, Rai; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Takeda, Kotaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi

    2014-01-01

    By way of a brief review of Si photonics technology, we show that significant improvements in device performance are necessary for practical telecommunications applications. In order to improve device performance in Si photonics, we have developed a Si-Ge-silica monolithic integration platform, on which compact Si-Ge–based modulators/detectors and silica-based high-performance wavelength filters are monolithically integrated. The platform features low-temperature silica film deposition, which cannot damage Si-Ge–based active devices. Using this platform, we have developed various integrated photonic devices for broadband telecommunications applications. (review)

  4. High-performance silicon photonics technology for telecommunications applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Koji; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Nishi, Hidetaka; Kou, Rai; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Takeda, Kotaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2014-04-01

    By way of a brief review of Si photonics technology, we show that significant improvements in device performance are necessary for practical telecommunications applications. In order to improve device performance in Si photonics, we have developed a Si-Ge-silica monolithic integration platform, on which compact Si-Ge-based modulators/detectors and silica-based high-performance wavelength filters are monolithically integrated. The platform features low-temperature silica film deposition, which cannot damage Si-Ge-based active devices. Using this platform, we have developed various integrated photonic devices for broadband telecommunications applications.

  5. Development and Performance Analysis of a Photonics-Assisted RF Converter for 5G Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ramon Maia; Muniz, André Luiz Marques; Sodré Junior, Arismar Cerqueira

    2017-03-01

    This article presents a simple, ultra-wideband and tunable radiofrequency (RF) converter for 5G cellular networks. The proposed optoelectronic device performs broadband photonics-assisted upconversion and downconversion using a single optical modulator. Experimental results demonstrate RF conversion from DC to millimeter waves, including 28 and 38 GHz that are potential frequency bands for 5G applications. Narrow linewidth and low phase noise characteristics are observed in all generated RF carriers. An experimental digital performance analysis using different modulation schemes illustrates the applicability of the proposed photonics-based device in reconfigurable optical wireless communications.

  6. Advances in Photonics Design and Modeling for Nano- and Bio-photonics Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan

    2010-01-01

    In this invited paper we focus on the discussion of two recent unique applications of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulation method to the design and modeling of advanced nano- and bio-photonic problems. We will first discuss the application of a traditional formulation of the FDTD...

  7. Silicon Micromachining in RF and Photonic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsen-Hwang; Congdon, Phil; Magel, Gregory; Pang, Lily; Goldsmith, Chuck; Randall, John; Ho, Nguyen

    1995-01-01

    Texas Instruments (TI) has developed membrane and micromirror devices since the late 1970s. An eggcrate space membrane was used as the spatial light modulator in the early years. Discrete micromirrors supported by cantilever beams created a new era for micromirror devices. Torsional micromirror and flexure-beam micromirror devices were promising for mass production because of their stable supports. TI's digital torsional micromirror device is an amplitude modulator (known as the digital micromirror device (DMD) and is in production development, discussed elsewhere. We also use a torsional device for a 4 x 4 fiber-optic crossbar switch in a 2 cm x 2 cm package. The flexure-beam micromirror device is an analog phase modulator and is considered more efficient than amplitude modulators for use in optical processing systems. TI also developed millimeter-sized membranes for integrated optical switches for telecommunication and network applications. Using a member in radio frequency (RF) switch applications is a rapidly growing area because of the micromechanical device performance in microsecond-switching characteristics. Our preliminary membrane RF switch test structure results indicate promising speed and RF switching performance. TI collaborated with MIT for modeling of metal-based micromachining.

  8. Multifrequency sources of quantum correlated photon pairs on-chip: a path toward integrated Quantum Frequency Combs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspani Lucia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in quantum photonics have initiated the process of bringing photonic-quantumbased systems out-of-the-lab and into real-world applications. As an example, devices to enable the exchange of a cryptographic key secured by the laws of quantum mechanics are already commercially available. In order to further boost this process, the next step is to transfer the results achieved by means of bulky and expensive setups into miniaturized and affordable devices. Integrated quantum photonics is exactly addressing this issue. In this paper, we briefly review the most recent advancements in the generation of quantum states of light on-chip. In particular, we focus on optical microcavities, as they can offer a solution to the problem of low efficiency that is characteristic of the materials typically used in integrated platforms. In addition, we show that specifically designed microcavities can also offer further advantages, such as compatibility with telecom standards (for exploiting existing fibre networks and quantum memories (necessary to extend the communication distance, as well as giving a longitudinal multimode character for larger information transfer and processing. This last property (i.e., the increased dimensionality of the photon quantum state is achieved through the ability to generate multiple photon pairs on a frequency comb, corresponding to the microcavity resonances. Further achievements include the possibility of fully exploiting the polarization degree of freedom, even for integrated devices. These results pave the way for the generation of integrated quantum frequency combs that, in turn, may find important applications toward the realization of a compact quantum-computing platform.

  9. Photonic crystal nanostructures for optical biosensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorfner, D.; Zabel, T.; Hürlimann, T.

    2009-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and optical investigation of photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity drop filters for use as optical biosensors. The resonant cavity mode wavelength and Q-factor are studied as a function of the ambient refractive index and as a function of adsorbed proteins (bovine...

  10. Signal Identification and Isolation Utilizing Radio Frequency Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    RF filter is the use of either a FIR or an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter. The FIR filter is simply the discrete convolution sum of the...by using a feedback loop of a fixed delay. In this case, the signal will ideally be a summation of an infinite number of delay round trips. While...and Infinite Impulse Response filters. A combination of FIR and IIR filters can be used to identify the center frequency of an RF signal, as seen in

  11. Photon upconversion towards applications in energy conversion and bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-C.; Ding, Yuchen C.; Sagar, Dodderi M.; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-12-01

    The field of plasmonics can play an important role in developing novel devices for application in energy and healthcare. In this review article, we consider the progress made in design and fabrication of upconverting nanoparticles and metal nanostructures for precisely manipulating light photons, with a wavelength of several hundred nanometers, at nanometer length scales, and describe how to tailor their interactions with molecules and surfaces so that two or more lower energy photons can be used to generate a single higher energy photon in a process called photon upconversion. This review begins by introducing the current state-of-the-art in upconverting nanoparticle synthesis and achievements in color tuning and upconversion enhancement. Through understanding and tailoring physical processes, color tuning and strong upconversion enhancement have been demonstrated by coupling with surface plasmon polariton waves, especially for low intensity or diffuse infrared radiation. Since more than 30% of incident sunlight is not utilized in most photovoltaic cells, this photon upconversion is one of the promising approaches to break the so-called Shockley-Queisser thermodynamic limit for a single junction solar cell. Furthermore, since the low energy photons typically cover the biological window of optical transparency, this approach can also be particularly beneficial for novel biosensing and bioimaging techniques. Taken together, the recent research boosts the applications of photon upconversion using designed metal nanostructures and nanoparticles for green energy, bioimaging, and therapy.

  12. Bottom-Up Assembly and Applications of Photonic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanbin Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The assembly of colloidal building-blocks is an efficient, inexpensive and flexible approach for the fabrication of a wide variety of photonic materials with designed shapes and large areas. In this review, the various assembly routes to the fabrication of colloidal crystals and their post-assembly modifications to the production of photonic materials are first described. Then, the emerging applications of the colloidal photonic structures in various fields such as biological and chemical sensing, anti-reflection, photovoltaics, and light extraction are summarized.

  13. Influence of two-photon absorption on soliton self-frequency shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Henrik; Agger, Christian; Bang, Ole

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop an analytical model for the soliton self-frequency shift, which includes second- and thirdorder dispersion, self-steepening, the full Raman term, and, for the first time to our best knowledge, the effect of two-photon absorption (TPA). We show that TPA can have a signific...

  14. Photon - axion conversions in a periodic electromagnetic field with axion frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Van Soa

    1998-09-01

    The conversion of photons into axions in a periodic external electromagnetic field with axion frequency is considered in detail by Feynman methods. The differential cross sections are given. It is shown that there is a resonant conversion for the considered process. (author)

  15. Spectrum Control through Discrete Frequency Diffraction in the Presence of Photonic Gauge Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chengzhi; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Yugui; Sounas, Dimitrios; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wang, Bing; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Xinliang; Alù; , Andrea; Lu, Peixiang

    2018-03-01

    By using optical phase modulators in a fiber-optical circuit, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate large control over the spectrum of an impinging signal, which may evolve analogously to discrete diffraction in spatial waveguide arrays. The modulation phase acts as a photonic gauge potential in the frequency dimension, realizing efficient control of the central frequency and bandwidth of frequency combs. We experimentally achieve a 50 GHz frequency shift and threefold bandwidth expansion of an impinging comb, as well as the frequency analogue of various refraction phenomena, including negative refraction and perfect focusing in the frequency domain, both for discrete and continuous incident spectra. Our study paves a promising way towards versatile frequency management for optical communications and signal processing using time modulation schemes.

  16. Finite element method analysis of band gap and transmission of two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals at terahertz frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degirmenci, Elif; Landais, Pascal

    2013-10-20

    Photonic band gap and transmission characteristics of 2D metallic photonic crystals at THz frequencies have been investigated using finite element method (FEM). Photonic crystals composed of metallic rods in air, in square and triangular lattice arrangements, are considered for transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. The modes and band gap characteristics of metallic photonic crystal structure are investigated by solving the eigenvalue problem over a unit cell of the lattice using periodic boundary conditions. A photonic band gap diagram of dielectric photonic crystal in square lattice array is also considered and compared with well-known plane wave expansion results verifying our FEM approach. The photonic band gap designs for both dielectric and metallic photonic crystals are consistent with previous studies obtained by different methods. Perfect match is obtained between photonic band gap diagrams and transmission spectra of corresponding lattice structure.

  17. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Donald 0; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David; Witherow, William K.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make Abstract: them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics.

  18. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  19. Scientific applications of frequency-stabilized laser technology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Bonny L.

    1990-01-01

    A synoptic investigation of the uses of frequency-stabilized lasers for scientific applications in space is presented. It begins by summarizing properties of lasers, characterizing their frequency stability, and describing limitations and techniques to achieve certain levels of frequency stability. Limits to precision set by laser frequency stability for various kinds of measurements are investigated and compared with other sources of error. These other sources include photon-counting statistics, scattered laser light, fluctuations in laser power, and intensity distribution across the beam, propagation effects, mechanical and thermal noise, and radiation pressure. Methods are explored to improve the sensitivity of laser-based interferometric and range-rate measurements. Several specific types of science experiments that rely on highly precise measurements made with lasers are analyzed, and anticipated errors and overall performance are discussed. Qualitative descriptions are given of a number of other possible science applications involving frequency-stabilized lasers and related laser technology in space. These applications will warrant more careful analysis as technology develops.

  20. Some optical properties of one dimensional annular photonic crystal with plasma frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandeya, G. N.; Thapa, Khem B.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents the reflection bands, photonic band gaps, of the one-dimensional annul photonic crystal (APC) containing double negative (DNG) metamaterials and air. The proposed annular structure consists of the alternate layers of dispersive DNG material and air immersed in free space. The reflectance properties of the APC by employing the transfer matrix method (TMM) in the cylindrical waves for TE polarization is studied theoretically. In addition of this, we have also studied the effect of plasma frequency on the reflection behavior of the considered annular structure.

  1. Tunable radio-frequency photonic filter based on an actively mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigosa-Blanch, A; Mora, J; Capmany, J; Ortega, B; Pastor, D

    2006-03-15

    We propose the use of an actively mode-locked fiber laser as a multitap optical source for a microwave photonic filter. The fiber laser provides multiple optical taps with an optical frequency separation equal to the external driving radio-frequency signal of the laser that governs its repetition rate. All the optical taps show equal polarization and an overall Gaussian apodization, which reduces the sidelobes. We demonstrate continuous tunability of the filter by changing the external driving radio-frequency signal of the laser, which shows good fine tunability in the operating range of the laser from 5 to 10 GHz.

  2. Simulating Photon Mapping for Real-time Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bent Dalgaard; Christensen, Niels Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel method for simulating photon mapping for real-time applications. First we introduce a new method for selectively redistributing photons. Then we describe a method for selectively updating the indirect illumination. The indirect illumination is calculated using a new...... GPU accelerated final gathering method and the illumination is then stored in light maps. Caustic photons are traced on the CPU and then drawn using points in the framebuffer, and finally filtered using the GPU. Both diffuse and non-diffuse surfaces can be handled by calculating the direct...... illumination on the GPU and the photon tracing on the CPU. We achieve real-time frame rates for dynamic scenes....

  3. Optics Communications: Special issue on Polymer Photonics and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziyang; Pitwon, Richard C. A.; Feng, Jing

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade polymer photonics has witnessed a tremendous boost in research efforts and practical applications. Polymer materials can be engineered to exhibit unique optical and electrical properties. Extremely transparent and reliable passive optical polymers have been made commercially available and paved the ground for the development of various waveguide components. Advancement in the research activities regarding the synthesis of active polymers has enabled devices such as ultra-fast electro-optic modulators, efficient white light emitting diodes, broadband solar cells, flexible displays, and so on. The fabrication technology is not only fast and cost-effective, but also provides flexibility and broad compatibility with other semiconductor processing technologies. Reports show that polymers have been integrated in photonic platforms such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI), III-V semiconductors, and silica PLCs, and vice versa, photonic components made from a multitude of materials have been integrated, in a heterogeneous/hybrid manner, in polymer photonic platforms.

  4. Switchable Photonic Crystals Using One-Dimensional Confined Liquid Crystals for Photonic Device Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Gim, Min-Jun; Lee, Wonsuk; Choi, Suk-Won; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-01-25

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have recently attracted considerable attention, with much effort devoted to photonic bandgap (PBG) control for varying the reflected color. Here, fabrication of a modulated one-dimensional (1D) anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) PC with a periodic porous structure is reported. The PBG of the fabricated PC can be reversibly changed by switching the ultraviolet (UV) light on/off. The AAO nanopores contain a mixture of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with irradiation-activated cis/trans photoisomerizable azobenzene. The resultant mixture of LCs in the porous AAO film exhibits a reversible PBG, depending on the cis/trans configuration of azobenzene molecules. The PBG switching is reliable over many cycles, suggesting that the fabricated device can be used in optical and photonic applications such as light modulators, smart windows, and sensors.

  5. High-flux solar photon processes: Opportunities for applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinfeld, J.I.; Coy, S.L.; Herzog, H.; Shorter, J.A.; Schlamp, M.; Tester, J.W.; Peters, W.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The overall goal of this study was to identify new high-flux solar photon (HFSP) processes that show promise of being feasible and in the national interest. Electric power generation and hazardous waste destruction were excluded from this study at sponsor request. Our overall conclusion is that there is promise for new applications of concentrated solar photons, especially in certain aspects of materials processing and premium materials synthesis. Evaluation of the full potential of these and other possible applications, including opportunities for commercialization, requires further research and testing. 100 refs.

  6. MEMS for Tunable Photonic Metamaterial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Thomas

    Photonic metamaterials are materials whose optical properties are derived from artificially-structured sub-wavelength unit cells, rather than from the bulk properties of the constituent materials. Examples of metamaterials include plasmonic materials, negative index materials, and electromagnetic cloaks. While advances in simulation tools and nanofabrication methods have allowed this field to grow over the past several decades, many challenges still exist. This thesis addresses two of these challenges: fabrication of photonic metamaterials with tunable responses and high-throughput nanofabrication methods for these materials. The design, fabrication, and optical characterization of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) tunable plasmonic spectrometer are presented. An array of holes in a gold film, with plasmon resonance in the mid-infrared, is suspended above a gold reflector, forming a Fabry-Perot interferometer of tunable length. The spectra exhibit the convolution of extraordinary optical transmission through the holes and Fabry-Perot resonances. Using MEMS, the interferometer length is modulated from 1.7 mum to 21.67 mum , thereby tuning the free spectral range from about 2900 wavenumbers to 230.7 wavenumbers and shifting the reflection minima and maxima across the infrared. Due to its broad spectral tunability in the fingerprint region of the mid-infrared, this device shows promise as a tunable biological sensing device. To address the issue of high-throughput, high-resolution fabrication of optical metamaterials, atomic calligraphy, a MEMS-based dynamic stencil lithography technique for resist-free fabrication of photonic metamaterials on unconventional substrates, has been developed. The MEMS consists of a moveable stencil, which can be actuated with nanometer precision using electrostatic comb drive actuators. A fabrication method and flip chip method have been developed, enabling evaporation of metals through the device handle for fabrication on an

  7. Fabrication of photonic amorphous diamonds for terahertz-wave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, Yuichiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kamimura, Yasushi; Edagawa, Keiichi, E-mail: edagawa@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2016-05-09

    A recently proposed photonic bandgap material, named “photonic amorphous diamond” (PAD), was fabricated in a terahertz regime, and its terahertz-wave propagation properties were investigated. The PAD structure was fabricated from acrylic resin mixed with alumina powder, using laser lithographic, micro-additive manufacturing technique. After fabrication, the resulting structure was dewaxed and sintered. The formation of a photonic bandgap at around 0.45 THz was demonstrated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Reflecting the disordered nature of the random network structure, diffusive terahertz-wave propagation was observed in the passbands; the scattering mean-free path decreased as the frequency approached the band edge. The mean-free paths evaluated at the band edges were close to the Ioffe-Regel threshold value for wave localization.

  8. First International Conference on Applications of Photonic Technology (ICAPT'94)

    CERN Document Server

    Chrostowski, Jacek; Measures, Raymond; Applications of Photonic Technology

    1995-01-01

    In this book we present a snapshot of the state of the art in photonics in 1994, showing typical applications and emerging new ones; discussing the key technologies behind these applications, their limitations, and prospects. The articles in this book are extended versions of the papers presented at the first International Conference on Applications ofPhotonic Technology (ICAPT'94), held in Toronto, Canada, on June 21-23, 1994. Photonics has been recognized as one of the key technologies for the 21 st century, as electronics was the technology of the 20th centrury and electrical engineering changed the life of people in the 19th century. According to the recent report of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in Paris (OECD), the market for photonics will grow dramatically in the next 10 years with an expected world-wide expenditure of US $230 billion from some US $30 billion in 1992. The explosion of information technology was the largest driving force for the deployment of photonic techno...

  9. Programmable dispersion on a photonic integrated circuit for classical and quantum applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaros, Jelena; Mower, Jacob; Heuck, Mikkel; Lupo, Cosmo; Harris, Nicholas C; Steinbrecher, Gregory R; Bunandar, Darius; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Lloyd, Seth; Englund, Dirk

    2017-09-04

    We demonstrate a large-scale tunable-coupling ring resonator array, suitable for high-dimensional classical and quantum transforms, in a CMOS-compatible silicon photonics platform. The device consists of a waveguide coupled to 15 ring-based dispersive elements with programmable linewidths and resonance frequencies. The ability to control both quality factor and frequency of each ring provides an unprecedented 30 degrees of freedom in dispersion control on a single spatial channel. This programmable dispersion control system has a range of applications, including mode-locked lasers, quantum key distribution, and photon-pair generation. We also propose a novel application enabled by this circuit - high-speed quantum communications using temporal-mode-based quantum data locking - and discuss the utility of the system for performing the high-dimensional unitary optical transformations necessary for a quantum data locking demonstration.

  10. Impact of Monoenergetic Photon Sources on Nonproliferation Applications Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Valentine, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quiter, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Descalle, Marie-Anne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Warren, Glen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinlaw, Matt [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chichester, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Cameron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pozzi, Sara [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources (MPSs) have the potential to improve sensitivity at greatly reduced dose in existing applications and enable new capabilities in other applications, particularly where passive signatures do not penetrate or are insufficiently accurate. MPS advantages include the ability to select energy, energy spread, flux, and pulse structures to deliver only the photons needed for the application, while suppressing extraneous dose and background. Some MPSs also offer narrow angular divergence photon beams which can target dose and/or mitigate scattering contributions to image contrast degradation. Current bremsstrahlung photon sources (e.g., linacs and betatrons) produce photons over a broad range of energies, thus delivering unnecessary dose that in some cases also interferes with the signature to be detected and/or restricts operations. Current sources must be collimated (reducing flux) to generate narrow divergence beams. While MPSs can in principle resolve these issues, they remain at relatively low TRL status. Candidate MPS technologies for nonproliferation applications are now being developed, each of which has different properties (e.g. broad vs. narrow angular divergence). Within each technology, source parameters trade off against one another (e.g. flux vs. energy spread), representing a large operation space. This report describes a broad survey of potential applications, identification of high priority applications, and detailed simulations addressing those priority applications. Requirements were derived for each application, and analysis and simulations were conducted to define MPS parameters that deliver benefit. The results can inform targeting of MPS development to deliver strong impact relative to current systems.

  11. Living in a digital world: features and applications of FPGA in photon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnesano, Cosimo

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging outcomes rely upon many factors; one of the most critical is the photon acquisition and processing method employed. For some types of measurements it may be crucial to acquire every single photon quickly with temporal resolution, but in other cases it is important to acquire as many photons as possible, regardless of the time information about each of them. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy belongs to the first case, where the information of the time of arrival of every single photon in every single pixel is fundamental in obtaining the desired information. Spectral tissue imaging belongs to the second case, where high photon density is needed in order to calculate the optical parameters necessary to build the spectral image. In both cases, the current instrumentation suffers from limitations in terms of acquisition time, duty cycle, cost, and radio-frequency interference and emission. We developed the Digital Frequency-Domain approach for photon acquisition and processing purpose using new digital technology. This approach is based on the use of photon detectors in photon counting mode, and the digital heterodyning method to acquire data which is analyzed in the frequency domain to provide the information of the time of arrival of the photons . In conjunction with the use of pulsed laser sources, this method allows the determination of the time of arrival of the photons using the harmonic content of the frequency domain analysis. The parallel digital FD design is a powerful approach that others the possibility to implement a variety of different applications in fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. It can be applied to fluorometry, Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM), and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), as well as multi frequency and multi wavelength tissue imaging in compact portable medical devices. It dramatically reduces the acquisition time from the several minutes scale to the seconds scale, performs

  12. Modeling the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierstorfer, Karl

    2018-01-01

    To find a simple model for the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of photon-counting detectors in the low flux limit. Formula for the spatial cross-talk, the noise power spectrum and the DQE of a photon-counting detector working at a given threshold are derived. Parameters are probabilities for types of events like single counts in the central pixel, double counts in the central pixel and a neighboring pixel or single count in a neighboring pixel only. These probabilities can be derived in a simple model by extensive use of Monte Carlo techniques: The Monte Carlo x-ray propagation program MOCASSIM is used to simulate the energy deposition from the x-rays in the detector material. A simple charge cloud model using Gaussian clouds of fixed width is used for the propagation of the electric charge generated by the primary interactions. Both stages are combined in a Monte Carlo simulation randomizing the location of impact which finally produces the required probabilities. The parameters of the charge cloud model are fitted to the spectral response to a polychromatic spectrum measured with our prototype detector. Based on the Monte Carlo model, the DQE of photon-counting detectors as a function of spatial frequency is calculated for various pixel sizes, photon energies, and thresholds. The frequency-dependent DQE of a photon-counting detector in the low flux limit can be described with an equation containing only a small set of probabilities as input. Estimates for the probabilities can be derived from a simple model of the detector physics. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Gold Nanoparticles in Photonic Crystals Applications: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Iole

    2017-01-24

    This review concerns the recently emerged class of composite colloidal photonic crystals (PCs), in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are included in the photonic structure. The use of composites allows achieving a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering with electronic excitations of the gold component (surface plasmon resonance, SPR) realizing a combination of absorption bands with the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystals. Considering different preparations of composite plasmonic-photonic crystals, based on 3D-PCs in presence of AuNPs, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tunable functionality of these crystals. Several chemical methods for fabrication of opals and inverse opals are presented together with preparations of composites plasmonic-photonic crystals: the influence of SPR on the optical properties of PCs is also discussed. Main applications of this new class of composite materials are illustrated with the aim to offer the reader an overview of the recent advances in this field.

  14. Gold Nanoparticles in Photonic Crystals Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Venditti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This review concerns the recently emerged class of composite colloidal photonic crystals (PCs, in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs are included in the photonic structure. The use of composites allows achieving a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering with electronic excitations of the gold component (surface plasmon resonance, SPR realizing a combination of absorption bands with the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystals. Considering different preparations of composite plasmonic-photonic crystals, based on 3D-PCs in presence of AuNPs, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tunable functionality of these crystals. Several chemical methods for fabrication of opals and inverse opals are presented together with preparations of composites plasmonic-photonic crystals: the influence of SPR on the optical properties of PCs is also discussed. Main applications of this new class of composite materials are illustrated with the aim to offer the reader an overview of the recent advances in this field.

  15. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  16. High-resolution broadband terahertz spectroscopy via electronic heterodyne detection of photonically generated terahertz frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelyev, D G; Skryl, A S; Bakunov, M I

    2014-10-01

    We report an alternative approach to the terahertz frequency-comb spectroscopy (TFCS) based on nonlinear mixing of a photonically generated terahertz pulse train with a continuous wave signal from an electronic synthesizer. A superlattice is used as a nonlinear mixer. Unlike the standard TFCS technique, this approach does not require a complex double-laser system but retains the advantages of TFCS-high spectral resolution and wide bandwidth.

  17. Multiple soliton self-frequency shift cancellations in a temporally tailored photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lai; Kang, Zhe; Li, Qing; Gao, Xuejian; Qin, Guanshi, E-mail: qings@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: wpqin@jlu.edu.cn; Qin, Weiping, E-mail: qings@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: wpqin@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Liao, Meisong; Hu, Lili [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Ohishi, Yasutake [Research Center for Advanced Photon Technology, Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2014-11-03

    We report the generation of multiple soliton self-frequency shift cancellations in a temporally tailored tellurite photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The temporally regulated group velocity dispersion (GVD) is generated in the fiber by soliton induced optical Kerr effect. Two red-shifted dispersive waves spring up when two Raman solitons meet their own second zero-dispersion-wavelengths in the PCF. These results show how, through temporally tailored GVD, nonlinearities can be harnessed to generate unexpected effects.

  18. Application of focused ion beam technology for photonic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ay, F.; Gadgil, V.J.; Geskus, D.; Aravazhi, S.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus

    Al2O3 and KY(WO4)2 are promising materials for photonic applications with excellent optical properties and of interest for obtaining on chip resonator structures. However, there is no method available to fabricate these structures except FIB technology. We will discuss strategies to optimize the

  19. Photonic Nanostructures Design and Optimization for Solar Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a semiconducting photonic nanostructure capable of wide range absorption and tunable optical resonance has been designed with a proposed theoretical optimization model. The design consists of ZnO/CdS core-shell nanowire arrays as well as multilayer thin films that act to absorb incident electromagnetic (EM waves over a broad frequency range. Theoretical, as well as numerical, studies of the nanostructure inside a solar cell plate have been conducted in order to validate the proposed microstructural design. Excellent energy absorption rates of EM waves have been achieved in the high frequency range by using the optical resonance of the nanowire array. By combining multilayer thin film with the core-shell nanowire in the unit cell of a photonic solar cell, a broadband high absorption has been achieved. Moreover, the geometry of the proposed photonic nanostructure is obtained through the implementation of a genetic algorithm. This avoids local minima and an optimized absorption rate of ~90% over the frequency range of 300 to 750 THz has been obtained in the solar cell.

  20. Exploring the physics of superconducting qubits strongly coupled to microwave frequency photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallraff, Andreas [ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    Using modern micro and nano-fabrication techniques combined with superconducting materials we realize electronic circuits the properties of which are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. In such circuits the strong interaction of photons with superconducting quantum two-level systems allows us to probe fundamental quantum properties of light and to develop components for applications in quantum information technology. Here, I present experiments in which we have created and probed entanglement between stationary qubits and microwave photons freely propagating down a transmission line. In these experiments we use superconducting parametric amplifiers realized in our lab to detect both qubit and photon states efficiently. Using similar techniques we aim at demonstrating a deterministic scheme for teleportation of quantum states in a macroscopic system based on superconducting circuits.

  1. Frequency-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Ranging Using Photon-Counting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Barber, Zeb W.; Dahl, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Optical ranging is a problem of estimating the round-trip flight time of a phase- or amplitude-modulated optical beam that reflects off of a target. Frequency- modulated, continuous-wave (FMCW) ranging systems obtain this estimate by performing an interferometric measurement between a local frequency- modulated laser beam and a delayed copy returning from the target. The range estimate is formed by mixing the target-return field with the local reference field on a beamsplitter and detecting the resultant beat modulation. In conventional FMCW ranging, the source modulation is linear in instantaneous frequency, the reference-arm field has many more photons than the target-return field, and the time-of-flight estimate is generated by balanced difference- detection of the beamsplitter output, followed by a frequency-domain peak search. This work focused on determining the maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation algorithm when continuous-time photoncounting detectors are used. It is founded on a rigorous statistical characterization of the (random) photoelectron emission times as a function of the incident optical field, including the deleterious effects caused by dark current and dead time. These statistics enable derivation of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRB) on the accuracy of FMCW ranging, and derivation of the ML estimator, whose performance approaches this bound at high photon flux. The estimation algorithm was developed, and its optimality properties were shown in simulation. Experimental data show that it performs better than the conventional estimation algorithms used. The demonstrated improvement is a factor of 1.414 over frequency-domainbased estimation. If the target interrogating photons and the local reference field photons are costed equally, the optimal allocation of photons between these two arms is to have them equally distributed. This is different than the state of the art, in which the local field is stronger than the target return. The optimal

  2. 3D holographic polymer photonic crystal for superprism application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaonan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Sasa; Chen, Ray T.

    2007-02-01

    Photonic crystal based superprism offers a new way to design new optical components for beam steering and DWDM application. 3D photonic crystals are especially attractive as they could offer more control of the light beam based on the needs. A polygonal prism based holographic fabrication method has been demonstrated for a three-dimensional face-centered-cubic (FCC)-type submicron polymer photonic crystal using SU8 as the photo-sensitive material. Therefore antivibration equipment and complicated optical alignment system are not needed and the requirement for the coherence of the laser source is relaxed compared with the traditional holographic setup. By changing the top-cut prism structure, the polarization of the laser beam, the exposure and development conditions we can achieve different kinds of triclinic or orthorhombic photonic crystals on demand. Special fabrication treatments have been introduced to ensure the survivability of the fabricated large area (cm2) nano-structures. Scanning electron microscopy and diffraction results proved the good uniformity of the fabricated structures. With the proper design of the refraction prism we have achieved a partial bandgap for S+C band (1460-1565nm) in the [111] direction. The transmission and reflection spectra obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are in good agreement with simulated band structure. The superprism effects around 1550nm wavelength for the fabricated 3D polymer photonic crystal have been theoretically calculated and such effects can be used for beam steering purpose.

  3. Aperture Array Photonic Metamaterials: Theoretical approaches, numerical techniques and a novel application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansey, Eli

    Optical or photonic metamaterials that operate in the infrared and visible frequency regimes show tremendous promise for solving problems in renewable energy, infrared imaging, and telecommunications. However, many of the theoretical and simulation techniques used at lower frequencies are not applicable to this higher-frequency regime. Furthermore, technological and financial limitations of photonic metamaterial fabrication increases the importance of reliable theoretical models and computational techniques for predicting the optical response of photonic metamaterials. This thesis focuses on aperture array metamaterials. That is, a rectangular, circular, or other shaped cavity or hole embedded in, or penetrating through a metal film. The research in the first portion of this dissertation reflects our interest in developing a fundamental, theoretical understanding of the behavior of light's interaction with these aperture arrays, specifically regarding enhanced optical transmission. We develop an approximate boundary condition for metals at optical frequencies, and a comprehensive, analytical explanation of the physics underlying this effect. These theoretical analyses are augmented by computational techniques in the second portion of this thesis, used both for verification of the theoretical work, and solving more complicated structures. Finally, the last portion of this thesis discusses the results from designing, fabricating and characterizing a light-splitting metamaterial.

  4. Advanced time-correlated single photon counting applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This book is an attempt to bridge the gap between the instrumental principles of multi-dimensional time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and typical applications of the technique. Written by an originator of the technique and by sucessful users, it covers the basic principles of the technique, its interaction with optical imaging methods and its application to a wide range of experimental tasks in life sciences and clinical research. The book is recommended for all users of time-resolved detection techniques in biology, bio-chemistry, spectroscopy of live systems, live cell microscopy, clinical imaging, spectroscopy of single molecules, and other applications that require the detection of low-level light signals at single-photon sensitivity and picosecond time resolution.

  5. Frequency-Stabilized Source of Single Photons from a Solid-State Qubit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Prechtel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Single quantum dots are solid-state emitters that mimic two-level atoms but with a highly enhanced spontaneous emission rate. A single quantum dot is the basis for a potentially excellent single-photon source. One outstanding problem is that there is considerable noise in the emission frequency, making it very difficult to couple the quantum dot to another quantum system. We solve this problem here with a dynamic feedback technique that locks the quantum-dot emission frequency to a reference. The incoherent scattering (resonance fluorescence represents the single-photon output, whereas the coherent scattering (Rayleigh scattering is used for the feedback control. The fluctuations in emission frequency are reduced to 20 MHz, just approximately 5% of the quantum-dot optical linewidth, even over several hours. By eliminating the 1/f-like noise, the relative fluctuations in quantum-dot noise power are reduced to approximately 10^{-5} at low frequency. Under these conditions, the antibunching dip in the resonance fluorescence is described extremely well by the two-level atom result. The technique represents a way of removing charge noise from a quantum device.

  6. Applications of a controlled phase gate for photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, C.; Kiesel, N.; Weber, U.; Weinfurter, H.; Toth, G; Ursin, R.; Guehne, O.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We report on experimental applications of a probabilistic quantum controlled-phase gate for photons. The gate is operating on the polarization degree of freedom and applies a pi phase shift to a target photon, conditioned on the polarization of a control photon. This is experimentally realized by overlapping the input photons on a beam splitter with polarization dependent splitting ratio (TH=1, TV=1/3). The phase is thereby introduced by a second order interference in case two vertically polarized photons are passing the gate. In order to ensure polarization independent weighting coefficients for the output states of all possible input combinations, two beam splitters with reversed splitting ratio (TH=1/3, TV=1) are placed after each output of the overlap BS. The gate allows the implementation of a full Bell state analysis and by this the accomplishment of a complete teleportation experiment. As input we used horizontal, vertical, +45 o , and right circular polarized photon states from which we could deduce a teleportation process tomography for each of the four Bell states detected. Whereas in the Bell state analysis the gate maps an entangled state onto a product state, it can be used as well in the opposite way for an entangling operation. We exploit this fact to generate a certain four qubit entangled state, the so-called four-photon cluster state. In order to do so we apply the gate on two photons of two different EPR pairs originating from a spontaneous parametric down conversion process. The resulting experimental state shows a fidelity of 74.4 ± 1.2 % to the theoretically expected one. By the experimental violation of a specially tailored Bell inequality we are able to proof its non-locality and delimit it from a GHZ state. We demonstrate its genuine four-photon entanglement by a witness measurement. Furthermore we characterize the generated state by the study of its remarkable entanglement persistency properties with respect to the measurement

  7. On the undesired frequency chirping in photonic time-stretch systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuxiao; Chi, Hao; Jin, Tao; Zheng, Shilie; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2017-12-01

    The technique of photonic time stretch (PTS) has been intensively investigated in the past decade due to its potential in the acquisition of ultra-high speed signals. The frequency-related RF power fading in the PTS systems with double sideband (DSB) modulation has been well-known, which limits the maximum modulation frequency. Some solutions have been proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, we report another effect, i.e., undesired frequency chirping, which also relates to the performance degradation of PTS systems with DSB modulation, for the first time to our knowledge. Distinct from the nonlinearities caused by nonlinear modulation and square-law photodetection, which is common in radio frequency analog optical links, this frequency chirping originates from the addition of two beating signals with a relative delay after photodetection. A theoretical model for exactly describing the frequency chirping is presented, and is then verified by simulations. Discussion on the method to avoid the frequency chirping is also presented.

  8. Soliton self-frequency shift controlled by a weak seed laser in tellurite photonic crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lai; Meng, Xiangwei; Yin, Feixiang; Liao, Meisong; Zhao, Dan; Qin, Guanshi; Ohishi, Yasutake; Qin, Weiping

    2013-08-01

    We report the first demonstration of soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) controlled by a weak continuous-wave (CW) laser, from a tellurite photonic crystal fiber pumped by a 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser. The control of SSFS is performed by the cross-gain modulation of the 1560 nm femtosecond laser. By varying the input power of the weak CW laser (1560 nm) from 0 to 1.17 mW, the soliton generated in the tellurite photonic crystal fiber blue shifts from 1935 to 1591 nm. The dependence of the soliton wavelength on the operation wavelength of the weak CW laser is also measured. The results show the CW laser with a wavelength tunable range of 1530-1592 nm can be used to control the SSFS generation.

  9. Photon acceleration versus frequency-domain interferometry for laser wakefield diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, J M; Oliveira e Silva, L; Mendonca, J T [GoLP/Centro de Fisica de Plasmas, Inst. Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)

    1998-03-01

    A detailed comparison between the photon acceleration diagnostic technique and the frequency-domain interferometric technique for laser wakefield diagnostics, by using ray-tracing equations is presented here. The dispersion effects on the probe beam and the implications of an arbitrary phase velocity of the plasma wave are discussed for both diagnostic techniques. In the presence of large amplitude plasma wave and long interaction distances significant frequency shifts can be observed. The importance of this effect on the determination of the phase and frequency shifts measurements given by each of the two diagnostic techniques, is also analyzed. The accuracy of both diagnostic techniques is discussed and some of their technical problems are reviewed. (author)

  10. Effect of photonic crystal and frequency selective surface implementation on gain enhancement in the microstrip patch antenna at terahertz frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejati, Ameneh, E-mail: ameneh.nejati@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghzadeh, Ramezan Ali [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K.N Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geran, Fatemeh [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, microstrip patch antenna with frequency selective surface (FSS) and photonic band gap (PBG) structures in the frequency range of 0.5–0.7 THz is presented for wireless communications. Proposed patch antenna is designed on a substrate with uniform and non-uniform PBG structures. Here, the effects of substrate thickness, various radii and arrangement of holes on antenna resonance in both PBG forms are studied. Near zero characteristic on uniform and non-uniform PBG substrate is compared and the results show that along with increase in hole radius, antenna operating frequency and bandwidth are increased. Also, the FSS structure is designed as a perfect absorber. Finally, by using FSS and PBG structures simultaneously, gain enhancement, increase in directivity and pattern shaping are studied at THz field. The antenna gain in final structure is increased by 2 dBi (32%) in comparison to simple form and Half-Power beam width is reduced from 100°×80° in simple form to 72°×48° by using FSS and PBG. All simulations and designs are done by Ansoft HFSS and CST Microwave Studio simulation tools with different full wave methods.

  11. Electrically tunable zero dispersion wavelengths in photonic crystal fibers filled with a dual frequency addressable liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahle, Markus; Kitzerow, Heinz-Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    We present a liquid crystal (LC) infiltrated photonic crystal fiber, which enables the electrical tuning of the position of zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs). A dual frequency addressable liquid crystal is aligned perpendicular on the inclusion walls of a photonic crystal fiber, which results in an escaped radial director field. The orientation of the LC is controlled by applying an external electric field. Due to the high index of the liquid crystal the fiber guides light by the photonic band gap effect. Multiple ZDWs exist in the visible and near infrared. The positions of the ZDWs can be either blue or red shifted depending on the frequency of the applied voltage

  12. Applications of Random Nonlinear Photonic Crystals Based on Strontium Tetraborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre I. Zaitsev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Properties of strontium tetraborate (SBO and features of as-grown anti-parallel domains are summarized. From the point of view of nonlinear optics, these domains form nonlinear photonic crystals (NPC. Applications of NPC to the deep ultraviolet generation and fs pulse diagnostics are described. NPC and SBO are prospective media for the creation of a widely tunable source of fs pulses in the vacuum ultraviolet and for autocorrelation diagnostics of broadly tunable sources.

  13. Mechanism of photonic band gap, optical properties, tuning and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, A.; Johri, M.

    2006-05-01

    Mechanism of occurrence of Photonic Band Gap (PBG) is presented for 3-D structure using close packed face centered cubic lattice. Concepts and our work, specifically optical properties of 3-D photonic crystal, relative width, filling fraction, effective refractive index, alternative mechanism of photonic band gap scattering strength and dielectric contrast, effect of fluctuations and minimum refractive index contrast, are reported. The temperature tuning and anisotropy of nematic and ferroelectric liquid crystal infiltrated opal for different phase transitions are given. Effective dielectric constant with filling fraction using Maxwell Garnet theory (MG), multiple modified Maxwell Garnet (MMMG) and Effective Medium theory (EM) and results are compared with experiment to understand the occurrence of PBG. Our calculations of Lamb shifts including fluctuations are given and compared with those of literature values. We have also done band structure calculations including anisotropy and compared isotropic characteristic of liquid crystal. A possibility of lowest refractive index contrast useful for the fabrication of PBG is given. Our calculations for relative width as a function of refractive index contrast are reported and comparisons with existing theoretical and experimental optimal values are briefed. Applications of photonic crystals are summarized. The investigations conducted on PBG materials and reported here may pave the way for understanding the challenges in the field of PBG. (author)

  14. Effect of shape of scatterers and plasma frequency on the complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T., E-mail: tfathollahi@aeoi.org.ir; Bananej, A.

    2016-12-16

    In this study, we analyze complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals with triangular and square lattices, composed of plasma rods with different geometrical shapes in the anisotropic tellurium background. Using the finite-difference time-domain method we discuss the maximization of the complete photonic band gap width as a function of plasma frequency and plasma rods parameters with different shapes and orientations. The numerical results demonstrate that our proposed structures represent significantly wide complete photonic band gaps in comparison to previously studied dielectric-plasma photonic crystals. - Highlights: • In this paper, we have investigated plasma photonic crystals. • Plasma is a kind of dispersive medium with its equivalent refractive index related to the frequency of an incident EM wave. • In this work, our simulations are performed using the Meep implementation of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. • For this study, the lattice structures investigated are triangular and square. • Extensive calculations reveal that almost all of these structures represent wide complete band gaps.

  15. Effect of shape of scatterers and plasma frequency on the complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T.; Bananej, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyze complete photonic band gap properties of two-dimensional dielectric-plasma photonic crystals with triangular and square lattices, composed of plasma rods with different geometrical shapes in the anisotropic tellurium background. Using the finite-difference time-domain method we discuss the maximization of the complete photonic band gap width as a function of plasma frequency and plasma rods parameters with different shapes and orientations. The numerical results demonstrate that our proposed structures represent significantly wide complete photonic band gaps in comparison to previously studied dielectric-plasma photonic crystals. - Highlights: • In this paper, we have investigated plasma photonic crystals. • Plasma is a kind of dispersive medium with its equivalent refractive index related to the frequency of an incident EM wave. • In this work, our simulations are performed using the Meep implementation of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. • For this study, the lattice structures investigated are triangular and square. • Extensive calculations reveal that almost all of these structures represent wide complete band gaps.

  16. High-directivity planar antenna using controllable photonic bandgap material at microwave frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Lustrac, A.; Gadot, F.; Akmansoy, E.; Brillat, T.

    2001-01-01

    In this letter, we experimentally demonstrate the capability of a controllable photonic bandgap (CPBG) material to conform the emitted radiation of a planar antenna at 12 GHz. The CPBG material is a variable conductance lattice fabricated with high-frequency PIN diodes soldered along metallic stripes on dielectric printed boards. Depending on the diode bias, the emitted radiation of the antenna can be either transmitted or totally reflected by the material. In the transmission state, the antenna radiation is spatially filtered by the CPBG material in a sharp beam perpendicular to the surface of the material. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  17. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kady, Ihab Fathy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal

  18. Integrated photon sources for quantum information science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanto, M. L.; Tison, C. C.; Steidle, J. A.; Lu, T.; Wang, Z.; Mogent, N. A.; Rizzo, A.; Thomas, P. M.; Preble, S. F.; Alsing, P. M.; Englund, D. R.

    2017-10-01

    Ring resonators are used as photon pair sources by taking advantage of the materials second or third order non- linearities through the processes of spontaneous parametric downconversion and spontaneous four wave mixing respectively. Two materials of interest for these applications are silicon for the infrared and aluminum nitride for the ultraviolet through the infrared. When fabricated into ring type sources they are capable of producing pairs of indistinguishable photons but typically suffer from an effective 50% loss. By slightly decoupling the input waveguide from the ring, the drop port coincidence ratio can be significantly increased with the trade-off being that the pump is less efficiently coupled into the ring. Ring resonators with this design have been demonstrated having coincidence ratios of 96% but requiring a factor of 10 increase in the pump power. Through the modification of the coupling design that relies on additional spectral dependence, it is possible to achieve similar coincidence ratios without the increased pumping requirement. This can be achieved by coupling the input waveguide to the ring multiple times, thus creating a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. This coupler design can be used on both sides of the ring resonator so that resonances supported by one of the couplers are suppressed by the other. This is the ideal configuration for a photon-pair source as it can only support the pump photons at the input side while only allowing the generated photons to leave through the output side. Recently, this device has been realized with preliminary results exhibiting the desired spectral dependence and with a coincidence ratio as high as 97% while allowing the pump to be nearly critically coupled to the ring. The demonstrated near unity coincidence ratio infers a near maximal heralding efficiency from the fabricated device. This device has the potential to greatly improve the scalability and performance of quantum computing and communication systems.

  19. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors: physics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Chandra M; Tanner, Michael G; Hadfield, Robert H

    2012-01-01

    Single-photon detectors based on superconducting nanowires (SSPDs or SNSPDs) have rapidly emerged as a highly promising photon-counting technology for infrared wavelengths. These devices offer high efficiency, low dark counts and excellent timing resolution. In this review, we consider the basic SNSPD operating principle and models of device behaviour. We give an overview of the evolution of SNSPD device design and the improvements in performance which have been achieved. We also evaluate device limitations and noise mechanisms. We survey practical refrigeration technologies and optical coupling schemes for SNSPDs. Finally we summarize promising application areas, ranging from quantum cryptography to remote sensing. Our goal is to capture a detailed snapshot of an emerging superconducting detector technology on the threshold of maturity. (topical review)

  20. Bilayer graphene: physics and application outlook in photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Hugen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Layered materials, such as graphene, transition metal dichacogenides and black phosphorus have attracted lots of attention recently. They are emerging novel materials in electronics and photonics, with tremendous potential in revolutionizing the traditional electronics and photonics industry. Marrying layered material to the nanophotonics is being proved fruitful. With the recent emphasis and development of metasurfaces in nanophotonics, atomically thin materials can find their unique position and strength in this field. In this article, I will focus on one specific two dimensional material: bilayer graphene. Basic physics will be reviewed, such as band-gap opening, electron-phonon interaction, phonon-plasmon interaction and Fano resonances in the optical response. Moreover, I will review the application of bilayer graphene as a sensitive and fast photodetector. An outlook will be given in the final part of the paper.

  1. Inkjet Printing of Functional Materials for Optical and Photonic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamán, Jorge; Alicante, Raquel; Peña, Jose Ignacio; Sánchez-Somolinos, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Inkjet printing, traditionally used in graphics, has been widely investigated as a valuable tool in the preparation of functional surfaces and devices. This review focuses on the use of inkjet printing technology for the manufacturing of different optical elements and photonic devices. The presented overview mainly surveys work done in the fabrication of micro-optical components such as microlenses, waveguides and integrated lasers; the manufacturing of large area light emitting diodes displays, liquid crystal displays and solar cells; as well as the preparation of liquid crystal and colloidal crystal based photonic devices working as lasers or optical sensors. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the materials employed as well as in the relevance of inkjet in the manufacturing of the different devices showing in each of the revised technologies, main achievements, applications and challenges. PMID:28774032

  2. Inkjet Printing of Functional Materials for Optical and Photonic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alamán

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing, traditionally used in graphics, has been widely investigated as a valuable tool in the preparation of functional surfaces and devices. This review focuses on the use of inkjet printing technology for the manufacturing of different optical elements and photonic devices. The presented overview mainly surveys work done in the fabrication of micro-optical components such as microlenses, waveguides and integrated lasers; the manufacturing of large area light emitting diodes displays, liquid crystal displays and solar cells; as well as the preparation of liquid crystal and colloidal crystal based photonic devices working as lasers or optical sensors. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the materials employed as well as in the relevance of inkjet in the manufacturing of the different devices showing in each of the revised technologies, main achievements, applications and challenges.

  3. Photonic crystal materials and their application in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huadong; Lou, Rong; Chen, Yanxiao; Chen, Lili; Lu, Jingya; Dong, Qianqian

    2017-11-01

    Photonic crystal (PC) materials exhibit unique structural colors that originate from their intrinsic photonic band gap. Because of their highly ordered structure and distinct optical characteristics, PC-based biomaterials have advantages in the multiplex detection, biomolecular screening and real-time monitoring of biomolecules. In addition, PCs provide good platforms for drug loading and biomolecule modification, which could be applied to biosensors and biological carriers. A number of methods are now available to fabricate PC materials with variable structure colors, which could be applied in biomedicine. Emphasis is given to the description of various applications of PC materials in biomedicine, including drug delivery, biodetection and tumor screening. We believe that this article will promote greater communication among researchers in the fields of chemistry, material science, biology, medicine and pharmacy.

  4. CORRELATION OF FERMI PHOTONS WITH HIGH-FREQUENCY RADIO GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mickaliger, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Lyutikov, M.; Langston, G. I.

    2011-01-01

    To constrain the giant pulse (GP) emission mechanism and test the model of Lyutikov for GP emission, we have carried out a campaign of simultaneous observations of the Crab pulsar at γ-ray (Fermi) and radio (Green Bank Telescope) wavelengths. Over 10 hr of simultaneous observations we obtained a sample of 2.1 x 10 4 GPs, observed at a radio frequency of 9 GHz, and 77 Fermi photons, with energies between 100 MeV and 5 GeV. The majority of GPs came from the interpulse (IP) phase window. We found no change in the GP generation rate within 10-120 s windows at lags of up to ±40 minutes of observed γ-ray photons. The 95% upper limit for a γ-ray flux enhancement in pulsed emission phase window around all GPs is four times the average pulsed γ-ray flux from the Crab. For the subset of IP GPs, the enhancement upper limit, within the IP emission window, is 12 times the average pulsed γ-ray flux. These results suggest that GPs, at least high-frequency IP GPs, are due to changes in coherence of radio emission rather than an overall increase in the magnetospheric particle density.

  5. Simultaneous negative refraction and focusing of fundamental frequency and second-harmonic fields by two-dimensional photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology and Beijing Key Laboratory of Fractional Signals and Systems, Beijing 100081 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, 453007 Xinxiang, Henan (China); Zhang, Xiangdong, E-mail: zhangxd@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology and Beijing Key Laboratory of Fractional Signals and Systems, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-09-28

    Simultaneous negative refraction for both the fundamental frequency (FF) and second-harmonic (SH) fields in two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals have been found through both the physical analysis and exact numerical simulation. By combining such a property with the phase-matching condition and strong second-order susceptibility, we have designed a SH lens to realize focusing for both the FF and SH fields at the same time. Good-quality non-near field images for both FF and SH fields have been observed. The physical mechanism for such SH focusing phenomena has been disclosed, which is different from the backward SH generation as has been pointed out in the previous investigations. In addition, the effect of absorption losses on the phenomena has also been discussed. Thus, potential applications of these phenomena to biphotonic microscopy technique are anticipated.

  6. Mode-Selective Photon Counting Via Quantum Frequency Conversion Using Spectrally-Engineered Pump Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manurkar, Paritosh

    Most of the existing protocols for quantum communication operate in a two-dimensional Hilbert space where their manipulation and measurement have been routinely investigated. Moving to higher-dimensional Hilbert spaces is desirable because of advantages in terms of longer distance communication capabilities, higher channel capacity and better information security. We can exploit the spatio-temporal degrees of freedom for the quantum optical signals to provide the higher-dimensional signals. But this necessitates the need for measurement and manipulation of multidimensional quantum states. To that end, there have been significant theoretical studies based on quantum frequency conversion (QFC) in recent years even though the experimental progress has been limited. QFC is a process that allows preservation of the quantum information while changing the frequency of the input quantum state. It has deservedly garnered a lot of attention because it serves as the connecting bridge between the communications band (C-band near 1550 nm) where the fiber-optic infrastructure is already established and the visible spectrum where high efficiency single-photon detectors and optical memories have been demonstrated. In this experimental work, we demonstrate mode-selective frequency conversion as a means to measure and manipulate photonic signals occupying d -dimensional Hilbert spaces where d=2 and 4. In the d=2 case, we demonstrate mode contrast between two temporal modes (TMs) which serves as the proof-of-concept demonstration. In the d=4 version, we employ six different TMs for our detailed experimental study. These TMs also include superposition modes which are a crucial component in many quantum key distribution protocols. Our method is based on producing pump pulses which allow us to upconvert the TM of interest while ideally preserving the other modes. We use MATLAB simulations to determine the pump pulse shapes which are subsequently produced by controlling the amplitude and

  7. Polarisation-preserving photon frequency conversion from a trapped-ion-compatible wavelength to the telecom C-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutyanskiy, V.; Meraner, M.; Schupp, J.; Lanyon, B. P.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate polarisation-preserving frequency conversion of single-photon-level light at 854 nm, resonant with a trapped-ion transition and qubit, to the 1550-nm telecom C band. A total photon in / fiber-coupled photon out efficiency of ˜30% is achieved, for a free-running photon noise rate of ˜60 Hz. This performance would enable telecom conversion of 854 nm polarisation qubits, produced in existing trapped-ion systems, with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 1. In combination with near-future trapped-ion systems, our converter would enable the observation of entanglement between an ion and a photon that has travelled more than 100 km in optical fiber: three orders of magnitude further than the state-of-the-art.

  8. Continuously tunable devices based on electrical control of dual-frequency liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Riishede, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    We present an electrically controlled photonic bandgap fiber device obtained by infiltrating the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a dual-frequency liquid crystal (LC) with pre-tilted molecules. Compared to previously demonstrated devices of this kind, the main new feature of this ...... in the same device. We investigate the dynamics of this device and demonstrate a birefringence controller based on this principle....

  9. Frequency-multiplexed bias and readout of a 16-pixel superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Wuensch, S.; Charaev, I.; Boes, F.; Zwick, T.; Siegel, M.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a 16-pixel array of microwave-current driven superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with an integrated and scalable frequency-division multiplexing architecture, which reduces the required number of bias and readout lines to a single microwave feed line. The electrical behavior of the photon-sensitive nanowires, embedded in a resonant circuit, as well as the optical performance and timing jitter of the single detectors is discussed. Besides the single pixel measurements, we also demonstrate the operation of a 16-pixel array with a temporal, spatial, and photon-number resolution.

  10. Radio frequency identification applications in hospital environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Angela M; Visich, John K; Li, Suhong

    2006-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has recently begun to receive increased interest from practitioners and academicians. This interest is driven by mandates from major retailers such as Wal-Mart, Target and Metro Group, and the United States Department of Defense, in order to increase the efficiency and visibility of material and information flows in the supply chain. However, supply chain managers do not have a monopoly on the deployment of RFID. In this article, the authors discuss the potential benefits, the areas of applications, the implementation challenges, and the corresponding strategies of RFID in hospital environments.

  11. Porous silicon: silicon quantum dots for photonic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavesi, L.; Guardini, R.

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon formation and structure characterization are briefly illustrated. Its luminescence properties rae presented and interpreted on the basis of exciton recombination in quantum dot structures: the trap-controlled hopping mechanism is used to describe the recombination dynamics. Porous silicon application to photonic devices is considered: porous silicon multilayer in general, and micro cavities in particular are described. The present situation in the realization of porous silicon LEDs is considered, and future developments in this field of research are suggested. (author). 30 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs

  12. Quantum Optics with Photonic Nanowires and Photonic Trumpets: Basics and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerard, J.; Claudon, J.; Munsch, M.

    , the node of future quantum networks. Besides optical microcavities [1], photonic wires have recently demonstrated in this context an appealing potential [2, 3]. For instance, single photon sources (SPS) based on a single quantum dot in a vertical photonic wire with integrated bottom mirror and tapered tip...... have enabled for the ¯rst time to achieve simultaneously a very high e±ciency (0.72 photon per pulse) and a very pure single photon emission (g(2)(0) control of the spontaneous emission of embedded emitters [4...

  13. Every photon counts: improving low, mid, and high-spatial frequency errors on astronomical optics and materials with MRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Chris; Lormeau, Jean Pierre; Dumas, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Many astronomical sensing applications operate in low-light conditions; for these applications every photon counts. Controlling mid-spatial frequencies and surface roughness on astronomical optics are critical for mitigating scattering effects such as flare and energy loss. By improving these two frequency regimes higher contrast images can be collected with improved efficiency. Classically, Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) has offered an optical fabrication technique to correct low order errors as well has quilting/print-through errors left over in light-weighted optics from conventional polishing techniques. MRF is a deterministic, sub-aperture polishing process that has been used to improve figure on an ever expanding assortment of optical geometries, such as planos, spheres, on and off axis aspheres, primary mirrors and freeform optics. Precision optics are routinely manufactured by this technology with sizes ranging from 5-2,000mm in diameter. MRF can be used for form corrections; turning a sphere into an asphere or free form, but more commonly for figure corrections achieving figure errors as low as 1nm RMS while using careful metrology setups. Recent advancements in MRF technology have improved the polishing performance expected for astronomical optics in low, mid and high spatial frequency regimes. Deterministic figure correction with MRF is compatible with most materials, including some recent examples on Silicon Carbide and RSA905 Aluminum. MRF also has the ability to produce `perfectly-bad' compensating surfaces, which may be used to compensate for measured or modeled optical deformation from sources such as gravity or mounting. In addition, recent advances in MRF technology allow for corrections of mid-spatial wavelengths as small as 1mm simultaneously with form error correction. Efficient midspatial frequency corrections make use of optimized process conditions including raster polishing in combination with a small tool size. Furthermore, a novel MRF

  14. New generation of one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities as robust high-efficient frequency converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvini, T. S.; Tehranchi, M. M.; Hamidi, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    An effective method is proposed to design finite one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities (PhCCs) as robust high-efficient frequency converter. For this purpose, we consider two groups of PhCCs which are constructed by stacking m nonlinear (LiNbO3) and n linear (air) layers with variable thicknesses. In the first group, the number of linear layers is less than the nonlinear layers by one and in the second group by two. The conversion efficiency is calculated as a function of the arrangement and thicknesses of the linear and nonlinear layers by benefiting from nonlinear transfer matrix method. Our numerical simulations show that for each group of PhCCs, there is a structural formula by which the configurations with the highest efficiency can be constructed for any values of m and n (i.e. any number of layers). The efficient configurations are equivalent to Fabry-Pérot cavities that depend on the relationship between m and n and the mirrors in two sides of these cavities can be periodic or nonperiodic. The conversion efficiencies of these designed PhCCs are more than 5 orders of magnitude higher than the perfect ones which satisfy photonic bandgap edge and quasi-phase matching. Moreover, the results reveal that conversion efficiencies of Fabry-Pérot cavities with non-periodic mirrors are one order of magnitude higher than those with periodic mirrors. The major physical mechanisms of the enhancement are quasi-phase matching effect, cavity effect induced by dispersive mirrors, and double resonance for the pump and the harmonic fields in defect state. We believe that this method is very beneficial to the design of high-efficient compact optical frequency converters.

  15. The application of microwave photonic detection in quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Wenting; Zhuang, Yongyong; Song, Xuerui; Wang, Liujun; Duan, Chongdi

    2018-03-01

    Quantum communication has attracted much attention in recent years, provides an ultimate level of security, and uniquely it is one of the most likely practical quantum technologies at present. In order to realize global coverage of quantum communication networks, not only need the help of satellite to realize wide area quantum communication, need implementation of optical fiber system to realize city to city quantum communication, but also, it is necessary to implement end-to-end quantum communications intercity and wireless quantum communications that can be received by handheld devices. Because of the limitation of application of light in buildings, it needs quantum communication with microwave band to achieve quantum reception of wireless handheld devices. The single microwave photon energy is very low, it is difficult to directly detect, which become a difficulty in microwave quantum detection. This paper summarizes the mode of single microwave photon detection methods and the possibility of application in microwave quantum communication, and promotes the development of quantum communication in microwave band and quantum radar.

  16. Application of visual cryptography for learning in optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Avikarsha; Wozniak, Peter; Vauderwange, Oliver; Curticapean, Dan

    2016-09-01

    In the age data digitalization, important applications of optics and photonics based sensors and technology lie in the field of biometrics and image processing. Protecting user data in a safe and secure way is an essential task in this area. However, traditional cryptographic protocols rely heavily on computer aided computation. Secure protocols which rely only on human interactions are usually simpler to understand. In many scenarios development of such protocols are also important for ease of implementation and deployment. Visual cryptography (VC) is an encryption technique on images (or text) in which decryption is done by human visual system. In this technique, an image is encrypted into number of pieces (known as shares). When the printed shares are physically superimposed together, the image can be decrypted with human vision. Modern digital watermarking technologies can be combined with VC for image copyright protection where the shares can be watermarks (small identification) embedded in the image. Similarly, VC can be used for improving security of biometric authentication. This paper presents about design and implementation of a practical laboratory experiment based on the concept of VC for a course in media engineering. Specifically, our contribution deals with integration of VC in different schemes for applications like digital watermarking and biometric authentication in the field of optics and photonics. We describe theoretical concepts and propose our infrastructure for the experiment. Finally, we will evaluate the learning outcome of the experiment, performed by the students.

  17. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  18. Application of single photon ECT for dynamic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, T.; Ishii, Y.; Tamaki, N.

    1982-01-01

    Feasibility of dynamic study in a form of ECT using a rotating gamma camera was evaluated. Since it takes longer one around time sampling, application for the dynamic study is limited under following conditions; 1) physiological gated process, 2) slow clearance process, 3) physiological steady state process. The gated study was applicated for heart pumping action synchronized with ECG. The ECG gated heart ECT either of blood pool or myocardium was useful to reveal a subtle wall motion abnormalities in a tomographic plane, even when a planar imaging failed to reveal it. As for slow dynamic process of tracer, an excretion process of hepatobiliary agent, was subjected to be analyzed in order to calculate clearance rate at each pixel. As for steady state process, an ECT of regional celebral blood flow (rCBF) was investigated during continuous infusion into intracarotid artery. All of these technique were proved to have a clinical feasibility and to potentiate usefulness of the single photon ECT (SPECT)

  19. Photonic arbitrary waveform generation applicable to multiband UWB communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolea, Mario; Mora, José; Ortega, Beatriz; Capmany, José

    2010-12-06

    A novel photonic structure for arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) is proposed based on the electrooptical intensity modulation of a broadband optical signal which is transmitted by a dispersive element and the optoelectrical processing is realized by combining an interferometric structure with balanced photodetection. The generated waveform can be fully reconfigured through the control of the optical source power spectrum and the interferometric structure. The use of balanced photodetection permits to remove the baseband component of the generated signal which is relevant in certain applications. We have theoretically described and experimentally demonstrated the feasibility of the system by means of the generation of different pulse shapes. Specifically, the proposed structure has been applicable to generate Multiband UWB signaling formats regarding to the FCC requirements in order to show the flexibility of the system.

  20. A Unique Photon Bombardment System for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    The innovative Electromagnetic Radiation Collection and Concentration System (EMRCCS) described is the foundation for the development of a multiplicity of space and terrestrial system formats. The system capability allows its use in the visual, infrared, and ultraviolet ranges of the spectrum for EM collection, concentration, source/receptor tracking, and targeting. The nonimaging modular optical system uses a physically static position aperture for EM radiation collection. Folded optics provide the concentration of the radiation and source autotracking. The collected and concentrated electromagnetic radiation is utilized in many applications, e.g., solar spectrum in thermal and associative photon bombardment applications for hazardous waste management, water purification, metal hardening, hydrogen generation, photovoltaics, etc., in both space and terrestrial segment utilization. Additionally, at the high end of the concentration capability range, i.e., 60,000+, a solar-pulsed laser system is possible.

  1. Generation of green frequency comb from chirped χ{sup (2)} nonlinear photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, C.-M. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Ming Chuan University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, K.-H.; Yang, Z.-Y.; Fu, S.-H.; Tsai, S.-T.; Hsu, C.-W.; Peng, L.-H. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, N. E. [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Boudrioua, A. [LPL, CNRS - UMR 7538, Université Paris 13, Sorbone Paris Cité (France); Kung, A. H. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-01

    Spectrally broad frequency comb generation over 510–555 nm range was reported on chirped quasi-phase-matching (QPM) χ{sup (2)} nonlinear photonic crystals of 12 mm length with periodicity stepwise increased from 5.9 μm to 7.1 μm. When pumped with nanosecond infrared (IR) frequency comb derived from a QPM optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and spanned over 1040 nm to 1090 nm wavelength range, the 520 nm to 545 nm up-converted green spectra were shown to consist of contributions from (a) second-harmonic generation among the signal or the idler modes, and (b) sum-frequency generation (SFG) from the neighboring pairs of the signal or the idler modes. These mechanisms led the up-converted green frequency comb to have the same mode spacing of 450 GHz as that in the IR-OPO pump comb. As the pump was further detuned from the aforementioned near-degeneracy point and moved toward the signal (1020–1040 nm) and the idler (1090–1110 nm) spectral range, the above QPM parametric processes were preserved in the chirped QPM devices to support up-converted green generation in the 510–520 nm and the 545–555 nm spectral regime. Additional 530–535 nm green spectral generation was also observed due to concurrence of multi-wavelength SFG processes between the (signal, idler) mode pairs. These mechanisms facilitate the chirped QPM device to support a single-pass up-conversion efficiency ∼10% when subject to an IR-OPO pump comb with 200 mW average power operated near- or off- the degeneracy point.

  2. Equi-frequency contour of photonic crystals with the extended Dirichlet-to-Neumann wave vector eigenvalue equation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Bin; Zhang Yejing; Wang Yufei; Liu Anjin; Zheng Wanhua

    2012-01-01

    We present the extended Dirichlet-to-Neumann wave vector eigenvalue equation (DtN-WVEE) method to calculate the equi-frequency contour (EFC) of square lattice photonic crystals (PhCs). With the extended DtN-WVEE method and Snell's law, the effective refractive index of the mode with a circular EFC can be obtained, which is further validated with the refractive index weighted by the electric field or magnetic field. To further verify the EFC calculated by the DtN-WVEE method, the finite-difference time-domain method is also used. Compared with other wave vector eigenvalue equation methods that calculate EFC directly, the size of the eigenmatrix used in the DtN-WVEE method is much smaller, and the computation time is significantly reduced. Since the DtN-WVEE method solves wave vectors for given arbitrary frequencies, it can also find applications in studying the optical properties of a PhC with dispersive, lossy and magnetic materials. (paper)

  3. Chemometric analysis of frequency-domain photon migration data: quantitative measurements of optical properties and chromophore concentrations in multicomponent turbid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Andrew J.; Venugopalan, Vasan; Durkin, Anthony J.; Pham, Tuan; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    Frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) is a widely used technique for measuring the optical properties (i.e., absorption, μ a , and reduced scattering, μ s ' , coefficients) of turbid samples. Typically, FDPM data analysis is performed with models based on a photon diffusion equation; however, analytical solutions are difficult to obtain for many realistic geometries. Here, we describe the use of models based instead on representative samples and multivariate calibration (chemometrics). FDPM data at seven wavelengths (ranging from 674 to 956 nm) and multiple modulation frequencies (ranging from 50 to 600 MHz) were gathered from turbid samples containing mixtures of three absorbing dyes. Values for μ a and μ s ' were extracted from the FDPM data in different ways, first with the diffusion theory and then with the chemometric technique of partial least squares. Dye concentrations were determined from the FDPM data by three methods, first by least-squares fits to the diffusion results and then by two chemometric approaches. The accuracy of the chemometric predictions was comparable or superior for all three dyes. Our results indicate that chemometrics can recover optical properties and dye concentrations from the frequency-dependent behavior of photon density waves, without the need for diffusion-based models. Future applications to more complicated geometries, lower-scattering samples, and simpler FDPM instrumentation are discussed. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America

  4. Integrated InP frequency discriminator for Phase-modulated microwave photonic links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandiño, J S; Doménech, J D; Muñoz, P; Capmany, J

    2013-02-11

    We report the design, fabrication and characterization of an integrated frequency discriminator on InP technology for microwave photonic phase modulated links. The optical chip is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported in an active platform and the first to include the optical detectors. The discriminator, designed as a linear filter in intensity, features preliminary SFDR values the range between 67 and 79 dB.Hz(2/3) for signal frequencies in the range of 5-9 GHz limited, in principle, by the high value of the optical losses arising from the use of several free space coupling devices in our experimental setup. As discussed, these losses can be readily reduced by the use of integrated spot-size converters improving the SFDR by 17.3 dB (84-96 dB.Hz(2/3)). Further increase up to a range of (104-116 dB.Hz(2/3)) is possible by reducing the system noise eliminating the EDFA employed in the setup and using a commercially available laser source providing higher output power and lower relative intensity noise. Other paths for improvement requiring a filter redesign to be linear in the optical field are also discussed.

  5. Frequency dependent steering with backward leaky waves via photonic crystal interface layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, Evrim; Caglayan, Humeyra; Cakmak, Atilla O; Villa, Alessandro D; Capolino, Filippo; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2009-06-08

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) with a surface defect layer (made of dimers) is studied in the microwave regime. The dispersion diagram is obtained with the Plane Wave Expansion Method. The dispersion diagram reveals that the dimer-layer supports a surface mode with negative slope. Two facts are noted: First, a guided (bounded) wave is present, propagating along the surface of the dimer-layer. Second, above the light line, the fast traveling mode couple to the propagating spectra and as a result a directive (narrow beam) radiation with backward characteristics is observed and measured. In this leaky mode regime, symmetrical radiation patterns with respect to the normal to the PC surface are attained. Beam steering is observed and measured in a 70 degrees angular range when frequency ranges in the 11.88-13.69 GHz interval. Thus, a PC based surface wave structure that acts as a frequency dependent leaky wave antenna is presented. Angular radiation pattern measurements are in agreement with those obtained via numerical simulations that employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD). Finally, the backward radiation characteristics that in turn suggest the existence of a backward leaky mode in the dimer-layer are experimentally verified using a halved dimer-layer structure.

  6. Photon counting altimeter and lidar for air and spaceborne applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Michael; Michalek, Vojtech; Peca, Marek; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Kodet, Jan

    2011-06-01

    We are presenting the concept and preliminary design of modular multipurpose device for space segment: single photon counting laser altimeter, atmospheric lidar, laser transponder and one way laser ranging receiver. For all the mentioned purposes, the same compact configuration of the device is appropriate. Overall estimated device weight should not exceed 5 kg with the power consumption below 10 W. The device will consists of three main parts, namely, receiver, transmitter and control and processing unit. As a transmitter a commercial solid state laser at 532 nm wavelength with 10 mW power will be used. The transmitter optics will have a diameter at most of 50 mm. The laser pulse width will be of hundreds of picoseconds order. For the laser altimeter and atmospheric lidar application, the repetition rate of 10 kHz is planned in order to obtain sufficient number of data for a distance value computing. The receiver device will be composed of active quenched Single Photon Avalanche Diode module, tiny optics, and narrow-band optical filter. The core part of the control and processing unit including high precision timing unit is implemented using single FPGA chip. The preliminary device concept includes considerations on energy balance, and statistical algorithms to meet all the mentioned purposes. Recently, the bread board version of the device is under construction in our labs. The concept, construction, and timing results will be presented.

  7. Mitigating radiation damage of single photon detectors for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimova, Elena; Higgins, Brendon L.; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Cranmer, Miles [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Choi, Eric [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Magellan Aerospace, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Hudson, Danya; Piche, Louis P.; Scott, Alan [Honeywell Aerospace (formerly COM DEV Ltd.), Ottawa, ON (Canada); Makarov, Vadim [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Quantum Information Science Program, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Single-photon detectors in space must retain useful performance characteristics despite being bombarded with sub-atomic particles. Mitigating the effects of this space radiation is vital to enabling new space applications which require high-fidelity single-photon detection. To this end, we conducted proton radiation tests of various models of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and one model of photomultiplier tube potentially suitable for satellite-based quantum communications. The samples were irradiated with 106 MeV protons at doses approximately equivalent to lifetimes of 0.6, 6, 12 and 24 months in a low-Earth polar orbit. Although most detection properties were preserved, including efficiency, timing jitter and afterpulsing probability, all APD samples demonstrated significant increases in dark count rate (DCR) due to radiation-induced damage, many orders of magnitude higher than the 200 counts per second (cps) required for ground-to-satellite quantum communications. We then successfully demonstrated the mitigation of this DCR degradation through the use of deep cooling, to as low as -86 C. This achieved DCR below the required 200 cps over the 24 months orbit duration. DCR was further reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures of +50 to +100 C. (orig.)

  8. Multi-photon entanglement and applications in quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Christian I.T.

    2008-05-30

    In this thesis, two new linear optics networks are introduced and their application for several quantum information tasks is presented. Spontaneous parametric down conversion, is used in different configurations to provide the input states for the networks. The first network is a new design of a controlled phase gate which is particularly interesting for applications in multi-photon experiments as it constitutes an improvement of former realizations with respect to stability and reliability. This is explicitly demonstrated by employing the gate in four-photon experiments. In this context, a teleportation and entanglement swapping protocol is performed in which all four Bell states are distinguished by means of the phase gate. A similar type of measurement applied to the subsystem parts of two copies of a quantum state, allows further the direct estimation of the state's entanglement in terms of its concurrence. Finally, starting from two Bell states, the controlled phase gate is applied for the observation of a four photon cluster state. The analysis of the results focuses on measurement based quantum computation, the main usage of cluster states. The second network, fed with the second order emission of non-collinear type ii spontaneous parametric down conversion, constitutes a tunable source of a whole family of states. Up to now the observation of one particular state required one individually tailored setup. With the network introduced here many different states can be obtained within the same arrangement by tuning a single, easily accessible experimental parameter. These states exhibit many useful properties and play a central role in several applications of quantum information. Here, they are used for the solution of a four-player quantum Minority game. It is shown that, by employing four-qubit entanglement, the quantum version of the game clearly outperforms its classical counterpart. Experimental data obtained with both networks are utilized to

  9. Multi-photon entanglement and applications in quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Christian I.T.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, two new linear optics networks are introduced and their application for several quantum information tasks is presented. Spontaneous parametric down conversion, is used in different configurations to provide the input states for the networks. The first network is a new design of a controlled phase gate which is particularly interesting for applications in multi-photon experiments as it constitutes an improvement of former realizations with respect to stability and reliability. This is explicitly demonstrated by employing the gate in four-photon experiments. In this context, a teleportation and entanglement swapping protocol is performed in which all four Bell states are distinguished by means of the phase gate. A similar type of measurement applied to the subsystem parts of two copies of a quantum state, allows further the direct estimation of the state's entanglement in terms of its concurrence. Finally, starting from two Bell states, the controlled phase gate is applied for the observation of a four photon cluster state. The analysis of the results focuses on measurement based quantum computation, the main usage of cluster states. The second network, fed with the second order emission of non-collinear type ii spontaneous parametric down conversion, constitutes a tunable source of a whole family of states. Up to now the observation of one particular state required one individually tailored setup. With the network introduced here many different states can be obtained within the same arrangement by tuning a single, easily accessible experimental parameter. These states exhibit many useful properties and play a central role in several applications of quantum information. Here, they are used for the solution of a four-player quantum Minority game. It is shown that, by employing four-qubit entanglement, the quantum version of the game clearly outperforms its classical counterpart. Experimental data obtained with both networks are utilized to demonstrate

  10. A photonic circuit for complementary frequency shifting, in-phase quadrature/single sideband modulation and frequency multiplication: analysis and integration feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mehedi; Hu, Jianqi; Nikkhah, Hamdam; Hall, Trevor

    2017-08-01

    A novel photonic integrated circuit architecture for implementing orthogonal frequency division multiplexing by means of photonic generation of phase-correlated sub-carriers is proposed. The circuit can also be used for implementing complex modulation, frequency up-conversion of the electrical signal to the optical domain and frequency multiplication. The principles of operation of the circuit are expounded using transmission matrices and the predictions of the analysis are verified by computer simulation using an industry-standard software tool. Non-ideal scenarios that may affect the correct function of the circuit are taken into consideration and quantified. The discussion of integration feasibility is illustrated by a photonic integrated circuit that has been fabricated using 'library' components and which features most of the elements of the proposed circuit architecture. The circuit is found to be practical and may be fabricated in any material platform that offers a linear electro-optic modulator such as organic or ferroelectric thin films hybridized with silicon photonics.

  11. Application of nuclear photon engines for deep-space exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulevich, Andrey V.; Ivanov, Eugeny A.; Kukharchuk, Oleg F.; Poupko, Victor Ya.; Zrodnikov, Anatoly V.

    2001-01-01

    Conception of using the nuclear photon rocket engines for deep space exploration is proposed. Some analytical estimations have been made to illustrate the possibility to travel to 100-10000 AU using a small thrust photon engine. Concepts of high temperature nuclear reactors for the nuclear photon engines are also discussed

  12. OW FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND APPLICATION IN KNEE ARTHROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Pedder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: in vitro study of ultrasound dissection devices' impact on meniscus and knee cartilage as well as comparison of outcomes with familiar arthroscopic techniques.Materials and methods. Meniscus and joint cartilage specimen obtained during total knee replacement were placed in a normal saline. All experiments were conducted no later than in 2 hours after obtaining and followed by histology of biopsy specimens. In the first series of experiment the authors performed meniscus dissection with ultrasound instrument «Scalpel», cold plasm ablator and surgical scalpel.Results. The first series of experiments demonstrated disruption of fibers orientation on meniscus rim after dissection with scalpel; necrosis depth after coblation is 0,7-0,8 mm. Ultrasound dissection devices leave necrosis depth of 0,1-0,2 mm and smooth cartilage surface. The second series of experiments proved that after shaver application cartilage surface was coarse; certain necrosis sections of 16-90 nm were observed on relatively smooth cartilage surface after coblation. Application of ultrasound «Miller» device leaves smooth cartilage surface with no fibers, no signs of cartilage thinning and necrosis not exceeding 15 nm.Conclusion. The results of experiments confirm that use of low frequency ultrasound dissection devices is advantageous as compared to mechanical and ablation cutting techniques while ensuring histologically proven atraumatic handling of biopsy specimens of meniscus and hyaline cartilage.

  13. Applications of Microwave Photonics in Radio Astronomy and Space Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addario, Larry R.; Shillue, William P.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of narrow band vs wide band signals is given. Topics discussed included signal transmission, reference distribution and photonic antenna metrology. Examples of VLA, ALMA, ATA and DSN arrays are given. . Arrays of small antennas have become more cost-effective than large antennas for achieving large total aperture or gain, both for astronomy and for communication. It is concluded that emerging applications involving arrays of many antennas require low-cost optical communication of both wide bandwidth and narrow bandwidth; development of round-trip correction schemes enables timing precision; and free-space laser beams with microwave modulation allow structural metrology with approx 100 micrometer precision over distances of 200 meters.

  14. Super-resolution from single photon emission: toward biological application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreva, E.; Traina, P.; Forneris, J.; Ditalia Tchernij, S.; Guarina, L.; Franchino, C.; Picollo, F.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Brida, G.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Carabelli, V.; Olivero, P.; Genovese, M.

    2017-08-01

    Properties of quantum light represent a tool for overcoming limits of classical optics. Several experiments have demonstrated this advantage ranging from quantum enhanced imaging to quantum illumination. In this work, experimental demonstration of quantum-enhanced resolution in confocal fluorescence microscopy will be presented. This is achieved by exploiting the non-classical photon statistics of fluorescence emission of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond. By developing a general model of super-resolution based on the direct sampling of the kth-order autocorrelation function of the photoluminescence signal, we show the possibility to resolve, in principle, arbitrarily close emitting centers. Finally, possible applications of NV-based fluorescent nanodiamonds in biosensing and future developments will be presented.

  15. Highly efficient photonic nanowire single-photon sources for quantum information applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Claudon, J.; Munsch, M.

    2013-01-01

    to a collection efficiency of only 1-2 %, and efficient light extraction thus poses a major challenge in SPS engineering. Initial efforts to improve the efficiency have exploited cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) to efficiently couple the emitted photons to the optical cavity mode. An alternative approach......Within the emerging field of optical quantum information processing, the current challenge is to construct the basic building blocks for the quantum computing and communication systems. A key component is the singlephoton source (SPS) capable of emitting single photons on demand. Ideally, the SPS...... must feature near-unity efficiency, where the efficiency is defined as the number of detected photons per trigger, the probability g(2)(τ=0) of multi-photon emission events should be 0 and the emitted photons are required to be indistinguishable. An optically or electrically triggered quantum light...

  16. Photonics applications and web engineering: WILGA Winter 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2016-09-01

    Since twenty years, young researchers form the Institute of Electronic Systems, Warsaw University of Technology, organize two times a year, under only a marginal supervision of the senior faculty members, under the patronage of WEiTI PW, KEiT PAN, SPIE, IEEE, PKOpto SEP and PSF, the WILGA Symposium on advanced, integrated functional electronic, photonic and mechatronic systems [1-5]. All aspects are considered like: research and development, theory and design, technology - material and construction, software and hardware, commissioning and tests, as well as pilot and practical applications. The applications concern mostly, which turned after several years to be a proud specialization of the WILGA Symposium, Internet engineering, high energy physics experiments, new power industry including fusion, nuclear industry, space and satellite technologies, telecommunications, smart municipal environment, as well as biology and medicine [6-8]. XXXVIIth WILGA Symposium was held on 29-31 January 2016 and gathered a few tens of young researchers active in the mentioned research areas. There were presented a few tens of technical papers which will be published in Proc.SPIE together with the accepted articles from the Summer Edition of the WILGA Symposium scheduled for 29.05-06.06.2016. This article is a digest of chosen presentations from WILGA Symposium 2016 Winter Edition. The survey is narrowed to a few chosen and main topical tracks, like electronics and photonics design using industrial standards like ATCA/MTCA, also particular designs of functional systems using this series of industrial standards. The paper, summarizing traditionally since many years the accomplished WILGA Symposium organized by young researchers from Warsaw University of Technology, is also the following part of a cycle of papers concerning their participation in design of new generations of electronic systems used in discovery experiments in Poland and in leading research laboratories of the world.

  17. Polarization entanglement of sum-frequency photons: A tool to probe the Markovian limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Victor; Chelli, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    The article addresses the possibility of entanglement-specific infrared-visible sum-frequency generation spectroscopy. In the case of an anisotropic interface, it is possible to employ SSS and PSS polarizations to detect responses not only specific to χY Y Y and χX Y Y nonlinearities, but also to higher-order χ(Y Y Y )(X Y Y ) and χ(X Y Y )(Y Y Y ) nonlinearities. Using quantum mechanical studies of the rhenium complex [Re (OH) 3(CO) 3] as a molecular model, we demonstrate that if such complexes would form an anisotropic orientational distribution at a surface, under the considered geometry and the polarization settings, we may prepare quantum correlated C =O vibrational states to emit polarization-entangled photons. Accordingly, we explore the possibility of a polarization-measurement protocol to extract spectral signatures of the entangled states. The response would be informative on intramolecular interactions. As a result, we discuss the possible practical implications in probing dynamics at interfaces, and different opportunities in the preparation of entangled vibrational states of quantified fidelity.

  18. Broadband Enhancement of Optical Frequency Comb Using Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing in Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfig Eltaif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A cascaded intensity modulator (IM and phase modulator (PM are used to modulate a continuous-wave (CW laser and generate an optical frequency comb (OFC. Thus, the generated comb is utilized as an initial seed and combined with another CW-laser to generate four-wave mixing (FWM in photonic crystal fiber (PCF. Results show that an initial flat 30 GHz OFC of 29, 55 lines within power fluctuation of 0.8 dB and 2 dB, respectively, can be achieved by setting the ratio of the DC bias to amplitude of sinusoidal signal at 0.1 and setting the modulation indices of both IM and PM at 10. Moreover, the 1st order of FWM created through 14 m of PCF has over 68 and 94 lines with fluctuation of 0.8 dB and 2 dB, respectively. Hence, the generated wavelengths of 1st left and right order of FWM can be tuned in a range from ~1500 nm to ~1525 nm and ~1590 nm to ~1604 nm, respectively.

  19. Photonic filtering of microwave signals in the frequency range of 0.01-20 GHz using a Fabry-Perot filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo-Rodriguez, G; Zaldivar-Huerta, I E [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE). Sta. Maria Tonantzintla, Pue. Mexico (Mexico); GarcIa-Juarez, A [Depto. de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON) Hermosillo, Son. Mexico (Mexico); Rodriguez-Asomoza, J [Depto. de Ingenieria Electronica, Universidad de las Americas-Puebla (UDLA). San Andres Cholula, Pue. Mexico (Mexico); Larger, L; Courjal, N [Laboratoire d' Optique P. M. Duffieux, UMR 6603 CNRS, Institut des Microtechiques de Franche-Comte, FRW 0067, UFR Sciences et Techniques, Universite de Franche-Comte (UFC), Besancon cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the efficiency of tuning of a photonic filter in the frequency range of 0.01 to 20 GHz. The presented work combines the use of a multimode optical source associated with a dispersive optical fiber to obtain the filtering effect. Tunability effect is achieved by the use of a Fabry-Perot filter that allows altering the spectral characteristics of the optical source. Experimental results are validated by means of numerical simulations. The scheme here proposed has a potential application in the field of optical telecommunications.

  20. Effects of frequency correlation in linear optical entangling gates operated with independent photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, M.

    2007-01-01

    Bose-Einstein coalescence of independent photons at the surface of a beam splitter is the physical process that allows linear optical quantum gates to be built. When distinct parametric down-conversion events are used as an independent photon source, distinguishability arises form the energy correlation of each photon with its twin. We derive upper bound for the entanglement which can be generated under these conditions

  1. Broadband high-resolution two-photon spectroscopy with laser frequency combs

    OpenAIRE

    Hipke, Arthur; Meek, Samuel A.; Ideguchi, Takuro; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon excitation spectroscopy with broad spectral span is demonstrated at Doppler-limited resolution. We describe first Fourier transform two-photon spectroscopy of an atomic sample with two mode-locked laser oscillators in a dual-comb technique. Each transition is uniquely identified by the modulation imparted by the interfering comb excitations. The temporal modulation of the spontaneous two-photon fluorescence is monitored with a single photodetector, and the spectrum is revealed by a...

  2. Broadband Doppler-limited two-photon and stepwise excitation spectroscopy with laser frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipke, Arthur; Meek, Samuel A.; Ideguchi, Takuro; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    Multiplex two-photon excitation spectroscopy is demonstrated at Doppler-limited resolution. We describe first Fourier-transform two-photon spectroscopy of an atomic sample with two mode-locked laser oscillators in a dual-comb technique. Each transition is uniquely identified by the modulation imparted by the interfering comb excitations. The temporal modulation of the spontaneous two-photon fluorescence is monitored with a single photodetector, and the spectrum of all excited transitions is revealed by a Fourier transform.

  3. Linear, Low Noise Microwave Photonic Systems using Phase and Frequency Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Lightwave Technology, Journal of, vol. 24, no. 12, pp. 4628 –4641, Dec 2006. [2] J. Capmany and D. Novak, “Microwave photonics combines two worlds...Journal of, vol. 32, no. 7, pp. 1141 –1149, Jul 1996. [13] J. Capmany and D. Novak, “Microwave photonics combines two worlds,” Nature Photonics, vol. 1, no... Capmany , “Analytical model and figures of merit for filtered Microwave photonic links,” Opt. Express, vol. 19, no. 20, pp. 19 758–19 774, Sep 2011

  4. The Influence of the External Signal Modulation Waveform and Frequency on the Performance of a Photonic Forced Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Castro, Noemi; Palomino-Ovando, Martha Alicia; Estrada-Wiese, Denise; Valladares, Nydia Xcaret; Del Río, Jesus Antonio; de la Mora, Maria Beatriz; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn; Lugo, Jesus Eduardo

    2018-05-21

    Photonic crystals have been an object of interest because of their properties to inhibit certain wavelengths and allow the transmission of others. Using these properties, we designed a photonic structure known as photodyne formed by two porous silicon one-dimensional photonic crystals with an air defect between them. When the photodyne is illuminated with appropriate light, it allows us to generate electromagnetic forces within the structure that can be maximized if the light becomes localized inside the defect region. These electromagnetic forces allow the microcavity to oscillate mechanically. In the experiment, a chopper was driven by a signal generator to modulate the laser light that was used. The driven frequency and the signal modulation waveform (rectangular, sinusoidal or triangular) were changed with the idea to find optimal conditions for the structure to oscillate. The microcavity displacement amplitude, velocity amplitude and Fourier spectrum of the latter and its frequency were measured by means of a vibrometer. The mechanical oscillations are modeled and compared with the experimental results and show good agreement. For external frequency values of 5 Hz and 10 Hz, the best option was a sinusoidal waveform, which gave higher photodyne displacements and velocity amplitudes. Nonetheless, for an external frequency of 15 Hz, the best option was the rectangular waveform.

  5. The Influence of the External Signal Modulation Waveform and Frequency on the Performance of a Photonic Forced Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Sánchez-Castro

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals have been an object of interest because of their properties to inhibit certain wavelengths and allow the transmission of others. Using these properties, we designed a photonic structure known as photodyne formed by two porous silicon one-dimensional photonic crystals with an air defect between them. When the photodyne is illuminated with appropriate light, it allows us to generate electromagnetic forces within the structure that can be maximized if the light becomes localized inside the defect region. These electromagnetic forces allow the microcavity to oscillate mechanically. In the experiment, a chopper was driven by a signal generator to modulate the laser light that was used. The driven frequency and the signal modulation waveform (rectangular, sinusoidal or triangular were changed with the idea to find optimal conditions for the structure to oscillate. The microcavity displacement amplitude, velocity amplitude and Fourier spectrum of the latter and its frequency were measured by means of a vibrometer. The mechanical oscillations are modeled and compared with the experimental results and show good agreement. For external frequency values of 5 Hz and 10 Hz, the best option was a sinusoidal waveform, which gave higher photodyne displacements and velocity amplitudes. Nonetheless, for an external frequency of 15 Hz, the best option was the rectangular waveform.

  6. Nonlinear Photonic Systems for V- and W-Band Antenna Remoting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-22

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0088 Nonlinear Photonic Systems for V- and W-Band Antenna Remoting Applications Sheng-Kwang Hwang NATIONAL CHENG KUNG...2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 26 May 2015 to 25 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nonlinear Photonic Systems for V- and W-Band...TERMS nonlinear, photonic , antenna, remote, microwave, amplification, bandwith, modulation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR

  7. Radiation Tests of Single Photon Avalanche Diode for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatelli, Francesco; Marisaldi, Martino; MacCagnani, Piera; Labanti, Claudio; Fuschino, Fabio; Prest, Michela; Berra, Alessandro; Bolognini, Davide; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan; hide

    2013-01-01

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been recently studied as photodetectors for applications in space missions. In this presentation we report the results of radiation hardness test on large area SPAD (actual results refer to SPADs having 500 micron diameter). Dark counts rate as low as few kHz at -10 degC has been obtained for the 500 micron devices, before irradiation. We performed bulk damage and total dose radiation tests with protons and gamma-rays in order to evaluate their radiation hardness properties and their suitability for application in a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space mission. With this aim SPAD devices have been irradiated using up to 20 krad total dose with gamma-rays and 5 krad with protons. The test performed show that large area SPADs are very sensitive to proton doses as low as 2×10(exp 8) (1 MeV eq) n/cm2 with a significant increase in dark counts rate (DCR) as well as in the manifestation of the "random telegraph signal" effect. Annealing studies at room temperature (RT) and at 80 degC have been carried out, showing a high decrease of DCR after 24-48 h at RT. Lower protons doses in the range 1-10×10(exp 7) (1 MeV eq) n/cm(exp 2) result in a lower increase of DCR suggesting that the large-area SPADs tested in this study are well suitable for application in low-inclination LEO, particularly useful for gamma-ray astrophysics.

  8. Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Optoelectronic materials and devices are examined. Optoelectronic devices, which generate, detect, modulate, or switch electromagnetic radiation are being developed for a variety of space applications. The program includes spatial light modulators, solid state lasers, optoelectronic integrated circuits, nonlinear optical materials and devices, fiber optics, and optical networking photovoltaic technology and optical processing.

  9. Bend-insensitive single-mode photonic crystal fiber with ultralarge effective area for dual applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Asiful; Alam, M. Shah

    2013-05-01

    A novel photonic crystal fiber (PCF) having circular arrangement of cladding air holes has been designed and numerically optimized to obtain a bend insensitive single mode fiber with large mode area for both wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) communication and fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) application. The bending loss of the proposed bent PCF lies in the range of 10-3 to 10-4 dB/turn or lower over 1300 to 1700 nm, and 2 × 10-4 dB/turn at the wavelength of 1550 nm for a 30-mm bend radius with a higher order mode (HOM) cut-off frequency below 1200 nm for WDM application. When the whole structure of the PCF is scaled down, a bending loss of 6.78×10-4 dB/turn at 1550 nm for a 4-mm bend radius is obtained, and the loss remains in the order of 10-4 dB/turn over the same range of wavelength with an HOM cut-off frequency below 700 nm, and makes the fiber useful for FTTH applications. Furthermore, this structure is also optimized to show a splice loss near zero for fusion-splicing to a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF).

  10. Excited-state lifetime measurement of silicon vacancy centers in diamond by single-photon frequency upconversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Youying; Ma, Jianhui; Chen, Lingxiao; Liu, Yan; Siyushev, Petr; Wu, Botao; Pan, Haifeng; Jelezko, Fedor; Wu, E.; Zeng, Heping

    2018-05-01

    We report a method with high time resolution to measure the excited-state lifetime of silicon vacancy centers in bulk diamond avoiding timing jitter from the single-photon detectors. Frequency upconversion of the fluorescence emitted from silicon vacancy centers was achieved from 738 nm to 436 nm via sum frequency generation with a short pump pulse. The excited-state lifetime can be obtained by measuring the intensity of upconverted light while the pump delay changes. As a probe, a pump laser with pulse duration of 11 ps provided a high temporal resolution of the measurement. The lifetime extracted from the pump–probe curve was 0.755 ns, which was comparable to the timing jitter of the single-photon detectors.

  11. Frequency tuning of single photons from a whispering-gallery mode resonator to MHz-wide transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunk, G.; Vogl, U.; Sedlmeir, F.

    2016-01-01

    photons, which is based on parametric down-conversion in a triply resonant whispering-gallery mode resonator, with alkaline transitions [Schunk et al., Optica 2015, 2, 773]. In this paper, we analyse our source in terms of phase matching, available wavelength-tuning mechanisms and applications...

  12. Femtosecond Laser--Pumped Source of Entangled Photons for Quantum Cryptography Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, D.; Donaldson, W.; Sobolewski, R.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental setup for generation of entangled-photon pairs via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, based on the femtosecond-pulsed laser. Our entangled-photon source utilizes a 76-MHz-repetition-rate, 100-fs-pulse-width, mode-locked, ultrafast femtosecond laser, which can produce, on average, more photon pairs than a cw laser of an equal pump power. The resulting entangled pairs are counted by a pair of high-quantum-efficiency, single-photon, silicon avalanche photodiodes. Our apparatus s intended as an efficient source/receiver system for the quantum communications and quantum cryptography applications

  13. Large-area metallic photonic lattices for military applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    In this project we developed photonic crystal modeling capability and fabrication technology that is scaleable to large area. An intelligent optimization code was developed to find the optimal structure for the desired spectral response. In terms of fabrication, an exhaustive survey of fabrication techniques that would meet the large area requirement was reduced to Deep X-ray Lithography (DXRL) and nano-imprint. Using DXRL, we fabricated a gold logpile photonic crystal in the <100> plane. For the nano-imprint technique, we fabricated a cubic array of gold squares. These two examples also represent two classes of metallic photonic crystal topologies, the connected network and cermet arrangement.

  14. Triplet-triplet annihilation photon-upconversion: towards solar energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Victor; Dzebo, Damir; Abrahamsson, Maria; Albinsson, Bo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2014-06-14

    Solar power production and solar energy storage are important research areas for development of technologies that can facilitate a transition to a future society independent of fossil fuel based energy sources. Devices for direct conversion of solar photons suffer from poor efficiencies due to spectrum losses, which are caused by energy mismatch between the optical absorption of the devices and the broadband irradiation provided by the sun. In this context, photon-upconversion technologies are becoming increasingly interesting since they might offer an efficient way of converting low energy solar energy photons into higher energy photons, ideal for solar power production and solar energy storage. This perspective discusses recent progress in triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) photon-upconversion systems and devices for solar energy applications. Furthermore, challenges with evaluation of the efficiency of TTA-photon-upconversion systems are discussed and a general approach for evaluation and comparison of existing systems is suggested.

  15. Active Photonic crystal fibers for high power applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    The photonic crystal ber technology provides means to realize bers optimized for high power operation, due to the large single-mode cores and the unique design exibility of the microstructure. The work presented in this thesis focuses on improving the properties of active photonic crystal bers...... contributed to the compounding of new and improved material compositions. The second part is an investigation of pump absorption in photonic crystal bers, demonstrating that the microstructure in photonic crystal bers improves the pump absorption by up to a factor of two compared to step-index bers....... This plays an important role in high power lasers and ampliers with respect to efficiency, packaging, and thermal handling. The third part of the work has involved developing tools for characterizing the mode quality and stability of large core bers. Stable, single-mode bers with larger cores are essential...

  16. Photonic band gap materials: design, synthesis, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Unlike semiconductors which facilitate the coherent propagation of electrons, photonic band gap (PBG) materials execute their novel functions through the coherent localization of photons. I review and discuss our recent synthesis of a large scale three-dimensional silicon photonic crystal with a complete photonic band gap near 1.5 microns. When a PBG material is doped with impurity atoms which have an electronic transition that lies within the gap, spontaneous emission of light from the atom is inhibited. Inside the gap, the photon forms a bound state to the atom. Outside the gap, radiative dynamics in the colored vacuum is highly non Markovian. I discuss the influence of these memory effects on laser action. When spontaneous emission is absent, the next order radiative effect (resonance dipole dipole interaction between atoms) must be incorporated leading to anomalous nonlinear optical effects which occur at a much lower threshold than in ordinary vacuum. I describe the collective switching of two-level atoms near a photonic band edge, by external laser field, from a passive state to one exhibiting population inversion. This effect is forbidden in ordinary vacuum. However, in the context of a PBG material, this effect may be utilized for an all-optical transistor. Finally, I discuss the prospects for a phase sensitive, single atom quantum memory device, onto which information may be written by an external laser pulse

  17. A novel Zeonex based oligoporous-core photonic crystal fiber for polarization preserving terahertz applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Saiful; Sultana, Jakeya; Dinovitser, Alex; Ng, Brian W.-H.; Abbott, Derek

    2018-04-01

    A novel waveguide consisting of oligo-porous core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a kagome lattice cladding has been designed for highly birefringent and near zero dispersion flattened applications of terahertz waves. The wave guiding properties of the designed PCF including birefringence, dispersion, effective material loss (EML), core power fraction, confinement loss, and modal effective area are investigated using a full vector Finite Element Method (FEM) with Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition. Simulation results demonstrate that an ultra-high birefringence of 0.079, low EML of 0.05 cm-1, higher core power fraction of 44% and negligible confinement loss of 7 . 24 × 10-7 cm-1 can be achieved at 1 THz. Furthermore, for the y-polarization mode a near zero flattened dispersion of 0 . 49 ± 0 . 05 ps/THz/cm is achieved within a broad frequency range of 0.8-1.7 THz. The fabrication of the proposed fiber is feasible using the existing fabrication technology. Due to favorable wave-guiding properties, the proposed fiber has potential for terahertz imaging, sensing and polarization maintaining applications in the terahertz frequency range.

  18. Coplanar stripline components for high frequency application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverdhanam, Kavita; Simons, Rainee N.; Dib, Nihad; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, coplanar stripline discontinuities such as a slit, a right angle bend and a T-junction are characterized and their performance is parameterized with respect to frequency and geometry. Lumped equivalent circuits are presented for some of them. The element values are obtained from the measured discontinuity scattering (S) parameters. The experimental results are compared with theoretical data obtained using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FD-TD) technique for validation and show very good agreement.

  19. Radial Photonic Crystal for detection of frequency and position of radiation sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, J; Díaz-Rubio, A; Torrent, D; Cervera, F; Kirleis, M A; Piqué, A; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2012-01-01

    Based on the concepts of artificially microstructured materials, i.e. metamaterials, we present here the first practical realization of a radial wave crystal. This type of device was introduced as a theoretical proposal in the field of acoustics, and can be briefly defined as a structured medium with radial symmetry, where the constitutive parameters are invariant under radial geometrical translations. Our practical demonstration is realized in the electromagnetic microwave spectrum, because of the equivalence between the wave problems in both fields. A device has been designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized. It is able to perform beam shaping of punctual wave sources, and also to sense position and frequency of external radiators. Owing to the flexibility offered by the design concept, other possible applications are discussed.

  20. [Study on spectral gain characterization of FWM processes with multi-frequency pumps in photonic crystal fiber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zhan-Qiang

    2011-10-01

    Spectral gain induced by four-wave-mixing with multi-frequency pump was investigated by exploiting the data signal and continue lights co-propagation in dispersion flattened high nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The effects of wavelength drift of pump lights, polarization state of orthogonal or parallel of pump lights, polarization mismatch of signal light versus orthogonal pump lights, total power of signal and probe light on the spectrum gain were analyzed. The results show that good FWM gain effects with multi-frequency pump can be obtained in 36.4 nm wavelength range when power ratio of pump to probe light is appropriate and with identical polarization. Furthermore, the gain of FWM with multi-frequency pump is very sensitive to polarization fluctuation and the different idle waves obtain different gain with the variation in signal polarization state. Moreover, the impact of pump numbers was investigated. The obtained results would be helpful for further research on ultrahigh-speed all optical signal processing devices exploiting the FWM with multi-frequency pump in PCF for future photonics network.

  1. Slow and fast light effects and their applications to microwave photonics using semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales, Salvador; Xue, Weiqi; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive review of the application of slow and fast light (SFL) techniques to the field of microwave photonics. Basic principles leading to the implementation of phase shifting and true time delay operations which are instrumental in this field are first considered. We then focus....... Finally, the main results obtained for several microwave photonic applications such as filtering, arbitrary waveform generation and optoelectronic scillators (OEOs)are reviewed, and other directions for future research in the field are discussed....

  2. Photorefractive lithium niobate crystals for applications in photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, U.

    2006-12-01

    Lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO 3 ) generally show a photorefractive response, i.e., light-induced refractive index changes. Crystals are investigated at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. As a result 'classical' photorefractive holographic volume-phase gratings, originating from space charge fields and the electro-optic effect, and 'non-classical' photorefractive volume-phase gratings, which can be traced back to strong absorption gratings, emerge. Single domain and periodically poled crystals (PPLN) are investigated. PPLN is typically used in non-linear optics for frequency conversion. The crystals also show non-linear photorefractive response during holographic recording with isotropically polarized light beams of equal intensity and, in the case of PPLN, by mixing of domain and holographic gratings. The results are important for applications combining the photorefractive and non-linear optical properties of LiNbO 3 . (orig.)

  3. Fabrication of Refractive Index Tunable Polydimethylsiloxane Photonic Crystal for Biosensor Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Karthik; Murthy, T. R. Srinivasa; Hegde, G. M.

    Photonic crystal based nanostructures are expected to play a significant role in next generation nanophotonic devices. Recent developments in two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal based devices have created widespread interest as such planar photonic structures are compatible with conventional microelectronic and photonic devices. Various optical components such as waveguides, resonators, modulators and demultiplexers have been designed and fabricated based on 2D photonic crystal geometry. This paper presents the fabrication of refractive index tunable Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer based photonic crystals. The advantages of using PDMS are mainly its chemical stability, bio-compatibility and the stack reduces sidewall roughness scattering. The PDMS structure with square lattice was fabricated by using silicon substrate patterned with SU8-2002 resist. The 600 nm period grating of PDMS is then fabricated using Nano-imprinting. In addition, the refractive index of PDMS is modified using certain additive materials. The resulting photonic crystals are suitable for application in photonic integrated circuits and biological applications such as filters, cavities or microlaser waveguides.

  4. Barium Titanate Photonic Crystal Electro-Optic Modulators for Telecommunication and Data Network Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girouard, Peter D.

    The microwave, optical, and electro-optic properties of epitaxial barium titanate thin films grown on (100) MgO substrates and photonic crystal electro-optic modulators fabricated on these films were investigated to demonstrate the applicability of these devices for telecommunication and data networks. The electrical and electro-optical properties were characterized up to modulation frequencies of 50 GHz, and the optical properties of photonic crystal waveguides were determined for wavelengths spanning the optical C band between 1500 and 1580 nm. Microwave scattering parameters were measured on coplanar stripline devices with electrode gap spacings between 5 and 12 mum on barium titanate films with thicknesses between 230 and 680 nm. The microwave index and device characteristic impedance were obtained from the measurements. Larger (lower) microwave indices (impedances) were obtained for devices with narrower electrode gap spacings and on thicker films. Thinner film devices have both lower index mismatch between the co-propagating microwave and optical signals and lower impedance mismatch to a 50O system, resulting in a larger predicted electro-optical 3 dB bandwidth. This was experimentally verified with electro-optical frequency response measurements. These observations were applied to demonstrate a record high 28 GHz electro-optic bandwidth measured for a BaTiO3 conventional ridge waveguide modulator having 1mm long electrodes and 12 mum gap spacing on a 260nm thick film. The half-wave voltage and electro-optic coefficients of barium titanate modulators were measured for films having thicknesses between 260 and 500 nm. The half-wave voltage was directly measured at low frequencies using a polarizer-sample-compensator-analyzer setup by over-driving waveguide integrated modulators beyond their linear response regime. Effective in-device electro-optic coefficients were obtained from the measured half-wave voltages. The effective electro-optic coefficients were

  5. Frequency stabilized lasers for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Mike; Adkins, Mike; Pierce, Robert; Warden, Robert; Wallace, Cynthia; Weimer, Carl

    2014-09-01

    metrology, spectroscopy, atomic clocks and geodesy. This technology will be a key enabler to several proposed NASA science missions. Although lasers such as Q-switched Nd-YAG are now commonly used in space, other types of lasers - especially those with narrow linewidth - are still few in number and more development is required to advance their technology readiness. In this paper we discuss a reconfigurable laser frequency stabilization testbed, and end-to-end modeling to support system development. Two important features enabling testbed flexibility are that the controller, signal processing and interfaces are hosted on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) which has spacequalified equivalent parts, and secondly, fiber optic relay of the beam paths. Given the nonlinear behavior of lasers, FPGA implementation is a key system reliability aspect allowing on-orbit retuning of the control system and initial frequency acquisition. The testbed features a dual sensor system, one based upon a high finesse resonator cavity which provides relative stability through Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) modulation and secondly an absolute frequency reference by dither locking to an acetylene gas cell (GC). To provide for differences between ground and space implementation, we have developed an end-to-end Simulink/ Matlab®-based control system model of the testbed components including the important noise sources. This model is in the process of being correlated to the testbed data which then can be used for trade studies, and estimation of space-based performance and sensitivities. A 1530 nm wavelength semiconductor laser is used for this initial work.

  6. Radio frequency transistors principles and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, Norm

    1993-01-01

    Cellular telephones, satellite communications and radar systems are adding to the increasing demand for radio frequency circuit design principles. At the same time, several generations of digitally-oriented graduates are missing the essential RF skills. This book contains a wealth of valuable design information difficult to find elsewhere.It's a complete 'tool kit' for successful RF circuit design. Written by experienced RF design engineers from Motorola's semiconductors product section.Book covers design examples of circuits (e.g. amplifiers; oscillators; switches; pulsed power; modular syst

  7. Theoretical analysis and modeling of a photonic integrated circuit for frequency 8-tupled and 24-tupled millimeter wave signal generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mehedi; Guemri, Rabiaa; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramón; Lucarz, Frédéric; de Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, Jean-Louis; Hall, Trevor

    2014-12-15

    A photonic circuit design for implementing frequency 8-tupling and 24-tupling is proposed. The front- and back-end of the circuit comprises 4×4 MMI couplers enclosing an array of four pairs of phase modulators and 2×2 MMI couplers. The proposed design for frequency multiplication requires no optical or electrical filters, the operation is not limited to carefully adjusted modulation indexes, and the drift originated from static DC bias is mitigated by making use of the intrinsic phase relations of multi-mode interference couplers. A transfer matrix approach is used to represent the main building blocks of the design and hence to describe the operation of the frequency 8-tupling and 24-tupling. The concept is theoretically developed and demonstrated by simulations. Ideal and imperfect power imbalances in the multi-mode interference couplers, as well as ideal and imperfect phases of the electric drives to the phase modulators, are analyzed.

  8. Spectrally-Selective Photonic Structures for PV Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Bläsi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We review several examples of how spectrally-selective photonic structures may be used to improve solar cell systems. Firstly, we introduce different spectrally-selective structures that are based on interference effects. Examples shown include Rugate filter, edge filter and 3D photonic crystals such as artificial opals. In the second part, we discuss several examples of photovoltaic (PV concepts that utilize spectral selectivity such as fluorescence collectors, upconversion systems, spectrum splitting concepts and the intermediate reflector concept. The potential of spectrally selective filters in the context of solar cells is discussed.

  9. THGEM based photon detector for Cherenkov imaging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, M; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Croci, G; Colantoni, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Duarte Pinto, S; Denisov, O; Diaz, V; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Giacomini, G; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Jahodova, V; Königsmann, K; Lauser, L; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Martin, A; Menon, G; Nerling, F; Panzieri, D; Pesaro, G; Polak, J; Rocco, E; Ropelewski, L; Sauli, F; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schopferer, S; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Takekawa, S; Tessarotto, F; Wollny, H

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a single photon detector for Cherenkov imaging counters. This detector is based on the use of THGEM electron multipliers in a multilayer design. The major goals of our project are ion feedback suppression down to a few per cent, large gain, fast response, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and a large detector size. We report about the project status and perspectives. In particular, we present a systematic study of the THGEM response as a function of geometrical parameters, production techniques and the gas mixture composition. The first figures obtained from measuring the response of a CsI coated THGEM to single photons are presented.

  10. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    train quantum electrodynamics. A brief description of particle (photon) position operators is given, and it is shown that photons usually are only algebraically confined in an emission process. Finally, it is demonstrated that the profile of the birth domain of a radio-frequency photon emitted...

  11. Molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Wen; Liu, Yongchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2017-03-01

    During the past two decades, two-photon microscopy (TPM), which utilizes two near-infrared photons as the excitation source, has emerged as a novel, attractive imaging tool for biological research. Compared with one-photon microscopy, TPM offers several advantages, such as lowering background fluorescence in living cells and tissues, reducing photodamage to biosamples, and a photobleaching phenomenon, offering better 3D spatial localization, and increasing penetration depth. Small-molecule-based two-photon fluorescent probes have been well developed for the detection and imaging of various analytes in biological systems. In this review, we will give a general introduction of molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes based on different fluorescence response mechanisms for bioimaging applications during the past decade. Inspired by the desired advantages of small-molecule two-photon fluorescent probes in biological imaging applications, we expect that more attention will be devoted to the development of new two-photon fluorophores and applications of TPM in areas of bioanalysis and disease diagnosis.

  12. Processing multiphoton states through operation on a single photon: Methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qing; He Bing; Bergou, Janos A.; Ren, Yuhang

    2009-01-01

    Multiphoton states are widely applied in quantum information technology. By the methods presented in this paper, the structure of a multiphoton state in the form of multiple single-photon qubit products can be mapped to a single-photon qudit, which could also be in a separable product with other photons. This makes possible the manipulation of such multiphoton states by processing single-photon states. The optical realization of unknown qubit discrimination [B. He, J. A. Bergou, and Y.-H. Ren, Phys. Rev. A 76, 032301 (2007)] is simplified with the transformation methods. Another application is the construction of quantum logic gates, where the inverse transformations back to the input state spaces are also necessary. We especially show that the modified setups to implement the transformations can realize the deterministic multicontrol gates (including Toffoli gate) operating directly on the products of single-photon qubits.

  13. Photonic Implementation of 4-QAM/QPSK Electrical Modulation at Millimeter-Wave Frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2008-01-01

    We propose a photonic method for generating millimeter-wave 4-QAM/QPSK modulated signals. The method is based on optical phase modulation by multilevel electrical signals and optical carrier-suppression. Simulation results are presented for 2.5 Gsymbol/s 4-QAM and QPSK signals at a 36 GHz carrier...

  14. Research on Shore-Ship Photonic Link Performance for Two- Frequency-Band Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yanqin; Cong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Ka and Ku bands links for shore-ship communications suffer limited bandwidth and high loss. In this paper, photonics-based links are proposed and modeled. The principle of phase modulation (PM) is elaborated and analyzed. It is showed that PM can effectively suppress high-order inter-modulation distortion (IMD), reduce the insert loss and improve the reliability of the system.

  15. Nonreciprocal frequency doubler of electromagnetic waves diode based on a photonic crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konotop, V. V.; Kuzmiak, Vladimír

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2003), s. - Grant - others:NATO-Linkadge(US) PST.CLG.978177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : harmonic generation * nonlinear media * photonic band gap Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://www.vjnano.org

  16. Nonreciprocal frequency doubler of electromagnetic waves based on a photonic crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konotop, V. V.; Kuzmiak, Vladimír

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 23 (2003), s. 2352081-2352085 ISSN 0163-1829 Grant - others:NATO-Linkadge(US) PST.CLG.978177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : harmonic generation * nonlinear media * photonic band gap Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.962, year: 2003

  17. Organic Thin Films for Photonics Applications. Volume 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    progress of the polymer optical fiber (POF) and related photonics polymer for high-speed telecommunication is reviewed. The high-bandwidth perfluorinated ...silicon. In the waveguide spectrometry studies described above, ab- sorption was measured on slab waveguides where fabrication imperfections are... compound in scries I[//| and II|//| , we have determined in solution: - the ground-state dipole /{ using capacitive measurements - the static

  18. Photonic Crystal Fibres for Dispersion and Sensor Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thorkild

    2005-01-01

    of the involved nonlinear processes. A hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) is used as a sensor for gas. It is filled with two gasses, 12C2H2 acetylene, and H13CN hydrogen cyanide, and the transmission spectra are subject for a discussion. A model for infusion speed of fluids to a capillary presented...

  19. Application of FIRE for the calculation of photon matrix elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to evaluate the two-loop Feynman diagrams for the photon matrix element of the ... sum of scalar Feynman integrals to a linear combination of a few master integrals. .... Then, FIRE is used to express these scalar integrals as a linear combi-.

  20. Slow and fast light effects in semiconductor waveguides for applications in microwave photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui; Öhman, Filip

    2009-01-01

    We review the theory of slow and fast light effects due to coherent population oscillations in semiconductor waveguides, and potential applications of these effects in microwave photonic systems as RF phase shifters. In order to satisfy the application requirement of 360º RF phase shift at differ......We review the theory of slow and fast light effects due to coherent population oscillations in semiconductor waveguides, and potential applications of these effects in microwave photonic systems as RF phase shifters. In order to satisfy the application requirement of 360º RF phase shift...

  1. High precision synchronization of time and frequency and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lijun

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the concept and methods for remote synchronization of time and frequency. We discuss a recent experiment that demonstrated time and frequency synchronization via a commercial fiber network, reaching accuracy of 7 × 10 -15 /s, 5 × 10 -19 /day, and a maximum time uncertainty of less than 50 femtoseconds. We discuss synchronization methods applicable to different topologies and their important scientific applications. (authors)

  2. Radio Frequency Plasma Applications for Space Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W. Jr.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Goulding, R.H.; Ilin, A.V.; Jaeger, E.F.; Sparks, D.O.; Squire, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments in solid-state radio frequency (RF) power technologies allow for the practical consideration of RF heated plasmas for space propulsion. These technologies permit the use of any electrical power source, de-couple the power and propellant sources, and allow for the efficient use of both the propellant mass and power. Efficient use of the propellant is obtained by expelling the rocket exhaust at the highest possible velocity, which can be orders of magnitude higher than those achieved in chemical rockets. Handling the hot plasma exhaust requires the use of magnetic nozzles, and the basic physics of ion detachment from the magnetic eld is discussed. The plasma can be generated by RF using helicon waves to heat electrons. Further direct heating of the ions helps to reduce the line radiation losses, and the magnetic geometry is tailored to allow ion cyclotron resonance heating. RF eld and ion trajectory calculations are presented to give a reasonably self-consistent picture of the ion acceleration process

  3. Low-frequency-field-induced spontaneous-emission interference in a two-level atom placed in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gaoxiang; Evers, Joerg; Keitel, Christoph H

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the spontaneous-emission properties of a two-level atom embedded in a three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal. In addition to the modified density of states, the atom is driven by a coherent intense low-frequency field (LFF), which creates additional multiphoton decay channels with the exchange of two low-frequency photons and one spontaneous photon during an atomic transition. Due to the low frequency of the applied field, the various transition pathways may interfere with each other and thus give rise to a modified system dynamics. We find that even if all the atomic (bare and induced) transition frequencies are in the conducting band of the photonic crystal, there still may exist a photon-atom bound state in coexistence with propagating modes. The system also allows us to generate narrow lines in the spontaneous-emission spectrum. This spectrum is a function of the distance of the observer from the atom due to the band gap in the photonic crystal. The system properties depend on three characteristic frequencies, which are influenced by quantum interference effects. Thus these results can be attributed to a combination of interference and band-gap effects

  4. Alternative Paths to Hearing (A Conjecture. Photonic and Tactile Hearing Systems Displaying the Frequency Spectrum of Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. Hara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the hearing process is considered from a system engineering perspective. For those with total hearing loss, a cochlear implant is the only direct remedy. It first acts as a spectrum analyser and then electronically stimulates the neurons in the cochlea with a number of electrodes. Each electrode carries information on the separate frequency bands (i.e., spectrum of the original sound signal. The neurons then relay the signals in a parallel manner to the section of the brain where sound signals are processed. Photonic and tactile hearing systems displaying the spectrum of sound are proposed as alternative paths to the section of the brain that processes sound. In view of the plasticity of the brain, which can rewire itself, the following conjectures are offered. After a certain period of training, a person without the ability to hear should be able to decipher the patterns of photonic or tactile displays of the sound spectrum and learn to ‘hear’. This is very similar to the case of a blind person learning to ‘read’ by recognizing the patterns created by the series of bumps as their fingers scan the Braille writing. The conjectures are yet to be tested. Designs of photonic and tactile systems displaying the sound spectrum are outlined.

  5. Deuterated silicon nitride photonic devices for broadband optical frequency comb generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, Jeff; Nader, Nima; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Yu, Su Peng; Briles, Travis Crain; Carlson, David; Jung, Hojoong; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Diddams, Scott; Papp, Scott B.; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard P.

    2018-04-01

    We report and characterize low-temperature, plasma-deposited deuterated silicon nitride thin films for nonlinear integrated photonics. With a peak processing temperature less than 300$^\\circ$C, it is back-end compatible with pre-processed CMOS substrates. We achieve microresonators with a quality factor of up to $1.6\\times 10^6 $ at 1552 nm, and $>1.2\\times 10^6$ throughout $\\lambda$ = 1510 -- 1600 nm, without annealing or stress management. We then demonstrate the immediate utility of this platform in nonlinear photonics by generating a 1 THz free spectral range, 900-nm-bandwidth modulation-instability microresonator Kerr comb and octave-spanning, supercontinuum-broadened spectra.

  6. Quantum Kinetic Theory and Applications Electrons, Photons, Phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Vasko, Fedir T

    2006-01-01

    This lecture-style monograph is addressed to several categories of readers. First, it will be useful for graduate students studying theory. Second, the topics covered should be interesting for postgraduate students of various specializations. Third, the researchers who want to understand the background of modern theoretical issues in more detail can find a number of useful results here. The phenomena covered involve kinetics of electron, phonon, and photon systems in solids. The dynamical properties and interactions of electrons, phonons, and photons are briefly described in Chapter 1. Further, in Chapters 2-8, the authors present the main theoretical methods: linear response theory, various kinetic equations for the quasiparticles under consideration, and diagram technique. The presentation of the key approaches is always accompanied by solutions of concrete problems to illustrate ways to apply the theory. The remaining chapters are devoted to various manifestations of quantum transport in solids. The choice...

  7. Photonics in wireless transceivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogani, A.; Ghelfi, P.

    2013-01-01

    During the last few years, the cross-fertilization between photonics and radio systems has been helping to overcome some major limitations of the classical radio technologies, setting new paradigms, and promising improved performance and new applications with strong benefits for public communications and safety. In particular, photonics-based wireless systems, albeit still at research level, are moving toward a new generation of multifunctional systems able to manage the wireless communication with several different frequencies and protocols, even simultaneously while also realizing surveillance operations. Photonics matches the new requirements of flexibility for software-defined architectures, thanks to its ultra-wide bandwidths and ease of tunability, and guarantees low footprint and weight, thanks to integrated photonic technologies. Moreover, photonics also allows increased resolution and sensitivity by means of the inherent low phase noise of lasers. (author)

  8. Application of Bottlebrush Block Copolymers as Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman-Martin, Allegra L; Chu, Crystal K; Grubbs, Robert H

    2017-07-01

    Brush block copolymers are a class of comb polymers that feature polymeric side chains densely grafted to a linear backbone. These polymers display interesting properties due to their dense functionality, low entanglement, and ability to rapidly self-assemble to highly ordered nanostructures. The ability to prepare brush polymers with precise structures has been enabled by advancements in controlled polymerization techniques. This Feature Article highlights the development of brush block copolymers as photonic crystals that can reflect visible to near-infrared wavelengths of light. Fabrication of these materials relies on polymer self-assembly processes to achieve nanoscale ordering, which allows for the rapid preparation of photonic crystals from common organic chemical feedstocks. The characteristic physical properties of brush block copolymers are discussed, along with methods for their preparation. Strategies to induce self-assembly at ambient temperatures and the use of blending techniques to tune photonic properties are emphasized. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Nanostructured Porous Silicon Photonic Crystal for Applications in the Infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Recio-Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades great interest has been devoted to photonic crystals aiming at the creation of novel devices which can control light propagation. In the present work, two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D devices based on nanostructured porous silicon have been fabricated. 2D devices consist of a square mesh of 2 μm wide porous silicon veins, leaving 5×5 μm square air holes. 3D structures share the same design although multilayer porous silicon veins are used instead, providing an additional degree of modulation. These devices are fabricated from porous silicon single layers (for 2D structures or multilayers (for 3D structures, opening air holes in them by means of 1 KeV argon ion bombardment through the appropriate copper grids. For 2D structures, a complete photonic band gap for TE polarization is found in the thermal infrared range. For 3D structures, there are no complete band gaps, although several new partial gaps do exist in different high-symmetry directions. The simulation results suggest that these structures are very promising candidates for the development of low-cost photonic devices for their use in the thermal infrared range.

  10. Application of spherical diodes for megavoltage photon beams dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbés, Benigno; Azcona, Juan D.; Burguete, Javier; Martí-Climent, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) usually uses heterogeneous dose distributions in a given volume. Designing detectors for quality control of these treatments is still a developing subject. The size of the detectors should be small to enhance spatial resolution and ensure low perturbation of the beam. A high uniformity in angular response is also a very important feature in a detector, because it has to measure radiation coming from all the directions of the space. It is also convenient that detectors are inexpensive and robust, especially to performin vivo measurements. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new detector for measuring megavoltage photon beams and to assess its performance to measure relative dose in EBRT. Methods: The detector studied in this work was designed as a spherical photodiode (1.8 mm in diameter). The change in response of the spherical diodes is measured regarding the angle of incidence, cumulated irradiation, and instantaneous dose rate (or dose per pulse). Additionally, total scatter factors for large and small fields (between 1 × 1 cm 2 and 20 × 20 cm 2 ) are evaluated and compared with the results obtained from some commercially available ionization chambers and planar diodes. Additionally, the over-response to low energy scattered photons in large fields is investigated using a shielding layer. Results: The spherical diode studied in this work produces a high signal (150 nC/Gy for photons of nominal energy of 15 MV and 160 for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and its angular dependence is lower than that of planar diodes: less than 5% between maximum and minimum in all directions, and 2% around one of the axis. It also has a moderated variation with accumulated dose (about 1.5%/kGy for 15 MV photons and 0.7%/kGy for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and a low variation with dose per pulse (±0.4%), and its behavior is similar to commercial diodes in total scatter factor measurements. Conclusions: The measurements of relative dose using

  11. Application of spherical diodes for megavoltage photon beams dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbés, Benigno; Azcona, Juan D; Burguete, Javier; Martí-Climent, Josep M

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) usually uses heterogeneous dose distributions in a given volume. Designing detectors for quality control of these treatments is still a developing subject. The size of the detectors should be small to enhance spatial resolution and ensure low perturbation of the beam. A high uniformity in angular response is also a very important feature in a detector, because it has to measure radiation coming from all the directions of the space. It is also convenient that detectors are inexpensive and robust, especially to perform in vivo measurements. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new detector for measuring megavoltage photon beams and to assess its performance to measure relative dose in EBRT. The detector studied in this work was designed as a spherical photodiode (1.8 mm in diameter). The change in response of the spherical diodes is measured regarding the angle of incidence, cumulated irradiation, and instantaneous dose rate (or dose per pulse). Additionally, total scatter factors for large and small fields (between 1 × 1 cm(2) and 20 × 20 cm(2)) are evaluated and compared with the results obtained from some commercially available ionization chambers and planar diodes. Additionally, the over-response to low energy scattered photons in large fields is investigated using a shielding layer. The spherical diode studied in this work produces a high signal (150 nC/Gy for photons of nominal energy of 15 MV and 160 for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and its angular dependence is lower than that of planar diodes: less than 5% between maximum and minimum in all directions, and 2% around one of the axis. It also has a moderated variation with accumulated dose (about 1.5%/kGy for 15 MV photons and 0.7%/kGy for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and a low variation with dose per pulse (± 0.4%), and its behavior is similar to commercial diodes in total scatter factor measurements. The measurements of relative dose using the spherical diode described in this

  12. Invited Article: Electrically tunable silicon-based on-chip microdisk resonator for integrated microwave photonic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics with advantages of small footprint, compatibility with the mature CMOS fabrication technology, and its potential for seamless integration with electronics is making a significant difference in realizing on-chip integration of photonic systems. A microdisk resonator (MDR with a strong capacity in trapping and storing photons is a versatile element in photonic integrated circuits. Thanks to the large index contrast, a silicon-based MDR with an ultra-compact footprint has a great potential for large-scale and high-density integrations. However, the existence of multiple whispering gallery modes (WGMs and resonance splitting in an MDR imposes inherent limitations on its widespread applications. In addition, the waveguide structure of an MDR is incompatible with that of a lateral PN junction, which leads to the deprivation of its electrical tunability. To circumvent these limitations, in this paper we propose a novel design of a silicon-based MDR by introducing a specifically designed slab waveguide to surround the disk and the lateral sides of the bus waveguide to suppress higher-order WGMs and to support the incorporation of a lateral PN junction for electrical tunability. An MDR based on the proposed design is fabricated and its optical performance is evaluated. The fabricated MDR exhibits single-mode operation with a free spectral range of 28.85 nm. Its electrical tunability is also demonstrated and an electro-optic frequency response with a 3-dB modulation bandwidth of ∼30.5 GHz is measured. The use of the fabricated MDR for the implementation of an electrically tunable optical delay-line and a tunable fractional-order temporal photonic differentiator is demonstrated.

  13. Optical frequency standard using acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triches, Marco; Michieletto, Mattia; Hald, Jan

    2015-01-01

    frequency instability. The locked fiber laser shows a fractional frequency instability below 4×10−12 for averaging time up to 104 s. The lock-point repeatability over more than 1 year is 1.3×10−11, corresponding to a standard deviation of 2.5 kHz. A complete experimental investigation of the light...

  14. Photonic integrated single-sideband modulator / frequency shifter based on surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barretto, Elaine Cristina Saraiva; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2010-01-01

    Optical frequency shifters are essential components of many systems. In this paper, a compact integrated optical frequency shifter is designed making use of the combination of surface acoustic waves and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. It has a very simple operation setup and can be fabricated...

  15. Generation and Photonic Guidance of Multi-Octave Optical-Frequency Combs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couny, F.; Benabid, F.; Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    crystal fiber. The waveguidance results not from a photonic band gap but from the inhibited coupling between the core and cladding modes. The spectrum consists of up to 45 high-order Stokes and anti-Stokes lines and is generated by driving the confined gas with a single, moderately powerful (10-kilowatt......) infrared laser, producing 12-nanosecond-duration pulses. This represents a reduction by six orders of magnitude in the required laser powers over previous equivalent techniques and opens up a robust and much simplified route to synthesizing attosecond pulses....

  16. Application of photonics in next generation telecommunication satellites payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalchi, J.; Inigo, P.; Roy, B.

    2017-11-01

    Next generation broadband telecommunication satellites are required to provide very high data throughput using complex multibeam architectures. These high throughput `Terabit/s' Satellites will incorporate payloads with very large quantity of conventional RF equipment, co-axial cables, waveguides, harnesses and ancillary equipment, making the Assembly, Integration and Test (AIT) very complex. Use of `RF over Fiber' and associated photonics equipment can make the process of AIT much simpler with the added benefit of significant reduction in number of payload equipment and inherent payload mass.

  17. Porous and Phase Change Nanomaterials For Photonic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Y. Han , M. S. Zhao, G. Morthier, and R. Baets. Athermal silicon-on-insulator ring resonators by overlaying a polymer cladding on narrowed waveguides...integrated photonics. Advanced Materials, 22(23):2561, 2010. [152] T. Sondergaard, S. M. Novikov, T. Holmgaard, R. L. Eriksen, J. Beermann, Z. H. Han , K...726, 2011. [181] N. N. Feng, D. Z. Feng, S. R. Liao, X. Wang, P. Dong, H. Liang, C. C. Kung , W. Qian, J. Fong, R. Shafiiha, Y. Luo, J. Cunningham, A. V

  18. Guided wave photonics fundamentals and applications with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Binh, Le Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    IntroductionHistorical Overview of Integrated Optics and PhotonicsWhy Analysis of Optical Guided-wave Devices?Principal ObjectivesChapters OverviewSingle Mode Planar Optical WaveguidesFormation of Planar Single Mode Waveguide ProblemsApproximate Analytical Methods of SolutionAPPENDIX A: Maxwell Equations in Dielectric MediaAPPENDIX B: Exact Analysis of Clad-linear Optical WaveguidesAPPENDIX C: Wentzel-Kramers-Brilluoin Method, Turning Points and Connection FormulaeAPPENDIX D: Design and Simulation of Planar Optical Waveguides3D Integrated Optical WaveguidesMarcatili's Method| Effective Index M

  19. Optimization and applications of planar silicon-based photonic crystal devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Burgos Leon, Juan

    2005-01-01

    such as topology optimization. We have also investigated a new device concept for coarse wavelength division de-multiplexing based on planar photonic crystal waveguides. The filtering of the wavelength channels has been realized by shifting the cut-off frequency of the fundamental photonic band gap mode...... in consecutive sections of the waveguide. Preliminary investigations show that this concepts allows coarse de-multiplexing to take place, but that optimization is required in order to reduce cross talk between adjacent channels and to increase the overall transmission. In this work the design, fabrication...

  20. Ultrafast-laser-inscribed 3D integrated photonics: challenges and emerging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross S.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery that tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses can induce a highly localised and permanent refractive index modification in a large number of transparent dielectrics, the technique of ultrafast laser inscription has received great attention from a wide range of applications. In particular, the capability to create three-dimensional optical waveguide circuits has opened up new opportunities for integrated photonics that would not have been possible with traditional planar fabrication techniques because it enables full access to the many degrees of freedom in a photon. This paper reviews the basic techniques and technological challenges of 3D integrated photonics fabricated using ultrafast laser inscription as well as reviews the most recent progress in the fields of astrophotonics, optical communication, quantum photonics, emulation of quantum systems, optofluidics and sensing.

  1. Position sensitive photon detectors for nuclear physics, particle physics and healthcare applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, B

    2012-01-01

    Modern experiments in hadronic physics require detector systems capable of identifying and reconstructing all final-state particles and their momentum vectors. Imaging Cherenkov counters (RICH and DIRC) are frequently employed in nuclear and particle physics experiments. These detectors require high-rate, single-photon capable light detection system with sufficient granularity and position resolution. Several candidate systems are available, ranging from multi-anode photomultiplier tubes to micro-channel plate systems to silicon photomultipliers. Each of these detection solutions has particular advantages and disadvantages. Detailed studies of rate dependence, cross-talk, time-resolution and position resolution for a range of available photon detection solutions are presented. These properties make these photon detection systems ideal for radionuclide imaging applications. Cherenkov radiation can also be used for medical imaging applications. Two different applications using the Cherenkov effect for radionuclide imaging will be reviewed.

  2. Broadband photonic single sideband frequency up-converter based on the cross polarization modulation effect in a semiconductor optical amplifier for radio-over-fiber systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Jong-In

    2014-01-13

    A broadband photonic single sideband (SSB) frequency up-converter based on the cross polarization modulation (XPolM) effect in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. An optical radio frequency (RF) signal in the form of an optical single sideband (OSSB) is generated by the photonic SSB frequency up-converter to solve the power fading problem caused by fiber chromatic dispersion. The generated OSSB RF signal has almost identical optical carrier power and optical sideband power. This SSB frequency up-conversion scheme shows an almost flat electrical RF power response as a function of the RF frequency in a range from 31 GHz to 75 GHz after 40 km single mode fiber (SMF) transmission. The photonic SSB frequency up-conversion technique shows negligible phase noise degradation. The phase noise of the up-converted RF signal at 49 GHz for an offset of 10 kHz is -93.17 dBc/Hz. Linearity analysis shows that the photonic SSB frequency up-converter has a spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) value of 79.51 dB · Hz(2/3).

  3. Physics of the Brain. Prevention of the Epileptic Seizures by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS Team

    The novel study of the epileptogenesis mechanisms is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated (amplitude modulation) multi-photon (frequency modulation) fiber-laser interaction with the brain epilepsy-topion (the epilepsy onset area), so as to prevent the excessive electrical discharge (epileptic seizure) in the brain. The repetition frequency, Ω, matches the low frequency (epileptic) phonon waves in the brain. The laser repetition frequency (5-100 pulses per second) enables the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the phonon (possible epileptic-to-be) activity in the brain. The tunable fiber laser frequencies, Δω (multi photon operation), are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling monitoring of the electrical charge imbalance (within the 10s of milliseconds), and the DNA-corruption in the epilepsy-topion, as the possible cause of the disease. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  4. Slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers for applications in microwave photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi

    This thesis analyzes semiconductor optical amplifiers based slow and fast light effects with particular focus on the applications in microwave photonics. We conceive novel ideas and demonstrate a great enhancement of light slow down. Furthermore, by cascading several slow light stages, >360 degree...... microwave phase shifts over a bandwidth of several tens of gigahertz are achieved. These also satisfy the basic requirements of microwave photonic systems. As an application demonstration, a tunable microwave notch filter is realized, where slow light based phase shifters provide 100% fractional tuning over...

  5. pH Memory Effects of Tunable Block Copolymer Photonic Gels and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Youngjong; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2007-03-01

    Materials with hysteresis, showing a bistable state to the external stimuli, have been widely investigated due to their potential applications. For example, they could be used as memory devices or optical switches when they have magnetic or optical hysteresis response to the external stimuli. Here we report pH tunable photonic gels which are spontaneously assembled from block copolymers. The general idea of this research is based on the selective swelling of block copolymer lamellar mesogels, where the solubility of one block is responsive to the change of pH. In this system, the domain spacing of the lamellar is varied with the extent of swelling. As a model system, we used protonated polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinly pyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) block copolymers forming lamellar structures. The photonic gel films prepared from protonated PS-b-P2VP show a strong reflectance in aqueous solution and the band position was varied with pH. Interestingly, a very strong optical hysteresis was observed while the reflection band of photonic gels was tuned by changing pH. We anticipate that pH tunable photonic gels with hysteresis can be applicable to novel applications such as a component of memory devices, photonic switches or drug delivery vehicles.

  6. Light manipulation and photonics applications of diatom frustules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanyan

    adaptive mechanism might be related to adjustments in the sinking rates affected by controlling the cellular silicon concentration. This will eventually optimize the light utilization under different light treatments. Finally, the spectral properties of drop-casted layers of both rinsed frustules and dried...... that different light spectra lead to significant changes in frustule morphology after 14 days of cultivation under different light treatments and that these changes in morphology is sufficient enough to cause the differences in photonic properties of the frustules. Further work on the long-term effects...... cultivation and the variability in some of the morphological parameters was even reduced. The effect of different light spectra on the cellular silicon concentration of C. granii has been studied. The change in cellular silicon concentration is mainly due to changes in the thickness of frustule. The potential...

  7. Single photon light detector for deep ocean applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuno, S.; Babson, J.; Learned, J.G.; O'Connor, D.; Grieder, P.K.F.; Wilson, C.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a single photon sensitive light detector module which can be operated in the ocean to a depth of 5000 m. It was designed primarily to be used as a Cherenkov light detector in conjunction with the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detector) experiment. After calibration in the laboratory, seven detectors, assembled in a vertical string geometry, have been operated simultaneously in the deep ocean off the coast of the island of Hawaii. Cosmic ray muons have been recorded successfully at dephts ranging from 2000 to 4000 m. The results have demonstrated the capability of the detector; it fulfills the specifications required for the modules to be used in a deep ocean muon and neutrino detector. (orig.)

  8. Laser-driven particle and photon beams and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, K W D; Galster, W

    2010-01-01

    Outstanding progress has been made in high-power laser technology in the last 10 years with laser powers reaching petawatt (PW) values. At present, there are 15 PW lasers built or being built around the world and plans are afoot for new, even higher power, lasers reaching values of exawatt (EW) or even zetawatt (ZW) powers. Petawatt lasers generate electric fields of 10 12 V m -1 with a large fraction of the total pulse energy being converted to relativistic electrons with energies reaching in excess of 1 GeV. In turn these electrons result in the generation of beams of protons, heavy ions, neutrons and high-energy photons. These laser-driven particle beams have encouraged many to think of carrying out experiments normally associated with conventional nuclear accelerators and reactors. To this end a number of introductory articles have been written under a trial name 'Laser Nuclear Physics' (Ledingham and Norreys 1999 Contemp. Phys. 40 367, Ledingham et al 2002 Europhys. News. 33 120, Ledingham et al 2003 Science 300 1107, Takabe et al 2001 J. Plasma Fusion Res. 77 1094). However, even greater strides have been made in the last 3 or 4 years in laser technology and it is timely to reassess the potential of laser-driven particle and photon beams. It must be acknowledged right from the outset that to date laser-driven particle beams have yet to compete favourably with conventional nuclear accelerator-generated beams in any way and so this is not a paper comparing laser and conventional accelerators. However, occasionally throughout the paper as a reality check, it will be mentioned what conventional nuclear accelerators can do.

  9. Laser-driven particle and photon beams and some applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledingham, K W D; Galster, W, E-mail: K.Ledingham@phys.strath.ac.u [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Outstanding progress has been made in high-power laser technology in the last 10 years with laser powers reaching petawatt (PW) values. At present, there are 15 PW lasers built or being built around the world and plans are afoot for new, even higher power, lasers reaching values of exawatt (EW) or even zetawatt (ZW) powers. Petawatt lasers generate electric fields of 10{sup 12} V m{sup -1} with a large fraction of the total pulse energy being converted to relativistic electrons with energies reaching in excess of 1 GeV. In turn these electrons result in the generation of beams of protons, heavy ions, neutrons and high-energy photons. These laser-driven particle beams have encouraged many to think of carrying out experiments normally associated with conventional nuclear accelerators and reactors. To this end a number of introductory articles have been written under a trial name 'Laser Nuclear Physics' (Ledingham and Norreys 1999 Contemp. Phys. 40 367, Ledingham et al 2002 Europhys. News. 33 120, Ledingham et al 2003 Science 300 1107, Takabe et al 2001 J. Plasma Fusion Res. 77 1094). However, even greater strides have been made in the last 3 or 4 years in laser technology and it is timely to reassess the potential of laser-driven particle and photon beams. It must be acknowledged right from the outset that to date laser-driven particle beams have yet to compete favourably with conventional nuclear accelerator-generated beams in any way and so this is not a paper comparing laser and conventional accelerators. However, occasionally throughout the paper as a reality check, it will be mentioned what conventional nuclear accelerators can do.

  10. Orthopedic applications of single photon emission computed Tomographic bone scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    When compared with planar bone scanning, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has technical advantages of potential diagnostic significance. Planar imaging often superimposes substantial underlying or overlying activity on the bony structure of medical interest. SPECT, however, can be used to remove such unwanted activity. For example, in the hip the acetabulum extends downwards behind the femoral head. Therefore when using planar bone scanning techniques, the photon-deficient defect typical of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral had may be obscured by activity originating in the underlying acetabulum. By using SPECT, underlying and overlying distributions of activity can be separated into sequential tomographic planes. For this reason SPECT facilitates the detection of AVN of the femoral head. When referring a patient without a history of malignancy for bone scanning, the orthopaedic surgeon usually has a specific clinical question involving a limited portion of the skeleton. Orthopaedic surgeons at their institution commonly use bone scanning to clarify the cause of back, hip or knee pain; to determine with a physiological test the significance of radiographic findings; and to establish the extent of disease at symptomatic skeletal sites such as the three compartments of the knee. In instances such as these, when clinical concern is limited to a specific anatomical region, a bone scan procedure that includes SPECT imaging of only a portion of the skeleton is appropriate. To date, SPECT of the skeletal system has most frequently been used to evaluate patients with pain the larger joints and bony structures such as the lumbar spine, hips, knees, or temporomandibular joints (TMJ)

  11. Application of PHOTON simulation software on calibration of HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, J., E-mail: jnikolic@vinca.rs [University of Belgrade Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinča, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Puzovic, J. [University of Belgrade Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 6, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Todorovic, D.; Rajacic, M. [University of Belgrade Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinča, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-11-01

    One of the major difficulties in gamma spectrometry of voluminous environmental samples is the efficiency calibration of the detectors used for the measurement. The direct measurement of different calibration sources, containing isolated γ-ray emitters within the energy range of interest, and subsequent fitting to a parametric function, is the most accurate and at the same time most complicated and time consuming method of efficiency calibration. Many other methods are developed in time, some of them using Monte Carlo simulation. One of such methods is a dedicated and user-friendly program PHOTON, developed to simulate the passage of photons through different media with different geometries. This program was used for efficiency calibration of three HPGe detectors, readily used in Laboratory for Environment and Radiation Protection of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade, Serbia. The simulation produced the spectral response of the detectors for fixed energy and for different sample geometries and matrices. Thus obtained efficiencies were compared to the values obtained by the measurement of the secondary reference materials and to the results obtained by GEANT4 simulation, in order to establish whether the simulated values agree with the experimental ones. To further analyze the results, a realistic measurement of the materials provided by the IAEA within different interlaboratory proficiency tests, was performed. The activities obtained using simulated efficiencies were compared to the reference values provided by the organizer. A good agreement in the mid energy section of the spectrum was obtained, while for low energies the lack of some parameters in the simulation libraries proved to produce unacceptable discrepancies.

  12. Near-Infrared and Optical Beam Steering and Frequency Splitting in Air-Holes-in-Silicon Inverse Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We present the design of a dielectric inverse photonic crystal structure that couples line-defect waveguide propagating modes into highly directional beams of controllable directionality. The structure utilizes a triangular lattice made of air holes drilled in an infinitely thick Si slab, and it is designed for operation in the near-infrared and optical regime. The structure operation is based on the excitation and manipulation of dark dielectric surface states, in particular on the tailoring of the dark states’ coupling to outgoing radiation. This coupling is achieved with the use of properly designed external corrugations. The structure adapts and matches modes that travel through the photonic crystal and the free space. Moreover it facilitates the steering of the outgoing waves, is found to generate well-defined, spatially and spectrally isolated beams, and may serve as a frequency splitting component designed for operation in the near-infrared regime and in particular the telecom optical wavelength band. The design complies with the state-of-the-art Si nanofabrication technology and can be directly scaled for operation in the optical regime. PMID:29541653

  13. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research results of hard photon technology have been summarized as a part of novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photon. Hard photon technology refers to photon beam technologies which use photon in the 0.1 to 200 nm wavelength region. Hard photon has not been used in industry due to the lack of suitable photon sources and optical devices. However, hard photon in this wavelength region is expected to bring about innovations in such areas as ultrafine processing and material synthesis due to its atom selective reaction, inner shell excitation reaction, and spatially high resolution. Then, technological themes and possibility have been surveyed. Although there are principle proposes and their verification of individual technologies for the technologies of hard photon generation, regulation and utilization, they are still far from the practical applications. For the photon source technology, the laser diode pumped driver laser technology, laser plasma photon source technology, synchrotron radiation photon source technology, and vacuum ultraviolet photon source technology are presented. For the optical device technology, the multi-layer film technology for beam mirrors and the non-spherical lens processing technology are introduced. Also are described the reduction lithography technology, hard photon excitation process, and methods of analysis and measurement. 430 refs., 165 figs., 23 tabs.

  14. Cascade photonic integrated circuit architecture for electro-optic in-phase quadrature/single sideband modulation or frequency conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mehedi; Hall, Trevor

    2015-11-01

    A photonic integrated circuit architecture for implementing frequency upconversion is proposed. The circuit consists of a 1×2 splitter and 2×1 combiner interconnected by two stages of differentially driven phase modulators having 2×2 multimode interference coupler between the stages. A transfer matrix approach is used to model the operation of the architecture. The predictions of the model are validated by simulations performed using an industry standard software tool. The intrinsic conversion efficiency of the proposed design is improved by 6 dB over the alternative functionally equivalent circuit based on dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulators known in the prior art. A two-tone analysis is presented to study the linearity of the proposed circuit, and a comparison is provided over the alternative. The proposed circuit is suitable for integration in any platform that offers linear electro-optic phase modulation such as LiNbO(3), silicon, III-V, or hybrid technology.

  15. Efficient continuous-wave nonlinear frequency conversion in high-Q gallium nitride photonic crystal cavities on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sabry Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on nonlinear frequency conversion from the telecom range via second harmonic generation (SHG and third harmonic generation (THG in suspended gallium nitride slab photonic crystal (PhC cavities on silicon, under continuous-wave resonant excitation. Optimized two-dimensional PhC cavities with augmented far-field coupling have been characterized with quality factors as high as 4.4 × 104, approaching the computed theoretical values. The strong enhancement in light confinement has enabled efficient SHG, achieving a normalized conversion efficiency of 2.4 × 10−3 W−1, as well as simultaneous THG. SHG emission power of up to 0.74 nW has been detected without saturation. The results herein validate the suitability of gallium nitride for integrated nonlinear optical processing.

  16. Generation of a frequency comb and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Mark J; Yarotski, Dmitry A

    2013-12-03

    Apparatus for generating a microwave frequency comb (MFC) in the DC tunneling current of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by fast optical rectification, cause by nonlinearity of the DC current vs. voltage curve for the tunneling junction, of regularly-spaced, short pulses of optical radiation from a focused mode-locked, ultrafast laser, directed onto the tunneling junction, is described. Application of the MFC to high resolution dopant profiling in semiconductors is simulated. Application of the MFC to other measurements is described.

  17. Orthogonal frequency division multiple access fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Supported by the expert-level advice of pioneering researchers, Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access Fundamentals and Applications provides a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the foundations and applications of one of the most promising access technologies for current and future wireless networks. It includes authoritative coverage of the history, fundamental principles, key techniques, and critical design issues of OFDM systems. Covering various techniques of effective resource management for OFDM/OFDMA-based wireless communication systems, this cutting-edge reference:Add

  18. Photon and electron interaction databases and their use in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    1994-05-01

    This paper discusses the All Particle-Method photon and electron interaction, and atomic relaxation data bases, that were initially developed for use in medical applications. Currently these data bases are being used in both medical and industrial applications. The All Particle Method data bases are designed to allow modelling of individual collisions in as much detail as possible. Elastic scattering can be modelled as single, as opposed to multiple, scattering events. Ionization can be modelled at the atomic subshell level, to define which subshell was ionized, spectrum of the initially emitted electron, as well as the spectra of electron and photons emitted as the atom relaxes back to neutrality. These data bases are currently being used in applications involving rather small spatial regions, where detailed calculations of individual events are required. While initially designed for use in medical applications, these data bases are now being used in a variety of industrial applications, e.g., transport in microelectronics

  19. A Novel Design of Frequency Reconfigurable Antenna for UWB Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolin; Yu, Ziliang; Wu, Zheng; Shen, Huajiao

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a novel frequency reconfigurable antenna which could be easily operate in a single notched-band (WiMAX (3.3-3.6 GHz)) UWB frequency band, another single notched-band (WLAN (5-6 GHz)) UWB frequency band and the dual band-notched UWB frequency band (the stopband covers the WiMAX (3.3-3.6 GHz) and WLAN (5-6 GHz)). The reconfigurability is achieved by changing the states of PIN diodes. The simulated results are in agreement well with the measured results. And the measured patterns are slightly changed with antenna reconfiguration. The proposed antenna is a good candidate for various UWB applications.

  20. Water application rate and frequency affect seedling survival and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequate amount of water is critical to successful tree nursery operation among resource-constrained smallholder farmers in Africa. Two experiments were undertaken with the objectives of evaluating effects of water application rate and frequency on seedling growth and survival of Persea americana and Vangueria ...

  1. Applications of radio frequency identification systems in the mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hind, D [Davis Derby Limited (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The paper describes the application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems in the mining industry for both surface and underground mines. The history of the RFID system, types available, the transponder, and the various techniques used are described and compared. The design and certification of a system for use in a hazardous area are described, noting the hazard of inadvertent detonator ignition. 2 refs.

  2. Mini-beam collimator applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shenglan, E-mail: sxu@anl.gov [GM/CA CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Keefe, Lisa J.; Mulichak, Anne [IMCA CAT, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Yan Lifen; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao Jiyong [X-ray Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fischetti, Robert F. [GM/CA CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    In 2007, the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA CAT, Sector 23, Advanced Photon Source) began providing mini-beam collimators to its users. These collimators contained individual, 5- or 10-{mu}m pinholes and were rapidly exchangeable, thereby allowing users to tailor the beam size to their experimental needs. The use of these collimators provided a reduction in background noise, and thus improved the signal-to-noise ratio . Recent improvements in the collimator design include construction of the device from a monolithic piece of molybdenum with multiple pinholes mounted inside . This allows users to select from various size options from within the beamline control software without the realignment that was previously necessary. In addition, a new, 20-{mu}m pinhole has been added to create a 'quad-collimator', resulting in greater flexibility for the users. The mini-beam collimator is now available at multiple crystallographic beamlines and also is a part of the first Moessbauer Microscopic system at sector 3-ID.

  3. Mini-beam collimator applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shenglan; Keefe, Lisa J.; Mulichak, Anne; Yan Lifen; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao Jiyong; Fischetti, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA CAT, Sector 23, Advanced Photon Source) began providing mini-beam collimators to its users. These collimators contained individual, 5- or 10-μm pinholes and were rapidly exchangeable, thereby allowing users to tailor the beam size to their experimental needs. The use of these collimators provided a reduction in background noise, and thus improved the signal-to-noise ratio . Recent improvements in the collimator design include construction of the device from a monolithic piece of molybdenum with multiple pinholes mounted inside . This allows users to select from various size options from within the beamline control software without the realignment that was previously necessary. In addition, a new, 20-μm pinhole has been added to create a 'quad-collimator', resulting in greater flexibility for the users. The mini-beam collimator is now available at multiple crystallographic beamlines and also is a part of the first Moessbauer Microscopic system at sector 3-ID.

  4. International Conference on Applications of Photonic Technology, Communications, Sensing, Materials and Signal Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Lessard, Roger; ICAPT '96; Applications of photonic technology 2

    1997-01-01

    This book presents a current review ofphotonic technologies and their applications. The papers published in this book are extended versions of the papers presented at the Inter­ national Conference on Applications ofPhotonic Technology (ICAPT'96) held in Montreal, Canada, on July 29 to August 1, 1996. The theme of this event was "Closing the Gap Between Theory, Developments and Applications. " The term photonics covers both optics and optical engineering areas of growing sci­ entific and commercial importance throughout the world. It is estimated that photonic tech­ nology-related applications to increase exponentially over the next few years and will play a significant role in the global economy by reaching a quarter of a trillion of US dollars by the year 2000. The global interest and advancements of this technology are represented in this book, where leading scientists of twenty-two countries with advanced technology in photon­ ics present their latest results. The papers selected herein are ...

  5. Applications of photonic crystal fibers in optical communications - What is in the future?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Lin, Chinlon

    2005-01-01

    Superior control of guiding properties in photonic-crystal fibers led to several interesting applications in optical communications ranging from nonlinear optical signal processing to high-power fiber amplifiers. This paper will review recent developments and discuss the future possibilities....

  6. Advances in the FDTD design and modeling of nano- and bio-photonics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanev, Stoyan; Tuchin, Valery; Cheben, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the discussion of two recent unique applications of the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation method to the design and modeling of advanced nano- and bio-photonic problems. The approach that is adopted here focuses on the potential of the FDTD methodology...

  7. Fully integrated free-running InGaAs/InP single-photon detector for accurate lidar applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Shangguan, Mingjia; Xia, Haiyun; Zhang, Jun; Dou, Xiankang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-06-26

    We present a fully integrated InGaAs/InP negative feedback avalanche diode (NFAD) based free-running single-photon detector (SPD) designed for accurate lidar applications. A free-piston Stirling cooler is used to cool down the NFAD with a large temperature range, and an active hold-off circuit implemented in a field programmable gate array is applied to further suppress the afterpulsing contribution. The key parameters of the free-running SPD including photon detection efficiency (PDE), dark count rate (DCR), afterpulse probability, and maximum count rate (MCR) are dedicatedly optimized for lidar application in practice. We then perform a field experiment using a Mie lidar system with 20 kHz pulse repetition frequency to compare the performance between the free-running InGaAs/InP SPD and a commercial superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD). Our detector exhibits good performance with 1.6 Mcps MCR (0.6 μs hold-off time), 10% PDE, 950 cps DCR, and 18% afterpulse probability over 50 μs period. Such performance is worse than the SNSPD with 60% PDE and 300 cps DCR. However, after performing a specific algorithm that we have developed for afterpulse and count rate corrections, the lidar system performance in terms of range-corrected signal (Pr 2 ) distribution using our SPD agrees very well with the result using the SNSPD, with only a relative error of ∼2%. Due to the advantages of low-cost and small size of InGaAs/InP NFADs, such detector provides a practical solution for accurate lidar applications.

  8. Simulation of photons from plasmas for the applications to display devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae June; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jae Koo

    2007-07-01

    Numerical modeling of the photon transport of the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible lights are presented for plasma based display devices. The transport of UV lights which undergo resonance trapping by ground state atoms is solved by using the Holstein equation. After the UV lights are transformed to visible lights at the phosphor surfaces, the visible lights experience complicated traces inside the cell and finally are emitted toward the viewing window after having some power loss within the cell. A three-dimensional ray trace of the visible lights is calculated with a radiosity model. These simulations for the photons strengthen plasma discharge modeling for the application to display devices.

  9. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S., E-mail: erickson@gatech.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology, Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, 770 State St., Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2016-08-14

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  10. Application of the Arbitrarily High Order Method to Coupled Electron Photon Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duo, Jose Ignacio

    2004-01-01

    This work is about the application of the Arbitrary High Order Nodal Method to coupled electron photon transport.A Discrete Ordinates code was enhanced and validated which permited to evaluate the advantages of using variable spatial development order per particle.The results obtained using variable spatial development and adaptive mesh refinement following an a posteriori error estimator are encouraging.Photon spectra for clinical accelerator target and, dose and charge depositio profiles are simulated in one-dimensional problems using cross section generated with CEPXS code.Our results are in good agreement with ONELD and MCNP codes

  11. Radio-Frequency Applications for Food Processing and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Tang, Juming; Wang, Yifen; Koral, Tony L

    2018-03-25

    Radio-frequency (RF) heating, as a thermal-processing technology, has been extending its applications in the food industry. Although RF has shown some unique advantages over conventional methods in industrial drying and frozen food thawing, more research is needed to make it applicable for food safety applications because of its complex heating mechanism. This review provides comprehensive information regarding RF-heating history, mechanism, fundamentals, and applications that have already been fully developed or are still under research. The application of mathematical modeling as a useful tool in RF food processing is also reviewed in detail. At the end of the review, we summarize the active research groups in the RF food thermal-processing field, and address the current problems that still need to be overcome.

  12. Advances on Frequency Diverse Array Radar and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wenqin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the conventional phased array that provides only angle-dependent transmit beampattern, Frequency Diverse Array (FDA employs a small frequency increment across its array elements to produce automatic beam scanning without requiring phase shifters or mechanical steering. FDA can produce both rangedependent and time-variant transmit beampatterns, which overcomes the disadvantages of conventional phased arrays that produce only angle-dependent beampattern. Thus, FDA has many promising applications. Based on a previous study conducted by the author, “Frequency Diverse Array Radar: Concept, Principle and Application” (Journal of Electronics & Information Technology, 2016, 38(4: 1000–1011, the current study introduces basic FDA radar concepts, principles, and application characteristics and reviews recent advances on FDA radar and its applications. In addition, several new promising applications of FDA technology are discussed, such as radar electronic warfare and radar-communications, as well as open technical challenges such as beampattern variance, effective receiver design, adaptive signal detection and estimation, and the implementation of practical FDA radar demos.

  13. Ant colony algorithm implementation in electron and photon Monte Carlo transport: Application to the commissioning of radiosurgery photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pareja, S.; Galan, P.; Manzano, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' ' Carlos Haya' ' , Avda. Carlos Haya s/n, E-29010 Malaga (Spain); Unidad de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Xanit Internacional, Avda. de los Argonautas s/n, E-29630 Benalmadena (Malaga) (Spain); NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an approach which has been developed to drive the application of different variance-reduction techniques to the Monte Carlo simulation of photon and electron transport in clinical accelerators. Methods: The new approach considers the following techniques: Russian roulette, splitting, a modified version of the directional bremsstrahlung splitting, and the azimuthal particle redistribution. Their application is controlled by an ant colony algorithm based on an importance map. Results: The procedure has been applied to radiosurgery beams. Specifically, the authors have calculated depth-dose profiles, off-axis ratios, and output factors, quantities usually considered in the commissioning of these beams. The agreement between Monte Carlo results and the corresponding measurements is within {approx}3%/0.3 mm for the central axis percentage depth dose and the dose profiles. The importance map generated in the calculation can be used to discuss simulation details in the different parts of the geometry in a simple way. The simulation CPU times are comparable to those needed within other approaches common in this field. Conclusions: The new approach is competitive with those previously used in this kind of problems (PSF generation or source models) and has some practical advantages that make it to be a good tool to simulate the radiation transport in problems where the quantities of interest are difficult to obtain because of low statistics.

  14. Ant colony algorithm implementation in electron and photon Monte Carlo transport: Application to the commissioning of radiosurgery photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Pareja, S.; Galan, P.; Manzano, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an approach which has been developed to drive the application of different variance-reduction techniques to the Monte Carlo simulation of photon and electron transport in clinical accelerators. Methods: The new approach considers the following techniques: Russian roulette, splitting, a modified version of the directional bremsstrahlung splitting, and the azimuthal particle redistribution. Their application is controlled by an ant colony algorithm based on an importance map. Results: The procedure has been applied to radiosurgery beams. Specifically, the authors have calculated depth-dose profiles, off-axis ratios, and output factors, quantities usually considered in the commissioning of these beams. The agreement between Monte Carlo results and the corresponding measurements is within ∼3%/0.3 mm for the central axis percentage depth dose and the dose profiles. The importance map generated in the calculation can be used to discuss simulation details in the different parts of the geometry in a simple way. The simulation CPU times are comparable to those needed within other approaches common in this field. Conclusions: The new approach is competitive with those previously used in this kind of problems (PSF generation or source models) and has some practical advantages that make it to be a good tool to simulate the radiation transport in problems where the quantities of interest are difficult to obtain because of low statistics.

  15. Ant colony algorithm implementation in electron and photon Monte Carlo transport: application to the commissioning of radiosurgery photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pareja, S; Galán, P; Manzano, F; Brualla, L; Lallena, A M

    2010-07-01

    In this work, the authors describe an approach which has been developed to drive the application of different variance-reduction techniques to the Monte Carlo simulation of photon and electron transport in clinical accelerators. The new approach considers the following techniques: Russian roulette, splitting, a modified version of the directional bremsstrahlung splitting, and the azimuthal particle redistribution. Their application is controlled by an ant colony algorithm based on an importance map. The procedure has been applied to radiosurgery beams. Specifically, the authors have calculated depth-dose profiles, off-axis ratios, and output factors, quantities usually considered in the commissioning of these beams. The agreement between Monte Carlo results and the corresponding measurements is within approximately 3%/0.3 mm for the central axis percentage depth dose and the dose profiles. The importance map generated in the calculation can be used to discuss simulation details in the different parts of the geometry in a simple way. The simulation CPU times are comparable to those needed within other approaches common in this field. The new approach is competitive with those previously used in this kind of problems (PSF generation or source models) and has some practical advantages that make it to be a good tool to simulate the radiation transport in problems where the quantities of interest are difficult to obtain because of low statistics.

  16. Manipulation of multi-photon-entanglement. Applications in quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, Alexander Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Over the last twenty years the field of quantum information processing (QIP) has attracted the attention of many scientists, due to the promise of impressive improvements in the areas of computational speed, communication security and the ability to simulate nature on the micro scale. This thesis describes an experimental work on the physics of multi-photon entanglement and its application in the field of QIP. We have thoroughly developed the necessary techniques to generate multipartite entanglement between up to six photons. By exploiting the developed six-photon interferometer, in this thesis we report for the first time the experimental quantum teleportation of a two-qubit composite system, the realization of multi-stage entanglement swapping, the implementation of a teleportation-based controlled-NOT gate for fault-tolerant quantum computation, the first generation of entanglement in sixpartite photonic graph states and the realization of 'one-way' quantum computation with two-photon four-qubit cluster states. The methods developed in these experiments are of great significance both for exploring the field of QIP and for future experiments on the fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. (orig.)

  17. Manipulation of multi-photon-entanglement. Applications in quantum information processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, Alexander Matthias

    2008-07-16

    Over the last twenty years the field of quantum information processing (QIP) has attracted the attention of many scientists, due to the promise of impressive improvements in the areas of computational speed, communication security and the ability to simulate nature on the micro scale. This thesis describes an experimental work on the physics of multi-photon entanglement and its application in the field of QIP. We have thoroughly developed the necessary techniques to generate multipartite entanglement between up to six photons. By exploiting the developed six-photon interferometer, in this thesis we report for the first time the experimental quantum teleportation of a two-qubit composite system, the realization of multi-stage entanglement swapping, the implementation of a teleportation-based controlled-NOT gate for fault-tolerant quantum computation, the first generation of entanglement in sixpartite photonic graph states and the realization of 'one-way' quantum computation with two-photon four-qubit cluster states. The methods developed in these experiments are of great significance both for exploring the field of QIP and for future experiments on the fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. (orig.)

  18. Low loss GaN waveguides at the visible spectral wavelengths for integrated photonics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Fu, Houqiang; Huang, Xuanqi; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Tsung-Han; Montes, Jossue A; Baranowski, Izak; Zhao, Yuji

    2017-12-11

    We perform comprehensive studies on the fundamental loss mechanisms in III-nitride waveguides in the visible spectral region. Theoretical analysis shows that free carrier loss dominates for GaN under low photon power injection. When optical power increases, the two photon absorption loss becomes important and eventually dominates when photon energy above half-bandgap of GaN. When the dimensions of the waveguides reduce, the sidewall scattering loss will start to dominate. To verify the theoretical results, a high performance GaN-on-sapphire waveguide was fabricated and characterized. Experimental results are consistent with the theoretical findings, showing that under high power injection the optical loss changed significantly for GaN waveguides. A low optical loss ~2 dB/cm was achieved on the GaN waveguide, which is the lowest value ever reported for the visible spectral range. The results and fabrication processes developed in this work pave the way for the development of III-nitride integrated photonics in the visible and potentially ultraviolet spectral range for nonlinear optics and quantum photonics applications.

  19. The photonic nanowire: an emerging platform for highly efficient single-photon sources for quantum information applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Munsch, Mathieu; Malik, Nitin S.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient coupling between a localized quantum emitter and a well defined optical channel represents a powerful route to realize single-photon sources and spin-photon interfaces. The tailored fiber-like photonic nanowire embedding a single quantum dot has recently demonstrated an appealing...... potential. However, the device requires a delicate, sharp needle-like taper with performance sensitive to minute geometrical details. To overcome this limitation we demonstrate the photonic trumpet, exploiting an opposite tapering strategy. The trumpet features a strongly Gaussian far-field emission...

  20. Femtosecond Optical Frequency Comb Technology Principle, Operation and Application

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Jun

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been a remarkable convergence among the fields of ultrafast optics, optical frequency metrology, and precision laser spectroscopy. This convergence has enabled unprecedented advances in control of the electric field of the pulses produced by femtosecond mode-locked lasers. The resulting spectrum consists of a comb of sharp spectral lines with well-defined frequencies. These new techniques and capabilities are generally known as "femtosecond comb technology." They have had dramatic impact on the diverse fields of precision measurement and extreme nonlinear optical physics. This book provides an introductory description of mode-locked lasers, the connection between time and frequency descriptions of their output and the physical origins of the electric field dynamics, together with an overview of applications of femtosecond comb technology. Individual chapters go into more detail on mode-locked laser development, spectral broadening in microstructure fiber, optical parametric ...

  1. A Compact Flexible and Frequency Reconfigurable Antenna for Quintuple Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. U. Hassan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel, compact coplanar waveguide fed flexible antenna is presented. The proposed design uses flexible Rogers RT/duroid 5880 (0.508mm thickness as a substrate with small size of 30×28.4 mm^2. Two switches are integrated on the antenna surface to change the current distribution which consequently changes the resonance frequency under different conditions of switches, thereby making it a frequency reconfigurable antenna. The antenna design is simulated on CST®MWS®. The proposed antenna exhibits VSWR less than 2 and appreciable radiation patterns with positive gain over desired frequency bands. Good agreement exists between simulated and measured results. On the basis of results, the proposed antenna is envisioned to be deployed for the following applications; aeronautical radio navigation [4.3 GHz], AMT fixed services [4.5 GHz], WLAN [5.2 GHz], Unlicensed WiMAX [5.8 GHz] and X-band [7.5 GHz].

  2. Theoretical analysis and modeling of a photonic integrated circuit for frequency 8-tupled and 24-tupled millimeter wave signal generation: erratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mehedi; Guemri, Rabiaa; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramón; Lucarz, Frédéric; de Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, Jean-Louis; Hall, Trevor

    2015-12-15

    A novel photonic circuit design for implementing frequency 8-tupling and 24-tupling was presented [Opt. Lett.39, 6950 (2014)10.1364/OL.39.006950OPLEDP0146-9592], and although its key message remains unaltered, there were typographical errors in the equations that are corrected in this erratum.

  3. Energy harvesting from low frequency applications using piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Deng, Z. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to eliminate the replacement of the batteries of electronic devices that are difficult or impractical to service once deployed, harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations or impacts using piezoelectric materials has been researched over the last several decades. However, a majority of these applications have very low input frequencies. This presents a challenge for the researchers to optimize the energy output of piezoelectric energy harvesters, due to the relatively high elastic moduli of piezoelectric materials used to date. This paper reviews the current state of research on piezoelectric energy harvesting devices for low frequency (0–100 Hz) applications and the methods that have been developed to improve the power outputs of the piezoelectric energy harvesters. Various key aspects that contribute to the overall performance of a piezoelectric energy harvester are discussed, including geometries of the piezoelectric element, types of piezoelectric material used, techniques employed to match the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric element to input frequency of the host structure, and electronic circuits specifically designed for energy harvesters

  4. Risks and injuries in laser and high-frequency applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giering, K.; Philipp, Carsten M.; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1995-01-01

    An analysis of injuries and risks using high frequency (HF) and lasers in medicine based on a literature search with MEDLINE was performed. The cases reported in the literature were classified according to the following criteria: (1) Avoidable in an optimal operational procedure. These kind of injuries are caused by a chain of unfortunate incidents. They are in principle avoidable by the 'right action at the right time' which presupposes an appropriate training of the operating team, selection of the optimal parameters for procedure and consideration of all safety instructions. (2) Avoidable, caused by malfunction of the equipment and/or accessories. The injuries classified into this group are avoidable if all safety regulations were fulfilled. This includes a pre-operational check-up and the use of medical lasers and high frequency devices only which meet the international safety standards. (3) Avoidable, caused by misuse/mistake. Injuries of this group were caused by an inappropriate selection of the procedure, wrong medical indication or mistakes during application. (4) Unavoidable, fateful. These injuries can be caused by risks inherent to the type of energy used, malfunction of the equipment and/or accessories though a pre-operational check-up was done. Some risks and complications are common to high frequency and laser application. But whereas these risks can be excluded easily in laser surgery there is often a great expenditure necessary or they are not avoidable if high frequency if used. No unavoidable risks due to laser energy occur.

  5. Radio frequency identification and its application in e-commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Bahr, Witold; Price, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), which is one of the Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) technologies (Wamba and Boeck, 2008) and discusses the application of RFID in E-Commerce. Firstly RFID is defined and the tag and reader components of the RFID system are explained. Then historical context of RFID is briefly discussed. Next, RFID is contrasted with other AIDC technologies, especially the use of barcodes which are commonly applied in E-Commerce. Las...

  6. Applications of radio frequency identification systems in underground mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knights, P F; Kairouz, J; Daneshmend, L K; Pathak, J [McGill University, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Canadian Centre for Automation and Robotics in Mining

    1994-12-31

    The paper describes the application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems in underground hardrock mines. The operating principles and some of the applications of RDIF systems are described. The system operates by the exchange of information between transponder tags and an antenna and controller device. The suitability of RFID systems for process control, inventory control, materials handling, control of access, security, and transportation in underground coal and hardrock mines is discussed. An ore tonnage tracking system is under development that uses RDIF transponder tags to locate vehicles in an underground mine. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Photon-number discrimination without a photon counter and its application to reconstructing non-Gaussian states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, H. M.; Bernu, J.; Sparkes, B. M.; Hage, B.; Lam, P. K.; Symul, T. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, Quantum Optics group, Department of Quantum Science, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Lund, A. P. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Nathan QLD 4111 (Australia); Ralph, T. C. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, Department of Physics, University of Queensland, St. Lucia QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    The nonlinearity of a conditional photon-counting measurement can be used to ''de-Gaussify'' a Gaussian state of light. Here we present and experimentally demonstrate a technique for photon-number resolution using only homodyne detection. We then apply this technique to inform a conditional measurement, unambiguously reconstructing the statistics of the non-Gaussian one- and two-photon-subtracted squeezed vacuum states. Although our photon-number measurement relies on ensemble averages and cannot be used to prepare non-Gaussian states of light, its high efficiency, photon-number-resolving capabilities, and compatibility with the telecommunications band make it suitable for quantum-information tasks relying on the outcomes of mean values.

  8. Photon-number discrimination without a photon counter and its application to reconstructing non-Gaussian states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrzanowski, H. M.; Bernu, J.; Sparkes, B. M.; Hage, B.; Lam, P. K.; Symul, T.; Lund, A. P.; Ralph, T. C.

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinearity of a conditional photon-counting measurement can be used to ''de-Gaussify'' a Gaussian state of light. Here we present and experimentally demonstrate a technique for photon-number resolution using only homodyne detection. We then apply this technique to inform a conditional measurement, unambiguously reconstructing the statistics of the non-Gaussian one- and two-photon-subtracted squeezed vacuum states. Although our photon-number measurement relies on ensemble averages and cannot be used to prepare non-Gaussian states of light, its high efficiency, photon-number-resolving capabilities, and compatibility with the telecommunications band make it suitable for quantum-information tasks relying on the outcomes of mean values.

  9. Generation of Mid-Infrared Frequency Combs for Spectroscopic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maser, Daniel L.

    Mid-infrared laser sources prove to be a valuable tool in exploring a vast array of phenomena, finding their way into applications ranging from trace gas detection to X-ray generation and carbon dating. Mid-infrared frequency combs, in particular, are well-suited for many of these applications, owing to their inherent low-noise and broadband nature. Frequency comb technology is well-developed in the near-infrared as a result of immense technological development by the telecommunication industry in silica fiber and the existence of readily-available glass dopants such as ytterbium and erbium that enable oscillators at 1 and 1.5 ?m. However, options become substantially more limited at longer wavelengths, as silica is no longer transparent and the components required in a mid-infrared frequency comb system (oscillators, fibers, and both fiber and free-space components) are far less technologically mature. This thesis explores several different approaches to generating frequency comb sources in the mid-infrared region, and the development of sources used in the nonlinear processes implemented to reach these wavelengths. An optical parametric oscillator, two approaches to difference frequency generation, and nonlinear spectral broadening in chip-scale waveguides are developed, characterized, and spectroscopic potential for these techniques is demonstrated. The source used for these nonlinear processes, the erbium-doped fiber amplifier, is also studied and discussed throughout the design and optimization process. The nonlinear optical processes critical to this work are numerically modeled and used to confirm and predict experimental behavior.

  10. Circular lasers for telecommunications and rf/photonics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffel, Giora

    2000-04-01

    Following a review of ring resonator research in the past decade we shall report a novel bi-level etching technique that permits the use of standard photolithography for coupling to deeply-etched ring resonator structures. The technique is employed to demonstrate InGaAsP laterally- coupled racetrack ring resonators laser with record low threshold currents of 66 mA. The racetrack laser have curved sections of 150 micrometers radius with negligible bending loss. The lasers operate CW single mode up to nearly twice threshold with a 26 dB side-mode-suppression ratio. We shall also present a transfer matrix formalism for the analysis of ring resonator arrays and indicate application examples for flat band filter synthesis.

  11. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the primary purposes of this work are to study important technologies, particularly involving thin films, relevant to organic and polymeric materials for improving applicability to optical circuitry and devices and to assess the contribution of convection on film quality in unit and microgravity environments. Among the most important materials processing techniques of interest in this work are solution-based and by physical vapor transport, both having proven gravitational and acceleration dependence. In particular, PolyDiAcetylenes (PDA's) and PhthaloCyanines (Pc's) are excellent NonLinear Optical (NLO) materials with the promise of significantly improved NLO properties through order and film quality enhancements possible through microgravity processing. Our approach is to focus research on integrated optical circuits and optoelectronic devices relevant to solution-based and vapor processes of interest in the Space Sciences Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Modification of organic materials is an important aspect of achieving more highly ordered structures in conjunction with microgravity processing. Parallel activities include characterization of materials for particular NLO properties and determination of appropriation device designs consistent with selected applications. One result of this work is the determination, theoretically, that buoyancy-driven convection occurs at low pressures in an ideal gas in a thermalgradient from source to sink. Subsequent experiment supports the theory. We have also determined theoretically that buoyancy-driven convection occurs during photodeposition of PDA, an MSFC-patented process for fabricating complex circuits, which is also supported by experiment. Finally, the discovery of intrinsic optical bistability in metal-free Pc films enables the possibility of the development of logic gate technology on the basis of these materials.

  12. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    m square pixels using trilinear interpolation, the presampled MTF at Nyquist frequency of 9.26 cycles/mm was 0.29 and 0.24 along the orthogonal directions and the limiting resolution (10% MTF) occurred at approximately 12 cycles/mm. Visual analysis of a bar pattern image showed the ability to resolve close to 12 line-pairs/mm and qualitative evaluation of a neurovascular nitinol-stent showed the ability to visualize its struts at clinically relevant conditions. Hexagonal pixel array photon-counting CdTe detector provides high spatial resolution in single-photon counting mode. After resampling to optimal square pixel size for distortion-free display, the spatial resolution is preserved. The dual-energy capabilities of the detector could allow for artifact-free subtraction angiography and basis material decomposition. The proposed high-resolution photon-counting detector with energy-resolving capability can be of importance for several image-guided interventional procedures as well as for pediatric applications.

  13. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.karellas@umassmed.edu; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pisa 56127, Italy and Pixirad Imaging Counters s.r.l., L. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    m. After resampling to 54 μm square pixels using trilinear interpolation, the presampled MTF at Nyquist frequency of 9.26 cycles/mm was 0.29 and 0.24 along the orthogonal directions and the limiting resolution (10% MTF) occurred at approximately 12 cycles/mm. Visual analysis of a bar pattern image showed the ability to resolve close to 12 line-pairs/mm and qualitative evaluation of a neurovascular nitinol-stent showed the ability to visualize its struts at clinically relevant conditions. Conclusions: Hexagonal pixel array photon-counting CdTe detector provides high spatial resolution in single-photon counting mode. After resampling to optimal square pixel size for distortion-free display, the spatial resolution is preserved. The dual-energy capabilities of the detector could allow for artifact-free subtraction angiography and basis material decomposition. The proposed high-resolution photon-counting detector with energy-resolving capability can be of importance for several image-guided interventional procedures as well as for pediatric applications.

  14. Monolithic photonic integration technology platform and devices at wavelengths beyond 2 μm for gas spectroscopy applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latkowski, S.; van Veldhoven, P.J.; Hänsel, A.; D'Agostino, D.; Rabbani-Haghighi, H.; Docter, B.; Bhattacharya, N.; Thijs, P.J.A.; Ambrosius, H.P.M.M.; Smit, M.K.; Williams, K.A.; Bente, E.A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a generic monolithic photonic integration technology platform and tunable laser devices for gas sensing applications at 2 μm will be presented. The basic set of long wavelength optical functions which is fundamental for a generic photonic integration approach is realized using planar,

  15. SMES application for frequency control during islanded microgrid operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A-Rong; Kim, Gyeong-Hun; Heo, Serim; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Kim, Hak-Man

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The operating characteristics of SMES for the frequency control of an islanded microgrid were investigated. ► The SMES contributes well for frequency control in the islanded operation. ► A dual and a single magnet type of SMES have been compared to demonstrate the performances. -- Abstract: This paper analyzes the operating characteristics of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for the frequency control of an islanded microgrid operation. In the grid-connected mode of a microgrid, an imbalance between power supply and demand is solved by a power trade with the upstream power grid. The difference in the islanded mode is a critical problem because the microgrid is isolated from any power grid. For this reason, the frequency control during islanded microgrid operation is a challenging issue. A test microgrid in this paper consisted of a wind power generator, a PV generation system, a diesel generator and a load to test the feasibility of the SMES for controlling frequency during islanded operation as well as the transient state varying from the grid-connected mode to the islanded mode. The results show that the SMES contributes well for frequency control in the islanded operation. In addition, a dual and a single magnet type of SMES have been compared to demonstrate the control performance. The dual magnet has the same energy capacity as the single magnet, but there are two superconducting coils and each coil has half inductance of the single magnet. The effectiveness of the SMES application with the simulation results is discussed in detail

  16. SMES application for frequency control during islanded microgrid operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A-Rong, E-mail: haven21c@changwon.ac.kr [Changwon National University, Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyeong-Hun; Heo, Serim; Park, Minwon [Changwon National University, Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, In-Keun, E-mail: yuik@changwon.ac.kr [Changwon National University, Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Man [University of Incheon, Songdo-dong, Incheon 406-772 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► The operating characteristics of SMES for the frequency control of an islanded microgrid were investigated. ► The SMES contributes well for frequency control in the islanded operation. ► A dual and a single magnet type of SMES have been compared to demonstrate the performances. -- Abstract: This paper analyzes the operating characteristics of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for the frequency control of an islanded microgrid operation. In the grid-connected mode of a microgrid, an imbalance between power supply and demand is solved by a power trade with the upstream power grid. The difference in the islanded mode is a critical problem because the microgrid is isolated from any power grid. For this reason, the frequency control during islanded microgrid operation is a challenging issue. A test microgrid in this paper consisted of a wind power generator, a PV generation system, a diesel generator and a load to test the feasibility of the SMES for controlling frequency during islanded operation as well as the transient state varying from the grid-connected mode to the islanded mode. The results show that the SMES contributes well for frequency control in the islanded operation. In addition, a dual and a single magnet type of SMES have been compared to demonstrate the control performance. The dual magnet has the same energy capacity as the single magnet, but there are two superconducting coils and each coil has half inductance of the single magnet. The effectiveness of the SMES application with the simulation results is discussed in detail.

  17. Accurate wavelength prediction of photonic crystal resonant reflection and applications in refractive index measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.

    2014-01-01

    and superstrate materials. The importance of accounting for material dispersion in order to obtain accurate simulation results is highlighted, and a method for doing so using an iterative approach is demonstrated. Furthermore, an application for the model is demonstrated, in which the material dispersion......In the past decade, photonic crystal resonant reflectors have been increasingly used as the basis for label-free biochemical assays in lab-on-a-chip applications. In both designing and interpreting experimental results, an accurate model describing the optical behavior of such structures...... is essential. Here, an analytical method for precisely predicting the absolute positions of resonantly reflected wavelengths is presented. The model is experimentally verified to be highly accurate using nanoreplicated, polymer-based photonic crystal grating reflectors with varying grating periods...

  18. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashutosh, E-mail: asingh.rs.ece@iitbhu.ac.in [Faculty of Physical Sciences, Institute of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Lucknow-Deva Road, Uttar Pradesh 225003 (India); Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Jain, P. K. [Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  19. Applications of radio frequency identification systems in the mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hind, D J [Davis Derby Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom)

    1994-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification Systems (RFID) are one of the automatic data capture technologies taking over from bar codes and magnetic swipe cards in many applications involving automatic hands free operation in arduous environments. RFID systems are based on the use of miniature radio transponders carrying encoded electronic data that is used to uniquely identify the identity of transponders. The paper reviews the types of system available and compares the various techniques involved in the different systems. The various types of transponder are described including the latest state of the art passive read/write high performance types. The problems involved in designing and certifying a system for use in hazardous areas are described, with particular reference to the problems of inadvertent detonator ignition by radio systems. Applications of RFID systems in the mining industry are described, covering applications both on the surface and underground. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  20. SMES application for frequency control during islanded microgrid operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A.-Rong; Kim, Gyeong-Hun; Heo, Serim; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Kim, Hak-Man

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the operating characteristics of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) for the frequency control of an islanded microgrid operation. In the grid-connected mode of a microgrid, an imbalance between power supply and demand is solved by a power trade with the upstream power grid. The difference in the islanded mode is a critical problem because the microgrid is isolated from any power grid. For this reason, the frequency control during islanded microgrid operation is a challenging issue. A test microgrid in this paper consisted of a wind power generator, a PV generation system, a diesel generator and a load to test the feasibility of the SMES for controlling frequency during islanded operation as well as the transient state varying from the grid-connected mode to the islanded mode. The results show that the SMES contributes well for frequency control in the islanded operation. In addition, a dual and a single magnet type of SMES have been compared to demonstrate the control performance. The dual magnet has the same energy capacity as the single magnet, but there are two superconducting coils and each coil has half inductance of the single magnet. The effectiveness of the SMES application with the simulation results is discussed in detail.

  1. Slow light in a semiconductor waveguide for true-time delay applications in microwave photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the slowand fast light properties of a semiconductor waveguide device employing concatenated gain and absorber sections. This letter presents the experimental results as well as theoretical modeling. A large phase shift of 110 and a true-time delay of more than 150 ps are dem...... are demonstrated. The combination of amplitude and phase control of the modulated signal shows great promise for applications within microwave photonics....

  2. Ferroelectric crystals for photonic applications including nanoscale fabrication and characterization techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Grilli, Simonetta

    2008-01-01

    This book deals with the latest achievements in the field of ferroelectric domain engineering and characterization at micron- and nano-scale dimensions and periods. The book collects the results obtained in the last years by world scientific leaders in the field, thus providing a valid and unique overview of the state of the art and also a view to future applications of those engineered materials in the field of photonics.

  3. Silicon Nitride Photonic Integration Platforms for Visible, Near-Infrared and Mid-Infrared Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micó, Gloria; Pastor, Daniel; Pérez, Daniel; Doménech, José David; Fernández, Juan; Baños, Rocío; Alemany, Rubén; Sánchez, Ana M.; Cirera, Josep M.; Mas, Roser

    2017-01-01

    Silicon nitride photonics is on the rise owing to the broadband nature of the material, allowing applications of biophotonics, tele/datacom, optical signal processing and sensing, from visible, through near to mid-infrared wavelengths. In this paper, a review of the state of the art of silicon nitride strip waveguide platforms is provided, alongside the experimental results on the development of a versatile 300 nm guiding film height silicon nitride platform. PMID:28895906

  4. Chemical and biological sensing applications of integrated photonics with an introduction to the American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics (AIM Photonics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, Justin; Guicheteau, Jason

    2016-05-01

    Integrated photonics affords an opportunity to explore novel sensing and lab-on-a-chip concepts. It offers a route to high sensitivity, high selectivity, and low SWaP-C test systems that can be operated autonomously or by minimallytrained field personnel. We'll introduce the topic, discuss possible sensing modalities, and highlight the advantages and limitations of this technology. We'll also introduce the recent American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics (AIM Photonics), give an overview of its vision and capabilities, how to utilize its Electronic-Photonic Design Automation (EPDA) tools and its Multi-Project Wafer and Assembly (MPWA) services, how to engage in its road mapping efforts, and how to become a contributing member.

  5. Phosphorene/ZnO Nano-Heterojunctions for Broadband Photonic Nonvolatile Memory Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Yuan, Jun; Ren, Yi; Wang, Yan; Yang, Jia-Qin; Zhou, Ye; Zeng, Yu-Jia; Han, Su-Ting; Ruan, Shuangchen

    2018-06-10

    High-performance photonic nonvolatile memory combining photosensing and data storage with low power consumption ensures the energy efficiency of computer systems. This study first reports in situ derived phosphorene/ZnO hybrid heterojunction nanoparticles and their application in broadband-response photonic nonvolatile memory. The photonic nonvolatile memory consistently exhibits broadband response from ultraviolet (380 nm) to near infrared (785 nm), with controllable shifts of the SET voltage. The broadband resistive switching is attributed to the enhanced photon harvesting, a fast exciton separation, as well as the formation of an oxygen vacancy filament in the nano-heterojunction. In addition, the device exhibits an excellent stability under air exposure compared with reported pristine phosphorene-based nonvolatile memory. The superior antioxidation capacity is believed to originate from the fast transfer of lone-pair electrons of phosphorene. The unique assembly of phosphorene/ZnO nano-heterojunctions paves the way toward multifunctional broadband-response data-storage techniques. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Assessment of Impact of Monoenergetic Photon Sources on Prioritized Nonproliferation Applications: Simulation Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Valentine, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quiter, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Descalle, Marie-Anne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Warren, Glen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinlaw, Matt [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chichester, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Cameron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pozzi, Sara [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources (MPSs) have the potential to improve sensitivity at greatly reduced dose in existing applications and enable new capabilities in other applications. MPS advantages include the ability to select energy, energy spread, flux, and pulse structures to deliver only the photons needed for the application, while suppressing extraneous dose and background. Some MPSs also offer narrow divergence photon beams which can target dose and/or mitigate scattering contributions to image contrast degradation. Current broad-band, bremsstrahlung photon sources (e.g., linacs and betatrons) deliver unnecessary dose that in some cases also interferes with the signature to be detected and/or restricts operations, and must be collimated (reducing flux) to generate narrow divergence beams. While MPSs can in principle resolve these issues, they are technically challenging to produce. Candidate MPS technologies for nonproliferation applications are now being developed, each of which have different properties (e.g. broad divergence vs. narrow). Within each technology, source parameters trade off against one another (e.g. flux vs. energy spread), representing a large operation space. To guide development, requirements for each application of interest must be defined and simulations conducted to define MPS parameters that deliver benefit relative to current systems. The present project conducted a broad assessment of potential nonproliferation applications where MPSs may provide new capabilities or significant performance enhancement (reported separately), which led to prioritization of several applications for detailed analysis. The applications prioritized were: cargo screening and interdiction of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), detection of hidden SNM, treaty/dismantlement verification, and spent fuel dry storage cask content verification. High resolution imaging for stockpile stewardship was considered as a sub-area of the treaty topic, as it is also of

  7. Microminiature radio frequency transmitter for communication and tracking applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutcher, Richard I.; Emery, Mike S.; Falter, Kelly G.; Nowlin, C. H.; Rochelle, Jim M.; Clonts, Lloyd G.

    1997-02-01

    A micro-miniature radio frequency (rf) transmitter has been developed and demonstrated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the rf transmitter development was to maximize the transmission distance while drastically shrinking the overall transmitter size, including antenna. Based on analysis and testing, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with a 16-GHz gallium arsenide (GaAs) oscillator and integrated on-chip antenna was designed and fabricated using microwave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) technology. Details of the development and the results of various field tests are discussed. The rf transmitter is applicable to covert surveillance and tracking scenarios due to its small size of 2.2 multiplied by 2.2 mm, including the antenna. Additionally, the 16-GHz frequency is well above the operational range of consumer-grade radio scanners, providing a degree of protection from unauthorized interception. Variations of the transmitter design have been demonstrated for tracking and tagging beacons, transmission of digital data, and transmission of real-time analog video from a surveillance camera. Preliminary laboratory measurements indicate adaptability to direct-sequence spread-spectrum transmission, providing a low probability of intercept and/or detection. Concepts related to law enforcement applications are presented.

  8. Nonstationary Hydrological Frequency Analysis: Theoretical Methods and Application Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, L.

    2014-12-01

    Because of its great implications in the design and operation of hydraulic structures under changing environments (either climate change or anthropogenic changes), nonstationary hydrological frequency analysis has become so important and essential. Two important achievements have been made in methods. Without adhering to the consistency assumption in the traditional hydrological frequency analysis, the time-varying probability distribution of any hydrological variable can be established by linking the distribution parameters to some covariates such as time or physical variables with the help of some powerful tools like the Generalized Additive Model of Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS). With the help of copulas, the multivariate nonstationary hydrological frequency analysis has also become feasible. However, applications of the nonstationary hydrological frequency formula to the design and operation of hydraulic structures for coping with the impacts of changing environments in practice is still faced with many challenges. First, the nonstationary hydrological frequency formulae with time as covariate could only be extrapolated for a very short time period beyond the latest observation time, because such kind of formulae is not physically constrained and the extrapolated outcomes could be unrealistic. There are two physically reasonable methods that can be used for changing environments, one is to directly link the quantiles or the distribution parameters to some measureable physical factors, and the other is to use the derived probability distributions based on hydrological processes. However, both methods are with a certain degree of uncertainty. For the design and operation of hydraulic structures under changing environments, it is recommended that design results of both stationary and nonstationary methods be presented together and compared with each other, to help us understand the potential risks of each method.

  9. Fabrication of 3D polymer photonic crystals for near-IR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Qiu, Liang; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett J.; Prather, Dennis W.; Sharkawy, Ahmed; Kelmelis, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Photonic crystals[1, 2] have stirred enormous research interest and became a growing enterprise in the last 15 years. Generally, PhCs consist of periodic structures that possess periodicity comparable with the wavelength that the PhCs are designed to modulate. If material and periodic pattern are properly selected, PhCs can be applied to many applications based on their unique properties, including photonic band gaps (PBG)[3], self-collimation[4], super prism[5], etc. Strictly speaking, PhCs need to possess periodicity in three dimensions to maximize their advantageous capabilities. However, many current research is based on scaled two-dimensional PhCs, mainly due to the difficulty of fabrication such three-dimensional PhCs. Many approaches have been explored for the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, including layer-by-layer surface micromachining[6], glancing angle deposition[7], 3D micro-sculpture method[8], self-assembly[9] and lithographical methods[10-12]. Among them, lithographic methods became increasingly accepted due to low costs and precise control over the photonic crystal structure. There are three mostly developed lithographical methods, namely X-ray lithography[10], holographic lithography[11] and two-photon polymerization[12]. Although significant progress has been made in developing these lithography-based technologies, these approaches still suffer from significant disadvantages. X-ray lithography relies on an expensive radiation source. Holographic lithography lacks the flexibility to create engineered defects, and multi-photon polymerization is not suitable for parallel fabrication. In our previous work, we developed a multi-layer photolithography processes[13, 14] that is based on multiple resist application and enhanced absorption upon exposure. Using a negative lift-off resist (LOR) and 254nm DUV source, we have demonstrated fabrication of 3D arbitrary structures with feature size of several microns. However, severe intermixing problem

  10. Radio-frequency quadrupole: general properties and specific applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, R.H.; Crandall, K.R.; Hamm, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac structure is being developed for the acceleration of low-velocity ions. Recent experimental tests have confirmed its expected performance and have led to an increased interest in a wide range of possible applications. The general properties of RFQ accelerators are reviewed and beam dynamics simulation results are presented for their use in a variety of accelerating systems. These include the low-beta sections of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Accelerator, a 200-MHz proton linear accelerator, and a xenon accelerator for heavy ion fusion

  11. On application of mean frequency for seismic differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dargahi-Noubary, G.R.

    1987-03-01

    A simple discriminant is introduced for differentiation of the underground nuclear explosion and natural earthquake. Here instead of magnitude which is related to the energy consideration is given to the mean frequency which is related to zero crossings and carries sufficient information concerning the energy. It is shown that this discriminant can be used in the absence of the facilities such as digitizer and computer. Finally, application of the proposed procedure is demonstrated using data from some underground and atmospheric explosions. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Electromagnetic Modelling of MMIC CPWs for High Frequency Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinulingga, E. P.; Kyabaggu, P. B. K.; Rezazadeh, A. A.

    2018-02-01

    Realising the theoretical electrical characteristics of components through modelling can be carried out using computer-aided design (CAD) simulation tools. If the simulation model provides the expected characteristics, the fabrication process of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) can be performed for experimental verification purposes. Therefore improvements can be suggested before mass fabrication takes place. This research concentrates on development of MMIC technology by providing accurate predictions of the characteristics of MMIC components using an improved Electromagnetic (EM) modelling technique. The knowledge acquired from the modelling and characterisation process in this work can be adopted by circuit designers for various high frequency applications.

  13. Active photonic sensor communication cable for field application of optical data and power transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthau, Eike; Rieske, Ralf; Zerna, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Omitting electrically conducting wires for sensor communication and power supply promises protection for sensor systems and monitored structures against lightning or high voltages, prevention of explosion hazards, and reduction of susceptibility to tampering. The ability to photonically power remote systems opens up the full range of electrical sensors. Power-over-fiber is an attractive option in electromagnetically sensitive environments, particularly for longterm, maintenance-free applications. It can deliver uninterrupted power sufficient for elaborate sensors, data processing or even actuators alongside continuous high speed data communication for remote sensor application. This paper proposes an active photonic sensor communication system, which combines the advantages of optical data links in terms of immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), high bandwidth, hardiness against tampering or eavesdropping, and low cable weight with the robustness one has come to expect from industrial or military electrical connectors. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented that implements a closed-loop regulation of the sensor power supply to guarantee continuous, reliable data communications while maintaining a highly efficient, adaptive sensor supply scheme. It is demonstrated that the resulting novel photonic sensor communication cable can handle sensors and actuators differing orders of magnitude with respect to power consumption. The miniaturization of the electro-optical converters and driving electronics is as important to the presented development as the energy efficiency of the detached, optically powered sensor node. For this reason, a novel photonic packaging technology based on wafer-level assembly of the laser power converters by means of passive alignment will be disclosed in this paper.

  14. Application of the Monte Carlo method in calculation of energy-time distribution from a pulsed photon source in homogeneous air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, R.D.; Vojvodic, V.I.; Orlic, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    The stochastic nature of photon interactions with matter and the characteristics of photon transport through real materials, are very well suited for applications of the Monte Carlo method in calculations of the energy-space distribution of photons. Starting from general principles of the Monte Carlo method, physical-mathematical model of photon transport from a pulsed source is given for the homogeneous air environment. Based on that model, a computer program is written which is applied in calculations of scattered photons delay spectra and changes of the photon energy spectrum. Obtained results provide the estimation of the timespace function of the electromagnetic field generated by photon from a pulsed source. (author)

  15. Whispering gallery mode resonators for frequency metrology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartel, Lukas

    This dissertation describes an investigation into the use of whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators for applications towards frequency reference and metrology. Laser stabilization and the measurement of optical frequencies have enabled myriad technologies of both academic and commercial interest. A technology which seems to span both motivations is optical atomic clocks. These devices are virtually unimaginable without the ultra stable lasers plus frequency measurement and down-conversion afforded by Fabry Perot (FP) cavities and model-locked laser combs, respectively. However, WGM resonators can potentially perform both of these tasks while having the distinct advantages of compactness and simplicity. This work represents progress towards understanding and mitigating the performance limitations of WGM cavities for such applications. A system for laser frequency stabilization to a the cavity via the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) method is described. While the laser lock itself is found to perform at the level of several parts in 1015, a variety of fundamental and technical mechanisms destabilize the WGM frequency itself. Owing to the relatively large thermal expansion coefficients in optical crystals, environmental temperature drifts set the stability limit at time scales greater than the thermal relaxation time of the crystal. Uncompensated, these drifts pull WGM frequencies about 3 orders of magnitude more than they would in an FP cavity. Thus, two temperature compensation schemes are developed. An active scheme measures and stabilizes the mode volume temperature to the level of several nK, reducing the effective temperature coefficient of the resonator to 1.7x10-7 K-1; simulations suggest that the value could eventually be as low as 3.5x10-8 K-1, on par with the aforementioned FP cavities. A second, passive scheme is also described, which employs a heterogeneous resonator structure that capitalizes on the thermo-mechanical properties of one material and the optical

  16. Nonlinear Dynamics of Photonics for Optical Signal Processing - Optical Frequency Conversion and Optical DSB-to-SSB Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    photonic system. ML: master laser; SL: slave laser; L; lens; PBS: polarizing beam splitter ; M: mirror; HW: half-wave plate; FR: Faraday rotator; V...microwave generation and stabilization, and photonic microwave amplification. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Non -linear Dynamics, Add-drop

  17. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2006-01-01

    Wireless, optical, and electronic networks continue to converge, prompting heavy research into the interface between microwave electronics, ultrafast optics, and photonic technologies. New developments arrive nearly as fast as the photons under investigation, and their commercial impact depends on the ability to stay abreast of new findings, techniques, and technologies. Presenting a broad yet in-depth survey, Microwave Photonics examines the major advances that are affecting new applications in this rapidly expanding field.This book reviews important achievements made in microwave photonics o

  18. Bio-inspired fabrication of stimuli-responsive photonic crystals with hierarchical structures and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Tao; Peng, Wenhong; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-01

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are stimuli-responsive, the resultant PCs exhibit optical properties that can be tuned by the stimuli. This can be exploited for promising applications in colour displays, biological and chemical sensors, inks and paints, and many optically active components. However, the preparation of the required photonic structures is the first issue to be solved. In the past two decades, approaches such as microfabrication and self-assembly have been developed to incorporate stimuli-responsive materials into existing periodic structures for the fabrication of PCs, either as the initial building blocks or as the surrounding matrix. Generally, the materials that respond to thermal, pH, chemical, optical, electrical, or magnetic stimuli are either soft or aggregate, which is why the manufacture of three-dimensional hierarchical photonic structures with responsive properties is a great challenge. Recently, inspired by biological PCs in nature which exhibit both flexible and responsive properties, researchers have developed various methods to synthesize metals and metal oxides with hierarchical structures by using a biological PC as the template. This review will focus on the recent developments in this field. In particular, PCs with biological hierarchical structures that can be tuned by external stimuli have recently been successfully fabricated. These findings offer innovative insights into the design of responsive PCs and should be of great importance for future applications of these materials. (topical review)

  19. Single Trial Probability Applications: Can Subjectivity Evade Frequency Limitations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Howden

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Frequency probability theorists define an event’s probability distribution as the limit of a repeated set of trials belonging to a homogeneous collective. The subsets of this collective are events which we have deficient knowledge about on an individual level, although for the larger collective we have knowledge its aggregate behavior. Hence, probabilities can only be achieved through repeated trials of these subsets arriving at the established frequencies that define the probabilities. Crovelli (2009 argues that this is a mistaken approach, and that a subjective assessment of individual trials should be used instead. Bifurcating between the two concepts of risk and uncertainty, Crovelli first asserts that probability is the tool used to manage uncertain situations, and then attempts to rebuild a definition of probability theory with this in mind. We show that such an attempt has little to gain, and results in an indeterminate application of entrepreneurial forecasting to uncertain decisions—a process far-removed from any application of probability theory.

  20. Zinc oxide piezoelectric nano-generators for low frequency applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, E. S.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2017-06-01

    Piezoelectric Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanogenerators (NGs) have been fabricated for low frequency (wireless system using footstep pressure. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using a ZnO NWs piezoelectric NG as a low-frequency self- powered sensor, with potential applications in wireless sensor networks. After that, we investigated and fabricated a sensor on a PEDOT: PSS plastic substrate using a one-sided growth and double-sided growth technique. For the first growth technique, the fabricated NG has been used as a sensor for an acceleration system; while the fabricated NG by the second technique works as an anisotropic direction sensor. This fabricated configuration showed stability for sensing and can be used in surveillance, security, and auto-Mobil applications. In addition to that, we investigated the fabrication of a sandwiched NG on plastic substrates. Finally, we demonstrated that doping ZnO NWs with extrinsic elements (such as Ag) will lead to the reduction of the piezoelectric effect due to the loss of crystal symmetry. A brief summary into future opportunities and challenges is also presented.

  1. Printable photonic crystals with high refractive index for applications in visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calafiore, Giuseppe; Mejia, Camilo A; Munechika, Keiko; Peroz, Christophe; Piña-Hernandez, Carlos; Fillot, Quentin; Dhuey, Scott; Sassolini, Simone; Salvadori, Filippo; Cabrini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) of functional high-refractive index materials has proved to be a powerful candidate for the inexpensive manufacturing of high-resolution photonic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate the fabrication of printable photonic crystals (PhCs) with high refractive index working in the visible wavelengths. The PhCs are replicated on a titanium dioxide-based high-refractive index hybrid material by reverse NIL with almost zero shrinkage and high-fidelity reproducibility between mold and printed devices. The optical responses of the imprinted PhCs compare very well with those fabricated by conventional nanofabrication methods. This study opens the road for a low-cost manufacturing of PhCs and other nanophotonic devices for applications in visible light. (paper)

  2. Fano resonance control in a photonic crystal structure and its application to ultrafast switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yi; Heuck, Mikkel; Hu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic ...... reshaping effect of the nonlinear Fano transfer function. As an example, we present a system application of a Fano structure, demonstrating its advantages by the experimental realiza- tion of 10 Gbit/s all-optical modulation with optical control power less than 1mW.......We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic...

  3. A versatile source of polarization entangled photons for quantum network applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, Florian; Issautier, Amandine; Ngah, Lutfi A; Alibart, Olivier; Martin, Anthony; Tanzilli, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    We report a versatile and practical approach for the generation of high-quality polarization entanglement in a fully guided-wave fashion. Our setup relies on a high-brilliance type-0 waveguide generator producing paired photons at a telecom wavelength associated with an advanced energy-time to polarization transcriber. The latter is capable of creating any pure polarization entangled state, and allows manipulation of single-photon bandwidths that can be chosen at will over five orders of magnitude, ranging from tens of MHz to several THz. We achieve excellent entanglement fidelities for particular spectral bandwidths, i.e. 25 MHz, 540 MHz and 80 GHz, proving the relevance of our approach. Our scheme stands as an ideal candidate for a wide range of network applications, ranging from dense division multiplexing quantum key distribution to heralded optical quantum memories and repeaters. (letter)

  4. Aberration correction in photoemission microscopy and applications in photonics and plasmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenenkamp, Rolf [Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States)

    2017-09-28

    We report on the design, assembly, operation and application of an aberration-corrected photoemission electron microscope. The instrument used novel hyperbolic mirror-correctors with two and three electrodes that allowed simultaneous correction of spherical and chromatic aberrations. A spatial resolution of 5.4nm was obtained with this instrument in 2009, and 4.7nm in subsequent years. New imaging methodology was introduced involving interferometric imaging of light diffraction. This methodology was applied in nano-photonics and in the characterization of surface-plasmon polaritons. Photonic crystals and waveguides, optical antennas and new plasmonic devices such as routers, localizers and filters were designed and demonstrated using the new capabilities offered by the microscope.

  5. All-optically tunable waveform synthesis by a silicon nanowaveguide ring resonator coupled with a photonic-crystal fiber frequency shifter

    KAUST Repository

    Savvin, Aleksandr D.

    2011-03-01

    A silicon nanowaveguide ring resonator is combined with a photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) frequency shifter to demonstrate an all-optically tunable synthesis of ultrashort pulse trains, modulated by ultrafast photoinduced free-carrier generation in the silicon resonator. Pump-probe measurements performed with a 50-fs, 625-nm second-harmonic output of a Cr:forsterite laser, used as a carrier-injecting pump, and a 1.50-1.56-μm frequency-tunable 100-fs soliton output of a photonic-crystal fiber, serving as a probe, resolve tunable ultrafast oscillatory features in the silicon nanowaveguide resonator response. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ka-band to L-band frequency down-conversion based on III-V-on-silicon photonic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gasse, K.; Wang, Z.; Uvin, S.; De Deckere, B.; Mariën, J.; Thomassen, L.; Roelkens, G.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we present the design, simulation and characterization of a frequency down-converter based on III-V-on-silicon photonic integrated circuit technology. We first demonstrate the concept using commercial discrete components, after which we demonstrate frequency conversion using an integrated mode-locked laser and integrated modulator. In our experiments, five channels in the Ka-band (27.5-30 GHz) with 500 MHz bandwidth are down-converted to the L-band (1.5 GHz). The breadboard demonstration shows a conversion efficiency of - 20 dB and a flat response over the 500 MHz bandwidth. The simulation of a fully integrated circuit indicates that a positive conversion gain can be obtained on a millimeter-sized photonic integrated circuit.

  7. All-optically tunable waveform synthesis by a silicon nanowaveguide ring resonator coupled with a photonic-crystal fiber frequency shifter

    KAUST Repository

    Savvin, Aleksandr D.; Melnikov, Vasily; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Perova, Tatiana S.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2011-01-01

    A silicon nanowaveguide ring resonator is combined with a photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) frequency shifter to demonstrate an all-optically tunable synthesis of ultrashort pulse trains, modulated by ultrafast photoinduced free-carrier generation in the silicon resonator. Pump-probe measurements performed with a 50-fs, 625-nm second-harmonic output of a Cr:forsterite laser, used as a carrier-injecting pump, and a 1.50-1.56-μm frequency-tunable 100-fs soliton output of a photonic-crystal fiber, serving as a probe, resolve tunable ultrafast oscillatory features in the silicon nanowaveguide resonator response. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Transmission system for distribution of video over long-haul optical point-to-point links using a microwave photonic filter in the frequency range of 0.01-10 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldívar Huerta, Ignacio E.; Pérez Montaña, Diego F.; Nava, Pablo Hernández; Juárez, Alejandro García; Asomoza, Jorge Rodríguez; Leal Cruz, Ana L.

    2013-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the use of an electro-optical transmission system for distribution of video over long-haul optical point-to-point links using a microwave photonic filter in the frequency range of 0.01-10 GHz. The frequency response of the microwave photonic filter consists of four band-pass windows centered at frequencies that can be tailored to the function of the spectral free range of the optical source, the chromatic dispersion parameter of the optical fiber used, as well as the length of the optical link. In particular, filtering effect is obtained by the interaction of an externally modulated multimode laser diode emitting at 1.5 μm associated to the length of a dispersive optical fiber. Filtered microwave signals are used as electrical carriers to transmit TV-signal over long-haul optical links point-to-point. Transmission of TV-signal coded on the microwave band-pass windows located at 4.62, 6.86, 4.0 and 6.0 GHz are achieved over optical links of 25.25 km and 28.25 km, respectively. Practical applications for this approach lie in the field of the FTTH access network for distribution of services as video, voice, and data.

  9. Applications of photon-in, photon-out spectroscopy with third-generation, synchrotron-radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, D.W.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Mother nature's finest test probe; soft x-ray emission spectroscopy with high-brightness synchrotron radiation sources; anisotropy and polarization of x-ray emission from atoms and molecules; valence-hole fluorescence from molecular photoions as a probe of shape-resonance ionization: progress and prospects; structural biophysics on third-generation synchrotron sources; ultra-soft x-ray fluorescence-yield XAFS: an in situ photon-in, photon-out spectroscopy; and x-ray microprobe: an analytical tool for imaging elemental composition and microstructure

  10. Colloidal PbS nanocrystals integrated to Si-based photonics for applications at telecom wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humer, M.; Guider, R.; Jantsch, W.; Fromherz, T.

    2013-05-01

    In the last decade, Si based photonics has made major advances in terms of design, fabrication, and device implementation. But due to Silicon's indirect bandgap, it still remains a challenge to create efficient Si-based light emitting devices. In order to overcome this problem, an approach is to develop hybrid systems integrating light-emitting materials into Si. A promising class of materials for this purpose is the class of semiconducting nanocrystal quantum dots (NCs) that are synthesized by colloidal chemistry. As their absorption and emission wavelength depends on the dot size, which can easily be controlled during synthesis, they are extremely attractive as building blocks for nanophotonic applications. For applications in telecom wavelength, Lead chalcogenide colloidal NCs are optimum materials due to their unique optical, electronic and nonlinear properties. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate the integration of PbS nanocrystals into Si-based photonic structures like slot waveguides and ring resonators as optically pumped emitters for room temperature applications. In order to create such hybrid structures, the NCs were dissolved into polymer resists and drop cast on top of the device. Upon optical pumping, intense photoluminescence emission from the resonating modes is recorded at the output of the waveguide with transmission quality factors up to 14000. The polymer host material was investigated with respect to its ability to stabilize the NC's photoluminescence emission against degradation under ambient conditions. The waveguide-ring coupling efficiency was also investigated as function of the NCs concentrations blended into the polymer matrix. The integration of colloidal quantum dots into Silicon photonic structures as demonstrated in this work is a very versatile technique and thus opens a large range of applications utilizing the linear and nonlinear optical properties of PbS NCs at telecom wavelengths.

  11. TH-CD-207B-07: Noise Modeling of Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) for Photon Counting CT Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Z; Zheng, X; Deen, J; Peng, H [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) has recently emerged as a promising photodetector for biomedical imaging applications. Due to its high multiplication gain (comparable to PMT), fast timing, low cost and compactness, it is considered a good candidate for photon counting CT. Dark noise is a limiting factor which impacts both energy resolution and detection dynamic range. Our goal is to develop a comprehensive model for noise sources for SiPM sensors. Methods: The physical parameters used in this work were based upon a test SPAD fabricated in 130nm CMOS process. The SPAD uses an n+/p-well junction, which is isolated from the p-substrate by a deep n-well junction. Inter-avalanche time measurement was used to record the time interval between two adjacent avalanche pulses. After collecting 1×106 counts, the histogram was obtained and multiple exponential fitting process was used to extract the lifetime associated with the traps within the bandgap. Results: At room temperature, the breakdown voltage of the SPAD is ∼11.4V and shows a temperature coefficient of 7.7mV/°C. The dark noise of SPAD increases with both the excess biasing voltage and temperature. The primary dark counts from the model were validated against the measurement results. A maximum relative error of 8.7% is observed at 20 °C with an excess voltage of 0.5V. The probabilities of after-pulsing are found to be dependent of both temperature and excess voltage. With 0.5V excess voltage, the after-pulsing probability is 63.5% at - 30 °C and drops to ∼6.6% at 40 °C. Conclusion: A comprehensive noise model for SPAD sensor was proposed. The model takes into account of static, dynamic and statistical behavior of SPADs. We believe that this is the first SPAD circuit simulation model that includes the band-to-band tunneling dark noise contribution and temporal dependence of the after-pulsing probability.

  12. Enhancement of Solar Cell Efficiency for Space Applications Using Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postigo P.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of having a nanopatterned photonic crystal (PC structure in the surface of a solar cell can be usefully employed to increase the energy conversion efficiency, which may be critical for space applications. In this work, we have measured the reflectance (R and transmittance (T of thin InP layers (270 nm thick bonded to a glass substrate and nanopatterned with holes down to the glass in a triangular symmetry lattice separated by a lattice parameter a=450nm and maintaining a value of r/a=0.32. The optical spectra were measured with angular resolution in the range from 0.55 to 2.0 eV. There are noticeable changes in the spectra of the PC sample, with minima and maxima of the R and T clearly shifted with respect to the unpatterned sample, and new features that alter significantly the overall lineshape of each spectrum. Those features correspond in a first approximation to the well-known Fano-like resonances of the discrete photonic modes of the PC lattice and they have been used before to determine experimentally the position of the PC bands. The observed features can be translated to the optical absorption (A defined as A=1-R-T provided there are low or negligible scattering effects. The generated absorption spectra show enhancements above and below the electronic band edge of the InP that can be correlated with the photonic band structure. Even using a thicker semiconductor layer, the abovementioned effects can justify to use a photonic crystal front surface with sub-wavelength motifs. In this way, we have fabricated and characterized a complete Ge/InGaP solar cell with a 2D-PC on its front surface. An increase in the photocurrent up to a 8% was achieved on a solar cell with a 40% of its surface covered with a PC pattern. Enhancements of the external quantum efficiency (EQE of 22% for a wide range of wavelengths and up to a 46% for specific wavelengths have been measured, without use of any anti-reflection coating (ARC. A correlation

  13. Applications of radio frequency identification systems in the mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hind, D J [Davis Derby Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom)

    1995-07-01

    Radio Frequency Identification Systems (RFID) are one of the automatic data capture technologies taking over from bar codes and magnetic swipe cards in many applications involving automatic hands free operation in arduous environments. RFID systems are based on the use of miniature radio transponders carrying encoded electronic data that is used to uniquely identify the identity of transponders. This paper reviews the types of system available and compares the various techniques involved in the different systems. The various types of transponder are described including the latest state of the art passive read/write high performance types. A review of the history of RFID systems in the mining industry is also given in the paper. The problems involved in designing and certifying a system for use in hazardous areas are also described, with particular reference to the problems of inadvertent detonator ignition by radio systems. Applications of RFID systems in the mining industry are described in considerable detail, covering applications both on the surface and underground. 1 ref., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Mutual Information in Frequency and Its Application to Measure Cross-Frequency Coupling in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malladi, Rakesh; Johnson, Don H.; Kalamangalam, Giridhar P.; Tandon, Nitin; Aazhang, Behnaam

    2018-06-01

    We define a metric, mutual information in frequency (MI-in-frequency), to detect and quantify the statistical dependence between different frequency components in the data, referred to as cross-frequency coupling and apply it to electrophysiological recordings from the brain to infer cross-frequency coupling. The current metrics used to quantify the cross-frequency coupling in neuroscience cannot detect if two frequency components in non-Gaussian brain recordings are statistically independent or not. Our MI-in-frequency metric, based on Shannon's mutual information between the Cramer's representation of stochastic processes, overcomes this shortcoming and can detect statistical dependence in frequency between non-Gaussian signals. We then describe two data-driven estimators of MI-in-frequency: one based on kernel density estimation and the other based on the nearest neighbor algorithm and validate their performance on simulated data. We then use MI-in-frequency to estimate mutual information between two data streams that are dependent across time, without making any parametric model assumptions. Finally, we use the MI-in- frequency metric to investigate the cross-frequency coupling in seizure onset zone from electrocorticographic recordings during seizures. The inferred cross-frequency coupling characteristics are essential to optimize the spatial and spectral parameters of electrical stimulation based treatments of epilepsy.

  15. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: Excitation and Suppression of the Brain Waves by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS-team Team

    2017-10-01

    The novel study of the laser excitation-suppression of the brain waves is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated multi-photon fiber-laser interaction with the brain parvalbumin (PV) neurons. The repetition frequency matches the low frequency brain waves (5-100 Hz); enabling the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the PV neurons (the generators of the brain wave activity). The tunable fiber laser frequencies are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling the monitoring of the PV neuron-DNA, within the 10s of milliseconds. In medicine, the method can be used as an ``instantaneous-on-off anesthetic.'' Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  16. Application of step-frequency radars in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishchenko, L.; Alekhin, M.; Tataraidze, A.; Ivashov, S.; Bugaev, Alexander S.; Soldovieri, F.

    2014-05-01

    The paper summarizes results of step-frequency radars application in medicine. Remote and non-contact control of physiological parameters with modern bioradars provides a wide range of possibilities for non-contact remote monitoring of a human psycho-emotional state and physiological condition. The paper provides information about technical characteristics of bioradars designed at Bauman Moscow State Technical University and experiments using them. Results of verification experiment showed that bioradars of BioRASCAN type may be used for simultaneous remote measurements of breathing and heart rate parameters. In addition, bioradar assisted experiments for detecting of different sleep disorders are described. Their results proved that method of bioradiolocation allows correct estimation of obstructive sleep apnea severity compared to the polysomnography method, which satisfies standard medical recommendations.

  17. Two-dimensional discrete ordinates photon transport calculations for brachytherapy dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daskalov, G.M.; Baker, R.S.; Little, R.C.; Rogers, D.W.O.; Williamson, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    The DANTSYS discrete ordinates computer code system is applied to quantitative estimation of water kerma rate distributions in the vicinity of discrete photon sources with energies in the 20- to 800-keV range in two-dimensional cylindrical r-z geometry. Unencapsulated sources immersed in cylindrical water phantoms of 40-cm diameter and 40-cm height are modeled in either homogeneous phantoms or shielded by Ti, Fe, and Pb filters with thicknesses of 1 and 2 mean free paths. The obtained dose results are compared with corresponding photon Monte Carlo simulations. A 210-group photon cross-section library for applications in this energy range is developed and applied, together with a general-purpose 42-group library developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, for DANTSYS calculations. The accuracy of DANTSYS with the 42-group library relative to Monte Carlo exhibits large pointwise fluctuations from -42 to +84%. The major cause for the observed discrepancies is determined to be the inadequacy of the weighting function used for the 42-group library derivation. DANTSYS simulations with a finer 210-group library show excellent accuracy on and off the source transverse plane relative to Monte Carlo kerma calculations, varying from minus4.9 to 3.7%. The P 3 Legendre polynomial expansion of the angular scattering function is shown to be sufficient for accurate calculations. The results demonstrate that DANTSYS is capable of calculating photon doses in very good agreement with Monte Carlo and that the multigroup cross-section library and efficient techniques for mitigation of ray effects are critical for accurate discrete ordinates implementation

  18. Two-photon polarization data storage in bacteriorhodopsin films and its potential use in security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, Martin; Hampp, Norbert, E-mail: hampp@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Chemistry, Material Sciences Center, University of Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Str., D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Rhinow, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue-Straße 3, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-02-24

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) films allow write-once-read-many recording of polarization data by a two-photon-absorption (TPA) process. The optical changes in BR films induced by the TPA recording were measured and the Müller matrix of a BR film was determined. A potential application of BR films in security technology is shown. Polarization data can be angle-selective retrieved with high signal-to-noise ratio. The BR film does not only carry optical information but serves also as a linear polarizer. This enables that polarization features recorded in BR films may be retrieved by merely using polarized light from a mobile phone display.

  19. Simulation Study of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for Industrial Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2008-01-01

    SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) provides for an invaluable non-invasive technique for the characterization and activity distribution of the gamma-emitting source. For many applications of radioisotopes for medical and industrial application, not only the positional information of the distribution of radioisotopes is needed but also its strength. The well-established X-ray radiography or transmission tomography techniques do not yield sufficient quantitative information about these objects. Emission tomography is one of the important methods for such characterization. Application of parallel beam, fan beam and 3D cone beam emission tomography methods have been discussed in this paper. Simulation studies to test these algorithms have been carried out to validate the technique.

  20. Average stopping powers for electron and photon sources for radiobiological modeling and microdosimetric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Kry, Stephen F.; Grosshans, David R.; Mohan, Radhe

    2018-03-01

    This study concerns calculation of the average electronic stopping power for photon and electron sources. It addresses two problems that have not yet been fully resolved. The first is defining the electron spectrum used for averaging in a way that is most suitable for radiobiological modeling. We define it as the spectrum of electrons entering the sensitive to radiation volume (SV) within the cell nucleus, at the moment they enter the SV. For this spectrum we derive a formula that combines linearly the fluence spectrum and the source spectrum. The latter is the distribution of initial energies of electrons produced by a source. Previous studies used either the fluence or source spectra, but not both, thereby neglecting a part of the complete spectrum. Our derived formula reduces to these two prior methods in the case of high and low energy sources, respectively. The second problem is extending electron spectra to low energies. Previous studies used an energy cut-off on the order of 1 keV. However, as we show, even for high energy sources, such as 60Co, electrons with energies below 1 keV contribute about 30% to the dose. In this study all the spectra were calculated with Geant4-DNA code and a cut-off energy of only 11 eV. We present formulas for calculating frequency- and dose-average stopping powers, numerical results for several important electron and photon sources, and tables with all the data needed to use our formulas for arbitrary electron and photon sources producing electrons with initial energies up to  ∼1 MeV.

  1. Measuring the photodetector frequency response for ultrasonic applications by a heterodyne system with difference- frequency servo control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Christian

    2010-05-01

    A technique for the calibration of photodiodes in ultrasonic measurement systems using standard and cost-effective optical and electronic components is presented. A heterodyne system was realized using two commercially available distributed feedback lasers, and the required frequency stability and resolution were ensured by a difference-frequency servo control scheme. The frequency-sensitive element generating the error signal for the servo loop comprised a delay-line discriminator constructed from electronic elements. Measurements were carried out at up to 450 MHz, and the uncertainties of about 5% (k = 2) can be further reduced by improved radio frequency power measurement without losing the feature of using only simple elements. The technique initially dedicated to the determination of the frequency response of photodetectors applied in ultrasonic applications can be transferred to other application fields of optical measurements.

  2. Photonic sensor opportunities for distributed and wireless systems in security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, David

    2006-10-01

    There are broad ranges of homeland security sensing applications that can be facilitated by distributed fiber optic sensors and photonics integrated wireless systems. These applications include [1]: Pipeline, (Monitoring, Security); Smart structures (Bridges, Tunnels, Dams, Public spaces); Power lines (Monitoring, Security); Transportation security; Chemical/biological detection; Wide area surveillance - perimeter; and Port Security (Underwater surveillance, Cargo container). Many vital assets which cover wide areas, such as pipeline and borders, are under constant threat of being attacked or breached. There is a rapidly emerging need to be able to provide identification of intrusion threats to such vital assets. Similar problems exit for monitoring the basic infrastructure such as water supply, power utilities, communications systems as well as transportation. There is a need to develop a coordinated and integrated solution for the detection of threats. From a sensor standpoint, consideration must not be limited to detection, but how does detection lead to intervention and deterrence. Fiber optic sensor technology must be compatible with other surveillance technologies such as wireless mote technology to facilitate integration. In addition, the multi-functionality of fiber optic sensors must be expanded to include bio-chemical detection. There have been a number of barriers for the acceptance and broad use of smart fiber optic sensors. Compared to telecommunications, the volume is low. This fact coupled with proprietary and custom specifications has kept the price of fiber optic sensors high. There is a general lack of a manufacturing infrastructure and lack of standards for packaging and reliability. Also, there are several competing technologies; some photonic based and other approaches based on conventional non-photonic technologies.

  3. Microstructured and Photonic Bandgap Fibers for Applications in the Resonant Bio- and Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Skorobogatiy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review application of microstructured and photonic bandgap fibers for designing resonant optical sensors of changes in the value of analyte refractive index. This research subject has recently invoked much attention due to development of novel fiber types, as well as due to development of techniques for the activation of fiber microstructure with functional materials. Particularly, we consider two sensors types. The first sensor type employs hollow core photonic bandgap fibers where core guided mode is confined in the analyte filled core through resonant effect in the surrounding periodic reflector. The second sensor type employs metalized microstructured or photonic bandgap waveguides and fibers, where core guided mode is phase matched with a plasmon propagating at the fiber/analyte interface. In resonant sensors one typically employs fibers with strongly nonuniform spectral transmission characteristics that are sensitive to changes in the real part of the analyte refractive index. Moreover, if narrow absorption lines are present in the analyte transmission spectrum, due to Kramers-Kronig relation this will also result in strong variation in the real part of the refractive index in the vicinity of an absorption line. Therefore, resonant sensors allow detection of minute changes both in the real part of the analyte refractive index (10−6–10−4 RIU, as well as in the imaginary part of the analyte refractive index in the vicinity of absorption lines. In the following we detail various resonant sensor implementations, modes of operation, as well as analysis of sensitivities for some of the common transduction mechanisms for bio- and chemical sensing applications. Sensor designs considered in this review span spectral operation regions from the visible to terahertz.

  4. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U.; Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K.; Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O_2) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H_2O_2) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H_2O_2 dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H_2O_2 addition with O_2 injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH"•, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O_2 injected and H_2O_2 added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  5. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U. [Jeju National University, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K. [Jeju National University, Faculty of Biotechnology (Korea, Republic of); Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J., E-mail: hjlee@jejunu.ac.kr [Jeju National University, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O{sub 2}) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition with O{sub 2} injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH{sup •}, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O{sub 2} injected and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  6. Frequency-selective near-field radiative heat transfer between photonic crystal slabs: a computational approach for arbitrary geometries and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Ilic, Ognjen; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Johnson, Steven G

    2011-09-09

    We demonstrate the possibility of achieving enhanced frequency-selective near-field radiative heat transfer between patterned (photonic-crystal) slabs at designable frequencies and separations, exploiting a general numerical approach for computing heat transfer in arbitrary geometries and materials based on the finite-difference time-domain method. Our simulations reveal a tradeoff between selectivity and near-field enhancement as the slab-slab separation decreases, with the patterned heat transfer eventually reducing to the unpatterned result multiplied by a fill factor (described by a standard proximity approximation). We also find that heat transfer can be further enhanced at selective frequencies when the slabs are brought into a glide-symmetric configuration, a consequence of the degeneracies associated with the nonsymmorphic symmetry group.

  7. Transport phenomena and kinetic theory applications to gases, semiconductors, photons, and biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gabetta, Ester

    2007-01-01

    The study of kinetic equations related to gases, semiconductors, photons, traffic flow, and other systems has developed rapidly in recent years because of its role as a mathematical tool in many applications in areas such as engineering, meteorology, biology, chemistry, materials science, nanotechnology, and pharmacy. Written by leading specialists in their respective fields, this book presents an overview of recent developments in the field of mathematical kinetic theory with a focus on modeling complex systems, emphasizing both mathematical properties and their physical meaning. The overall presentation covers not only modeling aspects and qualitative analysis of mathematical problems, but also inverse problems, which lead to a detailed assessment of models in connection with their applications, and to computational problems, which lead to an effective link of models to the analysis of real-world systems. "Transport Phenomena and Kinetic Theory" is an excellent self-study reference for graduate students, re...

  8. Image acquisition and analysis for beam diagnostics, applications of the Taiwan photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.Y.; Chen, J.; Cheng, Y.S.; Hsu, K.T.; Hu, K.H.; Kuo, C.H.; Wu, C.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Design and implementation of image acquisition and analysis is in proceeding for the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) diagnostic applications. The optical system contains screen, lens, and lighting system. A CCD camera with Gigabit Ethernet interface (GigE Vision) will be a standard image acquisition device. Image acquisition will be done on EPICS IOC via PV channel and analysis the properties by using Matlab tool to evaluate the beam profile (sigma), beam size position and tilt angle et al. The EPICS IOC integrated with Matlab as a data processing system is not only could be used in image analysis but also in many types of equipment data processing applications. Progress of the project will be summarized in this report. (authors)

  9. Ferrite Nanoparticles, Films, Single Crystals, and Metamaterials: High Frequency Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, V.

    2006-01-01

    Ferrite materials have long played an important role in power conditioning, conversion, and generation across a wide spectrum of frequencies (up to ten decades). They remain the preferred magnetic materials, having suitably low losses, for most applications above 1 MHz, and are the only viable materials for nonreciprocal magnetic microwave and millimeter-wave devices (including tunable filters, isolators, phase shifters, and circulators). Recently, novel processing techniques have led to a resurgence of research interest in the design and processing of ferrite materials as nanoparticles, films, single crystals, and metamaterials. These latest developments have set the stage for their use in emerging technologies that include cancer remediation therapies such as magnetohyperthermia, magnetic targeted drug delivery, and magneto-rheological fluids, as well as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. With reduced dimensionality of nanoparticles and films, and the inherent nonequilibrium nature of many processing schemes, changes in local chemistry and structure have profound effects on the functional properties and performance of ferrites. In this lecture, we will explore these effects upon the fundamental magnetic and electronic properties of ferrites. Density functional theory will be applied to predict the properties of these ferrites, with synchrotron radiation techniques used to elucidate the chemical and structural short-range order. This approach will be extended to study the atomic design of ferrites by alternating target laser-ablation deposition. Recently, this approach has been shown to produce ferrites that offer attractive properties not found in conventionally grown ferrites. We will explore the latest research developments involving ferrites as related to microwave and millimeter-wave applications and the attempt to integrate these materials with semiconductor materials platforms

  10. Low-loss transmission band in photonic crystal waveguides with sharp cutoff at a frequency below the bandgap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krüger, A.C.; Zhang, M.; Groothoff, N.; Malureanu, R.; Kristensen, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present TE transmission measurements of photonic crystal waveguides with high hole radius to period ratio r/¿ = 0.388. This geometry introduces a unique low loss transmission band in addition to the traditional PhC guiding band and very sharp transmission edges for devices with a length of 50 µm

  11. Silicon Photonics: All-Optical Devices for Linear and Nonlinear Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Jeffrey B.

    Silicon photonics has grown rapidly since the first Si electro-optic switch was demonstrated in 1987, and the field has never grown more quickly than it has over the past decade, fueled by milestone achievements in semiconductor processing technologies for low loss waveguides, high-speed Si modulators, Si lasers, Si detectors, and an enormous toolbox of passive and active integrated devices. Silicon photonics is now on the verge of major commercialization breakthroughs, and optical communication links remain the force driving integrated and Si photonics towards the first commercial telecom and datacom transceivers; however other potential and future applications are becoming uncovered and refined as researchers reveal the benefits of manipulating photons on the nanoscale. This thesis documents an exploration into the unique guided-wave and nonlinear properties of deeply-scaled high-index-contrast sub-wavelength Si waveguides. It is found that the tight confinement inherent to single-mode channel waveguides on the silicon-on-insulator platform lead to a rich physics, which can be leveraged for new devices extending well beyond simple passive interconnects and electro-optic devices. The following chapters will concentrate, in detail, on a number of unique physical features of Si waveguides and extend these attributes towards new and interesting devices. Linear optical properties and nonlinear optical properties are investigated, both of which are strongly affected by tight optical confinement of the guided waveguide modes. As will be shown, tight optical confinement directly results in strongly vectoral modal components, where the electric and magnetic fields of the guided modes extend into all spatial dimensions, even along the axis of propagation. In fact, the longitudinal electric and magnetic field components can be just as strong as the transverse fields, directly affecting the modal group velocity and energy transport properties since the longitudinal fields

  12. Manipulating light with strongly modulated photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notomi, Masaya

    2010-01-01

    Recently, strongly modulated photonic crystals, fabricated by the state-of-the-art semiconductor nanofabrication process, have realized various novel optical properties. This paper describes the way in which they differ from other optical media, and clarifies what they can do. In particular, three important issues are considered: light confinement, frequency dispersion and spatial dispersion. First, I describe the latest status and impact of ultra-strong light confinement in a wavelength-cubic volume achieved in photonic crystals. Second, the extreme reduction in the speed of light is reported, which was achieved as a result of frequency dispersion management. Third, strange negative refraction in photonic crystals is introduced, which results from their unique spatial dispersion, and it is clarified how this leads to perfect imaging. The last two sections are devoted to applications of these novel properties. First, I report the fact that strong light confinement and huge light-matter interaction enhancement make strongly modulated photonic crystals promising for on-chip all-optical processing, and present several examples including all-optical switches/memories and optical logics. As a second application, it is shown that the strong light confinement and slow light in strongly modulated photonic crystals enable the adiabatic tuning of light, which leads to various novel ways of controlling light, such as adiabatic frequency conversion, efficient optomechanics systems, photon memories and photons pinning.

  13. The Statistics of Emission and Detection of Neutrons and Photons from Fissile Samples for Safeguard Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    One particular purpose of nuclear safeguards, in addition to accounting for known materials, is the detection, identifying and quantifying unknown material, to prevent accidental and clandestine transports and uses of nuclear materials. This can be achieved in a non-destructive way through the various physical and statistical properties of particle emission and detection from such materials. This thesis addresses some fundamental aspects of nuclear materials and the way they can be detected and quantified by such methods. Factorial moments or multiplicities have long been used within the safeguard area. These are low order moments of the underlying number distributions of emission and detection. One objective of the present work was to determine the full probability distribution and its dependence on the sample mass and the detection process. Derivation and analysis of the full probability distribution and its dependence on the above factors constitutes the first part of the thesis. Another possibility of identifying unknown samples lies in the information in the 'fingerprints' (pulse shape distribution) left by a detected neutron or photon. A study of the statistical properties of the interaction of the incoming radiation (neutrons and photons) with the detectors constitutes the second part of the thesis. The interaction between fast neutrons and organic scintillation detectors is derived, and compared to Monte Carlo simulations. An experimental approach is also addressed in which cross correlation measurements were made using liquid scintillation detectors. First the dependence of the pulse height distribution on the energy and collision number of an incoming neutron was derived analytically and compared to numerical simulations. Then an algorithm was elaborated which can discriminate neutron pulses from photon pulses. The resulting cross correlation graphs are analyzed and discussed whether they can be used in applications to distinguish possible sample

  14. The Statistics of Emission and Detection of Neutrons and Photons from Fissile Samples for Safeguard Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enqvist, Andreas

    2008-03-15

    One particular purpose of nuclear safeguards, in addition to accounting for known materials, is the detection, identifying and quantifying unknown material, to prevent accidental and clandestine transports and uses of nuclear materials. This can be achieved in a non-destructive way through the various physical and statistical properties of particle emission and detection from such materials. This thesis addresses some fundamental aspects of nuclear materials and the way they can be detected and quantified by such methods. Factorial moments or multiplicities have long been used within the safeguard area. These are low order moments of the underlying number distributions of emission and detection. One objective of the present work was to determine the full probability distribution and its dependence on the sample mass and the detection process. Derivation and analysis of the full probability distribution and its dependence on the above factors constitutes the first part of the thesis. Another possibility of identifying unknown samples lies in the information in the 'fingerprints' (pulse shape distribution) left by a detected neutron or photon. A study of the statistical properties of the interaction of the incoming radiation (neutrons and photons) with the detectors constitutes the second part of the thesis. The interaction between fast neutrons and organic scintillation detectors is derived, and compared to Monte Carlo simulations. An experimental approach is also addressed in which cross correlation measurements were made using liquid scintillation detectors. First the dependence of the pulse height distribution on the energy and collision number of an incoming neutron was derived analytically and compared to numerical simulations. Then an algorithm was elaborated which can discriminate neutron pulses from photon pulses. The resulting cross correlation graphs are analyzed and discussed whether they can be used in applications to distinguish possible

  15. Tunable Multiband Microwave Photonic Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mable P. Fok

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for multifunctional devices, the use of cognitive wireless technology to solve the frequency resource shortage problem, as well as the capabilities and operational flexibility necessary to meet ever-changing environment result in an urgent need of multiband wireless communications. Spectral filter is an essential part of any communication systems, and in the case of multiband wireless communications, tunable multiband RF filters are required for channel selection, noise/interference removal, and RF signal processing. Unfortunately, it is difficult for RF electronics to achieve both tunable and multiband spectral filtering. Recent advancements of microwave photonics have proven itself to be a promising candidate to solve various challenges in RF electronics including spectral filtering, however, the development of multiband microwave photonic filtering still faces lots of difficulties, due to the limited scalability and tunability of existing microwave photonic schemes. In this review paper, we first discuss the challenges that were facing by multiband microwave photonic filter, then we review recent techniques that have been developed to tackle the challenge and lead to promising developments of tunable microwave photonic multiband filters. The successful design and implementation of tunable microwave photonic multiband filter facilitate the vision of dynamic multiband wireless communications and radio frequency signal processing for commercial, defense, and civilian applications.

  16. Stabilized soliton self-frequency shift and 0.1- PHz sideband generation in a photonic-crystal fiber with an air-hole-modified core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo-Wen; Hu, Ming-Lie; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Yan-Feng; Chai, Lu; Wang, Ching-Yue; Tong, Weijun; Luo, Jie; Voronin, Aleksandr A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2008-09-15

    Fiber dispersion and nonlinearity management strategy based on a modification of a photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) core with an air hole is shown to facilitate optimization of PCF components for a stable soliton frequency shift and subpetahertz sideband generation through four-wave mixing. Spectral recoil of an optical soliton by a red-shifted dispersive wave, generated through a soliton instability induced by high-order fiber dispersion, is shown to stabilize the soliton self-frequency shift in a highly nonlinear PCF with an air-hole-modified core relative to pump power variations. A fiber with a 2.3-microm-diameter core modified with a 0.9-microm-diameter air hole is used to demonstrate a robust soliton self-frequency shift of unamplified 50-fs Ti: sapphire laser pulses to a central wavelength of about 960 nm, which remains insensitive to variations in the pump pulse energy within the range from 60 to at least 100 pJ. In this regime of frequency shifting, intense high- and low-frequency branches of dispersive wave radiation are simultaneously observed in the spectrum of PCF output. An air-hole-modified-core PCF with appropriate dispersion and nonlinearity parameters is shown to provide efficient four-wave mixing, giving rise to Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands whose frequency shift relative to the pump wavelength falls within the subpetahertz range, thus offering an attractive source for nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy.

  17. Tailoring the Optical Properties of Silicon with Ion Beam Created Nanostructures for Advanced Photonics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Perveen

    In today's fast life, energy consumption has increased more than ever and with that the demand for a renewable and cleaner energy source as a substitute for the fossil fuels has also increased. Solar radiations are the ultimate source of energy but harvesting this energy in a cost effective way is a challenging task. Si is the dominating material for microelectronics and photovoltaics. But owing to its indirect band gap, Si is an inefficient light absorber, thus requiring a thickness of solar cells beyond tens of microns which increases the cost of solar energy. Therefore, techniques to increase light absorption in thin film Si solar cells are of great importance and have been the focus of research for a few decades now. Another big issue of technology in this fast-paced world is the computing rate or data transfer rate between components of a chip in ultra-fast processors. Existing electronic interconnects suffering from the signal delays and heat generation issues are unable to handle high data rates. A possible solution to this problem is in replacing the electronic interconnects with optical interconnects which have large data carrying capacity. However, optical components are limited in size by the fundamental laws of diffraction to about half a wavelength of light and cannot be combined with nanoscale electronic components. Tremendous research efforts have been directed in search of an advanced technology which can bridge the size gap between electronic and photonic worlds. An emerging technology of "plasmonics'' which exploits the extraordinary optical properties of metal nanostructures to tailor the light at nanoscale has been considered a potential solution to both of the above-mentioned problems. Research conducted for this dissertation has an overall goal to investigate the optical properties of silicon with metal nanostructures for photovoltaics and advanced silicon photonics applications. The first part of the research focuses on achieving enhanced

  18. Bayesian inference on multiscale models for poisson intensity estimation: applications to photon-limited image denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Stamatios; Maragos, Petros; Papandreou, George

    2009-08-01

    We present an improved statistical model for analyzing Poisson processes, with applications to photon-limited imaging. We build on previous work, adopting a multiscale representation of the Poisson process in which the ratios of the underlying Poisson intensities (rates) in adjacent scales are modeled as mixtures of conjugate parametric distributions. Our main contributions include: 1) a rigorous and robust regularized expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for maximum-likelihood estimation of the rate-ratio density parameters directly from the noisy observed Poisson data (counts); 2) extension of the method to work under a multiscale hidden Markov tree model (HMT) which couples the mixture label assignments in consecutive scales, thus modeling interscale coefficient dependencies in the vicinity of image edges; 3) exploration of a 2-D recursive quad-tree image representation, involving Dirichlet-mixture rate-ratio densities, instead of the conventional separable binary-tree image representation involving beta-mixture rate-ratio densities; and 4) a novel multiscale image representation, which we term Poisson-Haar decomposition, that better models the image edge structure, thus yielding improved performance. Experimental results on standard images with artificially simulated Poisson noise and on real photon-limited images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  19. Thermally Optimized Polarization-Maintaining Photonic Crystal Fiber and Its FOG Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxi; Zhang, Zhihao; Xu, Xiaobin; Cai, Wei

    2018-02-13

    In this paper, we propose a small-diameter polarization-maintaining solid-core photonic crystal fiber. The coating diameter, cladding diameter and other key parameters relating to the thermal properties were studied. Based on the optimized parameters, a fiber with a Shupe constant 15% lower than commercial photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) was fabricated, and the transmission loss was lower than 2 dB/km. The superior thermal stability of our fiber design was proven through both simulation and measurement. Using the small-diameter fiber, a split high precision fiber optic gyro (FOG) prototype was fabricated. The bias stability of the FOG was 0.0023 °/h, the random walk was 0.0003 °/ h , and the scale factor error was less than 1 ppm. Throughout a temperature variation ranging from -40 to 60 °C, the bias stability was less than 0.02 °/h without temperature compensation which is notably better than FOG with panda fiber. As a result, the PCF FOG is a promising choice for high precision FOG applications.

  20. Omnidirectional Photonic Band Gap Using Low Refractive Index Contrast Materials and its Application in Optical Waveguides

    KAUST Repository

    Vidal Faez, Angelo

    2012-07-01

    Researchers have argued for many years that one of the conditions for omnidirectional reflection in a one-dimensional photonic crystal is a strong refractive index contrast between the two constituent dielectric materials. Using numerical simulations and the theory of Anderson localization of light, in this work we demonstrate that an omnidirectional band gap can indeed be created utilizing low refractive index contrast materials when they are arranged in a disordered manner. Moreover, the size of the omnidirectional band gap becomes a controllable parameter, which now depends on the number of layers and not only on the refractive index contrast of the system, as it is widely accepted. This achievement constitutes a major breakthrough in the field since it allows for the development of cheaper and more efficient technologies. Of particular interest is the case of high index contrast one-dimensional photonic crystal fibers, where the propagation losses are mainly due to increased optical scattering from sidewall roughness at the interfaces of high index contrast materials. By using low index contrast materials these losses can be reduced dramatically, while maintaining the confinement capability of the waveguide. This is just one of many applications that could be proven useful for this discovery.

  1. Single Photon Detection with Semiconductor Pixel Arrays for Medical Imaging Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mikulec, B

    2000-01-01

    This thesis explores the functioning of a single photon counting pixel detector for X-ray imaging. It considers different applications for such a device, but focuses mainly on the field of medical imaging. The new detector comprises a CMOS read-out chip called PCC containing 4096 identical channels each of which counts X-ray hits. The conversion of the X-rays to electric charge takes place in a semiconductor sensor which is segmented into 4096 matching square diodes of side length 170 um, the 'pixels'. The photon counting concept is based on setting a threshold in energy above which a hit is registered. The immediate advantages are the elimination of background and the in principle unlimited dynamic range. Moreover, this approach allows the use of an electronic shutter for arbitrary measurement periods. As the device was intended for operation in the energy range of ~10-70 keV, gallium arsenide was selected as the preferred sensor material. The development of this detector followed on from about 10 years of r...

  2. Application of quantum-dot multi-wavelength lasers and silicon photonic ring resonators to data-center optical interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Douglas J. S.; Hickey, Ryan; Logan, Dylan F.; Knights, Andrew P.; Chen, Rong; Cao, Bin; Wheeldon, Jeffery F.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum dot comb sources integrated with silicon photonic ring-resonator filters and modulators enable the realization of optical sub-components and modules for both inter- and intra-data-center applications. Low-noise, multi-wavelength, single-chip, laser sources, PAM4 modulation and direct detection allow a practical, scalable, architecture for applications beyond 400 Gb/s. Multi-wavelength, single-chip light sources are essential for reducing power dissipation, space and cost, while silicon photonic ring resonators offer high-performance with space and power efficiency.

  3. Application of a general purpose user's version of the EGS4 code system to a photon skyshine benchmarking calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, I.; Fukasaku, Y.; Narita, O.

    1994-01-01

    A general purpose user's version of the EGS4 code system has been developed to make EGS4 easily applicable to the safety analysis of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. One such application involves the determination of skyshine dose for a variety of photon sources. To verify the accuracy of the code, it was benchmarked with Kansas State University (KSU) photon skyshine experiment of 1977. The results of the simulation showed that this version of EGS4 would be appicable to the skyshine calculation. (author)

  4. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the application of photon to industrial technologies, in particular, a hard photon technology was surveyed which uses photon beams of 0.1-200nm in wavelength. Its features such as selective atom reaction, dense inner shell excitation and spacial high resolution by quantum energy are expected to provide innovative techniques for various field such as fine machining, material synthesis and advanced inspection technology. This wavelength region has been hardly utilized for industrial fields because of poor development of suitable photon sources and optical devices. The developmental meaning, usable time and issue of a hard photon reduction lithography were surveyed as lithography in ultra-fine region below 0.1{mu}m. On hard photon analysis/evaluation technology, the industrial use of analysis, measurement and evaluation technologies by micro-beam was viewed, and optimum photon sources and optical systems were surveyed. Prediction of surface and surface layer modification by inner shell excitation, the future trend of this process and development of a vacuum ultraviolet light source were also surveyed. 383 refs., 153 figs., 17 tabs.

  5. A compact frequency stabilized telecom laser diode for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, C.; Holleville, D.; Le Targat, R.; Wolf, P.; Leveque, T.; Le Goff, R.; Martaud, E.; Acef, O.

    2017-09-01

    We report on a Telecom laser diode (LD) frequency stabilization to a narrow iodine hyperfine line in the green range, after frequency tripling process using fibered nonlinear waveguide PPLN crystals. We have generated up to 300 mW optical power in the green range ( 514 nm) from 800 mW of infrared power ( 1542 nm), corresponding to a nonlinear conversion efficiency h = P3?/P? 36%. Less than 10 mW of the generated green power are used for Doppler-free spectroscopy of 127I2 molecular iodine, and -therefore- for the frequency stabilization purpose. The frequency tripling optical setup is very compact (test the potential of this new frequency standard based on the couple "1.5 ?m laser / iodine molecule". We have already demonstrated a preliminary frequency stability of 4.8 x 10-14 ? -1/2 with a minimum value of 6 x 10-15 reached after 50 s of integration time, conferred to a laser diode operating at 1542.1 nm. We focus now our efforts to expand the frequency stability to a longer integration time in order to meet requirements of many space experiments, such earth gravity missions, inters satellites links or space to ground communications. Furthermore, we investigate the potential of a new approach based on frequency modulation technique (FM), associated to a 3rd harmonic detection of iodine lines to increase the compactness of the optical setup.

  6. A CMOS frequency generation module for 60-GHz applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chunyuan; Zhang Lei; Wang Hongrui; Qian He

    2012-01-01

    A frequency generation module for 60-GHz transceivers and phased array systems is presented in this paper. It is composed of a divide-by-2 current mode logic divider (CML) and a doubler in push-push configuration. Benefiting from the CML structure and push-push configuration, the proposed frequency generation module has a wide operating frequency range to cover process, voltage, and temperature variation. It is implemented in a 90-nm CMOS process, and occupies a chip area of 0.64 × 0.65 mm 2 including pads. The measurement results show that the designed frequency generation module functions properly with input frequency over 15 GHz to 25 GHz. The whole chip dissipates 12.1 mW from a 1.2-V supply excluding the output buffers. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  7. Development of GUS for control applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.; Barr, D.; Borland, M.; Kirchman, J.; Decker, G.; Kim, K.

    1994-01-01

    A script-based interpretive shell GUS (General Purpose Data Acquisition for Unix Shell) has been developed for application to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) control. The primary design objective of GUS is to provide a mechanism for efficient data flow among modularized objects called Data Access Modules (DAMs). GUS consists of four major components: user interface, kernel, built-in command module, and DAMS. It also incorporates the Unix shell to make use of the existing utility programs for file manipulation and data analysis. At this time, DAMs have been written for device access through EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System), data I/O for SDDS (Self-Describing Data Set) files, matrix manipulation, graphics display, digital signal processing, and beam position feedback system control. The modular and object-oriented construction of GUS will facilitate addition of more DAMs with other functions in the future

  8. Aqueous Exfoliation of Graphite into Graphene Assisted by Sulfonyl Graphene Quantum Dots for Photonic Crystal Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Minxiang; Shah, Smit A; Huang, Dali; Parviz, Dorsa; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Wang, Xuezhen; Green, Micah J; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2017-09-13

    We investigate the π-π stacking of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with graphene surfaces, showing that such interactions are general across a wide range of PAH sizes and species, including graphene quantum dots. We synthesized a series of graphene quantum dots with sulfonyl, amino, and carboxylic functional groups and employed them to exfoliate and disperse pristine graphene in water. We observed that sulfonyl-functionalized graphene quantum dots were able to stabilize the highest concentration of graphene in comparison to other functional groups; this is consistent with prior findings by pyrene. The graphene nanosheets prepared showed excellent colloidal stability, indicating great potential for applications in electronics, solar cells, and photonic displays which was demonstrated in this work.

  9. Light for the quantum. Entangled photons and their applications: a very personal perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-07-01

    The quantum physics of light is a most fascinating field. Here I present a very personal viewpoint, focusing on my own path to quantum entanglement and then on to applications. I have been fascinated by quantum physics ever since I heard about it for the first time in school. The theory struck me immediately for two reasons: (1) its immense mathematical beauty, and (2) the unparalleled precision to which its predictions have been verified again and again. Particularly fascinating for me were the predictions of quantum mechanics for individual particles, individual quantum systems. Surprisingly, the experimental realization of many of these fundamental phenomena has led to novel ideas for applications. Starting from my early experiments with neutrons, I later became interested in quantum entanglement, initially focusing on multi-particle entanglement like GHZ states. This work opened the experimental possibility to do quantum teleportation and quantum hyper-dense coding. The latter became the first entanglement-based quantum experiment breaking a classical limitation. One of the most fascinating phenomena is entanglement swapping, the teleportation of an entangled state. This phenomenon is fundamentally interesting because it can entangle two pairs of particles which do not share any common past. Surprisingly, it also became an important ingredient in a number of applications, including quantum repeaters which will connect future quantum computers with each other. Another application is entanglement-based quantum cryptography where I present some recent long-distance experiments. Entanglement swapping has also been applied in very recent so-called loophole-free tests of Bell’s theorem. Within the physics community such loophole-free experiments are perceived as providing nearly definitive proof that local realism is untenable. While, out of principle, local realism can never be excluded entirely, the 2015 achievements narrow down the remaining possibilities for

  10. Space applications of the MITS electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The MITS multigroup/continuous-energy electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system has matured to the point that it is capable of addressing more realistic three-dimensional adjoint applications. It is first employed to efficiently predict point doses as a function of source energy for simple three-dimensional experimental geometries exposed to simulated uniform isotropic planar sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 4.0 MeV. Results are in very good agreement with experimental data. It is then used to efficiently simulate dose to a detector in a subsystem of a GPS satellite due to its natural electron environment, employing a relatively complex model of the satellite. The capability for survivability analysis of space systems is demonstrated, and results are obtained with and without variance reduction

  11. Proposal to extend CSEWG neutron and photon multigroup structures for wider applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBauve, R.J.; Wilson, W.B.

    1976-02-01

    The 239-group neutron multigroup structure recommended by the Codes and Formats Subcommittee of the cross section evaluation working group (CSEWG) for use in LMFBR design is not well suited for application in certain other areas, particularly thermal reactor design. This report describes a proposal for a neutron group structure consisting of 347 groups, which is an extension of the CSEWG group structure into the thermal range, and also includes more detail in other energy ranges important in LWR, HTGR, GCFR, and CTR design. Similarly, a proposed extension of the CSEWG 94-group photon multigroup structure to 103 groups is described. A subset of the neutron multigroup structure, consisting of 154 groups and for use in power reactor studies, is also presented

  12. Proposal to extend CSEWG neutron and photon multigroup structures for wider applications. [Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBauve, R.J.; Wilson, W.B.

    1976-02-01

    The 239-group neutron multigroup structure recommended by the Codes and Formats Subcommittee of the cross section evaluation working group (CSEWG) for use in LMFBR design is not well suited for application in certain other areas, particularly thermal reactor design. This report describes a proposal for a neutron group structure consisting of 347 groups, which is an extension of the CSEWG group structure into the thermal range, and also includes more detail in other energy ranges important in LWR, HTGR, GCFR, and CTR design. Similarly, a proposed extension of the CSEWG 94-group photon multigroup structure to 103 groups is described. A subset of the neutron multigroup structure, consisting of 154 groups and for use in power reactor studies, is also presented.

  13. Design and application of CVD diamond windows for x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaski, Y.; Cookson, D.

    2007-01-01

    Two types of directly cooled, 0.2-mm-thick, 8-mm-diameter clear aperture CVD diamond windows have been designed and successfully fabricated by two different vendors for use at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Both windows contain a direct braze joint between the diamond and the cooled OFHC copper. These windows can be used to replace the front-end beryllium windows in high-heat-load applications and can be used as white beam windows in the beamlines. This paper presents the detailed design of the diamond windows, the thermal analysis of the diamond window under different thermal load configurations, as well as a complete list of the existing APS front-end beryllium window configurations and replacement scenarios. Small-angle scattering experiments have been conducted on both diamond windows and a polished beryllium window, and the results are presented.

  14. In-line photonic microcells based on the elliptical microfibers for refractive index sensors applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wa; Liu, Xuejing; Jin, Wei

    2017-10-01

    We report the fabrication of in-line photonic microcells (PMCs) by encapsulating tapered elliptical microfibers (MFs) inside glass tubes. The encapsulation does not change the optical property of the MF but protects the elliptical MF from external disturbance and contamination and makes the micro-laboratory robust. Such micro-laboratory can be easily integrated into standard fiber-optic circuits with low loss, making the elliptical MF-based devices more practical for real-world applications. Evanescent field sensing is realized by fabricating micro-channel on the PMC for ingress/egress of sample liquids/gas. Based on the encapsulated elliptical MF PMCs, we demonstrated RI sensitivity of 2024 nm per refractive index unit (nm/RIU) in gaseous environment and 21231 nm/RIU in water.

  15. The study of electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic crystals via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method with active gain material applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming

    material expressed by electric field dependent dielectric constant. Next, the concepts of spectrum interpolation (Chapter 3), higher-order incident (Chapter 4) and perfectly matched layer (Chapter 5) are introduced and applied to TMM, with detailed simulation for 1D, 2D, and 3D photonic crystal examples. Curvilinear coordinate transform is applied to the Maxwell's Equations to study waveguide bend (Chapter 6). By finding the phase difference along propagation direction at various XY plane locations, the behaviors of electromagnetic wave propagation (such as light bending, focusing etc) can be studied (Chapter 7), which can be applied to diffractive optics for new devices design. Numerical simulation tools for lasing devices are usually based on rate equations which are not accurate above the threshold and for small scale lasing cavities (such as nano-scale cavities). Recently, we extend the TMM package function to include the capacity of dealing active gain materials. Both lasing (above threshold) and spontaneous emission (below threshold) can be studied in the frame work of our Gain-TMM algorithm. Chapter 8 will illustrate the algorithm in detail and show the simulation results for 3D photonic crystal lasing devices. Then, microwave experiments (mainly resonant cavity embedded at layer-by-layer woodpile structures) are performed at Chapter 9 as an efficient practical way to study photonic crystal devices. The size of photonic crystal under microwave region is at the order of centimeter which makes the fabrication easier to realize. At the same time due to the scaling property, the result of microwave experiments can be applied directly to optical or infrared frequency regions. The systematic TMM simulations for various resonant cavities are performed and consistent results are obtained when compared with microwave experiments. Besides scaling the experimental results to much smaller wavelength, designing potential photonic crystal devices for application at microwave is

  16. Applications of Silicon-on-Insulator Photonic Crystal Structures in Miniature Spectrometer Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Boshen

    Optical spectroscopy is one of the most important fundamental scientific techniques. It has been widely adopted in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine and many other research fields. However, the size and weight of a spectrometer as well as the difficulty to align and maintain it have long limited spectroscopy to be a laboratory-only procedure. With the recent advancement in semiconductor electronics and photonics, miniaturized spectrometers have been introduced to complete many tasks in daily life where mobility and portability are necessary. This thesis focuses on the study of several photonic crystal (PC) nano-structures potentially suitable for miniaturized on-chip spectrometer designs. Chapter 1 briefly introduces the concept of PCs and their band structures. By analyzing the band structure, the origin of the superprism effect is explained. Defect-based PC nano-cavities are also discussed, as well as a type of coupled cavity waveguides (CCW) composed of PC nano-cavities. Chapter 2 is devoted to the optimization of a flat-band superprism structure for spectroscopy application using numerical simulations. Chapter 3 reports a fabricated broad-band superprism and the experimental characterization of its wavelength resolving performance. In chapter 4, the idea of composing a miniature spectrometer based on a single tunable PC nano-cavity is proposed. The rest of this chapter discusses the experimental study of this design. Chapter 5 examines the slow-light performance of a CCW and discusses its potential application in slow-light interferometry. Chapter 6 serves as a conclusion of this thesis and proposes directions for possible future work to follow up.

  17. Application of an efficient materials perturbation technique to Monte Carlo photon transport calculations in borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picton, D.J.; Harris, R.G.; Randle, K.; Weaver, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, accurate and efficient technique for the calculation of materials perturbation effects in Monte Carlo photon transport calculations. It is particularly suited to the application for which it was developed, namely the modelling of a dual detector density tool as used in borehole logging. However, the method would be appropriate to any photon transport calculation in the energy range 0.1 to 2 MeV, in which the predominant processes are Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption. The method enables a single set of particle histories to provide results for an array of configurations in which material densities or compositions vary. It can calculate the effects of small perturbations very accurately, but is by no means restricted to such cases. For the borehole logging application described here the method has been found to be efficient for a moderate range of variation in the bulk density (of the order of ±30% from a reference value) or even larger changes to a limited portion of the system (e.g. a low density mudcake of the order of a few tens of mm in thickness). The effective speed enhancement over an equivalent set of individual calculations is in the region of an order of magnitude or more. Examples of calculations on a dual detector density tool are given. It is demonstrated that the method predicts, to a high degree of accuracy, the variation of detector count rates with formation density, and that good results are also obtained for the effects of mudcake layers. An interesting feature of the results is that relative count rates (the ratios of count rates obtained with different configurations) can usually be determined more accurately than the absolute values of the count rates. (orig.)

  18. A Compact Frequency Reconfigurable Antenna for LTE Mobile Handset Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munyong Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact (8 × 62 × 5 mm3; 2.48 cc frequency reconfigurable antenna that uses electrical switching with PIN diodes is proposed for the low frequency LTE band (699 MHz–862 MHz, high frequency LTE band (2496 MHz–2690 MHz, GSM850/900 bands (824 MHz–960 MHz, and DCS/PCS/WCDMA bands (1710 MHz–2170 MHz. The penta-band PIFA is first designed for GSM850/900/DCS/PCS/WCDMA bands by using two slits and ground pins within a limited antenna volume (8 × 54.6 × 5 mm3; 2.18 cc. The frequency reconfigurable antenna based on this penta-band PIFA is thus proposed to additionally cover all LTE bands. The proposed antenna has two PIN diodes with an optimal location. For State 1 (PIN diode 1: ON state, PIN diode 2: OFF state, the proposed antenna covers the low frequency LTE band, DCS/PCS/WCDMA bands, and high frequency LTE band. For State 2 (PIN diode 1: OFF state, PIN diode 2: ON state, the antenna covers the GSM850/900 bands. Simulated and measured results show that the total efficiency of the proposed antenna was greater than 40% for all operating frequency bands.

  19. Application of multiple signal classification algorithm to frequency estimation in coherent dual-frequency lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruixiao; Li, Kun; Zhao, Changming

    2018-01-01

    Coherent dual-frequency Lidar (CDFL) is a new development of Lidar which dramatically enhances the ability to decrease the influence of atmospheric interference by using dual-frequency laser to measure the range and velocity with high precision. Based on the nature of CDFL signals, we propose to apply the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm in place of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) to estimate the phase differences in dual-frequency Lidar. In the presence of Gaussian white noise, the simulation results show that the signal peaks are more evident when using MUSIC algorithm instead of FFT in condition of low signal-noise-ratio (SNR), which helps to improve the precision of detection on range and velocity, especially for the long distance measurement systems.

  20. Apparatus and method for qualitative and quantitative measurements of optical properties of turbid media using frequency-domain photon migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromberg, B.J.; Tsay, T.T.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Haskell, R.C.

    1995-06-13

    Optical measurements of turbid media, that is media characterized by multiple light scattering, is provided through an apparatus and method for exposing a sample to a modulated laser beam. The light beam is modulated at a fundamental frequency and at a plurality of integer harmonics thereof. Modulated light is returned from the sample and preferentially detected at cross frequencies at frequencies slightly higher than the fundamental frequency and at integer harmonics of the same. The received radiance at the beat or cross frequencies is compared against a reference signal to provide a measure of the phase lag of the radiance and modulation ratio relative to a reference beam. The phase and modulation amplitude are then provided as a frequency spectrum by an array processor to which a computer applies a complete curve fit in the case of highly scattering samples or a linear curve fit below a predetermined frequency in the case of highly absorptive samples. The curve fit in any case is determined by the absorption and scattering coefficients together with a concentration of the active substance in the sample. Therefore, the curve fitting to the frequency spectrum can be used both for qualitative and quantitative analysis of substances in the sample even though the sample is highly turbid. 14 figs.

  1. Active Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterization of active photonic crystal waveguides, realized in III-V semiconductor material with embedded active layers. The platform offering active photonic crystal waveguides has many potential applications. One of these is a compact photonic...... due to photonic crystal dispersion. The observations are explained by the enhancement of net gain by light slow down. Another application based on active photonic crystal waveguides is micro lasers. Measurements on quantum dot micro laser cavities with different mirror configurations and photonic...

  2. Photonic crystal pioneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anscombe, Nadya

    2011-08-01

    Over the past ten years, Crystal Fiber, now part of NKT Photonics, has been busy commercializing photonic crystal fibre. Nadya Anscombe finds out about the evolution of the technology and its applications.

  3. Coupled multi-group neutron photon transport for the simulation of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Kimberly A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples.

  4. FENDL/E-2.0. Evaluated nuclear data library of neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections and photon production cross sections and photon-atom interaction cross sections for fusion applications. Version 1, March 1997. Summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.; Wienke, H.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the description of a physical tape containing the basic evaluated nuclear data library of neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections, photon production cross sections and photon-atom interaction cross sections for fusion applications. It is part of the evaluated nuclear data library for fusion applications FENDL-2. The data are available cost-free from the Nuclear Data Section upon request. The data can also be retrieved by the user via online access through international computer networks. (author)

  5. Low-loss transmission band in photonic crystal waveguides with sharp cutoff at a frequency below the bandgap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Asger Christian; Zhang, Min; Groothoff, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    We present TE transmission measurements of photonic crystal waveguides with high hole radius to period ratio r/Λ=0.388. This geometry introduces a unique low loss transmission band in addition to the traditional PhC guiding band and very sharp transmission edges for devices with a length of 50 μm...... or longer. Finite difference time domain and plane wave expansion simulations confirm the results and show that the sharpness of the cutoffs can be explained by the spectral shape of the guiding mode in the band diagram....

  6. A Novel HBT Frequency Doubler Design for Millimeter-Wave Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor; Vidkjær, Jens

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we presents a novel HBT frequency doubler design for millimeter-wave application. A HBT frequency doubler theory is described which leads to accurate design equations for optimal performance. The developed theory shows that an optimal HBT frequency doubler can be achieved using a no...

  7. Failure frequencies and probabilities applicable to BWR and PWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.; Chockie, A.D.

    1996-03-01

    This report deals with failure probabilities and failure frequencies of nuclear plant piping and the failure frequencies of flanges and bellows. Piping failure probabilities are derived from Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events (PRAISE) computer code calculations based on fatigue and intergranular stress corrosion as failure mechanisms. Values for both failure probabilities and failure frequencies are cited from several sources to yield a better evaluation of the spread in mean and median values as well as the widths of the uncertainty bands. A general conclusion is that the numbers from WASH-1400 often used in PRAs are unduly conservative. Failure frequencies for both leaks and large breaks tend to be higher than would be calculated using the failure probabilities, primarily because the frequencies are based on a relatively small number of operating years. Also, failure probabilities are substantially lower because of the probability distributions used in PRAISE calculations. A general conclusion is that large LOCA probability values calculated using PRAISE will be quite small, on the order of less than 1E-8 per year (<1E-8/year). The values in this report should be recognized as having inherent limitations and should be considered as estimates and not absolute values. 24 refs 24 refs

  8. High-frequency strontium vapor laser for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvorostovsky, A.; Kolmakov, E.; Kudashev, I.; Redka, D.; Kancer, A.; Kustikova, M.; Bykovskaya, E.; Mayurova, A.; Stupnikov, A.; Ruzankina, J.; Tsvetkov, K.; Lukyanov, N.; Paklinov, N.

    2018-02-01

    Sr-laser with high pulse repetition rate and high peak radiation power is a unique tool for studying rapidly occurring processes in time (plasma diagnostics, photoablation, etc.). In addition, the study of the frequency characteristics of the active medium of the laser helps to reveal the physics of the formation of an inverse medium in metal vapor lasers. In this paper, an experimental study of an Sr-laser with an active volume of 5.8 cm3 in the pulse repetition frequency range from 25 to 200 kHz is carried out, and a comparison with the frequency characteristics of media with large active volumes is given. We considered the frequency characteristics of the active medium in two modes: at a constant energy in the excitation pulse CU2 / 2 and at a constant average power consumed by the rectifier. In the presented work with a small-volume GRT using the TASITR-5/12 TASITRON switch, a laser was generated for Pairs of strontium at a CSF of 200 kHz. The behavior of the characteristics of the generation lines of 6.456 μm, 1 μm, and 3 μm at increased repetition frequencies is considered. Using the example of large-volume GRT, it is shown that tubes with a large active volume increase their energy characteristics with the growth of the CSF. The possibility of laser operation at pulse repetition rates above 200 kHz is shown.

  9. Singular value decomposition for photon-processing nuclear imaging systems and applications for reconstruction and computing null functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Frey, Eric C.; Clarkson, Eric; Caucci, Luca; Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in technology are enabling a new class of nuclear imaging systems consisting of detectors that use real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate the interaction position, deposited energy, and other attributes of each photon-interaction event and store these attributes in a list format. This class of systems, which we refer to as photon-processing (PP) nuclear imaging systems, can be described by a fundamentally different mathematical imaging operator that allows processing of the continuous-valued photon attributes on a per-photon basis. Unlike conventional photon-counting (PC) systems that bin the data into images, PP systems do not have any binning-related information loss. Mathematically, while PC systems have an infinite-dimensional null space due to dimensionality considerations, PP systems do not necessarily suffer from this issue. Therefore, PP systems have the potential to provide improved performance in comparison to PC systems. To study these advantages, we propose a framework to perform the singular-value decomposition (SVD) of the PP imaging operator. We use this framework to perform the SVD of operators that describe a general two-dimensional (2D) planar linear shift-invariant (LSIV) PP system and a hypothetical continuously rotating 2D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) PP system. We then discuss two applications of the SVD framework. The first application is to decompose the object being imaged by the PP imaging system into measurement and null components. We compare these components to the measurement and null components obtained with PC systems. In the process, we also present a procedure to compute the null functions for a PC system. The second application is designing analytical reconstruction algorithms for PP systems. The proposed analytical approach exploits the fact that PP systems acquire data in a continuous domain to estimate a continuous object function. The approach is parallelizable and

  10. Singular value decomposition for photon-processing nuclear imaging systems and applications for reconstruction and computing null functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K; Barrett, Harrison H; Frey, Eric C; Clarkson, Eric; Caucci, Luca; Kupinski, Matthew A

    2015-09-21

    Recent advances in technology are enabling a new class of nuclear imaging systems consisting of detectors that use real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate the interaction position, deposited energy, and other attributes of each photon-interaction event and store these attributes in a list format. This class of systems, which we refer to as photon-processing (PP) nuclear imaging systems, can be described by a fundamentally different mathematical imaging operator that allows processing of the continuous-valued photon attributes on a per-photon basis. Unlike conventional photon-counting (PC) systems that bin the data into images, PP systems do not have any binning-related information loss. Mathematically, while PC systems have an infinite-dimensional null space due to dimensionality considerations, PP systems do not necessarily suffer from this issue. Therefore, PP systems have the potential to provide improved performance in comparison to PC systems. To study these advantages, we propose a framework to perform the singular-value decomposition (SVD) of the PP imaging operator. We use this framework to perform the SVD of operators that describe a general two-dimensional (2D) planar linear shift-invariant (LSIV) PP system and a hypothetical continuously rotating 2D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) PP system. We then discuss two applications of the SVD framework. The first application is to decompose the object being imaged by the PP imaging system into measurement and null components. We compare these components to the measurement and null components obtained with PC systems. In the process, we also present a procedure to compute the null functions for a PC system. The second application is designing analytical reconstruction algorithms for PP systems. The proposed analytical approach exploits the fact that PP systems acquire data in a continuous domain to estimate a continuous object function. The approach is parallelizable and

  11. Application of precursor methodology in initiating frequency estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    The precursor methodology developed in recent years provides a consistent technique to identify important accident sequence precursors. It relies on operational events (extracting information from actual experience) and infers core damage scenarios based on expected safety system responses. The ranking or categorization of each precursor is determined by considering the full spectrum of potential core damage sequences. The methodology estimates the frequency of severe core damage based on the approach suggested by Apostolakis and Mosleh, which may lead to a potential overestimation of the severe-accident sequence frequency due to the inherent dependencies between the safety systems and the initiating events. The methodology is an encompassing attempt to incorporate most of the operating information available from nuclear power plants and is an attractive tool from the point of view of risk management. In this paper, a further extension of this methodology is discussed with regard to the treatment of initiating frequency of the accident sequences

  12. Online frequency estimation with applications to engine and generator sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manngård, Mikael; Böling, Jari M.

    2017-07-01

    Frequency and spectral analysis based on the discrete Fourier transform is a fundamental task in signal processing and machine diagnostics. This paper aims at presenting computationally efficient methods for real-time estimation of stationary and time-varying frequency components in signals. A brief survey of the sliding time window discrete Fourier transform and Goertzel filter is presented, and two filter banks consisting of: (i) sliding time window Goertzel filters (ii) infinite impulse response narrow bandpass filters are proposed for estimating instantaneous frequencies. The proposed methods show excellent results on both simulation studies and on a case study using angular speed data measurements of the crankshaft of a marine diesel engine-generator set.

  13. Test of a 32-channel Prototype ASIC for Photon Counting Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Cui, Y; O'Connor, P; Seo, Y; Camarda, G S; Hossain, A; Roy, U; Yang, G; James, R B

    2015-01-01

    A new low-power application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) application is being developed at BNL. As the first step, a 32-channel prototype ASIC was designed and tested recently. Each channel has a preamplifier followed by CR-RC 3 shaping circuits and three independent energy bins with comparators and 16-bit counters. The ASIC was fabricated with TSMC 0.35-μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process and tested in laboratories. The power consumption is around 1 mW/ch with a 2.5-V supply. With a gain of 400 mV/fC and the peaking time of 500 ns, the equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 360 e- has been measured in room temperature while the crosstalk rate is less than 0.3%. The 10-bit DACs for global thresholds have an integral nonlinearity (INL) less than 0.56% and differential nonlinearity (DNL) less than 0.33%. In the presentation, we will report the detailed test results with this ASIC.

  14. Preliminary characterization of a single photon counting detection system for CT application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.G.; Carpentieri, C.; Del Guerra, A.; Delogu, P.; Panetta, D.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the capability of a single photon counting acquisition system based on the Medipix2 read-out chip for Computed Tomography (CT) applications in Small Animal Imaging. We used a micro-focus X-ray source with a W anode. The detection system is based on the Medipix2 read-out chip, bump-bonded to a 1 mm thick silicon pixel detector. The read-out chip geometry is a matrix of 256x256 cells, 55 μmx55 μm each. This system in planar radiography shows a good detection efficiency (about 70%) at the anode voltage of 30 kV and a good spatial resolution (MTF=10% at 16.8 lp/mm). Starting from these planar performances we have characterized the system for the tomography applications with phantoms. We will present the results obtained as a function of magnification with two different background medium compositions. The effect of the reconstruction algorithm on image quality will be also discussed

  15. Application of artificial intelligence in load frequency control of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the use of artificial intelligence to study the load frequency control of interconnected power system. In the proposed scheme, a control methodology is developed using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Fuzzy Logic controller (FLC) for interconnected hydro-thermal power system. The control strategies ...

  16. High frequency MOSFET gate drivers technologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    This book describes high frequency power MOSFET gate driver technologies, including gate drivers for GaN HEMTs, which have great potential in the next generation of switching power converters. Gate drivers serve as a critical role between control and power devices.

  17. Application of frequency spectrum analysis in the rotator moving equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ruilan; Su Guanghui; Shang Zhi; Jia Dounan

    2001-01-01

    The experimental equipment is developed to simulate the rotator vibration. The running state of machine is simulated by using different running conditions. The vibration caused by non-equilibrium mass is analyzed and discussed for first order with focus load. The effective method is found out by using frequency spectrum analysis

  18. Photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief summary of the present status of photon-photon interactions is presented. Stress is placed on the use of two-photon collisions to test present ideas on the quark constituents of hadrons and on the theory of strong interactions

  19. Advanced Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with 100ps Timing for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; Rabin, M.; Bloch, J.

    In recent years EAG has implemented a variety of high-resolution, large format, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads. Our scheme of choice has been delay line readouts encoding photon event position centroids, by determination of the difference in arrival time of the event charge at the two ends of a distributed resistive-capacitive (RC) delay line. Our most commonly used delay line configuration is the cross delay line (XDL). In its simplest form the delay-line encoding electronics consists of a fast amplifier for each end of the delay line, followed by time-to-digital converters (TDC's). We have achieved resolutions of Pulsar with a telescope as small as 1m. Although microchannel plate delay line detectors meet many of the imaging and timing demands of various applications, they have limitations. The relatively high gain (107) reduces lifetime and local counting rate, and the fixed delay (10's of ns) makes multiple simultaneous event recording problematic. To overcome these limitations we have begun development of cross strip readout anodes for microchannel plate detectors. The cross strip (XS) anode is a coarse (~0.5 mm) multi-layer metal and ceramic pattern of crossed fingers on an alumina substrate. The charge cloud is matched to the anode period so that it is collected on several neighboring fingers to ensure an accurate event charge centroid can be determined. Each finger of the anode is connected to a low noise charge sensitive amplifier and followed by subsequent A/D conversion of individual strip charge values and a hardware centroid determination of better than 1/100 of a strip are possible. Recently we have commissioned a full 32 x 32 mm XS open face laboratory detector and demonstrated excellent resolution (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NASA and NSF we are developing high rate (>107 Hz) XS encoding electronics that will encode temporally simultaneous

  20. Bayesian multi-scale smoothing of photon-limited images with applications to astronomy and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John

    Multi-scale models for smoothing Poisson signals or images have gained much attention over the past decade. A new Bayesian model is developed using the concept of the Chinese restaurant process to find structures in two-dimensional images when performing image reconstruction or smoothing. This new model performs very well when compared to other leading methodologies for the same problem. It is developed and evaluated theoretically and empirically throughout Chapter 2. The newly developed Bayesian model is extended to three-dimensional images in Chapter 3. The third dimension has numerous different applications, such as different energy spectra, another spatial index, or possibly a temporal dimension. Empirically, this method shows promise in reducing error with the use of simulation studies. A further development removes background noise in the image. This removal can further reduce the error and is done using a modeling adjustment and post-processing techniques. These details are given in Chapter 4. Applications to real world problems are given throughout. Photon-based images are common in astronomical imaging due to the collection of different types of energy such as X-Rays. Applications to real astronomical images are given, and these consist of X-ray images from the Chandra X-ray observatory satellite. Diagnostic medicine uses many types of imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography that can also benefit from smoothing techniques such as the one developed here. Reducing the amount of radiation a patient takes will make images more noisy, but this can be mitigated through the use of image smoothing techniques. Both types of images represent the potential real world use for these methods.

  1. Study on low frequency probe characterization for concrete application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amry Amin Abas; Mohd Pauzi Ismail

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing has been widely used in metal and non-metal material. For non-metal material such as concrete, a probe emitting low frequency ultrasonic wave is applied. This paper describes the comparison between three custom made probes using same design and piezoelectric crystal. The only difference is the backing material, which comprise of three different materials. Characterization of each transducer is compared in order to understand the effects of backing material in the probe. (Author)

  2. Theoretical Study of Amplitude Modulation Application during Radio Frequency Electrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karpuhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the investigation results of influence of the amplitude-modulated acting signal parameters on the thermoelectric characteristics of biological tissues for a specified geometry of the working electrode section during RF mono-polar electrocoagulation. The geometric model ‘electrode - a biological tissue’ was suggested to study the distribution of power and temperature fields in biological tissue during mono-polar coagulation. The model of biological tissue is represented as a cylinder and the needle electrode is an ellipsoid immersed in the biological tissue. The heat and quasi-electrostatics equations are used as a mathematical model. These equations are solved in Comsol Multiphysics environment.As a result, we have got the following findings: the technique of calculating parameters of the PAM acting signal which has a fixed carrier frequency for the needle electrode of a specified geometry and the immersion depth in biological tissues is suggested. Parameters of PAM signal are determined for this electrode geometry. These parameters provide a 60 ... 80°C heating range of biological tissues near the working part of the tool for different amplitudes of acting signal during RF coagulation. It has been found out that both the temperature and the relaxation frequency of biological tissue depend on exposure time for the needle electrode of a specified geometry and immersion depth of the working part of tool into biological tissue.It is shown that the relaxation frequency of the biological tissue, subjected to the radiofrequency pulses, linearly depends on its heating temperature and can be used as a numerical criterion for maintaining the specified temperature conditions. It is found that the relaxation frequency of the biological tissue depends on the contact area of the tool working part and biological tissues. To reduce this dependence it is necessary to provide automatic current control of the output action.

  3. RADIO-FREQUENCY MASS SPECTROMETERS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS IN SPACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, Jr., A. S.

    1963-08-15

    The operation of three common radio-frequency mass spectrometers is described, and their performances are compared. Their limitations are pointed out. It is concluded that the quadrupole spectrometer has fewer limitations and is more generally useful in space probes than the other devices. Some present and proposed uses of spectrometers in space are discussed, and the problem of contamination of the atmosphere being sampled by the spectrometer is reviewed. (auth)

  4. Application of cascaded frequency multiplication to molecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Maiwald, Frank W.; Pearson, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory molecular spectroscopy provides the basis for interpretation of atmospheric, planetary, and astrophysical data gathered by remote sensing. Laboratory studies of atomic and molecular signatures across the electromagnetic spectrum provide high-precision, quantitative data used to interpret the observed environment from remote measurements. Historically, the region of the spectrum above 500 GHz has been relatively unexplored due to atmospheric absorption and technical difficulties generating and detecting radiation. Laboratory spectroscopy at these frequencies has traditionally involved measurement of one or two absorption features and relied on fitting of models to the limited data. We report a new spectrometer built around a computer-controlled commercial synthesizer and millimeter-wave module driving a series of amplifiers followed by a series of wide-bandwidth frequency doublers and triplers. The spectrometer provides the ability to rapidly measure large pieces of frequency space with higher resolution, accuracy, and sensitivity than with Fourier transform infrared techniques. The approach is simple, modular, and requires no custom-built electronics or high voltage and facilitates the use of infrared data analysis techniques on complex submillimeter spectra

  5. Time-frequency Representations Application in Psychological Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REIZ Romulus

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A psychological test is a test that is designed to measure one aspect of human behavior. These tests are usually designed to evaluate a person’s ability to complete tasks that were individual's performance on certain tasks that have usually been requested in advance. Usually a test score is used to compare with other results to measure the individual’s performance regarding cognitive ability, aptitude, personality, etc. One such test is the so called “finger tapping” test, designed to measure the integrity of the neuromuscular system and examine motor control. There are several ways to perform such a test. The purpose of this paper isn’t to study the finger tapping test which is well documented in the literature, but to develop if possible a simple way of performing such a test. Using the method presented in the paper a nonstationary signal was obtained and it was analyzed using the Short-time Fourier time frequency representation to obtain the signals frequency and its variation in time. The results presented in the paper show that this method can be used to perform the test and the frequency and spatial amplitude of the obtained tapping signal can be determined easily.

  6. Frequency up-shift in the stimulated thermal scattering under two-photon absorption in liquids and colloids of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanin, I. V.; Erokhin, A. I.; Baranov, A. N.

    2018-07-01

    We report the results of the experimental and theoretical study of stimulated temperature scattering in toluene and hexane solutions of Ag-nanoparticles, as well as in pure toluene in the two-photon absorption regime. A four-wave mixing scheme with two counter-propagating pump waves of the same frequency is utilised to demonstrate the lasing effect and the amplification of the backscattered anti-Stokes signal. For the first time, we have measured anti-Stokes spectral shifts which turn out to appreciably exceed the Rayleigh line widths in those liquids. It is shown that the amplification effect is provided predominantly by thermally induced coherent polarisation oscillations, while the dynamic interference temperature grating causes the formation of a self-induced optical cavity inside the interaction region.

  7. Photonic Integrated Circuit (PIC) Device Structures: Background, Fabrication Ecosystem, Relevance to Space Systems Applications, and Discussion of Related Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Electronic integrated circuits are considered one of the most significant technological advances of the 20th century, with demonstrated impact in their ability to incorporate successively higher numbers transistors and construct electronic devices onto a single CMOS chip. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) exist as the optical analog to integrated circuits; however, in place of transistors, PICs consist of numerous scaled optical components, including such "building-block" structures as waveguides, MMIs, lasers, and optical ring resonators. The ability to construct electronic and photonic components on a single microsystems platform offers transformative potential for the development of technologies in fields including communications, biomedical device development, autonomous navigation, and chemical and atmospheric sensing. Developing on-chip systems that provide new avenues for integration and replacement of bulk optical and electro-optic components also reduces size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) limitations, which are important in the selection of instrumentation for specific flight projects. The number of applications currently emerging for complex photonics systems-particularly in data communications-warrants additional investigations when considering reliability for space systems development. This Body of Knowledge document seeks to provide an overview of existing integrated photonics architectures; the current state of design, development, and fabrication ecosystems in the United States and Europe; and potential space applications, with emphasis given to associated radiation effects and reliability.

  8. Effect of irrigation frequency and application levels of sulphur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... both years of experimentation, application of two irrigations significantly increased the India ... marginal lands with poor fertility under rainfed conditions. ... and 40 kg K20 ha-1 as muriate of potash was applied to each plot.

  9. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  10. Generation of broad-group neutron/photon cross-section libraries for shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Roussin, R.W.; Fu, C.Y.; White, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The generation and use of multigroup cross-section libraries with broad energy group structures is primarily for the economy of computer resources. Also, the establishment of reference broad-group libraries is desirable in order to avoid duplication of effort, both in terms of the data generation and verification, and to assure a common data base for all participants in a specific project. Uncertainties are inevitably introduced into the broad-group cross sections due to approximations in the grouping procedure. The dominant uncertainty is generally with regard to the energy weighting function used to average the pointwise or fine-group data within a single broad group. Intelligent choice of the weighting functions can reduce such uncertainties. Also, judicious selection of the energy group structure can help to reduce the sensitivity of the computed responses to the weighting function, at least for a selected set of problems. Two new multigroup cross section libraries have been recently generated from ENDF/B-V data for two specific shielding applications. The first library was prepared for use in sodium-cooled reactor systems and is available in both broad-group structures. The second library, just recently completed, was prepared for use in air-over-ground environments and is available in a broad-group (46-neutron, 23-photon) energy structure. The selection of the specific group structures and weighting functions was an important part of the generation of both libraries

  11. Photonic crystals: emerging biosensors and their promise for point-of-care applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Hakan; Poyraz, Muhammet; Inci, Fatih; Lifson, Mark A; Baday, Murat; Cunningham, Brian T; Demirci, Utkan

    2017-01-23

    Biosensors are extensively employed for diagnosing a broad array of diseases and disorders in clinical settings worldwide. The implementation of biosensors at the point-of-care (POC), such as at primary clinics or the bedside, faces impediments because they may require highly trained personnel, have long assay times, large sizes, and high instrumental cost. Thus, there exists a need to develop inexpensive, reliable, user-friendly, and compact biosensing systems at the POC. Biosensors incorporated with photonic crystal (PC) structures hold promise to address many of the aforementioned challenges facing the development of new POC diagnostics. Currently, PC-based biosensors have been employed for detecting a variety of biotargets, such as cells, pathogens, proteins, antibodies, and nucleic acids, with high efficiency and selectivity. In this review, we provide a broad overview of PCs by explaining their structures, fabrication techniques, and sensing principles. Furthermore, we discuss recent applications of PC-based biosensors incorporated with emerging technologies, including telemedicine, flexible and wearable sensing, smart materials and metamaterials. Finally, we discuss current challenges associated with existing biosensors, and provide an outlook for PC-based biosensors and their promise at the POC.

  12. Spectroscopic investigations on Pr3+ ions doped lead telluro-borate glasses for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthanthirakumar, P.; Mariyappan, M.; Marimuthu, K.

    2018-04-01

    A new series of Lead telluro-borate glasses doped with different concentrations of Pr3+ ions (xPLTB) were prepared by melt quenching technique and their structural and spectroscopic properties were investigated by recording XRD, FTIR, optical absorption and luminescence spectral measurements. XRD measurements confirm the amorphous nature and the FTIR spectra reveal the presence of different vibrational modes of borate and tellurite networks in the prepared glasses. The bonding parameter values (δ) obtained from the absorption band positions indicates that the bonding between Pr3+ ions and their surrounding ligands is of ionic in nature. The optical band gap (Eopt) corresponding to the direct and indirect allowed transitions were determined with the framework of tauc's plot. From the luminescence spectra, important radiative parameters such as stimulated emission cross-section (σPE) , branching ratios (βR) and radiative lifetime (τR) were calculated for the dominant emission transition 3P0→3H4 (blue) in order to suggest the suitability of the studied glasses for suitable photonic applications.

  13. The physics of photons and neutrons with applications of deuterium labeling methods to polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wignall, G.D.

    1986-12-01

    Over the past decade small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), has found numerous applications in the fields of biology, polymer science, physical chemistry, materials science, metallurgy, colloids, and solid state physics. A number of excellent references are available which contain basic neutron scattering theory though these text books reflect the origins of the technique and the examples are largely drawn from physics e.g., single crystals, simple liquids, monatomic gases, liquid metals, magnetic materials, etc. in view of the large numbers of nonspecialists who are increasingly using neutron scattering, the need has become apparent for presentations which can provide rapid access to the method without unnecessary detail and mathematical rigor. This article is meant to serve as a general introduction to the symposium ''Scattering Deformation and Fracture in Polymers,'' and is intended to aid potential users who have a general scientific background, but no specialist knowledge of scattering, to apply the technique to provide new information in areas of their own particular interests. In view of space limitations, the general theory will be given in the case for neutron scattering and analogies and differences with photon scattering (x-rays) will be pointed out at the appropriate point. 90 refs., 6 figs

  14. The practical application of scintillation dosimetry in small-field photon-beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Elisa; Poppinga, Daniela; Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Poppe, Bjoern; Looe, Hui Khee [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Univ. Clinic for Medical Radiation Physics; Harder, Dietrich [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Medical Physics and Biophysics

    2017-07-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors are a new instrument of stereotactic photon-beam dosimetry. The clinical application of the plastic scintillation detector Exradin W1 at the Siemens Artiste and Elekta Synergy accelerators is a matter of current interest. In order to reduce the measurement uncertainty, precautions have to be taken with regard to the geometrical arrangement of the scintillator, the light-guide fiber and the photodiode in the radiation field. To determine the ''Cerenkov light ratio'' CLR with a type A uncertainty below 1%, the Cerenkov calibration procedure for small-field measurements based on the two-channel spectral method was used. Output factors were correctly measured with the W1 for field sizes down to 0.5 x 0.5 cm{sup 2} with a type A uncertainty of 1.8%. Measurements of small field dose profiles and percentage depth dose curves were carried out with the W1 using automated water phantom profile scans, and a type A uncertainty for dose maxima of 1.4% was achieved. The agreement with a synthetic diamond detector (microDiamond, PTW Freiburg) and a plane parallel ionization chamber (Roos chamber, PTW Freiburg) in relative dose measurements was excellent. In oversight of all results, the suitability of the plastic scintillation detector Exradin W1 for clinical dosimetry under stereotactic conditions, in particular the tried and tested procedures for CLR determination, output factor measurement and automated dose profile scans in water phantoms, have been confirmed.

  15. Proton beam writing of long, arbitrary structures for micro/nano photonics and fluidics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udalagama, Chammika; Teo, E.J.; Chan, S.F.; Kumar, V.S.; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade has seen proton beam writing maturing into a versatile lithographic technique able to produce sub-100 nm, high aspect ratio structures with smooth side walls. However, many applications in the fields of photonics and fluidics require the fabrication of structures with high spatial resolution that extends over several centimetres. This cannot be achieved by purely magnetic or electrostatic beam scanning due to the large off-axis beam aberrations in high demagnification systems. As a result, this has limited us to producing long straight structures using a combination of beam and stage scanning. In this work we have: (1) developed an algorithm to include any arbitrary pattern into the writing process by using a more versatile combination of beam and stage scanning while (2) incorporating the use of the ubiquitous AutoCAD DXF (drawing exchange format) into the design process. We demonstrate the capability of this approach in fabricating structures such as Y-splitters, Mach-Zehnder modulators and microfluidic channels that are over several centimetres in length, in polymer. We also present optimisation of such parameters as scanning speed and scanning loops to improve on the surface roughness of the structures. This work opens up new possibilities of using CAD software in PBW for microphotonics and fluidics device fabrication.

  16. Proton beam writing of long, arbitrary structures for micro/nano photonics and fluidics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udalagama, Chammika; Teo, E. J.; Chan, S. F.; Kumar, V. S.; Bettiol, A. A.; Watt, F.

    2011-10-01

    The last decade has seen proton beam writing maturing into a versatile lithographic technique able to produce sub-100 nm, high aspect ratio structures with smooth side walls. However, many applications in the fields of photonics and fluidics require the fabrication of structures with high spatial resolution that extends over several centimetres. This cannot be achieved by purely magnetic or electrostatic beam scanning due to the large off-axis beam aberrations in high demagnification systems. As a result, this has limited us to producing long straight structures using a combination of beam and stage scanning. In this work we have: (1) developed an algorithm to include any arbitrary pattern into the writing process by using a more versatile combination of beam and stage scanning while (2) incorporating the use of the ubiquitous AutoCAD DXF (drawing exchange format) into the design process. We demonstrate the capability of this approach in fabricating structures such as Y-splitters, Mach-Zehnder modulators and microfluidic channels that are over several centimetres in length, in polymer. We also present optimisation of such parameters as scanning speed and scanning loops to improve on the surface roughness of the structures. This work opens up new possibilities of using CAD software in PBW for microphotonics and fluidics device fabrication.

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of a MOSFET detector for clinical application in photon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hirano, Eriko; Nishio, Teiji; Miyagishi, Tomoko; Goka, Tomonori; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of a metal oxide-silicon semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector are studied with megavoltage photon beams for patient dose verification. The major advantages of this detector are its size, which makes it a point dosimeter, and its ease of use. In order to use the MOSFET detector for dose verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and in-vivo dosimetry for radiation therapy, we need to evaluate the dosimetric properties of the MOSFET detector. Therefore, we investigated the reproducibility, dose-rate effect, accumulated-dose effect, angular dependence, and accuracy in tissue-maximum ratio measurements. Then, as it takes about 20 min in actual IMRT for the patient, we evaluated fading effect of MOSFET response. When the MOSFETs were read-out 20 min after irradiation, we observed a fading effect of 0.9% with 0.9% standard error of the mean. Further, we applied the MOSFET to the measurement of small field total scatter factor. The MOSFET for dose measurements of small field sizes was better than the reference pinpoint chamber with vertical direction. In conclusion, we assessed the accuracy, reliability, and usefulness of the MOSFET detector in clinical applications such as pinpoint absolute dosimetry for small fields.

  18. Proton beam writing of long, arbitrary structures for micro/nano photonics and fluidics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udalagama, Chammika, E-mail: chammika@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Teo, E.J. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Chan, S.F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); NUS Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, NUS, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Kumar, V.S.; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2011-10-15

    The last decade has seen proton beam writing maturing into a versatile lithographic technique able to produce sub-100 nm, high aspect ratio structures with smooth side walls. However, many applications in the fields of photonics and fluidics require the fabrication of structures with high spatial resolution that extends over several centimetres. This cannot be achieved by purely magnetic or electrostatic beam scanning due to the large off-axis beam aberrations in high demagnification systems. As a result, this has limited us to producing long straight structures using a combination of beam and stage scanning. In this work we have: (1) developed an algorithm to include any arbitrary pattern into the writing process by using a more versatile combination of beam and stage scanning while (2) incorporating the use of the ubiquitous AutoCAD DXF (drawing exchange format) into the design process. We demonstrate the capability of this approach in fabricating structures such as Y-splitters, Mach-Zehnder modulators and microfluidic channels that are over several centimetres in length, in polymer. We also present optimisation of such parameters as scanning speed and scanning loops to improve on the surface roughness of the structures. This work opens up new possibilities of using CAD software in PBW for microphotonics and fluidics device fabrication.

  19. High index glass thin film processing for photonics and photovoltaic (PV) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuu, Okechukwu Anthony

    To favorably compete with fossil-fuel technology, the greatest challenge for thin film solar-cells is to improve efficiency and reduce material cost. Thickness scaling to thin film reduces material cost but affects the light absorption in the cells; therefore a concept that traps incident photons and increases its optical path length is needed to boost absorption in thin film solar cells. One approach is the integration of low symmetric gratings (LSG), using high index material, on either the front-side or backside of 30 um thin c-Si cells. In this study, Multicomponent TeO2--Bi2O 3--ZnO (TBZ) glass thin films were prepared using RF magnetron sputtering under different oxygen flow rates. The influences of oxygen flow rate on the structural and optical properties of the resulting thin films were investigated. The structural origin of the optical property variation was studied using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that TBZ glass thin film is a suitable material for front side LSG material photovoltaic and photonics applications due to their amorphous nature, high refractive index (n > 2), broad band optical transparency window, low processing temperature. We developed a simple maskless method to pattern sputtered tellurite based glass thin films using unconventional agarose hydrogel mediated wet etching. Conventional wet etching process, while claiming low cost and high throughput, suffers from reproducibility and pattern fidelity issues due to the isotropic nature of wet chemical etching when applied to glasses and polymers. This method overcomes these challenges by using an agarose hydrogel stamp to mediate a conformal etching process. In our maskless method, agarose hydrogel stamps are patterned following a standard soft lithography and replica molding process from micropatterned masters and soaked in a chemical etchant. The micro-scale features on the stamp are

  20. The Application of Time-Frequency Methods to HUMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Anna H.; Mosher, Marianne; Lewicki, David G.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the study of four time-frequency transforms applied to vibration signals and presents a new metric for comparing them for fault detection. The four methods to be described and compared are the Short Time Frequency Transform (STFT), the Choi-Williams Distribution (WV-CW), the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Vibration data of bevel gear tooth fatigue cracks, under a variety of operating load levels, are analyzed using these methods. The new metric for automatic fault detection is developed and can be produced from any systematic numerical representation of the vibration signals. This new metric reveals indications of gear damage with all of the methods on this data set. Analysis with the CWT detects mechanical problems with the test rig not found with the other transforms. The WV-CW and CWT use considerably more resources than the STFT and the DWT. More testing of the new metric is needed to determine its value for automatic fault detection and to develop methods of setting the threshold for the metric.

  1. High-frequency behavior of amorphous microwires and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, P.; Cortina, D.; Hernando, A.

    2005-01-01

    A magnetic microwire is a continuous filament of total diameter less than 100 μm consisting of an inner metallic magnetic nuclei covered by a glassy outer shell, usually obtained by Taylor's technique, with interesting magnetic properties connected with its high axial magnetic anisotropy. Magnetic sensors based on microwires used, as operating principle, the strong connection between the composition and the uniaxial anisotropy through a magnetostriction constant such as the large Barkhausen effect, Mateucci effect and giant magneto-impedance effect. The study of the microwave properties is also very promising technologically. In the microwave region (approaching GHz range), the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs and it is connected with the spin precession of the magnetisation vector due to the effect of the high-frequency electromagnetic field applied such that the magnetic component is perpendicular to the magnetisation vector. The natural ferromagnetic resonance (NFMR) has been also observed. The frequency depends upon the value of magnetic anisotropy and it is characterised by the single well-distinguished line in the 2-10 GHz range. Tags detector based on the microwires FMR and a new kind of electromagnetic radiation absorbers based on the microwires NFMR have been developed

  2. Clinical applications of single photon emission tomography in neuromedicine. Part 1. Neuro-oncology, epilepsy, movement disorders, cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartenstein, P.; Gruenwald, F.; Kuwert, T.; Tatsch, K.; Sabri, O.; Benkert, O.; Fahlbusch, R.; Gruender, G.; Herzholz, K.; Weiller, C.

    2000-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography is, because of its availability and the relatively low costs, the functional imaging modality currently most widely used for clinical applications in the brain. Beside the application of radiopharmaceuticals for the assessment of regional cerebral blood flow there is an increasing clinical use of more selective SPECT-radiopharmaceuticals, like amino acid analogs or receptor ligands. This article gives in its first part a critical review of the clinical applications of SPECT in neuro-oncology, epilepsy, basal ganglia disorders and cerebrovascular disease. (orig.) [de

  3. Behavior of a hollow core photonic crystal fiber under high radial pressure for downhole application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, J., E-mail: j-sadeghi@sbu.ac.ir; Chenari, Z.; Ziaee, F. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Latifi, H., E-mail: latifi@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Santos, J. L., E-mail: josantos@fc.up.pt [INESC Porto—Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Física, da Faculdade de Ciências, da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2014-02-17

    Pressure fiber sensors play an important role in downhole high pressure measurements to withstand long term operation. The purpose of this paper is to present an application of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) as a high pressure sensor head for downhole application based on dispersion variation. We used a high pressure stainless steel unit to exert pressure on the sensor. The experimental results show that different wavelengths based on sagnac loop interferometer have additive sensitivities from 5 × 10{sup −5} nm/psi at 1480 nm to 1.3 × 10{sup −3} nm/psi at 1680 nm. We developed a simulation to understand the reason for difference in sensitivity of wavelengths and also the relationship between deformation of HC-PCF and dispersion variation under pressure. For this purpose, by using the finite element method, we investigated the effect of structural variation of HC-PCF on spectral transformation of two linear polarizations under 1000 psi pressure. The simulation and experimental results show exponential decay behavior of dispersion variation from −3.4 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.3 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi and from −5 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi to −1.8 × 10{sup −6} 1/psi, respectively, which were in a good accordance with each other.

  4. Thermal field theory in a layer: Applications of thermal field theory methods to the propagation of photons in a two-dimensional electron sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, Jose F.

    2010-01-01

    We apply the thermal field theory methods to study the propagation of photons in a plasma layer, that is a plasma in which the electrons are confined to a two-dimensional plane sheet. We calculate the photon self-energy and determine the appropriate expression for the photon propagator in such a medium, from which the properties of the propagating modes are obtained. The formulas for the photon dispersion relations and polarization vectors are derived explicitly in some detail for some simple cases of the thermal distributions of the charged particle gas, and appropriate formulas that are applicable in more general situations are also given.

  5. Surface modification of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals for photocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew Yee; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Santos, Abel

    2018-01-01

    Herein, we report on the development of a rationally designed composite photocatalyst material by combining nanoporous anodic alumina-rugate filters (NAA-RFs) with photo-active layers of titanium dioxide (TiO2). NAA-RFs are synthesised by sinusoidal pulse anodisation and subsequently functionalised with TiO2 by sol-gel method to provide the photonic structures with photocatalytic properties. We demonstrate that the characteristic photonic stopband (PSB) of the surface-modified NAA-RFs can be precisely tuned across the UV-visible-NIR spectrum to enhance the photon-toelectron conversion of TiO2 by `slow photon effect'. We systematically investigate the effect of the anodisation parameters (i.e. anodisation period and pore widening time) on the position of the PSB of NAA-RFs as well as the photocatalytic performances displayed by these photonic crystal structures. When the edges of the PSB of surfacemodified NAA-RFs are positioned closely to the absorption peak of the model organic dye (i.e. methyl orange - MO), the photocatalytic performance of the system to degrade these molecules is enhanced under simulated solar light irradiation due to slow photon effect. Our investigation also reveals that the photocatalytic activity of surface-modified NAA-RFs is independent of slow photon effect and enhances with increasing period length (i.e. increasing anodisation period) of the photonic structures when there is no overlap between the PSB and the absorption peak of MO. This study therefore provides a rationale towards the photocatalytic enhancement of photonic crystals by a rational design of the PSB, creating new opportunities for the future development of high-performance photocatalysts.

  6. Composable Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling and Power Management for Dataflow Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, Kees; She, Dongrui; Milutinovic, A.; Molnos, Anca; Lopez, S.

    2010-01-01

    Composability means that the behaviour of an application, including its timing, is not affected by the absence or presence of other applications. It is required to be able to design, test, and verify applications independently. In this paper we de﬿ne composable dynamic voltage and frequency scaling

  7. Composable dynamic voltage and frequency scaling and power management for dataflow applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, K.G.W.; She, D.; Milutinovic, A.; Molnos, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Composability means that the behaviour of an application, including its timing, is not affected by the absence or presence of other applications. It is required to be able to design, test, and verify applications independently. In this paper we define composable dynamic voltage and frequency scaling

  8. Design and application possibilities of superconducting radio-frequency quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schempp, A.; Deitinghoff, H.

    1990-01-01

    In recent experiments, cw surface electric fields in excess of 100 MV/m have been obtained in a superconducting rf quadrupole (SCRFQ) device. In this paper we explore some design and application possibilities of SCRFQs which have been opened by these results. For example, SCRFQs may be able to accelerate higher cw currents than is now possible. Also, highly-modulated SCRFQs could be designed to provide compact, high-longitudinal-gradient devices. Some conceptual designs and applications will be discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs

  9. Silicon Microspheres Photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpenguzel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Electrophotonic integrated circuits (EPICs), or alternatively, optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEICs) are the natural evolution of the microelectronic integrated circuit (IC) with the addition of photonic capabilities. Traditionally, the IC industry has been based on group IV silicon, whereas the photonics industry on group III-V semiconductors. However, silicon based photonic microdevices have been making strands in siliconizing photonics. Silicon microspheres with their high quality factor whispering gallery modes (WGMs), are ideal candidates for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) applications in the standard near-infrared communication bands. In this work, we will discuss the possibility of using silicon microspheres for photonics applications in the near-infrared

  10. Entangled, guided photon generation in (1+1)-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciscione, L.; Centini, M.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Scalora, M.

    2006-01-01

    A scheme based on photonic crystal technology is proposed as an ultrabright source of entangled photons on a miniaturized scale. The geometry consists of a multilayer microcavity, excited by a resonant pump frequency, such that the emitted photons are guided transversally to the direction of the incident pump. The entanglement occurs in direction, frequency, and polarization, and the bandwidth of the emitted photons is of the order of 1 nm. We propose a feasible design based on Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 As/Al 2 O 3 structures and predict an emission rate 10 5 pairs per second with 100 mW pump power. These results are promising for realization of chip and future quantum computer applications

  11. Excitation of photonic atoms (dielectric microspheres) on optical fibers: application to room-temperature persistent spectral hole burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Arnold, Stephen; Griffel, Giora

    1995-05-01

    Recently, photonic atoms (dielectric microspheres) have enjoyed the attention of the optical spectroscopy community. A variety of linear and nonlinear optical processes have been observed in liquid microdroplets. But solid state photonic devices using these properties are scarce. A first of these applications is the room temperature microparticle hole-burning memory. New applications can be envisioned if microparticle resonances can be coupled to traveling waves in optical fibers. In this paper we demonstrate the excitation of narrow morphology dependent resonances of microparticles placed on an optical fiber. Furthermore we reveal a model for this process which describes the coupling efficiency in terms of the geometrical and material properties of the microparticle-fiber system.

  12. Graphene-based photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Boyko, Vladimir S.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Kolesnikov, Anton A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of photonic crystal formed by embedding a periodic array of constituent stacks of alternating graphene and dielectric discs into a background dielectric medium is proposed. The photonic band structure and transmittance of such photonic crystal are calculated. The graphene-based photonic crystals can be used effectively as the frequency filters and waveguides for the far infrared region of electromagnetic spectrum. Due to substantial suppression of absorption of low-frequency radiation in doped graphene the damping and skin effect in the photonic crystal are also suppressed. The advantages of the graphene-based photonic crystal are discussed.

  13. Performance demonstration of a single-frequency optically-pumped cesium beam frequency standard for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, S.; Haldimann, M.; Ruffieux, R.; Thomann, P.; Berthoud, P.

    2017-11-01

    Observatoire de Neuchâtel (ON) is developing a compact optically-pumped cesium beam frequency standard in the frame of an ESA-ARTES 5 project. The simplest optical scheme, which is based on a single optical frequency for both preparation and detection processes of atoms, has been chosen to fulfill reliability constraints of space applications. With our laboratory demonstrator operated at 852 nm (D2 line), we have measured a frequency stability of σy=2.74x10-12 τ -1/2, which is compliant with the Galileo requirement. The atomic resonator is fully compliant to be operated with a single diode laser at 894 nm (D1 line). Sensitivity measurements of the clock signal to the microwave power and to the optical pumping power are also presented. Present performance limitations are discussed and further improvements are proposed in order to reach our ultimate frequency stability goal of σy=1x10-12 τ -1/2. The clock driving software is also briefly described.

  14. Ultralow frequency bridge for dielectric measurements: applications to electrects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaets, J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of U.L.F. (Ultra Low Frequency) dielectric relaxation is investigated. An experimental model is proposed for a bridge covering the range of 10 -3 Hz-10Hz, pased on phase shift measurements originally proposed by Van Turhout and collaborators. The main experimental problems are also analyzed with such U.L.F. measurements and describe its construction and performance. The theoretical correlation between U.L.F. dielectric relaxation and electret thermal stimulated currents is also investigated. A correction for the integral expression given by Turnhout and collaborators, is calculated in particular that takes into account the value of the activation energy in the relation between the two techniques.The correction is important for values of the activation energy below 0,5eV, which occur frequently in dielectric relaxation processes. (Author) [pt

  15. Flexible metamaterial absorbers for stealth applications at terahertz frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Strikwerda, Andrew C; Fan, Kebin; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2012-01-02

    We have wrapped metallic cylinders with strongly absorbing metamaterials. These resonant structures, which are patterned on flexible substrates, smoothly coat the cylinder and give it an electromagnetic response designed to minimize its radar cross section. We compare the normal-incidence, small-beam reflection coefficient with the measurement of the far-field bistatic radar cross section of the sample, using a quasi-planar THz wave with a beam diameter significantly larger than the sample dimensions. In this geometry we demonstrate a near-400-fold reduction of the radar cross section at the design frequency of 0.87 THz. In addition we discuss the effect of finite sample dimensions and the spatial dependence of the reflection spectrum of the metamaterial.

  16. Towards THz integrated photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The demonstration of an integrated terahertz transceiver featuring a quantum cascade laser and a Schottky diode mixer promises new applications for compact and convenient terahertz photonic instrumentation.

  17. Monolithic photonic integration for visible and short near-infrared wavelengths: technologies and platforms for bio and life science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Marco A. G.; Artundo, Iñigo; Domenech, J. David; Geuzebroek, Douwe; Sunarto, Rino; Hoofman, Romano

    2018-04-01

    This tutorial aims to provide a general overview on the state-of-the-art of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) in the visible and short near-infrared (NIR) wavelength ranges, mostly focusing in silicon nitride (SiN) substrates, and a guide to the necessary steps in the design toward the fabrication of such PICs. The focus is put on bio- and life sciences, given the adequacy and, thus, a large number of applications in this field.

  18. A compact two photon light sheet microscope for applications in neuroscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piksarv, Peeter; Marti, Dominik; Le, Tuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a compact setup for two photon light sheet microscopy. By using pulsed Airy beam illumination we demonstrate eight-fold increase of the FOV compared to Gaussian light sheet with the same axial resolution....

  19. Development of wide-band, time and energy resolving, optical photon detectors with application to imaging astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.J.; Cabrera, B.; Romani, R.W.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Nam, S.W.; Clarke, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs) are showing promise for the wide-band spectroscopy of individual photons from the mid-infrared (IR), through the optical, and into the near ultraviolet (UV). Our TES sensors are ∼20 μm square, 40 nm thick tungsten (W) films with a transition temperature of about 80 mK. We typically attain an energy resolution of 0.15 eV FWHM over the optical range with relative timing resolution of 100 ns. Single photon events with sub-microsecond risetimes and few microsecond falltimes have been achieved allowing count rates in excess of 30 kHz per pixel. Additionally, tungsten is approximately 50% absorptive in the optical (dropping to 10% in the IR) giving these devices an intrinsically high quantum efficiency. These combined traits make our detectors attractive for fast spectrophotometers and photon-starved applications such as wide-band, time and energy resolved astronomical observations. We present recent results from our work toward the fabrication and testing of the first TES optical photon imaging arrays

  20. Nonlinear optical and multiphoton processes for in situ manipulation and conversion of photons: applications to energy and healthcare (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Paras N.

    2017-02-01

    Chiral control of nonlinear optical functions holds a great promise for a wide range of applications including optical signal processing, bio-sensing and chiral bio-imaging. In chiral polyfluorene thin films, we demonstrated extremely large chiral nonlinearity. The physics of manipulating excitation dynamics for photon transformation will be discussed, along with nanochemistry control of upconversion in hierarchically built organic chromophore coupled-core-multiple shell nanostructures which enable introduce new, organic-inorganic energy transfer routes for broadband light harvesting and increased upconversion efficiency via multistep cascaded energy transfer. We are pursuing the applications of photon conversion technology in IR harvesting for photovoltaics, high contrast bioimaging, photoacoustic imaging, photodynamic therapy, and optogenetics. An important application is in Brain research and Neurophotonics for functional mapping and modulation of brain activities. Another new direction pursued is magnetic field control of light in in a chiral polymer nanocomposite to achieve large magneto-optic coefficient which can enable sensing of extremely weak magnetic field due to brain waves. Finally, we will consider the thought provoking concept of utilizing photons to quantify, through magneto-optics, and augment - through nanoptogenetics, the cognitive states, thus paving the path way to a quantified human paradigm.

  1. Liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals for lab-on-a-chip applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Pedersen, Jesper; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we theoretically discuss how a strongly dispersive photonic crystals environment may be used to enhance the light-matter interactions, thus potentially compensating for the reduced optical path in typical lab-on- a-chip systems. Combining electromagnetic perturbation theory with ful......-wave electromagnetic simulations we address the prospects for slow-light enhancement of Beer-Lambert absorption and photonic band-gap based refractometry....

  2. Experimental quantum teleportation and multiphoton entanglement via interfering narrowband photon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jian; Zhang Han; Peng Chengzhi; Chen Zengbing; Bao Xiaohui; Chen Shuai; Pan Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a realization of synchronization-free quantum teleportation and narrowband three-photon entanglement through interfering narrowband photon sources. Since both the single-photon and the entangled photon pair utilized are completely autonomous, it removes the requirement of high-demanding synchronization techniques in long-distance quantum communication with pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversion sources. The frequency linewidth of the three-photon entanglement realized is on the order of several MHz, which matches the requirement of atomic ensemble based quantum memories. Such a narrowband multiphoton source will have applications in some advanced quantum communication protocols and linear optical quantum computation.

  3. Hyperuniform Disordered photonic bandgap materials, from 2D to 3D, and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Sahba, Shervin; Sellers, Steven

    Recently, hyperuniform disordered systems attracted increasing attention due to their unique physical properties and the potential possibilities of self-assembling them. We had introduced a class of 2D hyperuniform disordered (HUD) photonic bandgap (PBG) materials enabled by a novel constrained optimization method for engineering the material's isotropic photonic bandgap. The intrinsic isotropy in these disordered structures is an inherent advantage associated with the lack of crystalline order, offering unprecedented freedom for functional defect design impossible to achieve in photonic crystals. Beyond our previous experimental work using macroscopic samples with microwave radiation, we demonstrated functional devices based on submicron-scale planar hyperuniform disordered PBG structures further highlight their ability to serve as highly compact, flexible and energy-efficient platforms for photonic integrated circuits. We further extended the design, fabrication, and characterization of the disordered photonic system into 3D. We also identify local self-uniformity as a novel measure of a disordered network's internal structural similarity, which we found crucial for photonic band gap formation. National Science Foundations award DMR-1308084.

  4. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e#betta# scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by #betta##betta# collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F 2 /sup #betta#/(x,Q 2 ) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved

  5. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haissinski, J.

    1986-06-01

    The discussions presented in this paper deal with the following points: distinctive features of gamma-gamma collisions; related processes; photon-photon elastic scattering in the continuum and γγ →gg; total cross section; γγ → V 1 V 2 (V=vector meson); radiative width measurements and light meson spectroscopy; exclusive channels at large /t/; jets and inclusive particle distribution in γγ collisions; and, the photon structure function F γ 2

  6. MODELLING AND SIMULATION OF HIGH FREQUENCY INVERTER FOR INDUCTION HEATING APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    SACHIN S. BANKAR; Dr. PRASAD M. JOSHI

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents modelling and simulation of high frequency inverter for induction heating applications. Induction heating has advantages like higher efficiency, controlled heating, safety and pollution free therefore this technology is used in industrial, domestic and medical applications. The high frequency full bridge inverter is used for induction heating, also MOSFET is used as a switching device for inverter and the control strategy used for inverter is Bipolar PWM control. The size ...

  7. Photonics-based microwave frequency measurement using a double-sideband suppressed-carrier modulation and an InP integrated ring-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandiño, Javier S; Muñoz, Pascual

    2013-11-01

    A photonic system capable of estimating the unknown frequency of a CW microwave tone is presented. The core of the system is a complementary optical filter monolithically integrated in InP, consisting of a ring-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a second-order elliptic response. By simultaneously measuring the different optical powers produced by a double-sideband suppressed-carrier modulation at the outputs of the photonic integrated circuit, an amplitude comparison function that depends on the input tone frequency is obtained. Using this technique, a frequency measurement range of 10 GHz (5-15 GHz) with a root mean square value of frequency error lower than 200 MHz is experimentally demonstrated. Moreover, simulations showing the impact of a residual optical carrier on system performance are also provided.

  8. Photon-photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R ampersand D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy

  9. Low temperature high frequency coaxial pulse tube for space application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Aurelia; Charles, Ivan; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean-Marc [SBT, UMR-E CEA / UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, Grenoble, F-38054 (France); Daniel, Christophe [CNES, 18, avenue Edouard Belin, Toulouse, F-31401 (France)

    2014-01-29

    The 4K stage is a critical step for space missions. The Hershel mission is using a helium bath, which is consumed day by day (after depletion, the space mission is over) while the Plank mission is equipped with one He4 Joule-Thomson cooler. Cryogenic chain without helium bath is a challenge for space missions and 4.2K Pulse-Tube working at high frequency (around 30Hz) is one option to take it up. A low temperature Pulse-Tube would be suitable for the ESA space mission EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, expected launch in 2022), which requires around 30mW cooling power at 6K; and for the ESA space mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics), to pre-cool the sub-kelvin cooler (few hundreds of mW at 15K). The test bench described in this paper combines a Gifford-McMahon with a coaxial Pulse-Tube. A thermal link is joining the intercept of the Pulse-Tube and the second stage of the Gifford-McMahon. This intercept is a separator between the hot and the cold regenerators of the Pulse-Tube. The work has been focused on the cold part of this cold finger. Coupled with an active phase shifter, this Pulse-Tube has been tested and optimized and temperatures as low as 6K have been obtained at 30Hz with an intercept temperature at 20K.

  10. Integrated Microwave Photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Marpaung, David; Roeloffzen, Chris; Heideman, René; Leinse, Arne; Sales Maicas, Salvador; Capmany Francoy, José

    2013-01-01

    Microwave photonics (MWP) is an emerging field in which radio frequency (RF) signals are generated, distributed, processed and analyzed using the strength of photonic techniques. It is a technology that enables various functionalities which are not feasible to achieve only in the microwave domain. A particular aspect that recently gains significant interests is the use of photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology in the MWP field for enhanced functionalities and robustness as well as the r...

  11. Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography-basic principles and cardiac applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grant T; Reutter, Bryan W; Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F; Sitek, Arkadiusz

    2010-01-01

    The very nature of nuclear medicine, the visual representation of injected radiopharmaceuticals, implies imaging of dynamic processes such as the uptake and wash-out of radiotracers from body organs. For years, nuclear medicine has been touted as the modality of choice for evaluating function in health and disease. This evaluation is greatly enhanced using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which permits three-dimensional (3D) visualization of tracer distributions in the body. However, to fully realize the potential of the technique requires the imaging of in vivo dynamic processes of flow and metabolism. Tissue motion and deformation must also be addressed. Absolute quantification of these dynamic processes in the body has the potential to improve diagnosis. This paper presents a review of advancements toward the realization of the potential of dynamic SPECT imaging and a brief history of the development of the instrumentation. A major portion of the paper is devoted to the review of special data processing methods that have been developed for extracting kinetics from dynamic cardiac SPECT data acquired using rotating detector heads that move as radiopharmaceuticals exchange between biological compartments. Recent developments in multi-resolution spatiotemporal methods enable one to estimate kinetic parameters of compartment models of dynamic processes using data acquired from a single camera head with slow gantry rotation. The estimation of kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements improves bias and variance over the conventional method of first reconstructing 3D dynamic images, generating time-activity curves from selected regions of interest and then estimating the kinetic parameters from the generated time-activity curves. Although the potential applications of SPECT for imaging dynamic processes have not been fully realized in the clinic, it is hoped that this review illuminates the potential of SPECT for dynamic imaging

  12. Porous shaped photonic crystal fiber with strong confinement field in sensing applications: Design and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawrab Chowdhury

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, porous core porous cladding photonic crystal fiber (P-PCF has been proposed for aqueous analytes sensing applications. Guiding properties of the proposed P-PCF has been numerically investigated by utilizing the full vectorial finite element method (FEM. The relative sensitivity and confinement loss are obtained by varying distinct geometrical parameters like the diameter of air holes, a pitch of the core and cladding region over a wider range of wavelength. The proposed P-PCF is organized with five rings air hole in the cladding and two rings air hole in a core territory which maximizes the relative sensitivity expressively and minimizes confinement loss depressively compare with the prior-PCF structures. After completing all investigations, it is also visualized that the relative sensitivity is increasing with the increment of the wavelength of communication band (O + E + S + C + L + U. Higher sensitivity is gained by using higher band for all applied liquids. Finally the investigating effects of different structural parameters of the proposed P-PCF are optimized which shows the sensitivity of 60.57%, 61.45% and 61.82%; the confinement loss of 8.71 × 10−08 dB/m, 1.41 × 10−10 dB/m and 6.51 × 10−10 dB/m for Water (n = 1.33, Ethanol (n = 1.354 and Benzene (n = 1.366 respectively at 1.33 μm wavelength. The optimized P-PCF with higher sensitivity and lower confinement loss has high impact in the area of the chemical as well as gas sensing purposes. Keywords: Porous shaped PCF, Sensitivity, Optical sensing, Liquid sensor, Confinement loss

  13. Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography-basic principles and cardiac applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Grant T; Reutter, Bryan W; Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F [E O Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sitek, Arkadiusz, E-mail: gtgullberg@lbl.go [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-10-21

    The very nature of nuclear medicine, the visual representation of injected radiopharmaceuticals, implies imaging of dynamic processes such as the uptake and wash-out of radiotracers from body organs. For years, nuclear medicine has been touted as the modality of choice for evaluating function in health and disease. This evaluation is greatly enhanced using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which permits three-dimensional (3D) visualization of tracer distributions in the body. However, to fully realize the potential of the technique requires the imaging of in vivo dynamic processes of flow and metabolism. Tissue motion and deformation must also be addressed. Absolute quantification of these dynamic processes in the body has the potential to improve diagnosis. This paper presents a review of advancements toward the realization of the potential of dynamic SPECT imaging and a brief history of the development of the instrumentation. A major portion of the paper is devoted to the review of special data processing methods that have been developed for extracting kinetics from dynamic cardiac SPECT data acquired using rotating detector heads that move as radiopharmaceuticals exchange between biological compartments. Recent developments in multi-resolution spatiotemporal methods enable one to estimate kinetic parameters of compartment models of dynamic processes using data acquired from a single camera head with slow gantry rotation. The estimation of kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements improves bias and variance over the conventional method of first reconstructing 3D dynamic images, generating time-activity curves from selected regions of interest and then estimating the kinetic parameters from the generated time-activity curves. Although the potential applications of SPECT for imaging dynamic processes have not been fully realized in the clinic, it is hoped that this review illuminates the potential of SPECT for dynamic imaging

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography—basic principles and cardiac applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2010-10-01

    The very nature of nuclear medicine, the visual representation of injected radiopharmaceuticals, implies imaging of dynamic processes such as the uptake and wash-out of radiotracers from body organs. For years, nuclear medicine has been touted as the modality of choice for evaluating function in health and disease. This evaluation is greatly enhanced using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which permits three-dimensional (3D) visualization of tracer distributions in the body. However, to fully realize the potential of the technique requires the imaging of in vivo dynamic processes of flow and metabolism. Tissue motion and deformation must also be addressed. Absolute quantification of these dynamic processes in the body has the potential to improve diagnosis. This paper presents a review of advancements toward the realization of the potential of dynamic SPECT imaging and a brief history of the development of the instrumentation. A major portion of the paper is devoted to the review of special data processing methods that have been developed for extracting kinetics from dynamic cardiac SPECT data acquired using rotating detector heads that move as radiopharmaceuticals exchange between biological compartments. Recent developments in multi-resolution spatiotemporal methods enable one to estimate kinetic parameters of compartment models of dynamic processes using data acquired from a single camera head with slow gantry rotation. The estimation of kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements improves bias and variance over the conventional method of first reconstructing 3D dynamic images, generating time-activity curves from selected regions of interest and then estimating the kinetic parameters from the generated time-activity curves. Although the potential applications of SPECT for imaging dynamic processes have not been fully realized in the clinic, it is hoped that this review illuminates the potential of SPECT for dynamic imaging

  15. System Control Applications of Low-Power Radio Frequency Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Roger

    2017-09-01

    This paper conceptualizes a low-power wireless sensor network design for application employment to reduce theft of portable computer devices used in educational institutions today. The aim of this study is to design and develop a reliable and robust wireless network that can eradicate accessibility of a device’s human interface. An embedded system supplied by an energy harvesting source, installed on the portable computer device, may represent one of multiple slave nodes which request regular updates from a standalone master station. A portable computer device which is operated in an undesignated area or in a field perimeter where master to slave communication is restricted, indicating a possible theft scenario, will initiate a shutdown of its operating system and render the device unusable. Consequently, an algorithm in the device firmware may ensure the necessary steps are executed to track the device, irrespective whether the device is enabled. Design outcomes thus far indicate that a wireless network using low-power embedded hardware, is feasible for anti-theft applications. By incorporating one of the latest Bluetooth low-energy, ANT+, ZigBee or Thread wireless technologies, an anti-theft system may be implemented that has the potential to reduce major portable computer device theft in institutions of digitized learning.

  16. Frequency Analysis of Aircraft hazards for License Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Ashley

    2006-01-01

    The preclosure safety analysis for the monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain must consider the hazard that aircraft may pose to surface structures. Relevant surface structures are located beneath the restricted airspace of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the eastern slope of Yucca Mountain, near the North Portal of the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel (Figure 1). The North Portal is located several miles from the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), which is used extensively by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) for training and test flights (Figure 1). The NTS airspace, which is controlled by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for NTS activities, is not part of the NTTR. Agreements with the DOE allow USAF aircraft specific use of the airspace above the NTS (Reference 2.1.1 [DIRS 103472], Section 3.1.1 and Appendix A, Section 2.1; and Reference 2.1.2 [DIRS 157987], Sections 1.26 through 1.29). Commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft fly within several miles to the southwest of the repository site in the Beatty Corridor, which is a broad air corridor that runs approximately parallel to U.S. Highway 95 and the Nevada-California border (Figure 2). These aircraft and other aircraft operations are identified and described in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Sections 6 and 8). The purpose of this analysis is to estimate crash frequencies for aircraft hazards identified for detailed analysis in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Section 8). Reference 2.1.3, Section 8, also identifies a potential hazard associated with electronic jamming, which will be addressed in this analysis. This analysis will address only the repository and not the transportation routes to the site. The analysis is intended to provide the basis for: (1) Categorizing event sequences related to aircraft hazards; (2) Identifying design or operational requirements related to aircraft hazards

  17. Frequency notching applicable to CMOS implementation of WLAN compatible IR-UWB pulse generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Jiang, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Due to overlapping frequency bands, IEEE 802.11a WLAN and Ultra Wide-Band systems potentially suffer from mutual interference problems. This paper proposes a method for inserting frequency notches into the IR-UWB power spectrum to ensure compatibility with WLAN systems. In contrast to conventional...... approaches where complicated waveform equations are used, the proposed method uses a dual-pulse frequency notching approach to achieve frequency suppression in selected bands. The proposed method offers a solution that is generically applicable to UWB pulse generators using different pulse waveforms...

  18. Development, diagnostic and applications of radio-frequency plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puac, N.

    2008-07-01

    In many areas of the industry, plasma processing of materials is a vital technology. Nonequilibrium plasmas proved to be able to produce chemically reactive species at a low gas temperature while maintaining highly uniform reaction rates over relatively large areas (Makabe and Petrovic 2006). At the same time nonequilibrium plasmas provide means for good and precise control of the properties of active particles that determine the surface modification. Plasma needle is one of the atmospheric pressure sources that can be used for treatment of the living matter which is highly sensitive when it comes to low pressure or high temperatures (above 40 C). Dependent on plasma conditions, several refined cell responses are induced in mammalian cells (Sladek et al. 2005). It appears that plasma treatment may find many biomedical applications. However, there are few data in the literature about plasma effects on plant cells and tissues. So far, only the effect of low pressure plasmas on seeds was investigated. It was shown that short duration pretreatments by non equilibrium low temperature air plasma were stimulative in light induced germination of Paulownia tomentosa seeds (Puac et al. 2005). As membranes of plants have different properties to those of animals and as they show a wide range of properties we have tried to survey some of the effects of typical plasma which is envisaged to be used in biotechnological applications on plant cells. In this paper we will make a comparison between two configurations of plasma needle that we have used in treatment of biological samples (Puac et al. 2006). Difference between these two configurations is in the additional copper ring that we have placed around glass tube at the tip of the needle. We will show some of the electrical characteristics of the plasma needle (with and without additional copper ring) and, also, plasma emission intensity obtained by using fast ICCD camera.

  19. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  20. Frequency Analysis of Aircraft hazards for License Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ashley

    2006-10-24

    The preclosure safety analysis for the monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain must consider the hazard that aircraft may pose to surface structures. Relevant surface structures are located beneath the restricted airspace of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the eastern slope of Yucca Mountain, near the North Portal of the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel (Figure 1). The North Portal is located several miles from the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), which is used extensively by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) for training and test flights (Figure 1). The NTS airspace, which is controlled by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for NTS activities, is not part of the NTTR. Agreements with the DOE allow USAF aircraft specific use of the airspace above the NTS (Reference 2.1.1 [DIRS 103472], Section 3.1.1 and Appendix A, Section 2.1; and Reference 2.1.2 [DIRS 157987], Sections 1.26 through 1.29). Commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft fly within several miles to the southwest of the repository site in the Beatty Corridor, which is a broad air corridor that runs approximately parallel to U.S. Highway 95 and the Nevada-California border (Figure 2). These aircraft and other aircraft operations are identified and described in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Sections 6 and 8). The purpose of this analysis is to estimate crash frequencies for aircraft hazards identified for detailed analysis in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Section 8). Reference 2.1.3, Section 8, also identifies a potential hazard associated with electronic jamming, which will be addressed in this analysis. This analysis will address only the repository and not the transportation routes to the site. The analysis is intended to provide the basis for: (1) Categorizing event sequences related to aircraft hazards; (2) Identifying design or operational requirements related to aircraft hazards.

  1. Photorefractive lithium niobate crystals for applications in photonics; Photorefraktive Lithiumniobatkristalle fuer Anwendungen in der Photonik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, U.

    2006-12-15

    Lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO{sub 3}) generally show a photorefractive response, i.e., light-induced refractive index changes. Crystals are investigated at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. As a result 'classical' photorefractive holographic volume-phase gratings, originating from space charge fields and the electro-optic effect, and 'non-classical' photorefractive volume-phase gratings, which can be traced back to strong absorption gratings, emerge. Single domain and periodically poled crystals (PPLN) are investigated. PPLN is typically used in non-linear optics for frequency conversion. The crystals also show non-linear photorefractive response during holographic recording with isotropically polarized light beams of equal intensity and, in the case of PPLN, by mixing of domain and holographic gratings. The results are important for applications combining the photorefractive and non-linear optical properties of LiNbO{sub 3}. (orig.)

  2. Silicon Photonics Integrated Circuits for 5th Generation mm-Wave Wireless Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    Hybrid photonic-wireless transmission schemes in the mm-wave frequency are promising candidates to enable the multi-gigabit per second data communications required from wireless and mobile networks of the 5th and future generations. Photonic integration may pave the way to practical applicability...

  3. Integrated microwave photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marpaung, D.A.I.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Heideman, Rene; Leinse, Arne; Sales, S.; Capmany, J.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave photonics (MWP) is an emerging field in which radio frequency (RF) signals are generated, distributed, processed and analyzed using the strength of photonic techniques. It is a technology that enables various functionalities which are not feasible to achieve only in the microwave domain. A

  4. FENDL/E. Evaluated nuclear data library of neutron nuclear interaction cross-sections and photon production cross-sections and photon-atom interaction cross sections for fusion applications. Version 1.1 of November 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.; Wienke, H.; Ganesan, S.; McLaughlin, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    This document presents the description of a physical tape containing the basic evaluated nuclear data library of neutron nuclear interaction cross-sections and photon production cross-sections and photon-atom interaction cross-sections for fusion applications. It is part of FENDL, the evaluated nuclear data library for fusion applications. The nuclear data are available cost-free for distribution to interested scientists upon request. The data can also be retrieved by the user via online access through international computer networks. (author). 11 refs, 1 tab

  5. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.B., E-mail: prose6@gatech.edu; Erickson, A.S., E-mail: anna.erickson@me.gatech.edu

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in {sup 11}B(d,n-γ){sup 12}C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example {sup 232}Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  6. Photon-phonon interaction in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, T

    2010-01-01

    Photon-phonon interaction on the analogy of electron-phonon interaction is considered in one-dimensional photonic crystal. When lattice vibration is artificially introduced to the photonic crystal, a governing equation of electromagnetic field is derived. A simple model is numerically analysed and the following novel phenomena are found out. The lattice vibration generates the light of frequency which added the integral multiple of the vibration frequency to that of the incident wave and also amplifies the incident wave resonantly. On a resonance, the amplification factor increases very rapidly with the number of layers increases. Resonance frequencies change with the phases of lattice vibration. The amplification phenomenon is analytically discussed for low frequency of the lattice vibration.

  7. FIBER LASER CONSTRUCTION AND THEORY INCLUDING FIBER BRAGG GRATINGS Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) and applications of gas filled PCFs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Jacob O. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-08

    The principles used in fiber lasers have been around for a while but it is only within the past few years that fiber lasers have become commercially available and used in high power laser applications. This paper will focus on the basic design principles of fiber lasers, including fiber Bragg gratings, principles of operation, and forms of non-linear effects. It will describe the type and associated doping of the fiber used and difficult designs used to guide energy from the pump to the active medium. Topics covered include fiber laser design, fiber Bragg gratings, materials used, differences in quantum energy loss, thermo-optical effects, stimulated Raman scattering, Brillouin scattering, photonic crystal fibers and applications of gas filled Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs). Thanks to fiber lasers, the energy required to produce high power lasers has greatly dropped and as such we can now produce kW power using a standard 120V 15A circuit. High power laser applications are always requiring more power. The fiber laser can now deliver the greater power that these applications demand. Future applications requiring more power than can be combined using standard materials or configurations will need to be developed to overcome the high energy density and high non-linear optical scattering effects present during high power operations.

  8. Unidirectional Wave Propagation in Low-Symmetric Colloidal Photonic-Crystal Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Yannopapas, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    We show theoretically that photonic crystals consisting of colloidal spheres exhibit unidirectional wave propagation and one-way frequency band gaps without breaking time-reversal symmetry via, e.g., the application of an external magnetic field or the use of nonlinear materials. Namely, photonic crystals with low symmetry such as the monoclinic crystal type considered here as well as with unit cells formed by the heterostructure of different photonic crystals show significant unidirectional ...

  9. MnF2/SiO2 Transport Properties of Quasiperiodic Photonic Crystals for Potential Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically recyclable materials should be ideal support in photocatalytic system because they permit the photocatalysts to be recovered rapidly and efficiently by applying an external magnetic field such as, MnF2. In this paper, MnF2 and SiO2 layers constitute a one-dimensional quasiperiodic photonic crystal according to Fibonacci. When the electromagnetic wave irradiates obliquely, the transmission peak moves to higher frequency direction with the angle increasing. Both the number of transmission peaks and the transmission peaks of double-forked structure increase with the increase of structural progression. We also found that the polarization of electromagnetic waves has influence on the transmission properties; TM wave transmission peak half wide is significantly greater than TE wave transmission peak half wide. The band gap near antiferromagnetic (AF resonance frequency becomes narrow as the intensity of the applied static magnetic field increases. The as-prepared photonic crystal has tremendous potential practical use to eliminate organic pollutants from wastewater.

  10. Linear Mode HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiodes for Photon Counting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, William, III; Beck, Jeffrey; Scritchfield, Richard; Skokan, Mark; Mitra, Pradip; Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James; Carpenter, Darren; Lane, Barry

    2015-01-01

    An overview of recent improvements in the understanding and maturity of linear mode photon counting with HgCdTe electron-initiated avalanche photodiodes is presented. The first HgCdTe LMPC 2x8 format array fabricated in 2011 with 64 micron pitch was a remarkable success in terms of demonstrating a high single photon signal to noise ratio of 13.7 with an excess noise factor of 1.3-1.4, a 7 ns minimum time between events, and a broad spectral response extending from 0.4 micron to 4.2 micron. The main limitations were a greater than 10x higher false event rate than expected of greater than 1 MHz, a 5-7x lower than expected APD gain, and a photon detection efficiency of only 50% when greater than 60% was expected. This paper discusses the reasons behind these limitations and the implementation of their mitigations with new results.

  11. Loophole to the universal photon spectrum in electromagnetic cascades and application to the cosmological lithium problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2015-03-06

    The standard theory of electromagnetic cascades onto a photon background predicts a quasiuniversal shape for the resulting nonthermal photon spectrum. This has been applied to very disparate fields, including nonthermal big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). However, once the energy of the injected photons falls below the pair-production threshold the spectral shape is much harder, a fact that has been overlooked in past literature. This loophole may have important phenomenological consequences, since it generically alters the BBN bounds on nonthermal relics; for instance, it allows us to reopen the possibility of purely electromagnetic solutions to the so-called "cosmological lithium problem," which were thought to be excluded by other cosmological constraints. We show this with a proof-of-principle example and a simple particle physics model, compared with previous literature.

  12. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexei; Pagnoux, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as cages for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale paves the way to the realization of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This will contribute towards meeting the demands for greater miniaturization imposed by the processing of an ever increasing number of data. Photonic Crystals will provide students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background required for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, ranging from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found application. As such, it aims at building bridges between...

  13. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexis

    2005-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid-state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as a cage for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale thus paves the way to the realisation of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This should contribute toward meeting the demands for a greater miniaturisation that the processing of an ever increasing number of data requires. Photonic Crystals intends at providing students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background needed for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found applications. As such, it aims at building brid...

  14. Methods and applications of radio frequency geophysics in glaciology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschuh, Nicholas

    Simple radar systems of the past were used primarily for radar depth sounding, the process of using reflection travel times and electromagnetic velocities to determine the ice thickness. Modern radioglaciology uses both the travel times and reflection amplitudes to make inferences about the englacial and subglacial environments; however, non-uniqueness in geophysical data, combined with the large number of physical parameters that control reflection amplitude, have led to significant uncertainties in this type of analysis. In this set of studies, I improve on data collection, processing, and assimilation methods, with a focus on radar reflection amplitudes and internal layers. The first two studies are devoted to radar survey methods, in which I examine the impact of reflector geometry on amplitude (2), and investigate an independent measure of radar attenuation using variable-offset data, in an effort to eliminate the effects of ice chemistry and temperature on reflection amplitudes (3). These studies emphasize the fact that radar data are a product of both the physical system and the imaging process, and caution glaciologists from over-interpreting processing artifacts common in radar data collected in areas of complex glacial flow. In the following two chapters, I go on to provide glaciological applications of processed radar data, interpreting the record of complex flow left behind in englacial reflector slopes (4), and applying improved boundary conditions to better predict the maximum extent of West Antarctic collapse (5). These studies use geometric information from the bed reflector and englacial reflectors to describe the flow regime present in Antarctica today. Chapter 4 examines how boundary conditions that are difficult to observe directly (the geothermal heat flux, as well as the frictional and deformation characteristics of the ice-sheet substrate) manifest through internal layer deformation. Chapter 5 focuses on Marie Byrd Land (MBL), where

  15. Slow-light-enhanced upconversion for photovoltaic applications in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig M; Reece, Peter J; Conibeer, Gavin J

    2011-10-15

    We present an approach to realizing enhanced upconversion efficiency in erbium (Er)-doped photonic crystals. Slow-light-mode pumping of the first Er excited state transition can result in enhanced emission from higher-energy levels that may lead to finite subbandgap external quantum efficiency in crystalline silicon solar cells. Using a straightforward electromagnetic model, we calculate potential field enhancements of more than 18× within he slow-light mode of a one-dimensional photonic crystal and discuss design trade-offs and considerations for photovoltaics.

  16. Trends in the development of large area photon detectors for Cherenkov light imaging applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nappi, E

    2003-01-01

    Since the successful operations of hi-tech devices at OMEGA, DELPHI and SLD, the technique of Cherenkov light imaging has gone through an impressive and fruitful evolution driven by the conception of novel large area photon detectors. The well-assessed potentialities of thin CsI films, employed as reflective photoconverters in gas counters operated at atmospheric pressure, will be compared with the promising features of hybrid and multianode vacuum photomultipliers. Recently proposed single-photon gaseous detectors based on GEMs will also be reviewed.

  17. Photonic band gap properties of one-dimensional Thue-Morse all-dielectric photonic quasicrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chenxi; Tan, Wei; Liu, Jianjun

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, the photonic band gap (PBG) properties of one-dimensional (1D) Thue-Morse photonic quasicrystal (PQC) S4 structure are theoretically investigated by using transfer matrix method in Bragg condition. The effects of the center wavelength, relative permittivity and incident angle on PBG properties are elaborately analyzed. Numerical results reveal that, in the case of normal incidence, the symmetry and periodicity properties of the photonic band structure are presented. As the center wavelength increases, the PBG center frequency and PBG width decrease while the photonic band structure is always symmetrical about the central frequency and the photonic band structure repeats periodically in the expanding observation frequency range. With the decrease of relative permittivity contrast, the PBG width and the relative PBG width gradually decreases until PBG disappears while the symmetry of the photonic band structure always exists. In the case of oblique incidence, as the incident angle increases, multiple narrow PBGs gradually merge into a wide PBG for the TE mode while for the TM mode, the number of PBG continuously decreases and eventually disappears, i.e., multiple narrow PBGs become a wide passband for the TM mode. The research results will provide a reference for the choice of the material, the incident angle for the PBG properties and its applications of 1D Thue-Morse PQC.

  18. Frequency-shift vs phase-shift characterization of in-liquid quartz crystal microbalance applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagut, Y. J.; Garcia, J. V.; Jimenez, Y.; Arnau, A.; March, C.; Montoya, A.

    2011-01-01

    The improvement of sensitivity in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) applications has been addressed in the last decades by increasing the sensor fundamental frequency, following the increment of the frequency/mass sensitivity with the square of frequency predicted by Sauerbrey. However, this sensitivity improvement has not been completely transferred in terms of resolution. The decrease of frequency stability due to the increase of the phase noise, particularly in oscillators, made impossible to reach the expected resolution. A new concept of sensor characterization at constant frequency has been recently proposed. The validation of the new concept is presented in this work. An immunosensor application for the detection of a low molecular weight contaminant, the insecticide carbaryl, has been chosen for the validation. An, in principle, improved version of a balanced-bridge oscillator is validated for its use in liquids, and applied for the frequency shift characterization of the QCM immunosensor application. The classical frequency shift characterization is compared with the new phase-shift characterization concept and system proposed.

  19. Multichannel Recorder for Low Frequency Signals: Application of Oscilloscope as Integrated Mobile Service for a Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Kochlan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data acquisition and processing are well known for some time. Many applications use powerful hardware to acquire, process, and visualize signal waveforms. But there are some applications that do not have to perform high resolution signal acquisition and process large amount of data, for example, low frequency applications of embedded design and applications for remote power grid monitoring. The paper describes special system for low frequency signal data sample acquisition, processing, and visualization implemented as a service on Android-based smart device. The service makes smart device functioning as an oscilloscope or arbitrary waveform generator which is accessible remotely through Bluetooth. The design respects low power consumption requirements, simplicity, and user friendliness in application design. Application scenario was implemented as wireless data acquisition system for power grid monitoring.

  20. Volumetric CT with sparse detector arrays (and application to Si-strip photon counters).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J W; Xu, J; Taguchi, K; Fredenberg, E; Lundqvist, Mats; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-07

    Novel x-ray medical imaging sensors, such as photon counting detectors (PCDs) and large area CCD and CMOS cameras can involve irregular and/or sparse sampling of the detector plane. Application of such detectors to CT involves undersampling that is markedly different from the commonly considered case of sparse angular sampling. This work investigates volumetric sampling in CT systems incorporating sparsely sampled detectors with axial and helical scan orbits and evaluates performance of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with spatially varying regularization in mitigating artifacts due to sparse detector sampling. Volumetric metrics of sampling density and uniformity were introduced. Penalized-likelihood MBIR with a spatially varying penalty that homogenized resolution by accounting for variations in local sampling density (i.e. detector gaps) was evaluated. The proposed methodology was tested in simulations and on an imaging bench based on a Si-strip PCD (total area 5 cm  ×  25 cm) consisting of an arrangement of line sensors separated by gaps of up to 2.5 mm. The bench was equipped with translation/rotation stages allowing a variety of scanning trajectories, ranging from a simple axial acquisition to helical scans with variable pitch. Statistical (spherical clutter) and anthropomorphic (hand) phantoms were considered. Image quality was compared to that obtained with a conventional uniform penalty in terms of structural similarity index (SSIM), image uniformity, spatial resolution, contrast, and noise. Scan trajectories with intermediate helical width (~10 mm longitudinal distance per 360° rotation) demonstrated optimal tradeoff between the average sampling density and the homogeneity of sampling throughout the volume. For a scan trajectory with 10.8 mm helical width, the spatially varying penalty resulted in significant visual reduction of sampling artifacts, confirmed by a 10% reduction in minimum SSIM (from 0.88 to 0.8) and a 40

  1. Illusion optics via one-dimensional ultratransparent photonic crystals with shifted spatial dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhongqi; Luo, Jie; Lai, Yun

    2017-12-11

    In this work, we propose that one-dimensional ultratransparent dielectric photonic crystals with wide-angle impedance matching and shifted elliptical equal frequency contours are promising candidate materials for illusion optics. The shift of the equal frequency contour does not affect the refractive behaviors, but enables a new degree of freedom in phase modulation. With such ultratransparent photonic crystals, we demonstrate some applications in illusion optics, including creating illusions of a different-sized scatterer and a shifted source with opposite phase. Such ultratransparent dielectric photonic crystals may establish a feasible platform for illusion optics devices at optical frequencies.

  2. Harnessing Light with Photonic Nanowires: Fundamentals and Applications to Quantum Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudon, Julien; Gregersen, Niels; Lalanne, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    the Purcell effect that arises in a resonant microcavity. Recently, the need to relax the constraints inherent to such a narrow-band approach has motivated large effort to develop structures ensuring broadband and efficient SE control. This minireview deals with fiber-like photonic nanowires, a class of high...

  3. Phased-array-based photonic integrated circuits for wavelength division multiplexing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staring, A.A.M.; Smit, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    Wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technology provides many options to the design of flexible all-optical networks. In order to exploit these options to their full potential, photonic integrated circuits (PICs) for wavelength routing and switching will be indispensable. One of the basic building

  4. Resource-saving application of FDTD technique in 3D photonic crystal waveguide calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm based on the well-known FDTD numerical method which is adapted for 3D problems of transmission and reflection of photonic crystal waveguides, and which effectively saves memory and computing resources. Specific examples showing its validity and effectiveness...

  5. Applications of two-photon fluorescence microscopy in deep-tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen-Yuan; Yu, Betty; Hsu, Lily L.; Kaplan, Peter D.; Blankschstein, D.; Langer, Robert; So, Peter T. C.

    2000-07-01

    Based on the non-linear excitation of fluorescence molecules, two-photon fluorescence microscopy has become a significant new tool for biological imaging. The point-like excitation characteristic of this technique enhances image quality by the virtual elimination of off-focal fluorescence. Furthermore, sample photodamage is greatly reduced because fluorescence excitation is limited to the focal region. For deep tissue imaging, two-photon microscopy has the additional benefit in the greatly improved imaging depth penetration. Since the near- infrared laser sources used in two-photon microscopy scatter less than their UV/glue-green counterparts, in-depth imaging of highly scattering specimen can be greatly improved. In this work, we will present data characterizing both the imaging characteristics (point-spread-functions) and tissue samples (skin) images using this novel technology. In particular, we will demonstrate how blind deconvolution can be used further improve two-photon image quality and how this technique can be used to study mechanisms of chemically-enhanced, transdermal drug delivery.

  6. Multi-Photon Entanglement and Quantum Teleportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shih, Yanhua

    1999-01-01

    The project 'Multi-Photon Entanglement and Quantum Teleportation' concerns a series of experimental and theoretical investigations on multi-photon entangled states and the applications, for example...

  7. Application of energies of optimal frequency bands for fault diagnosis based on modified distance function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamanian, Amir Hosein [Southern Methodist University, Dallas (United States); Ohadi, Abdolreza [Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Low-dimensional relevant feature sets are ideal to avoid extra data mining for classification. The current work investigates the feasibility of utilizing energies of vibration signals in optimal frequency bands as features for machine fault diagnosis application. Energies in different frequency bands were derived based on Parseval's theorem. The optimal feature sets were extracted by optimization of the related frequency bands using genetic algorithm and a Modified distance function (MDF). The frequency bands and the number of bands were optimized based on the MDF. The MDF is designed to a) maximize the distance between centers of classes, b) minimize the dispersion of features in each class separately, and c) minimize dimension of extracted feature sets. The experimental signals in two different gearboxes were used to demonstrate the efficiency of the presented technique. The results show the effectiveness of the presented technique in gear fault diagnosis application.

  8. High field high frequency EPR techniques and their application to single molecule magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.S.; Hill, S.; Goy, P.; Wylde, R.; Takahashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    We present details of a new high-field/high-frequency EPR technique, and its application to measurements of single-molecule magnets (SMMs). By using a quasi-optical set-up and microwave sources covering a continuous frequency range from 170 to 600 GHz, in conjunction with a millimetre-wave vector network analyser, we are able to measure EPR to high magnetic fields. For example, a g=2 system will exhibit EPR at about 14 T at a frequency of 400 GHz. We illustrate the technique by presenting details of recent high-frequency experiments on several SMMs which are variations of the well-known SMM Mn 12 -Ac. This material has a spin ground state of S=10 and large uniaxial anisotropy, hence frequencies above 300 GHz are required in order to observe EPR from the ground state

  9. Radio frequency interference noise reduction using a field programmable gate array for SQUID applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuta, K; Narita, Y; Itozaki, H

    2007-01-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurement without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is one of the effective methods to reduce environmental noise. Recently, SQUIDs have been used in various applications at high frequencies, such as nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The NQR frequency from explosives is in the range 0.5-5 MHz. In this case, an NQR sensor is exposed to AM radio frequency interference (RFI). The feasibility of the ANC system for RFI that used digital signal processing was studied. Our investigation showed that this digital ANC system can be applied to SQUID measurements for RFI suppression

  10. Variable Sampling Composite Observer Based Frequency Locked Loop and its Application in Grid Connected System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARUN, K.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A modified digital signal processing procedure is described for the on-line estimation of DC, fundamental and harmonics of periodic signal. A frequency locked loop (FLL incorporated within the parallel structure of observers is proposed to accommodate a wide range of frequency drift. The error in frequency generated under drifting frequencies has been used for changing the sampling frequency of the composite observer, so that the number of samples per cycle of the periodic waveform remains constant. A standard coupled oscillator with automatic gain control is used as numerically controlled oscillator (NCO to generate the enabling pulses for the digital observer. The NCO gives an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency making it suitable for power quality applications. Another observer with DC and second harmonic blocks in the feedback path act as filter and reduces the double frequency content. A systematic study of the FLL is done and a method has been proposed to design the controller. The performance of FLL is validated through simulation and experimental studies. To illustrate applications of the new FLL, estimation of individual harmonics from nonlinear load and the design of a variable sampling resonant controller, for a single phase grid-connected inverter have been presented.

  11. Transverse angular momentum in topological photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Min; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Fu-Li; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2018-01-01

    Engineering local angular momentum of structured light fields in real space enables applications in many fields, in particular, the realization of unidirectional robust transport in topological photonic crystals with a non-trivial Berry vortex in momentum space. Here, we show transverse angular momentum modes in silicon topological photonic crystals when considering transverse electric polarization. Excited by a chiral external source with either transverse spin angular momentum or transverse phase vortex, robust light flow propagating along opposite directions is observed in several kinds of sharp-turn interfaces between two topologically-distinct silicon photonic crystals. A transverse orbital angular momentum mode with alternating phase vortex exists at the boundary of two such photonic crystals. In addition, unidirectional transport is robust to the working frequency even when the ring size or location of the pseudo-spin source varies in a certain range, leading to the superiority of the broadband photonic device. These findings enable one to make use of transverse angular momentum, a kind of degree of freedom, to achieve unidirectional robust transport in the telecom region and other potential applications in integrated photonic circuits, such as on-chip robust delay lines.

  12. Implications for photonic applications of diatom growth and frustule nanostructure changes in response to different light wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanyan; Lundholm, Nina; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk

    2015-01-01

    in nanotechnology is one of the technological challenges for these applications. Light is one of the most important abiotic factors for algal photosynthetic growth, and the frustule may play an important role in mediatin g light for these biological functions, as well as being central for its nano - technological...... significant change in nanostructure compared to white light. Green light at 100 μmol photon m - 2 s - 1 led to a significant dec rease in mean frustule diameter and mean foramen diameter. Numerical simulations confirmed that the morphological changes obtained were sufficient to induce clear differences...

  13. Transverse Micro-structuring of Photonic Crystal Fibers for Industrial Sensors and Side Viewing Probes for Optical Coherence Tomography Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay KHER

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report a simple and easily adaptable technique of lateral micro-machining of Photonic Crystal fibers (PCFs using modulated CO2-laser in conjunction with electrical arc system. The technique is controlled, convenient and precise over wide dimensions (50-250 mm. Lateral access to the holes of PCF provides additional flexibility for sensitive real time detection of gases such as green-house gases. Long period gratings are made in PCF through inscription of micro-grooves for sensitive detection of longitudinal strain. A unique and versatile PCF based probe for possible endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT applications is reported.

  14. Coherent spectroscopy of a {Lambda} atomic system and its prospective application to tunable frequency offset locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, Y B [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ray, Ayan [Radioactive Ion Beam Group, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India); Lawande, Q V [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Jagatap, B N, E-mail: yogeshwar84@rediffmail.com, E-mail: ayan_ray_in@rediffmail.com, E-mail: bnj@barc.gov.in [Atomic and Molecular Physics Division and Homi Bhabha National Institute, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the coherent pump-probe spectroscopy of a three-level {Lambda} system, 6s{sub 1/2}F = 3,4{yields}6p{sub 3/2}F{sup '}= 4, in the hyperfine manifold of D{sub 2} transition (852 nm) of cesium with particular reference to the sub-Doppler linewidth resonance arising from Aulter-Townes (AT) splitting and the possibility of using it for realizing a scheme for tunable atomic frequency offset locking (AFOL). We discuss here the theoretical framework for a {Lambda} system interacting with a coherent pump and probe and use it to describe the process of modulation transfer in the AT and electromagnetically induced transparency regimes. We further employ an experimental scheme consisting of a strong pump and a pair of weak probes to resolve the sub-Doppler linewidth ({approx}8 MHz) AT resonance and study its dependence on pump intensity and detuning. In order to explore the possibility of using such a sub-Doppler linewidth resonance for AFOL, we use its first derivative signal as a frequency discriminator to stabilize the probe laser. The frequency stability of the probe is characterized by means of error signal analysis. This study reveals that while the frequency stability of the AT locked laser is limited by the pump laser, the tuning range of the offset frequency lock can cover the entire Doppler profile and its immediate neighbourhood, thereby providing a simple and cost effective alternative to the external modulator. The study described in this paper contributes to the discussion on the subtle link between dressed state spectroscopy and AFOL, which is relevant for developing a master-slave-type laser system in the domain of coherent photon-atom interaction.

  15. Topology optimization for nano-photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Topology optimization is a computational tool that can be used for the systematic design of photonic crystals, waveguides, resonators, filters and plasmonics. The method was originally developed for mechanical design problems but has within the last six years been applied to a range of photonics...... applications. Topology optimization may be based on finite element and finite difference type modeling methods in both frequency and time domain. The basic idea is that the material density of each element or grid point is a design variable, hence the geometry is parameterized in a pixel-like fashion....... The optimization problem is efficiently solved using mathematical programming-based optimization methods and analytical gradient calculations. The paper reviews the basic procedures behind topology optimization, a large number of applications ranging from photonic crystal design to surface plasmonic devices...

  16. Harvesting Low-Frequency (<5 Hz) Irregular Mechanical Energy: A Possible Killer Application of Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Yunlong; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-26

    Electromagnetic generators (EMGs) and triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are the two most powerful approaches for harvesting ambient mechanical energy, but the effectiveness of each depends on the triggering frequency. Here, after systematically comparing the performances of EMGs and TENGs under low-frequency motion (frequency, while that of TENGs is approximately in proportion to the frequency. Therefore, the TENG has a much better performance than that of the EMG at low frequency (typically 0.1-3 Hz). Importantly, the extremely small output voltage of the EMG at low frequency makes it almost inapplicable to drive any electronic unit that requires a certain threshold voltage (∼0.2-4 V), so that most of the harvested energy is wasted. In contrast, a TENG has an output voltage that is usually high enough (>10-100 V) and independent of frequency so that most of the generated power can be effectively used to power the devices. Furthermore, a TENG also has advantages of light weight, low cost, and easy scale up through advanced structure designs. All these merits verify the possible killer application of a TENG for harvesting energy at low frequency from motions such as human motions for powering small electronics and possibly ocean waves for large-scale blue energy.

  17. Common-signal-induced synchronization in photonic integrated circuits and its application to secure key distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takuma; Kakesu, Izumi; Mitsui, Yusuke; Rontani, Damien; Uchida, Atsushi; Sunada, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki; Inubushi, Masanobu

    2017-10-16

    We experimentally achieve common-signal-induced synchronization in two photonic integrated circuits with short external cavities driven by a constant-amplitude random-phase light. The degree of synchronization can be controlled by changing the optical feedback phase of the two photonic integrated circuits. The change in the optical feedback phase leads to a significant redistribution of the spectral energy of optical and RF spectra, which is a unique characteristic of PICs with the short external cavity. The matching of the RF and optical spectra is necessary to achieve synchronization between the two PICs, and stable synchronization can be obtained over an hour in the presence of optical feedback. We succeed in generating information-theoretic secure keys and achieving the final key generation rate of 184 kb/s using the PICs.

  18. Evanescent Properties of Optical Diffraction from 2-Dimensional Hexagonal Photonic Crystals and Their Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Yang; Chen, Yung-Tsan; Chen, Chien-Chun; Huang, Jian-Jang

    2018-04-03

    The sensitivity of traditional diffraction grating sensors is limited by the spatial resolution of the measurement setup. Thus, a large space is required to improve sensor performance. Here, we demonstrate a compact hexagonal photonic crystal (PhC) optical sensor with high sensitivity. PhCs are able to diffract optical beams to various angles in azimuthal space. The critical wavelength that satisfies the phase matching or becomes evanescent was used to benchmark the refractive index of a target analyte applied on a PhC sensor. Using a glucose solution as an example, our sensor demonstrated very high sensitivity and a low limit of detection. This shows that the diffraction mechanism of hexagonal photonic crystals can be used for sensors when compact size is a concern.

  19. PCBM : P3HT polymer composites for photonic crystal all-optical switching applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhiqiang; Hu Xiaoyong; Zhang Jiaxiang; Yang Hong; Gong Qihuang

    2010-01-01

    An all-optical switching with an operating pump intensity of 1 MW cm -2 is realized in a one-dimensional nonlinear organic photonic crystal made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) doped with 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)propyl-1-phenyl-(6,6)C 61 , fabricated by focused ion-beam etching. The femtosecond pump and probe method is adopted to measure the transmittance changes of the probe laser based on the photonic bandgap shift induced by the pump laser. Under resonant excitation, a large nonlinear refractive index of the order of 10 -9 cm 2 W -1 is obtained for the polymer composite. A switching time of 58.9 ps is maintained due to intermolecular charge transfer and exciton-exciton annihilation.

  20. PCBM : P3HT polymer composites for photonic crystal all-optical switching applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhiqiang; Hu Xiaoyong; Zhang Jiaxiang; Yang Hong; Gong Qihuang, E-mail: xiaoyonghu@pku.edu.c, E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.c [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-09-29

    An all-optical switching with an operating pump intensity of 1 MW cm{sup -2} is realized in a one-dimensional nonlinear organic photonic crystal made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) doped with 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)propyl-1-phenyl-(6,6)C{sub 61}, fabricated by focused ion-beam etching. The femtosecond pump and probe method is adopted to measure the transmittance changes of the probe laser based on the photonic bandgap shift induced by the pump laser. Under resonant excitation, a large nonlinear refractive index of the order of 10{sup -9} cm{sup 2} W{sup -1} is obtained for the polymer composite. A switching time of 58.9 ps is maintained due to intermolecular charge transfer and exciton-exciton annihilation.